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Sample records for lhc main dipole

  1. Installation Strategy for the LHC Main Dipoles

    CERN Multimedia

    Fartoukh, Stephane David

    2004-01-01

    All positions in the LHC machine are not equivalent in terms of beam requirements on the geometry and the field quality of the main dipoles. In the presence of slightly or strongly out-of tolerance magnets, a well-defined installation strategy will therefore contribute to preserve or even optimize the performance of the machine. Based on the present status of the production, we have anticipated a list of potential issues (geometry, transfer function, field direction and random b3) which, combined by order of priority, have been taken into account to define a simple but efficient installation algorithm for the LHC main dipoles. Its output is a prescription for installing the available dipoles in sequence while reducing to an absolute minimum the number of holes required by geometry or FQ issues.

  2. Retraining of the 1232 Main Dipole Magnets in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Verweij, A; Bednarek, M; Bottura, L; Charifoulline, Z; Feher, S; Hagen, P; Modena, M; Le Naour, S; Romera, I; Siemko, A; Steckert, J; Tock, J Ph; Todesco, E; Willering, G; Wollmann, D

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) contains eight main dipole circuits, each of them with 154 dipole magnets powered in series. These 15-m-long magnets are wound from Nb-Ti superconducting Rutherford cables, and have active quench detection triggering heaters to quickly force the transition of the coil to the normal conducting state in case of a quench, and hence reduce the hot spot temperature. During the reception tests in 2002-2007, all these magnets have been trained up to at least 12 kA, corresponding to a beam energy of 7.1 TeV. After installation in the accelerator, the circuits have been operated at reduced currents of up to 6.8 kA, from 2010 to 2013, corresponding to a beam energy of 4 TeV. After the first long shutdown of 2013-2014, the LHC runs at 6.5 TeV, requiring a dipole magnet current of 11.0 kA. A significant number of training quenches were needed to bring the 1232 magnets up to this current. In this paper, the circuit behavior in case of a quench is presented, as well as the quench training as...

  3. Retraining of the 1232 Main Dipole Magnets in the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verweij, A. [CERN; Auchmann, B.; Bednarek, M.; Bottura, L.; Charifoulline, Z.; Feher, S. [Fermilab; Hagen, P.; Modena, M.; Le Naour, S.; Romera, I.; Siemko, A.; Steckert, J.; Tock, J. Ph; Todesco, E.; Willering, G.; Wollmann, D.

    2016-01-05

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) contains eight main dipole circuits, each of them with 154 dipole magnets powered in series. These 15-m-long magnets are wound from Nb-Ti superconducting Rutherford cables, and have active quench detection triggering heaters to quickly force the transition of the coil to the normal conducting state in case of a quench, and hence reduce the hot spot temperature. During the reception tests in 2002-2007, all these magnets have been trained up to at least 12 kA, corresponding to a beam energy of 7.1 TeV. After installation in the accelerator, the circuits have been operated at reduced currents of up to 6.8 kA, from 2010 to 2013, corresponding to a beam energy of 4 TeV. After the first long shutdown of 2013-2014, the LHC runs at 6.5 TeV, requiring a dipole magnet current of 11.0 kA. A significant number of training quenches were needed to bring the 1232 magnets up to this current. In this paper, the circuit behavior in case of a quench is presented, as well as the quench training as compared to the initial training during the reception tests of the individual magnets.

  4. Description of the Main Features of the Series Production of the LHC Main Dipole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Savary, F; Chevret, P; de Rijk, G; Fessia, P; Liénard, P; Miles, J; Modena, M; Rossi, L; Tommasini, D; Vlogaert, J; Bresson, D; Grunblatt, G; Decoene, JF; Bressani, F; Drago, G; Gagliardi, P; Eysselein, F; Gärtner, W; Lublow, P

    2008-01-01

    The series production of the LHC main dipole magnets was completed in November 2006. This paper presents the organization implemented at CERN and the milestones fixed to fullfil the technical requirements and to respect the master schedule of the machine installation. The CERN organization for the production follow-up, the quality assurance and the magnet testing, as well as the organization of the three main contractors will be described. A description of the design work and procurement of most of the specific heavy tooling and key components will be given with emphasis on the advantages and drawbacks.

  5. Review of quench simulations for the protection of LHC main dipole magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Sonnemann, F; Danner, A

    1999-01-01

    The simulation program QUABER [1] allows studying the quench process of superconducting magnets for the LHC. The performance of the protection system of the LHC main dipole magnets was simulated under various parameter dependencies at different magnet excitation currents. This simulation study was motivated to complement measurement results in order to help preparing and understanding experiments of the quench propagation and magnet protection. The influence of the quench propagation velocity...

  6. Accurate Calculation of Fringe Fields in the LHC Main Dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Kurz, S; Siegel, N

    2000-01-01

    The ROXIE program developed at CERN for the design and optimization of the superconducting LHC magnets has been recently extended in a collaboration with the University of Stuttgart, Germany, with a field computation method based on the coupling between the boundary element (BEM) and the finite element (FEM) technique. This avoids the meshing of the coils and the air regions, and avoids the artificial far field boundary conditions. The method is therefore specially suited for the accurate calculation of fields in the superconducting magnets in which the field is dominated by the coil. We will present the fringe field calculations in both 2d and 3d geometries to evaluate the effect of connections and the cryostat on the field quality and the flux density to which auxiliary bus-bars are exposed.

  7. Industrial Learning Curves Series Production of the LHC Main Superconduting Dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Fessia, Paolo; Rossi, Lucio

    2007-01-01

    By mid August 2006, 1160 of the 1232 of LHC main dipoles have been delivered to CERN by the three suppliers in charge of the production. The training of the staff, mostly hired just for this manufacture, and the improvement of the procedures with the acquired experience, naturally decrease the time necessary for the assembly of a unit. The aim of this paper is to apply methodologies like the cost-based learning curves and the time-based learning curves to the LHC Main Dipole production comparing the estimated learning percentage to the ones experienced in other industries. This type of analysis, already presented on 500 units is here extended to more than 1000 completed units. The work also tries to identify which type of industry presents the learning percentages that are the most similar to our case and to investigate the impact of the production strategy on the process efficiency.

  8. Application of the Learning Curve Analysis to the LHC Main Dipole Production First Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Fessia, P; Rossi, L

    2006-01-01

    About two third of the LHC main dipoles have been delivered by the three suppliers charged of the production. The training of the staff, mostly hired just for this manufacture, and the natural improvement of the procedures with the acquired experience, decrease naturally the time necessary for the assembly of a unit. The aim of this paper is to apply methodologies like the cost-based learning curves and the time-based learning curves to the LHC Main Dipole comparing the estimated learning percentage to the ones experienced in other industries. This type of analysis, still in a preliminary phase and here applied to about 40% of the total production of the LHC magnets that will end by 2006, shows that our production has a relatively high learning percentage and it is similar to aerospace and complex machine tools for new models. Therefore with the LHC project, accelerator magnets seem to have reached industrial maturity and this production can be used as bench mark for other large scientific projects implying s...

  9. Modeling of the Voltage Waves in the LHC Main Dipole Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ravaioli, E; Formenti, F; Steckert, J; Thiesen, H; Verweij, A

    2012-01-01

    When a fast power abort is triggered in the LHC main dipole chain, voltage transients are generated at the output of the power converter and across the energy-extraction switches. The voltage waves propagate through the chain of 154 superconducting dipoles and can have undesired effects leading to spurious triggering of the quench protection system and firing of the quench heaters. The phase velocity of the waves travelling along the chain changes due to the inhomogeneous AC behavior of the dipoles. Furthermore, complex phenomena of reflection and superposition are present in the circuit. For these reasons analytical calculations are not sufficient for properly analyzing the circuit behavior after a fast power abort. The transients following the switch-off of the power converter and the opening of the switches are analyzed by means of a complete electrical model, developed with the Cadence© suite (PSpice© based). The model comprises all the electrical components of the circuit, additional components simula...

  10. A Finite Element Model for Mechanical Analysis of LHC Main Dipole Magnet Coils

    CERN Document Server

    Pojer, Mirko; Scandale, Walter

    2007-01-01

    After years of studies and observations, the mechanical stability of the LHC main dipole magnets still remains an open issue. The robustness of these magnets has already been asserted and their reliability in operation is not far from being proven. However, anomalous mechanical behaviors sometimes observed are not yet completely understood. A finite element model, which has been recently developed at CERN, aims at providing an instrument for better explaining these anomalies. Cable modeling and contact between elements, friction and mechanical hysteresis are the key features of this model. The simulation of the hysteresis experienced by the coil during collaring, presented here, is the starting point for the representation of the whole life cycle of the dipole coil.

  11. Performance of the Main Dipole Magnet Circuits of the LHC during Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Verweij, A; Ballarino, A; Bellesia, B; Bordry, Frederick; Cantone, A; Casas Lino, M; Castaneda Serra, A; Castillo Trello, C; Catalan-Lasheras, N; Charifoulline, Z; Coelingh, G; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; D'Angelo, G; Denz, R; Fehér, S; Flora, R; Gruwé, M; Kain, V; Khomenko, B; Kirby, G; MacPherson, A; Marqueta Barbero, A; Mess, K H; Modena, M; Mompo, R; Montabonnet, V; le Naour, S; Nisbet, D; Parma, V; Pojer, M; Ponce, L; Raimondo, A; Redaelli, S; Reymond, H; Richter, D; de Rijk, G; Rijllart, A; Romera Ramirez, I; Saban, R; Sanfilippo, S; Schmidt, R; Siemko, A; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Thurel, Y; Thiessen, H; Venturini-Delsolaro, W; Vergara Fernandez, A; Wolf, R; Zerlauth, M

    2008-01-01

    During hardware commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), 8 main dipole circuits are tested at 1.9 K and up to their nominal current. Each dipole circuit contains 154 magnets of 15 m length, and has a total stored energy of up to 1.3 GJ. All magnets are wound from Nb-Ti superconducting Rutherford cables, and contain heaters to quickly force the transition to the normal conducting state in case of a quench, and hence reduce the hot spot temperature. In this paper the performance of the first three of these circuits is presented, focussing on quench detection, heater performance, operation of the cold bypass diodes, and magnet-to-magnet quench propagation. The results as measured on the entire circuits will be compared to the test results obtained during the reception tests of the individual magnets.

  12. Review of quench simulations for the protection of LHC main dipole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnemann, F

    1999-01-01

    The simulation program QUABER [1] allows studying the quench process of superconducting magnets for the LHC. The performance of the protection system of the LHC main dipole magnets was simulated under various parameter dependencies at different magnet excitation currents. This simulation study was motivated to complement measurement results in order to help preparing and understanding experiments of the quench propagation and magnet protection. The influence of the quench propagation velocity and the time for a quench propagation between adjacent turns was studied. The different copper plating cycles of the quench heater strips were simulated. Experimental measurement results [2] were used to calibrate the input parameters. The performance of the protection system for various quench detection thresholds was investigated and different failure modes of the system were considered. The maximum voltages and values of the quench load are discussed. The values given are obtained using conservatively chosen parameter...

  13. Influence of Austenitic Steel Collar Dimensions on Magnetic Field Harmonics in the LHC Main Dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Bellesia, B; Todesco, Ezio

    2005-01-01

    The influence of the geometry of the collars in the main LHC dipole on the magnetic field harmonics is analyzed. The study aims at finding if the collar geometry is the driving mechanism of field quality for some harmonics and if the two different collar suppliers give a special signature on the magnetic field. Data of more than 700 magnets of the LHC series dipoles are analyzed and discussed. The main result of the analysis is that the collar shape is the driving mechanism of the magnetic field harmonics only for b2 and a3 in one of the three Cold Mass Assemblers (Firm3), where only collars of the supplier S2 are used. Two independent observations support this fact: firstly, strong correlations between apertures of the same magnet as expected from the assembly procedure have been found. Secondly, the expected values based on the measured dimensions of the collars and on a magneto-static model agree with magnetic measurements both for the average and for the standard deviation.

  14. Design and analysis of the tooling upgrade for the production of the superconductive main dipole magnet prototypes of LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2093638

    Design and analysis of the tooling upgrade for the production of the superconductive main dipole magnet prototypes of LHC Master of Science Thesis, 110 pages, 12 Appendix pages September 2013 Major: Design of machines and systems Examiner: Professor Reijo Kouhia Keywords: CERN, LHC, High Luminosity LHC project, superconductive dipole magnet, welding press, Nb$_{3}$Sn, pre-stress, Ar-inert gas furnace This thesis work has been carried out as a contribution to the development program of superconductive magnets within the LHC High Luminosity study. The thesis provides an insight to the steps that need to be taken in order to produce a superconductive magnet mainly focusing on mechanical assembly. Tooling upgrade is necessary for the production of the superconductive dipole magnet prototypes in near future. Major attention is given by the introduction of the welding assembly in chapter three. The structural compression is given by the so called shell stress defined by the thermal shrinkage of the weld. The associ...

  15. Energy Extraction Resistors for the Main Dipole and Quadrupole Circuits of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Popov, V; Sytchev, V V; Vasilev, L B; Zubko, V G

    2000-01-01

    When the LHC will be operating at its maximum beam energy, its superconducting dipole chains store a total magnetic energy of more than 11 GJ. At the same time, the QF and QD quadrupole circuits store a total energy of 400 MJ. Even with the sectorisation of each of the three principal power circuits into eight individually powered segments, the stored energy of a single circuit is considerable. During normal operation the energy in the dipole circuits is safely returned to the mains grid, using the thyristor-based, 'booster' unit of the power converters, operating in inversion. For the quadrupole chains, where the converter is of a mono-polar topology, the stored energy is dissipated into the resistive part of the warm d.c. power lines (busbars and cables) in a slow, controlled run-down. When a magnet quenches, however, such a slow energy transfer, taking 20 minutes from the rated LHC current, will not be possible. The 'cold' diode, taking over the magnet current in case of a quench, will not survive this slo...

  16. Production Follow-Up of the LHC Main Dipoles through Magnetic Measurements at Room Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Wildner, E; Remondino, Vittorio; Scandale, Walter; Todesco, Ezio; Völlinger, C

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we review the tools used for controlling the production of the LHC main dipoles through warm magnetic measurements. For the collared coil measurements, control limits are based on the statistics relative to the pre-series production. For the cold mass, the difference between collared coil and cold mass is considered, allowing a very stringent test. In both cases, measurements are split in straight part average, variations and coil ends contributions. Two different alarm levels exist in case the measured field is out of limits. The analysis can be carried out at the manufacturer and allows detection of anomalies in the measured magnetic field. These can be either due to wrong measurements or caused by assembly defects. Techniques used to work out information on the magnet assembly from the field harmonics are outlined. We summarize the experience gathered on about 180 collared coils and 120 cold masses, pointing out the bad cases and investigating the reliability of the measurements.

  17. Dependence of Magnetic Field Quality on Collar Supplier and Dimensions in the Main LHC Dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Bellesia, B; Santoni, C; Todesco, E

    2006-01-01

    In order to keep the electro-magnetic forces and to minimize conductor movements, the superconducting coils of the main Large Hadron Collider dipoles are held in place by means of austenitic steel collars. Two suppliers provide the collars necessary for the whole LHC production, which has now reached more than 800 collared coils. In this paper we first assess if the different collar suppliers origin a noticeable difference in the magnetic field quality measured at room temperature. We then analyze the measurements of the collar dimensions carried out at the manufacturers, comparing them to the geometrical tolerances. Finally we use a magneto-static model to evaluate the expected spread in the field components induced by the actual collar dimensions. These spreads are compared to the magnetic measurements at room temperature over the magnet production in order to identify if the collars, rather than other components or assembly process, can account for the measured magnetic field effects. It has been found tha...

  18. Dissecting an LHC dipole

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The cold mass of a 15-metre main dipole magnet has some fifteen different components. All the main components are manufactured under CERN's direct responsibility. Four of them transit through CERN before being shipped to the dipole assembly contractors, namely the cable, which constitutes the magnet's superconducting core (see Bulletin 14/2004), the beam screens, the heat exchanger tubes and the cold bore beam tubes. The two latter components transit via Building 927 where they undergo part of the production process. The 58-mm diameter heat exchanger tubes will remove heat from the magnets using superfluid helium. The 53-mm diameter cold bore tubes will be placed under vacuum to allow the twin beams to circulate around the LHC.

  19. LHC main dipole magnet circuits: sustaining near-nominal beam energies

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085621; Auchmann, Bernhard; Knox, Andrew; O'Shea, Valentine

    2016-11-04

    Crossing the Franco-Swiss border, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), designed to collide 7 TeV proton beams, is the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator the operation of which was originally intended to commence in 2008. Unfortunately, due to an interconnect discontinuity in one of the main dipole circuit's 13 kA superconducting busbars, a catastrophic quench event occurred during initial magnet training, causing significant physical system damage. Furthermore, investigation into the cause found that such discontinuities were not only present in the circuit in question, but throughout the entire LHC. This prevented further magnet training and ultimately resulted in the maximum sustainable beam energy being limited to approximately half that of the design nominal, 3.5-4 TeV, for the first three years of operation (Run 1, 2009-2012) and a major consolidation campaign being scheduled for the first long shutdown (LS 1, 2012-2014). Throughout Run 1, a series of studies attempted to predict the amo...

  20. Magnetic Measurement of Alignment of Main LHC Dipoles and Associated Correctors

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L; Deferne, G; Schnizer, P; Sievers, P; Smirnov, N

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the method developed for the verification of alignment of magnetic elements contained in the LHC cryodipole cold mass during series tests at CERN. First, we outline motivations and requirements and then we focus on test strategy, equipment and procedures. Our goal is to express the magnetic field of the dipole and of its associated correctors w.r.t. the reference beam line, not accessible during cryogenic tests. To do so, we use traveling harmonic coil probes ("moles") that allow simultaneous measurement of the field and of the coil position. A laser tracker is used to relate these measurements to fiducials. In the dipole, the axis of the Quadrupole Configured Dipole (QCD) is used as an intermediate reference for the transfer. We provide details on the devices used for measurements in warm and cold conditions, some results from prototypes and pre-series dipoles and an assessment of the precision expected for the series tests.

  1. Unbalanced Impedance of the Aperture Coils of Some LHC Main Dipole Magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravaioli, Emanuele; Verweij, A.P.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    2013-01-01

    During the Large Hadron Collider operation in 2010 and 2011, it was observed that about 50% of the main dipole magnets exhibiting two apertures showed unbalanced dynamic-impedance behavior not well understood. When a main dipole circuit is switched off, voltage waves with a frequency of 28 Hz travel

  2. A Non-Linear Finite Element Model for the LHC Main Dipole Coil Cross-Section

    CERN Document Server

    Pojer, M; Scandale, Walter

    2006-01-01

    The production of the dipole magnets for the Large Hadron Collider is at its final stage. Nevertheless, some mechanical instabilities are still observed for which no clear explanation has been found yet. A FE modelization of the dipole cold mass cross-section had already been developed at CERN, mainly for magnetic analysis, taking into account conductor blocks and a frictionless behavior. This paper describes a new ANSYS® model of the dipole coil cross-section, featuring individual turns inside conductor blocks, and implementing friction and the mechanical non-linear behavior of insulated cables. Preliminary results, comparison with measurements performed in industry and ongoing developments are discussed.

  3. submitter Simulation of a quench event in the upgraded High-Luminosity LHC Main dipole circuit including the 11 T Nb$_{3}$Sn dipole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Navarro, Alejandro Manuel; Verweij, Arjan P; Bortot, Lorenzo; Mentink, Matthias; Prioli, Marco; Auchmann, Bernhard; Izquierdo Bermudez, Susana; Ravaioli, Emmanuele; Yammine, Samer

    2018-01-01

    To achieve the goal of increased luminosity, two out of eight main dipole circuits of the accelerator will be reconfigured in the coming LHC upgrade by replacing one standard 14.3-m long, Nb-Ti-based, 8.3 T dipole magnet by two 5.3-m long, Nb$_{3}$Sn-based, 11.2 T magnets (MBH). The modified dipole circuits will contain 153 Nb-Ti magnets and two MBH magnets. The latter will be connected to an additional trim power converter to compensate for the differences in the magnetic transfer functions. These modifications imply a number of challenges from the point of view of the circuit integrity, operation, and quench protection. In order to assess the circuit performance under different scenarios and to validate the circuit quench protection strategy, reliable and accurate numerical transient simulations have to be performed. We present the field/circuit coupling simulation of the reconfigured main dipole magnet chain following the introduction of the MBH magnets. 2-D distributed LEDET models of the MBH's have been ...

  4. Results of 3-dimensional structural FE-modeling of the coil end-regions of the LHC main dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeck, U; Schillo, M; Perini, D; Siegel, N

    2000-01-01

    The transition region between the straight part and the ends of the coils of the LHC model and prototype dipole magnets are often identified as the origin of training quenches. In order to study how the discontinuities in the material properties of these regions affect coil pre-stress and possibly gain more insight in the quench behavior, a program was set up at CERN to analyze by 3D-FEM these particular regions. The ACCEL team, who performed a similar analysis for the main quadrupoles of the Superconducting Supercollider SSC, is entrusted with this program. In this paper we report on the results of 3D-modeling and analysis of the coil return end region, including the complete coil mass, of a 1-m single bore model magnet. This magnet represents all relevant features of the "two-in-one" LHC main dipole design concerning the winding configuration, the collar pack, the yoke, and the outer shell representing the He-vessel. The transition region between coil ends and straight section is modeled by slicing the magn...

  5. LHC Dipoles Accelerate

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Andrezej Siemko (left), Peter Sievers (centre), and Lucio Rossi (right), have the exciting challenge of preparing and testing 2000 magnets for the LHC. The LHC is going to require a lot of powerful magnets by the time it begins operation in 2006. More specifically, it is going to need 130 special magnets, 400 quadrupoles, and a whopping 1250 dipoles! Preparing and testing these magnets for the conditions they will encounter in the LHC is not an easy task. But evaluation of the most recently received magnet, from the German company Noell, is showing that while the monumental task of receiving and testing nearly 2000 magnets is going to be exhausting, the goals are definitely attainable. At the moment and over the next year, pre-series magnets (the magnets that CERN uses to fine tune performance) are arriving slowly (90 in total will arrive), but by 2003 the rate of series magnet arrival will accelerate to 9 per week, that's over 450 in a single year! And working with these magnets when they arrive is tough. ...

  6. FEM Computations Concerning the Effect of Friction in Two LHC Main Dipole Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Bajko, M; Perini, D

    2000-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of a dipole structure is considered when also friction is taken into account, studying its effect on different components and in different conditions. In particular the difference in behavior between a structure with aluminium collars and one with austenitic steel ones was studied.

  7. Room Temperature Magnetic Field Measurements as a Tool to Localize Inter-turns Electrical Short Circuits in the LHC Main Dipole coils

    CERN Document Server

    Bellesia, B; Todesco, E

    2006-01-01

    In this report the method for the localization of the electric shorts circuits in the main LHC dipoles using the magnetic measurements at room temperature is presented. The steps of the method are discussed, and two cases are studied in detail. A complete statistics of the 12 cases analyzed up to now is given.

  8. Development of special machines for production of large number of superconducting coils for the spool correctors for the main dipole of LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puntambekar, A.M.; Karmarkar, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting (Sc) spool correctors of different types namely Sextupole, (MCS) Decapole (MCD) and Octupole (MCO) are incorporated in each of the main dipole of Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In all 2464 MCS and 1232 MCDO magnets are required to equip all 1232 Dipoles of LHC. The coils wound from thin rectangular section Sc wires are the heart of magnet assembly and its performance for the field quality and cold quench training largely depends on the precise and robust construction of these coils. Under DAE-CERN collaboration CAT was entrusted with the responsibility of making these magnets for LHC. Starting with development of manual fixtures and prototyping using soldering, a more advances special Automatic Coils Winding and Ultrasonic Welding (USW) system for production of large no. of coils and magnets were built at CAT. The paper briefly describes the various developments in this area. (author)

  9. CERN LHC dipole prototype success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    In a crash programme, the first prototype superconducting dipole magnet for CERN's LHC protonproton collider was successfully powered for the first time at CERN on 14 April, eventually sailing to 9T, above the 8.65T nominal LHC field, before quenching for the third time. The next stage is to install the delicate measuring system for making comprehensive magnetic field maps in the 10 m long, 50 mm diameter twin-apertures of the magnet. These measurements will check that the required LHC field quality has been achieved at both the nominal and injection fields

  10. LHC dipoles: the countdown has begun

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    At the entrance to the fourth floor corridor of the LHC-MMS (Main Magnets and Superconductors) Group in building 30, the Director-General has unveiled an electronic information panel indicating the number of LHC dipoles still to be delivered and the days remaining to the deadline (30 June 2006). The panel was the idea of Lucio Rossi, leader of the MMS Group, which is responsible for the construction of the dipole magnets. The unveiling ceremony took place on the morning of Friday 11 October 2002, at the end of a drink held to celebrate with MMS group and the LHC top management the exceptional performance of the latest dipoles, built by the French consortium Alstom-Jeumont. They are the first dipoles to achieve a magnetic field of 9 tesla in one go without quenching, thus exceeding the nominal operating field of 8.3 tesla. The challenge is now to increase the production rate from 2 to 35 dipoles per month by 2004 in order to meet the deadline, while maintaining this quality. Photo 01: The Director-General Luci...

  11. A Correlation Study between Geometry of Collared Coils and Normal Quadrupole Multipole in the Main LHC Dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F; Berthollon-Vitte, S; Glaude, D; Vanenkov, I

    2006-01-01

    The quality control implemented at all LHC dipole assemblers includes precise mechanical measurements of the geometry of collared coils. A cross-analysis performed between mechanical and magnetic measurements data shows a correlation between collared coils outer dimensions and the normal quadrupole multipole (b2) for one dipole assembler. The profile geometry of the single collars - as determined from 3D measurements at the collar suppliers and CERN - could not account alone for the significant left – right aperture asymmetry observed. This triggered a deeper investigation on different elements of the geometry of single collars. The results of this work show that the relative positioning of the collaring holes, allowing a small bending deformation of collars under the effect of coil pre-stress, is an important effect that generates a b2 multipole at the limit of specification. The study has deepened the understanding of the factors affecting collared coil geometry and field quality. The precision of 3D m...

  12. Field quality of LHC superconducting dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    The author reports here the main results of field measurements performed so far on the LHC superconducting dipoles at superfluid helium temperature. The main field strength at injection, collision conditions and higher order multipoles are discussed. Superconducting magnets exhibit additional field imperfections due to diamagnetic properties of superconducting cables, apart from geometric error, saturation of iron yoke and eddy currents error. Dynamic effects on field harmonics, such as field decay at injection and subsequent snap back are also discussed. (author)

  13. Slice of LHC dipole wiring

    CERN Multimedia

    Dipole model slice made in 1994 by Ansaldo. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. 50’000 tonnes of steel sheets are used to make the magnet yokes that keep the wiring firmly in place. The yokes constitute approximately 80% of the accelerator's weight and, placed side by side, stretch over 20 km!

  14. Dipoles for High-Energy LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Todesco, E; De Rijk, G; Rossi, L

    2014-01-01

    For the High Energy LHC, a study of a 33 TeV center of mass collider in the LHC tunnel, main dipoles of 20 T operational field are needed. In this paper we first review the conceptual design based on block coil proposed in the Malta workshop, addressing the issues related to coil fabrication and assembly. We then propose successive simplifications of this design, associating a cost estimate of the conductor. We then analyse a block layout for a 15 T magnet. Finally, we consider two layouts based on the D20 and HD2 short models built by LBL. A first analysis of the aspects related to protection of these challenging magnets is given.

  15. Impact of the Voltage Transients after a Fast Power Abort on the Quench Detection System in the LHC Main Dipole Chain

    CERN Document Server

    Ravaioli, E; Formenti, F; Montabonnet, V; Pojer, M; Schmidt, R; Siemko, A; Solfaroli Camillocci, A; Steckert, J; Thiesen, H; Verweij, A

    2012-01-01

    A Fast Power Abort in the LHC superconducting main dipole circuit consists in the switch-off of the power converter and the opening of the two energy-extraction switches. Each energy-extraction unit is composed of redundant electromechanical breakers, which are opened to force the current through an extraction resistor. When a switch is opened arcing occurs in the switch and a voltage of up to 1 kV builds up across the extraction resistor with a typical ramp rate of about 80 kV/s. The subsequent voltage transient propagates through the chain of 154 dipoles and superposes on the voltage waves caused by the switch-off of the power converter. The resulting effect caused intermittent triggering of the quench protection systems along with heater firings in the magnets when the transient occurred during a ramp of the current. A delay between power converter switch-off and opening of the energy-extraction switches was introduced to prevent this effect. Furthermore, the output filters of the power converters were mod...

  16. Development of superconducting sextupole and decapole spool corrector magnets at CAT for the main dipole of Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puntambekar, A.M.; Karmarkar, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting (Sc)-corrector magnets are one of the important Indian contributions to LHC under construction at Geneva, Switzerland. Under DAE-CERN collaboration we embarked on the development of these magnets at CAT. This involved making prototype to validate basic design, then incorporate engineering design features and develop all tooling, machines to suit large production lot. We started the work in close collaboration with LHC/ICP, CERN and developed necessary tooling and fixtures, machining methods for intricate shape coil supports, Sc coil winding machines, test-equipment for warm and cold testing etc and made several prototypes. These prototypes were tested at CAT and CERN at warm and at 4.2 and 1.8K for acceptance. This paper describes salient features of prototype development at CAT. (author)

  17. The LHC AC Dipole system: an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Serrano, J; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2010-01-01

    The LHC AC Dipole is an instrument to study properties of the LHC lattice by inducing large transverse displacements in the beam. These displacements are generated by exciting the beam with an oscillating magnetic field at a frequency close to the tune. This paper presents the system requirements and the technical solution chosen to meet them, based of high-power audio amplifiers and a resonant parallel RLC circuit.

  18. LHC Dipoles: The countdown has begun

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    One of the LHC dipole magnets has just achieved a record magnetic field of 9 Tesla in one go without quenching. The challenge now is to increase the production rate to 35 magnets a month by 2004. As a new information panel in Building 30 shows, the countdown has begun.

  19. State of the Short Dipole Model Program for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, N I; Kurtyka, T; Oberli, L R; Perini, D; Russenschuck, Stephan; Siegel, N; Siemko, A; Tommasini, D; Vanenkov, I; Walckiers, L

    1998-01-01

    Superconducting single and twin aperture 1-m long dipole magnets are currently being fabricated at CERN at a rate of about one per month in the framework of the short dipole model program for the LHC. The program allows to study performance improvements coming from refinements in design, components and assembly options and to accumulate statistics based on a small-scale production. The experience thus gained provides in turn feedback into the long magnet program in industry. In recent models initial quenching fields above 9 T have been obtained and after a short training the conductor limit at 2 K is reached, resulting in a central bore field exceeding 10 T. The paper describes the features of recent single aperture models, the results obtained during cold tests and the plans to ensure the continuation of a vigorous model program providing input for the fabrication of the main LHC dipoles.

  20. Status of 11 T 2-in-1 Nb$_3$Sn Dipole Development for LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlobin, Alexander [Fermilab; Andreev, Nicolai [Fermilab; Apollinari, Giorgio [Fermilab; Barzi, Emanuela [Fermilab; Bossert, Rodger [Fermilab; Buehler, Marc [Fermilab; Chlachidze, Guram [Fermilab; DiMarco, Joseph [Fermilab; Nobrega, Alfred [Fermilab; Novitski, Igor [Fermilab; Turrioni, Daniele [Fermilab; Velev, Gueorgui [Fermilab; Auchmann, Bernhard [CERN; Karppinen, Mikko [CERN; Rossi, Lucio [CERN; Smekens, David [CERN

    2014-07-01

    The LHC upgrade plans foresee installation of additional collimators in the LHC lattice. To provide the necessary longitudinal space for these collimators, shorter and stronger Nb3Sn dipoles compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems could be used. This paper describes the design and status of the twin-aperture Nb3Sn dipole being developed by FNAL and CERN for the LHC, and reports test results of two collared coils to be used in the first 1 m long twin-aperture dipole model.

  1. The LHC dipole test control architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorskaya, E.; Samojlov, V.; Raimondo, A.; Rijllart, A.

    2003-01-01

    The next large accelerator project at CERN is the Large Hadron Collider, which is foreseen to be installed in the existing LEP tunnel, and scheduled to be commissioned in 2007. For this project, 1200 15-metre long dipole magnets need to be tested at CERN in warm and cold conditions on dedicated test benches that are under development. The final LHC dipole series test set-up will consist of 12 benches organized in 6 clusters of two benches sharing the largest and most expensive devices. This sharing is made possible by a deliberate de-phasing of the tests among magnets, ensuring an optimum use of resources, such as cryogenics and power equipment, without limiting the total throughput. An offered two-level control architecture includes: 1) the Test 'Master' that drives the test for a cluster; 2) the Resource 'Manager' that allocates common devices and central resources. The implementation of this architecture is done in the LabVIEW environment

  2. SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNETS FOR THE LHC INSERTION REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILLEN, E.; ANERELLA, M.; COZZOLINO, J.; GANETIS, G.; GHOSH, A.; GUPTA, R.; HARRISON, M.; JAIN, A.; MARONE, A.; MURATORE, J.; PLATE, S.; SCHMALZLE, J.; WANDERER, P.; WU, K.C.

    2000-01-01

    Dipole bending magnets are required to change the horizontal separation of the two beams in the LHC. In Intersection Regions (IR) 1, 2, 5, and 8, the beams are brought into collision for the experiments located there. In IR4, the separation of the beams is increased to accommodate the machine's particle acceleration hardware. As part of the US contribution to the LHC Project, BNL is building the required superconducting magnets. Designs have been developed featuring a single aperture cold mass in a single cryostat, two single aperture cold masses in a single cryostat, and a dual aperture cold mass in a single cryostat. All configurations feature the 80 mm diameter, 10 m long superconducting coil design used in the main bending magnets of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider recently completed at Brookhaven. The magnets for the LHC, to be built at Brookhaven, are described and results from the program to build two dual aperture prototypes are presented

  3. Status of the 11 T Nb$_{3}$Sn Dipole Project for the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savary, F.; et al.

    2015-01-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC collimation system includes additional collimators in the LHC lattice. The longitudinal space for the collimators could be obtained by replacing some LHC main dipoles with shorter but stronger dipoles compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems. A joint development program with the goal of building a 5.5 m long two-in-one aperture Nb_3Sn dipole prototype suitable for installation in the LHC is being conducted by FNAL and CERN magnet groups. As part of the first phase of the program, 1 m long and 2 m long single aperture models are being built and tested, and the collared coils from these magnets will be assembled and tested in two-in-one configuration in both laboratories. In parallel with the short model magnet activities, the work has started on the production line in view of the scale-up to 5.5 m long prototype magnet. The development of the final cryo-assembly comprising two 5.5 m long 11 T dipole cold masses and the warm collimator in the middle, fully compatible with the LHC main systems and the existing machine interfaces, has also started at CERN. This paper summarizes the progress made at CERN and FNAL towards the construction of 5.5 m long 11 T Nb_3Sn dipole prototype and the present status of the activities related to the integration of the 11 T dipole and collimator in the LHC.

  4. Working on an LHC dipole end-cap

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    A metal worker constructs an end-cap for an LHC dipole magnet. These magnets will be used to bend the proton beams around the LHC, which is due to start up in 2008. The handmade prototype seen here will be used to make a mold from which the final set of components will be made for the accelerator.

  5. Normal Conducting Separation Dipoles For The Lhc Beam Cleaning Insertions

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, V; de Rijk, G; Gerard, D; Hans, O; Kalbreier, Willi; Kiselev, O; Protopopov, I V; Pupkov, Yu; Ramberger, S; Ruvinsky, E; Sukhanov, A

    2004-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), two straight sections, IR3 and IR7, will be dedicated to beam cleaning [1]. These cleaning insertions will be equipped with normal conducting magnets. MBW magnets are dipole magnets used to increase the separation of the two beams. They have a core length of 3.4 m and a gap height of 52 mm and will operate at a magnetic field ranging from 0.09 T to 1.53 T. Limitations on the dimensions and total weight of the magnet resulted in a special design with a common yoke for the two beams. The orbits of the two beams will be separated horizontally by a distance between 194 mm and 224 mm in the gap of the magnet. The magnet was designed in collaboration between CERN and BINP. The report presents the main design issues and results of the pre-series acceptance tests including mechanical, electrical and magnetic field measurements. Index terms - LHC, normal conducting magnet, twin aperture design, separation dipole

  6. Quench Protection Studies of the 11-T $Nb_3Sn$ Dipole for LHC Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Izquierdo Bermudez, Susana; BAJAS, Hugues; Bajko, Marta; Bordini, Bernardo; Bottura, Luca; Chlachidze, Guram; Karppinen, Mikko; Rysti, Juho; Savary, Frederic; Willering, Gerard; Zlobin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC collimation system foresees additional collimators to be installed in the dispersion suppressor areas. Fermilab and CERN are developing an 11 T Nb$_{3}$Sn dipole to replace some 8.33 T-15-m-long Nb-Ti LHC main dipoles providing longitudinal space for the collimators. In case of a quench, the large stored energy and the low copper stabilizer fraction make the protection of the 11 T Nb$_{3}$Sn dipoles challenging. This paper presents the results of quench protection analysis, including quench protection heater design and efficiency, quench propagation and coil heating. The numerical results are compared with the experimental data from the 2-m-long Nb$_{3}$Sn dipole models. The validated model is used to predict the current decay and hot spot temperature under operating conditions in the LHC and the presently foreseen magnet protection scheme is discussed.

  7. Impedance Localization Measurements using AC Dipoles in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Biancacci, Nicolo; Papotti, Giulia; Persson, Tobias; Salvant, Benoit; Tomás, Rogelio

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the LHC impedance is of primary importance to predict the machine performance and allow for the HL-LHC upgrade. The developed impedance model can be benchmarked with beam measurements in order to assess its validity and limit. This is routinely done, for example, moving the LHC collimator jaws and measuring the induced tune shift. In order to localize possible unknown impedance sources, the variation of phase advance with intensity between beam position monitors can be measured. In this work we will present the impedance localization measurements performed at injection in the LHC using AC dipoles as exciter as well as the underlying theory.

  8. The last LHC dipole magnet is lowered

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    A ceremony is held as the last of 1746 superconducting magnets is lowered into the 27-km circumference tunnel that houses the LHC. The LHC project leader, Lyn Evans, changes a banner reading ‘first magnet for the LHC’ to ‘last magnet for the LHC’ in his native Welsh.

  9. Normal Conducting Separation Dipoles for the LHC Beam Cleaning Insertions

    CERN Document Server

    Bidon, S; Hans, O; Kalbreier, Willi; Kiselev, O; Petrov, V; Protopopov, I V; Pupkov, Yu A; Ramberger, S; de Rijk, G; Ruvinsky, E; Sukhanov, A

    2004-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), two straight sections, IR3 and IR7, will be dedicated to beam cleaning. These cleaning insertions will be equipped with normal conducting magnets. MBW magnets are dipole magnets used to increase the separation of the two beams. They have a core length of 3.4 m and a gap height of 52 mm and will operate at a magnetic field ranging from 0.09 T to 1.53 T. Limitations on the dimensions and total weight of the magnet resulted in a special design with a common yoke for the two beams. The orbits of the two beams will be separated horizontally by a distance between 194 mm and 224 mm in the gap of the magnet. The magnet was designed in collaboration between CERN and BINP. The report presents the main design issues and results of the pre-series acceptance tests including mechanical, electrical and magnetic field measurements.

  10. Results on Fermilab main injector dipole measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.C.; Baiod, R.; DiMarco, J.; Glass, H.D.; Harding, D.J.; Martin, P.S.; Mishra, S.; Mokhtarani, A.; Orris, D.F.; russell, O.A.; Tompkins, J.C.; Walbridge, D.G.C.

    1995-06-01

    Measurements of the Productions run of Fermilab Main Injector Dipole magnets is underway. Redundant strength measurements provide a set of data which one can fit to mechanical and magnetic properties of the assembly. Plots of the field contribution from the steel supplement the usual plots of transfer function (B/I) vs. I in providing insight into the measured results

  11. Hadron production at LHC in dipole momentum space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basso, E. A.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; De Oliveira, E. G.

    2013-01-01

    The dipole color approach is the framework that considers the quark-antiquark pair scattering off the target. The rapidity evolution of color dipoles is given by the nonlinear Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation, for which analytical solutions are not yet known. A good way to explore the asymptotic BK solutions is through the traveling wave method of QCD, that uses a correspondence between the BK evolution equation in momentum space and reaction-diffusion physics. Using the traveling wave based AGBS model for the dipole amplitude in momentum space, and within the k t -factorization formalism, we describe the LHC data on single inclusive hadron yield for p–p collisions.

  12. Quench Heater Experiments on the LHC Main Superconducting Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Mateos, F; Pugnat, P; Sanfilippo, S; Schmidt, R; Siemko, A; Sonnemann, F

    2000-01-01

    In case of a quench in one of the main dipoles and quadrupoles of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the magnet has to be protected against excessive temperatures and high voltages. In order to uniformly distribute the stored magnetic energy in the coils, heater strips installed in the magnet are fired after quench detection. Tests of different quench heater configurations were performed on various 1 m long model and 15 m long prototype dipole magnets, as well as on a 3 m long prototype quad...

  13. Computer-generated diagram of an LHC dipole

    CERN Multimedia

    AC Team

    1998-01-01

    This computer-generated image of an LHC dipole magnet shows some of the parts vital for the operation of these components. The magnets must be cooled to 1.9 K (less than –270.3°C) so that the superconducting coils can produce the required 8 T magnetic field strength.

  14. The 11 T Dipole for HL-LHC: Status and Plan

    CERN Document Server

    Savary, F; Bordini, B; Bottura, L; Chlachidze, G; Ramos, D; Izquierdo Bermudez, S; Karppinen, M; Lackner, F; Loffler, C H; Moron-Ballester, R; Nobrega, A; Perez, J C; Prin, H; Smekens, D; de Rijk, G; Redaelli, S; Rossi, L; Willering, G; Zlobin, A V; Giovannozzi, M

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system includes additional collimators in the LHC lattice. The longitudinal space for these collimators will be created by replacing some of the LHC main dipoles with shorter but stronger dipoles compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems. The project plan comprises the construction of two cryoassemblies containing each of the two 11-T dipoles of 5.5-m length for possible installation on either side of interaction point 2 of LHC in the years 2018-2019 for ion operation, and the installation of two cryoassemblies on either side of interaction point 7 of LHC in the years 2023-2024 for proton operation. The development program conducted in conjunction between the Fermilab and CERN magnet groups is progressing well. The development activities carried out on the side of Fermilab were concluded in the middle of 2015 with the fabrication and test of a 1-m-long two-in-one model and those on the CERN side are ramping up with the construction of 2-m-long ...

  15. LHC dipole magnets start to roll off the production line

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The first pre-series LHC dipole magnet has been delivered to CERN, a further 1247 are due to be produced by 2005. Their production is the result of technology transfer from CERN to its suppliers. Fifteen metres long, thirty-tonnes in weight, and using several kilometres of superconducting cable, the magnet that has just arrived in hall 181 is a true colossus. It is the first pre-series dipole that will begin service in 2005 in the future Large Hadron Collider, LHC. Delivered by the French Alstom-Jeumont Industrie consortium, it is the first of 1248 magnets that will be manufactured over the coming five years. Needless to say, lavish attention has been devoted to this magnet by the engineers and technicians who accompanied it to CERN from Belfort in north east France. The task of the dipole magnets will be to steer the LHC's proton beams on a circular trajectory around the LHC's 27 kilometre circumference. A magnetic field of 8.33 Tesla is required to guide the protons, accelerated to an energy of 7 TeV, aroun...

  16. Slice of the LHC prototype beam tubes in dipole magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    A slice of the LHC accelerator prototype beam tubes surrounded by magnets. The LHC will accelerate two proton beams in opposite directions. The high bending and accelerating fields needed can only be reached using superconductors. At very low temperatures superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC will be the largest superconducting installation ever built, a unique challenge for CERN and its industrial partners. About dipole magnets: There will be 1232 dipole magnets in the LHC, used to guide the particles around the 27 km ring. Dipole magnets must have an extremely uniform field, which means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. The temperature is measured to five thousandths of a degree, the current to one part in a million. The current creating the magnetic field will pass through superconducting wires at up to 12 500 amps, about 30 000 times the current flowing ...

  17. First 15-m dipole prototype for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    The first full-size dipole prototype for the LHC was delivered to CERN on 16 December 1997. This 56 mm diameter bore twin-aperture magnet has a physical length of 15.16 m and a magnetic length at 1.9 K of 14.2 m. The magnet, which weighs about 26 ton radius of curvature of 2700 m. This prototype was developed in the framework of a collaboration between CERN and INFN (the Italian "Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare") on LHC superconducting magnets.

  18. Surface Resistance Measurements of LHC Dipole Beam Screen Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Ruggiero, F; Tan, J; Tsutsui, H

    2000-01-01

    An estimate of the resistive losses in the LHC dipole beam screen is given from cold surface resistance measurements using the shielded pair technique. Several beam screen samples have been evaluated, with different copper coating methods, including a sample with ribbed surface envisaged to reduce electron cloud losses thanks to its low reflectivity. Experimental data, derived by a proper analysis of the measured Q-factors and including error estimates are compared with theoretical predictions of the anomalous skin effect.

