WorldWideScience

Sample records for lhc energy regions

  1. Energy Deposition Studies for the LHC Insertion Region Upgrade Phase-I

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Mereghetti, A; Wildner, E

    2010-01-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is starting operation with beam, aiming to achieve nominal performance in the shortest term, the upgrade of the LHC interaction regions is actively pursued in order to enhance the physics reach of the machine. Its first phase, with the target of increasing the LHC luminosity to 2-3 1034cm-2s-1, relies on the mature Nb-Ti superconducting magnet technology and is intended to maximize the use of the existing infrastructure. The impact of the increased power of the collision debris has been investigated through detailed energy deposition studies, considering the new aperture requirements for the low-ß quadrupoles and a number of other elements in the insertions. Effective solutions in terms of shielding options and design/layout optimization have been envisaged and the crucial factors have been pointed out.

  2. Inclusive production at LHC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino, C.; Pajares, C.; Shabelski, Yu.M.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the first LHC data for pp collisions in the framework of Regge theory. The integral cross sections and inclusive densities of secondaries are determined by the Pomeron exchange, and we present the corresponding predictions for them. The first measurements of inclusive densities in the midrapidity region are in agreement with these predictions. The contribution of the baryon-number transfer due to String Junction diffusion in the rapidity space is at the origin of the differences in the inclusive spectra of particle and antiparticle in the central region, and this effect could be significant at LHC energies. We discuss the first data of ALICE and LHCb collaborations on the baryon/antibaryon asymmetry at LHC. (orig.)

  3. US Department of Energy Secretary Bill Richardson (centre) at an LHC interaction region quadrupole test cryostat. part of the US contribution to LHC construction and built by the US-LHC collaboration (hence the Fermilab logo)

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2000-01-01

    Photo 01 : September 2000 - Mr Bill Richardson, Secretary of Energy, United States of America (centre) at an LHC interaction region quadrupole test cryostat, part of the US contribution to LHC construction and built by the US-LHC collaboration (hence the Fermilab logo); with l. to r. Dr Mildred Dresselhaus, Dr Carlo Wyss, CERN Director General, Profesor Luciano Maiani, Professor Roger Cashmore, Ambassador George Moose, Dr Peter Rosen, Dr John Ellis. Photo 02 : Mr. Bill Richardson (right), Secretary of Energy United States of America with Prof. Luciano Maiani leaning over one of the LHC magnets produced at Fermilab during his visit to CERN on 16th September 2000.

  4. Charged-particle multiplicity at LHC energies

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The talk presents the measurement of the pseudorapidity density and the multiplicity distribution with ALICE at the achieved LHC energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV.An overview about multiplicity measurements prior to LHC is given and the related theoretical concepts are briefly discussed.The analysis procedure is presented and the systematic uncertainties are detailed. The applied acceptance corrections and the treatment of diffraction are discussed.The results are compared with model predictions. The validity of KNO scaling in restricted phase space regions is revisited. 

  5. Gluon saturation and baryon stopping in the SPS, RHIC, and LHC energy regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuang; Feng Shengqin

    2012-01-01

    A new geometrical scaling method with a gluon saturation rapidity limit is proposed to study the gluon saturation feature of the central rapidity region of relativistic nuclear collisions. The net-baryon number is essentially transported by valence quarks that probe the saturation regime in the target by multiple scattering. We take advantage of the gluon saturation model with geometric scaling of the rapidity limit to investigate net baryon distributions, nuclear stopping power and gluon saturation features in the SPS and RHIC energy regions. Predictions for net baryon rapidity distributions, mean rapidity loss and gluon saturation feature in central Pb + Pb collisions at the LHC are made in this paper. (authors)

  6. Luminosity Optimization for a Higher-Energy LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, O

    2011-01-01

    A Higher-Energy Large Hadron Collider (HE-LHC) is an option to further push the energy frontier of particle physics beyond the present LHC. A beam energy of 16.5 TeV would require 20 T dipole magnets in the existing LHC tunnel, which should be compared with 7 TeV and 8.33 T for the nominal LHC. Since the synchrotron radiation power increases with the fourth power of the energy, radiation damping becomes significant for the HE-LHC. It calls for transverse and longitudinal emittance control vis-a-vis beam-beam interaction and Landau damping. The heat load from synchrotron radiation, gas scattering, and electron cloud also increases with respect to the LHC. In this paper we discuss the proposed HE-LHC beam parameters; the time evolution of luminosity, beam-beam tune shifts, and emittances during an HE-LHC store; the expected heat load; and luminosity optimization schemes for both round and flat beams.

  7. LHC project. Exploring the smallest world with the highest energy beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Takahiko; Kobayashi, Tomio

    2007-01-01

    The LHC accelerator at CERN will be completed soon and the experiments are about to start, making it possible to explore the TeV energy region for the first time in human history. There exists a clear reason why the TeV region is especially important for experimental exploration. The Higgs particle, the last elusive element of the Standard Model, will be discovered with very high probability. In addition there are high chances to discover signs of new physics beyond the Standard Model such as SUSY particles. Dark matter may be discovered. As an introduction of the mini-special issue for LHC, its goals and history is briefly reviewed, followed by a description on LHC accelerator, four LHC experiments as well as the contributions by Japan. (author)

  8. Considerations on Energy Frontier Colliders after LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2016-11-15

    Since 1960’s, particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics, 29 total have been built and operated, 7 are in operation now. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). The future of the world-wide HEP community critically depends on the feasibility of possible post-LHC colliders. The concept of the feasibility is complex and includes at least three factors: feasibility of energy, feasibility of luminosity and feasibility of cost. Here we overview all current options for post-LHC colliders from such perspective (ILC, CLIC, Muon Collider, plasma colliders, CEPC, FCC, HE-LHC) and discuss major challenges and accelerator R&D required to demonstrate feasibility of an energy frontier accelerator facility following the LHC. We conclude by taking a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and discussion on the perspectives for the far future of the accelerator-based particle physics. This paper largely follows previous study [1] and the presenta ion given at the ICHEP’2016 conference in Chicago [2].

  9. A First Baseline for the Magnets in the High Luminosity LHC Insertion Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Todesco, E; Ambrosio, G; Arduini, G; Cerutti, F; De Maria, R; Esposito, L; Fartoukh, S; Ferracin, P; Felice, H; Gupta, R; Kersevan, R; Mokhov, N; Nakamoto, T; Rakno, I; Rifflet, J M; Rossi, L; Sabbi, G L; Segreti, M; Toral, F; Xu, Q; Wanderer, P; van Weelderen, R

    2014-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project aims at accumulating 3000 fb-1 in the years 2023-2035, i.e. ten times more w.r.t. the nominal LHC performance expected for 2010- 2021. One key element to reach this challenging performance is a new insertion region to reduce the beam size in the interaction point by approximately a factor two. This requires larger aperture magnets in the region spanning from the interaction point to the matching section quadrupoles. This aperture has been fixed to 150 mm for the inner triplet quadrupoles in 2012. In this paper we give a first baseline of the interaction region. We discuss the main motivations that lead us to choose the technology, the combination of fields/gradients and lengths, the apertures, the quantity of superconductor, and the operational margin. Key elements are also the constraints given by the energy deposition in terms of heat load and radiation damage; we present the main features related to shielding and heat removal.

  10. LHC Interaction Region Upgrade Phase I

    CERN Document Server

    Ostojic, R

    2009-01-01

    The LHC is starting operation with beam in 2008. The primary goal of CERN and the LHC community is to ensure that the collider is operated efficiently, maximizing its physics reach, and to achieve the nominal performance in the shortest term. Since several years the community has been discussing the directions for upgrading the experiments, in particular ATLAS and CMS, the LHC machine and the CERN proton injector complex. A well substantiated and coherent scenario for the first phase of the upgrade, which is foreseen in 2013, is now approved by CERN Council. In this paper, we present the goals and the proposed conceptual solution for the Phase-I upgrade of the LHC interaction regions. This phase relies on the mature Nb-Ti superconducting magnet technology, with the target of increasing the luminosity by a factor of 2-3 with respect to the nominal luminosity of 1034 cm-2s-1, while maximising the use of the existing infrastructure.

  11. High Energy LHC Document prepared for the European HEP strategy update

    CERN Document Server

    Brüning, O; Mangano, M; Myers, S; Rossi, L; Todesco, E; Zimmerman, F

    2012-01-01

    The LHC will run to produce physics at the energy frontier of 13-14 TeV c.o.m. for protons for the next 20-25 years. The possibility of increasing the proton beam energy well beyond its nominal value of 7 TeV has been addressed in a study group in 2010 and then discussed in a workshop in October 2010. The reuse of the CERN infrastructure, the “ease” in producing luminosity with proton circular collider and the practical and technical experience gained with LHC, all are concurring reasons to explore this route. The High Energy LHC relies on the “natural” evolution of the LHC technologies. The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) demands going 50% beyond the limit of magnetic field of LHC: therefore HL-LHC can be considered as the first milestone in the path toward the highest energy. The beam energy is set by the strength of superconducting magnets: assuming a dipole field in the range 16-20 T, the maximum attainable collision energy falls in the range of 26 to 33 TeV in the centre of mass. The driving techno...

  12. Concept of a Machine Protection System for the High-Energy LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Raginel, Vivien; Wollmann, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The High-Energy LHC (HE-LHC) is setting new precedents in stored energy in both, the superconducting magnet system (∼ 20 GJ) and the beams (1.34 GJ) as compared to LHC and the LHC upgrade to increase the luminosity (HL-LHC). Therefore, the requirements and performance of the existing machine protection systems have to be reviewed and adapted to the new HE-LHC beam parameters, failure cases and machine availability requirements.

  13. Optimization of the LHC interaction region with respect to beam-induced energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Strait, J.B.

    1996-06-01

    Energy deposition in the superconducting magnets by particles from p- p collisions is a significant challenge for the design of the LHC high luminosity insertions. We have studies the dependence of the energy deposition on the apertures and strengths of insertion magnets and on the placement of absorbers in front of and within the quadrupoles. Monte Carlo simulations were made using the code DTUJET to generate 7x7 TeV p-p events and the code MARS to follow hadronic and electromagnetic cascades induced in the insertion components. The 3D geometry and magnetic field descriptions of the LHC-4.1 lattice were used. With a quadrupole coil aperture ≥70 mm, absorbers can be placed within the magnet bore which reduce the peak power density, at full luminosity, below 0.5 mW/g, a level that should allow the magnets to operate at their design field. The total heat load can be removed by a cooling system similar to that used in the main magnets

  14. LHC beam energy in 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemko, A.; Charifouline, Z.; Dahlerup-Petersen, K.; Denz, R.; Ravaioli, E.; Schmidt, R.; Verweij, A.

    2012-01-01

    The interconnections between the LHC main magnets are made of soldered joints (splices) of two superconducting cables stabilized by a copper bus bar. The measurements performed in 2009 in the whole machine, in particular in sector 3-4 during the repair after the 2008 accident, demonstrated that there is a significant fraction of defective copper bus bar joints in the machine. In this paper, the limiting factors for operating the LHC at higher energies with defective 13 kA bus bar joints are briefly reviewed. The experience gained during the 2011 run, including the quench statistics and dedicated quench propagation tests impacting on maximum safe energy are presented. The impact of the by-pass diode contact resistance issue is also addressed. Finally, a proposal for running at the highest possible safe energy compatible with the pre-defined risk level is presented. (authors)

  15. LHC Beam Energy in 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Siemko, A; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Denz, R; Ravaioli, E; Schmidt, R; Verweij, A

    2012-01-01

    The interconnections between the LHC main magnets are made of soldered joints (splices) of two superconducting cables stabilized by a copper bus bar. The measurements performed in 2009 in the whole machine, in particular in sector 3-4 during the repair after the 2008 accident, demonstrated that there is a significant fraction of defective copper bus bar joints in the machine. In this paper, the limiting factors for operating the LHC at higher energies with defective 13 kA bus bar joints are briefly reviewed. The experience gained during the 2011 run, including the quench statistics and dedicated quench propagation tests impacting on maximum safe energy are presented. The impact of the by-pass diode contact resistance issue is also addressed. Finally, a proposal for running at the highest possible safe energy compatible with the pre-defined risk level is presented.

  16. Interaction region design driven by energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roman; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Cerutti, Francesco; Langner, Andy; Tomás, Rogelio; Cruz-Alaniz, Emilia; Dalena, Barbara

    2017-08-01

    The European Strategy Group for High Energy Physics recommends to study collider designs for the post-LHC era. Among the suggested projects there is the circular 100 TeV proton-proton collider FCC-hh. Starting from LHC and its proposed upgrade HL-LHC, this paper outlines the development of the interaction region design for FCC-hh. We identify energy deposition from debris of the collision events as a driving factor for the layout and draft the guiding principles to unify protection of the superconducting final focus magnets from radiation with a high luminosity performance. Furthermore, we offer a novel strategy to mitigate the lifetime limitation of the first final focus magnet due to radiation load, the Q1 split.