  19. Hadron production at LHC in dipole momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basso, E. A.; Gay Ducati, M. B. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Caixa Postal 15051, 91501-970 - Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); De Oliveira, E. G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05314-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    The dipole color approach is the framework that considers the quark-antiquark pair scattering off the target. The rapidity evolution of color dipoles is given by the nonlinear Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation, for which analytical solutions are not yet known. A good way to explore the asymptotic BK solutions is through the traveling wave method of QCD, that uses a correspondence between the BK evolution equation in momentum space and reaction-diffusion physics. Using the traveling wave based AGBS model for the dipole amplitude in momentum space, and within the k{sub t}-factorization formalism, we describe the LHC data on single inclusive hadron yield for p-p collisions.

  20. 3-D metrology applied to superconducting dipole magnets for LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, M.; Missiaen, D.; Peguiron, L.

    1999-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) requires the manufacture of 1232 superconducting dipole magnets containing two beam channels in a common mechanical structure. These dipole magnets, which produce the required magnetic field to deflect the particles along a circular trajectory, have to be bent in their horizontal plane in order to ensure the largest mechanical aperture. Very tight tolerances on the geometry of these magnets have to be imposed during their fabrication in order to minimise, during operation, the possible losses of particles, which circulate in rather small channels and to ensure the alignment of the adjacent magnets in the ring tunnel. This necessitates a thorough metrological inspection of the magnet geometry and an accurate positioning of some of its components. This paper presents the measuring system and the developed methodology to realize these operations. The results on the first 15 m long dipole magnet are shown. (author)

  1. Electromagnetic and mechanical design of a 56 mm aperture mode dipole for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlbaeck, J.; Ikaeheimo, J.; Jaervi, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project is proposed as the future extension of the CERN accelerator complex. The LHC requires twin aperture superconducting dipoles of highest possible field to guide the proton beams in the existing LEP tunnel of 26.7 km circumference. This paper describes the electromagnetic and mechanical design of a 56 mm aperture model dipole for the LHC

  2. Magnetic Analysis of a Single-Aperture 11T Nb3Sn Demonstrator Dipole for LHC Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchmann, B. [CERN; Karppinen, M. [CERN; Kashikhin, V. [Fermilab; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC collimation system foresees additional collimators to be installed in the dispersion suppressor areas around points 2, 3, and 7. The necessary longitudinal space for the collimators could be provided by replacing some 8.33-T 15-m-long NbTi LHC main dipoles with shorter 11-T Nb3Sn dipoles compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems. To demonstrate this possibility, in 2011 Fermilab and CERN started a joint R&D program with the goal of building a 5.5-m-long tw in-aperture dipole prototype suitable for installation in the LHC by 2014. The first step of this program is the development of a 2-m-long single-aperture demonstration dipole with the nominal field of 11 T at the LHC nominal current of ~11.85 kA and 60-m m bore with ~20% margin. This paper presents the results of magnetic analysis of the single-aperture Nb3Sn demonstrator dipole for the LHC collimation system upgrade.

  3. A computer-aided control system for automatic performance measurements on the LHC series dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorskaya, E.; Samojlov, V.; Raimondo, A.; Rijllart, A.

    2003-01-01

    The control system software (Test Master) for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) magnet series measurements is presented. This system was developed at CERN to automate as many tests on the LHC magnets as possible. The Test Master software is the middle layer of the main software architecture developed by the LHC/IAS group for central supervision of all types of LHC dipole tests in the SM18 hall. It serves as a manager and scheduler for applications, controlling all measurements that are performed in a cluster of two test benches. The software was implemented in the LabVIEW environment. The information about the interactive user interface, the software architecture, communication protocols, file-configuration different types of commands and status files of the Test Master are described

  4. Ambient temperature field measuring system for LHC superconducting dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billan, J.; De Panfilis, S.; Giloteaux, D.; Pagano, O.

    1996-01-01

    It is foreseen to perform acceptance tests including field measurements of the collared coils assembly of the LHC superconducting dipoles to estimate, at an early production stage, the possible significant deviations from the expected multipole component value of these magnets. A sensitive measuring probe and efficient data acquisition are the consequence of a low magnetizing current necessary to limit the coils heating. This demands a high signals sensitivity and an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio to retrieve the higher multipole component. Moreover, the correlation with the multipoles content of the magnets at cryogenic temperature and nominal excitation current need to be identified before the manufacturing process may continue. The field probe of the mole-type is equipped with three radial rotating search coils, an angular encoder and gravity sensor. It has been designed to slide inside the bore of the dipole coils and to measure the local field at fixed positions. The field analysis resulting in terms of multipole components, field direction and field integrals, measured on four 10 m long, twin-aperture LHC dipole prototypes, will be described together with the performance of the measuring method

  5. Geometric and Magnetic Axes of the LHC Dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Bajko, M; Buzio, M; Deferne, G; Ferracin, P; García-Pérez, J; Scandale, Walter; Todesco, Ezio

    2001-01-01

    The 15-m long superconducting dipoles of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with two-in-one design are curved by about 5 mrad to follow the beam trajectory. They are supported on three cold feet to minimise the vertical sagitta induced by their 35 tonnes weight. The cold masses contain at both ends local multipolar correctors to compensate for the detrimental effect of persistent current during injection. We discuss how we measure and control the geometrical shape of the cold mass and the alignment of the associated correctors and how we identify the magnetic axis of the field-shape harmonics with respect to the expected beam reference orbit. We present results relative to prototype dipoles obtained both at room temperature and in operational conditions at 1.9 K.

  6. Electrical Integrity Tests during Production of the LHC Dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    de Rijk, G; Cornelis, M; Fessia, P; Miles, J; Modena, M; Molinari, G; Rinn, J; Savary, F; Vlogaert, J

    2006-01-01

    For the LHC dipoles, mandatory electrical integrity tests are performed to qualify the cold mass (CM) at four production stages: individual pole, collared coil, CM before end cover welding and final CM. A description of the measurement equipment and its recent development are presented. After passing the demands set out in the specification, the results of the tests are transmitted to CERN where they are further analyzed. The paper presents the most important results of these measurements. We also report a review of the electrical non-conformities encountered e.g. interturn shorts and quench heater failure, their diagnostic and the cures.

  7. Design and Fabrication of a Single-Aperture 11T Nb3Sn Dipole Model for LHC Upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, N.; Apollinari, G.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; Auchmann, B.; Karppinen, M.

    2011-01-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC collimation system includes additional collimators to be installed in the dispersion suppressor areas of points 2, 3 and 7. To provide the necessary longitudinal space for the collimators, a replacement of 8.33 T Nb-Ti LHC main dipoles with 11 T dipoles based on Nb 3 Sn superconductor compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems is being considered. To demonstrate this possibility FNAL and CERN have started a joint program to develop a 2 m long single-aperture dipole magnet with the nominal field of 11 T at ∼11.85 kA current and 60 mm bore. This paper describes the demonstrator magnet magnetic and mechanical designs and analysis, coil fabrication procedure. The Nb 3 Sn strand and cable parameters and test results are also reported.

  8. Production of Austenitic Steel for the LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F; Komori, T; Peiro, G; Rossi, L

    2006-01-01

    The austenitic-steel collars are an important component of the LHC dipole magnets, operating at cryogenic temperature under high mechanical stress. The required steel, known as YUS 130S, has been specifically developed for this application by Nippon Steel Corporation (NSC), who was awarded a CERN contract in 1999 for the supply of 11 500 tonnes. In 2005 - after six years of work - the contract is being successfully completed, with final production being ensured since October 2003 by Nippon Steel & Sumikin Stainless Steel Corporation (NSSC). The paper describes the steel properties, its manufacturing and quality control process, organization of production, logistics and contract follow-up. Extensive statistics have been collected relating to mechanical, physical and technological parameters. Specific attention is dedicated to measurements of magnetic permeability performed at cryogenic temperatures by CERN, the equipment used and statistical results. Reference is also made to the resulting precision of the...

  9. Statistical Analysis of Conductor Motion in LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Calvi, M; Pugnat, P; Siemko, A

    2004-01-01

    Premature training quenches are usually caused by the transient energy release within the magnet coil as it is energised. The dominant disturbances originate in cable motion and produce observable rapid variation in voltage signals called spikes. The experimental set up and the raw data treatment to detect these phenomena are briefly recalled. The statistical properties of different features of spikes are presented like for instance the maximal amplitude, the energy, the duration and the time correlation between events. The parameterisation of the mechanical activity of magnets is addressed. The mechanical activity of full-scale prototype and first preseries LHC dipole magnets is analysed and correlations with magnet manufacturing procedures and quench performance are established. The predictability of the quench occurrence is discussed and examples presented.

  10. Detecting a heavy neutrino electric dipole moment at the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Sher

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The milliQan Collaboration has proposed to search for millicharged particles by looking for very weakly ionizing tracks in a detector installed in a cavern near the CMS experiment at the LHC. We note that another form of exotica can also yield weakly ionizing tracks. If a heavy neutrino has an electric dipole moment (EDM, then the milliQan experiment may be sensitive to it as well. In particular, writing the general dimension-5 operator for an EDM with a scale of a TeV and a one-loop factor, one finds a potential EDM as high as a few times 10−17 e-cm, and models exist where it is an order of magnitude higher. Redoing the Bethe calculation of ionization energy loss for an EDM, it is found that the milliQan detector is sensitive to EDMs as small as 10−17 e-cm. Using the production cross-section and analyzing the acceptance of the milliQan detector, we find the expected 95% exclusion and 3σ sensitivity over the range of neutrino masses from 5–1000 GeV for integrated luminosities of 300 and 3000 fb−1 at the LHC.

  11. Detecting a heavy neutrino electric dipole moment at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Marc; Stevens, Justin R.

    2018-02-01

    The milliQan Collaboration has proposed to search for millicharged particles by looking for very weakly ionizing tracks in a detector installed in a cavern near the CMS experiment at the LHC. We note that another form of exotica can also yield weakly ionizing tracks. If a heavy neutrino has an electric dipole moment (EDM), then the milliQan experiment may be sensitive to it as well. In particular, writing the general dimension-5 operator for an EDM with a scale of a TeV and a one-loop factor, one finds a potential EDM as high as a few times 10-17 e-cm, and models exist where it is an order of magnitude higher. Redoing the Bethe calculation of ionization energy loss for an EDM, it is found that the milliQan detector is sensitive to EDMs as small as 10-17 e-cm. Using the production cross-section and analyzing the acceptance of the milliQan detector, we find the expected 95% exclusion and 3σ sensitivity over the range of neutrino masses from 5-1000 GeV for integrated luminosities of 300 and 3000 fb-1 at the LHC.

  12. Normal-Conducting Separation and Compensation Dipoles for the LHC Experimental Insertions

    CERN Document Server

    Ramberger, S; Cornuet, D; Gérard, D; Gurov, D; Hans, O; Kalbreier, Willi; Kiselev, O; Morozov, I; Ogurtsov, A; Petrov, V; de Rijk, G; Ruvinsky, E; Sukhanov, A; Zhilayev, K

    2006-01-01

    The experimental insertions of the LHC make use of normal-conducting magnets to provide for part of the beam separation and to compensate the effect of two large spectrometer dipoles. Three different types with respect to the length were designed and are based on the same type of lamination. The main type of magnet MBXW has a core length of 3.4 m while the MBXWT and MBXWS magnets are 1.5 m and 0.75 m long versions respectively. The magnet design was done in collaboration between CERN and BINP and the dipole magnets are produced by BINP. So far all three MBXWS magnets, all three MBXWT magnets and fifteen of twenty-nine MBXW magnets have been manufactured and delivered to CERN. The report presents the main design issues and results of the acceptance tests including mechanical, electrical and magnetic field measurements.

  13. Progress on the Development of the $Nb_3Sn$ 11T Dipole for the High Luminosity Upgrade of LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Savary, Frederic; Bordini, Bernardo; Bottura, Luca; Fiscarelli, Lucio; Fleiter, Jerome; Foussat, Arnaud; Izquierdo Bermudez, Susana; Karppinen, Mikko; Lackner, Friedrich; Loffler, Christian H; Nilsson, Emelie; Perez, Juan Carlos; Prin, Herve; Principe, Rosario; Ramos, Delio; de Rijk, Gijs; Rossi, Lucio; Smekens, David; Sequeira Tavares, Sandra; Willering, Gerard; Zlobin, Alexander V

    2017-01-01

    The high-luminosity large hadron collider (LHC) project at CERN entered into the production phase in October 2015 after the completion of the design study phase. In the meantime, the development of the 11 T dipole needed for the upgrade of the collimation system of the machine made significant progress with very good performance of the first two-in-one magnet model of 2-m length made at CERN. The 11 T dipole, which is more powerful than the current main dipoles of LHC, can be made shorter with an equivalent integrated field. This will allow creating space for the installation of additional collimators in specific locations of the dispersion suppressor regions. Following tests carried out during heavy ions runs of LHC in the end of 2015, and a more recent review of the project budget, the installation plan for the 11 T dipole was revised. Consequently, one 11 T dipole full assembly containing two 11 T dipoles of 5.5-m length will be installed on either side of interaction point 7. These two units shall be inst...

  14. The LHC Main Quadrupoles during Series Fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Tortschanoff, Theodor; Durante, M; Hagen, P; Klein, U; Krischel, D; Payn, A; Rossi, L; Schellong, B; Schmidt, P; Simon, F; Schirm, K-M; Todesco, E

    2006-01-01

    By the end of August 2005 about 320 of the 400 main LHC quadrupole magnets have been fabricated and about 220 of them assembled into their cold masses, together with corrector magnets. About 130 of them have been cold tested in their cryostats and most of the quadrupoles exceeded their nominal excitation, i.e. 12,000 A, after no more than two training quenches. During this series fabrication, the quality of the magnets and cold masses was thoroughly monitored by means of warm magnetic field measurements, of strict geometrical checking, and of various electrical verifications. A number of modifications were introduced in order to improve the magnet fabrication, mainly correction of the coil geometry for achieving the specified field quality and measures for avoiding coil insulation problems. Further changes concern the electrical connectivity and insulation of instrumentation, and of the corrector magnets inside the cold masses. The contact resistances for the bus-bar connections to the quench protection diode...

  15. 11 T Twin-Aperture Nb$_3$Sn Dipole Development for LHC Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Zlobin, A V; Apollinari, G; Auchmann, B; Barzi, E; Izquierdo Bermudez, S; Bossert, R; Buehler, M; Chlachidze, G; DiMarco, J; Karppinen, M; Nobrega, F; Novitski, I; Rossi, L; Smekens, D; Tartaglia, M; Turrioni, D; Velev, Genadi

    2015-01-01

    FNAL and CERN are developing a twin-aperture 11 T Nb$_{3}$Sn dipole suitable for installation in the LHC. This paper describes the design and parameters of the 11 T dipole developed at FNAL for the LHC upgrades in both single-aperture and twin-aperture configurations, and presents details of the constructed dipole models. Results of studies of magnet quench performance, quench protection and magnetic measurements performed using short 1 m long coils in the dipole mirror and single-aperture configurations are reported and discussed.

  16. 11 T Twin-Aperture Nb$_3$Sn Dipole Development for LHC Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab; Andreev, N. [Fermilab; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Auchmann, B. [CERN; Barzi, E. [Fermilab; Izquierdo Bermudez, S. [CERN; Bossert, R. [Fermilab; Buehler, M. [Fermilab; Chlachidze, G. [Fermilab; DiMarco, J. [Fermilab; Karppinen, M. [CERN; Nobrega, F. [Fermilab; Novitski, I. [CERN; Rossi, L. [CERN; Smekens, D. [CERN; Tartaglia, M. [Fermilab; Turrioni, D. [Fermilab; Velev, Genadi [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    FNAL and CERN are developing a twin-aperture 11 T Nb3Sn dipole suitable for installation in the LHC. This paper describes the design and parameters of the 11 T dipole developed at FNAL for the LHC upgrades in both single-aperture and twin-aperture configurations, and presents details of the constructed dipole models. Results of studies of magnet quench performance, quench protection and magnetic measurements performed using short 1 m long coils in the dipole mirror and single-aperture configurations are reported and discussed.

  17. Development and Test of a Single-Aperture 11 T $ \\hbox{Nb}_{3}\\hbox{Sn}$ Demonstrator Dipole for LHC Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlobin, A. V.; Andreev, N.; Apollinari, G.; Auchmann, B.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Karppinen, M.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Rossi, L.; Smekens, D.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.

    2013-06-01

    The upgrade of the LHC collimation system foresees installation of additional collimators around the LHC ring. The longitudinal space for the collimators could be provided by replacing some 8.33 T NbTi LHC main dipoles with shorter 11 T Nb3Sn dipoles compatible with the LHC lattice and main systems. To demonstrate this possibility, FNAL and CERN have started a joint program with the goal of building a 5.5 m long twin-aperture dipole prototype suitable for installation in the LHC. The first step of this program is the development of a 2 m long single-aperture demonstrator dipole with a nominal field of 11 T at the LHC nominal current of 11.85 kA and ~ 20% margin. This paper describes the design, construction, and test results of the first single-aperture Nb3Sn demonstrator dipole model.

  18. Correlation between magnetic field quality and mechanical components of the Large Hadron Collider main dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellesia, B.

    2006-12-01

    The 1234 superconducting dipoles of the Large Hadron Collider, working at a cryogenic temperature of 1.9 K, must guarantee a high quality magnetic field to steer the particles inside the beam pipe. Magnetic field measurements are a powerful way to detect assembly faults that could limit magnet performances. The aim of the thesis is the analysis of these measurements performed at room temperature during the production of the dipoles. In a large scale production the ideal situation is that all the magnets produced were identical. However all the components constituting a magnet are produced with certain tolerance and the assembly procedures are optimized during the production; due to these the reality drifts away from the ideal situation. We recollected geometrical data of the main components (superconducting cables, coil copper wedges and austenitic steel coil collars) and coupling them with adequate electro-magnetic models we reconstructed a multipolar field representation of the LHC dipoles defining their critical components and assembling procedures. This thesis is composed of 3 main parts: 1) influence of the geometry and of the assembling procedures of the dipoles on the quality of the magnetic field, 2) the use of measurement performed on the dipoles in the assembling step in order to solve production issues and to understand the behaviour of coils during the assembling step, and 3) a theoretical study of the uncertain harmonic components of the magnetic field in order to assess the dipole production

  19. Correlation between magnetic field quality and mechanical components of the Large Hadron Collider main dipoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellesia, B

    2006-12-15

    The 1234 superconducting dipoles of the Large Hadron Collider, working at a cryogenic temperature of 1.9 K, must guarantee a high quality magnetic field to steer the particles inside the beam pipe. Magnetic field measurements are a powerful way to detect assembly faults that could limit magnet performances. The aim of the thesis is the analysis of these measurements performed at room temperature during the production of the dipoles. In a large scale production the ideal situation is that all the magnets produced were identical. However all the components constituting a magnet are produced with certain tolerance and the assembly procedures are optimized during the production; due to these the reality drifts away from the ideal situation. We recollected geometrical data of the main components (superconducting cables, coil copper wedges and austenitic steel coil collars) and coupling them with adequate electro-magnetic models we reconstructed a multipolar field representation of the LHC dipoles defining their critical components and assembling procedures. This thesis is composed of 3 main parts: 1) influence of the geometry and of the assembling procedures of the dipoles on the quality of the magnetic field, 2) the use of measurement performed on the dipoles in the assembling step in order to solve production issues and to understand the behaviour of coils during the assembling step, and 3) a theoretical study of the uncertain harmonic components of the magnetic field in order to assess the dipole production.

  20. Status Report on the Superconducting Dipole Magnet Production for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bajko, M; Bellesia, B; Fessia, P; Hagen, P; Koutchouk, Jean-Pierre; Miles, J; Modena, M; Pojer,, M; Rossi, L; de Rijk, G; Savary, F; Todesco, E; Tommasini, D; Vlogaert, J; Völlinger, C; Wildner, E

    2007-01-01

    In August 2006, about 95 % of the production of the 1232 LHC superconducting dipole cold masses, whose coils are wound with Cu/Nb-Ti cables, is completed. One of the 3 manufacturers, having produced one third of the required magnets, completed its production in the end of 2005. The acceptance of the magnets takes place after the 1.9 K performance tests and has been issued for more then 1000 magnets so far. More then half of the dipole magnets are already installed in the tunnel. The paper reviews the main features of the dipoles, the most important steps of the manufacturing and the most critical operations. The quality control and the critical nonconformities that have led, for instance, to a swift campaign of investigations and repairs of few subcomponents (diode assembly, cold bore tube to welding flare fillet weld) are discussed. The status of the production and the performance of the tested dipoles will be presented. Finally the expected schedule for the completion of the production will be shown.

  1. Quench Performance of the First Twin-aperture 11 T Dipole for LHC upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Zlobin, A V; Apollinari, G; Barzi, E; Chlachidze, G; Nobrega, A; Novitski, I; Stoynev, S; Turrioni, D; Auchmann, B; Izquierdo Bermudez, S; Karppinen, M; Rossi, L; Savary, F; Smekens, D

    2015-01-01

    FNAL and CERN are developing a twin-aperture 11 T Nb$_{3}$Sn dipole suitable for installation in the LHC. A single-aperture 2-m long dipole demonstrator and two 1-m long dipole models have been fabricated and tested at FNAL in 2012-2014. The two 1 m long collared coils were then assembled into the first twin-aperture Nb$_{3}$Sn demonstrator dipole and tested. Test results of this twin-aperture Nb$_{3}$Sn dipole model are reported and discussed.

  2. Quench Performance and Field Quality of FNAL Twin-Aperture 11 T Nb$_{3}$Sn Dipole Model for LHC Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Stoynev, S; Apollinari, G; Auchmann, B; Barzi, E; Izquierdo Bermudez, S; Bossert, R; Chlachidze, G; DiMarco, J; Karppinen, M; Nobrega, F; Novitski, I; Rossi, F; Savary, F; Smekens, D; Strauss, T; Turrioni, D; Velev, G; Zlobin, A V

    2017-01-01

    A 2 m long single-aperture dipole demonstrator and two 1 m long single-aperture models based on Nb$_{3}$Sn superconductor have been built and tested at FNAL. The two 1 m long collared coils were then assembled in a twin-aperture Nb$_{3}$Sn dipole demonstrator compatible with the LHC main dipole and tested in two thermal cycles. This paper summarizes the quench performance of the FNAL twin-aperture Nb$_{3}$Sn 11 T dipole in the temperature range of 1.9-4.5 K. The results of magnetic measurements for one of the two apertures are also presented. Test results are compared to the performance of coils in a single-aperture configuration. A summary of quench propagation studies in both apertures is given.

  3. Methods and results of modeling and transmission-line calculations of the superconducting dipole chains of CERN's LHC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bourgeois, F

    2001-01-01

    Electrical modeling and simulation of the LHC magnet strings are being used to determine the key parameters that are needed for the design of the powering and energy extraction equipment. Poles and zeros of the Laplace expression approximating the Bode plot of the measured coil impedance are used to synthesize an R/L/C model of the magnet. Subsequently, this model is used to simulate the behavior of the LHC main dipole magnet string. Lumped transmission line behavior, impedance, resonance, propagation of the power supply ripple, ramping errors, energy extraction transients and their damping are presented in this paper. (3 refs).

  4. Twin Rotating Coils for Cold Magnetic Measurements of 15 m Long LHC Dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Billan, J; Buzio, M; D'Angelo, G; Deferne, G; Dunkel, O; Legrand, P; Rijllart, A; Siemko, A; Sievers, P; Schloss, S; Walckiers, L

    2000-01-01

    We describe here a new harmonic coil system for the field measurement of the superconducting, twin aperture LHC dipoles and the associated corrector magnets. Besides field measurements the system can be used as an antenna to localize the quench origin. The main component is a 16 m long rotating shaft, made up of 13 ceramic segments, each carrying two tangential coils plus a central radial coil, all working in parallel. The segments are connected with flexible Ti-alloy bellows, allowing the piecewise straight shaft to follow the curvature of the dipole while maintaining high torsional rigidity. At each interconnection the structure is supported by rollers and ball bearings, necessary for the axial movement for installation and for the rotation of the coil during measurement. Two such shafts are simultaneously driven by a twin-rotating unit, thus measuring both apertures of a dipole at the same time. This arrangement allows very short measurement times (typically 10 s) and is essential to perform cold magnetic ...

  5. Assessment of the tests results of the two CERN-INFN 10 m long superconducting dipole prototypes for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bona, M.; Perin, R.; Acerbi, E.; Rossi, L.

    1996-01-01

    In the first phase of the R and D program for LHC dipoles, seven 10-m-long, 50-mm-aperture prototypes have been manufactured by European Industries. The first two prototypes, fabricated under a CERN-INFN Collaboration, were successfully tested in 1994. This paper provides a first assessment of the main test results of these two magnets, in particular for what concerns kinematics and evolution of the stress distribution in the magnet during cooldown, energization and warmup. The influence of some adopted technological solutions is also discussed. Based on test results, some design corrections are proposed for adoption in the design of the future 15-m-long LHC dipole prototype

  6. Present State of the Single and Twin Aperture Short Dipole Model Program for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, N I; Kurtyka, T; Leroy, D; Oberli, L R; Perini, D; Russenschuck, Stephan; Siegel, N; Siemko, A; Tommasini, D; Vanenkov, I; Walckiers, L; Weterings, W

    1998-01-01

    The LHC model program for main dipoles is based on the design, fabrication and testing at CERN of a number of single and twin aperture 1m long magnets. So far, a number of single aperture models, each with specific characteristics, were tested at 2 K at a rate of about one per month. These magnets are the main tool used to check coil performance as a function of design and assembly options in view of optimizing and finalizing choices of components and procedures. Initial quenching field levels of 8.8 T were obtained and the short sample limit of the cable at 1.9 K was reached corresponding to a central bore field of 10 T. A few twin aperture dipole models were also built and tested, using the same structural components as for the long magnets which are now being built in industry. The paper discusses the main characteristics of the models built so far, the instrumentation developed to date and the experience obtained. Finally it describes the plans aimed at continuing a vigorous program to provide input to th...

  7. A Mole for Warm Magnetic and Optical Measurements of LHC Dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L; Deferne, G; Glöckner, C; Jansen, H; Köster, A; Legrand, P; Rijllart, A; Sievers, P

    2000-01-01

    A new rotating coil probe (a mole) has been developed for the simultaneous measurement of the magnetic field and magnetic axis of warm superconducting LHC dipoles and associated corrector windings. The mole houses a radial rotating coil and travels inside the magnet aperture by means of an externally driven two-way traction belt. The coil is rotated by an on-board piezo motor, being tested in view of future devices for cold measurements as the only type of motor compatible with strong magnetic fields. A virtual light spot is generated in the coil center by a LED source. The position of this light spot is measured from the outside by a system including a telescope, a CCD camera and a DSP. Jigs on reference granite tables are used to transfer the optical measurements to the magnet fiducials. We describe here the main characteristics and performance of the mole

  8. Data Analysis of Transient Energy Releases in the LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Calvi, M; Bottura, L; Di Castro, M; Masi, A; Siemko, A

    2007-01-01

    Premature training quenches are caused by transient energy released within the LHC dipole magnet coils while it is energized. Voltage signals recorded across the magnet coils and on the so-called quench antenna carry information about these disturbances. The transitory events correlated to transient energy released are extracted making use of continuous wavelet transform. Several analyses are performed to understand their relevance to the so called training phenomenon. The statistical distribution of the signals amplitude, the number of events occurring at a given current level, the average frequency content of the events are the main parameters on which the analysis have been focalized. Comparisons among different regions of the magnet, among different quenches in the same magnet and among magnets made by different builders are reported. Conclusions about the efficiency of the raw data treatment and the relevance of the parameters developed with respect to the magnet global behavior are finally given.

  9. Performance Evaluation and Quality Assurance Management during the Series Power Tests of LHC Main Lattice Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Siemko, A

    2008-01-01

    Within the LHC magnet program a series production of superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles has recently been completed in industry and all magnets were cold tested at CERN. The main features of these magnets are: two-in-one structure, 56 mm aperture, two layer coils wound from 15.1 mm wide Nb-Ti cables, and all-polyimide insulation. This paper reviews the process of the power test quality assurance and performance evaluation, which was applied during the LHC magnet series tests. The main test results of magnets tested in both supercritical and superfluid helium, including the quench training, the conductor performance, the magnet protection efficiency and the electrical integrity are presented and discussed in terms of the design parameters and the requirements of the LHC project.

  10. Long term estimates for sorting strategies of the LHC dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Todesco, Ezio

    1998-01-01

    Sorting strategies are investigated in view of improving the dynamic aperture of the CERN-LHC. Local and quasi-local compensation of the random field shape imperfections are discussed and applied to simplified model of the LHC lattice. The most promising strategies are further investigated on a realistic LHC model with particular emphasis on the analysis of the robustness of the dynamic aperture improvements including long term effects. First results on the application of the recently developed extrapolation law for the prediction of the dynamic aperture to the sorting problem are presented.

  11. Control of the Dipole Cold Mass Geometry at CERN to Optimize LHC Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Wildner, E; La China, M; Tommasini, D

    2006-01-01

    The detailed shape of the 15 m long superconducting LHC dipole cold mass is of high importance as it determines three key parameters: the beam aperture, nominally of the order of 10 beam standard deviations; the connectivity of the beam- and technical lines between magnets; the transverse position of non-linear correctors mounted on the dipole ends. An offset of the latter produces unwanted beam dynamics perturbations. The tolerances are in the order of mm over the length of the magnet. The natural flexibility of the dipole and its mechanical structure allow deformations during handling and transportation which exceed the tolerances. This paper presents the observed deformations of the geometry during handling and various operations at CERN, deformations which are interpreted thanks to a simple mechanical model. These observations have led to a strategy of dipole geometry control at CERN, based on adjustment of the position of its central support (the dipole is supported at three positions, horizontally and v...

  12. ELECTRO-THERMAL AND MECHANICAL VALIDATION EXPERIMENT ON THE LHC MAIN BUSBAR SPLICE CONSOLIDATION

    CERN Document Server

    Willering, GP; Bourcey, N; Bottura, L; Charrondiere, M; Cerqueira Bastos, M; Deferne, G; Dib, G; Giloux, Chr; Grand-Clement, L; Heck, S; Hudson, G; Kudryavtsev, D; Perret, P; Pozzobon, M; Prin, H; Scheuerlein, Chr; Rijllart, A; Triquet, S; Verweij, AP

    2012-01-01

    To eliminate the risk of thermal runaways in LHC interconnections a consolidation by placing shunts on the main bus bar interconnections is proposed by the Task Force Splices Consolidation. To validate the design two special SSS magnet spares are placed on a test bench in SM-18 to measure the interconnection in between with conditions as close as possible to the LHC conditions. Two dipole interconnections are instrumented and prepared with worst-case-conditions to study the thermo-electric stability limits. Two quadrupole interconnections are instrumented and prepared for studying the effect of current cycling on the mechanical stability of the consolidation design. All 4 shunted interconnections showed very stable behaviour, well beyond the LHC design current cycle.

  13. Dr Marta Bajko in front of the Gold pated "half-moon" connector of an LHC dipole Diode in SM18.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Photo 1 : Cold Diode for the LHC superconducting dipoles protection. Prepared for cryogenic powering test OFF line in SM18. - Photo 2 : A gold plated bus bar of an LHC dipole diode ready for cryogenic powering test in Sm18. - Photo 3 : The gold pated “ half-moon” connector of an LHC dipole diode. Ready for a cryogenic powering test in SM18.

  14. Three-dimensional computation of magnetic fields and Lorentz forces of an LHC dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daum, C.; Avest, D. ter

    1989-07-01

    Magnetic fields and Lorentz forces of an LHC dipole magnet are calculated using the method of image currents to represent the effect of the iron shield. The calculation is performed for coils of finite length using a parametrization for coil heads of constant perimeter. A comparison with calculations based on POISSON and TOSCA is made. (author). 5 refs.; 31 figs.; 6 tabs

  15. Development of an experimental 10 T Nb3Sn dipole magnet for the CERN LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Kate, H.H.J.; den Ouden, A.; ter Avest, D.; Wessel, S.; Dubbeldam, R.; van Emden, W.; Daum, C.; Bona, M.; Perin, R.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental 1-m long twill aperture dipole magnet developed using a high-current Nb3Sn conductor in order to attain a magnetic field well beyond 10 T at 4.2 K is described. The emphasis in this Nb3Sn project is on the highest possible field within the known Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

  16. High Precision Current Control for the LHC Main Power Converters

    CERN Document Server

    Thiesen, H; Hudson, G; King, Q; Montabonnet, V; Nisbet, D; Page, S

    2010-01-01

    Since restarting at the end of 2009, the LHC has reached a new energy record in March 2010 with the two 3.5 TeV beams. To achieve the performance required for the good functioning of the accelerator, the currents in the main circuits (Main Bends and Main Quadrupoles) must be controlled with a higher precision than ever previously requested for a particle accelerator at CERN: a few parts per million (ppm) of nominal current. This paper describes the different challenges that were overcome to achieve the required precision for the current control of the main circuits. Precision tests performed during the hardware commissioning of the LHC illustrate this paper.

  17. Trends in Cable Magnetization and Persistent Currents during the Production of the Main Dipoles of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bellesia, B; Granata, V; Le Naour, S; Oberli, L; Sanfilippo, S; Santoni, C; Scandale, Walter; Schwerg, N; Todesco, Ezio; Völlinger, C

    2005-01-01

    The production of more than 60% of superconducting cables for the main dipoles of the Large Hadron Collider has been completed. The results of the measurements of cable magnetization and the dependence on the manufacturers are presented. The strand magnetization produces field errors that have been measured in a large number of dipoles (approximately 100 to date) tested in cold conditions. We examine here the correlation between the available magnetic measurements and the large database of cable magnetization. The analysis is based on models documented elsewhere in the literature. Finally, a forecast of the persistent current effects to be expected in the LHC main dipoles is presented, and the more critical parameters for beam dynamics are singled out.

  18. Thermo-electric Analysis of the Interconnection of the LHC main Superconducting Bus Bars

    CERN Document Server

    Granieri, P P; Casali, M; Bottura, L; Siemko, A

    2013-01-01

    Spurred by the question of the maximum allowable energy for the operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), we have progressed in the understanding of the thermo-electric behavior of the 13 kA superconducting bus bars interconnecting its main magnets. A deep insight of the underlying mechanisms is required to ensure the protection of the accelerator against undesired effects of resistive transitions. This is especially important in case of defective interconnections which can jeopardize the operation of the whole LHC. In this paper we present a numerical model of the interconnections between the main dipole and quadrupole magnets, validated against experimental tests of an interconnection sample with a purposely built-in defect. We consider defective interconnections featuring a lack of bonding among the superconducting cables and the copper stabilizer components, such as those that could be present in the machine. We evaluate the critical defect length limiting the maximum allowable current for powering th...

  19. Quench Protection Studies of 11T Nb$_3$Sn Dipole Models for LHC Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlobin, Alexander [Fermilab; Chlachidze, Guram [Fermilab; Nobrega, Alfred [Fermilab; Novitski, Igor [Fermilab; Karppinen, Mikko [CERN

    2014-07-01

    CERN and FNAL are developing 11 T Nb3Sn dipole magnets for the LHC collimation system upgrade. Due to the large stored energy, protection of these magnets during a quench is a challenging problem. This paper reports the results of experimental studies of key quench protection parameters including longitudinal and radial quench propagation in the coil, coil heating due to a quench, and energy extraction and quench-back effect. The studies were performed using a 1 m long 11 T Nb3Sn dipole coil tested in a magnetic mirror configuration.

  20. Recuperation of ISR Dipole Magnet Yokes for Use as Shielding for the LHC Beam Dumps TDE

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, M

    1999-01-01

    The quantity of iron shielding required for two LHC dumps was estimated at about 1500 tons. Possible sources of slightly irradiated iron shielding were considered, in particular, the ISR dipole yokes, which were stocked in the I2. Of rectangular form and weighing 22 tons each, they were well suited to the LHC dump geometry. Furthermore, they were to all intents and purposes non-radioactive. The preferred solution was to cut off four lifting pads and three support plates using arc/air equipment, seal temporarily each end with shutters, fit two lifting "anchor" pins, and fill with concrete.

  1. Coil end design for the LHC dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the design of the coil ends for the Large Hadron Collider dipole magnets of the CERN European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Switzerland. This alternative to existing European designs was provided by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory by agreement between CERN and the United States. The superconducting cable paths are determined from both magnetic and mechanical considerations. The coil end parts used to shape and constrain the conductors in the coil ends are designed using the developable surface, grouped end approach. This method allows the analysis of strain energy within the conductor groups, and the optimization of mechanical factors during the design. Design intent and implementation are discussed. Inner and outer coil design challenges and end analysis are detailed

  2. Features of 10-M-long, 50-MM-Twin-aperture LHC dipole magnet prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devred, A.

    1998-03-01

    In 1991, the Laboratoire Europeen pour la Physique des particules (CERN) has launched the fabrication in industry of seven 10-m long, 50-mm-twin-aperture dipole magnet prototypes for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Three of these prototypes were built in Italy, in collaboration with the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN, by Ansaldo Energia Spa, two were built in Germany by Noell GmbH, one was built in France by a consortium constituted by Jeumont Industries and GEC Alsthom, and the last one was built by a consortium constituted by Elin in Austria and Holec in the Netherlands. In this paper, we review the design and specific features of the seven LHC dipole magnet prototypes. (author)

  3. Features of 10-M-long, 50-MM-Twin-aperture LHC dipole magnet prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devred, A. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee]|[CERN, Laboratoire Europeen pour la Physique des Particules, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1998-03-01

    In 1991, the Laboratoire Europeen pour la Physique des particules (CERN) has launched the fabrication in industry of seven 10-m long, 50-mm-twin-aperture dipole magnet prototypes for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Three of these prototypes were built in Italy, in collaboration with the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN, by Ansaldo Energia Spa, two were built in Germany by Noell GmbH, one was built in France by a consortium constituted by Jeumont Industries and GEC Alsthom, and the last one was built by a consortium constituted by Elin in Austria and Holec in the Netherlands. In this paper, we review the design and specific features of the seven LHC dipole magnet prototypes. (author) 21 refs.

  4. Exclusive photoproduction of quarkonium at the LHC energies within the color dipole approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducati, M. B. Gay; Griep, M. T.; Machado, M. V. T. [High Energy Physics Phenomenology Group, GFPAE IF-UFRGS, Caixa Postal 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-04-10

    The exclusive photoproduction of ψ(2S) meson was investigated and the coherent and the incoherent contributions were evaluated. The light-cone dipole formalism was considered in this analysis and predictions are done for PbPb collisions at the CERN-LHC energy of 2.76 TeV. A comparison is done to the recent ALICE Collaboration data for the ψ(1S) state photoproduction with good agreement.

  5. arXiv Electromagnetic dipole moments of charged baryons with bent crystals at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bagli, E.; Cavoto, G.; Guidi, V.; Henry, L.; Marangotto, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Mazzolari, A.; Merli, A.; Neri, N.; Ruiz Vidal, J.

    2017-12-05

    We propose a unique program of measurements of electric and magnetic dipole moments of charm, beauty and strange charged baryons at the LHC, based on the phenomenon of spin precession of channeled particles in bent crystals. Studies of crystal channeling and spin precession of positively- and negatively-charged particles are presented, along with feasibility studies and expected sensitivities for the proposed experiment using a layout based on the LHCb detector.

  6. Electromagnetic dipole moments of charged baryons with bent crystals at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A. [Universita di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Ferrara (Italy); Cavoto, G. [' ' Sapienza' ' Universita di Roma, Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma (Italy); Henry, L.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Ruiz Vidal, J. [IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Marangotto, D. [Universita di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano (Italy); Merli, A.; Neri, N. [Universita di Milano, Milan (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN, Sezione di Milano (Italy)

    2017-12-15

    We propose a unique program of measurements of electric and magnetic dipole moments of charm, beauty and strange charged baryons at the LHC, based on the phenomenon of spin precession of channeled particles in bent crystals. Studies of crystal channeling and spin precession of positively- and negatively-charged particles are presented, along with feasibility studies and expected sensitivities for the proposed experiment using a layout based on the LHCb detector. (orig.)

  7. Inductive Soldering of the Junctions of the Main Superconducting Busbars of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquemod, A; Schauf, F; Skoczen, Blazej; Tock, J P

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the next world-facility for the high energy physics community, presently under construction at CERN, Geneva. The LHC will bring into collisions intense beams of protons and ions. The main components of the LHC are the twin-aperture high-field superconducting cryomagnets that will be installed in the existing 26.7-km long tunnel. They are powered in series by superconducting Nb-Ti cables. Along the machine, about 60 000 joints between superconducting cables must be realised in-situ during the installation. Ten thousands of them, rated at 13 000 A, are involved in the powering scheme of the main dipoles and quadrupoles. To meet the requirements of the cryogenic budget, an electrical resistance at operating temperature (1.9 K) lower than 0.6 nW has to be achieved. The induction soldering technology was selected for this purpose. After a brief introduction to the LHC project, the constraints and requirements are listed. Then, the applied solution is detailed. The splices of the ...

  8. Using permanent magnets to boost the dipole field for the High-Energy LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The High-Energy LHC (HE-LHC) will be a new accelerator in the LHC tunnel based on novel dipole magnets, with a field up to 20 T, which are proposed to be realized by a hybrid-coil design, comprising blocks made from Nb- Ti, Nb$_{3}$Sn and HTS, respectively. Without the HTS the field would be only 15 T. In this note we propose and study the possibility of replacing the inner HTS layer by (weaker) permanent magnets that might contribute a field of 1-2 T, so that the final field would reach 16-17 T. Advantages would be the lower price of permanent magnets compared with HTS magnets and their availability in principle.

  9. LHC Superconducting Dipole Production Follow-up Results of Audit on QA Aspects in Industry

    CERN Document Server

    Modena, M; Cornelis, M; Fessia, P; Liénard, P; Miles, J; de Rijk, G; Savary, F; Sgobba, Stefano; Tommasini, D; Vlogaert, J; Völlinger, C; Wildner, E

    2006-01-01

    The manufacturing of the 1232 Superconducting Main Dipoles for LHC is under way at three European Contractors: Alstom-Jeumont (Consortium), Ansaldo Superconduttori Genova and Babcock Noell Nuclear. The manufacturing is proceeding in a very satisfactory way and in March 2005 the mid production was achieved. To intercept eventually â€ワweak points” of the production process still present and in order to make a check of the Quality Assurance and Control in place for the series production, an Audit action was launched by CERN during summer-fall 2004. Aspects like: completion of Production and Quality Assurance documentation, structure of QC Teams, traceability, calibration and maintenance for tooling, incoming components inspections, were checked during a total of seven visits at the five different production sites. The results of the Audit in terms of analysis of â€ワsystematic” and â€ワrandom” problems encountered as well as corrective actions requested are presented.

  10. Current distribution inside Rutherford-type superconducting cables and impact on performance of LHC dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiner, T

    2002-01-01

    The windings of high--field superconducting accelerator magnets are usually made of Rutherford--type cables. The magnetic field distribution along the axis of such magnets exhibits a periodic modulation with a wavelength equal to the twist pitch length of the cable used in the winding. Such a Periodic Field Pattern (PFP) has already been observed in number of superconducting accelerator magnets. Additional unbalanced currents in individual strands of the cable appear to be causing this effect. The present thesis describes the investigation of the PFPs performed with a Hall probes array inserted inside the aperture of the LHC superconducting dipoles, both in the small--scale model magnets with a length of one meter and in full--scale prototypes and pre--series magnets with fifteen meters of length. The amplitude and the time dependence of this periodic field oscillation have been studied as a function of the magnet current history. One of the main parameters influencing the properties of the PFP is the cross--...

  11. Displacement measurements in the cryogenically cooled dipoles of the new CERN-LHC particle accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Inaudi, D; Scandale, Walter; Pérez, J G; Billan, J; Redaelli, S

    2001-01-01

    The LHC will use the most advanced superconducting magnet and accelerator technologies ever employed. One of the main challenges in this new machine resides in the design and production of the superconducting dipoles used to steer the particles around the 27 km underground tunnel. These so-called cryodipoles are composed of an external vacuum tube and an insert, appropriately named the cold mass, that contains the particle tubes, the superconducting coil and will be cooled using superfluid helium to 1.9 K. The particle beam must be placed inside the magnetic field with a submillimeter accuracy; this requires in turn that the relative displacements between the vacuum tube and the cold-mass must be monitored with accuracy. Due to the extreme condition environmental conditions (the displacement measurement must be made in vacuum and between two points with a temperature difference of more than 200 degrees C) no adequate existing monitoring system was found for this application. It was therefore decided to develo...

  12. Fabrication and Test of a 1 m Long Single-Aperture 11 T Nb$_3$Sn Dipole for LHC Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab; Andreev, N. [Fermilab; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Barzi, E. [Fermilab; Bossert, R. [Fermilab; Chlachidze, G. [Fermilab; DiMarco, J. [Fermilab; Nobrega, F. [Fermilab; Novitski, I. [Fermilab; Turrioni, D. [Fermilab; Velev, G. [Fermilab; Auchmann, B. [CERN; Karppinen, M. [CERN; Rossi, L. [CERN; Smekens, D. [CERN

    2013-06-01

    FNAL and CERN are carrying out a joint R&D program with the goal of building a 5.5-m long twin-aperture Nb$_3$Sn dipole prototype suitable for installation in the LHC. An important part of the program is the development and test of a series of short single-aperture demonstration dipoles with a nominal field of 11 T at the LHC nominal current of 11.85 kA and 20% margin. This paper describes design features and test results of a 1 m long single-aperture Nb3Sn demonstrator dipole.

  13. Geometrical position of the Large Hadron Collider main dipole inside the cryostat

    CERN Document Server

    La China, M; Gubello, G; Hauviller, Claude; Scandale, Walter; Todesco, Ezio

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting dipole of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a cylindrical structure made of a shrinking cylinder containing iron laminations and collared coils. This 15 m long structure, weighing about 28 t, is horizontally bent by 5 mrad. Its geometrical shape should be preserved, from the assembly phase to the operational condition at cryogenic temperature. When inserted in its cryostat, the dipole cold mass is supported by three posts also providing the thermal insulation. Sliding interfaces should minimize the interference between the dipole and the cryostat during cooling down and warming up. Indeed, a possible non-linear response of the sliding interface can detrimentally affect the final dipole shape. This paper presents the results of dedicated tests investigating interferences and of specific simulations with a 3D finite element model (FEM) describing the mechanical behaviour of the dipole inside the cryostat. Comparison between measurements and FEM simulations is also discussed.

  14. On the search for the electric dipole moment of strange and charm baryons at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botella, F.J.; Garcia Martin, L.M.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ruiz Vidal, J. [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Valencia (Spain); Marangotto, D.; Merli, A.; Neri, N. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Milano Univ., Milan (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    Permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) of fundamental particles provide powerful probes for physics beyond the Standard Model. We propose to search for the EDM of strange and charm baryons at LHC, extending the ongoing experimental program on the neutron, muon, atoms, molecules and light nuclei. The EDM of strange Λ baryons, selected from weak decays of charm baryons produced in pp collisions at LHC, can be determined by studying the spin precession in the magnetic field of the detector tracking system. A test of CPT symmetry can be performed by measuring the magnetic dipole moment of Λ and anti Λ baryons. For short-lived Λ{sup +}{sub c} and Ξ{sup +}{sub c} baryons, to be produced in a fixed-target experiment using the 7 TeV LHC beam and channeled in a bent crystal, the spin precession is induced by the intense electromagnetic field between crystal atomic planes. The experimental layout based on the LHCb detector and the expected sensitivities in the coming years are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Compensation of the magnetization current induced sextupole error at LHC injection field by short lumped permanent sextupole magnets, incorporated into the end configuration of superconducting dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Asner, A

    1985-01-01

    Compensation of the magnetization current induced sextupole error at LHC injection field by short lumped permanent sextupole magnets, incorporated into the end configuration of superconducting dipoles

  16. Studies of E-Cloud Build up for the FNAL Main Injector and for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    We present a summary of recent simulation studies of the electron-cloud (EC) build-up for the FNAL MI and for the LHC. In the first case we pay particular attention to the dependence on bunch intensity N b at injection energy assuming the nominal bunch spacing t b = 19 ns, and we focus on the dipole magnets and field-free regions. The saturated value of the average EC density shows a clear threshold in N b beyond which the beam will be approximately neutralized on average. For the case of the LHC we limit our discussion to arc dipoles at collision energy, and bunch spacings t b = 25 ns or t b = 75 ns. The main variables exercised in this study are N b and the peak value of the secondary emission yield (SEY) (delta) max . For t b = 25 ns we conclude that the EC power deposition is comfortably below the available cooling capacity of the cryogenic system if (delta) max is below ∼ 1.2 at nominal N b . For t b = 75 ns, the EC power deposition is insignificant. As a byproduct of this exercise, we reach a detailed understanding of the significant role played by the backscattered secondary electrons. This article summarizes the results, an slightly extends the discussions, presented in Refs. 1 and 2

  17. Moles, Laser, Mirrors and the Measurement of LHC Dipole Cold Masses

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Marta Bajko measuring the geometry of a dipole magnet with the 3-D laser measuring machine. Over in buildings 181 and SM 18 the LHC dipole magnets await final measurements to make sure they are of exactly the right geometry (shape). And since the dipole cold masses are not straight (they are slightly bent in the horizontal plane), getting them to meet their very tight assembly tolerances of tenth of millimetre is not an easy task. 'We are aiming for one order of magnitude better than that which we actually need for the accuracy of the measurements, and old school rulers of any sort cannot handle these requirements,' says Marta Bajko, one of the project's engineers, 'for our work we need to rely on optical measuring technology.' And rely on optical measuring is exactly what they have done. The dipole measurements are being taken with a gadget called LTD 500 (Laser Tracker and Absolute Distance-Meter), created by Leica Geosystems, a Swiss Company that designs and distributes high precision measurement technol...

  18. Further Development of the Sextupole Dipole Corrector (MSCB) Magnet for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ang, Z; Bajko, M; Bottura, L; Coxill, D; Giloux, C; Ijspeert, Albert; Karppinen, M; Landgrebe, D; Walckiers, L

    2000-01-01

    Combined sextupole-dipole corrector magnets (MSCB) will be mounted in each half cell of the new Large Hadron Collider (LHC) being built at CERN. The dipole part, used for particle orbit corrections, will be powered individually and is designed for low current, originally 30 A but now 55 A. The sextupole part, used for chromaticity corrections, is connected via cold busbars in families of 12 or 13 magnets and is powered with 550 A. Several versions of this corrector magnet were tested as model magnets in order to develop the final design for the series. In the first design the coils are nested, with the dipole coil wound around the sextupole coil to obtain as short a magnet as possible, accepting the slight cross-talk between the coils due to persistent currents, and increased saturation effects. The design has evolved and an alternative design, in which the dipole and sextupole coils are separated, is now favored. Tests at 4.5 K and at 1.9 K were conducted to determine the training behavior, the field qualit...

  19. Completion of the Series Fabrication of the Main Superconducting Quadrupole Magnets of LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tortschanoff, Theodor; Papaphilippou, Y; Rossi, L; Schirm, K M; Burgmer, R; Klein, H U; Krischel, D; Schellong, B; Schmidt, P; Durante, M; Payn, A; Rifflet, J M; Simon, F

    2007-01-01

    By end of November 2006, the last main superconducting quadrupole cold mass needed for the installation was delivered by ACCEL Instruments to CERN. In total, 360 cold masses for the arc regions of the machine and 32 special units dedicated to the dispersion suppressor regions are installed in the LHC ring. The latter ones contain the same main magnet but different types of correctors and are of increased length with respect to the regular arc ones. The end of the fabrication of these magnets coincided with the end of the main dipole deliveries allowing a parallel assembly into their cryostats and installation into the LHC tunnel. The positioning into the tunnel was optimized using the warm field measurements performed in the factory. On the other hand, the correct slot assignment of the quadrupoles was complicated due to the multitude of variants and to the fact that a number of units needed to be replaced by spares which were customized for other slots. The paper gives some final data about the successful fa...

  20. Thermo-electric analysis of the interconnection of the LHC main superconducting bus bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granieri, P. P.; Breschi, M.; Casali, M.; Bottura, L.; Siemko, A.

    2013-01-01

    Spurred by the question of the maximum allowable energy for the operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), we have progressed in the understanding of the thermo-electric behavior of the 13 kA superconducting bus bars interconnecting its main magnets. A deep insight of the underlying mechanisms is required to ensure the protection of the accelerator against undesired effects of resistive transitions. This is especially important in case of defective interconnections which can jeopardize the operation of the whole LHC. In this paper we present a numerical model of the interconnections between the main dipole and quadrupole magnets, validated against experimental tests of an interconnection sample with a purposely built-in defect. We consider defective interconnections featuring a lack of bonding among the superconducting cables and the copper stabilizer components, such as those that could be present in the machine. We evaluate the critical defect length limiting the maximum allowable current for powering the magnets. We determine the dependence of the critical defect length on different parameters as the heat transfer towards the cooling helium bath, the quality of manufacturing, the operating conditions and the protection system parameters, and discuss the relevant mechanisms.

  1. Performance of the cold powered diodes and diode leads in the main magnets of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Willering, G P; Bajko, M; Bednarek, M; Bottura, L; Charifoulline, Z; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Dib, G; D'Angelo, G; Gharib, A; Grand-Clement, L; Izquierdo Bermudez, S; Prin, H; Roger, V; Rowan, S; Savary, F; Tock, J-Ph; Verweij, A

    2015-01-01

    During quench tests in 2011 variations in resistance of an order of magnitude were found in the diode by-pass circuit of the main LHC magnets. An investigation campaign was started to understand the source, the occurrence and the impact of the high resistances. Many tests were performed offline in the SM18 test facility with a focus on the contact resistance of the diode to heat sink contact and the diode wafer temperature. In 2014 the performance of the diodes and diode leads of the main dipole bypass systems in the LHC was assessed during a high current qualification test. In the test a current cycle similar to a magnet circuit discharge from 11 kA with a time constant of 100 s was performed. Resistances of up to 600 μΩ have been found in the diode leads at intermediate current, but in general the high resistances decrease at higher current levels and no sign of overheating of diodes has been seen and the bypass circuit passed the test. In this report the performance of the diodes and in particular the co...

  2. Design and test of the benches for the magnetic measurement of the LHC dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billan, J.; Buckley, J.; Saban, R.; Sievers, P.; Walckiers, L.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic measurement of more than 1,300 LHC dipoles comprises the content of higher harmonic field components, field direction and field integrals. The measurements will be carried out along a warm bore installed inside the magnet cold bore, thus allowing the use of rotating coils at room temperature. This coil, together with Hall and NMR detectors is mounted at one end of a 12.5 m long shaft which is specially designed for very high rotational stiffness and which is controlled from its far end by a motor, an angular encoder and a level meter, all standard components placed outside the magnetic field without space restrictions. Particular emphasis has been put on the user-friendliness of the bench and its automated, computer-controlled operation requiring a minimum of staff, an important issue during production measurements of large series of magnets. The bench and its performed and precision achieved during its commissioning are described

  3. Beam-induced quench test of LHC main quadrupole

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Holzer, E B; Kurfuerst, C; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Steckert, J; Verweij, A; Zamantzas, C

    2011-01-01

    Unexpected beam loss might lead to a transition of the accelerator superconducting magnet to a normal conducting state. The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system is designed to abort the beam before the energy deposited in the magnet coils reach a quench-provoking level. In order to verify the threshold settings generated by simulation, a series of beam-induced quench tests at various beam energies has been performed. The beam losses are generated by means of an orbital bump peaked in one of main quadrupole magnets (MQ). The analysis includes not only BLM data but also the quench protection system (QPS) and cryogenics data. The measurements are compared to Geant4 simulations of energy deposition inside the coils and corresponding BLM signal outside the cryostat.

  4. LHC dipoles flood into CERN : the dipole nr 154 crowns the efforts of the LHC teams for increasing the fabrication rate of the magnets.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    On 3 December the "tableau" on the 4th floor in building 30 indicated 1078 dipoles to completion - or in other words, 154 dipoles had by this day been delivered to CERN, enough to complete the first octant of the machine. CERN has also now received enough superconducting cable - the "heart" of the magnets - for 600 dipoles, nearly half the total number of 1232.

  5. Performance review and reengineering of the protection diodes of the LHC main superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Savary, F; Bednarek, M J; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; D'Angelo, G; Dib, G; Giloux, C; Grand-Clement, L; Izquierdo Bermudez, S; Moron-Ballester, R; Prin, H; Roger, V; Verweij, A; Willering, G

    2014-01-01

    The LHC main superconducting circuits are composed of up to 154 series-connected dipole magnets and 51 series-connected quadrupole magnets. These magnets operate at 1.9 K in superfluid helium at a nominal current of 11.85 kA. Cold diodes are connected in parallel to each magnet in order to bypass the current in case of a quench in the magnet while ramping down the current in the entire circuit. Both the diodes and the diode leads should therefore be capable of conducting this exponentially decaying current with time constants of up to 100 s. The diode stacks consist of the diodes and their heat sinks, and are essential elements of the protection system from which extremely high reliability is expected. The electrical resistance of 24 diode leads was measured in the LHC machine during operation. Unexpectedly high resistances of the order of 40 μΩ were measured at a few locations, which triggered a comprehensive review of the diode behaviour and of the associated current leads and bolted contacts. In this pap...

  6. Quench protection studies of 11T 2-in-1 Nb$_{3}$Sn dipole models for LHC upgrades

    OpenAIRE

    Zlobin, AV; Chlachidze, G; Nobrega, F; Novitski, I; Karppinen, M

    2014-01-01

    CERN and FNAL are developing 11 T Nb3Sn dipole magnets for the LHC collimation system upgrade. Due to the large stored energy, protection of these magnets during a quench is a challenging problem. This paper reports the results of experimental studies of key quench protection parameters including longitudinal and radial quench propagation in the coil, coil heating due to a quench, and energy extraction and quench-back effect. The studies were performed using a 1 m long 11 T Nb3Sn dipole coil ...

  7. Quench protection studies of 11T 2-in-1 Nb$_{3}$Sn dipole models for LHC upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Zlobin, AV; Nobrega, F; Novitski, I; Karppinen, M

    2014-01-01

    CERN and FNAL are developing 11 T Nb$_{3}$Sn dipole magnets for the LHC collimation system upgrade. Due to the large stored energy, protection of these magnets during a quench is a challenging problem. This paper reports the results of experimental studies of key quench protection parameters including longitudinal and radial quench propagation in the coil, coil heating due to a quench, and energy extraction and quench-back effect. The studies were performed using a 1 m long 11 T Nb$_{3}$Sn dipole coil tested in a magnetic mirror configuration.

  8. Study of top quark dipole interactions in t t \\xAF production associated with two heavy gauge bosons at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khatibi, Sara; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the prospects of measuring the strong and weak dipole moments of the top quark at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Measurements of these couplings provide an excellent opportunity to probe new physics interactions as they have quite small magnitudes in the standard model. Our analyses are performed using the production cross sections of t t ¯W W and t t ¯Z Z processes in the same sign dilepton and four-lepton final states, respectively. The sensitivities to strong and weak top quark dipole interactions at the 95% confidence level for various integrated luminosity scenarios are derived and compared with other studies. To estimate the constraints, the main source of backgrounds and a realistic simulation of the detector response are considered.

  9. Design of a Large Single-Aperture Dipole Magnet for HL-LHC Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Qingjin, Xu; Iio, Masami; Ogitsu, Toru; Sasaki, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Akira; Todesco, Ezio

    2013-01-01

    An upgrade of the low-beta insertion system for the ATLAS and Compact Muon Solenoid experiments is proposed in the high luminosity Large Hadron Collider upgrade project. It includes final beam focusing quadrupoles, beam separation and recombination dipoles, and larger aperture matching section quadrupoles. KEK is in charge of the conceptual design of the large aperture separation dipole D1. The latest design parameters are a main field of ~ 5 T at 1.9 K with Nb-Ti superconducting technology, a coil aperture of 160 mm, and a cos-theta one-layer coil with Large Hadron Collider dipole cable. Because the new D1 is expected to be operated in a very high radiation environment, radiation resistance and a cooling scheme are being carefully considered. The collaring-yoke structure is adopted to provide the mechanical support for the single-layer Nb-Ti coil. We summarize the design study of this magnet, including i) the very large iron saturation effect on field quality due to the large aperture and limited size of the...

  10. Evaluation of the transfer of heat from the coil of the LHC dipole magnet to Helium II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, D.; Sevred, A.; Fleiter, J.; Baudouy, B.; Devred, A.

    2007-01-01

    During operation of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, heat will be generated inside the coils of its superconducting magnets as a consequence of ramping of magnetic field, and of the interaction of lost beam particles with the magnet mass. Heat has to be transferred from the conductor into the He II coolant and removed from the magnet environment. During the LHC R and D stage, this transfer has been extensively studied on simulated coil segments at CEA/Saclay, and by analyzing dynamic behavior of short model magnets at CERN. Owing to the importance of efficient cooling for the design of future superconducting accelerator magnets, study of heat transfer has been restored at CERN and in frame of the Next European Dipole Collaboration. The article features two recently performed works: 1) Attempt to analyse archived high ramp rate quench data of 1-m-long LHC model dipole magnets of the 2. generation. 2) Development of a method for direct measurement of heat transfer on segments of production LHC dipole magnet coils. (authors)

  11. Characterization of Nb$_{3}$Sn Rutherford cables for the LHC 11-T Dipole Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Wuis, A J; Ballarino, A; Oberli, L; Ten Kate, H H J

    2013-01-01

    The so-called CERN-LHC DS upgrade relies on the use of 11 T dipole magnets. For these magnets 40 strands Nb$_{3}$Sn type Rutherford cables based on 0.7 mm wires are being developed. Recently four samples of the cables were characterized in the CERN FRESCA cable test station. The critical current and the premature quench current due to magneto-thermal instability were measured at 1.9 K and 4.3 K in a background magnetic field between 0 and 9.6 T (the peak magnetic field on the conductor, including the self-field of the cable, ranges from ~ 2 T to ~ 12 T). Two cable samples were based on Powder-In-Tube (PIT) wire and two on Restacked-Rod-Process (RRP) wire. The PIT samples were identical and without a core in the cable while one of the RRP samples features a 25 μm thick stainless steel core. All cables samples tested have a width and a thickness of about 14.7 mm and 1.25 mm, respectively. Cables and sample holders were manufactured at CERN. In this paper we report and discuss the cable test results and compare...

  12. Statistical analysis of LHC main interconnection splices room temperature resistance (R-8) results

    CERN Document Server

    Heck, S

    2012-01-01

    During the 2008/2009 shutdown the so-called R-8/R-16 room temperature resistance test has been introduced for the quality control of the LHC main interconnection splices. It has been found that at present two groups of LHC main interconnection splices can be distinguished, so-called “old” splices produced during LHC installation, and so-called “new” splices produced during 2009. 2009 production splices are considered as the state-of-the art, which is reflected by a much smaller R-8 distribution as compared to that of splices produced during first LHC installation.

  13. Test results on the long models and full scale prototypes of the second generation LHC arc dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Billan, J; Bottura, L; Leroy, D; Pagano, O; Perin, R; Perini, D; Savary, F; Siemko, A; Sievers, P; Spigo, G; Vlogaert, J; Walckiers, L; Wyss, C; Rossi, L

    1999-01-01

    With the test of the first full scale prototype in June-July 1998, the R&D on the long superconducting dipoles based on the LHC design of 1993-95 has come to an end. This second generation of long magnets has a 56 mm coil aperture, is wound with 15 mm wide cable arranged in a 5 coil block layout. The series includes four 10 m long model dipoles, whose coils have been wound and collared in industry and the cold mass assembled and cryostated at CERN, as well as one 15 m long dipole prototype, manufactured totally in industry in the framework of a CERN-INFN collaboration for the LHC. After a brief description of particular features of the design and of the manufacturing, test results are reported and compared with the expectations. One magnet reached the record field for long model dipoles of 9.8 T but results have not been well reproducible from magnet to magnet. Guidelines for modifications that will appear in the next generation of long magnets, based on a six block coil design, are indicated in the concl...

  14. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of LHC dipole thermal shield bottom tray assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of 1 250 LHC dipole thermal shield bottom tray assemblies. Following a market survey carried out among 95 firms in sixteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2650/LHC/LHC) was sent on 8 November 1999 to eight firms in six Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received four tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the firm EISENWERKE KAISERSLAUTERN (DE), the lowest bidder, for the supply of 1 250 LHC dipole thermal shield bottom tray assemblies for a total amount of 6 150 808 euros (9 858 518 Swiss francs), subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2001, with an option for the supply of up to 150 additional thermal shield bottom tray assemblies, for a total amount of 696 979 euros (1 117 118 Swiss francs), subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2001, bringing the total amount to a maximum of 6 847 787 euros (10 975 636 Swiss francs), subject to...

  15. Magnet production for the LHC is complete!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On 27 November, the LHC teams celebrated the end of production of the machine's main magnets. Some 1232 main dipole and 392 main quadrupole magnets have been manufactured in an unprecedented collaboration effort between CERN and European industry.

  16. Main Achievements 2003-2004 - LHC scientific programme - LCG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    To prepare an infrastructure for LHC computing in Cracow the IFJ ATLAS group has started the grid initiative in collaboration with the Academic Computing Centre Cyfronet (AGH), which developed into the CrossGrid European project, Cracow becoming its coordinator. As the result, and thanks to the support of the Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN), a cluster of 80 processors has been assembled together with a 3 TB disk matrix. In 2003 a part of this cluster has been connected to the LHC Computing Grid (LCG), being amongst the first of 14 world institutions. Now the Cracow group participates in massive and distributed preparation of Monte Carlo samples for the experiment, called the ATLAS Data Challenge (DC). The Cracow resources were used in ATLAS DC 1 (2003) for production of 50000 and 20000 simulated and pile-up events respectively, which represented 1% of total ATLAS production. Originally, the process was human driven, however now, using LCG-2 software, it is controlled by the ATLAS ''virtual organization'' (VO), located at CERN. In 2004 another set of events was generated at the Cracow cluster, under the ATLAS DC2. Up to now about 1 % of the whole ATLAS production has been performed at Cracow, which is reflected in ATLAS reports and publications

  17. Shape Stability of the LHC Superconducting Dipole Mechanical Model and Experimental Investigations

    CERN Document Server

    La China, M; Scandale, Walter

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is the study of the geometry of the main superconducting dipole for the Large Hadron Collider from the manufacturing process throughout the pre-operative stages to predict the respect of the tight tolerance, imposed by the beam dynamic, in both nominal and chancy working conditions. Expected and unexpected situations have been approached through the development of dedicate models and tests with the purpose of evaluating their impact on magnet geometry. In our study we used structural models of different complexity for different purposes. For example we used analytical models in conjunction with the cold mass geometry database to simulate the overall effect of individual geometry corrections or to discriminate elastic from inelastic measured deformations. By means of finite element models, instead, we investigated the effect of mechanic loads as induced by road transport, or the effect of electro-magnetic forces arising in working conditions. As the assembly complexity prevents from deduci...

  18. submitter Training Behavior of the Main Dipoles in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Todesco, Ezio; Bajko, Marta; Bottura, Luca; Bruning, Oliver; De Rijk, Gijs; Fessia, Paolo; Hagen, Per; Naour, Sandrine Le; Modena, Michele; Perez, Juan Carlos; Rossi, Lucio; Schmidt, Rudiger; Siemko, Andrzej; Tock, Jean-Philippe; Tommasini, Davide; Verweij, Arjan; Willering, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, the 1232 Nb-Ti dipole magnets in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have been commissioned to 7.8 T operational field, with 172 quenches. More than 80% of these quenches occurred in the magnets of one of the three cold mass assemblers (3000 series), confirming what was already observed in 2008. In this paper, the recent analysis carried out on the quench performance of the Large Hadron Collider dipole magnets is reported, including the individual reception tests and the 2008 and 2015 commissioning campaigns, to better understand the above-mentioned anomaly and give an outlook for future operation and possible increase of the operational field. The lower part of the quench probability spectrum is compatible with Gaussian distributions; therefore, the training curve can be fit through error functions. An essential ingredient in this analysis is the estimate of the error to be associated with the training data due to sampling of rare events, allowing to test different hypothesis. Using this approach, an es...

  19. Removal of stored particle background via the electric dipole method in the KATRIN main spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilk, Daniel [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Collaboration: KATRIN-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The goal of the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is to determine the effective mass of the electron anti neutrino by measuring the electron energy spectrum of tritium beta decay near the endpoint. The goal is to reach a sensitivity on the neutrino mass of 200 meV for which a low background level of 10{sup -2} counts per second is mandatory. Electrons from single radioactive decays of radon and tritium in the KATRIN main spectrometer with energies in the keV range can be magnetically stored for hours. While cooling down via ionization of residual gas molecules, they produce hundreds of secondary electrons, which can reach the detector and contribute to the background signals. In order to suppress this background component, several methods are investigated to remove stored electrons, such as the application of an electric dipole field and the application of magnetic pulses. This talk introduces the mechanism of background production due to stored electrons and their removal by the electric dipole method in the main spectrometer. In context of the spectrometer- and detector-commissioning phase in summer 2015, measurement results of the application of the electric dipole method are presented.

  20. Production of Low-Carbon Magnetic Steel for the LHC Superconducting Dipole and Quadrupole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F; Harlet, P; Peiro, G; Russo, A; Taquet, A

    2006-01-01

    In 1996 CERN negotiated a contract with Cockerill Sambre – ARCELOR Group for the supply of 50 000 tonnes of low-carbon steel for the LHC main magnets: this was the first contract to be placed for the project, and one of the single largest. In 2005 – after nine years of work – the contract is being successfully completed. This paper describes the steel specifically developed, known as MAGNETIL™, its manufacturing and quality control process, organization of production, logistics and contract follow-up. Extensive statistics have been collected relating to physical, mechanical and technological parameters. Specific attention is dedicated to magnetic measurements (coercivity and permeability) performed at both room and cryogenic temperatures, the equipment used and statistical results. Reference is also made to the resulting precision of the fineblanked laminations used for the magnet yoke. The technology transfer from the particle accelerator domain to industry is ongoing, for example for ...

  1. The Fermilab Main Injector dipole and quadrupole cooling design and bus connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satti, J.A.

    1995-06-01

    The proposed system for connecting the low conductivity water (LCW) and the electrical power to the magnets is explained. This system requires minimum maintenance. Stainless steel headers supply LCW to local, secondary manifolds which regulate the flow to the dipole and to the copper bus which conduct both power and cooling water to the quadrupole. A combination of ceramic feedthroughs and thermoplastic hoses insulate the piping electrically from the copper bus system. The utilities for the Main Injector are grouped together at the outside wall of the tunnel leaving most of the enclosure space for servicing. Space above the headers is available for future accelerator expansion. The new dipoles have bolted electrical connections with flexible copper jumpers. Separate compression fittings are used for the water connections. Each dipole magnet has two water circuits in parallel designed to minimize thermal stresses and the number of insulators. Two electrical insulators are used in series because this design has been shown to minimize electrolyses problems and copper ion deposits inside the insulators. The design value of the temperature gradient of the LCW is 8 degrees C

  2. Status of the LHC machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faugeras, P.

    1997-01-01

    The report represents itself a set of diagrams, characterizing: the LHC main parameters for proton-proton collisions and lead ion collisions, parameters of SC dipole and quadrupole magnets and outlines of their designs, LHC cryogenic systems, injection complex and detectors [ru

  3. The Fermilab main injector dipole construction techniques and prototype magnet measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleadon, M.; Brown, B.; Chester, N.; Desavouret, E.; Garvey, J.; Glass, H.; Harding, D.; Harfoush, F.; Holmes, S.; Humbert, J.; Kerby, J.; Knauf, A.; Kobliska, G.; Lipski, A.; Martin, P.; Mazur, P.; Orris, D.; Ostiguy, J.; Peggs, S.; Pachnik, J.; Pewitt, E.; Satti, J.; Schmidt, E.; Sim, J.; Snowdon, S.; Walbridge, D.

    1991-09-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector Project will provide 120--150 GeV Proton and Antiproton Beams for Fermilab Fixed Target Physics and Colliding Beams Physics use. A dipole magnet has been designed and prototypes constructed for the principal bending magnets of this new accelerator. The design considerations and fabrication techniques are described. Measurement results on prototypes are reported, emphasizing the field uniformity achieved in both body field and end field at excitation levels from injection at 0.1 T to full field of 1.7 T. 6 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Methods for the evaluation of quench temperature profiles and their application for LHC superconducting short dipole magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, S.; Siemko, A.

    2000-08-01

    This paper presents a study of the thermal effects on quench performance for several large Hadron collider (LHC) single aperture short dipole models. The analysis is based on the temperature profile in a superconducting magnet evaluated after a quench. Peak temperatures and temperature gradients in the magnet coil are estimated for different thicknesses of insulation layer between the quench heaters and the coil and different powering and protection parameters. The results show clear correlation between the thermo-mechanical response of the magnet and quench performance. They also display that the optimisation of the position of quench heaters can reduce the decrease of training performance caused by the coexistence of a mechanical weak region and of a local temperature rise.

  5. The design and manufacture of the Fermilab Main Injector Dipole Magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.C.; Chester, N.S.; Harding, D.J.; Martin, P.S.

    1992-03-01

    Fermilab's new Main Injector Ring (MIR) will replace the currently operating Main Ring to provide 150 GeV Proton and Antiproton beams for Tevetron injection, and rapid cycling, high intensity, 120 GeV Proton beams for Antiproton production. To produce and maintain the required high beam quality, high intensity, and high repetition rate, conventional dipole magnets with laminated iron core and water cooled copper conductor were chosen as the bending magnet. A new magnet design having low inductance, large copper cross section, and field uniformity sufficient for high intensity injection and efficient slow resonant extraction, is required to obtain the needed geometric aperture, dynamic aperture, and operational reliability. The current Main Injector Ring lattice design requires the use of 344 of these magnets. 216 of these magnets are to be 6 m long, and 128 are to be 4 m long

  6. Field Quality Study of a 1-m-Long Single-Aperture 11-T Nb$_3$Sn Dipole Model for LHC Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chlachidze, G. [Fermilab; DiMarco, J. [Fermilab; Andreev, N. [Fermilab; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Auchmann, B. [CERN; Barzi, E. [Fermilab; Bossert, R. [Fermilab; Fiscarelli, L. [CERN; Karppinen, M. [CERN; Nobrega, F. [Fermilab; Novitski, I. [Fermilab; Rossi, L. [CERN; Smekens, D. [CERN; Turrioni, D. [Fermilab; Velev, G. V. [Fermilab; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab

    2014-01-01

    FNAL and CERN are carrying out a joint R&D program with the goal of building a 5.5-m-long twin-aperture 11-T Nb_3Sn dipole prototype that is suitable for installation in the LHC. An important part of the program is the development and test of a series of short single-aperture and twin-aperture dipole models with a nominal field of 11 T at the LHC operation current of 11.85 kA and 20% margin. This paper presents the results of magnetic measurements of a 1-m-long single-aperture Nb_3Sn dipole model fabricated and tested recently at FNAL, including geometrical field harmonics and effects of coil magnetization and iron yoke saturation.

  7. Azimuthal coil size and field quality in the main CERN Large Hadron Collider dipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ferracin

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Field quality in superconducting magnets strongly depends on the geometry of the coil. Fiberglass spacers (shims placed between the coil and the collars have been used to optimize magnetic and mechanical performances of superconducting magnets in large accelerators. A change in the shim thickness affects both the geometry of the coil and its state of compression (prestress under operational conditions. In this paper we develop a coupled magnetomechanical model of the main Large Hadron Collider dipole. This model allows us to evaluate the prestress dependence on the shim thickness and the map of deformations of the coil and the collars. Results of the model are compared to experimental measurements carried out in a dedicated experiment, where a magnet model has been reassembled 5 times with different shims. A good agreement is found between simulations and experimental data both on the mechanical behavior and on the field quality. We show that this approach allows us to improve this agreement with respect to models previously used in the literature. We finally evaluate the range of tunability that will be provided by shims during the production of the Large Hadron Collider main dipoles.

  8. Temperature Profiles During Quenches in LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets Protected by Quench Heaters

    OpenAIRE

    Maroussov, V; Sanfilippo, S; Siemko, A

    1999-01-01

    The efficiency of the magnet protection by quench heaters was studied using a novel method which derives the temperature profile in a superconducting magnet during a quench from measured voltage signals. In several Large Hadron Collider single aperture dipole models, temperature profiles and temperature gradients in the magnet coil have been evaluated in the case of protection by different sets of quench heaters and different powering and protection parameters. The influence of the insulation...

  9. Test Results Of A Single Aperture Dipole Model Magnet For LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Shintomi, T; Higashi, N; Kimura, N; Ogitsu, T; Tanaka, K; Terashima, A; Tsuchiya, K; Yamamoto, A; Orikasa, A; Makishima, K; Siegel, N; Leroy, D; Perin, R

    1999-01-01

    The 56 mm single aperture superconducting dipole model with a 5-block coil configuration was reassembled and tested to investigate the full support of electromagnetic forces using a high-manganese steel collar structure without $9 mechanical contribution from an iron yoke. The reassembled model, which has a gap between the high manganese steel collar and the horizontally split iron yoke, reached a central field of 9 tesla (93554330f short sample) at the first

  10. The Development of the Inner Triplet Dipole Corrector (MCBX) for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Karppinen, M; Hauge, N; Nielsen, B R

    1999-01-01

    A prototype of the MCBX correction dipole magnet is being built in industry. It features a horizontal dipole nested inside a vertical dipole The coils of the 0.6 m long single-bore magnet are wound with 7 or 9 rectangular superconducting wires pre-assembled as flat cables. As the end fields contribute for more than 50 % to the field integral an optimisation in 3D was required. The impregnated coils containing CNC-machined end spacers are pre-compressed with an aluminium shrinking cylinder. The yoke consists of scissor-laminations to back up the coil rigidity and to centre the coil assembly. These laminations move inward during the cooldown and the movement is blocked at a pre-defined temperature building-up a circumferential stress in the stainless steel outer shell. This paper describes the magnetic and mechanical design of this magnet. The expected performance from the calculations is presented. The assembly procedure is reviewed and the experience with the 250 mm long mechanical model is reported.

  11. Main improvements of LHC Cryogenics Operation during Run 2 (2015-2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delprat, L.; Bradu, B.; Brodzinski, K.; Ferlin, G.; Hafi, K.; Herblin, L.; Rogez, E.; Suraci, A.

    2017-12-01

    After the successful Run 1 (2010-2012), the LHC entered its first Long Shutdown period (LS1, 2013-2014). During LS1 the LHC cryogenic system went under a complete maintenance and consolidation program. The LHC resumed operation in 2015 with an increased beam energy from 4 TeV to 6.5 TeV. Prior to the new physics Run 2 (2015-2018), the LHC was progressively cooled down from ambient to the 1.9 K operation temperature. The LHC has resumed operation with beams in April 2015. Operational margins on the cryogenic capacity were reduced compared to Run 1, mainly due to the observed higher than expected electron-cloud heat load coming from increased beam energy and intensity. Maintaining and improving the cryogenic availability level required the implementation of a series of actions in order to deal with the observed heat loads. This paper describes the results from the process optimization and update of the control system, thus allowing the adjustment of the non-isothermal heat load at 4.5 - 20 K and the optimized dynamic behaviour of the cryogenic system versus the electron-cloud thermal load. Effects from the new regulation settings applied for operation on the electrical distribution feed-boxes and inner triplets will be discussed. The efficiency of the preventive and corrective maintenance, as well as the benefits and issues of the present cryogenic system configuration for Run 2 operational scenario will be described. Finally, the overall availability results and helium management of the LHC cryogenic system during the 2015-2016 operational period will be presented.

  12. Some LHC milestones...

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    October 1995 The LHC technical design report is published. This document details the operation and the architecture of the future accelerator. November 2000 The first of the 1232 main dipole magnets for the LHC are delivered. May 2005 The first interconnection between two magnets of the accelerator is made. To carry out the 1700 interconnections of the LHC, 123 000 operations are necessary. February 2006 The new CERN Control Centre, which combines all the control rooms for the accelerators, the cryogenics and the technical infrastructure, starts operation. The LHC will be controlled from here. October 2006 Construction of the largest refrigerator in the world is complete. The 27 km cryogenic distribution line inside the LHC tunnel will circulate helium in liquid and gas phases to provide cryogenic conditions for the superconducting magnets of the accelerator. November 2006 Magnet production for the LHC is complete. The last of t...

  13. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of austenitic steel strips for collars of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of 410 mm-wide austenitic steel strips for the collars of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets. Following a market survey carried out among 39 firms in twelve Member States and two firms in Japan, a call for tenders (IT-2618/LHC/LHC) was sent on 3 June 1999 to five firms in four Member States and two firms in Japan. The Council agreed to the Management?s proposal to invite Japanese industry to participate, where appropriate, in calls for tenders for supplies for the LHC Project (CERN/CC/2110). By the closing date, CERN had received six tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to approve the negotiation of a contract with the firm NIPPON STEEL CORPORATION (JP) for the supply of 11 000 tonnes of 410 mm-wide austenitic steel strips for the collars of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets for a total amount of 4 298 943 000 Japanese yen, subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2000, with an option for the supply of up to 10...

  14. Review of selected coil and collared-coil assembly data from 10-M-long, 50-MM-Twin-aperture LHC dipole magnet prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devred, A.

    1999-02-01

    In 1991, the Laboratoire Europeen pour la Physique des Particules (CERN) has launched the fabrication in industry of seven 10 m long, 50 mm twin aperture dipole magnet prototypes for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The design and specific features of these magnets have been described elsewhere. In this paper, we review some of the coil and collared-coil assembly data and we analyze the influence of tooling imperfections on magnet assembly. (author)

  15. Compensation of the Persistent Current Multipoles in the LHC Dipoles by making the Coil Protection Sheet from Soft Magnetic Material

    CERN Document Server

    Völlinger, C

    2000-01-01

    This note presents a scheme for compensating the persistent current multipole errors of the LHC dipoles by making the coil protection sheets from soft magnetic material of 0.5 mm thickness. The material properties assumed in this study are those of iron sheets with a very low content of impurities (99.99% pure Fe). The non-linearities in the upramp cycle on the b3 multipole component can be reduced by the factor of four (while decreasing the b5 variation by the factor of two. Using sheets of slightly different thicknesses offers a tuning possibility for the series magnet coils and can compensate deviations arising from cables of different suppliers. The calculation method is based on a semi-analytical hysteresis model for hard superconductors and an M(B) - iteration using the method of coupled boundary elements - finite elements (BEM - FEM). It is now possible to compute persistent current multipole errors of geometries with arbitrarily shaped iron yokes and thin layers of soft magnetic material such as tunin...

  16. Proposal for the award of two contracts for the supply of fine-blanked austenitic steel collars for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    This document concerns the award of two contracts for the supply of 12 500 000 fine-blanked austenitic steel collars in three different shapes and of two different types for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets. Following a market survey carried out among 70 firms in fourteen Member States and one firm in Japan, a call for tenders (IT-2469/LHC/LHC) was sent on 3 June 1999 to eleven firms in five Member States and one firm in Japan. By the closing date, CERN had received five tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of two contracts with: - MALVESTITI (IT) for the supply of up to 7 812 500 fine-blanked austenitic steel collars, which represents 5/8 of the total quantity required for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets, for a total amount of up to 6 908 509 Swiss francs, subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2001, with an option for the supply of up to 4 687 500 additional fine-blanked austenitic steel collars, wh...

  17. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of low-carbon steel sheets for LHC resistive dipole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of 1 106 tonnes of low-carbon steel sheets for the MBW, MBXW and MCBW resistive dipole magnets for the LHC. Following a market survey (MS-2619/SL/LHC) carried out among 62 firms in sixteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2911/SL/LHC) was sent on 6 March 2001 to 11 firms in seven Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received one tender. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the firm COCKERILL SAMBRE (BE), the only bidder, for the supply of 1 106 tonnes of low-carbon steel sheets for the MBW, MBXW and MCBW resistive dipole magnets for a total amount of 984 803 euros (1 511 328 Swiss francs), not subject to revision until 1 January 2003, with an option for the supply of up to 15% additional steel sheets, for a total amount of 147 720 euros (226 699 Swiss francs), not subject to revision until 1 January 2003, bringing the total amount to a maximum of 1 132 523 euros (1 738 027 Swiss francs), not s...

  18. submitter Quench Protection Heater Study With the 2-m Model Magnet of Beam Separation Dipole for the HL-LHC Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Kento; Higashi, Norio; Iida, Masahisa; Ikemoto, Yukiko; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Ogitsu, Toru; Ohata, H; Okada, Naoki; Okada, Ryutaro; Sugano, Michinaka; Musso, Andrea; Todesco, Ezio

    2018-01-01

    The beam separation dipole magnet (D1), which is being operated in the large hadron collider (LHC), has to be replaced in accordance with upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC. The new D1 will be equipped with several circuits of heaters by which most of the stored energy is dissipated in the whole of the magnet during its quench, thereby avoiding localization of hot spots. Prior to construction of the production magnet, the 2-m mechanical short model is fabricated, and performance of this quench protection heater is evaluated through a series of the cold tests. As a result, we confirm that the maximum hot spot temperature obtained in the measurement reaches the practical limit of 300 K, and determine to design a new heater circuit. In this paper, we report the heater studies together with the prospect for future design of the quench protection heater.

  19. A System for Series Magnetic Measurements of the LHC Main Quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, N; Chiusano, F; Dunkel, O; Legrand, P; Schloss, S; Schnizer, P; Sievers, P

    2002-01-01

    More than 400 twin aperture lattice quadrupoles are needed for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is under construction at CERN. The main quadrupole is assembled with correction magnets in a common cryostat called the Short Straight Section (SSS). We plan to measure all SSS's in cold conditions with an unprecedented accuracy: integrated gradient of the field within 150 ppm, harmonics in a range of 1 to 5 ppm, magnetic axis of all elements within 0.1 mm and their field direction within 0.2 mrad. In this paper we describe the automatic measurement system that we have designed, built and calibrated. Based on the results obtained on the two first prototypes of the SSS's (SSS3 and SSS4) we show that this system meets all above requirements.

  20. Special Colloquium for the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School: Main Dilemmas in Particle Physics for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    A review of the status of the most crucial issues in particle physics at the start of the LHC is presented. The main questions are related to electroweak symmetry breaking and the mystery of new physics at the TeV scale, that is reasonably expected to be nearby and yet must be very peculiar because it was not seen at LEP and in flavour physics experiments. The main current ideas on models will be discussed and their implications for LHC searches, dark matter etc.

  1. Series fabrication of the main quadrupole cold masses for the LHC begins

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Three hundred and sixty main quadrupole (MQ) magnets will perform the principal beam focusing around the 27 km LHC ring. CERN and CEA-Saclay began collaborating on the development and prototyping of these magnets in 1989. This resulted in five highly successful quadrupole units - also known as short straight sections - one of which was integrated for testing in String 1, and two others of the final design in String 2. Once the tests had confirmed the validity of the design and realization, the fabrication of the 360 cold masses had to be transferred to industry.The German firm ACCEL Instruments was entrusted both with the construction of the quadrupole magnets themselves, and with their assembly into the cold masses together with various combinations of corrector magnets produced by other European manufacturers. Here we see the first of the cold masses containing the MQ magnet of the machine arcs together with two types of corrector magnet ready for shipping to CERN. This first unit was delivered on 12 Februa...

  2. Series fabrication of the main quadrupole cold masses for the LHC begins

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Three hundred and sixty main quadrupole (MQ) magnets will perform the principal beam focusing around the 27 km LHC ring. CERN and CEA-Saclay began collaborating on the development and prototyping of these magnets in 1989. This resulted in five highly successful quadrupole units - also known as short straight sections - one of which was integrated for testing in String 1, and two others of the final design in String 2. Once the tests had confirmed the validity of the design and realization, the fabrication of the 360 cold masses had to be transferred to industry.The German firm ACCEL Instruments was entrusted both with the construction of the quadrupole magnets themselves, and with their assembly into the cold masses together with various combinations of corrector magnets produced by other European manufacturers. Here we see the first of the cold masses containing the MQ magnet of the machine arcs together with two types of corrector magnet ready for shipping to CERN. Pictured with this first unit, delivered o...

  3. Design and Manufacture of the Superconducting Bus-bars for the LHC Main Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Belova, L M; Perinet-Marquet, J L; Ivanov, P; Urpin, C

    2002-01-01

    The main magnets of the LHC are series-connected electrically in different powering circuits by means of superconducting bus-bars, carrying a maximum current of 13 kA. These superconducting bus-bars consist of a superconducting cable thermally and electrically coupled to a copper profile all along the length. The function of the copper profile is essentially to provide an alternative path for the current in case the superconducting cable loses its superconducting state and returns to normal state because of a transient disturbance or of a normal zone propagation coming from the neighbouring magnets. When a superconducting bus-bar quenches to normal state its temperature must always stay below a safe values of about 100°C while the copper is conducting. When a resistive transition is detected, the protection systems triggers the ramping down of the current from 13000 A to 0. The ramp rate must not exceed a maximum value to avoid the transition of magnets series-connected in the circuit. This paper concerns th...

  4. Analysis of the Magnetic Measurements at Room Temperature of the LHC Main Quadrupole Prototypes

    CERN Document Server

    Peyrot, M; Remondino, Vittorio; Rifflet, J M; Scandale, Walter; Simon, F; Todesco, Ezio; Tortschanoff, Theodor

    2000-01-01

    The room temperature magnetic measurements of the first series-design prototypes of the LHC main quadrupoles are analysed. Field shape harmonics for the nominal design are worked out using numerical simulations. Data relative to six apertures (three quadrupoles) are considered. The averages of the multipoles are interpreted as the systematic components. The agreement with the nominal design is verified, and possible explanations for discrepancies are worked out. An offset in b6 of around 2.4 units is observed, and can be justified in terms of a coil azimuthal length larger than the nominal value by about 0.1 mm. Standard deviations of the multipoles are interpreted as the random components. We show that the latter can be in-terpreted in terms of random movements of around 25-35 µm r.m.s. of the coil blocks, because of components and assembly tolerances. A good correlation between measurements made on collared coil and the assembled cold mass is found. Comparison with target values for beam dynamics is given.

  5. Test Results of the Third LHC Main Quadrupole Magnet Prototype at CEA/Saclay

    CERN Document Server

    Derégel, J; Gourdin, C; Hervieu, M; Ogitsu, T; Peyrot, M; Rifflet, J M; Schild, T; Simon, F; Tortschanoff, Theodor; Tsuchiya, K

    2002-01-01

    The construction of the third second-generation main quadrupole magnet prototype for LHC has been completed at CEA/Saclay in November 2000. The magnet was tested at 1.9 K. Similarly to the two first ones, this prototype has exceeded the operating current in one training step and exhibited excellent training memory after a thermal cycle. This paper describes the quench performance and quench start localization determined by means of voltage-taps and a quench antenna system developed in collaboration with KEK. As this magnet was equipped with capacitive gauges, the stresses during cool-down and powering have been recorded and are in agreement with FE computations. The newly designed quench heaters have improved efficiency and reproducibility compared to those of the first generation. Magnetic measurements have been performed at various stages. The cold measurements show minor differences with those at room temperature and are similar to those of the two first magnets of this design. These results prove that the...