  17. Interaction region design driven by energy deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Martin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Strategy Group for High Energy Physics recommends to study collider designs for the post-LHC era. Among the suggested projects there is the circular 100 TeV proton-proton collider FCC-hh. Starting from LHC and its proposed upgrade HL-LHC, this paper outlines the development of the interaction region design for FCC-hh. We identify energy deposition from debris of the collision events as a driving factor for the layout and draft the guiding principles to unify protection of the superconducting final focus magnets from radiation with a high luminosity performance. Furthermore, we offer a novel strategy to mitigate the lifetime limitation of the first final focus magnet due to radiation load, the Q1 split.

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP ON LHC INTERACTION REGION CORRECTION SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; WEI, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Workshop on LHC Interaction Region Correction Systems was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, on 6 and 7 May 1999. It was attended by 25 participants from 5 institutions. The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region quadrupoles and dipoles. In three sessions the workshop addressed the field quality of the these magnets, reviewed the principles and efficiency of global and local correction schemes and finalized a corrector layout. The session on Field Quality Issues, chaired by J. Strait (FNAL), discussed the progress made by KEK and FNAL in achieving the best possible field quality in the interaction region quadrupoles. Results of simulation studies were presented that assess the effects of magnetic field errors with simulation studies. Attention was given to the uncertainties in predicting and measuring field errors. The session on Global Correction, chaired by J.-P. Koutchouk (CERN), considered methods of reducing the nonlinear detuning or resonance driving terms in the accelerator one-turn map by either sorting or correcting. The session also discussed the crossing angle dependence of the dynamic aperture and operational experience from LEP. The session on Local Correction, chaired by T. Taylor (CERN), discussed the location, strength and effectiveness of multipole correctors in the interaction regions for both proton and heavy ion operation. Discussions were based on technical feasibility considerations and dynamic aperture requirements. The work on linear corrections in the interaction regions was reviewed

  19. Conceptual Design of the LHC Interaction Region Upgrade Phase-I

    CERN Document Server

    Ostojic, R; Baglin, V; Ballarino, A; Cerutti, F; Denz, R; Fartoukh, S; Fessia, P; Foraz, K; Fürstner, M; Herr, Werner; Karppinen, M; Kos, N; Mainaud-Durand, H; Mereghetti, A; Muttoni, Y; Nisbet, D; Prin, H; Tock, J P; Van Weelderen, R; Wildner, E

    2008-01-01

    The LHC is starting operation with beam. The primary goal of CERN and the LHC community is to ensure that the collider is operated efficiently and that it achieves nominal performance in the shortest term. Since several years the community has been discussing the directions for maximizing the physics reach of the LHC by upgrading the experiments, in particular ATLAS and CMS, the LHC machine and the CERN proton injector complex, in a phased approach. The first phase of the LHC interaction region upgrade was approved by Council in December 2007. This phase relies on the mature Nb-Ti superconducting magnet technology with the target of increasing the LHC luminosity to 2 to 3 10^34 cm^-2s^-1, while maximising the use of the existing infrastructure. In this report, we present the goals and the proposed conceptual solutions for the LHC IR Upgrade Phase-I which include the recommendations of the conceptual design review.

  20. Dipoles for High-Energy LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Todesco, E; De Rijk, G; Rossi, L

    2014-01-01

    For the High Energy LHC, a study of a 33 TeV center of mass collider in the LHC tunnel, main dipoles of 20 T operational field are needed. In this paper we first review the conceptual design based on block coil proposed in the Malta workshop, addressing the issues related to coil fabrication and assembly. We then propose successive simplifications of this design, associating a cost estimate of the conductor. We then analyse a block layout for a 15 T magnet. Finally, we consider two layouts based on the D20 and HD2 short models built by LBL. A first analysis of the aspects related to protection of these challenging magnets is given.

  1. Energy Deposition in Adjacent LHC Superconducting Magnets from Beam Loss at LHC Transfer Line Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Beavan, S; Kain, V

    2006-01-01

    Injection intensities for the LHC are over an order of magnitude above the damage threshold. The collimation system in the two transfer lines is designed to dilute the beam sufficiently to avoid damage in case of accidental beam loss or mis-steered beam. To maximise the protection for the LHC most of the collimators are located in the last 300 m upstream of the injection point where the transfer lines approach the LHC machine. To study the issue of possible quenches following beam loss at the collimators part of the collimation section in one of the lines, TI 8, together with the adjacent part of the LHC has been modeled in FLUKA. The simulated energy deposition in the LHC for worst-case accidental losses and as well as for losses expected during a normal filling is presented.

  2. LHC interaction region quadrupole cryostat design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, T.H.; Darve, Ch.; Huang, Y.; Page, T.M.

    2002-01-01

    The cryostat of a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Interaction Region (IR) quadrupole magnet consists of all components of the inner triplet except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, to house all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations, and must be able to be manufactured at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shield, multi-layer insulation system, cryogenic piping, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course of their expected operating lifetime. This paper describes the current LHC IR inner triplet quadrupole magnet cryostats being designed and manufactured at Fermilab as part of the US-LHC collaboration, and includes discussions on the structural and thermal considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems

  3. Off-momentum collimation and cleaning in the energy ramp in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Quaranta, Elena; Giulini Castiglioni Agosteo, Stefano Luigi Maria

    This Master thesis work has been carried out at CERN in the framework of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) Collimation project. The LHC is a two-beam proton collider, built to handle a stored energy of 360MJ for each beam. Since the energy deposition from particle losses could quench the superconducting magnets, a system of collimators has been installed in two cleaning insertions in the ring and in the experimental areas. The achievable LHC beam intensity is directly coupled to the beam loss rate and, consequently, to the cleaning eciency of the collimation system. This study analyses the collimation cleaning performance in dierent scenarios inside the accelerator. First, simulations are performed of the transverse losses in the LHC collimation system during the acceleration process. The results are compared with data taken during a dedicated session at the LHC machine. Simulations are also performed to predict the collimation eciency during future operation at higher energy. Furthermore, an investigation of t...

  4. Double diffractive cross-section measurement in the forward region at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Antchev, G.; Atanassov, I.; Baechler, J.; Avati, V.; Berardi, V.; Bossini, E.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.S.; Catanesi, M.G.; Csanad, M.; Csorgo, T.; Deile, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Grzanka, L.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Karev, A.; Kaspar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrat, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leszko, T.; Lippmaa, E.; Lippmaa, J.; Lokajicek, M.; Losurdo, L.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Macri, M.; Maki, T.; Mercadante, A.; Minafra, N.; Minutoli, S.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Oliveri, E.; Orava, R.; Oljemark, F.; Oriunno, M.; Osterberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Prochazka, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Scribano, A.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.; Welti, J.; Whitmore, J.; Wyszkowski, P.