  6. Development of a New Insulation Approach for the LHC Main 13 kA Interconnection Splices

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, F; Fessia, P; Lopez, R; Prin, H; Tock, J Ph

    2012-01-01

    In the long LHC (Large Hadron Collider) shutdown in 2013 it is foreseen to intervene on all the 13 kA interconnections in order to guarantee the necessary margin and redundancy to provide safe LHC operation at 7 TeV per beam. This implies reinforcement of the present interconnection configuration including a new insulation scheme of the busbars. The purpose of the new insulation model is to provide dielectric insulation with at least the same performance as its predecessor currently installed in the LHC machine, but in addition to contain the Lorentz forces. This paper describes the analytic and empirical approach of development to reach a new insulation concept based on state of the art materials and manufacturing techniques.

  7. Design of superconducting corrector magnets for LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baynham, D.E.; Coombs, R.C.; Ijspeert, A.; Perin, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will require a range of superconducting corrector magnets. This paper presents the design of sextupole and decapole corrector coils which will be included as spool pieces adjacent to reach main ring dipole. The paper gives detailed 3D field computations of the coil configurations to meet LHC beam dynamics requirements. Coil protection within a long string environment is addressed and mechanical design outlines are presented

  8. Design of superconducting corrector magnets for LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynham, D. E.; Coombs, R. C.; Ijspeert, A.; Perin, R.

    1994-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will require a range of superconducting corrector magnets. This paper presents the design of sextupole and decapole corrector coils which will be included as spool pieces adjacent to each main ring dipole. The paper gives detailed 3D field computations of the coil configurations to meet LHC beam dynamics requirements. Coil protection within a long string environment is addressed and mechanical design outlines are presented.

  9. Main Consolidations and Improvements of the Control System and Instrumentation for the LHC Cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Fluder, C; Bremer, J; Bremer, K; Ivens, B; Casas-Cubillos, J; Claudet, S; Gomes, P; Ivens, B; Perin, A; Pezzetti, M; Tovar-Gonzalez, A; Vauthier, N

    2013-01-01

    Operation of the LHC during 2010 and 2011 with 3.5 TeV beam energy and luminosity up to 3.65x1033 cm-2 s-1, led to radiation-induced failures of micro-electronic devices used in the cryogenic control system. Mitigating actions addressed equipment relocation and corrective patches on electronics and software. Driven by the technical requirements and by feedback from the cryogenic operation team, numerous consolidations and improvements were implemented on-the-fly, enhancing availability and operability of the LHC cryogenics. Furthermore, additional diagnostic tools, test benches, technical procedures and trainings have been provided to strengthen first line support services.

  10. First Investigations on the Energy Deposited in a D0 early separation scheme Dipole for the LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Hoa, C

    2007-01-01

    This note gives the first results of energy deposition calculation on a simplified model for an early scheme separation dipole D0, located at 3.5 m from the IP. The Monte Carlo code FLUKA version 2006.3 has been used for modelling the multi-particle interactions and energy transport. After a short introduction to particle interaction with matter and power deposition processes, the FLUKA modelling is described with bench marked power deposition calculation on the TAS, the absorber located in front of the triplet quadrupoles. The power deposition results for the D0 early scheme are then discussed in details, with the averaged and peak power density, and the variations of the total heat load in the dipole with the longitudinal position and with the aperture diameter.

  11. Deformations and Displacements of the LHC Superconducting Dipoles Induced by Standard and Non-Standard Operational Modes

    CERN Document Server

    La China, M; Gubello, G; Scandale, Walter

    2004-01-01

    A full-scale and fully-instrumented working model of the LHC lattice cell has been tested at CERN between March and December 2002. Aside of the current, pressure and temperature sensors, controlled by an industrial supervision system, a novel device has been set to monitor magnet positions with respect to the surrounding cryostat. The series of operating modes to test cryogenics, current leads and quench recovery electronics offered the chance to investigate potentially harmful deformations of the superconducting structure. In this paper we present a survey of displacements and deformations experienced by the LHC cell magnets during thermal cycles, current ramps and resistive transitions. Although the system complexity prevented from complete modeling, a preliminary phenomena explanation is given.

  12. Surface Resistance Measurements and Estimate of the Beam-Induced Resistive Wall Heating of the LHC Dipole Beam Screen

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Ruggiero, F; Tan, J

    1999-01-01

    An estimate of the resistive losses in the LHC beam screen is given from cold surface resistance measurements using the shielded pair technique, with particular emphasis on the effect of a high magnetic field. Two different copper coating methods, namely electro-deposition and co-lamination, have been evaluated. Experimental data are compared with theories including the anomalous skin effect and the magneto-resistance effect. It is shown whether the theory underestimates or not the losses depends strongly on the RRR value, on the magnetic field and on the surface characteristics. In the pessimistic case and for nominal machine parameters, the estimated beam-induced resistive wall heating can be as large as 260 mW/m for two circulating beams.

  13. Testing of the large bore single aperture 1-meter superconducting dipoles made with phenolic inserts

    CERN Document Server

    Boschmann, H; Dubbeldam, R L; Kirby, G A; Lucas, J; Ostojic, R; Russenschuck, Stephan; Siemko, A; Taylor, T M; Vanenkov, I; Weterings, W

    1998-01-01

    Two identical single aperture 1-metre superconducting dipoles have been built in collaboration with HMA Power Systems and tested at CERN. The 87.8 mm aperture magnets feature a single layer coil wound using LHC main dipole outer layer cable, phenolic spacer type collars, and a keyed two part structural iron yoke. The magnets are designed as models of the D1 separation dipole in the LHC experimental insertions, whose nominal field is 4.5 T at 4.5 K. In this report we present the test results of the two magnets at 4.3 K and 1.9 K.

  14. Modelling and transmission-line calculations of the final superconducting dipole and quadrupole chains of CERN's LHC collider methods and results

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. A long chain of superconducting magnets represents a complex load impedance for the powering and turns into a complex generator during the energy extraction. Detailed information about the circuit is needed for the calculation of a number of parameters and features, which are of vital importance for the choice of powering and extraction equipment and for the prediction of the circuit performance under normal and fault conditions. Constitution of the complex magnet chain impedance is based on a synthesized, electrical model of the basic magnetic elements. This is derived from amplitude and phase measurements of coil and ground impedances from d.c. to 50 kHz and the identification of poles and zeros of the impedance and transfer functions. An electrically compatible RLC model of each magnet type was then synthesized by means of a combination of conventional algorithms. Such models have been elaborated for the final, 15-m long LHC dipole (both apertures in series) as well as ...

  15. Proposal for the award of two contracts for the supply of fine-blanked low-carbon steel yoke laminations and inserts for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    This document concerns the award of two contracts for the supply of 5 812 000 fine-blanked low-carbon steel yoke laminations, of two different types, and 5 800 000 inserts for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets. Following a market survey carried out among 70 firms in sixteen Member States and one firm in Japan, a call for tenders (IT-2467/LHC/LHC) was sent on 3 June 1999 to seven firms in four Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received five tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of two contracts with: - FUG (DE) for the supply of 3 632 000 fine-blanked low-carbon steel yoke laminations and 3 625 000 inserts, which represents 5/8 of the total quantity required for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets, for a total amount of 2 525 563 euros, which at the exchange rate given in the tender correspond to 4 019 038 Swiss francs, subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2001, with an option for the supply of ...

  16. Proposal for the award of two contracts for the supply of fine-blanked austenitic steel yoke laminations and inserts for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    This document concerns the award of two contracts for the total supply of 642 000 fine-blanked austenitic steel yoke laminations, of two different types, and 642 000 inserts for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets. Following a market survey carried out among 70 firms in sixteen Member States and one firm in Japan, a call for tenders (IT-2700/LHC/LHC) was sent on 3 June 1999 to seven firms in four Member States and one firm in Japan. By the closing date, CERN had received five tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of two contracts with: - ELAY INDUSTRIAL (ES) for the supply of 324 000 fine-blanked austenitic steel yoke laminations of the first type and the corresponding number of inserts, which represents the total required quantity of laminations of the first type and of corresponding inserts for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets, for a total amount of 481 814 euros, which at the exchange rate given in the tender correspond to 770 8...

  17. Results of Magnetic Axis Measurements on a Prototype Main Lattice Quadrupole for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, N; Deferne, G; Parma, V; Rohmig, P; Tortschanoff, Theodor

    2004-01-01

    More than 470 twin aperture lattice quadrupoles are needed for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN. The lattice quadrupole, assembled with correction magnets in its helium enclosure - the cold mass and integrated in a common cryostat called the Short Straight Section (SSS). All SSS cold mass prototypes have been developed and built by CEA (Saclay) in collaboration with CNRS (Orsay, France). The last SSS prototype (SSS5) was used to investigate the behavior of the magnetic axis through various steps of the installation cycle for the series quadrupoles: including transportation, thermal-cycles, and being lowered into the tunnel. Results of extensive measurements before and after each of these stages are presented here, showing that the effect of transport is weak and within the window of measurement resolution. Also shown is that the long-term stability observed during two years is comparable with the requirements from magnet tolerances. To minimize systematic errors, all tests were perfo...

  18. Determination of AC Characteristics of Superconducting Dipole Magnets in the Large Hadron Collider Based on Experimental Results and Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ambjørndalen, Sara; Verweij, Arjan

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) utilizes high-field superconducting Main Dipole Magnets that bend the trajectory of the beam. The LHC ring is electrically divided into eight octants, each allocating a 7 km chain of 154 Main Dipole Magnets. Dedicated de- tection and protection systems prevent irreversible magnet damage caused by quenches. Quench is a local transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state. Triggering of such systems, along with other failure scenarios, result in fast transient phenomena. In order to analyze the consequence of such electrical transients and failures in the dipole chain, one needs a circuit model that is validated against measurements. Currently, there exists an equivalent circuit of the Main Dipole Magnet resolved at an aperture level. Each aperture model takes into account the dynamic effects occurring in the magnets, trough a lossy-inductance model and parasitic capacitances to ground. At low frequencies the Main Dipole Magnet behaves as a linear inductor. Ca...

  19. Field distributions and particle optics in main bending dipoles of Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source accumulator ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    The SNS accumulator ring employs 32 electro-magnetic dipoles to bend proton beams. The dipoles are typical sector magnets with relatively large aperture and short length. Thus, how to correctly treat magnetic fringe fields in the devices remains as a question. We have performed 3D computer simulations to study magnetic field distributions in the dipoles. Further, we have analyzed particle optics based on the space-dependent curvature and focusing functions in the magnets. The effect of magnetic fringe fields on the particle motion, especially the focusing/defocusing and dispersion, is investigated. The lens parameters, including the second-order aberrations, are derived and compared with the design hard-edge parameters used in the ring lattice calculations

  20. 2008 LHC Open Days LHC magnets on display

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years you’ve probably seen many of the 15 m long blue LHC dipole magnets being ferried around the site. Most of them are underground now, but on the LHC Open Days on 5 and 6 April the magnets will also play a central role on the surface. Installation of one of the LHC dipole magnets on the Saint-Genis roundabout on 7 March. The LHC dipole testing facility with several magnets at various stages of testing. The 27 km ring of the LHC consists of 1232 double-aperture superconducting dipole magnets, 360 short straight sections (SSS) and 114 special SSS for the insertion regions. On the Open Day, you will be able to "Follow the LHC magnets" through different stages around the site, culminating in their descent into the tunnel. Discover all the many components that have to be precisely integrated in the magnet casings, and talk to the engine...

  1. Production and Quality Assurance of Main Busbar Interconnection Splices during the LHC 2008-2009 Shutdown.

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F; Dalin, J-M; Fessia, P; Flora, R H; Heck, S; Pfeffer, H; Prin, H; Scheuerlein, C; Thonet, P; Tock, J-P; Williams, L

    2011-01-01

    The main busbar interconnection splices of the Large Hadron Collider are assembled by inductive soldering of the Rutherford type cables and the copper profiles of the stabilizer. Following the September 2008 incident, the assembly process and the quality assurance have been improved, with new measurement and diagnostics methods introduced. In the 2008-2009 shutdown the resistance both in the superconducting and in the normal conducting states have been the focus for improvements. The introduction of gamma radiography has allowed the visualization of voids between cable and stabilizer. It is now known that during the standard soldering heating cycle solder is lost from the busbar extremities adjacent to the splice profiles, leaving parts of the cable in poor contact with the stabilizer. A room temperature resistance measurement has been introduced as a simple, non-destructive test to measure the electrical continuity of the splice in its normal conducting state. An ultrasonic test has been performed systematic...

  2. Computer graphic of LHC in the tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    A computer-generated image of the LHC particle accelerator at CERN in the tunnel originally built for the LEP accelerator that was closed in 2000. The cross-section of an LHC superconducting dipole magnet is also seen.

  3. arXiv Dipole portal to heavy neutral leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Magill, Gabriel; Pospelov, Maxim; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    We consider generic neutrino dipole portals between left-handed neutrinos, photons, and right-handed heavy neutral leptons (HNL) with Dirac masses. The dominance of this portal significantly alters the conventional phenomenology of HNLs. We derive a comprehensive set of constraints on the dipole portal to HNLs by utilizing data from LEP, LHC, MiniBooNE, LSND as well as observations of Supernova 1987A and consistency of the standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We calculate projected sensitivities from the proposed high-intensity SHiP beam dump experiment, and the ongoing experiments at the Short-Baseline Neutrino facility at Fermilab. Dipole mediated Primakoff neutrino upscattering and Dalitz-like meson decays are found to be the main production mechanisms in most of the parametric regime under consideration. Proposed explanations of LSND and MiniBooNE anomalies based on HNLs with dipole-induced decays are found to be severely constrained, or to be tested in the future experiments.

  4. Record current in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    On 19 December, just before CERN's end-of-year break, Sector 4-5, which had been cooled to 1.9 K, beat the LHC current record for 2007. The current was raised to 8500 amperes in the main magnets. The current of the dipole circuit was repeatedly ramped up and quenches were provoked. The magnets were maintained at 4.5 K over the holiday period so that they could be quickly brought back down to the nominal temperature after the shutdown. The testing of the sector has now resumed.

  5. LHC: seven golden suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The fourth CERN Golden Hadron awards saw seven of the LHC's best suppliers receive recognition for the high quality of their work, compliance with delivery deadlines, flexibility and adaptability to the demanding working conditions of the project. The representatives of the seven companies which received awards during the Golden Hadron ceremony, standing with Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader. 'The Golden Hadron awards are a symbol of our appreciation of not only the quality and timely delivery of components but also the collaborative and flexible way the firms have contributed to this very difficult project,' said Lyn Evans, head of the LHC project. The awards went to Kemppi-Kempower (Finland), Metso Powdermet (Finland), Transtechnik (Germany), Babcock Noell Nuclear (Germany), Iniziative Industriali (Italy), ZTS VVU Kosice (Slovakia), and Jehier (France). Babock Noell Nuclear (BNN) successfully produced one-third (416 cold dipole masses) of the LHC's superconducting dipole magnets, one of the most critical an...

  6. Design, Fabrication and Initial Testing of a Large Bore Single Aperture 1 m Long Superconducting Dipole Made with Phenolic Inserts

    CERN Document Server

    Boschmann, H; Kirby, G A; Lucas, J; Ostojic, R; Russenschuck, Stephan; Siemko, A; Vanenkov, I; Weterings, W

    1997-01-01

    In the framework of the LHC magnet development programme, a large bore single aperture 1-meter long superconducting dipole has been built in collaboration with HOLEC. The magnet features a single layer coil wound using the LHC main dipole outer layer cable, phenolic inserts, and a keyed two part structural iron yoke. This paper presents the magnetic and mechanical design and optimisation of the magnet. We describe the coil winding and curing, and present the construction and assembly procedures. Finally we report on the mechanical behaviour during assembly and cooling, and present the magnet training behaviour.

  7. Aperture measurements with AC dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Fuster Martinez, Nuria; Dilly, Joschua Werner; Nevay, Laurence James; Bruce, Roderik; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Redaelli, Stefano; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    During the MDs performed on the 15th of September and 29th of November 2017, we measured the LHC global aperture at injection with a new AC dipole method as well as using the Transverse Damper (ADT) blow-up method used during the 2017 LHC commissioning for benchmarking. In this note, the MD procedure is presented as well as the analysis of the comparison between the two methods. The possible benefits of the new method are discussed.

  8. Testing of a Single 11 T $Nb_3Sn$ Dipole Coil Using a Dipole Mirror Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlobin, Alexander [Fermilab; Andreev, Nicolai [Fermilab; Barzi, Emanuela [Fermilab; Chlachidze, Guram [Fermilab; Kashikhin, Vadim [Fermilab; Nobrega, Alfred [Fermilab; Novitski, Igor [Fermilab; Turrioni, Daniele [Fermilab; Karppinen, Mikko [CERN; Smekens, David [CERN

    2014-07-01

    FNAL and CERN are developing an 11 T Nb3Sn dipole suitable for installation in the LHC. To optimize coil design parameters and fabrication process and study coil performance, a series of 1 m long dipole coils is being fabricated. One of the short coils has been tested using a dipole mirror structure. This paper describes the dipole mirror magnetic and mechanical designs, and reports coil parameters and test results.

  9. A finite element model of the LHC dipole cold mass with hysteretic, non-linear behavior and single turn description: towards the interpretation of magnet quenches

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067087

    In one of its acceptation, the word quench is synonym of destruction. And this is even more consistent with reality in the case of the Large Hadron Collider dipole magnets, whose magnetic field and stored energy are unprecedented: the uncontrolled transition from the superconducting to the resistive state can be the origin of dramatic events. This is why the protection of magnets is so important, and why so many studies and investigations have been carried out on quench origin. The production, cold testing and installation of the 1232 arc dipole magnets is completed. They have fulfilled all the requirements and the operation reliability of these magnets has already been partially confirmed. From an academic standpoint, nevertheless, the anomalous mechanical behaviour, which was sometimes observed during power tests, has not yet been given a clear explanation. The work presented in this thesis aims at providing an instrument to better understand the reasons for such anomalies, by means of finite element modell...

  10. LHC collars - 12 million high technology gems

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Some 12 million steel collars will keep the LHC dipole magnet structures rigid. Their production has just begun. A huge job began last week: the high speed manufacturing of twelve million steel collars for the 1250 dipole magnets of the future Large Hadron Collider, LHC. The challenge is not only a matter of quantity: these collars are very high technology components because of the important role they play in the way the collider works. One of the main difficulties with the accelerator is that the magnetic field that keeps particles in orbit must have the same configuration and intensity in all the dipoles. But when the 8.33 tesla magnetic field is on -100.000 times the earth magnetic field - it produces a very strong force that can deform the 'soft' parts of the magnets, such as superconducting coils. The force loading one metre of dipole is almost comparable with the weight of a Boeing 747 - about 400 tonnes - so a huge deformation would occur without a mechanical component to keep the whole structure rigid...

  11. Radiation protection issues after 20 years of LHC operation

    CERN Document Server

    Forkel-Wirth, D.; Roesler, S.; Theis, C.; Ulrici, L.; Vincke, H.; Vincke, Hz.

    2011-01-01

    Since November 2009, the LHC commissioning progresses very well, both with proton and lead beams. It will continue in 2011 and nominal LHC operation is expected to be attained in 2013. In parallel, plans for various LHC upgrades are under discussion, suggesting a High-Luminosity (HL) upgrade first and a High-Energy (HE) upgrade in a later state. Whereas the upgrade in luminosity would require the modification of only some few key accelerator components like the inner triplets, the upgrade in beam energy from 7 TeV to 16.5 TeV would require the exchange of all dipoles and of numerous other accelerator components. The paper gives an overview of the radiation protection issues related to the dismantling of LHC components prior to the installation of the HE-LHC components, i.e. after about 20 years of LHC operation. Two main topics will be discussed: (i) the exposure of workers to ionizing radiation during the dismantling of dipoles, inner triplets or collimators and experiments and (ii) the production, condition...

  12. LHC magnets: the great descent

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    A first dipole magnet was delivered to its final location in the LHC tunnel on Monday, 7 March. This achievement coincides with another important milestone in the installation of the future collider, the completion of the delivery of half the dipole magnets.

  13. ACOL dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlogaert, J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the general design of ACOL dipoles, including the special injection area dipole. A list of mechanical, electrical and magnetic parameters and results of magnetic measurements are presented. Particular attention is paid to the proximity effects between quadrupoles and dipoles

  14. Theoretical Modeling and Experimental Investigation of the Thermal Performance of the LHC Prototype Lattice Cryostats

    CERN Document Server

    Riddone, G

    1997-01-01

    This thesis presents the thermal performance of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) prototype cryostats both in steady-state and in transient conditions. LHC will be built in the 27 km LEP tunnel and will provide proton-proton collisions. It will make use of superconducting magnets operating in static bath of superfluid helium at 1.9 K. The thesis is mainly divided in three parts. The first part cont ains three chapters which present a brief overview of the LHC project. Part 1-Chapter 1 gives a short introduction to the LHC design layout and performance. Part 1-Chapter 2 refers to LHC cryogenic s ystem and describes the general architecture of the cryogenic plants, the temperature levels and the heat loads. The 50 m long LHC prototype half-cell contains one twin-bore quadrupole and four twin-a perture dipoles. In Part 1-Chapter 3 the design and construction of the prototype dipole and quadrupole cryostats are presented. The LHC prototype cryostats have integrated cryogenic lines, while the final LHC cryostats hav...

  15. A 120 mm Bore Quadrupole for the Phase 1 LHC Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Fessia, P; Borgnolutti, F; Regis, F; Richter, D; Todesco, E

    2010-01-01

    The phase I LHC upgrade foresees the installation of a new final focusing for the high luminosity experiences in order to be able to focus the beams in the interaction points to b*~ 0.25 cm. Key element of this upgrade is a large bore (120 mm) superconducting quadrupole. This article proposes a magnet design that will make use of the LHC main dipole superconducting cable. Due to the schedule constraints and to the budget restrictions, it is mandatory to integrate in the design the maximum number of features successfully used during the LHC construction. This paper presents this design option and the rationales behind the several technical choices.

  16. UNK superconducting dipole development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageev, A.I.; Andreev, N.I.; Balbekov, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    For choozing the design of superconducting dipoles (SCD) for the IHEP UNK the test results for SCD with warm and cold iron are given. The main parameters of dipoles are presented. The SCD designs are described. At present works on SP magnet simulation for UNK are carried out in two directions. Tests are conducted on a rig with a chain of series dipoles with a warm magnetic screen. The purpose of these tests is to study heat exchange and hydraulics in magnets, energy and helium evacuation in emergency magnet transition into normal conditions, simulation of possible cooling and heating schemes. Another direction involves production of short and full-scale dipole models with cold iron and their testing on rigs. The final choice of the dipole design for commercial production is planned for 1987

  17. Energy of the LHC after the 2013-2014 shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todesco, E.; Lorin, C.; Bajko, M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 all the LHC main dipole circuits were trained to 5 TeV, two sectors to 6 TeV, and one sector was pushed up to 6.6 TeV. In the 5-6 TeV range, a few quenches were needed to retrain the LHC dipoles, and none for the quadrupoles. On the other hand, in the 6- 7 TeV range a larger than expected number of quenches was observed in the main dipoles. Using this limited set of data, tentative estimates were given to guess the number of quenches needed to reach nominal energy. After three years, the only additional experimental data are the retraining of the magnets individually tested at SM18, either coming from the spares or from the 3-4 sector. After presenting this additional information, we will consider the different scenarios that can be envisaged to train the LHC main magnets after the Long Shut-down 1 (LS1), the expected energy, the impact on the commissioning time and the associated risk. (authors)

  18. Mechanical Design of the LHC Standard Half-Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet, A.; Brunet, J. C.; Cruikshank, P.; Genet, M.; Parma, V.; Rohmig, P.; Saban, R.; Tavian, L.; Veness, R.; Vlogaert, J.; Williams, L. R.

    1997-05-01

    The LHC Conceptual Design Report issued on 20th October 1995 (CERN/AC/95-05 (LHC) - nicknamed "Yellow Book") introduced significant changes to some fundamental features of the LHC standard half-cell, composed of one quadrupole, 3 dipoles and a set of corrector magnets. A separate cryogenic distribution line was introduced, which was previously inside the main cryostat. The dipole length has been increased from 10 to 15 m and independent powering of the focusing and defocusing quadrupole magnets was chosen. Individual quench protection diodes were introduced in magnets interconnects and many auxiliary bus bars were added to feed in series the various families of correcting superconducting magnets. The various highly intricate basic systems such as: cryostats and cryogenics feeders, superconducting magnets and their electrical feeding and protection, vacuum beam screen and its cooling, support and alignment devices have been redesigned, taking into account the very tight space available. These space constraints are given by the necessity to have maximum integral bending field strength for maximum LHC energy, and the existing LHC tunnel. Finally, cryogenic and vacuum sectorisation have been introduced to reduce downtimes and facilitate commissioning.

  19. Slice through an LHC bending magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Slice through an LHC superconducting dipole (bending) magnet. The slice includes a cut through the magnet wiring (niobium titanium), the beampipe and the steel magnet yokes. Particle beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have the same energy as a high-speed train, squeezed ready for collision into a space narrower than a human hair. Huge forces are needed to control them. Dipole magnets (2 poles) are used to bend the paths of the protons around the 27 km ring. Quadrupole magnets (4 poles) focus the proton beams and squeeze them so that more particles collide when the beams’ paths cross. There are 1232 15m long dipole magnets in the LHC.

  20. Main channels of the decay of the giant dipole resonance in the 20,22Ne nuclei and isospin splitting of the giant dipole resonance in the 22Ne nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlamov, V.V.; Stepanov, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Data published in the literature on various photonuclear reactions for the 20,22 Ne isotopes and for their natural mixture are analyzed with the aim of exploring special features of the decay of giant-dipole-resonance states in these two isotopes. With the aid of data on the abundances of the isotopes and on the energy reaction thresholds, the cross sections for the reactions 20,22 Ne[(γ, n) + (γ, np)] and 20,22 Ne[(γ, p) + (γ, np)] are broken down into the contributions from the one-nucleon reactions (γ, n) and (γ, p) and the contributions from the reactions (γ, np). The cross sections evaporation model used here to treat the deexcitation of residual nucle(γ, p) 19,21 F in the energy range E γ = 16.0-28.0 MeV and the cross sections for the reactions 20,22 Ne(γ, np) 18,20 F in the energy range E γ = 23.3-28.0 MeV are estimated. The behavior of the cross-section ratio r = σ(γ, p)/σ(γ, n) for the 22 Ne nucleus as a function of energy is analyzed, and the isospin components of the giant dipole resonance in the 22 Ne nucleus are identified. The contributions of the isospin components of the giant dipole resonance in the 22 Ne nucleus to the cross sections for various photonuclear reactions are determined on the basis of an analysis of the diagram of the excitation and decay of pure isospin states in the 22 Ne nucleus and in nuclei neighboring it, which are members of the corresponding isospin multiplets. The isospin splitting of the giant dipole resonance and the ratio of the intensities of the isospin components are determined to be ΔE = 4.57 ± 0.69 MeV and R = 0.24 ± 0.04, respectively

  1. The LHC quench protection system

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The new quench protection system (QPS) has the crucial roles of providing an early warning for any part of the superconducting coils and busbars that develop high resistance, as well as triggering the switch-off of the machine. Over 2000 new detectors will be installed around the LHC to make sure every busbar segment between magnets is monitored and protected. One of the major consolidation activities for the LHC is the addition of two new detectors to the quench protection system. A magnet quench occurs when part of the superconducting cable becomes normally-conducting. When the protection system detects an increased resistance the huge amount of energy stored in the magnet chains is safely extracted and ‘dumped’ into specially designed resistors. In the case of the main dipole chain, the stored energy in a single LHC sector is roughly the same as the kinetic energy of a passenger jet at cruising speed. The first new detector is designed to monitor the superconducting...

  2. LHC Report: a brief deceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    Rossano Giachino & Markus Albert

    2015-01-01

    The LHC has now transitioned from powering tests to the machine checkout phase. This phase involves the full-scale tests of all systems in preparation for beam. Early last Saturday morning, during the ramp-down, an earth fault developed in the main dipole circuit. Full evaluation of the situation is ongoing.   The various systems are put through their operational paces from the CCC. This includes important tests of the beam dump system and full-scale tests of the beam interlock system (BIS) and its many inputs from other systems around the ring. All magnetic circuits are driven through the ramp, squeeze, ramp-down, and pre-cycle along with the collimators and RF. Instrumentation, feedbacks, and the control system are also stress tested. Inevitably there is some final frantic debugging but, up to now, things seem to be in reasonable shape. The machine checkout is an important coming together of all LHC systems. During this final phase before beam, the operations team tests all of the LHC subsystem...

  3. Short Circuit Tests First Step of LHC Hardware Commissioning Completion

    CERN Document Server

    Barbero-Soto, E; Bordry, Frederick; Casas Lino, M P; Coelingh, G J; Cumer, G; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Guillaume, J C; Inigo-Golfin, J; Montabonnet, V; Nisbet, D; Pojer, M; Principe, R; Rodríguez-Mateos, F; Saban, R; Schmidt, R; Thiesen, H; Vergara-Fernández, A; Zerlauth, M; Castaneda Serra, A; Romera Ramirez, I

    2008-01-01

    For the two counter rotating beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) about 8000 magnets (main dipole and quadrupole magnets, corrector magnets, separation dipoles, matching section quadrupoles etc.) are powered in about 1500 superconducting electrical circuits. The magnets are powered by power converters that have been designed for the LHC with a current between 60 and 13000A. Between October 2005 and September 2007 the so-called Short Circuit Tests were carried-out in 15 underground zones where the power converters of the superconducting circuits are placed. The tests aimed to qualify the normal conducting equipments of the circuits such as power converters and normal conducting high current cables. The correct operation of interlock and energy extraction systems was validated. The infrastructure systems including AC distribution, water and air cooling and the control systems was also commissioned. In this paper the results of the two year test campaign are summarized with particular attention to problems e...

  4. Safe LHC beam commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uythoven, J.; Schmidt, R.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the large amount of energy stored in magnets and beams, safety operation of the LHC is essential. The commissioning of the LHC machine protection system will be an integral part of the general LHC commissioning program. A brief overview of the LHC Machine Protection System will be given, identifying the main components: the Beam Interlock System, the Beam Dumping System, the Collimation System, the Beam Loss Monitoring System and the Quench Protection System. An outline is given of the commissioning strategy of these systems during the different commissioning phases of the LHC: without beam, injection and the different phases with stored beam depending on beam intensity and energy. (author)

  5. Proposal for the award of a contract, without competitive tendering, for the supply of two cabling machines for the manufacture of superconducting cable for the LHC main magnets

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract, without competitive tendering, for the supply of two cabling machines for the production of superconducting cable for the LHC main magnets. These cables are of two different types, hereafter referred as Cable 1 and Cable 2. For the reasons set out in this document, the Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with SETIC (FR) for the supply of two cabling machines, for a total amount not exceeding 3 200 000 euros (4 948 800 Swiss francs), not subject to revision. The rate of exchange which has been used is that stipulated in the tender. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: FR - 100%.

  6. The metrology of the LHC project: what news?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambardon, M.; Missiaen, D.; Quesnel, J.P.; Scandale, W.; Naegely, A.V.; Naegely, P.

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), under construction at CERN, uses superconducting magnets operating at a temperature of 1.9 K to guide the circulating particles. A specific feature of the main magnets (dipoles and quadrupoles) is the two-in-one design with two magnetic channels in one common retaining structure. Indeed, the accelerator is made of two rings, mechanically linked, that have to be simultaneously aligned during the installation in the already existing LEP tunnel. The assembly tolerances of the LHC main magnets have been reconsidered to take into account the tight constraints on geometry. The dipoles are bent to follow closely the curvature of the circulating particles and to make a larger mechanical aperture available for the circulating particles. In order to minimise the geometrical errors the dipole assembly procedure is assisted by high precision survey measurements based on laser trackers. By this we hope to reduce to ± 1 mm the positioning error along the axis of the magnets. In addition the ends of the dipoles and quadrupoles should be aligned with even better precision to reduce to below ± 0.3 mm the displacement of the bellows in the magnet-to-magnet interconnection. All these precautions are expected to make easier the installation and to improve the LHC machine operation. In Section 2, we discuss the survey activity related to the civil engineering work. In section 3 we discuss the alignment of the dipoles in their cryostats. In Section 4 we present our geodetic network and in Section 5 we draw our conclusions. (authors)

  7. LHC Supertable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, M.; Lahey, T.E.; Lamont, M.; Mueller, G.J.; Teixeira, D.D.; McCrory, E.S.

    2012-01-01

    LHC operations generate enormous amounts of data. This data is being stored in many different databases. Hence, it is difficult for operators, physicists, engineers and management to have a clear view on the overall accelerator performance. Until recently the logging database, through its desktop interface TIMBER, was the only way of retrieving information on a fill-by-fill basis. The LHC Supertable has been developed to provide a summary of key LHC performance parameters in a clear, consistent and comprehensive format. The columns in this table represent main parameters that describe the collider operation such as luminosity, beam intensity, emittance, etc. The data is organized in a tabular fill-by-fill manner with different levels of detail. Particular emphasis was placed on data sharing by making data available in various open formats. Typically the contents are calculated for periods of time that map to the accelerator's states or beam modes such as Injection, Stable Beams, etc. Data retrieval and calculation is triggered automatically after the end of each fill. The LHC Supertable project currently publishes 80 columns of data on around 100 fills. (authors)

  8. LHC physics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Binoth, T

    2012-01-01

    "Exploring the phenomenology of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, LHC Physics focuses on the first years of data collected at the LHC as well as the experimental and theoretical tools involved...

  9. Open midplane designs based on sector coils in superconducting dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Bruer, J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the effects of opening up the midplane in conventional sector coil dipoles, also known as cosè-designs. The open midplane design is a candidate for the higher luminosity upgrade for the LHC, and also for the future beta beam project at CERN, which has the heat deposition mainly concentrated in the midplane of the dipoles. By opening up the midplane, the major part of the spray particles can be avoided, allowing the use of strong superconductive magnets. The aim of this study is to maintain good field quality after a gap in the midplane has been inserted. Short sample field and the electromagnetic force distribution will also be presented for some solutions.

  10. LHC bending magnet coil

    CERN Multimedia

    A short test version of coil of wire used for the LHC dipole magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair.

  11. Superconducting Coil of Po Dipole

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The Po superconducting dipole was built as a prototype beam transport magnet for the SPS extracted proton beam P0. Its main features were: coil aperture 72 mm, length 5 m, room-temperature yoke, NbTi cable conductor impregnated with solder, nominal field 4.2 T at 4.7 K (87% of critical field). It reached its nominal field without any quench.After this successful test up to its nominal field of 4.2 T, the power was not raised to reach a quench. The magnet was not installed in a beam and had no other further use. Nevertheless its construction provided knowledges and experience which became useful in the design and construction of the LHC magnets. The photo shows a detail of the inner layer winding before superposing the outer layer to form the complete coil of a pole. Worth noticing is the interleaved glass-epoxy sheet (white) with grooved channels for the flow of cooling helium. See also 8211532X.

  12. LHC Supertable

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, M; Lamont, M; Muller, GJ; Teixeira, D D; McCrory, ES

    2011-01-01

    LHC operations generate enormous amounts of data. This data is being stored in many different databases. Hence, it is difficult for operators, physicists, engineers and management to have a clear view on the overall accelerator performance. Until recently the logging database, through its desktop interface TIMBER, was the only way of retrieving information on a fill-by-fill basis. The LHC Supertable has been developed to provide a summary of key LHC performance parameters in a clear, consistent and comprehensive format. The columns in this table represent main parameters that describe the collider’s operation such as luminosity, beam intensity, emittance, etc. The data is organized in a tabular fill-by-fill manner with different levels of detail. Particular emphasis was placed on data sharing by making data available in various open formats. Typically the contents are calculated for periods of time that map to the accelerator’s states or beam modes such as Injection, Stable Beams, etc. Data retrieval and ...

  13. LHC challenges and upgrade options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruning, O [CERN AB/ABP, Y03600, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)], E-mail: Oliver.Bruning@cern.ch

    2008-05-15

    The presentation summarizes the key parameters of the LHC collider. Following a discussion of the main challenges for reaching the nominal machine performance the presentation identifies options for increasing the operation tolerances and the potential performance reach of the LHC by means of future hardware upgrades of the LHC and its injector complex.

  14. LHC challenges and upgrade options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruning, O

    2008-01-01

    The presentation summarizes the key parameters of the LHC collider. Following a discussion of the main challenges for reaching the nominal machine performance the presentation identifies options for increasing the operation tolerances and the potential performance reach of the LHC by means of future hardware upgrades of the LHC and its injector complex

  15. The LHC magnet system and its status of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Maurizio; Perin, Romeo; Vlogaert, Jos

    1995-01-01

    CERN is preparing for the construction of a new high energy accelerator/collider, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This new facility will mainly consist of two superconducting magnetic beam channels, 27 km long, to be installed in the existing LEP tunnel. The magnetic system comprises about 1200 twin-aperture dipoles, 13.145 m long, with an operational field of 8.65 T, about 600 quadrupoles, 3 m long, and a very large number of other superconducting magnetic components. A general description of the system is given together with the main features of the design of the regular lattice magnets. The paper also describes the present state of the magnet R & D program. Results from short model work, as well as from full scale prototypes will be presented, including the recently tested 10 m long full-scale prototype dipole manufactured in industry.

  16. How to implement all HL-LHC upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L; Ballarino, A; Brüning, O; Jensen, E; Redaelli, S; Tavian, L; Todesco, E

    2014-01-01

    The luminosity upgrade will require major changes in the LHC machine layout : about 1.2 km of the machine will undergo major renova tion or modification. In the paper we will review the list of main equipment foreseen to be replaced or to be added. We will review the upgrade plan that should start already in the Long Shutdown (LS) 2 (with the installation of the first dispersion suppressor 11T dipole – collimator unit , the superconducting link in Point 7 and the cryo-plant in Point 4), through to the major works in LS3, synchronized with an upgrade of the LHC detectors. Best estimates of the required duration of the various shutdowns will be discussed, and also the main risks and their mitigation.

  17. Arc detector system for extraction switches in LHC CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Kuper, E; Ovchar, V; Zverev, S

    2006-01-01

    The opening switches, which will be used in case of quenches or other failures in CERN’s future LHC collider to extract the large amounts of energy stored in the magnetic field of the superconducting chains of main dipoles (8 chains with 1350 MJ each) and main quadrupoles (16 chains with about 24 MJ each) consist of an array of series/parallel connected, electro-mechanical D.C. breakers, specifically designed for this particular application. During the opening process the magnet excitation current is transferred from the cluster of breakers to extraction resistors for rapid de-excitation of the magnet chain. An arc detector has been developed in order to facilitate the determination of the need for maintenance interventions on the switches. The paper describes the arc detector and highlight results from operation of the detector with a LHC pilot extraction...

  18. The LHC on the table

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    How many dipoles have been manufactured so far? How many have been delivered? To find out, you can now consult the LHC Progress Dashboard on the web. The dashboard tracks progress with regard to manufacture and delivery of thirty different types of LHC components. Do you want to know everything about progress on LHC construction? The LHC's engineers have recently acquired a very useful tracking tool precisely for that purpose. This is the LHC Progress Dashboard which makes it possible to track work progress in graph form. In the interests of transparency, the LHC Project Management has decided to make it accessible to the public on the web. You can now consult normalized graphs for each of the thirty different types of components that form part of machine construction, such as the cold masses of the dipole magnets, the vacuum chambers and the octupoles, etc. The graphs show: in blue: the contractual delivery curves, i.e. the delivery schedules to which the suppliers have committed themselves in their contra...

  19. Physics Validation of the LHC Software

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The LHC Software will be confronted to unprecedented challenges as soon as the LHC will turn on. We summarize the main Software requirements coming from the LHC detectors, triggers and physics, and we discuss several examples of Software components developed by the experiments and the LCG project (simulation, reconstruction, etc.), their validation, and their adequacy for LHC physics.

  20. Heavy feet for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The first 800 jacks (adjustable supports) for one sector of the LHC have arrived from India in recent weeks. After the final acceptance of the preseries jacks at the end of October, they can now be used to support the LHC cryo-magnets. How do you move the weight of eight adult Indian elephants by the breadth of a human hair? If you are a surveyor at CERN who has to adjust the 32 ton LHC dipoles with a resolution of 1/20 of a millimetre, you use the 80 kg jacks which were designed and are being procured by the Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT) in India. The jacks are undergoing final pre-shipment inspection by CAT engineers in India. More than 800 jacks have arrived in recent weeks from India, enough to equip the first sector of the LHC (one octant of the ring). For all the cryo-magnets (dipoles and quadrupoles) of the LHC 7000 jacks are needed in total. They are now being continuously delivered to CERN up to mid-2005. The close collaboration between the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) in India and CE...

  1. View of the LHC tunnel with worker.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The 616th dipole out of 1232, on its way to its final position in the tunnel of the LHC. Technicians and engineers continue to work day and night carefully installing 20 magnets a week. Each of the dipoles weighs 34 tonnes and is 15 m long. Once they have been lowered down the specially constructed shaft on the Meyrin site, they begin a slow progression to their final destinations in the LHC tunnel, taking about 10 hours to arrive at Point 6, the furthest point on the LHC ring. Upon arrival, each of the dipoles is aligned and interconnected to the magnets that are already installed.Bigger files available (39Mpx)

  2. Design, fabrication and testing of a 56 mm bore twin-aperture 1 m long dipole magnet made with SSC type cable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostler, J.; Perini, D.; Russenschuck, S.; Siegel, N.; Siemko, A.; Trinquart, G.; Walckiers, L.; Weterings, W. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1996-07-01

    In the framework of the LHC superconducting dipole magnet model program, a 56 mm bore, twin-aperture dipole model 1 m long, using existing cables of the standard SSC type, was launched to initiate studies of lower field magnets with smaller strand size cables for a 7 TeV collider. This model was designed, built, assembled and tested at CERN and reached a peak field of 9.7 T at 1.8 K. The paper reviews the main design principles, presents the fabrication and assembly procedures and finally discusses the overall test results.

  3. Design, fabrication and testing of a 56 mm bore twin-aperture 1 m long dipole magnet made with SSC type cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostler, J.; Perini, D.; Russenschuck, S.; Siegel, N.; Siemko, A.; Trinquart, G.; Walckiers, L.; Weterings, W.

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of the LHC superconducting dipole magnet model program, a 56 mm bore, twin-aperture dipole model 1 m long, using existing cables of the standard SSC type, was launched to initiate studies of lower field magnets with smaller strand size cables for a 7 TeV collider. This model was designed, built, assembled and tested at CERN and reached a peak field of 9.7 T at 1.8 K. The paper reviews the main design principles, presents the fabrication and assembly procedures and finally discusses the overall test results

  4. A worker inside the LHC tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Technicians and engineers worked days and nights, carefully installing 20 magnets a week between 7 March 2005 and 26 April 2006. Each dipole weighs 34 tonnes and is 15 m long. Once they have been lowered down the specially constructed shaft, they begin a slow progression to their final destinations in the LHC tunnel, taking about 10 hours to arrive at the furthest point on the LHC ring.

  5. Experimental results and analysis from the 11 T Nb3Sn DS dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlachidze, G; Novitski, I; Zlobin, A V; Auchmann, B; Karppinen, M

    2013-01-01

    FNAL and CERN are developing a 5.5-m-long twin-aperture Nb3Sn dipole suitable for installation in the LHC. A 2-m-long single-aperture demonstrator dipole with 60 mm bore, a nominal field of 11 T at the LHC nominal current of 11.85 kA and 20% margin has been developed and tested. This paper presents the results of quench protection analysis and protection heater study for the Nb3Sn demonstrator dipole. Extrapolations of the results for long magnet and operation in LHC are also presented. (author)

  6. The HL-LHC accelerator physics challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, S

    2014-01-01

    We review the conceptual baseline of the HL-LHC project, putting into perspective the main beam physics challenges of this new collider in comparison with the existing LHC, and the series of solutions and possible mitigation measures presently envisaged.

  7. The HL-LHC Accelerator Physics Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartoukh, S.; Zimmermann, F.

    The conceptual baseline of the HL-LHC project is reviewed, putting into perspective the main beam physics challenges of this new collider in comparison with the existing LHC, and the series of solutions and possible mitigation measures presently envisaged.

  8. The HL-LHC accelerator physics challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, S

    2015-01-01

    The conceptual baseline of the HL-LHC project is reviewed, putting into perspective the main beam physics challenges of this new collider in comparison with the existing LHC, and the series of solutions and possible mitigation measures presently envisaged.

  9. All systems go for LHC quadrupoles

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The series fabrication of the Main Quadrupole cold masses for the LHC has begun with the delivery of the first unit on February 12th. The superconducting dipole magnets required to bend the proton beams around the LHC are often in the news. Less famous, perhaps, but equally important are the 360 main quadrupole (MQ) magnets, which will perform the principal focusing around the 27 km ring. CERN and CEA-Saclay began collaborating on the development and prototyping of these magnets in 1989. This resulted in five highly successful quadrupole units - also known as short straight sections - one of which was integrated for testing in String 1, and two others of the final design in String 2. Once the tests had confirmed the validity of the design and realization, the fabrication of the 360 cold masses had to be transferred to industry. After highly competitive tendering, the German firm ACCEL Instruments was entrusted both with the construction of the quadrupole magnets themselves, and with their assembly into the co...

  10. Large Cryogenic Infrastructure for LHC Superconducting Magnet and Cryogenic Component Tests: Layout, Commissioning and Operational Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzas, C.; Chanat, D.; Knoops, S.; Sanmarti, M.; Serio, L.

    2004-01-01

    The largest cryogenic test facility at CERN, located at Zone 18, is used to validate and to test all main components working at cryogenic temperature in the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) before final installation in the machine tunnel. In total about 1300 main dipoles, 400 main quadrupoles, 5 RF-modules, eight 1.8 K refrigeration units will be tested in the coming years.The test facility has been improved and upgraded over the last few years and the first 18 kW refrigerator for the LHC machine has been added to boost the cryogenic capacity for the area via a 25,000 liter liquid helium dewar. The existing 6 kW refrigerator, used for the LHC Test String experiments, will also be employed to commission LHC cryogenic components.We report on the design and layout of the test facility as well as the commissioning and the first 10,000 hours operational experience of the test facility and the 18 kW LHC refrigerator

  11. LHC report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    This week's Report, by Gianluigi Arduini,  will be included in the LHC Physics Day, dedicated to the reviews of the LHC physics results presented at ICHEP 2010. Seehttp://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=102669 

  12. Permanent Magnet Dipole for DIRAC Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Vorozhtsov, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    Two dipole magnets including one spare unit are needed for the for the DIRAC experiment. The proposed design is a permanent magnet dipole. The design based on Sm2Co17 blocks assembled together with soft ferromagnetic pole tips. The magnet provides integrated field strength of 24.6 10-3 T×m inside the aperture of 60 mm. This Design Report summarizes the main magnetic and mechanic design parameters of the permanent dipole magnets.

  13. The first LHC insertion quadrupole

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An important milestone was reached in December 2003 at the CERN Magnet Assembly Facility. The team from the Accelerator Technology - Magnet and Electrical Systems group, AT-MEL, completed the first special superconducting quadrupole for the LHC insertions which house the experiments and major collider systems. The magnet is 8 metres long and contains two matching quadrupole magnets and an orbit corrector, a dipole magnet, used to correct errors in quadrupole alignment. All were tested in liquid helium and reached the ultimate performance criteria required for the LHC. After insertion in the cryostat, the superconducting magnet will be installed as the Q9 quadrupole in sector 7-8, the first sector of the LHC to be put in place in 2004. Members of the quadrupole team, from the AT-MEL group, gathered around the Q9 quadrupole at its inauguration on 12 December 2003 in building 181.

  14. The latest from the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The consolidation campaign, managed by the Quench Protection team, is advancing well. Phase 1 of the campaign is focused on the new protection system designed to monitor the superconducting busbars. This system will be able to detect tiny electrical resistances on these busbars, similar to the one that caused the incident in Sector 3-4. Following completion of the design of the two principal electronics boards, the first order for 2500 and 500 such boards will be placed this week. The manufacture of the cable segments for the first three LHC sectors is going ahead, and the installation programme has already begun in Sector 4-5. In total, more than 230 km of various types of cables will have to be laid. The complete system will consist of a network of 2132 detectors housed in 436 crates around the machine. These will monitor the interconnections of the main dipoles and quadrupoles in the three major circuits. The detectors will precisely measure the electrical resistance of each busbar segment, including the ...

  15. LHC Report: Omnium-gatherum

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC team

    2012-01-01

    The last couple of weeks have seen a mixed bag of special runs, luminosity production, machine development and down-time.   Van der Meer scans were performed for ATLAS, CMS and ALICE. These scans step the beams transversely across each other and aim at a measurement of the absolute luminosity. A precise determination of the luminosity uncertainty is beneficial for many physics analyses and, indeed, measurements of important physics processes (such as top quark pair production) can be limited by luminosity errors. The scans were ultimately successful but the set-up and execution were affected by a number of technical problems. One of the main down-times was due to the replacement of an SPS dipole magnet which had developed a vacuum leak. A SPS magnet exchange is a well-practiced intervention. In this case, the whole exercise, including the pump down of the vacuum, took around 24 hours. There were also re-occuring problems with the fast switches of the SPS beam dump system. The LHC, as always, dep...

  16. End of the road for the LHC magnets...well, above ground that is!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The first LHC dipole cryomagnet has been delivered to the SMI2 building for final assembly prior to lowering it into the LHC tunnel. Over the next 3 years, all LHC cryomagnets will pass through these doors before starting their journey underground.

  17. CP-violation and electric dipole moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Dall, Matthias; Ritz, Adam, E-mail: aritz@uvic.ca [University of Victoria, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada)

    2013-03-15

    Searches for intrinsic electric dipole moments of nucleons, atoms and molecules are precision flavour-diagonal probes of new -odd physics. We review and summarise the effective field theory analysis of the observable EDMs in terms of a general set of CP-odd operators at 1 GeV, and the ensuing model-independent constraints on new physics. We also discuss the implications for supersymmetric models, in light of the mass limits emerging from the LHC.

  18. Analysis of Defective Interconnections of the 13 kA LHC Superconducting Bus Bars

    CERN Document Server

    Granieri, P P; Bianchi, M; Breschi, M; Bottura, L; Willering, G

    2012-01-01

    The interconnections between Large Hadron Collider (LHC) main dipole and quadrupole magnets are made of soldered joints of two superconducting cables stabilized by a copper bus bar. The 2008 incident revealed the possible presence of defects in the interconnections of the 13 kA circuits that could lead to unprotected resistive transitions. Since then thorough experimental and numerical investigations were undertaken to determine the safe operating conditions for the LHC. This paper reports the analysis of experimental tests reproducing defective interconnections between main quadrupole magnets. A thermo-electromagnetic model was developed taking into account the complicated sample geometry. Close attention was paid to the physical description of the heat transfer towards helium, one of the main unknown parameters. The simulation results are reported in comparison with the measurements in case of static He I cooling bath. The outcome of this study constitutes a useful input to improve the stability assessment ...

  19. CERN Open Days The LHC demystified!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Lots of surprises are being planned for the CERN Open Days scheduled for 5 and 6 April (see 21 January edition of the Bulletin). Fred’s itinerary on 6 April 20089.00 a.m\tDeparture from SM12 at CERN (the pit down which all the LHC magnets were lowered into the tunnel)9.15 a.m. Saint-Genis theatre10.00 a.m.\tRoussillon communal hall in Crozet 10.50 a.m. La Chenaille communal hall in Echenevex 11.40 a.m. CMS Building SX5 at Cessy 2.30 p.m. La Forge communal hall in Versonnex 3.30 p.m. Le Levant communal hall in Ferney Voltaire4.40 Forum in Meyrin 5.30 p.m. Main Auditorium at CERN For instance, Fred, who fronts the French television programme "C’est pas sorcier" on France 3 will be taking part in the Open Day for the general public on Sunday, 6 April. He will be on board a CERN lorry carrying a 35 tonne 15 m long dipole magnet and will make halts at eight Swiss and French communes around the LHC Ring to meet the local inhabitants (see...

  20. Build your own tiny Lego LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Abha Eli Phoboo

    2015-01-01

    A PhD student working on the ATLAS experiment has created a replica of the Large Hadron Collider using Lego building blocks. Nathan Readioff, from the University of Liverpool (see here), submitted his design to Lego Ideas (see here) this week and is now awaiting the 10,000 votes needed for it to qualify for the Lego Review, which decides if projects become new Lego products. You can help this project, vote online now!   A computer simulation of the miniature Lego LHC, complete with four detectors connected with blue dipole magnets. His Lego design is a stylised model of the LHC, showcasing the four main detectors ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb at the micro scale. Each detector is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, yet the details of the internal systems are intricate, revealed by cutaway walls. Every major detector component is represented by a Lego piece. The models are not strictly to scale with one another, but the same size base is used for each one to maximise the detail that can...

  1. Budker INP in the LHC Machine (2)

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The main BINP contributions to the LHC machine are magnets for transfer lines (26 MCHF) and bus- bar sets (23 MCHF). Budker INP is also responsible for construction of some other LHC magnets and vacuum parts. In total, the contribution to the LHC machine will reach about 90 MCHF.

  2. View of an open LHC interconnection

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    Two LHC magnets are seen before they are connected together. The blue cylinders contain the magnetic yoke and coil of the dipole magnets together with the liquid helium system required to cool the magnet so that it becomes superconducting. Eventually this connection will be welded together so that the beams are contained within the beam pipes.

  3. LHC opening delayed, operating schedule extended

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will reportedly reopen in October rather than this summer [...]. The $ 6.5 billion particle accelerator has 1'232 superconducting dipole magnets out of a total of more than 1'700 large magnets" (0.5 page)

  4. Precision transport of LHC superconducting magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    These photos show tests of the first convoy with a prototype short straight section (SSS) quadrupole in the LHC tunnel. There is little free space in the tunnel as the SSS convoy passes alongside a dipole vacuum vessel. These convoys feature infrared guidance, which offsets the minimal clearance in the tunnel and limits vibration, both of which could damage the fragile magnets.

  5. String 2, test facility for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    String 2 is the long chain seen to the right, representing one complete cell of bending dipoles, focusing quadrupoles and corrector magnets. On 17 June 2002 the test string reached the nominal running current of 11 860 A and magnetic field of 8.335 T for the LHC.

  6. LS1 Report: the electric atmosphere of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Simon Baird

    2013-01-01

    In the LHC, testing of the main magnet (dipole and quadrupole) circuits has been completed. At the same time, the extensive tests of all the other circuits up to current levels corresponding to 7 TeV beam operation have been performed, and now the final ElQA (Electrical Quality Assurance) tests of the electrical circuits are proceeding.   In Sectors 4-5 and 5-6, where the ElQA checks have been finished, the process of removing and storing the helium has started (see the article Heatwave warning for the LHC, in this issue). This is the first step in warming up the whole machine to room temperature so that the main LS1 activities, SMACC (Super Conducting Magnet and Circuit Consolidation) and the R2E (Radiation Two Electronics) programmes, which are scheduled to start on 19 April and 22 March respectively, can get under way. As far as the LHC injectors are concerned, LINAC2 and the PS Booster are in shutdown mode, having completed their preparatory hardware test programmes, and shutdown work has alr...

  7. The LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The LHC will use the latest technologies on an enormous scale. 8000 superconducting magnets will keep the beams on track. The entire 27 km ring will be cooled by 700 000 litres of liquid helium to a temperature of -271 degrees Celsius , making the LHC the world's largest superconducting installation. Conventional superconducting wire will form the magnet coils, while high-temperature superconductors will carry a total of 2 300 000 amperes from the power supplies into the magnet cryostat

  8. LHC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Preparations for the LHC proton collider to be built in CERN's LEP tunnel continue to make good progress. In particular development work for the high field superconducting magnets to guide the almost 8 TeVproton beams through the 'tight' curve of the 27-kilometre ring are proceeding well, while the magnet designs and lattice configuration are evolving in the light of ongoing experience. At the Evian LHC Experiments meeting, this progress was covered by Giorgio Brianti

  9. Technological challenges for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Rossi, Lucio; Lebrun, Philippe; Bordry, Frederick; Mess, Karl Hubert; Schmidt, Rüdiger

    2003-01-01

    For the LHC to provide particle physics with proton-proton collisions at the centre of mass energy of 14 TeV with a luminosity of 1034 cm-2s-1, the machine will operate with high-field dipole magnets using NbTi superconductors cooled to below the lambda point of helium. In order to reach design performance, the LHC requires both, the use of existing technologies pushed to the limits as well as the application of novel technologies. The construction follows a decade of intensive R&D and technical validation of major collider sub-systems. The first lecture will focus on the required LHC performance, and on the implications on the technologies. In the following lectures several examples for LHC technologies will be discussed: the superconducting magnets to deflect and focus the beams, the cryogenics to cool the magnets to a temperature below the lambda point of helium along most of the LHC circumference, the powering system supplying about 7000 magnets connected in 1700 electrical circuits with a total curr...

  10. Advanced measurement systems based on digital processing techniques for superconducting LHC magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Masi, Alessandro; Cennamo, Felice

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a particle accelerator aimed at exploring deeper into matter than ever before, is currently being constructed at CERN. Beam optics of the LHC, requires stringent control of the field quality of about 8400 superconducting magnets, including 1232 main dipoles and 360 main quadrupoles to assure the correct machine operation. The measurement challenges are various: accuracy on the field strength measurement up to 50 ppm, harmonics in the ppm range, measurement equipment robustness, low measurement times to characterize fast field phenomena. New magnetic measurement systems, principally based on analog solutions, have been developed at CERN to achieve these goals. This work proposes the introduction of digital technologies to improve measurement performance of three systems, aimed at different measurement target and characterized by different accuracy levels. The high accuracy measurement systems, based on rotating coils, exhibit high performance in static magnetic field. With vary...

  11. Commissioning of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The LHC construction is now approaching the end and it is now time to prepare for commissioning with beam. The behavior of a proton storage ring is much different to that of LEP, which profited from strong radiation damping to keep the beam stable. Our last experience with a hadron collider at CERN goes back more than 15 years when the proton-antiproton collider last operated. Ppbar taught us a lot about the machine physics of bunched beam proton storage rings and was essential input for the design of the LHC. After a short presentation of where we stand today with machine installation and hardware commissioning, I will discuss the main machine physics issues that will have to be dealt with in the LHC.

  12. Chromaticity decay due to superconducting dipoles on the injection plateau of the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Aquilina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that in a superconducting accelerator a significant chromaticity drift can be induced by the decay of the sextupolar component of the main dipoles. In this paper we give a brief overview of what was expected for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC on the grounds of magnetic measurements of individual dipoles carried out during the production. According to this analysis, the decay time constants were of the order of 200 s: since the injection in the LHC starts at least 30 minutes after the magnets are at constant current, the dynamic correction of this effect was not considered to be necessary. The first beam measurements of chromaticity showed significant decay even after a few hours. For this reason, a dynamic correction of decay on the injection plateau was implemented based on beam measurements. This means that during the injection plateau the sextupole correctors are powered with a varying current to cancel out the decay of the dipoles. This strategy has been implemented successfully. A similar phenomenon has been observed for the dependence of the decay amplitude on the powering history of the dipoles: according to magnetic measurements, also in this case time constants are of the order of 200 s and therefore no difference is expected between a one hour or a ten hours flattop. On the other hand, the beam measurements show a significant change of decay for these two conditions. For the moment there is no clue of the origin of these discrepancies. We give a complete overview of the two effects, and the modifications that have been done to the field model parameters to be able to obtain a final chromaticity correction within a few units.

  13. RF upgrade program in LHC injectors and LHC machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, E.

    2012-01-01

    The main themes of the RF upgrade program are: the Linac4 project, the LLRF-upgrade and the study of a tuning-free wide-band system for PSB, the upgrade of the SPS 800 MHz amplifiers and beam controls and the upgrade of the transverse dampers of the LHC. Whilst LHC Splice Consolidation is certainly the top priority for LS1, some necessary RF consolidation and upgrade is necessary to assure the LHC performance for the next 3- year run period. This includes: 1) necessary maintenance and consolidation work that could not fit the shorter technical stops during the last years, 2) the upgrade of the SPS 200 MHz system from presently 4 to 6 cavities and possibly 3) the replacement of one LHC cavity module. On the longer term, the LHC luminosity upgrade requires crab cavities, for which some preparatory work in SPS Coldex must be scheduled during LS1. (author)

  14. Status of the Next European Dipole (NED) activity of the collaborated accelerator research in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devred, A.; Baudouy, B.; den Ouden, A.; Baynham, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Plans for LHC upgrade and for the final focalization of linear colliders call for large aperture and/or high-performance dipole and quadrupole magnets that may be beyond the reach of conventional NbTi magnet technology. The Next European Dipole (NED) activity was launched on January 1st, 2004 to

  15. 293 K - 1.9 K supporting systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) cryo-magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, M; Renaglia, T; Rohmig, P; Williams, L R

    1998-01-01

    The LHC machine will incorporate some 2000 main ring super-conducting magnets cooled at 1.9 K by super-fluid pressurized helium, mainly 15m-long dipoles with their cryostats and 6m-long quadrupoles housed in the Short Straight Section (SSS) units. This paper presents the design of the support system of the LHC arc cryo-magnets between 1.9 K at the cold mass and 293 K at the cryostat vacuum vessel. The stringent positioning precision for magnet alignment and the high thermal performance for cryogenic efficiency are the main conflicting requirements, which have lead to a trade-off design. The systems retained for LHC are based on column-type supports positioned in the vertical plane of the magnets inside the cryostats. An ad-hoc design has been achieved both for cryo-dipoles and SSS. Each column is composed of a main tubular thin-walled structure in composite material (glass-fibre/epoxy resin, for its low thermal conductivity properties), interfaced to both magnet and cryostat via stainless steel flanges. The t...

  16. The LHC magnets' trip underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Buildings SMI 2 and SDI 2 are currently a big blue construction at the end of the Meyrin site. When they are finished, in 2003, they will be the departure point from where the magnets for the LHC will be lowered down into the tunnel. View of the new building at the end of the Meyrin site. If you live in neighbouring France, you have probably noticed a new blue steel construction that has changed the view from Saint Genis Pouilly since last March. It's the first of two contiguous buildings, SMI 2 and SDI 2, which will make it possible to prepare and lower the 1232 dipole magnets, the 400 short straight sections and some 60 insertion magnets down into the TI2 tunnel, and from there, to their final location in the LHC tunnel. According to Paul Faugeras, Technical Co-ordinator for the LHC machine, 'the installation of the magnets will start in early 2004, and hopefully everything will be done by October 2006'. The first part of the magnets' journey will take place on surface. The 15 metre-long dipole magnets a...

  17. The DFBX cryogenic distribution boxes for the LHC straight sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbasnik, Jon P.; Corradi, Carol A.; Green, Michael A.; Kajiyama, Y.; Knolls, Michael J.; LaMantia, Roberto F.; Rasson, Joseph E.; Reavill, Dulie; Turner, William C.

    2002-01-01

    The DFBX distribution boxes are designed to connect the LHC cryogenic distribution system to the interaction region quadrupoles [1] and dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The DFBX distribution boxes also have the current leads for the superconducting interaction region magnets and the LHC interaction region correction coils. The DFBX boxes also connect the magnet and cryogenic instrumentation to the CERN data collection system. The DFBX boxes serve as the cryogenic circulation center and the nerve center for four of the LHC straight sections. This report describes primarily the cryogenic function of the DFBXs

  18. Fringe fields modeling for the high luminosity LHC large aperture quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Dalena, B; Payet, J; Chancé, A; Brett, D R; Appleby, R B; De Maria, R; Giovannozzi, M

    2014-01-01

    The HL-LHC Upgrade project relies on large aperture magnets (mainly the inner Triplet and the separation dipole D1). The beam is much more sensitive to non-linear perturbations in this region, such as those induced by the fringe fields of the low-beta quadrupoles. Different tracking models are compared in order to provide a numerical estimate of the impact of fringe fields for the actual design of the inner triplet quadrupoles. The implementation of the fringe fields in SixTrack, to be used for dynamic apertures studies, is also discussed.

  19. The LHC test string first operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    Bézaguet, Alain-Arthur; Casas-Cubillos, J; Coull, L; Cruikshank, P; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Faugeras, Paul E; Flemsæter, B; Guinaudeau, H; Hagedorn, Dietrich; Hilbert, B; Krainz, G; Kos, N; Lavielle, D; Lebrun, P; Leo, G; Mathewson, A G; Missiaen, D; Momal, F; Parma, Vittorio; Quesnel, Jean Pierre; Richter, D; Riddone, G; Rijllart, A; Rodríguez-Mateos, F; Rohmig, P; Saban, R I; Schmidt, R; Serio, L; Skiadelli, M; Suraci, A; Tavian, L; Walckiers, L; Wallén, E; Van Weelderen, R; Williams, L; McInturff, A

    1996-01-01

    CERN operates the first version of the LHC Test String which consists of one quadrupole and three 10-m twin aperture dipole magnets. An experimental programme aiming at the validation of the LHC systems started in February 1995. During this programme the string has been powered 100 times 35 of which at 12.4 kA or above. The experiments have yielded a number of results some of which, like quench recovery for cryogenics, have modified the design of subsystems of LHC. Others, like controlled helium leaks in the cold bore and quench propagation bewteen magnets, have given a better understanding on the evolution of the phenomena inside a string of superconducting magnets cooled at superfluid helium temperatures. Following the experimental programme, the string will be powered up and powered down in one hour cycles as a fatigue test of the structure thus simulating 20 years of operation of LHC.

  20. The dipole response of {sup 132}Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrock, Philipp; Aumann, Thomas; Johansen, Jacob; Schindler, Fabia [IKP, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Boretzky, Konstanze [GSI Helmholtzzentrum (Germany); Rossi, Dominic [Michigan State University (United States); Collaboration: R3B-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance (IVGDR) is a well-known collective excitation in which all protons oscillate against all neutrons of a nucleus. In neutron-rich nuclei an additional low-lying dipole excitation occurs, often denoted as Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR). To study the PDR in exotic Sn-isotopes, an experiment has been successfully performed with the upgraded R{sup 3}B-LAND setup at GSI. The complete-kinematics measurement of all reaction participants allows for the reconstuction of the excitation energy and, hence, the extraction of the dipole strength. Presented are the main features of the experiment, the analysis concept and the current status of the analysis of the dipole response of the doubly-magic isotope {sup 132}Sn.

  1. LHC milestone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    At the December meeting of CERN's Council, the Organization's Governing Body, the delegates from the 16 Member States unanimously agreed that the LHC proton-proton collider proposed for the 27-kilometre LEP tunnel is the 'right machine for the advance of the subject and of the future of CERN'

  2. LHC Create

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    LHC Create is an upcoming 2-day workshop held at IdeaSquare in November. Participants from CERN and IPAC school of design will compete to design an exhibit that explains why CERN does what it does. The winner will have their exhibit fully realised and made available to experiments, institutes, and tourism agencies around the world.

  3. High Luminosity LHC Project Description

    CERN Document Server

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Rossi, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is a novel configuration of the Large Hadron Collider, aiming at increasing the luminosity by a factor five or more above the nominal LHC design, to allow increasing the integrated luminosity, in the high luminosity experiments ATLAS and CMS, from the 300 fb-1 of the LHC original design up to 3000 fb-1 or more. This paper contains a short description of the main machine parameters and of the main equipment that need to be developed and installed. The preliminary cost evaluation and the time plan are presented, too. Finally, the international collaboration that is supporting the project, the governance and the project structure are discussed, too.

  4. LHC Accelerator Fault Tracker - First Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonio, Andrea; Roderick, Chris; Schmidt, Ruediger; Todd, Benjamin; Wollmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Availability is one of the key performance indicators of LHC operation, being directly correlated with integrated luminosity production. An effective tool for availability tracking is a necessity to ensure a coherent capture of fault information and relevant dependencies on operational modes and beam parameters. At the beginning of LHC Run 2 in 2015, the Accelerator Fault Tracking (AFT) tool was deployed at CERN to track faults or events affecting LHC operation. Information derived from the AFT is crucial for the identification of areas to improve LHC availability, and hence LHC physics production. For the 2015 run, the AFT has been used by members of the CERN Availability Working Group, LHC Machine coordinators and equipment owners to identify the main contributors to downtime and to understand the evolution of LHC availability throughout the year. In this paper the 2015 experience with the AFT for availability tracking is summarised and an overview of the first results as well as an outlook to future develo...

  5. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f ~ 20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  6. What the neutron knows about the top at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenik, Jernej F. [Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ljubljana Univ. (Slovenia). Dept. of Physics; Papucci, Michele [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab.; European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Weiler, Andreas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the direct and indirect bounds on dipole operators involving the top quark. A careful analysis shows that the experimental upper limit on the neutron electric dipole moment strongly constrains the chromo-electric dipole of the top. We improve previous bounds by two orders of magnitude. This has significant implications for new physics models and it also means that CP violation in top pair production mediated by dipole operators will not be accessible at the LHC. The CP conserving chromo-magnetic dipole moments are constrained by recent measurements of the t anti t spectrum by the ATLAS collaboration. We also update the indirect constraints on electric and magnetic dipole moments from radiative b{yields}s transitions, finding that they can be considerably larger than their colored counterparts. (orig.)

  7. The last stage of LHC construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serin, L.

    2006-01-01

    A few months ago the setting of the LHC (large hadron collider) machine began in the Lep's tunnel at CERN. The LHC is composed of 1200 dipole magnets that are progressively installed in the 27 km long underground circular facility, 2 universal experiments ATLAS and CMS, huge by the size of their respective detector: 40 x 20 x 20 m as well as by their number of participants: 1500 people for each one are being built in gigantic carves. All the efforts are concentrated to make every component of the machine fully installed by summer 2007 in order to get the first collisions before 2008

  8. Electric dipole moments reconsidered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupertsberger, H.

    1989-01-01

    The electric dipole moments of elementary particles, atoms, molecules and their connection to the electric susceptibility are discussed for stationary states. Assuming rotational invariance it is emphasized that for such states only in the case of a parity and time reversal violating interaction the considered particles can obtain a nonvanishing expectation value for the electric dipole moment. 1 fig., 13 refs. (Author)

  9. Exclusive ϒ photoproduction in hadronic collisions at CERN LHC energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, V.P., E-mail: barros@ufpel.edu.br [High and Medium Energy Group, Instituto de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Moreira, B.D.; Navarra, F.S. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-06

    The exclusive ϒ photoproduction in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at LHC energies is investigated using the color dipole formalism and considering different models for the ϒ wave function and forward dipole–target scattering amplitude. Our goal is to update the color dipole predictions and estimate the theoretical uncertainty present in these predictions. We present predictions for the kinematical ranges probed by the ALICE, CMS and LHCb Collaborations.

  10. Magnetic and mechanical design of a 130 mm aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felice, H.; Vedrine, P. [CEA Saclay, DAPNIA/SACM/LEAS, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Mailfert, A. [LEM, F-54500 Vandoeuvre Les Nancy, (France)

    2007-07-01

    For the next generation of dipoles for accelerators, two main challenges come into play. In one hand, high dipolar fields in the range of 13 to 15 T are targeted. In the other hand, large apertures (above 80 mm) are required in the interaction regions. These two requirements lead to two issues. First, a new superconductor has to replace the NbTi as its limits have been reached around 10 T with the LHC. The superconducting material liable to be its successor is the Nb{sub 3}Sn. However, it is a very mechanical stress sensitive material. Up to now, a mechanical stress of 150 MPa is supposed to degrade its critical properties. Second, large aperture dipole can not be considered with the well-known cosine theta design. Indeed, above 88 mm, azimuthal Lorentz forces in this magnetic configuration produces mechanical stresses on the coil midplane higher than the acceptable limit. In this paper, an alternative coil arrangement based on intersecting ellipses and limiting the mechanical stresses is proposed for a 130 mm aperture dipole. The first part of this paper is dedicated to the magnetic study of this magnet. We can underline the fact that the field quality required in particle accelerators can be reached with a bore field of about 13 T. The second part deals with the mechanical structure of the magnet which is necessary to withstand the Lorentz forces involved and to apply pre-stress. (authors)

  11. LHC Startup

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067853

    2008-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider will commence operations in the latter half of 2008. The plans of the LHC experiments ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are described. The scenario for progression of luminosity and the strategies of these 4 experiments to use the initial data are detailed. There are significant measurements possible with integrated luminosities of 1, 10 and 100 pb^-1. These measurements will provide essential calibration and tests of the detectors, understanding of the Standard Model backgrounds and a first oportunity to look for new physics.

  12. Changes in earth's dipole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Peter; Amit, Hagay

    2006-11-01

    The dipole moment of Earth's magnetic field has decreased by nearly 9% over the past 150 years and by about 30% over the past 2,000 years according to archeomagnetic measurements. Here, we explore the causes and the implications of this rapid change. Maps of the geomagnetic field on the core-mantle boundary derived from ground-based and satellite measurements reveal that most of the present episode of dipole moment decrease originates in the southern hemisphere. Weakening and equatorward advection of normal polarity magnetic field by the core flow, combined with proliferation and growth of regions where the magnetic polarity is reversed, are reducing the dipole moment on the core-mantle boundary. Growth of these reversed flux regions has occurred over the past century or longer and is associated with the expansion of the South Atlantic Anomaly, a low-intensity region in the geomagnetic field that presents a radiation hazard at satellite altitudes. We address the speculation that the present episode of dipole moment decrease is a precursor to the next geomagnetic polarity reversal. The paleomagnetic record contains a broad spectrum of dipole moment fluctuations with polarity reversals typically occurring during dipole moment lows. However, the dipole moment is stronger today than its long time average, indicating that polarity reversal is not likely unless the current episode of moment decrease continues for a thousand years or more.

  13. LHC Report: machine development

    CERN Multimedia

    Rogelio Tomás García for the LHC team

    2015-01-01

    Machine development weeks are carefully planned in the LHC operation schedule to optimise and further study the performance of the machine. The first machine development session of Run 2 ended on Saturday, 25 July. Despite various hiccoughs, it allowed the operators to make great strides towards improving the long-term performance of the LHC.   The main goals of this first machine development (MD) week were to determine the minimum beam-spot size at the interaction points given existing optics and collimation constraints; to test new beam instrumentation; to evaluate the effectiveness of performing part of the beam-squeezing process during the energy ramp; and to explore the limits on the number of protons per bunch arising from the electromagnetic interactions with the accelerator environment and the other beam. Unfortunately, a series of events reduced the machine availability for studies to about 50%. The most critical issue was the recurrent trip of a sextupolar corrector circuit –...

  14. Impedance and collective effects in the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gareyte, J [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1996-08-01

    After a review of the main LHC parameters, and a brief description of the RF and vacuum systems, the coupling impedances of the main machine elements are given, as well as the resulting thresholds for instabilities. (author)

  15. The dipoles reach the half-way mark

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the positioning of the 616th magnet, installation of the LHC dipoles has reached the half-way mark. Only half the dipoles remain to be installed! The 616th dipole out of a total of 1232 was installed at 3 a.m on Wednesday 12 July. Night and day, the tunnel is the setting for a never-ending series of carefully choreographed installation operations. At a rate of around twenty per week, there has been a steady underground flow of dipole magnets, each measuring 15 metres in length and weighing 34 tonnes. 'In order to recover the accumulated delays, installation is proceeding three times faster than planned', confides Claude Hauviller, who is supervising LHC installation. Four dipoles can be transported underground at the same time. It is a real challenge, which the 65-man team responsible for this difficult task faces on a daily basis. This is because there is very little space in the tunnel and there are no passing places for the magnet transport vehicles. The room for manoeuvre can sometimes be measured ...

  16. Properties of the superconductor in accelerator dipole magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teravest, Derk

    Several aspects of the application of superconductors to high field dipole magnets for particle accelerators are discussed. The attention is focused on the 10 tesla (1 m model) magnet that is envisaged for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator. The basic motivation behind the study is the intention of employing superconductors to their utmost performance. An overview of practical supercomputers, their applications and their impact on high field dipole magnets used for particle accelerators, is presented. The LHC reference design for the dipole magnets is outlined. Several models were used to study the influence of a number of factors in the shape and in particular, the deviation from the shape that is due to the flux flow state. For the investigated extrinsic and intrinsic factors, a classification can be made with respect to the effect on the shape of the characteristic of a multifilamentary wire. The optimization of the coil structure for high field dipole magnets, with respect to the field quality is described. An analytical model for solid and hollow filaments, to calculate the effect of filament magnetization in the quality of the dipole field, is presented.

  17. Lepton dipole moments

    CERN Document Server

    Marciano, William J

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a self-contained description of the measurements of the magnetic dipole moments of the electron and muon, along with a discussion of the measurements of the fine structure constant, and the theory associated with magnetic and electric dipole moments. Also included are the searches for a permanent electric dipole moment of the electron, muon, neutron and atomic nuclei. The related topic of the transition moment for lepton flavor violating processes, such as neutrinoless muon or tauon decays, and the search for such processes are included as well. The papers, written by many o

  18. 1754 Days to the LHC and counting!

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    At the 118th session of CERN Council, held on Friday 15 June under the chairmanship of Professor Maurice Bourquin of Switzerland, Director-General, Luciano Maiani, presented the commissioning schedule for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for the first time. The LHC will collide its first beams in a pilot run starting on 1 April 2006. 'We are 1754 days from the LHC', said Professor Maiani. A full seven-month physics run will begin in August 2006, and the LHC's heavy-ion programme will start in February 2007. Left to right: Lyn Evans, Luciano Maiani, Alexander Skrinsky, and Kurt Hubner with the magnets from Novosibirsk. Professor Maiani underlined to Council that the LHC is now CERN's most important single activity, accounting for over 70% of the Laboratory's resources. Moreover, with some 70% of the total LHC cost adjudicated and 30% paid, the project is very far advanced. With the adjudication this Autumn of the contracts for the 1236 fifteen metre superconducting dipole magnets, the placing of major contrac...

  19. On the feasibility of a tripler uprade for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    McIntyre, P

    2006-01-01

    The design of high-field dipoles has been optimized using a block-coil geometry. The optimization includes stress management and flux plate suppression of multipoles from snap-back. The design has been extended to higher field by devising a hybrid coil geometry containing inner windings of Bi-2212 and outer windings of Nb$_{3}$Sn. A 24 Tesla dual dipole using this design offers the possibility of an LHC tripler. Issues of fabrication technology and synchrotron radiation control are discussed. There is no obvious upper limit to the field that could be attained for the dipoles of future hadron colliders.

  20. The LHC machine Exhibition Lepton-Photon 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The LHC will enable the study of proton-proton and ion-ion collisions. The existing chain of injectors (LINAC, booster, PS, SPS) will provide the necessary particles. The LHC superconducting magnets will generate the highest magnetic fields ever reached in an accelerator of this scale. The dipoles and quadrupoles will be interconnected so as to form a continuous cryogenic "pipe" installed in the 27 km-long LEP/LHC tunnel with its separate cryoline. The superconducting RF accelerating cavities, along with the beam cleaning and beam dump systems, will complete the machine.

  1. LHC an unprecedented technological challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baruch, J.O.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents the future LHC (large hadron collider) in simple terms and gives some details concerning radiation detectors and supra-conducting magnets. LHC will take the place of the LEP inside the 27 km long underground tunnel near Geneva and is scheduled to operate in 2007. 8 years after its official launching the LHC project has piled up 2 year delay and has exceeded its initial budget (2 milliard euros) by 18%. Technological challenges and design difficulties are the main causes of these shifts. The first challenge has been carried out successfully, it was the complete clearing out of the LEP installation. In order to release 14 TeV in each proton-proton collision, powerful magnetic fields (8,33 Tesla) are necessary. 1248 supra-conducting 15 m-long bipolar magnets have to be built. 30% of the worldwide production of niobium-titanium wires will be used each year for 5 years in the design of these coils. The global cryogenic system will be gigantic and will use 94 tons of helium. 4 radiation detectors are being built: ATLAS (a toroidal LHC apparatus), CMS (compact muon solenoid), ALICE (a large ion collider experiment) and LHC-b (large hadron collider beauty). The 2 first will search after the Higgs boson, ALICE will be dedicated to the study of the quark-gluon plasma and LHC-b will gather data on the imbalance between matter and anti-matter. (A.C.)

  2. Some dipole shower studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabouat, Baptiste; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2018-03-01

    Parton showers have become a standard component in the description of high-energy collisions. Nowadays most final-state ones are of the dipole character, wherein a pair of partons branches into three, with energy and momentum preserved inside this subsystem. For initial-state showers a dipole picture is also possible and commonly used, but the older global-recoil strategy remains a valid alternative, wherein larger groups of partons share the energy-momentum preservation task. In this article we introduce and implement a dipole picture also for initial-state radiation in Pythia, and compare with the existing global-recoil one, and with data. For the case of Deeply Inelastic Scattering we can directly compare with matrix element expressions and show that the dipole picture gives a very good description over the whole phase space, at least for the first branching.

  3. Particle electric dipole moments

    CERN Document Server

    Pendlebury, J M

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of particle electric dipole moments (EDMs) continue to put powerful constraints on theories of T-symmetry and CP-symmetry violation, which form currently one of the most prominent fields in particle physics. EDM measurements have been concentrated on neutral systems such as the neutron and atoms and molecules. These measurements allow one to deduce, in turn, the electric dipole moments of the fundamental fermions, that is, the lighter leptons and quarks and also those of some heavy nuclei.

  4. LHC Report: imaginative injectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Pierre Freyermuth for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    A new bunch injection scheme from the PS to the SPS allowed the LHC to achieve a new peak luminosity record.   Figure 1: PSB multi-turn injection principle: to vary the parameters during injection with the aim of putting the newly injected beam in a different region of the transverse phase-space plan. The LHC relies on the injector complex to deliver beam with well-defined bunch populations and the necessary transverse and longitudinal characteristics – all of which fold directly into luminosity performance. There are several processes taking place in the PS Booster (PSB) and the Proton Synchrotron (PS) acting on the beam structure in order to obtain the LHC beam characteristics. Two processes are mainly responsible for the beam brightness: the PSB multi-turn injection and the PS radio-frequency (RF) gymnastics. The total number of protons in a bunch and the transverse emittances are mostly determined by the multi-turn Booster injection, while the number of bunches and their time spacin...

  5. Dipole nano-laser: Theory and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghannam, T., E-mail: gtalal@hotmail.com [King Abdullah Institute for Nano-Technology, King Saud University, PO Box 2454, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-03-31

    In this paper we outline the main quantum properties of the system of nano-based laser called Dipole Nano-Laser emphasizing mainly on its ability to produce coherent light and for different configurations such as different embedding materials and subjecting it to an external classical electric field.

  6. LHC Report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    During last week the commissioning effort has been devoted to beam development work, required to accelerate beams with nominal bunch intensity to 3.5 TeV. Significant progress has been done with the commissioning of the systems required to control the beam size and bunch length during the ramp and accelerate the beam with reproducible characteristics. The setting-up of the collimation system for the operation with higher intensity is presently ongoing with the aim of delivering physics with nominal bunch intensity towards the end of next week. For more information about the LHC and a video of the presentation recently done by LHC operators, please visit: http://lpcc.web.cern.ch/LPCC/ http://indico.cern.ch/categoryDisplay.py?categId=2687

  7. Quench simulations for superconducting elements in the LHC accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnemann, F.; Schmidt, R.

    2000-08-01

    The design of the protection system for the superconducting elements in an accelerator such as the large Hadron collider (LHC), now under construction at CERN, requires a detailed understanding of the thermo-hydraulic and electrodynamic processes during a quench. A numerical program (SPQR - simulation program for quench research) has been developed to evaluate temperature and voltage distributions during a quench as a function of space and time. The quench process is simulated by approximating the heat balance equation with the finite difference method in presence of variable cooling and powering conditions. The simulation predicts quench propagation along a superconducting cable, forced quenching with heaters, impact of eddy currents induced by a magnetic field change, and heat transfer through an insulation layer into helium, an adjacent conductor or other material. The simulation studies allowed a better understanding of experimental quench data and were used for determining the adequate dimensioning and protection of the highly stabilised superconducting cables for connecting magnets (busbars), optimising the quench heater strip layout for the main magnets, and studying quench back by induced eddy currents in the superconductor. After the introduction of the theoretical approach, some applications of the simulation model for the LHC dipole and corrector magnets are presented and the outcome of the studies is compared with experimental data.

  8. Dynamics of nonstationary dipole vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesthaven, J.S.; Lynov, Jens-Peter; Nycander, J.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamics of tilted dipole vortices in the equivalent barotropic vorticity (or Hasegawa-Mima) equation is studied. A recent theory is compared with numerical simulations and found to describe the short time behavior of dipole vortices well. In the long time limit the dipoles are found to eithe...... disintegrate or relax toward a steady eastward propagating dipole vortex. This relaxation is a consequence of nonviscous enstrophy loss by the dipole vortex....

  9. Robert Aymar seals the last interconnect in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    The LHC completes the circle. On 7 November, in a brief ceremony in the LHC tunnel, CERN Director General Robert Aymar (Photo 1) sealed the last interconnect between the main magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Jean-Philippe Tock, leader of the Interconnections team, tightens the last bolt (Photos 4-8).

  10. A bit of the LHC in the mairies

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    As partners in the Organization’s Open Days, the communes will be given a present that is very symbolic of CERN. On Saturday, 5 April, CERN will be offering its personnel and their families preview visits to the LHC before the general public is admitted the following day. The mayors and deputy mayors of each partner commune will inaugurate the various tour routes. A CERN delegation will take the opportunity to offer the mayors a unique present to thank them for their invaluable cooperation: a 60 cm diameter section of a dipole magnet weighing almost 10 kg. The choice of present is no coincidence. It is highly symbolic since the dipoles are at the very heart of the LHC project. Each section is a faithful replica of a slice of one of the 1232 LHC dipole magnets which will be used to guide the particles around the ring. The dipoles alone occupy almost 18 km of the 27 km LHC tunnel. They are composed of superconducting cables, consisting of niobium-titanium strands with ...

  11. MD 349: Impedance Localization with AC-dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Biancacci, Nicolo; Metral, Elias; Salvant, Benoit; Papotti, Giulia; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this MD is to measure the distribution of the transverse impedance of the LHC by observing the phase advance variation with intensity between the machine BPMs. Four injected bunches with different intensities are excited with an AC dipole and the turn by turn data is acquired from the BPM system. Through post-processing analysis the phase variation along the machine is depicted and, from this information, first conclusions of the impedance distribution can be drawn.

  12. Stability of the Horizontal Curvature of the LHC Cryodipoles During Cold Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, E D Fernandez; García-Pérez, J; Jeanneret, Jean Bernard; Poncet, A; Seyvet, F; Tovar-Gonzalez, A; Wildner, E; IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci.

    2006-01-01

    The LHC will be composed of 1232 horizontally curved, 15 meter long, superconducting dipole magnets cooled at 1.9 K. They are supported within their vacuum vessel by three Glass Fiber Reinforced Epoxy (GFRE) support posts. Each cryodipole is individually cold tested at CERN before its installation and interconnection in the LHC 27 km circumference tunnel. As the magnet geometry under cryogenic operation is extremely important for the LHC machine aperture, a new method has been developed at CERN in order to monitor the magnet curvature change between warm and cold states. It enabled us to conclude that there is no permanent horizontal curvature change of the LHC dipole magnet between warm and cold states, although a systematic horizontal transient deformation during cool-down was detected. This deformation generates loads in the dipole supporting system; further investigation permitted us to infer this behavior to the asymmetric thermal contraction of the rigid magnet thermal shield during cool-down. Controlli...

  13. High-Field Nb3Sn Cos-theta Dipole with Stress Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novitski, Igor [Fermilab; Carmichael, Justin [Fermilab; Kashikhin, Vadim V. [Fermilab; Zlobin, Alexander V. [Fermilab

    2017-01-01

    Cost-effective superconducting dipole magnets with operating fields up to 16 T are being considered for the LHC en-ergy upgrade (HE-LHC) and a Future Circular Collider (FCC). To demonstrate feasibility of 15 T accelerator quality dipole mag-nets, FNAL as a part of the US-MDP is developing a single-aper-ture Nb3Sn dipole demonstrator based on a 4-layer graded cos-theta coil with 60 mm aperture and cold iron yoke. In parallel, to explore the limit of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet technology, op-timize magnet design and performance parameters, and reduce magnet cost, magnet design studies are also being performed to push the nominal bore field to 16 T in a 60-mm aperture cos-theta dipole. Results of these studies are reported and discussed in this paper.

  14. Optics Measurements and Correction Challenges for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Carlier, Felix Simon; Fartoukh, Stephane; Fol, Elena; Gamba, Davide; Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Ana; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Hofer, Michael; Langner, Andy Sven; Maclean, Ewen Hamish; Malina, Lukas; Medina Medrano, Luis Eduardo; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Skowronski, Piotr Krzysztof; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Van Der Veken, Frederik; Wegscheider, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Optics control in the HL-LHC will be challenged by a very small β* of 15 cm in the two main experiments. HL-LHC physics fills will keep a constant luminosity during several hours via β* leveling. This will require the commissioning of a large number of optical configurations, further challenging the efficiency of the optics measurements and correction tools. We report on the achieved level of optics control in the LHC with simulations and extrapolations for the HL-LHC.

  15. Ten out of ten for LHC decapole magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN's Albert Ijspeert (left) and Avinash Puntambekar of the Indian CAT laboratory with the ten Indian decapole magnets on the test bench. Tests will be carried out by the LHC-MTA group. A batch of 10 superconducting decapole magnets for the LHC has just arrived at CERN from India. These will be used to correct for slight imperfections in the dipole magnets that will steer proton beams around CERN's new accelerator. All magnets have slight imperfections in the fields they produce, and in the LHC dipoles these will be corrected for using sextupoles and decapoles. The sextupoles were the first LHC magnets to be given the production green-light following successful tests of pre-series magnets last year (Bulletin 21/2000, 22 May 2000). Now it is the turn of pre-series decapoles to go on trial at CERN. Of the LHC's 1232 dipole magnets, half will use sextupole correctors only and the other half will use both sextupoles and decapoles. That means that a total of 616 pairs of decapoles are needed. Like the sextupole...

  16. Alternative dipole magnets for ISABELLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C.; Althaus, R.; Caspi, S.; Gilbert, W.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Meuser, R.; Rechen, J.; Warren, R.

    1982-05-01

    A dipole magnet, intended as a possible alternative for the ISABELLE main ring magnet, was designed. Three layers of FNAL Doubler/Saver conductor were used. Two 1.3-m-long models were built and tested, both with and without an iron core, and in both helium I and helium II. The training behavior, cyclic energy loss, point of quench initiation, and quench velocity were determined. A central field of 6.5 tesla was obtained in He I (4.4 K), and 7.6 tesla in He II (1.8K).