    2013-12-26

    The first double diffractive cross-section measurement in the very forward region has been carriedout by the TOTEM experiment at the LHC with center-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV. By utilizingthe very forward TOTEM tracking detectors T1 and T2, which extend up to pseudo rapidity |$\\eta$|=6.5, a clean sample of double diffractive pp events was extracted. From these events, we measured the cross-section $\\sigma_{DD}$ = (116±25) mb for events where both diffractive systems have 4.7 < |$\\eta$|$_{min}$ < 6.5.

  5. SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLE MAGNETS FOR THE LHC INSERTION REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILLEN, E.; ANERELLA, M.; COZZOLINO, J.; GANETIS, G.; GHOSH, A.; GUPTA, R.; HARRISON, M.; JAIN, A.; MARONE, A.; MURATORE, J.; PLATE, S.; SCHMALZLE, J.; WANDERER, P.; WU, K.C.

    2000-01-01

    Dipole bending magnets are required to change the horizontal separation of the two beams in the LHC. In Intersection Regions (IR) 1, 2, 5, and 8, the beams are brought into collision for the experiments located there. In IR4, the separation of the beams is increased to accommodate the machine's particle acceleration hardware. As part of the US contribution to the LHC Project, BNL is building the required superconducting magnets. Designs have been developed featuring a single aperture cold mass in a single cryostat, two single aperture cold masses in a single cryostat, and a dual aperture cold mass in a single cryostat. All configurations feature the 80 mm diameter, 10 m long superconducting coil design used in the main bending magnets of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider recently completed at Brookhaven. The magnets for the LHC, to be built at Brookhaven, are described and results from the program to build two dual aperture prototypes are presented

  6. Meson production in two-photon interactions at LHC energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, D. T.; Goncalves, V. P.; Sauter, W. K. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Universitario UFPel, CP 354, 96010-900, Capao do Leao-RS (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    The LHC opens a new kinematical regime at high energy, where several questions related to the description of the high-energy regime of the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) remain without satisfactory answers. Some open questions are the search for non-q-bar q resonances, the determination of the spectrum of q-bar q states and the identification of states with anomalous {gamma}{gamma} couplings. A possible way to study these problems is the study of meson production in two-photon interactions. In this contribution we calculate the meson production in two-photon interactions at LHC energies considering proton - proton collisions and estimate the total cross section for the production of the mesons {pi}, a, f, {eta} and {chi}.

  7. pp elastic scattering at LHC energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohara, A.K.; Ferreira, E.; Kodama, T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, C.P. 68528, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    Using a unified analytic representation for the elastic scattering amplitudes of pp scattering valid for all energies above 20 GeV, the behavior of observables in the LHC collisions in the range √(s) = 2.76-14 TeV is discussed. After the precise description of dσ/dt at 7 TeV, we discuss the energy dependence of the amplitudes and expect that the proposed analytical forms give equally good predictions for the future experiments. (orig.)

  8. pp elastic scattering at LHC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohara, A.K.; Ferreira, E.; Kodama, T.

    2014-01-01

    Using a unified analytic representation for the elastic scattering amplitudes of pp scattering valid for all energies above 20 GeV, the behavior of observables in the LHC collisions in the range √(s) = 2.76-14 TeV is discussed. After the precise description of dσ/dt at 7 TeV, we discuss the energy dependence of the amplitudes and expect that the proposed analytical forms give equally good predictions for the future experiments. (orig.)

  9. Physics programmes of the restarted LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokushuku, Katsuo

    2011-01-01

    Experimental programs at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have started. On March 30th in 2010, proton beams collided at 7 TeV in the LHC, at the highest center-of-mass energy the humankind has ever produced. The machine will be operated almost continuously until the end of 2011, providing many collision data to explore new physics in the TeV region. The LHC has recovered from the unfortunate helium-leak incident in September 2009. In this article, after describing the history of the consolidation works in the LHC, physics prospects from the 2 year run are discussed. (author)

  10. Considerations on a Partial Energy Upgrade of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fartoukh, Stephane; Missiaen, Dominique; Todesco, Ezio; Zimmermann, Frank

    2017-01-01

    In the frame of the HL-LHC project, a few accelerator dipole and quadrupole magnets of higher critical field and/or larger aperture are being produced. The new inner triplet quadrupoles and dispersion-suppressor dipoles are made from Nb$_{3}$Sn superconductor, which supports a higher field than the classical Nb-Ti magnets used for the LHC. For the longer term future, it has been proposed to replace a fraction of the Nb-Ti arc magnets in the LHC arcs with Nb$_{3}$Sn magnets of higher field (e.g. 11 T), in order to boost the beam energy. Here we examine several options: the replacement of every third dipole by a stronger one, the substitution of the present Nb-Ti quadrupole by Nb$_{3}$Sn combined-function magnets, the excitation of the horizontal orbit correctors, and pushing all the dipole magnets to their ultimate field. We discuss challenges and constraints, including issues related to mechanical aperture, powering, or other hardware limitations, and we estimate the potential energy reach for each of the opt...

  11. Energy of the LHC after the 2013-2014 shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todesco, E.; Lorin, C.; Bajko, M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 all the LHC main dipole circuits were trained to 5 TeV, two sectors to 6 TeV, and one sector was pushed up to 6.6 TeV. In the 5-6 TeV range, a few quenches were needed to retrain the LHC dipoles, and none for the quadrupoles. On the other hand, in the 6- 7 TeV range a larger than expected number of quenches was observed in the main dipoles. Using this limited set of data, tentative estimates were given to guess the number of quenches needed to reach nominal energy. After three years, the only additional experimental data are the retraining of the magnets individually tested at SM18, either coming from the spares or from the 3-4 sector. After presenting this additional information, we will consider the different scenarios that can be envisaged to train the LHC main magnets after the Long Shut-down 1 (LS1), the expected energy, the impact on the commissioning time and the associated risk. (authors)

  12. Energy Extracting and Quench Protection System in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Abu Siam, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    quadrupole magnets. The electromagnets are built of special cables that operate in superconducting state by cooling them to 1.9K (-271.3℃); the superconducting magnets of the LHC are powered in about 1700 electrical circuits. A phenomenon called quench can spontaneously occur in superconducting magnets, which means that the superconductivity is lost in part of their windings. The energy stored within the magnet, up to 1.3 GJ, can cause severe damage. In order to protect the superconducting elements after a resistive transition, the energy is dissipated into a dump resistor installed in series with the magnet chain that is switched into the circuit by opening circuit breakers. The system described above is utilized for magnets installed in the LHC that operate under currents ranging from 600A up to 13kA. For the next LHC upgrade (High Luminosity) there is a need for circuit breakers capable of interrupting high DC currents in a solely inductive circuit within one millisecond and under development of very hig...