  17. Dipole-dipole dispersion interactions between neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Babb, James F.; Higa, Renato; Hussein, Mahir S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the long-range interactions between two neutrons utilizing recent data on the neutron static and dynamic electric and magnetic dipole polarizabilities. The resulting long-range potentials are used to make quantitative comparisons between the collisions of a neutron with a neutron and a neutron with a proton. We also assess the importance of the first pion production threshold and first excited state of the nucleon, the $\\Delta$-resonance ($J^{\\pi}$ = + 3/2, I = 3/2). We found b...

  18. Quench propagation tests on the LHC superconducting magnet string

    CERN Document Server

    Coull, L; Krainz, G; Rodríguez-Mateos, F; Schmidt, R

    1996-01-01

    The installation and testing of a series connection of superconducting magnets (three 10 m long dipoles and one 3 m long quadrupole) has been a necessary step in the verification of the viability of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In the LHC machine, if one of the lattice dipoles or quadrupoles quenches, the current will be by-passed through cold diodes and the whole magnet chain will be de-excited by opening dump switches. In such a scenario it is very important to know whether the quench propagates from the initially quenching magnet to adjacent ones. A series of experiments have been performed with the LHC Test String powered at different current levels and at different de-excitation rates in order to understand possible mechanisms for such a propagation, and the time delays involved. Results of the tests and implications regarding the LHC machine operation are described in this paper.

  19. Multiple transparency windows and Fano interferences induced by dipole-dipole couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, E. C.; Borges, H. S.; Villas-Boas, C. J.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the optical properties of a two-level system (TLS) coupled to a one-dimensional array of N other TLSs with dipole-dipole coupling between the first neighbors. The first TLS is probed by a weak field, and we assume that it has a decay rate much greater than the decay rates of the other TLSs. For N =1 and in the limit of a Rabi frequency of a probe field much smaller than the dipole-dipole coupling, the optical response of the first TLS, i.e., its absorption and dispersion, is equivalent to that of a three-level atomic system in the configuration which allows one to observe the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) phenomenon. Thus, here we investigate an induced transparency phenomenon where the dipole-dipole coupling plays the same role as the control field in EIT in three-level atoms. We describe this physical phenomenon, named a dipole-induced transparency (DIT), and investigate how it scales with the number of coupled TLSs. In particular, we have shown that the number of TLSs coupled to the main TLS is exactly equal to the number of transparency windows. The ideas presented here are very general and can be implemented in different physical systems, such as an array of superconducting qubits, or an array of quantum dots, spin chains, optical lattices, etc.

  20. Dipoles at rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    In a world populated by magnetic monopoles (as well as ordinary electric charges), there are two kinds of electric dipoles: those due to separated electric charges, and those due to current loops of magnetic charge. Similarly, there are two kinds of magnetic dipoles: those due to separated magnetic monopoles, and those due to electric current loops. This paper derives the potentials and fields of each of the four dipole species, and calculates the force, torque, energy, momentum, and angular momentum of each type, when placed (at rest) in a static external field (which may itself be produced by electric charges and currents, magnetic charges and currents, or all of these). Some implications and applications of the various results are discussed

  1. Dark Matter Searches at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Terashi, Koji; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This talk will present dark matter searches at the LHC in the PIC2017 conference. The main emphasis is placed on the direct dark matter searches while the interpretation of searches for SUSY and invisible Higgs signals for the dark matter is also presented.

  2. The neutron electric dipole moment and the Weinberg's operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chongsheng; Hu Bingquan

    1992-01-01

    After a summary of the predictions for the neutron electric dipole moment in a number of models of CP violation, the authors review mainly the recent developments associated with Weimberg's purely gluonic CP violation operator. Its implications on the neutron electric dipole moment in various models of CP violation are discussed. Inspired by Weimberg's work, several new mechanisms of generating large electric dipole moments of charged leptons and large electric and chromo-electric dipole moments of light quarks are recently proposed. Brief discussions on these new developments are also given

  3. Searches for SUSY at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchilava, A.

    1997-01-01

    One of the main motivations of experiments at the LHC is to search for SUSY particles. The talk is based on recent analyses, performed by CMS Collaboration, within the framework of the Supergravity motivated minimal SUSY extension of the Standard Model. The emphasis is put on leptonic channels. The strategies for obtaining experimental signatures for strongly and weakly interacting sparticles productions, as well as examples of determination of SUSY masses and model parameters are discussed. The domain of parameter space where SUSY can be discovered is investigated. Results show, that if SUSY is of relevance at Electro-Weak scale it could hardly escape detection at LHC. (author)

  4. Automating dipole subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, K.; Moch, S.; Uwer, P.

    2008-07-01

    We report on automating the Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction which is a general procedure to treat infrared divergences in real emission processes at next-to-leading order in QCD. The automatization rests on three essential steps: the creation of the dipole terms, the calculation of the color linked squared Born matrix elements, and the evaluation of different helicity amplitudes. The routines have been tested for a number of complex processes, such as the real emission process gg→t anti tggg. (orig.)

  5. Automating dipole subtraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, K.; Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Uwer, P. [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik

    2008-07-15

    We report on automating the Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction which is a general procedure to treat infrared divergences in real emission processes at next-to-leading order in QCD. The automatization rests on three essential steps: the creation of the dipole terms, the calculation of the color linked squared Born matrix elements, and the evaluation of different helicity amplitudes. The routines have been tested for a number of complex processes, such as the real emission process gg{yields}t anti tggg. (orig.)

  6. Automatic dipole subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, K.

    2008-01-01

    The Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction is a general procedure to treat infrared divergences in real emission processes at next-to-leading order in QCD. We automatized the procedure in a computer code. The code is useful especially for the processes with many parton legs. In this talk, we first explain the algorithm of the dipole subtraction and the whole structure of our code. After that we show the results for some processes where the infrared divergences of real emission processes are subtracted. (author)

  7. Measurement of the Residual Resistivity Ratio of the Bus Bars Copper Stabilizer of the 13 kA Circuits of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonio, A; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Schmidt, R; Verweij, A; Siemko, A; Claudet, S; Steckert, J; Thiesen, H

    2012-01-01

    After the incident of September 2008, the operational beam energy of the LHC has been set to 3.5 TeV, since not all joints of the superconducting (SC) bus bars between magnets have the required quality for 7 TeV operation. This decision is based on simulations to determine the safe current in the main dipole and quadrupole circuits, reproducing the thermal behaviour of a quenched superconducting joint by taking into account all relevant factors that affect a possible thermal runaway. One important parameter is the Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) of the copper stabilizer of the bus bar connecting the superconducting magnets. A dedicated campaign to measure the RRR for the main 13 kA circuits of the LHC in all sectors was performed during the Christmas stop in December 2010 and January 2011. The measurement method as well as the data analysis and results are presented in this paper.

  8. Measurement of the Residual Resistivity Ratio of the busbars copper stabilizer of the 13kA circuits of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonio, A; Solfaroli, M; Schmidt, R; Verweij, A

    2012-01-01

    After the incident of September 2008, the operational beam energy of the LHC has been set to 3.5 TeV, since not all joints of the superconducting busbars between magnets have the required quality for 7 TeV operation. This choice is based on simulations to determine the safe current in the main dipole and quadrupole magnets, reproducing the thermal behavior of a quenched superconducting joint by taking into account all relevant factors that affect a possible thermal runaway. One important parameter of the simulation is the RRR (Residual Resistivity Ratio) of the copper stabilizer of the busbar connecting superconducting magnets. A dedicated campaign to measure this quantity for the main 13kA circuits of the LHC on all sectors was performed during the Christmas stop in December 2010 and January 2011. The measurement method as well as the data analysis and results are presented in this note.

  9. Design and fabrication of the prototype superconducting tuning quadrupole and octupole correction winding for the LHC project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perin, R.; Siegel, N.; Bidaurrazaga, H.; Garcia Tabares, L.

    1992-01-01

    CERN is preparing for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to be installed in the LEP tunnel. The magnetic lattice of the LHC will consist of a ring of twin aperture dipoles and quadrupoles, connected electrically in series. To adjust the working point of the machine, so called tuning quadrupoles will be installed in pairs in each regular cell, next to the main quadrupoles. Also, to correct multipolar field errors in the LHC, an octupole correction winding is required near each lattice quadrupole. A nested construction of these two magnets is foreseen. As part of the LHC R and D program, CERN and ACICA (a group of five Spanish industries: Abengoz, Canzler, Indar, Cenemesa and AME; since June 1990 Cenemesa is part of ABB Spain), signed a common development agreement for the design, fabrication and testing of a prototype tuning quadrupole and octupole corrector. This paper describes the design of these magnets, giving details of magnetic and mechanical calculations, including results from existing and specially developed computer codes, and model work. Further, the construction procedures are described, including the facilities and tooling developed by ACICA for this work

  10. Impact of a CP-violating Higgs sector: from LHC to baryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jing; Zhang, Yue

    2013-08-30

    We observe a generic connection between LHC Higgs data and electroweak baryogenesis: the particle that contributes to the CP-odd hgg or hγγ vertex would provide the CP-violating source during a first-order phase transition. It is illustrated in the two Higgs doublet model that a common complex phase controls the lightest Higgs properties at the LHC, electric dipole moments, and the CP-violating source for electroweak baryogenesis. We perform a general parametrization of Higgs effective couplings and a global fit to the LHC Higgs data. Current LHC measurements prefer a nonzero phase for tanβ≲1 and electric dipole moment constraints still allow an order-one phase for tanβ∼1, which gives sufficient room to generate the correct cosmic baryon asymmetry. We also give some prospects in the direct measurements of CP violation in the Higgs sector at the LHC.

  11. Dipole-dipole van der Waals interaction in alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, B.N.; Thakur, K.P.

    1978-01-01

    Values of van der Waals dipole-dipole constants and interaction energetics of alkali halides are reported using the recent data. The values obtained are somewhat larger than those of earlier workers. (orig.) [de

  12. Quantum calculation of dipole excitation in fusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simenel, C.; Chomaz, Ph.; De France, G.

    2000-01-01

    The excitation of the giant dipole resonance by fusion is studied with N/Z asymmetry in the entrance channel. The TDHF solution exhibits a strong dipole vibration which can be associated with a giant vibration along the main axis of a fluctuating prolate shape. The consequences on the gamma-ray emission from hot compound nuclei are discussed. (author)

  13. Dashboard for the LHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, J; Cirstoiu, C; Miguel, M D F D; Ivanchenko, A; Gaidioz, B; Herrala, J; Janulis, M; Maier, G; Maguire, E J; Rivera, R P; Rocha, R; Saiz, P; Sidorova, I; Belov, S; Berejnoj, A; Kodolova, O; Chen, Y; Chen, T; Chiu, S; Munro, C

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the Experiment Dashboard monitoring system, which is currently in use by four Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments. The goal of the Experiment Dashboard is to monitor the activities of the LHC experiments on the distributed infrastructure, providing monitoring data from the virtual organization (VO) and user perspectives. The LHC experiments are using various Grid infrastructures (LCG/EGEE, OSG, NDGF) with correspondingly various middleware flavors and job submission methods. Providing a uniform and complete view of various activities like job processing, data movement and publishing, access to distributed databases regardless of the underlying Grid flavor is the challenging task. In this paper we will describe the Experiment Dashboard concept, its framework and main monitoring applications

  14. CERN: LHC progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The push for CERN's next major project, the LHC proton collider to be built in the 27-kilometre LEP tunnel, is advancing on a wide front. For the machine itself, there has been considerable progress in the detailed design. While the main thrust is for proton-proton collisions, heavy ions are also on the LHC collision menu. On the experimental side, proposals are coming into sharper focus. For the machine, the main aim is for the highest possible proton collision energies and collision rates in the confines of the existing LEP tunnel, and the original base design looked to achieve these goals in three collision regions. Early discussions on the experimental programme quickly established that the most probable configuration would have two collision regions rather than three. This, combined with hints that the electronics of several detectors would have to handle several bunch crossings at a time, raised the question whether the originally specified bunch spacing of 15 ns was still optimal

  15. Dipole-dipole dispersion interactions between neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babb, James F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, ITAMP, Cambridge, MA (United States); Higa, Renato [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hussein, Mahir S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Estudos Avancados, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, CTA, Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    We investigate the long-range interactions between two neutrons utilizing recent data on the neutron static and dynamic electric and magnetic dipole polarizabilities. The resulting long-range potentials are used to make quantitative comparisons between the collisions of a neutron with a neutron and a neutron with a proton. We also assess the importance of the first pion production threshold and first excited state of the nucleon, the Δ-resonance (J{sup π} = +3/2, I = 3/2). We found both dynamical effects to be quite relevant for distances r between ∝ 50 fm up to ∝ 10{sup 3} fm in the nn system, the neutron-wall system and in the wall-neutron-wall system, reaching the expected asymptotic limit beyond that. Relevance of our findings to the confinement of ultra cold neutrons inside bottles is discussed. (orig.)

  16. The Alignment Jacks of the LHC Cryomagnets

    CERN Document Server

    Dwivedi, J; Goswami, S G; Madhumurthy, V; Parma, V; Soni, H C

    2004-01-01

    The precise alignment of the 1232 dipoles, 474 Short Straight Sections (SSS) and some other components of the LHC collider, requires the use of 6800 jacks. The specific requirements and the need for a cost-effective solution for this large production, justified the development and industrialisation of a dedicated mechanical jack. The jack was developed, and is now being produced by Centre for Advanced Technology, India, in the framework of a collaboration between CERN and the Department of Atomic Energy in India. Three jacks support each of the 32-ton heavy, 15-meter long cryo-dipole of LHC, and provide the required alignment features. Identical jacks support the lighter LHC Short Straight Sections. Presently, the mass production of 6800 jacks is in progress with two Indian manufacturers, and 3545 jacks have already been delivered to CERN by April 2004. Considering the successful performance of the jacks, it is now envisaged to extend their use, with some modifications, for even higher-demanding alignment of ...

  17. Luminosity Optimization for a Higher-Energy LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, O

    2011-01-01

    A Higher-Energy Large Hadron Collider (HE-LHC) is an option to further push the energy frontier of particle physics beyond the present LHC. A beam energy of 16.5 TeV would require 20 T dipole magnets in the existing LHC tunnel, which should be compared with 7 TeV and 8.33 T for the nominal LHC. Since the synchrotron radiation power increases with the fourth power of the energy, radiation damping becomes significant for the HE-LHC. It calls for transverse and longitudinal emittance control vis-a-vis beam-beam interaction and Landau damping. The heat load from synchrotron radiation, gas scattering, and electron cloud also increases with respect to the LHC. In this paper we discuss the proposed HE-LHC beam parameters; the time evolution of luminosity, beam-beam tune shifts, and emittances during an HE-LHC store; the expected heat load; and luminosity optimization schemes for both round and flat beams.

  18. LHC Report: Now it’s full speed ahead (still with probe beam)

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont

    2015-01-01

    Since the last report, the commissioning with beam was delayed after a short to ground appeared in the cold mass of the main dipole chain in sector 3-4. After a remarkable team effort coordinated by the Machine Protection group, a procedure to burn away the small piece of metallic debris that was causing the earth fault was conceived, prototyped, tested and deployed. The intervention was successfully completed on the afternoon of 31 March and the first beams circulated in the LHC on Sunday, 5 April. Just a few days later, at just past midnight on Friday, 10 April, beam was ramped up to 6.5 TeV.   "LHC page 1" shows the status of the LHC last night. The black line shows the beam energy increasing to 6.5 TeV. The intervention successfully conducted in sector 3-4 opened the way for the completion of quench training in the sector and the final qualification of the circuit. This marked the end of a long and arduous powering test campaign that has fully qualified all circuits for...

  19. Instrumentation status of the low-b magnet systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Darve, C.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Perin, A.; Vauthier, N.

    2011-01-01

    The low-beta magnet systems are located in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) insertion regions around the four interaction points. They are the key elements in the beams focusing/defocusing process allowing proton collisions at luminosity up to 10**34/cm**2s. Those systems are a contribution of the US-LHC Accelerator project. The systems are mainly composed of the quadrupole magnets (triplets), the separation dipoles and their respective electrical feed-boxes (DFBX). The low-beta magnet systems operate in an environment of extreme radiation, high gradient magnetic field and high heat load to the cryogenic system due to the beam dynamic effect. Due to the severe environment, the robustness of the diagnostics is primordial for the operation of the triplets. The hardware commissioning phase of the LHC was completed in February 2010. In the sake of a safer and more user-friendly operation, several consolidations and instrumentation modifications were implemented during this commissioning phase. This paper presents ...

  20. Instrumentation Status of the Low-β Magnet Systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Darve, C; Casas-Cubillos, J; Perin, A; Vauthier, N

    2011-01-01

    The low-β magnet systems are located in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) insertion regions around the four interaction points. They are the key elements in the beams focusing/defocusing process allowing proton collisions at luminosity up to 1034cm-2s-1. Those systems are a contribution of the US-LHC Accelerator project. The systems are mainly composed of the quadrupole magnets (triplets), the separation dipoles and their respective electrical feed-boxes (DFBX). The low-β magnet systems operate in an environment of extreme radiation, high gradient magnetic field and high heat load to the cryogenic system due to the beam dynamic effect. Due to the severe environment, the robustness of the diagnostics is primordial for the operation of the triplets. The hardware commissioning phase of the LHC was completed in February 2010. In the sake of a safer and more user-friendly operation, several consolidations and instrumentation modifications were implemented during this commissioning phase. This paper presents the in...

  1. Installation of the ALICE dipole magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The large dipole magnet is installed on the ALICE detector at CERN. This magnet, which is cooled by demineralised water, will bend the path of muons that leave the huge rectangular solenoid (in the background). These muons are heavy electrons that interact less with matter, allowing them to traverse the main section of the detector.

  2. Dipole-dipole interaction of dust grains in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tskhakaya, D.D.; Shukla, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Complete screening of the negative dust grain charge by a cloud of trapped ions in plasmas is investigated. In the external electric field, the compound dust particle - 'dust grain + ion cloud' acquires a dipole moment due to displacement of the centers of positive and negative charges in the opposite directions. By analogy to the Van der Waals potential, the dipole-dipole interaction of the compound dust particles can have an attractive behavior. It is shown that the dipole-dipole attractive force can exceed the shadowing force that is connected with the reciprocal interception of ions by the neighboring dust grains

  3. The Latest from the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    In SM18 six magnets have been cold tested with good results. It has also been a good week for cyostating with five more magnets completed. In sector 3-4 interconnection work and welding has started in the area damaged on 19 September last year. Interconnection work is also ongoing on the replacement magnet for the faulty dipole removed from sector 1-2. Three separate teams are now working in the three sectors to install the new DN200 pressure release nozzles. In total 27 magnets have been completed so far, with 34 nozzles welded. A new study is also underway to include a similar pressure release system for both the stand-alone magnets (SAMs) and the triplet magnets. All about Chamonix At the public session of the LHCC (the LHC experiments committee) held Wednesday, 18 February Steve Myers, Director for Accelerators and Technology, reviewed the discussions on the LHC at the Chamonix workshop. He explained the scenarios being studied to implement the machine consolidation measures and resume operation. The ...

  4. The LHC Low Level RF

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, Philippe; Molendijk, John Cornelis; Olsen, Ragnar; Rohlev, Anton; Rossi, Vittorio; Stellfeld, Donat; Valuch, Daniel; Wehrle, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight 400 MHz superconducting cavities per ring, with each cavity independently powered by a 300 kW klystron, via a circulator. The challenge for the Low Level is to cope with very high beam current (more than 1 A RF component) and achieve excellent beam lifetime (emittance growth time in excess of 25 hours). Each cavity has an associated Cavity Controller rack consisting of two VME crates which implement high gain RF Feedback, a Tuner Loop with a new algorithm, a Klystron Ripple Loop and a Conditioning system. In addition each ring has a Beam Control system (four VME crates) which includes a Frequency Program, Phase Loop, Radial Loop and Synchronization Loop. A Longitudinal Damper (dipole and quadrupole mode) acting via the 400 MHz cavities is included to reduce emittance blow-up due to filamentation from phase and energy errors at injection. Finally an RF Synchronization system implements the bunch into bucket transfer from the SPS into each LHC ring. When fully installed in 2007, the...

  5. Operational results from the LHC luminosity monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, R.; Ratti, A.; Matis, H.S.; Stezelberger, T.; Turner, W.C.; Yaver, H.; Bravin, E.

    2011-03-28

    The luminosity monitors for the high luminosity regions in the LHC have been operating to monitor and optimize the luminosity since 2009. The device is a gas ionization chamber inside the neutral particle absorber 140 m from the interaction point and monitors showers produced by high energy neutral particles from the collisions. It has the ability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation in the nominal LHC operation. We present operational results of the device during proton and lead ion operations in 2010 and make comparisons with measurements of experiments. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN can accelerate proton and lead ion beams to 7 TeV and 547 TeV and produce collisions of these particles. Luminosity measures performance of the LHC and is particularly important for experiments in high luminosity interaction points (IPs), ATLAS (IP1) and CMS (IP5). To monitor and optimize the luminosities of these IPs, BRAN (Beam RAte Neutral) detectors [1, 2] have been installed and operating since the beginning of the 2009 operation [3]. A neutral particle absorber (TAN) protects the D2 separation dipole from high energy forward neutral particles produced in the collisions [4]. These neutral particles produce electromagnetic and hadronic showers inside the TAN and their energy flux is proportional to the collision rate and hence to the luminosity. The BRAN detector is an Argon gas ionization chamber installed inside the TANs on both sides of the IP1 and IP5 and monitors the relative changes in the luminosity by detecting the ionization due to these showers. When the number of collisions per bunch crossing (multiplicity) is small, the shower rate inside the TAN is also proportional to the luminosity. Hence, the detector is designed to operate by measuring either the shower rate (counting mode for low and intermediate luminosities) or the average shower flux (pulse height mode for high luminosities). The detector is

  6. LHC Report: focus on luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    The intensity ramp-up of the LHC beams resumed last Friday after the main powering system of the PS accelerator was put back in service.    The image above shows the last twenty four hours of fill #4947 in the machine. The LHC operations team kept the beams of this fill in the machine for a record 35 and a half hours.  Beams are back in the LHC. On Friday, the accelerator resumed the intensity ramp-up, reaching 1752 bunches per beam last week-end. The intensity ramp-up was interrupted on 20 May because of a problem with the PS’s main power supply (see box). A steady increase in the total number of bunches per beam is required to check out all aspects of beam operation and make sure the LHC is fully safe before the nominal number of bunches per beam can be brought into collision. At present, four intensity steps have been completed: 313, 601, 889, and 1177 bunches per beam. The qualification of the next step with 1752 bunches is in progress. At every s...

  7. Keeping the LHC in power

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    The critical safety equipment around the LHC, including the machine protection systems, is connected to Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS).  In case of mains failure, the UPS systems continue to power, for a limited time, these critical systems and ensure a safe shutdown of the accelerator. This week, work began to upgrade and replace over 100 UPS systems in the LHC.   The new UPS installations. For the LHC, even a perturbation on the mains is more than just an inconvenience: it often results in beam dumps and, in some cases, requires an energy extraction from superconducting circuits. When this occurs, machine protection systems, and in particular the Quench Protection System, must remain active to correctly carry out the shutdown procedure. With the UPS systems, 10 minutes of crucial power can be provided to the protection systems during this critical phase. There are currently two UPS systems in place in each one of the 32 LHC UPS zones. Originally one was used as a backup if ...

  8. LHC beampipe section

    CERN Multimedia

    A short section of the LHC beam-pipe including beam screen. In the LHC, particles circulate under vacuum. The vacuum chamber can be at room temperature (for example, in the experimental areas), or at cryogenic temperature, in the superconductive magnets. This piece is located in the superconductive magnets. The outer pipe is the vacuum chamber, which is in contact with the magnets, at cryogenic temperature (1.9K). It is called the “cold bore”. The inner tube is the beam screen. Its main goal is to protect the magnets from the heat load coming from the synchrotron radiation. Indeed, when high energy protons’ trajectory is bent, photons are emitted by the beam. They are intercepted by the beam screen. The temperature of the beam screen is kept between 5 and 20K by a circulation of gaseous helium in the small pipes on both sides of the beam screen. As those surfaces are at cryogenic temperature. The residual gas present in the accelerator is sticking on the surfaces. This phenomenon called “adsorption”...

  9. LHC Power Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Pedersen, J

    1999-01-01

    The power distribution for the LHC machine and its experiments will be realised making extensive use of the existing infrastructure for the LEP. The overall power requirement is approximately the same, about 125 MW. The load distribution will however change. The even points will loose in importance and the points 1 and 5 will, due to the installation of ATLAS and CMS, gain. A thorough reorganisation of the 18 kV distribution will thus be necessary. Due to the important cryogenic installations required for the LHC, the 3.3 kV distribution system, supplying mainly cryogenic compressors, will be extended with a number of new substations. The important number of new surface buildings, underground caverns and other underground structures all will receive general service installations: Lighting and power. The new injection tunnels will require complete installations: A.C. supplies for the power converters and for general service, and D.C. cabling for the magnets of the beam line. Special safe power installations ar...

  10. LHC Capabilities for Quarkonia

    CERN Document Server

    Petrushanko, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of the charmonium and bottomonium resonances in nucleus-nucleus collisions provides crucial information on high-density QCD matter. First, the suppression of quarkonia production is generally agreed to be one of the most direct probes of quark-gluon plasma formation. The observation of anomalous J/$\\psi$ suppression at the CERN-SPS and at RHIC is well established but the clarification of some important remaining questions requires equivalent studies of the $\\Upsilon$ family, only possible at the LHC energies. Second, the production of heavy-quarks proceeds mainly via gluon-gluon fusion processes and, as such, is sensitive to saturation of the gluon density at low-x in the nucleus. Measured departures from the expected vacuum quarkonia cross-sections in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC will thus provide valuable information not only on the thermodynamical state of the produced partonic medium, but also on the initial-state modifications of the nuclear parton distribution functions. The capabilities ...

  11. Considerations on a Partial Energy Upgrade of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, Stephane; Missiaen, Dominique; Todesco, Ezio; Zimmermann, Frank

    2017-01-01

    In the frame of the HL-LHC project, a few accelerator dipole and quadrupole magnets of higher critical field and/or larger aperture are being produced. The new inner triplet quadrupoles and dispersion-suppressor dipoles are made from Nb$_{3}$Sn superconductor, which supports a higher field than the classical Nb-Ti magnets used for the LHC. For the longer term future, it has been proposed to replace a fraction of the Nb-Ti arc magnets in the LHC arcs with Nb$_{3}$Sn magnets of higher field (e.g. 11 T), in order to boost the beam energy. Here we examine several options: the replacement of every third dipole by a stronger one, the substitution of the present Nb-Ti quadrupole by Nb$_{3}$Sn combined-function magnets, the excitation of the horizontal orbit correctors, and pushing all the dipole magnets to their ultimate field. We discuss challenges and constraints, including issues related to mechanical aperture, powering, or other hardware limitations, and we estimate the potential energy reach for each of the opt...

  12. Vacuum vessels for the LHC magnets arrive at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The first batch of pre-series vacuum vessels for the LHC dipole magnets has just been delivered to CERN. The vessels are components of the cryostats and will provide the thermal insulation for the superconducting magnets. The first batch of vacuum vessels for the LHC dipole magnets with the team taking part at CERN in ordering and installing them. Left to right : Claude Hauviller, Monique Dupont, Lloyd Williams, Franck Gavin, Alain Jacob, Christophe Vuitton, Davide Bozzini, Laure Sandri, Mikael Sjoholm and André de Saever. In 2006 all that will be seen of the LHC superconducting dipoles in the LHC tunnel will be a line of over 1230 blue cylindrical vacuum vessels. Ten vessels, each weighing 4 tonnes, are already at CERN. On 6 July the first batch of pre-series vessels reached the Lab-oratory from the firm SIMIC Spa whose works are near Savona in north-western Italy. Despite appearances, these 15-metre long, 1-metre diameter blue tubes are much more sophisticated than sections of a run-of-the-mill...

  13. Golden Jubilee Photos: The great LHC industrial adventure

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Assembly of the LHC's superconducting dipoles in 2003 at the German company Noell, one of the three European industrial centres of production for the 1 250 dipole magnets. Moving a project from the drawing board into production is never an easy task. With a project as sophisticated, innovative and grandiose as the LHC, it becomes a major challenge lasting several years. When the LHC was approved in December 1994, the teams knew that a colossal task lay ahead of them. The LHC Division was created in 1996 and quickly saw its staff numbers rise to around 300 full-time employees. One of the major difficulties was the move from the prototype phase to industrial series production, involving, among other things, the production of 1250 fifteen-metre-long superconducting dipole magnets forming the very heart of the machine. As an illustration of the complexity involved, these magnets are made up of windings of superconducting cables, each comprising some thirty strands approximately 1 millimetre in diameter, each stra...

  14. HL-LHC Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    The tentative schedule, key ingredients, as well as progress of pertinent R&D and component prototypes for the LHC luminosity upgrade, "HL-LHC," are reviewed. Also alternative scenarios based on performance-improving consolidations (PICs) instead of a full upgrade are discussed. Tentative time schedules and expected luminosity evolutions for the different scenarios are sketched. The important role of HL-LHC development as a step towards a future HE-LHC or VHE-LHC is finally highlighted. Presented at "Higgs & Beyond" Conference Tohoku University, Sendai 7 June 2013.

  15. Simulation studies on the electron cloud build-up in the elements of the LHC Arcs at 6.5 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkstal, Philipp; Mether, Lotta; Rumolo, Giovanni; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The formation of electron clouds in the arcs of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been identified as one of the main limitations for the performance of the machine. In particular, the impacting electrons can deposit a significant power on the cold beam screens of the LHC superconducting magnets, which translates into a significant heat load for the cryogenic system. A detailed model of the e-cloud formation in the different elements of the LHC arc half-cell has been developed using the PyECLOUD simulation code. The model includes the main dipole and quadrupole magnets, shorter corrector magnets and drift spaces. Particular care was taken to correctly model the impact of the hotoelectrons produced by the beam synchrotron radiation. For this purpose, we reviewed the available literature on the characterization of the LHC beam screen surface in terms of reflectivity and photoelectron yield and we defined the necessary steps to obtain the photoemission model in the format required in input by t...

  16. Giant Primeval Magnetic Dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    Macroscopic magnetic dipoles are considered cosmic dark matter. Permanent magnetism in relativistic field structures can involve some form of superconductivity, one example being current-carrying string loops (“springs”) with vanishing net tension. We derive the cross-section for free classical dipoles to collide, finding it depends weakly on orientation when mutual precession is rapid. The collision rate of “spring” loops with tension { T }˜ {10}-8{c}4/G in galactic halos approaches the measured rate of fast radio bursts (FRBs) if the loops compose most of the dark matter. A large superconducting dipole (LSD) with mass ˜1020 g and size ˜1 mm will form a ˜100 km magnetosphere moving through interstellar plasma. Although hydromagnetic drag is generally weak, it is strong enough to capture some LSDs into long-lived rings orbiting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that form by the direct collapse of massive gas clouds. Repeated collisions near young SMBHs could dominate the global collision rate, thereby broadening the dipole mass spectrum. Colliding LSDs produce tiny, hot electromagnetic explosions. The accompanying paper shows that these explosions couple effectively to propagating low-frequency electromagnetic modes, with output peaking at 0.01-1 THz. We describe several constraints on, and predictions of, LSDs as cosmic dark matter. The shock formed by an infalling LSD triggers self-sustained thermonuclear burning in a C/O (ONeMg) white dwarf (WD) of mass ≳1 M ⊙ (1.3 M ⊙). The spark is generally located off the center of the WD. The rate of LSD-induced explosions matches the observed rate of Type Ia supernovae.

  17. Experiments with dipole antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Employment of a data-acquisition system for data collection and calculations makes experiments with antennas more convenient and less time consuming. The determined directional patterns of the dipole antennas of different lengths are in reasonable agreement with theory. The enhancement of the signal by using a reflector is demonstrated, and a variant of the Yagi-Uda antenna is explored. The experiments are suitable as laboratory works and classroom demonstrations, and are attractive for student projects.

  18. ALICE dipole and decoration

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ALICE cavern receives a painting made specially to mark the 50th anniversary of CERN that is mounted on the L3 solenoid magnet, reused from the LEP experiment that ran from 1989 to 2000. The dipole, which is cooled by demineralised water, will bend the path of muons that leave the huge rectangular solenoid. These muons are heavy electrons that interact less with matter allowing them to be studied at large distances from the interaction point.

  19. Mechanical Behaviour of the LHC Cryodipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Buenaventura, A; Skoczen, Blazej

    2000-01-01

    The LHC cryodipoles are slender and heavy objects more than 15-m long. The major components of the cryodipole assembly are the 28-tonne cold mass, supported on its three Glass-Fibre-Reinforced-Epoxy support posts and the 4-tonne vacuum vessel. The performance of the LHC depends very much upon the accurate positioning of the dipoles and the beam tubes, in particular to maximise the useful beam apertures. The cryodipoles will be conditioned and measured in surface assembly buildings, then handled and transported to their positions in the tunnel and, finally, aligned. This paper presents the static and dynamic studies of the cryodipole in different configurations. The tests and analyses carried out have led to a thorough understanding of the mechanical behaviour of the cryodipoles. From the static analysis, an hyperstatic supporting system is proposed in order to minimise the systematic deflections and the effects due to changing temperature conditions in the tunnel. The dynamic analysis has shown that the cryod...

  20. Slice through an LHC focusing magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Slice through an LHC superconducting quadrupole (focusing) magnet. The slice includes a cut through the magnet wiring (niobium titanium), the beampipe and the steel magnet yokes. Particle beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have the same energy as a high-speed train, squeezed ready for collision into a space narrower than a human hair. Huge forces are needed to control them. Dipole magnets (2 poles) are used to bend the paths of the protons around the 27 km ring. Quadrupole magnets (4 poles) focus the proton beams and squeeze them so that more particles collide when the beams’ paths cross. Bringing beams into collision requires a precision comparable to making two knitting needles collide, launched from either side of the Atlantic Ocean.

  1. Visualizing dipole radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girwidz, Raimund V

    2016-01-01

    The Hertzian dipole is fundamental to the understanding of dipole radiation. It provides basic insights into the genesis of electromagnetic waves and lays the groundwork for an understanding of half-wave antennae and other types. Equations for the electric and magnetic fields of such a dipole can be derived mathematically. However these are very abstract descriptions. Interpreting these equations and understanding travelling electromagnetic waves are highly limited in that sense. Visualizations can be a valuable supplement that vividly present properties of electromagnetic fields and their propagation. The computer simulation presented below provides additional instructive illustrations for university lectures on electrodynamics, broadening the experience well beyond what is possible with abstract equations. This paper refers to a multimedia program for PCs, tablets and smartphones, and introduces and discusses several animated illustrations. Special features of multiple representations and combined illustrations will be used to provide insight into spatial and temporal characteristics of field distributions—which also draw attention to the flow of energy. These visualizations offer additional information, including the relationships between different representations that promote deeper understanding. Finally, some aspects are also illustrated that often remain unclear in lectures. (paper)

  2. Dipole defects in beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holanda, B A; Cordeiro, R C; Blak, A R

    2010-01-01

    Dipole defects in gamma irradiated and thermally treated beryl (Be 3 Al 2 Si 6 O 18 ) samples have been studied using the Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) technique. TSDC experiments were performed in pink (morganite), green (emerald), blue (aquamarine) and colourless (goshenite) natural beryl. TSDC spectra present dipole peaks at 190K, 220K, 280K and 310K that change after gamma irradiation and thermal treatments. In morganite samples, for thermal treatments between 700K and 1100K, the 280K peak increase in intensity and the band at 220K disappears. An increase of the 280K peak and a decrease of the 190K peak were observed in the TSDC spectra of morganite after a gamma irradiation of 25kGy performed after the thermal treatments. In the case of emerald samples, thermal treatments enhanced the 280K peak and gamma irradiation partially destroyed this band. The goshenite TSDC spectra present only one band at 280K that is not affected either by thermal treatments or by gamma irradiation. All the observed peaks are of dipolar origin because the intensity of the bands is linearly dependent on the polarization field, behaviour of dipole defects. The systematic study, by means of TSDC measurements, of ionizing irradiation effects and thermal treatments in these crystals makes possible a better understanding of the role played by the impurities in beryl crystals.

  3. Links between astroparticle physics and the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinfold, James L

    2005-01-01

    Research into the fundamental nature of matter at the high energy frontier takes place in three main areas: accelerator-based particle physics, high energy astrophysics, and the cosmology of the early universe. As a consequence the study of astroparticle physics can have significant implications for collider physics at the LHC. Likewise, the LHC project provides the laboratory to perform measurements of great importance for cosmic ray astrophysics and cosmology. This paper reviews some of the important synergistic links between astroparticle and LHC physics. (topical review)

  4. LHC Report: The beam is back at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Reyes Alemany

    2015-01-01

    A series of sector beam tests paved the way for the start-up of the LHC in 2008 and 2009. These tests and the follow-up of the issues that arose were part of the process that led to a smooth start-up with beam.   Given this experience, sector tests were scheduled to take place several weeks before the 2015 start-up. On the weekend of 6-9 March, beam from the SPS was injected into both LHC injection regions, followed by a first pass through the downstream LHC sectors. For the clockwise LHC beam (called “beam 1”) this meant passing through ALICE and into Sector 2-3, while the anticlockwise beam (called “beam 2”) was threaded through LHCb and all the way from Point 8 to Point 6, where it was extracted by the beam dump kickers onto the beam dump block. The dry runs in the previous weeks were mainly targeted at preparation for the sector tests. The systems tested included: injection, timing, synchronisation and beam instrumentation. The beam interlock ...

  5. Experience with LHC Magnets from Prototyping to Large Scale Industrial Production and Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Rossi, L

    2004-01-01

    The construction of the LHC superconducting magnets is approaching its half way to completion. At the end of 2003, main dipoles cold masses for more than one octant were delivered; meanwhile the winding for the second octant was almost completed. The other large magnets, like the main quadrupoles and the insertion quadrupoles, have entered into series production as well. Providing more than 20 km of superconducting magnets, with the quality required for an accelerator like LHC, is an unprecedented challenge in term of complexity that has required many steps from the construction of 1 meterlong magnets in the laboratory to today’s production of more than one 15 meter-long magnet per day in Industry. The work and its organization is made even more complex by the fact that CERN supplies most of the critical components and part of the main tooling to the magnet manufacturers, both for cost reduction and for quality issues. In this paper the critical aspects of the construction will be reviewed and the actual ...

  6. Academic Training: A walk through the LHC injector chain

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 21, 22, 23 March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 A walk through the LHC injector chain M. BENEDIKT, P. COLLIER, K. SCHINDL /CERN-AB Proton linac, PS Booster, PS, SPS and the two transfer channels from SPS to LHC are used for LHC proton injection. The lectures will review the features of these faithful machines and underline the modifications required for the LHC era. Moreover, an overview of the LHC lead ion injector scheme from the ion source through ion linac, LEIR, PS and SPS right to the LHC entry will be given. The particular behaviour of heavy ions in the LHC will be sketched and the repercussions on the injectors will be discussed. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  7. LHC suppliers win Golden Hadron awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    In a ceremony on 30 July, three of the 200 suppliers for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) were presented with Golden Hadron awards. It is the third year that the awards have been presented to suppliers, not only for their technical and financial achievements but also for their compliance with contractual deadlines. This year the three companies are all involved in the supplies for the LHC's main magnet system.

  8. AutoDipole - Automated generation of dipole subtraction terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, K.; Uwer, P.

    2009-11-01

    We present an automated generation of the subtraction terms for next-to-leading order QCD calculations in the Catani-Seymour dipole formalism. For a given scattering process with n external particles our Mathematica package generates all dipole terms, allowing for bothmassless and massive dipoles. The numerical evaluation of the subtraction terms proceeds with MadGraph, which provides Fortran code for the necessary scattering amplitudes. Checks of the numerical stability are discussed. (orig.)

  9. AutoDipole - Automated generation of dipole subtraction terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, K.; Uwer, P. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    We present an automated generation of the subtraction terms for next-to-leading order QCD calculations in the Catani-Seymour dipole formalism. For a given scattering process with n external particles our Mathematica package generates all dipole terms, allowing for bothmassless and massive dipoles. The numerical evaluation of the subtraction terms proceeds with MadGraph, which provides Fortran code for the necessary scattering amplitudes. Checks of the numerical stability are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Quarkonium photoproduction in pp and AA collisions at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay Ducati, M.B.; Griep, M.T.; Machado, M.V.T.

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we report on the investigations of the exclusive production of quarkonium states in proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus reactions at the LHC using the theoretical framework of the light-cone dipole formalism. In particular, we discuss the rapidity distribution for J/ψ, ψ(2S) and Υ(1S) states and the transverse momentum distribution for the J/ψ meson. The numerical calculations are compared to recent experimental results and prediction are done for future LHC runs in the ultra-peripheral channel. (authors)

  11. Status of the LHC Superconducting Cable Mass Production

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, J D; Cavallari, Giorgio; Charifoulline, Z; Denarié, C H; Le Naour, S; Leroy, D F; Oberli, L R; Richter, D; Verweij, A P; Wolf, R

    2002-01-01

    Six contracts have been placed with industrial companies for the production of 1200 tons of the superconducting (SC) cables needed for the main dipoles and quadrupoles of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In addition, two contracts have been placed for the supply of 470 tons of NbTi and 26 tons of Nb sheets. The main characteristic of the specification is that it is functional. This means that the physical, mechanical and electrical properties of strands and cables are specified without defining the manufacturing processes. Facilities for the high precision measurements of the wire and cable properties have been implemented at CERN, such as strand and cable critical current, copper to superconductor ratio, interstrand resistance, magnetisation, RRR at 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The production has started showing that the highly demanding specifications can be fulfilled. This paper reviews the organisation of the contracts, the test facilities installed at CERN, the various types of measurements and the results of the ma...

  12. Further Development of the Sextupole and Decapole Spool Corrector Magnets for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Allitt, M; Ijspeert, Albert; Karmarkar, M; Karppinen, M; Mazet, J; Pérez, J; Puntambekar, A; Ruwali, K; Salminen, J; Thipsay, A

    2000-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) the main dipoles will be equipped with sextupole (MCS) and decapole (MCD) spool correctors to meet the very high demands of field quality required for the satisfactory operation of the machine. Each decapole corrector will in addition have an octupole insert (MCO) and the assembly of the two is designated MCDO. These correctors are needed in relatively large quantities, i.e. 2464 MCS Sextupoles and 1232 MCDO Decapole-Octupole assemblies. Half the number of the required spool correctors will be made in India through a collaboration between CERN and CAT (Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, India), the other half will be built by European industry. The paper describes final choices concerning design, materials, production techniques, and testing so as to assure economic magnet manufacture but while maintaining a homogenous magnetic quality that results in a robust product.

  13. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mischke, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    The status of experiments to measure the electric dipole moment of the neutron is presented and the planned experiment at Los Alamos is described. The goal of this experiment is an improvement in sensitivity of a factor of 50 to 100 over the current limit. It has the potential to reveal new sources of T and CP violation and to challenge calculations that propose extensions to the Standard Model. The experiment employs several advances in technique to reach its goals and the feasibility of meeting these technical challenges is currently under study

  14. LHC synchronization test successful

    CERN Multimedia

    The synchronization of the LHC's clockwise beam transfer system and the rest of CERN's accelerator chain was successfully achieved last weekend. Tests began on Friday 8 August when a single bunch of a few particles was taken down the transfer line from the SPS accelerator to the LHC. After a period of optimization, one bunch was kicked up from the transfer line into the LHC beam pipe and steered about 3 kilometres around the LHC itself on the first attempt. On Saturday, the test was repeated several times to optimize the transfer before the operations group handed the machine back for hardware commissioning to resume on Sunday. The anti-clockwise synchronization systems will be tested over the weekend of 22 August.Picture:http://lhc-injection-test.web.cern.ch/lhc-injection-test/

  15. Towards LHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    As plans for the LHC proton collider to be built in CERN's 27-kilometre LEP tunnel take shape, interest widens to bring in the experiments exploiting the big machine. The first public presentations of 'expressions of interest' for LHC experiments featured from 5-8 March at Evian-les-Bains on the shore of Lake Geneva, some 50 kilometres from CERN, at the special Towards the LHC Experimental Programme' meeting

  16. Magnetic dipole moment of a moving electric dipole

    OpenAIRE

    Hnizdo, V.

    2012-01-01

    The current density of a moving electric dipole is expressed as the sum of polarization and magnetization currents. The magnetic field due to the latter current is that of a magnetic dipole moment that is consistent with the relativistic transformations of the polarization and magnetization of macroscopic electrodynamics.

  17. Collisional transfer of coherence by electric dipole-dipole interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gough , W.

    1983-01-01

    An expression is derived for the contribution from dipole-dipole interaction to the intensity of sensitized fluorescence, from the results of a theory by Chiu. Tensor operator methods are used. The degree of polarization is deduced for certain particular cases.

  18. LHC and CLIC LLRF final reports

    CERN Document Server

    Dexter, A; Woolley, B; Ambattu, P; Tahir, I; Syratchev, Igor; Wuensch, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Crab cavities rotate bunches from opposing beams to achieve effective head-on collision in CLIC or collisions at an adjustable angle in LHC. Without crab cavities 90% of achievable luminosity at CLIC would be lost. In the LHC, the crab cavities allow the same or larger integrated luminosity while reducing significantly the requested dynamic range of physics detectors. The focus for CLIC is accurate phase synchronisation of the cavities, adequate damping of wakefields and modest amplitude stability. For the LHC, the main LLRF issues are related to imperfections: beam offsets in cavities, RF noise, measurement noise in feedback loops, failure modes and mitigations. This report develops issues associated with synchronising the CLIC cavities. It defines an RF system and experiments to validate the approach. It reports on the development of hardware for measuring the phase performance of the RF distributions system and cavities. For the LHC, the hardware being very close to the existing LLRF, the report focuses on...

  19. Magnetic field of a dipole and the dipole-dipole interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    With a data-acquisition system and sensors commercially available, it is easy to determine magnetic fields produced by permanent magnets and to study the dipole-dipole interaction for different separations and angular positions of the magnets. For sufficiently large distances, the results confirm the 1/R 3 law for the magnetic field and the 1/R 4 law for the interaction force between two dipoles, as well as their angular dependences

  20. Extended equivalent dipole model for radiated emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Obiekezie, Chijioke S.

    2016-01-01

    This work is on the characterisation of radiated fields from electronic devices. An equivalent dipole approach is used. Previous work showed that this was an effective approach for single layer printed circuit boards where an infinite ground plane can be assumed. In this work, this approach is extended for the characterisation of more complex circuit boards or electronic systems.\\ud For complex electronic radiators with finite ground planes, the main challenge is characterising field diffract...

  1. CKM angles measurements and New Physics at Lhc b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musy, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a review is given of the main characteristics of the future measurements of the unitary triangle by the Lhc b experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (Lhc), and the expected achievable precision. The Lhc b experiment will be able to exploit a wide range of physics decays involving the B mesons, allowing for the possibility to have early indications of New Physics.

  2. Synchrotron radiation interferences between small dipoles at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovet, C.; Burns, A.; Meot, F.; Placidi, M.; Rossa, E.; Vries, J. de

    1997-06-01

    Synchrotron Radiation interferences between small dipoles in the very low (visible) frequency range have been studied at the LEP diagnostic mini-wiggler. Their understanding allowed a substantial brightness gain by adequate layout modifications. The phenomenon is described analytically in terms of time coherence effects. This serves as a basis for further detailed numerical simulations of the experiment by means of stepwise ray-tracing, and allows precise interpretation of the spectral, polarization and intensity measurements collected at LEP. It also provides guidelines for SR diagnostic at injection energy in LHC

  3. LHC beam energy in 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemko, A.; Charifouline, Z.; Dahlerup-Petersen, K.; Denz, R.; Ravaioli, E.; Schmidt, R.; Verweij, A.

    2012-01-01

    The interconnections between the LHC main magnets are made of soldered joints (splices) of two superconducting cables stabilized by a copper bus bar. The measurements performed in 2009 in the whole machine, in particular in sector 3-4 during the repair after the 2008 accident, demonstrated that there is a significant fraction of defective copper bus bar joints in the machine. In this paper, the limiting factors for operating the LHC at higher energies with defective 13 kA bus bar joints are briefly reviewed. The experience gained during the 2011 run, including the quench statistics and dedicated quench propagation tests impacting on maximum safe energy are presented. The impact of the by-pass diode contact resistance issue is also addressed. Finally, a proposal for running at the highest possible safe energy compatible with the pre-defined risk level is presented. (authors)

  4. Reliability issues at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Gillies, James D

    2002-01-01

    The Lectures on reliability issues at the LHC will be focused on five main Modules on five days. Module 1: Basic Elements in Reliability Engineering Some basic terms, definitions and methods, from components up to the system and the plant, common cause failures and human factor issues. Module 2: Interrelations of Reliability & Safety (R&S) Reliability and risk informed approach, living models, risk monitoring. Module 3: The ideal R&S Process for Large Scale Systems From R&S goals via the implementation into the system to the proof of the compliance. Module 4: Some Applications of R&S on LHC Master logic, anatomy of risk, cause - consequence diagram, decomposition and aggregation of the system. Module 5: Lessons learned from R&S Application in various Technologies Success stories, pitfalls, constrains in data and methods, limitations per se, experienced in aviation, space, process, nuclear, offshore and transport systems and plants. The Lectures will reflect in summary the compromise in...

  5. LHC Beam Energy in 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Siemko, A; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Denz, R; Ravaioli, E; Schmidt, R; Verweij, A

    2012-01-01

    The interconnections between the LHC main magnets are made of soldered joints (splices) of two superconducting cables stabilized by a copper bus bar. The measurements performed in 2009 in the whole machine, in particular in sector 3-4 during the repair after the 2008 accident, demonstrated that there is a significant fraction of defective copper bus bar joints in the machine. In this paper, the limiting factors for operating the LHC at higher energies with defective 13 kA bus bar joints are briefly reviewed. The experience gained during the 2011 run, including the quench statistics and dedicated quench propagation tests impacting on maximum safe energy are presented. The impact of the by-pass diode contact resistance issue is also addressed. Finally, a proposal for running at the highest possible safe energy compatible with the pre-defined risk level is presented.

  6. Photodetection in the LHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joram, C.

    2012-01-01

    The challenging requirements on photodetection in the LHC experiments have motivated large-scale R and D efforts on various detector technologies, which started already in the 1990s. The state-of-the-art of the LEP era would not have allowed satisfying the demanding needs, particularly from calorimetry and particle identification. After almost two decades of intense development, construction and integration efforts, the LHC and its four major experiments are performing in a just exemplary manner, in many respects exceeding the expectations. Hundreds of thousands of photodetectors with millions of readout channels contribute to this success story. This article aims at reviewing the main activities in photodetection, the initial achieved performance as well as some consolidation and first upgrade efforts.

  7. Beam Loss Monitors at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main functions of the LHC beam loss measurement system is the protection of equipment against damage caused by impacting particles creating secondary showers and their energy dissipation in the matter. Reliability requirements are scaled according to the acceptable consequences and the frequency of particle impact events on equipment. Increasing reliability often leads to more complex systems. The downside of complexity is a reduction of availability; therefore, an optimum has to be found for these conflicting requirements. A detailed review of selected concepts and solutions for the LHC system will be given to show approaches used in various parts of the system from the sensors, signal processing, and software implementations to the requirements for operation and documentation.

  8. Backfire antennas with dipole elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Erik Dragø; Pontoppidan, Knud

    1970-01-01

    A method is set up for a theoretical investigation of arbitrary backfire antennas based upon dipole structures. The mutual impedance between the dipole elements of the antenna is taken into account, and the field radiated due to a surface wave reflector of finite extent is determined by calculating...

  9. Dipole plasma in molecular crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotel'nikov, Yu.E.; Kochelaev, B.I.

    1976-01-01

    Collective oscillations in a system of electric dipoles of molecular crystals are investigated. It has been proved in the exciton approximation that in an elementary cell of a molecular crystal with one molecule there may exist energy fluctuations of the ''dipole'' plasma, analogous to plasma oscillations in the charged Fermi liquid

  10. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Jen-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    The neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) provides unique information on CP violation and physics beyond the Standard Model. We first review the history of experimental searches for neutron electric dipole moment. The status of future neutron EDM experiments, including experiments using ultra-cold neutrons produced in superfluid helium, will then be presented.

  11. LHC superconducting strand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    This cross-section through a strand of superconducting matieral as used in the LHC shows the 8000 Niobium-Titanium filaments embedded like a honeycomb in copper. When cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in the LHC accelerator, these filaments will have zero resistance and so will carry a high electric current with no energy loss.

  12. The physics behind LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    What do physicists want to discover with experiments at the LHC? What is the Higgs boson? What are the new phenomena that could be observed at the LHC?I will try to answer these questions using language accessible also to non-experts. Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  13. Mapping the HISS Dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McParland, C.; Bieser, F.

    1984-01-01

    The principal component of the Bevalac HISS facility is a large super-conducting 3 Tesla dipole. The facility's need for a large magnetic volume spectrometer resulted in a large gap geometry - a 2 meter pole tip diameter and a 1 meter pole gap. Obviously, the field required detailed mapping for effective use as a spectrometer. The mapping device was designed with several major features in mind. The device would measure field values on a grid which described a closed rectangular solid. The grid would be a regular with the exact measurement intervals adjustable by software. The device would function unattended over the long period of time required to complete a field map. During this time, the progress of the map could be monitored by anyone with access to the HISS VAX computer. Details of the mechanical, electrical, and control design follow

  14. Nuclear DVCS at small x using color-dipole phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Magno V.T.

    2009-01-01

    Using the high-energy color-dipole formalism, we study the coherent and incoherent nuclear DVCS process, γ * A→γX, in the small-x regime. We consider simple models for the elementary dipole-hadron scattering amplitude that capture the main features of the dependence on atomic number A, on energy and on momentum transfer t. Using the amplitudes obtained we make predictions for the nuclear DVCS cross section at the photon level in collider kinematics. (orig.)

  15. CERN reacts to increased costs to completion of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Aspects of LHC construction. The CERN Council, where the representatives of the 20 Member States of the Organization decide on scientific programmes and financial resources, held its 120th session on 14 December under the chairmanship of Prof. Maurice Bourquin (CH). CERN adjusts to the LHC Director-General, Luciano Maiani, stressed that CERN was now fully engaged in the LHC and outlined the first moves to react to the increased cost to completion of the LHC. The new accelerator is an extremely complex, high-tech project which CERN is building under very severe conditions. However, the technical challenges are solved and industrial production of accelerator elements, and installation are starting. Professor Maiani said that 2001 had been a very hard but decisive year for CERN. An important milestone had been passed during this meeting with the approval of the LHC dipole magnets contract, the last major contract for the accelerator. The new costs to completion of the LHC project are now clear. A first propos...

  16. The LHC is safe

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2008-01-01

    Concerns have been expressed from time to time about the safety of new high-energy colliders, and the LHC has been no exception. The LHC Safety Assessment Group (LSAG)(*) was asked last year by the CERN management to review previous LHC safety analyses in light of additional experimental results and theoretical understanding. LSAG confirms, updates and extends previous conclusions that there is no basis for any conceivable threat from the LHC. Indeed, recent theoretical and experimental developments reinforce this conclusion. In this Colloquium, the basic arguments presented by LSAG will be reviewed. Cosmic rays of much higher effective centre-of-mass energies have been bombarding the Earth and other astronomical objects for billions of years, and their continued existence shows that the Earth faces no dangers from exotic objects such as hypothetical microscopic black holes that might be produced by the LHC - as discussed in a detailed paper by Giddings and Mangano(**). Measurements of strange particle produc...

  17. LHC Report: Ticking over

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The past two weeks have seen luminosity production rates vary somewhat but the overall upwards slope has remained steady. Over 17 fb-1 have been delivered to both ATLAS and CMS; LHCb is also doing well, with around 1.6 fb-1 delivered so far in 2012. The proton physics production also slotted in a five-day machine development period (Monday 8 to Saturday 13 October).   When producing the LHC beam in the PS, some parasitic low-intensity satellite bunches are formed 25 ns from the main bunches, which are spaced by 50 ns. ALICE, whose detector is designed to work with relatively low collision rates, has been taking data from satellite-main collisions. The population of these satellites has recently been increased thanks to gentle tweaks by the PS radio frequency experts. This has increased the peak luminosity in ALICE and will help them to reach their proton-proton integrated luminosity goal for the year. The October machine development programme was a mixed bag. While some studies were aimed at sho...

  18. Field quality issues in iron-dominated dipoles at low fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.C.

    1996-10-01

    In order to help assess the usable dynamic range of iron-dominated dipoles, field shape data at low field on several Fermi-lab accelerator dipole designs are presented. Emphasis is placed on the systematic and random values of the low field sextupole since it is the first ''allowed'' field error. The Main Injector dipoles provide four times smaller sextupole and more than 20 times less sextupole hysteresis than earlier designs for the Main Ring

  19. TEST RESULTS FOR LHC INSERTION REGION DEPOLE MAGNETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MURATORE, J.; JAIN, A.; ANERELLA, M.; COSSOLINO, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has made 20 insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. These 9.45 m-long, 8 cm aperture magnets have the same coil design as the arc dipoles now operating in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL and are of single aperture, twin aperture, and double cold mass configurations. They are required to produce fields up to 4.14 T for operation at 7.56 TeV. Eighteen of these magnets have been tested at 4.5 K using either forced flow supercritical helium or liquid helium. The testing was especially important for the twin aperture models, whose construction was very different from the RHIC dipoles, except for the coil design. This paper reports on the results of these tests, including spontaneous quench performance, verification of quench protection heater operation, and magnetic field quality

  20. LHC Report: Beams are back in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The LHC has shaken itself awake after the winter break, and, as the snow melts on the lower slopes, the temperature in the magnets has dropped to a chilly 1.9 K once more.   Following the cool-down, the last few weeks have seen an intense few tests of the magnets, power supplies and associated protection systems. These tests, referred to as hardware commissioning, have been completed in record time. At the same time the other accelerator systems have been put through the preparatory machine checkout. In parallel, the injectors (LINAC2, Booster, PS and SPS) have also come out of the technical stop in order to prepare to deliver beam to the LHC very early in the season. Of particular note here was the remarkably seamless transition to POPS, the PS's new main power supply system. All this work culminated in the LHC taking beam again for the first time in 2011 on Saturday, 19 February. The careful preparation paid off, with circulating beams being rapidly re-established. There then followed a programme ...

  1. LHC Report: getting in shape for the Run 2 marathon

    CERN Multimedia

    Mirko Pojer & Matteo Solfaroli

    2015-01-01

    The buzzword you'll hear most both inside and outside the CCC is "training". Rather than preparation for an athletic competition, it actually refers to the way the LHC is trying to get in shape for the long Run 2 marathon at 6.5 TeV.   Picture 1: progress of LHC superconducting circuit commissioning. In the previous edition of the Bulletin, we discussed the lengthy process of commissioning LHC superconducting circuits and the phenomenon of repetitive quenches accompanying the progressive increase in their performance. This is typical for superconducting magnets, but it is particularly intriguing for the LHC dipole magnets. Not only because each and every one of the 1,232 dipoles has to reach the same current target in order for beams to circulate at a certain energy (the weakest link of the chain determining or compromising the performance of all the others), but also because we know that every additional quench brings us closer to our 2015 objective. All...

  2. Decreasing the LHC impedance with a nonlinear collimation system

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-López, J; Zimmermann, F

    2007-01-01

    A two-stage nonlinear collimation system based on a pair of skew sextupoles is presented for the LHC.We show the details of the optics design and study the halo cleaning efficiency of such a system. This nonlinear collimation system would allow opening up collimator gaps, and thereby reduce the collimator impedance, which presently limits the LHC beam intensity. Assuming the nominal LHC beam at 7 TeV, the transverse coherent tune shifts of rigid-dipole coupled-bunch modes are computed for both the baseline linear collimation system and the proposed nonlinear one. In either case, the tune shifts of the most unstable modes are compared with the stability diagrams for Landau damping.

  3. General-purpose event generators for LHC physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Andy [PPE Group, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, EH25 9PN (United Kingdom); Butterworth, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Gieseke, Stefan [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Grellscheid, David [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham University, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Hoeche, Stefan [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Hoeth, Hendrik; Krauss, Frank [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham University, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Loennblad, Leif [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University (Sweden); PH Department, TH Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Nurse, Emily [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Richardson, Peter [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham University, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Schumann, Steffen [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Seymour, Michael H. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sjoestrand, Torbjoern [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University (Sweden); Skands, Peter [PH Department, TH Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Webber, Bryan, E-mail: webber@hep.phy.cam.ac.uk [Cavendish Laboratory, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    We review the physics basis, main features and use of general-purpose Monte Carlo event generators for the simulation of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics included are: the generation of hard scattering matrix elements for processes of interest, at both leading and next-to-leading QCD perturbative order; their matching to approximate treatments of higher orders based on the showering approximation; the parton and dipole shower formulations; parton distribution functions for event generators; non-perturbative aspects such as soft QCD collisions, the underlying event and diffractive processes; the string and cluster models for hadron formation; the treatment of hadron and tau decays; the inclusion of QED radiation and beyond Standard Model processes. We describe the principal features of the ARIADNE, Herwig++, PYTHIA 8 and SHERPA generators, together with the Rivet and Professor validation and tuning tools, and discuss the physics philosophy behind the proper use of these generators and tools. This review is aimed at phenomenologists wishing to understand better how parton-level predictions are translated into hadron-level events as well as experimentalists seeking a deeper insight into the tools available for signal and background simulation at the LHC.

  4. General-purpose event generators for LHC physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, Andy; Butterworth, Jonathan; Gieseke, Stefan; Grellscheid, David; Hoeche, Stefan; Hoeth, Hendrik; Krauss, Frank; Loennblad, Leif; Nurse, Emily; Richardson, Peter; Schumann, Steffen; Seymour, Michael H.; Sjoestrand, Torbjoern; Skands, Peter; Webber, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    We review the physics basis, main features and use of general-purpose Monte Carlo event generators for the simulation of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics included are: the generation of hard scattering matrix elements for processes of interest, at both leading and next-to-leading QCD perturbative order; their matching to approximate treatments of higher orders based on the showering approximation; the parton and dipole shower formulations; parton distribution functions for event generators; non-perturbative aspects such as soft QCD collisions, the underlying event and diffractive processes; the string and cluster models for hadron formation; the treatment of hadron and tau decays; the inclusion of QED radiation and beyond Standard Model processes. We describe the principal features of the ARIADNE, Herwig++, PYTHIA 8 and SHERPA generators, together with the Rivet and Professor validation and tuning tools, and discuss the physics philosophy behind the proper use of these generators and tools. This review is aimed at phenomenologists wishing to understand better how parton-level predictions are translated into hadron-level events as well as experimentalists seeking a deeper insight into the tools available for signal and background simulation at the LHC.

  5. General-purpose event generators for LHC physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Andy; /Edinburgh U.; Butterworth, Jonathan; /University Coll. London; Gieseke, Stefan; /Karlsruhe U., ITP; Grellscheid, David; /Durham U., IPPP; Hoche, Stefan; /SLAC; Hoeth, Hendrik; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Lonnblad, Leif; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys. /CERN; Nurse, Emily; /University Coll. London; Richardson, Peter; /Durham U., IPPP; Schumann, Steffen; /Heidelberg U.; Seymour, Michael H.; /Manchester U.; Sjostrand, Torbjorn; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Skands, Peter; /CERN; Webber, Bryan; /Cambridge U.

    2011-03-03

    We review the physics basis, main features and use of general-purpose Monte Carlo event generators for the simulation of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics included are: the generation of hard-scattering matrix elements for processes of interest, at both leading and next-to-leading QCD perturbative order; their matching to approximate treatments of higher orders based on the showering approximation; the parton and dipole shower formulations; parton distribution functions for event generators; non-perturbative aspects such as soft QCD collisions, the underlying event and diffractive processes; the string and cluster models for hadron formation; the treatment of hadron and tau decays; the inclusion of QED radiation and beyond-Standard-Model processes. We describe the principal features of the Ariadne, Herwig++, Pythia 8 and Sherpa generators, together with the Rivet and Professor validation and tuning tools, and discuss the physics philosophy behind the proper use of these generators and tools. This review is aimed at phenomenologists wishing to understand better how parton-level predictions are translated into hadron-level events as well as experimentalists wanting a deeper insight into the tools available for signal and background simulation at the LHC.

  6. Experiment Dashboard for Monitoring of the LHC Distributed Computing Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, J; Campos, M Devesas; Cros, J Tarragon; Gaidioz, B; Karavakis, E; Kokoszkiewicz, L; Lanciotti, E; Maier, G; Ollivier, W; Nowotka, M; Rocha, R; Sadykov, T; Saiz, P; Sargsyan, L; Sidorova, I; Tuckett, D

    2011-01-01

    LHC experiments are currently taking collisions data. A distributed computing model chosen by the four main LHC experiments allows physicists to benefit from resources spread all over the world. The distributed model and the scale of LHC computing activities increase the level of complexity of middleware, and also the chances of possible failures or inefficiencies in involved components. In order to ensure the required performance and functionality of the LHC computing system, monitoring the status of the distributed sites and services as well as monitoring LHC computing activities are among the key factors. Over the last years, the Experiment Dashboard team has been working on a number of applications that facilitate the monitoring of different activities: including following up jobs, transfers, and also site and service availabilities. This presentation describes Experiment Dashboard applications used by the LHC experiments and experience gained during the first months of data taking.

  7. Resistive wall instability for the LHC: intermediate review

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, D

    2001-01-01

    As the design of some basic components of the LHC becomes available, it is possible to refine the evaluation of the expected contribution of these elements to the total impedance budget of the machine. The LHC beam-screen being expected to be the main contributor for the resistive wall effect, it appeared justified to review the impedance budget, taking into account the latest available data. This note first recalls the original estimations presented in the LHC Conceptual Design [1], then presents an updated review of the instability rise times and finally discusses a possible reduction of this rather large contribution. ------------- !!Note!!: Please note that updated values for the LHC impedance budget are now available from the report CERN LHC Project Report 585 (Coupled Bunch Instabilities in the LHC, D. Angal-Kalinin and L. Vos, EPAC, July 2002 ).

  8. LHC Report: LHC hit the target!

    CERN Multimedia

    Enrico Bravin for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    Last week, the accumulated integrated luminosity reached the target value for 2016 of 25 fb-1 in both ATLAS and CMS.   The integrated luminosity delivered to ATLAS and CMS reached (and already passed!) 25 fb-1– the target for the whole year! Tuesday, 30 August was just a regular day for the 2016 LHC run. However,  on that day, the integrated luminosity delivered to ATLAS and CMS reached 25 fb-1 – the target for the whole year! How did we get here? A large group of committed scientists and technical experts work behind the scenes at the LHC, ready to adapt to the quirks of this truly impressive machine. After the push to produce as many proton-proton collisions as possible before the summer conferences, several new ideas and production techniques (such as Bunch Compression Multiple Splitting, BCMS) have been incorporated in the operation of LHC in order to boost its performance even further. Thanks to these improvements, the LHC was routinely operated with peak luminos...

  9. The LHC babies

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    With the machine restart and first collisions at 3.5 TeV, 2009 and 2010 were two action-packed years at the LHC. The events were a real media success, but one important result that remained well hidden was the ten births in the LHC team over the same period. The mothers – engineers, cryogenics experts and administrative assistants working for the LHC – confirm that it is possible to maintain a reasonable work-life balance. Two of them tell us more…   Verena Kain (left) and Reyes Alemany (right) in the CERN Control Centre. With the LHC running around the clock, LHC operations engineers have high-pressure jobs with unsociable working hours. These past two years, which will undoubtedly go down in the annals of CERN history, the LHC team had their work cut out, but despite their high-octane professional lives, several female members of the team took up no less of a challenge in their private lives, creating a mini-baby-boom by which the LHC start-up will also be remembe...

  10. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavian, L.; Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Wagner, U.; van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  11. The latest from the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Mathew Stracy

    As promised by the Director-General, we will start a series of regular updates detailing the status of the LHC repairs, consolidation and commissioning.As of last week all magnets in the damaged area of sector 3-4 have been removed and raised to the surface. In total 39 dipoles and 14 short straight sections are now on the surface. Four replacement magnets have been lowered and installed, and by the end of this week this figure should total seven. Cold testing replacement magnets in SM18 has resumed after the Christmas shutdown. The civil engineering work to repair the slight damage to the concrete has been completed. Outside the damaged area the Vacuum Group are cleaning some of the beam screens in situ.Both sector 1-2 and sector 5-6 are also now at room temperature and accessible. As well as routine maintenance in these sectors, one magnet from sector 1-2 which was found to have high resistance (approximately 100 nano-ohms, two orders of magnitude higher than the specified resistance) has been removed and ...

  12. The latest from the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    On 26 August, the first two fully tested crates for the new quench protection system (QPS) were installed in Sector 1-2. These are the first of 436 crates that will be installed around the ring. The two crates include detectors for both the enhanced busbar protection and the symmetric quench protection (more details). To test the crates before installation, a dedicated test bed has been created, capable of simulating all the conditions in the LHC, from a symmetric quench to an increase in busbar resistance. The teams are working two shifts a day, including weekends, to test the new crates. Two more test benches are also being built to increase the production rate. The whole task is on target for completion in mid October. Another important new task for the QPS team is to try and speed up the energy extraction from the magnets. The quicker the energy can be extracted the lower the risk of dangerously high temperatures should a quench occur. The time constant for the dipoles...

  13. LHC@home is ready to support HiLumi LHC: take part!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Recently relaunched, the LHC@home volunteer computing project is now ready to support the HiLumi LHC project, the design phase of the planned upgrade of the LHC that will increase its luminosity by a factor of 5 to 10 beyond its original design value. HiLumi will need massive simulations to test the beam dynamics. Whether you are at home or at work, you can help experts design the future LHC by connecting your computer to LHC@home. Go for it!   LHC@home is aimed at involving the public in real science. If you have a computer that is connected to the Internet, you can join the large team of volunteers who are already supporting its two main projects: Test4Theory, which runs computer simulations of high-energy particle collisions, and SixTrack, which is aimed at optimizing the LHC performance by performing beam dynamics simulations. In both cases, the software is designed to run only when your computer is idle and causes no disruption to your normal activities. To the simulations run by the Six...

  14. LHC preparations change gear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    After the formal approval by CERN Council in December (January, page 1) of the LHC protonproton collider for CERN's 27- kilometre LEP tunnel, preparations for the new machine change gear. Lyndon Evans becomes LHC Project Leader, and CERN's internal structure will soon be reorganized to take account of the project becoming a definite commitment. On the experimental side, the full Technical Proposals for the big general purpose ATLAS and CMS detectors were aired at a major meeting of the LHC Committee at CERN in January. These Technical Proposals are impressive documents each of some several hundred pages. (Summaries of the detector designs will appear in forthcoming issues of the CERN Courier.) The ALICE heavy ion experiment is not far behind, and plans for other LHC experiments are being developed. Playing an important role in this groundwork has been the Detector Research and Development Committee (DRDC), founded in 1990 to foster detector development for the LHC experimental programme and structured along the lines of a traditional CERN Experiments Committee. Established under the Director Generalship of Carlo Rubbia and initially steered by Research Director Walter Hoogland, the DRDC has done sterling work in blazing a trail for LHC experiments. Acknowledging that the challenge of LHC experimentation needs technological breakthroughs as well as specific detector subsystems, DRDC proposals have covered a wide front, covering readout electronics and computing as well as detector technology. Its first Chairman was Enzo larocci, succeeded in 1993 by Michal Turala. DRDC's role was to evaluate proposals, and make recommendations to CERN's Research Board for approval and resource allocation, not an easy task when the LHC project itself had yet to be formally approved. Over the years, a comprehensive portfolio of detector development has been built up, much of which has either led to specific LHC detector subsystems for traditional detector tasks

  15. LHC magnet quench protection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coull, L.; Hagedorn, D.; Remondino, V.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.

    1994-07-01

    The quench protection system for the superconducting magnets of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The system is based on the so called 'cold diode' concept. In a group of series connected magnets if one magnet quenches then the magnetic energy of all the magnets will be dissipated in the quenched magnet so destroying it. This is avoided by by-passing the quenched magnet and then rapidly de-exciting the unquenched magnets. For the LHC machine it is foreseen to use silicon diodes situated inside the cryostat as by-pass elements - so called 'cold diodes'. The diodes are exposed to some 50 kGray of radiation during a 10 year operation life-time. The high energy density of the LHC magnets (500 kJ/m) coupled with the relatively slow propagation speed of a 'natural' quench (10 to 20 m/s) can lead to excessive heating of the zone where the quench started and to high internal voltages. It is therefore necessary to detect quickly the incipient quench and fire strip heaters which spread the quench out more quickly over a large volume of the magnet. After a quench the magnet chain must be de-excited rapidly to avoid spreading the quench to other magnets and over-heating the by-pass diode. This is done by switching high-power energy-dump resistors in series with the magnets. The LHC main ring magnet will be divided into 16 electrically separated units which has important advantages.

  16. LHC magnet quench protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coull, L.; Hagedorn, D.; Remondino, V.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.

    1994-01-01

    The quench protection system for the superconducting magnets of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The system is based on the so called ''cold diode'' concept. In a group of series connected magnets if one magnet quenches then the magnetic energy of all the magnets will be dissipated in the quenched magnet so destroying it. This is avoided by by-passing the quenched magnet and then rapidly de-exciting the unquenched magnets. For the LHC machine it is foreseen to use silicon diodes situated inside the cryostat as by-pass elements--so called ''cold diodes''. The diodes are exposed to some 50 kGray of radiation during a 10 year operation life-time. The high energy density of the LHC magnets (500 kJ/m) coupled with the relatively slow propagation speed of a ''natural'' quench (10 to 20 m/s) can lead to excessive heating of the zone where the quench started and to high internal voltages. It is therefore necessary to detect quickly the incipient quench and fire strip heaters which spread the quench out more quickly over a large volume of the magnet. After a quench the magnet chain must be de-excited rapidly to avoid spreading the quench to other magnets and over-heating the by-pass diode. This is done by switching high-power energy-dump resistors in series with the magnets. The LHC main ring magnet will be divided into 16 electrically separated units which has important advantages

  17. Quench Protection Study of the Eurocircol 16 T cosθ Dipole for the Future Circular Collider (FCC)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2151660; Caiffi, Barbara; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Farinon, Stefania; Salmi, Tiina-Mari; Sorbi, Massimo Leone; Stenvall, Antti; Volpini, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    After LHC will be turned off, a new, more energetic machine will be needed in order to explore unknown regions of the high-energy physics. For this reason, the project Future Circular Collider (FCC) has started, with the goal of developing a 100 km circumference collider of 50 TeV proton beams. The Eurocircol collaboration is part of the FCC study under the European Community leadership, and it aims to develop a conceptual design of FCC within 2019. One of the main targets is to design a bending dipole able to reach 16 T operation magnetic field, in order to accomplish the size and energy constraints. Such a magnetic field can be reached using Nb$_{3}$Sn conductors at their highest performance. One option under exploration is the Cosθ dipole, by INFN of Milano and Genova. One of the aspects to be taken into consideration is the amount of conductor needed, because of the relatively high cost of superconducting cables involving Nb$_{3}$Sn. The amount of superconductor in the cross-section conductor area is a d...

  18. Conference: STANDARD MODEL @ LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    HCØ institute Universitetsparken 5 DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø Denmark Room: Auditorium 2 STANDARD MODEL @ LHC Niels Bohr International Academy and Discovery Center 10-13 April 2012 This four day meeting will bring together both experimental and theoretical aspects of Standard Model phenomenology at the LHC. The very latest results from the LHC experiments will be under discussion. Topics covered will be split into the following categories:     * QCD (Hard,Soft & PDFs)     * Vector Boson production     * Higgs searches     * Top Quark Physics     * Flavour physics

  19. HL-LHC alternatives

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; White, S

    2014-01-01

    The HL-LHC parameters assume unexplored regimes for hadron colliders in various aspects of accelerator beam dynamics and technology. This paper reviews three alternatives that could potentially improve the LHC performance: (i) the alternative filling scheme 8b+4e, (ii) the use of a 200 MHz RF system in the LHC and (iii) the use of proton cooling methods to reduce the beam emittance (at top energy and at injection). The alternatives are assessed in terms of feasibility, pros and cons, risks versus benefits and the impact on beam availability.

  20. The Lhc beam commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redarelli, S.; Bailey, R.

    2008-01-01

    The plans for the Lhc proton beam commissioning are presented. A staged commissioning approach is proposed to satisfy the request of the Lhc experiments while minimizing the machine complexity in early commissioning phases. Machine protection and collimation aspects will be tackled progressively as the performance will be pushed to higher beam intensities. The key parameters are the number of bunches, k b , the proton intensity pe bunch, N, and the β in the various interaction points. All together these parameters determine the total beam power and the complexity of the machine. We will present the proposed trade off between the evolution of these parameters and the Lhc luminosity performance.

  1. The super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, Michelangelo L

    2010-01-01

    We review here the prospects of a long-term upgrade programme for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN laboratory's new proton-proton collider. The super-LHC, which is currently under evaluation and design, is expected to deliver of the order of ten times the statistics of the LHC. In addition to a non-technical summary of the principal physics arguments for the upgrade, I present a pedagogical introduction to the technological challenges on the accelerator and experimental fronts, and a review of the current status of the planning.

  2. PERSISTENT CURRENT EFFECT IN 15-16 T NB3SN ACCELERATOR DIPOLES AND ITS CORRECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V. V. [Fermilab; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermilab

    2016-11-08

    Nb3Sn magnets with operating fields of 15-16 T are considered for the LHC Energy Doubler and a future Very High Energy pp Collider. Due to large coil volume, high critical current density and large superconducting (SC) filament size the persistent current effect is very large in Nb3Sn dipoles al low fields. This paper presents the results of analysis of the persistent current effect in the 15 T Nb3Sn dipole demonstrator being developed at FNAL, and describes different possibilities of its correction including passive SC wires, iron shims and coil geometry.

  3. Academic Training: The LHC machine /experiment interface

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 18, 19, 20, 21 & 22 April from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 The LHC machine /experiment interface S. TAPPROGGE, Univ. of Mainz, D, R. ASSMANN, CERN-AB E. TSESMELIS and D. MACINA, CERN-TS This series of lectures will cover some of the major issues at the boundary between the LHC machine and the experiments: 1) The physics motivation and expectations of the experiments regarding the machine operation. This will include an overview of the LHC physics programme (in pp and PbPb collisions), of the experimental signatures (from high pT objects to leading nucleons) and of the expected trigger rates as well as the data sets needed for specific measurements. Furthermore, issues related to various modes of operation of the machine (e.g. bunch spacings of 25 ns. vs. 75 ns.) and special requirements of the detectors for their commissioning will be described. 2) The LHC machine aspects: introduction of the main LHC parameters and discu...

  4. Academic Training: The LHC machine /experiment interface

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 18, 19, 20, 21 & 22 April from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 The LHC machine /experiment interface S. TAPPROGGE, Univ. of Mainz, D, R. ASSMANN, CERN-AB E. TSESMELIS and D. MACINA, CERN-TS This series of lectures will cover some of the major issues at the boundary between the LHC machine and the experiments: 1) The physics motivation and expectations of the experiments regarding the machine operation. This will include an overview of the LHC physics programme (in pp and PbPb collisions), of the experimental signatures (from high pT objects to leading nucleons) and of the expected trigger rates as well as the data sets needed for specific measurements. Furthermore, issues related to various modes of operation of the machine (e.g. bunch spacings of 25 ns. vs. 75 ns.) and special requirements of the detectors for their commissioning will be described. 2) The LHC machine aspects: introduction of the main LHC parameters and disc...

  5. The LHC Project Status and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Faugeras, Paul E

    2001-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN's future major facility for high-energy physics, has entered into the construction and preparation for installation phases. After recalling briefly the main machine design choices and challenges, one will review the progress of civil works for the machine and experimental areas and the status of the main LHC components, which are presently series-built and for some of them procured in kind through world-wide collaborations. Report will also be given on the full-scale prototype of an elementary LHC lattice cell, called String 2, which is being commissioned and used for optimising the installation and testing procedures of the LHC. The size and duration of the LHC Project, its intrinsic complexity and the large number of world-wide collaborations involved require rather elaborate project management tools, which will be shortly described. Finally, following the extended running of the LEP and the delay for emptying of the machine tunnel, a new planning for project completion...

  6. LHC brochure (Italian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  7. LHC brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  8. LHC brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  9. LHC brochure (Danish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  10. LHC brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  11. LHC brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  12. LHC brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070305

    2014-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  13. CERN confirms LHC schedule

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The CERN Council held its 125th session on 20 June. Highlights of the meeting included confirmation that the LHC is on schedule for a 2007 start-up, and the announcement of a new organizational structure in 2004.

  14. LHC Brochure (german version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Vanoli, C.

    2006-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  15. LHC brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  16. CERN recognises LHC suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN has just presented the first awards recognising LHC suppliers. The Russian institute BINP, the Belgian firm Cockerill-Sambre and the US company Wah-Chang are the recipients of the first 'Golden Hadrons'.

  17. LHC Luminosity Performance

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091107; Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Papotti, Giulia

    This thesis adresses several approaches with the common goal of assessing, understanding and improving the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). To better exploit existing margins for maximum luminosity while fulfilling the requirements of the LHC experiments, new techniques for luminosity levelling are studied and developed to an operational state, such as changing the crossing angle or $\\beta^*$ (beam size) at the interaction points with the beams in collisions. In 2017 LHC operation, the crossing angle reduction in collisions improved the integrated luminosity by $\\mathrm{\\sim} 2\\,\\mathrm{fb^{-1}}$ ($\\mathrm{\\sim} 4\\,\\mathrm{\\%}$ of the yearly production). For additional diagnostics, a new method for measuring beam sizes and orbits for each circulating bunch using the luminosity measurement during beam separation scans is shown. The results of these Emittance Scans improved the understanding of the LHC luminosity reach and of the orbit offsets introduced by beam-beam long-range effects.

  18. LHC brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which started up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  19. LHC brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    A presentation of the largest and the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will start-up in 2008. Its role, characteristics, technologies, etc. are explained for the general public.

  20. Possible displacement of mercury's dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, K.H.; Beard, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    Earlier attempts to model the Hermean magnetospheric field based on a planet-centered magnetic multipole field have required the addition of a quadrupole moment to obtain a good fit to space vehicle observations. In this work we obtain an equally satisfactory fit by assuming a null quadrupole moment and least squares fitting of the displacement of the planetary dipole from the center of the planet. We find a best fit for a dipole displacement from the planet center of 0.033 R/sub m/ away from the solar direction, 0.025 R/sub m/ toward dawn in the magnetic equatorial plane, and 0.189 R/sub m/ northward along the magnetic dipole axis, where R/sub m/ is the planet radius. Therefore the presence of a magnetic quadrupole moment is not ruled out. The compressed dipole field more completely represents the field in the present work than in previous work where the intrinsic quadrupole field was not included in the magnetopause surface and field calculations. Moreover, we have corrected a programing error in previous work in the computation of dipole tilt lambda away from the sun. We find a slight increase for the planet dipole moment of 190γR/sub m/ 3 and a dipole tilt angle lambda away from the sun. We find a slight increase for the planet moment of 190γR/sub m/ 3 and a dipole tilt angle lambda of only 1.2 0 away from the sun. All other parameters are essentially unchanged

  1. Dipole Bands in 196Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Newman, R. T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Smit, F. D.; Msezane, B.; Benatar, M.; Mabala, G. K.; Mutshena, K. P.; Federke, M.; Mullins, S. M.; Ncapayi, N. J.; Vymers, P.

    2011-01-01

    High spin states in 196 Hg have been populated in the 198 Pt(α,6n) reaction at 65 MeV and the level scheme has been extended. A new dipole band has been observed and a previously observed dipole has been confirmed. Excitation energies, spins and parities of these bands were determined from DCO ratio and linear polarization measurements. Possible quasiparticle excitations responsible for these structures are discussed.

  2. Electrical Quality Assurance of the Superconducting Circuits during LHC Machine Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzini, D; Desebe, O; Mess, K H; Russenschuck, Stephan; Bednarek, M; Dworak, D; Górnicki, E; Jurkiewicz, P; Kapusta, P; Kotarba, A; Ludwin, J; Olek, S; Talach, M; Zieblinski, M; Klisch, M; Prochal, B

    2008-01-01

    Based on the LHC powering reference database, all-together 1750 superconducting circuits were connected in the various cryogenic transfer lines of the LHC machine. Testing the continuity, magnet polarity, and the quality of the electrical insulation were the main tasks of the Electrical Quality Assurance (ELQA) activities during the LHC machine assembly. With the assembly of the LHC now complete, the paper reviews the work flow, resources, and the qualification results including the different types of electrical non-conformities.

  3. LHC First Beam 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    Tuura, L

    2008-01-01

    The CMS Centre played a major part in the LHC First Beam Event on September 10th 2008: it was a central point for CMS, hosting journalists from all over the world and providing live link-ups to collaborating institutes as well as, of course, monitoring events as they happened at Point 5. It was also a venue for celebration as the beam completed circuits of the LHC in both directions, passing successfully through the detector (Courtesy of Lassi Tuura)

  4. submitter LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Shuji

    2001-01-01

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is under construction at the CERN Laboratory in Switzerland. Four experiments (ATLAS, CMS, LHCb, ALICE) will try to study the new physics by LHC from 2006. Its goal to explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces. The PDF file of the transparency is located on http://www-atlas.kek.jp/sub/documents/lepsymp-stanaka.pdf.

  5. Future of LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dova, Maria-Teresa; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC aims to provide a total integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 from p-p collisions at  14 TeV over the course of 10 years. The upgraded ATLAS detector must be able to cope well with increased occupancies and data rates. The large data samples at the High-Luminosity LHC will enable precise measurements of the Higgs boson and other Standard Model particles, as well as searches for new phenomena BSM.

  6. SPS Dipole Multipactor Test and TEWave Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F; Edwards, P; Federmann, S; Holz, M; Taborelli, M

    2013-01-01

    Electron cloud accumulation in particle accelerators can be mitigated by coating the vacuum beam pipe with thin films of low secondary electron yield (SEY) material. The SEY of small coated samples are usually measured in the laboratory. To further test the properties of different coating materials, RF-induced multipacting in a coaxial waveguide configuration can be performed. The technique is applied to two main bending dipoles of the SPS, where the RF power is fed through a tungsten wire stretched along the vacuum chamber (6.4 m). A dipole with a bare stainless steel chamber shows a clear power threshold initiating an abrupt rise in reflected power and pressure. The effect is enhanced at RF frequencies corresponding to electron cyclotron resonances for given magnetic fields. Preliminary results show that the dipole with a carbon coated vacuum chamber does not exhibit any pressure rise or reflected RF power up to the maximum available input power. In the case of a large scale coating production this techniqu...

  7. A Note on the Dipole Coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Kageyama, Akira; Sugiyama, Tooru; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Sato, Tetsuya

    2004-01-01

    A couple of orthogonal coordinates for dipole geometry are proposed for numerical simulations of plasma geophysics in the Earth's dipole magnetic field. These coordinates have proper metric profiles along field lines in contrast to the standard dipole coordinate system that is commonly used in analytical studies for dipole geometry.

  8. Radiation Levels around the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mala, P; Calviani, M; Nordt, A

    2013-01-01

    This work discuss on the radiation levels measured around the LHC machine during the 2012 operational year. The doses and particle fluences are measured primarily by RadMon detectors – about 300 RadMons are installed around the accelerator – and by thermoluminescent detectors. In addition, BLMs, IG5/PMI ionisation chambers as well as FGCs can be used for corresponding cumulated dose evaluations. The probability of SEE depends directly on the high-energy hadron (HEH) fluence, so this is the main parameter that is calculated based on RadMons counts.

  9. Beam screen cryogenic control improvements for the LHC run 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068353; Rogez, Edouard; Blanco Vinuela, Enrique; Ferlin, Gerard; Tovar-Gonzalez, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the improvements made on the cryogenic control system for the LHC beam screens. The regulation objective is to maintain an acceptable temperature range around 20 K which simultaneously ensures a good LHC beam vacuum and limits cryogenic heat loads. In total, through the 27 km of the LHC machine, there are 485 regulation loops affected by beam disturbances. Due to the increase of the LHC performance during Run 2, standard PID controllers cannot keeps the temperature transients of the beam screens within desired limits. Several alternative control techniques have been studied and validated using dynamic simulation and then deployed on the LHC cryogenic control system in 2015. The main contribution is the addition of a feed-forward control in order to compensate the beam effects on the beam screen temperature based on the main beam parameters of the machine in real time.

  10. LHC Report: astounding availability

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Apollonio for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is off to an excellent start in 2016, having already produced triple the luminosity of 2015. An important factor in the impressive performance so far this year is the unprecedented machine availability.   LHC integrated luminosity in 2011, 2012, 2015 and 2016 and the prediction of the 2016 performance foreseen at the start of the year. Following the 2015-2016 end of year shutdown, the LHC restarted beam operation in March 2016. Between the restart and the first technical stop (TS1) in June, the LHC's beam intensity was successively increased, achieving operation with 2040 bunches per beam. The technical stop on 7-8 June was shortened to maximise the time available for luminosity production for the LHC experiments before the summer conferences. Following the technical stop, operation resumed and quickly returned to the performance levels previously achieved. Since then, the LHC has been running steadily with up to 2076 bunches per beam. Since the technical stop, a...

  11. LHC INAUGURATION, LHC Fest highlights: exhibition time!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    David Gross, one of the twenty-one Nobel Laureates who have participated in the project.Tuesday 21 October 2008 Accelerating Nobels Colliding Charm, Atomic Cuisine, The Good Anomaly, A Quark Somewhere on the White Paper, Wire Proliferation, A Tale of Two Liquids … these are just some of the titles given to artworks by Physics Nobel Laureates who agreed to make drawings of their prize-winning discoveries (more or less reluctantly) during a special photo session. Science photographer Volker Steger made portraits of Physics Nobel Laureates and before the photo sessions he asked them to make a drawing of their most important discovery. The result is "Accelerating Nobels", an exhibition that combines unusual portraits of and original drawings by twenty-one Nobel laureates in physics whose work is closely related to CERN and the LHC. This exhibition will be one of the highlights of the LHC celebrations on 21 October in the SM18 hall b...

  12. LHC detectors trigger/DAQ at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sphicas, Paris

    1998-01-01

    At its design luminosity, the LHC will deliver hundreds of millions of proton-proton interactions per second. Storage and computing limitations limit the number of physics events that can be recorded to about 100 per second. The selection will be carried out by the Trigger and data acquisition systems of the experiments. This lecture will review the requirements, architectures and various designs currently considered.

  13. LHC Report: LHC smashes collision records

    CERN Multimedia

    Sarah Charley

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is now producing more than a billion proton-proton collisions per second.   The LHC is colliding protons at a faster rate than ever before: approximately 1 billion times per second. Since April 2016, the LHC has delivered more than 30 inverse femtobarns (fb-1) to both ATLAS and CMS. This means that around 2.4 quadrillion (2.4 million billion) collisions have been seen by each of the experiments this year. The inverse femtobarn is the unit of measurement for integrated luminosity, indicating the cumulative number of potential collisions. This compares with the total of 33.2 fb-1 produced between 2010 and 2015. The unprecedented performance this year is the result of both the incremental increases in collision rate and the sheer amount of time the LHC has been up and running. This comes after a slow start-up in 2015, when scientists and engineers still needed to learn how to operate the machine at a much higher energy. “With more energy, the machine is much more sen...