  13. Energy transfer in isolated LHC II studied by femtosecond pump-probe technique

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Yi; Liu Yuan; Liu Wei Min; Zhu Rong Yi; Qian Shi Xiong; Xu Chun He

    2003-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer in the isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl)-a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC II) was studied by the one-colour pump-probe technique with femtosecond time resolution. After exciting Chl-b by 638nm beam, the dynamic behaviour shows that the ultrafast energy transfer from Chl-b at positions of B2, B3, and B5 to the corresponding Chl-a molecules in monomeric subunit of LHC II is in the time scale of 230fs. While with the excitation of Chl-a at 678nm, the energy transfer between excitons of Chl-a molecules has the lifetime of about 370 fs, and two other slow decay components are due to the energy transfer between different Chl-a molecules in a monomeric subunit of LHC II or in different subunits, or due to change of molecular conformation. (20 refs).

  14. Towards a new LHC Interaction Region design for a luminosity upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Strait, J; Limon, P; Mokhov, N V; Sen, T; Zlobin, A V; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Ostojic, R; Rossi, L; Ruggiero, F; Taylor, T; ten Kate, H; Devred, A; Gupta, R; Harrison, M; Peggs, S; Pilat, F; Caspi, S; Gourlay, S; Sabbi, G

    2003-01-01

    After the LHC operates for several years at nominal parameters, it will be necessary to upgrade it for higher luminosity. Replacing the low-beta insertions with a higher performance design based on advanced superconducting magnets is one of the most straightforward steps in this direction. Preliminary studies show that, with magnet technology that is expected to be developed by early in the next decade, a factor of 2 to 5 reduction in beta* could be achieved with new insertions, as part of an upgrade aimed at a factor of 10 luminosity increase. In this paper we survey several possible second generation LHC interaction regions designs, which address the expected limitations on LHC performance imposed by the baseline insertions.

  15. Towards a new LHC interaction region design for a luminosity upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James Strait et al.

    2003-01-01

    After the LHC operates for several years at nominal parameters, it will be necessary to upgrade it for higher luminosity. Replacing the low-β insertions with a higher performance design based on advanced superconducting magnets is one of the most straightforward steps in this direction. Preliminary studies show that, with magnet technology that is expected to be developed by early in the next decade, a factor of 2 to 5 reduction in β* could be achieved with new insertions, as part of an upgrade aimed at a factor of 10 luminosity increase. In this paper we survey several possible second generation LHC interaction regions designs, which address the expected limitations on LHC performance imposed by the baseline insertions

  16. High Energy Physics Model Database - HEPMDB - Towards decoding the underlying theory at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, M.; Belyaev, A.; Basso, L.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Sekhar Chivukula, R.; Christensen, D.; Cox, S.; De Roeck, A.; Moretti, S.; Pukhov, A.; Sekmen, S.; Semenov, A.; Simmons, E.H.; Shepherd-Themistocleus, C.; Speckner, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present here the first stage of development of the High Energy Physics Model Data-Base (HEPMDB) which is a convenient centralized storage environment for HEP (High Energy Physics) models, and can accommodate, via web interface to the HPC cluster, the validation of models, evaluation of LHC predictions and event generation-simulation chain. The ultimate goal of HEPMDB is to perform an effective LHC data interpretation isolating the most successful theory for explaining LHC observations. (authors)

  17. LHC and the neutrino paradigm

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    I argue that LHC may shed light on the nature of neutrino mass through the probe of the seesaw mechanism. The smoking gun signature is lepton number violation through the production of same sign lepton pairs, a collider analogy of the neutrinoless double beta decay. I discuss this in the context of L-R symmetric theories, which predicted neutrino mass long before experiment and led to the seesaw mechanism. A WR gauge boson with a mass in a few TeV region could easily dominate neutrinoless double beta decay, and its discovery at LHC would have spectacular signatures of parity restoration and lepton number violation. I also discuss the collider signatures of the three types of seesaw mechanism, and show how in the case of Type II one can measure the PMNS mixing matrix at the LHC, complementing the low energy probes. Finally, I give an example of a simple realistic SU(5) grand unified theory that predicts the hybrid Type I + III seesaw with a weak fermion triplet at the LHC energies. The seminar will be fol...

  18. Crystals channel high-energy beams in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    Bent crystals can be used to deflect particle beams, as suggested by E. Tsyganov in 1976. Experimental demonstrations have been carried out for four decades in various laboratories worldwide. In recent tests, a bent crystal inserted into the LHC beam halo successfully channelled and deflected 6.5 TeV protons into an absorber, with reduced secondary irradiation.    Quasimosaic crystal for the LHC (developed by PNPI). Bent crystal technology was introduced at CERN and further developed for the LHC by the UA9 Collaboration. For about ten years, experts from CERN, INFN (Italy), Imperial College (UK), LAL (France), and PNPI, IHEP and JINR (Russia) have been investigating the advantages of using bent crystals in the collimation systems of high-energy hadron colliders. A bent crystal replacing the primary collimator can deflect the incoming halo deeply inside the secondary collimators, improving their absorption efficiency. “The bent crystals we have just tested at the world-record en...

  19. Origins of transverse emittance blow-up during the LHC energy tramp

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhn, M; Arduini, G; Kain, V; Schaumann, M; Tomas, R

    2014-01-01

    During LHC Run 1 about 30 % of the potential peak performance was lost due to transverse emittance blow-up through the LHC cycle. Measurements indicated that the majority of the blow-up occurred during the energy ramp. Until the end of LHC Run 1 this emittance blow-up could not be eliminated. In this paper the measurements and observations of emittance growth through the ramp are summarized. Simulation results for growth due to Intra Beam Scattering will be shown and compared to measurements. A summary of investigations of other possible sources will be given and backed up with simulations where possible. Requirements for commissioning the LHC with beam in 2015 after Long Shutdown 1 to understand and control emittance blow-up will be listed.

  20. The TileCal Online Energy Estimation for the Next LHC Operation Period

    CERN Document Server

    Peralva, B S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the detector used in the reconstruction of hadrons, jets, muons and missing transverse energy from the proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It covers the central part of the ATLAS detector (|η|<1.6). The energy deposited by the particles is read out by approximately 5,000 cells, with double readout channels. The signal provided by the readout electronics for each channel is digitized at 40 MHz and its amplitude is estimated by an optimal filtering algorithm, which expects a single signal with a well-defined shape. However, the LHC luminosity is expected to increase leading to signal pile-up that deforms the signal of interest. Due to limited resources, the current DSP-based hardware setup does not allow the implementation of sophisticated energy estimation methods that deal with the pile-up. Therefore, the technique to be employed for online energy estimation in TileCal for next LHC operation period must be based on fast filters such as the M...