  14. Two-Layer 16 Tesla Cosθ Dipole Design for the FCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holik, Eddie Frank [Fermilab; Ambrosio, Giorgio [Fermilab; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab

    2018-02-13

    The Future Circular Collider or FCC is a study aimed at exploring the possibility to reach 100 TeV total collision energy which would require 16 tesla dipoles. Upon the conclusion of the High Luminosity Upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Upgrade Pro-ject in collaboration with CERN will have extensive Nb3Sn magnet fabrication experience. This experience includes robust Nb3Sn conductor and insulation scheming, 2-layer cos2θ coil fabrication, and bladder-and-key structure and assembly. By making im-provements and modification to existing technology the feasibility of a two-layer 16 tesla dipole is investigated. Preliminary designs indicate that fields up to 16.6 tesla are feasible with conductor grading while satisfying the HE-LHC and FCC specifications. Key challenges include accommodating high-aspect ratio conductor, narrow wedge design, Nb3Sn conductor grading, and especially quench protection of a 16 tesla device.

  15. The LHC Cryomagnet Supports in Glass-Fiber Reinforced Epoxy A Large Scale Industrial Production with High Reproducibility in Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Poncet, A; Trigo, J; Parma, V

    2008-01-01

    The about 1700 LHC main ring super-conducting magnets are supported within their cryostats on 4700 low heat in leak column-type supports. The supports were designed to ensure a precise and stable positioning of the heavy dipole and quadrupole magnets while keeping thermal conduction heat loads within budget. A trade-off between mechanical and thermal properties, as well as cost considerations, led to the choice of glass fibre reinforced epoxy (GFRE). Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), featuring a high level of automation and control, was the manufacturing process retained to ensure the reproducibility of the performance of the supports throughout the large production. The Spanish aerospace company EADS-CASA Espacio developed the specific RTM process, and produced the total quantity of supports between 2001 and 2004. This paper describes the development and the production of the supports, and presents the production experience and the achieved performance.

  16. THE LHC CRYOMAGNET SUPPORTS IN GLASS-FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY: A LARGE SCALE INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION WITH HIGH REPRODUCIBILITY IN PERFORMANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncet, A.; Struik, M.; Parma, V.; Trigo, J.

    2008-01-01

    The about 1700 LHC main ring super-conducting magnets are supported within their cryostats on 4700 low heat in leak column-type supports. The supports were designed to ensure a precise and stable positioning of the heavy dipole and quadrupole magnets while keeping thermal conduction heat loads within budget. A trade-off between mechanical and thermal properties, as well as cost considerations, led to the choice of glass fibre reinforced epoxy (GFRE). Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), featuring a high level of automation and control, was the manufacturing process retained to ensure the reproducibility of the performance of the supports throughout the large production.The Spanish aerospace company EADS-CASA Espacio developed the specific RTM process, and produced the total quantity of supports between 2001 and 2004.This paper describes the development and the production of the supports, and presents the production experience and the achieved performance

  17. Acceleration of the LHC commissioning tests

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The quadrupole and main dipole circuits have been powered up to 10,200 amps in Sector 4-5. Sector 5-6 is currently being cooled and will be the next to undergo electrical tests, which will be stepped up over the next few weeks.

  18. Electronics for LHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, Francois

    1995-01-01

    Full text: A major effort is being mounted to prepare the way handling the high interaction rates expected from CERN's new LHC proton-proton collider (see, for example, November, page 6). September saw the First Workshop on Electronics for LHC Experiments, organized by Lisbon's Particle Physics Instrumentation Laboratory (LIP) on behalf of CERN's LHC Electronics Review Board (LERB - March, page 2). Its purpose was not only for the LERB to have a thorough review of ongoing activities, but also to promote cross fertilization in the engineering community involved in electronics design for LHC experiments. The Workshop gathered 187 physicists and engineers from 20 countries including USA and Japan. The meeting comprised six sessions and 82 talks, with special focus on radiation-hard microelectronic processes, electronics for tracking, calorimetry and muon detectors, optoelectronics, trigger and data acquisition systems. Each topic was introduced by an invited speaker who reviewed the requirements set by the particular detector technology at LHC. At the end of each session, panel discussions were chaired by each invited speaker. Representatives from four major integrated circuit manufacturers covered advanced radiation hard processes. Two talks highlighted the importance of obsolescence and quality systems in the long-lived and demanding environment of LHC. The Workshop identified areas and encouraged efforts for rationalization and common developments within and between the different detector groups. As a result, it will also help ensure the reliability and the long term maintainability of installed equipment. The proceedings of the Workshop are available from LIP Lisbon*. The LERB Workshop on Electronics for LHC Experiments will become a regular event, with the second taking place in Hungary, by Lake Balaton, from 23-27 September 1996. The Hungarian institutes KFKIRMKI have taken up the challenge of being as successful as LIP Lisbon in the organization

  19. High Luminosity LHC: challenges and plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.; Brüning, O.; Buffat, X.; Cai, Y.; Carver, L. R.; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, M.; Iadarola, G.; Li, K.; Lechner, A.; Medina Medrano, L.; Métral, E.; Nosochkov, Y.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pellegrini, D.; Pieloni, T.; Qiang, J.; Redaelli, S.; Romano, A.; Rossi, L.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Schenk, M.; Tambasco, C.; Tomás, R.; Valishev, S.; Van der Veken, F. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb3Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. The dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  20. Academic Training - LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES 13, 14, 15, March, from 11:00 to 12:00 - 16 March from 10:00 to 12:00 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 14, 15 March, Council Room on 13, 16 March LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges A. De Roeck / CERN-PH, D. Bortoletto / Purdue Univ. USA, R. Wigmans / Texas, Tech Univ. USA, W. Riegler / CERN-PH, W. Smith / Wisconsin Univ. USA The upgrade of the LHC machine towards higher luminosity (1035 cm-2s-1) has been studied over the last few years. These studies have investigated scenarios to achieve the increase in peak luminosity by an order of magnitude, as well as the physics potential of such an upgrade and the impact of a machine upgrade on the LHC DETECTORS. This series of lectures will cover the following topics: Physics motivation and machine scenarios for an order of magnitude increase in the LHC peak luminosity (lecture 1) Detector challenges including overview of ideas for R&D programs by the LHC experiments: tracking and calorimetry, other new detector ...

  1. High Luminosity LHC: Challenges and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11–12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb 3 Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. As a result, the dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  2. Issues in the design of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R; CERN. Geneva

    1995-01-01

    The lectures aim is to give an overall view of the project rather than a detailed specialized analysis.The main issues are reviewed in the first lecture. After a brief overall description of the machine as foreseen at the present stage of the dessign,the various problems that the design team has to face and the proposed solutions are detailed.The beam dynamics and beam optics problems are briefly discussed. The superconducting magnet technology is presented together with the first models and prototypes results. Some indications are given on the possible strategy for their manufacture.The required performance of the cryogenics system is given,the utilization of the LEP cryogenics plant in the LHC cryogenics system is explained. The implantation of the LHC equipment in underground caverns and in surface buildings is reviewed. Finally some indications are given on the running in of LHC.

  3. LIGHT and LUMINOSITY, from Einstein to LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Prof. ROSSI, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    After an introduction on the concept of light in physics, this talk will focus on CERN’s High Luminosity LHC project, aiming at extending the discovery potential of CERN’s flagship accelerator by increasing its “luminosity” (ie the number of particles that can be squeezed inside the accelerator to maximize the number of collisions). To achieve this objective, many new technologies are being developed at CERN and many collaborating institutes worldwide, especially in the field of superconductivity. Lucio Rossi, the main speaker, is the head of the HL-LHC project, based at CERN. Giorgio Apollinari, Director for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) will speak through a videoconference from Fermilab (USA). The event is webcast live and will be followed by Fermilab and other institutes in the USA.

  4. Demineralised water cooling in the LHC accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Peón-Hernández, G

    2002-01-01

    In spite of the LHC accelerator being a cryogenic machine, it remains nevertheless a not negligible heat load to be removed by conventional water-cooling. About 24MW will be taken away by demineralised water cooled directly by primary water from the LHC cooling towers placed at the even points. This paper describes the demineralised water network in the LHC tunnel including pipe diameters, lengths, water speed, estimated friction factor, head losses and available supply and return pressures for each point. It lists all water cooled equipment, highlights the water cooled cables as the most demanding equipment followed by the radio frequency racks and cavities, and by the power converters. Their main cooling requirements and their positions in the tunnel are also presented.

  5. The dance of the LHC magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The dance of the blue magnets has begun. On 25 April, the first superconducting dipole magnet for the LHC made the trip from Building SM18, where it had been tested and assembled, to the Prévessin site, where it is now being stored. The next few months will see many of these exceptional convoys - in more ways than one - bringing the magnets along the Route de l'Europe to Prévessin for storage before they are lowered into the tunnel. CERN's impressive overhead travelling crane loading the 15-metre-long magnet onto a lorry.The start of the 10-km-an-hour journey to the Prévessin site. Infinite care is taken with the loading, transportation and unloading of these precious magnets.

  6. Structure of dipole bands in 106In

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, A. Y.; Palit, R.; Naik, Z.; Joshi, P. K.; Mazumdar, I.; Sihotra, S.; Mehta, D.; Kumar, S.; Chakrabarti, R.; Kshetri, R.; Jain, H. C.

    2009-01-01

    High spin states in neutron-deficient 106 In were investigated using 78 Se( 32 S,p3n) reaction at 125 MeV. The level scheme is extended up to 7 MeV of excitation energy for the negative parity states constituting four dipole bands, and the positive parity states which mainly exhibit single-particle excitations are extended up to 5 MeV. Projected deformed Hartree-Fock calculations were carried out to understand the configurations of different bands in this nucleus.

  7. Chromoelectric dipole moment of the top quark in models with vectorlike multiplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Tarek; Nath, Pran

    2011-01-01

    The chromoelectric dipole moment of the top quark is calculated in a model with a vectorlike multiplet, which mixes with the third generation in an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. Such mixings allow for new CP violating phases. Including these new CP phases, the chromoelectric dipole moment that generates an electric dipole of the top in this class of models is computed. The top chromoelectric dipole moment operator arises from loops involving the exchange of the W, the Z, as well as from the exchange involving the charginos, the neutralinos, the gluino, and the vectorlike multiplet and their superpartners. The analysis of the chromoelectric dipole moment operator of the top is more complicated than for the light quarks because the mass of the external fermion, in this case the top quark mass, cannot be ignored relative to the masses inside the loops. A numerical analysis is presented and it is shown that the contribution to the top electric dipole moment (EDM) could lie in the range (10 -19 -10 -18 ) ecm, consistent with the current limits on the EDM of the electron, the neutron and on atomic EDMs. A top EDM of size (10 -19 -10 -18 ) ecm could be accessible in collider experiments such as at the LHC and at the International Linear Collider.

  8. Experiments and Cycling at the LHC Prototype Half-Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saban, R.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Coull, L.; Cruikshank, P.; Dahlerup-Petersen, K.; Hilbert, B.; Krainz, G.; Kos, N.; Lebrun, P.; Momal, F.; Misiaen, D.; Parma, V.; Poncet, A.; Riddone, G.; Rijllart, A.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.; Schmidt, R.; Serio, L.; Wallen, E.; van Weelderen, R.; Williams, L. R.

    1997-05-01

    The first version of the LHC prototype half-cell has been in operation since February 1995. It consists of one quadrupole and three 10-m twin aperture dipole magnets which operate at 1.8 K. This experimental set-up has been used to observe and study phenomena which appear when the systems are assembled in one unit and influence one another. The 18-month long experimental program has validated the cryogenic system and yielded a number of results on cryogenic instrumentation, magnet protection and vacuum in particular under non-standard operating conditions. The program was recently complemented by the cycling experiment: it consisted in powering the magnets following the ramp rates which will be experienced by the magnets during an LHC injection. In order to simulate 10 years of routine operation of LHC, more than 2000 1-hour cycles were performed interleaved with provoked quenches. The objective of this experiment was to reveal eventual flaws in the design of components. The prototype half-cell performed to expectations showing no sign of failure of fatigue of components for more than 2000 cycles until one of the dipoles started exhibiting an erratic quench behavior.

  9. High Energy LHC Document prepared for the European HEP strategy update

    CERN Document Server

    Brüning, O; Mangano, M; Myers, S; Rossi, L; Todesco, E; Zimmerman, F

    2012-01-01

    The LHC will run to produce physics at the energy frontier of 13-14 TeV c.o.m. for protons for the next 20-25 years. The possibility of increasing the proton beam energy well beyond its nominal value of 7 TeV has been addressed in a study group in 2010 and then discussed in a workshop in October 2010. The reuse of the CERN infrastructure, the “ease” in producing luminosity with proton circular collider and the practical and technical experience gained with LHC, all are concurring reasons to explore this route. The High Energy LHC relies on the “natural” evolution of the LHC technologies. The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) demands going 50% beyond the limit of magnetic field of LHC: therefore HL-LHC can be considered as the first milestone in the path toward the highest energy. The beam energy is set by the strength of superconducting magnets: assuming a dipole field in the range 16-20 T, the maximum attainable collision energy falls in the range of 26 to 33 TeV in the centre of mass. The driving techno...

  10. Dipole Resonances of 76Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, R. S.; Cooper, N.; Werner, V.; Rusev, G.; Pietralla, N.; Kelly, J. H.; Tornow, W.; Yates, S. W.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E.

    2013-10-01

    Dipole resonances in 76Ge have been studied using the method of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF). The experiment was performed using the Free Electron Laser facility at HI γS/TUNL, which produced linearly polarised quasi-monoenergetic photons in the 4-9 MeV energy range. Photon strength, in particular dipole strength, is an important ingredient in nuclear reaction calculations, and recent interest in its study has been stimulated by observations of a pygmy dipole resonance near the neutron separation energy Sn of certain nuclei. Furthermore, 76Ge is a candidate for 0 ν 2 β -decay. The results are complimentary to a relevant experiment done at TU Darmstadt using Bremsstrahlung beams. Single-resonance parities and a preliminary estimate of the total photo-excitation cross section will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under grant no. DE-FG02-91ER40609.

  11. Stacks of SPS Dipole Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Stacks of SPS Dipole Magnets ready for installation in the tunnel. The SPS uses a separated function lattice with dipoles for bending and quadrupoles for focusing. The 6.2 m long normal conducting dipoles are of H-type with coils that are bent-up at the ends. There are two types, B1 (total of 360) and B2 (384). Both are for a maximum field of 1.8 Tesla and have the same outer dimensions (450x800 mm2 vxh) but with different gaps (B1: 39x129 mm2, B2: 52x92 mm2) tailored to the beam size. The yoke, made of 1.5 mm thick laminations, consists of an upper and a lower half joined together in the median plane once the coils have been inserted.

  12. Cryogenics in CEBAF HMS dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogensberger, P.; Ramsauer, F.; Brindza, P.; Wines, R.; Koefler, H.

    1994-01-01

    The paper will report upon the final design, manufacturing and tests of CEBAF's HMS Dipole cryogenic equipment. The liquid nitrogen circuits, the helium circuits and thermal insulation of the magnet will be addressed. The cryogenic reservoir and control module as an integral part of the HMS Dipole magnet will be presented. The construction, manufacturing, tests and final performance of the HMS Dipole cryogenic system will be reported. The LN 2 circuit and the He circuit are tied together by the control system for cool down, normal operation and standby. This system monitors proper temperature differences between both circuits and controls the cryogenic supply to meet the constraints. Implementation of the control features for the cryogenic system into the control system will be reported

  13. Derivation of the dipole map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Halima; Punjabi, Alkesh; Boozer, Allen

    2004-01-01

    In our method of maps [Punjabi et al., Phy. Rev. Lett. 69, 3322 (1992), and Punjabi et al., J. Plasma Phys. 52, 91 (1994)], symplectic maps are used to calculate the trajectories of magnetic field lines in divertor tokamaks. Effects of the magnetic perturbations are calculated using the low MN map [Ali et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 1908 (2004)] and the dipole map [Punjabi et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 3992 (2003)]. The dipole map is used to calculate the effects of externally located current carrying coils on the trajectories of the field lines, the stochastic layer, the magnetic footprint, and the heat load distribution on the collector plates in divertor tokamaks [Punjabi et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 3992 (2003)]. Symplectic maps are general, efficient, and preserve and respect the Hamiltonian nature of the dynamics. In this brief communication, a rigorous mathematical derivation of the dipole map is given

  14. Fast crab cavity failures in HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Yee-Rendon, B; Calaga, R; Tomas, R; Zimmermann, F; Barranco, J

    2014-01-01

    Crab cavities (CCs) are a key ingredient of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) to ensure head on collisions at the main experiments (ATLAS and CMS) and fully profit from the smaller provided by the ATS optics [1]. At KEKB, CCs have exhibited abrupt changes of phase and voltage during a time period of few LHC turns and considering the large energy stored in the HL-LHC beam, CC failures represent a serious risk to the LHC machine protection. In this paper, we discuss the effect of CC voltage or phase changes on a time interval similar to, or longer than, the one needed to dump the beam. The simulations assume a realistic steady-state distribution to assess the beam losses for the HL-LHC. Additionally, some strategies are studied in order to reduce the damage caused by the CC failures.

  15. Stepping outside the neighborhood of Tc at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    ' As you are well aware, many in the RHIC community are interested in the LHC heavy-ion program, but have several questions: What can we learn at the LHC that is qualitatively new? Are collisions at LHC similar to RHIC ones, just with a somewhat hotter/denser initial state? If not, why not? These questions are asked in good faith, and this talk is an opportunity to answer them directly to much of the RHIC community.' With these words, the organizers of Quark Matter 2009 in Knoxville invited me to discuss the physics opportunities for heavy ion collisions at the LHC without recalling the standard arguments, which are mainly based on the extended kinematic reach of the machine. In response, I emphasize here that lattice QCD indicates characteristic qualitative differences between thermal physics in the neighborhood of the critical temperature (T c 400-500MeV), for which the relevant energy densities will be solely attainable at the LHC.

  16. LHC physics results and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Kono, Takanori; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This talk presents the latest results from LHC Run-2 as of May 2018 which include Standard Model measurements, Higgs boson properties and beyond Standard Model search results. The prospects for future LHC runs are also shown.

  17. Electronics at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Geoffrey

    1998-01-01

    An overview of the electronic readout systems planned for use in the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the LHC will be given, with an emphasis on the motivations for the designs adopted and major technologies to be employed, specially those which are specific to LHC. At its design luminosity, the LHC will deliver hundreds of millions of proton-proton interactions per second. Storage and computing limitations limit the number of physics events that can be recorded to about 100 per second. The selection will be carried out by the Trigger and data acquisition systems of the experiments. This lecture will review the requirements, architectures and various designs currently considered. Introduction. Structure of gauge theories. The QED and QCD examples. Chiral theories. The electroweak theory. Spontaneous symmetry breaking. The Higgs machanism.Gauge boson and fermion masses. Yukawa coupling. Charges current couplings. The Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and CP violation. neutral current couplings. the Clashow-Iliopoul...

  18. Lectures on LHC physics

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the LHC experiments have closed the most important gap in our understanding of fundamental interactions, confirming that such interactions between elementary particles can be described by quantum field theory, more specifically by a renormalizable gauge theory. This theory is a priori valid for arbitrarily high energy scales and does not require an ultraviolet completion. Yet, when trying to apply the concrete knowledge of quantum field theory to actual LHC physics - in particular to the Higgs sector and certain regimes of QCD - one inevitably encounters an intricate maze of phenomenological know-how, common lore and other, often historically developed intuitions about what works and what doesn’t. These lectures cover three aspects to help understand LHC results in the Higgs sector and in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model: they discuss the many facets of Higgs physics, which is at the core of this significantly expanded second edition; then QCD, to the deg...

  19. The LHC in numbers

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    What makes the LHC the biggest particle accelerator in the world? Here are some of the numbers that characterise the LHC, and their equivalents in terms that are easier for us to imagine.   Feature Number Equivalent Circumference ~ 27 km   Distance covered by beam in 10 hours ~ 10 billion km a round trip to Neptune Number of times a single proton travels around the ring each second 11 245   Speed of protons first entering the LHC 299 732 500 m/s 99.9998 % of the speed of light Speed of protons when they collide 299 789 760 m/s 99.9999991 % of the speed of light Collision temperature ~ 1016 °C ove...

  20. UFOs in the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grob, Laura [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) localized and recurring beam losses have been observed, which usually persist for several hundred microseconds. With increasing beam energy these losses were found to pose a serious risk to the machine availability, as some of these events can cause quenches in the superconducting magnets. The current understanding is that these losses are caused by falling microparticles that interact with the proton beam. To describe these so-called UFOs (unidentified falling objects) and their dynamics, a model was developed starting from the approach that only gravitational and electrostatic forces act on a neutrally charged particle. However, the model's results cannot reproduce the actual data from the LHC's beam loss monitors (BLMs), which indicates a more complex UFO dynamic. Experimental studies and further analysis of the BLM data are planned to investigate the UFO dynamics in greater detail and to understand origins and release mechanisms for microparticles in the LHC beam pipe.

  1. Coupled-resonator waveguide perfect transport single-photon by interatomic dipole-dipole interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guo-an; Lu, Hua; Qiao, Hao-xue; Chen, Ai-xi; Wu, Wan-qing

    2018-06-01

    We theoretically investigate single-photon coherent transport in a one-dimensional coupled-resonator waveguide coupled to two quantum emitters with dipole-dipole interactions. The numerical simulations demonstrate that the transmission spectrum of the photon depends on the two atoms dipole-dipole interactions and the photon-atom couplings. The dipole-dipole interactions may change the dip positions in the spectra and the coupling strength may broaden the frequency band width in the transmission spectrum. We further demonstrate that the typical transmission spectra split into two dips due to the dipole-dipole interactions. This phenomenon may be used to manufacture new quantum waveguide devices.

  2. System of coefficients for charged-particle beam linear transformation by a magnetic dipole element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarantin, N.I.

    1979-01-01

    A new technique for consideration of dipole magnet ion-optical effect has been developed to study the problems of commutation and monochromatization of a charged particle beam. In a new form obtained are systematized coefficients of linear transformation (CLT) of the charged particle beam for radial and axial motions in a magnetic dipole element (MDE) including a dipole magnet and two gaps without magnetic field. Given is a method of graphic determination of MDE parameters and main CLT. The new form of coefficients and conditions of the transformations feasibility considerably facilitates the choice and calculation of dipole elements

  3. Low-loss wire design for the DiSCoRaP dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Volpini, G; Bellomo, G; Sorbi, M; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Musenich, R; Gambardella, U; Kaugerts, J; Moritz, G; Wilson, M N

    2009-01-01

    The SIS-300 synchrotron of the new FAIR facility at GSI (Germany) will use fast-cycled superconducting magnets. Its dipoles will be pulsed at 1 T/s; for comparison, LHC is ramped at 0.007 T/s and RHIC at 0.042 T/s. Within the frame of a collaboration between INFN and GSI, INFN has funded the project DISCORAP (DIpoli SuperCOnduttori RApidamente Pulsati, or Fast Pulsed Superconducting Dipoles) whose goal is to design, construct and test a half-length (4 m), curved, model of one lattice dipole. This paper focuses on the low loss superconducting wire design, and in particular to the transverse resistivity calculations and the dynamic stability verification.

  4. The optimised sc dipole of SIS100 for series production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Christian; Mierau, Anna; Bleile, Alexander; Fischer, Egbert; Kaether, Florian; Körber, Boris; Schnizer, Pierre; Sugita, Kei; Szwangruber, Piotr

    2017-02-01

    At the international facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany, an accelerator complex is developed for fundamental research in various fields of modern physics. In the SIS100 heavy-ion synchrotron, the main accelerator of FAIR, superconducting dipoles are used to bend the particle beam. The fast ramped dipoles are 3 m long super-ferric curved magnets operated at 4.5 K. The demands on field homogeneity required for sufficient beam stability are given by ΔB/B ≤ ±6 · 10-4. An intense measurement program of the First of Series (FoS) dipole showed excellent quench behavior and lower than expected AC losses yielding the main load on the SIS100 cryoplant. The FoS is capable to provide a field strength of 1.9 T. However, with sophisticated measurement systems slight distortions of the dipole field were detected. Those effects were tracked down to mechanical inaccuracies of the yoke proven by appropriate geometrical measurements and simulations. After a survey on alternative fabrication techniques a magnet with a new yoke was built with substantial changes to improve the mechanical accuracy. Its characteristics concerning cryogenic losses, cold geometry and the resulting magnetic-field quality are presented and an outlook on the series production of superconducting dipoles for SIS100 is given.

  5. LHC beam stability and feedback control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhagen, Ralph

    2007-07-20

    This report presents the stability and the control of the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) two beam orbits and their particle momenta using beam-based feedback systems. The aim of this report is to contribute to a safe and reliable LHC commissioning and machine operation. The first part of the analysis gives an estimate of the expected sources of orbit and energy perturbations that can be grouped into environmental sources, machine-inherent sources and machine element failures: the slowest perturbation due to ground motion, tides, temperature fluctuations of the tunnel and other environmental influences are described in this report by a propagation model that is both qualitatively and quantitatively supported by geophone and beam motion measurements at LEP and other CERN accelerators. The second part of this analysis deals with the control of the two LHC beams' orbit and energy through automated feedback systems. Based on the reading of the more than 1056 beam position monitors (BPMs) that are distributed over the machine, a central global feedback controller calculates new deflection strengths for the more than 1060 orbit corrector magnets (CODs) that are suitable to correct the orbit and momentum around their references. this report provides an analysis of the BPMs and CODs involved in the orbit and energy feedback. The BPMs are based on a wide-band time normaliser circuit that converts the transverse beam position reading of each individual particle bunch into two laser pulses that are separated by a time delay and transmitted through optical fibres to an acquisition card that converts the delay signals into a digital position. A simple error model has been tested and compared to the measurement accuracy of LHC type BPMs, obtained through beam-based measurements in the SPS. The average beam position is controlled through 1060 superconducting and individually powered corrector dipole magnets. The proposed correction in 'time-domain' consists of a

  6. LHC beam stability and feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhagen, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the stability and the control of the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) two beam orbits and their particle momenta using beam-based feedback systems. The aim of this report is to contribute to a safe and reliable LHC commissioning and machine operation. The first part of the analysis gives an estimate of the expected sources of orbit and energy perturbations that can be grouped into environmental sources, machine-inherent sources and machine element failures: the slowest perturbation due to ground motion, tides, temperature fluctuations of the tunnel and other environmental influences are described in this report by a propagation model that is both qualitatively and quantitatively supported by geophone and beam motion measurements at LEP and other CERN accelerators. The second part of this analysis deals with the control of the two LHC beams' orbit and energy through automated feedback systems. Based on the reading of the more than 1056 beam position monitors (BPMs) that are distributed over the machine, a central global feedback controller calculates new deflection strengths for the more than 1060 orbit corrector magnets (CODs) that are suitable to correct the orbit and momentum around their references. this report provides an analysis of the BPMs and CODs involved in the orbit and energy feedback. The BPMs are based on a wide-band time normaliser circuit that converts the transverse beam position reading of each individual particle bunch into two laser pulses that are separated by a time delay and transmitted through optical fibres to an acquisition card that converts the delay signals into a digital position. A simple error model has been tested and compared to the measurement accuracy of LHC type BPMs, obtained through beam-based measurements in the SPS. The average beam position is controlled through 1060 superconducting and individually powered corrector dipole magnets. The proposed correction in 'time-domain' consists of a proportional

  7. Cryogenics will cool LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Results of the investigation into the cryogenic regulating line (QRL) performed by the LHC laboratory are presented. It is projected that eight cryogenic units located in five places around the LHC ring will provide superconducting magnets by liquid helium through eight cryogenic regulating lines of 3.2 km each. All QRL zones remain to be independent. CERN uses three test units with the aim of the certification of chosen constructions and verification of their thermal and mechanical efficiency before starting full-scale production [ru

  8. LHC-ILC synergy

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, Rohini M

    2006-01-01

    I will begin by making a few general comments on the synergy between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which will go in action in 2007 and the International Linear Collider (ILC) which is under planning. I will then focus on the synergy between the LHC and the PLC option at the ILC, which is expected to be realised in the later stages of the ILC program. In this I will cover the possible synergy in the Higgs sector (with and without CP violation), in the determination of the anomalous vector boson couplings and last but not the least, in the search for extra dimensions and radions.

  9. The LHC detector challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Virdee, Tejinder S

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from CERN, scheduled to come online in 2007, is a multi-TeV proton-proton collider with vast detectors. Two of the more significant detectors for LHC are ATLAS and CMS. Currently, both detectors are more than 65% complete in terms of financial commitment, and the experiments are being assembled at an increasing pace. ATLAS is being built directly in its underground cavern, whereas CMS is being assembled above ground. When completed, both detectors will aid researchers in determining what lies at the high-energy frontier, in particular the mechanism by which particles attain mass. (Edited abstract).

  10. LHC beampipe interconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Particle beams circulate for around 10 hours in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). During this time, the particles make four hundred million revolutions of the machine, travelling a distance equivalent to the diameter of the solar system. The beams must travel in a pipe which is emptied of air, to avoid collisions between the particles and air molecules (which are considerably bigger than protons). The beam pipes are pumped down to an air pressure similar to that on the surface of the moon. Much of the LHC runs at 1.9 degrees above absolute zero. When material is cooled, it contracts. The interconnections must absorb this contraction whilst maintaining electrical connectivity.

  11. LHC Report: superconducting circuit powering tests

    CERN Multimedia

    Mirko Pojer

    2015-01-01

    After the long maintenance and consolidation campaign carried out during LS1, the machine is getting ready to start operation with beam at 6.5 TeV… the physics community can’t wait! Prior to this, all hardware and software systems have to be tested to assess their correct and safe operation.   Most of the cold circuits (those with high current/stored energy) possess a sophisticated magnet protection system that is crucial to detect a transition of the coil from the superconducting to the normal state (a quench) and safely extract the energy stored in the circuits (about 1 GJ per dipole circuit at nominal current). LHC operation relies on 1232 superconducting dipoles with a field of up to 8.33 T operating in superfluid helium at 1.9 K, along with more than 500 superconducting quadrupoles operating at 4.2 or 1.9 K. Besides, many other superconducting and normal resistive magnets are used to guarantee the possibility of correcting all beam parameters, for a total of mo...

  12. LHC Report: Cloudy with sunny spells

    CERN Multimedia

    Lionel Herblin & Mike Lamont for the LHC team

    2015-01-01

    The LHC is continuing its 25 ns intensity ramp-up and has now reached 1465 bunches per beam. Performance is reasonable and the experiments have seen some long fills with steadily increasing luminosity delivery rates. Some now familiar issues continue to make life interesting.   The image shows the heat load evolution as measured in specially equipped dipoles. (Image: Giovanni Iadarola). Top frame: energy and intensity. Middle frame: measured heat load in W/m. Bottom frame: heat load normalised to total beam intensity. One of the key challenges of 2015 was always expected to be electron clouds. The two scrubbing runs that were performed in the summer successfully qualified the LHC for up to around 1500 bunches. However, the final phase of the scrubbing, which saw the move from regular 25 ns beam to the doublet beam, proved difficult, and the scrubbing team concluded that the machine was not yet well-enough scrubbed for the doublets to be used effectively. The 25 ...

  13. Flavour in the era of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 4th meeting of the 'Flavour in the era of the LHC' workshop will take place at CERN on 9-11 October, 2006. The goal of this workshop is to outline and document a programme for flavour physics for the next decade, addressing in particular the complementarity and synergy between the discoveries we expect to emerge from the LHC and the potential for accurate measurements of future flavour factories. Over 150 physicists will join in the discussions of the three working groups dedicated to 'Flavour physics at high Q', 'B/D/K decays' and 'Flavour in the lepton sector, EDM's, g-2, etc'. The previous meetings took place in November 2005, and in February and May this year. In addition to the working group sessions, a special miniworkshop dedicated to future prospects for electric dipole moment (EDM) searches and g-2 measurements will be held on 9-10 October. Sensitive EDM and g-2 experiments probe physics in an integral way, and in many cases their physics reach is much higher than the spectrometer searches at th...

  14. Flavour in the era of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 4th meeting of the 'Flavour in the era of the LHC'workshop will take place at CERN on 9-11 October, 2006. The goal of this workshop is to outline and document a programme for flavour physics for the next decade, addressing in particular the complementarity and synergy between the discoveries we expect to emerge from the LHC and the potential for accurate measurements of future flavour factories. Over 150 physicists will join in the discussions of the three working groups dedicated to 'Flavour physics at high Q', 'B/D/K decays'and 'Flavour in the lepton sector, EDM's, g-2, etc'. The previous meetings took place in November 2005, and in February and May this year. In addition to the working group sessions, a special miniworkshop dedicated to future prospects for electric dipole moment (EDM) searches and g-2 measurements will be held on 9-10 October. Sensitive EDM and g-2 experiments probe physics in an integral way, and in many cases their physics reach is much higher than the spectrometer searches at th...

  15. LHC Commissioning and First Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, S

    2010-01-01

    A description is given of the repair of the LHC after the accident of September 2008. The LHC hardware and beam commissioning and initial operation are reviewed both in terms of beam and hardware performance. The implemented machine protection measures and their impact on LHC operation are presented.

  16. LHC Report: Summer temperatures in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The LHC experiments have finished their data-taking period before the summer conferences. The machine has already delivered substantially more collisions to the experiments this year than in the whole of 2011. The LHC has now started a six-day Machine Development period, which will be followed by the second Technical Stop of the year.   The number of collisions delivered to the experiments is expressed in integrated luminosity. In 2011, the integrated luminosity delivered to both ATLAS and CMS was around 5.6 fb-1. On Monday 18 June, experiments finished taking data before the summer conferences and the integrated luminosity for 2012 so far is about 6.6 fb-1, well above the unofficial target of 5 fb-1. The LHC’s performance over the last week of running was so efficient that the injection kicker magnets – which heat up due to the circulating beam – did not have time to cool down between the subsequent fills. As the time constants for warming up and cooli...

  17. C P -violation in the two Higgs doublet model: From the LHC to EDMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Li, Hao-Lin; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael

    2018-01-01

    We study the prospective sensitivity to C P -violating two Higgs doublet models from the 14 TeV LHC and future electric dipole moment (EDM) experiments. We concentrate on the search for a resonant heavy Higgs that decays to a Z boson and a SM-like Higgs h , leading to the Z (ℓℓ)h (b b ¯ ) final state. The prospective LHC reach is analyzed using the Boosted Decision Tree method. We illustrate the complementarity between the LHC and low energy EDM measurements and study the dependence of the physics reach on the degree of deviation from the alignment limit. In all cases, we find that there exists a large part of parameter space that is sensitive to both EDMs and LHC searches.

  18. Raising the last LEP dipole

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    The last of the 3280 dipole magnets from the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider is seen on its journey to the surface on 12 February 2002. The LEP era, which began at CERN in 1989 and ended 2000, comes to an end.

  19. Locating a buried magnetic dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffey, T.W.H.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical basis and required computations for locating a buried magnetic dipole are outlined. The results are compared with measurements made with a tiltable coil lowered to a depth of 20 m in a vertical borehole within a three-layered earth. this work has application to the rescue of trapped miners. 3 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  20. Particle electric dipole-moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendlebury, J M [Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    The incentive to detect particle electric dipole-moments, as a window on time-reversal violation, remains undiminished. Efforts to improve the measurements for the neutron, the electron and some nuclei are still making rapid progress as more powerful experimental methods are brought to bear. A new measurement for the neutron at ILL is presented. (author). 7 refs.

  1. 5cm aperture dipole studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInturff, A.D.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.; Kuchnir, M.; Lundy, R.; Mantech, P.; Strait, J.

    1986-01-01

    The results obtained during the evolution of the design, construction, and testing program of the design ''B'' dipole are presented here. Design ''B'' is one of the original three competing designs for the Superconducting Super Collider ''SSC'' arc dipoles. The final design parameters were as follows: air cored (less than a few percent of the magnetic field derived from any iron present), aluminum collared, two layered winding, 5.5T maximum operating field, and a 5 cm cold aperture. There have been fourteen 64 cm long 5 cm aperture model dipoles cold tested (at 4.3K and less) in this program so far. There was a half length full size (6m) mechanical analog (M-10) built and tested to check the cryostat's mechanical design under ramping and quench conditions. Several deviations from the ''Tevatron'' dipole fabrication technique were incorporated, for example the use of aluminum collars instead of stainless steel. The winding technique variations explored were ''dry welding,'' a technique with the cable covered with Kapton insulation only and ''wet winding'' where the Kapton was covered with a light coat of ''B'' stage epoxy. Test data include quench currents, field quality (Fourier multipole co-efficients), coil magnetization, conductor current performance, and coil loading. Quench current, loss per cycle, and harmonics were measured as a function of the magnitude and rate of change of the magnetic field, and helium bath temperature

  2. The Collider dipole magnet program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, R.W.; Bailey, R.; Bever, D.; Bogart, L.; Gigg, G.; Packer, M.; Page, L.; Stranberg, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider will consist of more large superconducting magnets than have been built to date. Over 12,000 superconducting magnets are required and more than 8,000 will be Collider dipoles. The dipole magnet program is on the critical path of the project and requires the optimized utilization of the Nation's resources - National Laboratories, Universities and Industry. General Dynamics and Westinghouse Electric Corporation have been chosen as the Leader and Follower companies for the design of producible magnets and the manufacturing of the SSC dipoles. Industry has the necessary experience, skills and facilities required to produce reliable and cost effective dipole magnets. At peak production, 10 CDMs per day, very large quantities (nearly 130 metric tonnes/day) of materials will have to be procured from companies nationwide and fabricated into defect-free magnets. A key element of the SSCL's strategy to produce the most efficient CDM program is to employ the Leader-Follower approach, with the Leader transferring technology from the laboratories to the Leader's facility, fully integrating the Follower in the producibility and tooling/factory design efforts, and assisting the Follower in magnet qualification tests. General Dynamics is ready to help build America's most powerful research tool. Management is in place, the facilities are ready for activation and resources are available for immediate assignment

  3. A Tale of Two Dipoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Bach

    2006-01-01

    A number of antenna topics may be treated by studying just two parallel, closely spaced electrical dipoles. They form an array and they may be coupled to form a single antenna with one port, or coupled through a coupling network to form a multiport antenna. The situations discussed are the creation...

  4. The LHC Computing Grid Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Åkesson, T

    In the last ATLAS eNews I reported on the preparations for the LHC Computing Grid Project (LCGP). Significant LCGP resources were mobilized during the summer, and there have been numerous iterations on the formal paper to put forward to the CERN Council to establish the LCGP. ATLAS, and also the other LHC-experiments, has been very active in this process to maximally influence the outcome. Our main priorities were to ensure that the global aspects are properly taken into account, that the CERN non-member states are also included in the structure, that the experiments are properly involved in the LCGP execution and that the LCGP takes operative responsibility during the data challenges. A Project Launch Board (PLB) was active from the end of July until the 10th of September. It was chaired by Hans Hoffmann and had the IT division leader as secretary. Each experiment had a representative (me for ATLAS), and the large CERN member states were each represented while the smaller were represented as clusters ac...

  5. CERN: LHC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    With test magnets for CERN's LHC proton-proton collider regularly attaining field strengths which show that 10 Tesla is not forbidden territory, attention turns to why and where quenches happen. If 'training' can be reduced, superconducting magnets become easier to commission

  6. LHC status report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Following the great success of the first 3.5 TeV collisions in all four LHC experiments on 30 March, the focus of the LHC commissioning teams has turned to consolidating the beam injection and acceleration procedures.   During the last two weeks, the operators have adopted a cycle of beam commissioning studies by day and the preparation and delivery of collisions during the night shifts. The injection and acceleration processes for the beams are by now well established and almost all feedback systems, which are an essential ingredient for establishing reliable and safe machine operation, have been commissioned. Thanks to special current settings for the quadrupoles that are situated near the collision points, the LHC luminosity at high energy has been increased by a factor of 5 in three of the four experiments. Similar improvements are under way for the fourth experiment. The next steps include adjustments of the LHC machine protection and collimation devices, which will ensure 'stable beam' co...

  7. Fully transparent LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Thanks to the first real signals received from the LHC while in operation before the incident, the experiments are now set to make the best use of the data they have collected. Report from the LHCC open session.The September open session of the LHCC (LHC Experiments Committee) came just a few days after the incident that occurred at the LHC. The packed auditorium was a testament to the huge interest raised by Lyn Evans’ talk about the status of the machine and the plans for the future. After being told that the actual consequences of the incident will be clear only once Sector 3-4 has been warmed up, the audience focussed on the reports from the experiments. For the first time, the reports showed performance results of the various detectors with particles coming from the machine and not just from cosmic rays or tests and simulations. "The first days of LHC beam exceeded all expectations and the experiments made extensive and rapid use of the data they collected", says ...

  8. Higgs physics at LHC

    OpenAIRE

    Unal, G

    2006-01-01

    This is a review of Higgs physics at LHC. The topics covered are the search of the Standard Model Higgs boson (with emphasis on the low mass region), the measurements of the Higgs boson properties (mass, width, spin, CP and couplings) and the Higgs sector of the MSSM.

  9. Mobilizing for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    A follow-up report on the incident that occurred in LHC Sector 3-4 was published on 5 December. It confirms that the accelerator will be restarted in the summer of 2009. From now until then, the teams will be pulling out all the stops to repair the sector and enhance the operational safety of the machine.

  10. LHC: forwards and onwards

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Following the recent incident in Sector 3-4, which has brought the start-up of the LHC to a halt, the various teams are working hard to establish the cause, evaluate the situation and plan the necessary repairs. The LHC will be started up again in spring 2009 following the winter shutdown for the maintenance of all the CERN installations. The LHC teams are at work on warming up Sector 3-4 and establishing the cause of the serious incident that occurred on Friday, 19 September. Preliminary investigations suggest that the likely cause of the problem was a faulty electrical connection between two magnets. The connections probably melted, leading to a mechanical failure and a large leak of helium into the tunnel. However, the teams will not be able to carry out a full evaluation and assess the repairs needed until the sector has been warmed up again and inspected. "We are not worried about repairing the magnets as spare parts are available", said Lyn Evans, the LHC Project Leade...

  11. LHC Report: Ion Age

    CERN Multimedia

    John Jowett for the LHC team

    2013-01-01

    The LHC starts the New Year facing a new challenge: proton-lead collisions in the last month before the shutdown in mid-February.    Commissioning this new and almost unprecedented mode of collider operation is a major challenge both for the LHC and its injector chain. Moreover, it has to be done very quickly to achieve a whole series of physics goals, requiring modifications of the LHC configuration, in a very short time. These include a switch of the beam directions halfway through the run, polarity reversals of the ALICE spectrometer magnet and Van der Meer scans.    The Linac3 team kept the lead source running throughout the end-of-year technical stop, and recovery of the accelerator complex was very quick. New proton and lead beams were soon ready, with a bunch filling pattern that ensures they will eventually match up in the LHC. The LEIR machine has even attained a new ion beam intensity record.  On Friday 11 January the first single bunches o...

  12. Higgs physics at LHC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The large hadron collider (LHC) and its detectors, ATLAS and CMS, are being built to study TeV scale physics, and to fully understand the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. The Monte-Carlo simulation results for the standard model and minimal super symmetric standard model Higgs boson searches and ...

  13. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance.

  14. CERN: LHC magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-08-15

    With test magnets for CERN's LHC proton-proton collider regularly attaining field strengths which show that 10 Tesla is not forbidden territory, attention turns to why and where quenches happen. If 'training' can be reduced, superconducting magnets become easier to commission.

  15. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance

  16. The influence of Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) on biogeochemistry of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Positive SST anomalies (SSTA) were found in the Arabian Sea (0.4 to 1.8 ... Keywords. Indian Ocean Dipole; biogeochemistry; carbon; chlorophyll; Arabian Sea; models. ... mainly control the strength of this source (Sarma ... of the CO2 evasion at the air–water interface (70 ..... tive SSHA due to asymmetric effect of upwelling.

  17. Resonant Dipole Nanoantenna Arrays for Enhanced Terahertz Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Toma, A.

    2015-08-04

    Our recent studies on dipole nanoantenna arrays resonating in the terahertz frequency range (0.1 – 10 THz) will be presented. The main near- and far-field properties of these nanostructures will be shown and their application in enhanced terahertz spectroscopy of tiny quantities of nanomaterials will be discussed.

  18. Electrically Small Magnetic Dipole Antennas with Magnetic Core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2010-01-01

    This work extends the theory of a spherical magnetic dipole antenna with magnetic core by numerical results for practical antenna configurations that excite higher-order modes besides the main TE10 spherical mode. The multiarm spherical helix (MSH) and the spherical split ring (SSR) antennas...

  19. Multiscale dipole relaxation in dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    Dipole relaxation from thermally induced perturbations is investigated on different length scales for dielectric materials. From the continuum dynamical equations for the polarisation, expressions for the transverse and longitudinal dipole autocorrelation functions are derived in the limit where ...

  20. Dipole rescattering and the nuclear structure function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, F. [Depto de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, V. P. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Navarra, F. S.; Oliveira, E. G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    In the framework of the dipole model, we study the effects of the dipole multiple scatterings in a nuclear target and compute the nuclear structure function. We compare different unitarization schemes and confront our results with the E665 data.