  1. Characterization and performance optimization of radiation monitoring sensors for high energy physics experiments at the CERN LHC and Super-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mekki, Julien

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the matter originating from the universe, a new particle accelerator named the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been built at CERN. The radiation environment generated by the hadrons collisions in the high energy physics experiments of the LHC will be complex and locally very intense. For monitoring this complex radiation field, dosimeters have been installed in the LHC experiments. In previous study, RadFET dosimeters and PIN diodes have been characterized for their use in the particle accelerator. However, even if the RadFETs sensors have been already extensively characterized, their radiation response can be affected by their package. Depending on the material and the geometry, the package can induce errors in the dose measurement. In this thesis, a complete study has been carried out in order to evaluate its influence. Concerning the PIN diodes, the readout protocol used for the LHC is no longer valuable for the Super-LHC. Therefore, a complete study on their radiation response has been p...

  2. Evaluation of the combined betatron and momentum cleaning in point 3 in terms of cleaning efficiency and energy deposition for the LHC Collimation upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Boccone, V; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Rossi, A; Versaci, R; Vlachoudis, V; Wollmann, D; Mereghetti, A; Faus-Golfe, A

    2011-01-01

    The Phase I LHC Collimation System Upgrade could include moving part of the Betatron Cleaning from LHC Point 7 to Point 3 to improve both operation flexibility and intensity reach. In addition, the partial relocation of beam losses from the current Betatron cleaning region at Point 7 will mitigate the risks of Single Event Upsets to equipment installed in adjacent and partly not sufficient shielded areas. The combined Betatron and Momentum Cleaning at Point 3 implies that new collimators have to be added as well as to implement a new collimator aperture layout. This paper shows the whole LHC Collimator Efficiency variation with the new layout at different beam energies. As part of the evaluation, energy deposition distribution in the IR3 region give indications about the effect of this new implementations not only on the collimators themselves but also on the other beam line elements as well as in the IR3 surrounding areas.

  3. On the LHC observation of gluinos from the Egret-preferred region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bednyakov, V. A.; Budagov, Ju. A.; Gladyshev, A. V.; Kazakov, D. I.; Khramov, E. V.; Khubua, D. I.

    2009-01-01

    Prospects for observation of a SUSY-like signal from two gluinos g-bar g-bar are investigated within a certain region of the mSUGRA parameter space, where the cross section of the two-gluino production in pp-collisions at the LHC (√s = 14 TeV) is estimated at a rather high level of 17.3 pb. In this so-called EGRET-preferred region, the lightest stable neutralinos χ 1 0 can serve as cold-dark-matter particles and can naturally explain the excess of diffuse Galactic gamma rays observed by the EGRET space apparatus. The g-bar g-bar-event selection relies on a clear signature when decay products of each gluino contain one bb-bar pair, one or two ll-bar pair(s) or one or two light qq-bar pair(s), and a neutralino. Rather high transverse missing energy carried away by the two neutralinos is the essential signature of the events using of which allows the relevant Standard Model background to be reduced significantly. Furthermore, distributions of the reconstructed invariant masses of two opposite-charged-lepton or light-jet pairs produced by the χ 2 0 → χ 1 0 l + l - and χ 2 0 → χ 1 0 qq-bar three-body decays have kinematic end points which measure the difference between masses of χ 2 0 and χ 1 0 . In particular, it was found that these signatures of selected processes demonstrate good prospects for discovery of gluinos at the LHC. These signatures allow one to distinguish different mSUGRA parameters m 1/2 within the EGRET-preferred region (at a higher than 6σ confidence level with 300 fb -1 data).

  4. Light stop searches at the LHC in events with one hard photon or jet and missing energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carena, M.; Freitas, A.; Wagner, C.E.M.

    2008-01-01

    Low energy supersymmetric models provide a solution to the hierarchy problem and also have the necessary ingredients to solve two of the most outstanding issues in cosmology: the origin of the baryon asymmetry and the source of dark matter. In the MSSM, weak scale generation of the baryon asymmetry may be achieved in the presence of light stops, with masses lower than about 130 GeV. Moreover, the proper dark matter density may be obtained in the stop-neutralino co-annihilation region, where the stop-neutralino mass difference is smaller than a few tens of GeV. Searches for scalar top quarks (stops) in pair production processes at the Tevatron and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) become very challenging in this region of parameters. At the LHC, however, light stops proceeding from the decay of gluino pairs may be identified, provided the gluino mass is smaller than about 900 GeV. In this article we propose an alternative method for stop searches in the co-annihilation region, based on the search for these particles in events with missing energy plus one hard photon or jet. We show that this method is quite efficient and, when complemented with ongoing Tevatron searches, allows to probe stop masses up to about 160 GeV, fully probing the region of parameters consistent with electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM.

  5. Underlying Event Studies for LHC Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnafoeldi, Gergely Gabor; Levai, Peter; Agocs, Andras G.

    2011-01-01

    Underlying event was originally defined by the CDF collaboration decades ago. Here we improve the original definition to extend our analysis for events with multiple-jets. We introduce a definition for surrounding rings/belts and based on this definition the jet- and surrounding-belt-excluded areas will provide a good underlying event definition. We inverstigate our definition via the multiplicity in the defined geometry. In parallel, mean transverse momenta of these areas also studied in proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 7 TeV LHC energy.

  6. Beam Cleaning in Experimental IRs in HL-LHC for the Incoming Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Morales, H; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC will store 675 MJ of energy per beam, about 300 MJ more than the nominal LHC. Due to the increase in stored energy and a different interaction region (IR) optics layout, the collimation system for the incoming beam must be revisited in order to avoid dangerous losses that could cause quenches or machine damage. This paper studies the effectiveness of the current LHC collimation system in intercepting cleaning losses close to the experiments in the HL-LHC. The study reveals that additional tertiary collimators would be beneficial in order to protect not only the final focusing triplets but also the two quadrupoles further upstream.

  7. Beam cleaning of the incoming beam in experimental IRs in HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Morales, Hector; Redaelli, Stefano; De Maria, Riccardo; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The HL-LHC will store 675 MJ of energy per beam, about 300 MJ more than the nominal LHC. Due to the increase in stored energy and a different interaction region (IR) layout and optics design, the collimation system for the incoming beam must be revisited in order to avoid dangerous losses that could cause quenches and machine damage. This paper studies the effectiveness of the current LHC collimation system in intercepting cleaning losses close to the experiments in the HL-LHC. The study reveals that in addition to the triplet also the Q4 needs local protection, which could be provided by an additional pair of TCTs.

  8. Mueller-Navelet jets at 13 TeV LHC: dependence on dynamic constraints in the central rapidity region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celiberto, F.G.; Papa, A. [Universita della Calabria, Dipartimento di Fisica, Cosenza (Italy); Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Cosenza (Italy); Ivanov, D.Yu. [Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Murdaca, B. [Gruppo collegato di Cosenza, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Cosenza (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    We study the production of Mueller-Navelet jets at 13 TeV LHC, within collinear factorization and including the BFKL resummation of energy logarithms in the next-to-leading approximation. We calculate several azimuthal correlations for different values of the rapidity separation Y between the two jets and evaluate the effect of excluding those events where, for a given Y, one of the two jets is produced in the central region. (orig.)

  9. 5th report from the LHC performance workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Bulletin's correspondent from Chamonix

    2012-01-01

    The morning session on Friday 10 February - the final day of the workshop - saw further examination of the challenges of the High Luminosity LHC and included a look at the state of R&D for the new magnets required for the high luminosity interaction regions. There was then an entertaining look at even more distant future. Possible future projects under consideration include the Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) which foresees colliding 60 GeV electrons with 7 TeV protons, and the High Energy LHC (HE-LHC) in which the beam energy of the LHC is increased from 7 to 16.5 TeV. Serious technological challenges exist for both these options. In the afternoon Steve Myers, CERN's Director for Accelerators and Technology, presented a summary of the workshop recommendations. In brief, the LHC should operate at 4 TeV in 2012 with the key priorities being: delivering enough luminosity to ATLAS and CMS to allow them to independently discover or exclude the Higgs; the proton-Lead ion run; and machine deve...

  10. Machine Protection Challenges for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, R; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2014-01-01

    LHC operation requires the flawless functioning of the machine protection systems. The energy stored in the beam was progressively increased beyond the 140 MJ range at the end of 2012 at 4 TeV/c. The further increase to more than 300 MJ expected for 2015 at 6.5 TeV/c should be possible with the existing protection systems. For HL-LHC additional failure modes need to be considered. The stored beam energy will increase by another factor of two with respect to nominal and a factor of five more than experienced so far. The maximum beta function in the high luminosity insertion regions will increase. It is planned to install crab cavities in the LHC to compensate for the loss in luminosity due to the crossing-angle. With crab cavities, sudden voltage decays within 100 µs after e.g. cavity quenches can lead to large transverse beam oscillations. Tracking simulations predict trajectory distortions of up to 1.5 σ after a sudden drop of the deflecting voltage in a single cavity. Protons in the halo with an energy of...

  11. CERN: LHC progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The push for CERN's next major project, the LHC proton collider to be built in the 27-kilometre LEP tunnel, is advancing on a wide front. For the machine itself, there has been considerable progress in the detailed design. While the main thrust is for proton-proton collisions, heavy ions are also on the LHC collision menu. On the experimental side, proposals are coming into sharper focus. For the machine, the main aim is for the highest possible proton collision energies and collision rates in the confines of the existing LEP tunnel, and the original base design looked to achieve these goals in three collision regions. Early discussions on the experimental programme quickly established that the most probable configuration would have two collision regions rather than three. This, combined with hints that the electronics of several detectors would have to handle several bunch crossings at a time, raised the question whether the originally specified bunch spacing of 15 ns was still optimal

  12. Chemical freeze-out study in proton-proton collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sabita; Mishra, Debadeepti; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Chatterjee, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Particle multiplicities measured at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facilities can be used to understand the chemical freeze-out dynamics. At chemical freeze-out (CFO), inelastic collisions cease and the freeze-out parameters can be determined using measured particle multiplicities within the framework of a statistical model. The statistical model has proven to be quite successful in describing the particle production from elementary p-p and e"+e"- collisions up to heavy-ion collisions. It helps to do a systematic study of the centrality and energy dependence of freeze-out parameters in heavy-ion collisions from lower SPS to higher LHC energies. The new data at LHC along with the RHIC data can be used to do such a systematic study in proton-proton collisions

  13. Safe LHC beam commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uythoven, J.; Schmidt, R.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the large amount of energy stored in magnets and beams, safety operation of the LHC is essential. The commissioning of the LHC machine protection system will be an integral part of the general LHC commissioning program. A brief overview of the LHC Machine Protection System will be given, identifying the main components: the Beam Interlock System, the Beam Dumping System, the Collimation System, the Beam Loss Monitoring System and the Quench Protection System. An outline is given of the commissioning strategy of these systems during the different commissioning phases of the LHC: without beam, injection and the different phases with stored beam depending on beam intensity and energy. (author)

  14. Photoproduction at collider energies: from RHIC and HERA to the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Baltz, A; Brodsky, S J; D'Enterria, D G; Dreyer, U; Engel, R; Frankfurt, L; Gorbunov, Y; Guzey, V; Hamilton, A; Klasen, M; Klein, S R; Kowalski, H; Levonian, S; Lourenço, C; Machado, M V T; Nachtmann, O; Nagy, Z; Nystrand, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Ramalhete, P; Savin, A; Scapparone, E; Schicker, R; Silvermyr, D; Strikman, M I; Valkárová, A; Vogt, R; Yilmaz, M; Enterria, David d'

    2007-01-01

    We present the mini-proceedings of the workshop on "Photoproduction at collider energies: from RHIC and HERA to the LHC" held at the European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas (ECT*, Trento) from January 15 to 19, 2007. The workshop gathered both theorists and experimentalists to discuss the current status of investigations of high-energy photon-induced processes at different colliders (HERA, RHIC, and Tevatron) as well as preparations for extension of these studies at the LHC. The main physics topics covered were: (i) small-$x$ QCD in photoproduction studies with protons and in electromagnetic (aka. ultraperipheral) nucleus-nucleus collisions, (ii) hard diffraction physics at hadron colliders, and (iii) photon-photon collisions at very high energies: electroweak and beyond the Standard Model processes. These mini-proceedings consist of an introduction and short summaries of the talks presented at the meeting.

  15. Two photon absorption energy transfer in the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) modified with organic boron dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Rui; Feng, Jiao; Wang, Shuangqing; Li, Shayu; Yang, Chunhong; Yang, Guoqiang

    2014-07-01

    The plant light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHC-II) play important roles in collecting solar energy and transferring the energy to the reaction centers of photosystems I and II. A two photon absorption compound, 4-(bromomethyl)-N-(4-(dimesitylboryl)phenyl)-N-phenylaniline (DMDP-CH2Br), was synthesized and covalently linked to the LHC-II in formation of a LHC-II-dye complex, which still maintained the biological activity of LHC-II system. Under irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at 754 nm, the LHC-II-dye complex can absorb two photons of the laser light effectively compared with the wild type LHC-II. The absorbed excitation energy is then transferred to chlorophyll a with an obvious fluorescence enhancement. The results may be interesting and give potentials for developing hybrid photosystems.

  16. Physics perspectives with AFTER@LHC (A Fixed Target ExpeRiment at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massacrier L.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AFTER@LHC is an ambitious fixed-target project in order to address open questions in the domain of proton and neutron spins, Quark Gluon Plasma and high-x physics, at the highest energy ever reached in the fixed-target mode. Indeed, thanks to the highly energetic 7 TeV proton and 2.76 A.TeV lead LHC beams, center-of-mass energies as large as sNN = 115 GeV in pp/pA and sNN = 72 GeV in AA can be reached, corresponding to an uncharted energy domain between SPS and RHIC. We report two main ways of performing fixed-target collisions at the LHC, both allowing for the usage of one of the existing LHC experiments. In these proceedings, after discussing the projected luminosities considered for one year of data taking at the LHC, we will present a selection of projections for light and heavy-flavour production.

  17. Double diffractive cross-section measurement in the forward region at LHC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Atanassov, I.; Kašpar, Jan; Kopal, Josef; Kundrát, Jan; Lokajíček, Miloš V.; Procházka, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 26 (2013), "262001-1"-"262001-6" ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : LHC * TOTEM * diffractive production Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 7.728, year: 2013

  18. Results from Commissioning of the Energy Extraction Facilities of the LHC Machine

    CERN Document Server

    Coelingh, G J; Mess, K H

    2008-01-01

    The risk of damage to the superconducting magnets, bus bars and current leads of the LHC machine in case of a resistive transition (quench) is being minimized by adequate protection. The protection is based on early quench detection, bypassing the quenching magnets by cold diodes, energy density dilution in the quenching magnets using heaters and, eventually, energy extraction. For two hundred and twenty-six LHC circuits (600 A and 13 kA) extraction of the stored magnetic energy to external dump resistors was required. All these systems are now installed in the machine and the final hardware commissioning has been undertaken. After a short description of the topology and definitive features, layouts and parameters of these systems the paper will focus on the results from their successful commissioning and an analysis of the system performance.

  19. Transverse and Longitudinal Beam Collimation in a High-Energy Proton Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Catalan-Lasheras, N

    1998-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), particles from the beam halo might potentially impinge on the vacuum chamber, effecting harmful transitions of the superconducting magnets ("quenches"). This can be prevented by the collimation system which confines the particle losses to special, non superconducting sections of the machine. Due to the high energy and intensity of the LHC, any removal system must attain an unprecedented efficiency. The cleaning system was designed on the basis of purely geometric and optical models which neglect non linear effects and assume perfectly absorbing materials. In a second step, true scattering in matter is considered. A series of machine developments (MD) were carried out in 1996-7 with the principal aim of validating the design assumptions. A collimation system comparable to that of the LHC was employed. The predictions of the numerical model used to compute the LHC collimation system efficiency were compared with the data acquired during the measurement sessions. The experimen...

  20. 2008 LHC Open Days LHC magnets on display

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years you’ve probably seen many of the 15 m long blue LHC dipole magnets being ferried around the site. Most of them are underground now, but on the LHC Open Days on 5 and 6 April the magnets will also play a central role on the surface. Installation of one of the LHC dipole magnets on the Saint-Genis roundabout on 7 March. The LHC dipole testing facility with several magnets at various stages of testing. The 27 km ring of the LHC consists of 1232 double-aperture superconducting dipole magnets, 360 short straight sections (SSS) and 114 special SSS for the insertion regions. On the Open Day, you will be able to "Follow the LHC magnets" through different stages around the site, culminating in their descent into the tunnel. Discover all the many components that have to be precisely integrated in the magnet casings, and talk to the engine...

  1. LHC Injection Beam Quality During LHC Run I

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079186; Kain, Verena; Stapnes, Steinar

    The LHC at CERN was designed to accelerate proton beams from 450 GeV to 7 TeV and collide them in four large experiments. The 450 GeV beam is extracted from the last pre-accelerator, the SPS, and injected into the LHC via two 3 km long transfer lines, TI 2 and TI 8. The injection process is critical in terms of preservation of beam quality and machine protection. During LHC Run I (2009-2013) the LHC was filled with twelve high intensity injections per ring, in batches of up to 144 bunches of 1.7*10^11 protons per bunch. The stored beam energy of such a batch is already an order of magnitude above the damage level of accelerator equipment. Strict quality and machine protection requirements at injection have a significant impact on operational efficiency. During the first years of LHC operation, the injection phase was identified as one of the limiting factors for fast LHC turnaround time. The LHC Injection Quality Check (IQC) software framework was developed as a part of this thesis to monitor the beam quality...

  2. The TileCal Energy Reconstruction for LHC Run2 and Future Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Seixas, Jose; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the main hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS and it covers the central part of the detector (|η|<1.6). The energy deposited by the particles in TileCal is read out by approximately 10,000 channels. The signal provided by the readout electronics for each channel is digitized at 40 MHz and its amplitude is estimated by an optimal filtering algorithm. The increase of LHC luminosity leads to signal pile-up that deforms the signal of interest and compromises the amplitude estimation performance. This work presents the proposed algorithm for energy estimation during LHC Run 2. The method is based on the same approach used during LHC Run 1, namely the Optimal Filter (OF). The only difference is that the signal baseline (pedestal) will be subtracted from the received digitized samples, while in Run 1 this quantity was estimated on an event-by-event basis. The pedestal value is estimated through special calibration runs and it is stored in a data base for online and offline usage. Addit...

  3. The TileCal Energy Reconstruction for LHC Run2 and Future Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00517880

    2015-01-01

    The TileCal is the main hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS and it covers the central part of the detector ($|\\eta|$ < 1.6). The energy deposited by the particles in TileCal is read out by approximately 10,000 channels. The signal provided by the readout electronics for each channel is digitized at 40 MHz and its amplitude is estimated by an optimal filtering algorithm. The increase of LHC luminosity leads to signal pile-up that deforms the signal of interest and compromises the amplitude estimation performance. This work presents the proposed algorithm for energy estimation during LHC Run 2. The method is based on the same approach used during LHC Run 1, namely the Optimal Filter. The only difference is that the signal baseline (pedestal) will be subtracted from the received digitized samples, while in Run 1 this quantity was estimated on an event-by-event basis. The pedestal value is estimated through special calibration runs and it is stored in a data base for online and offline usage. Additionally, the backg...

  4. The TileCal Energy Reconstruction for LHC Run2 and Future Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Seixas, Jose; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the main hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS and it covers the central part of the detector (|eta|<1.6). The energy deposited by the particles in TileCal is read out by approximately 10,000 channels. The signal provided by the readout electronics for each channel is digitized at 40 MHz and its amplitude is estimated by an optimal filtering algorithm. The increase of LHC luminosity leads to signal pile-up that deforms the signal of interest and compromises the amplitude estimation performance. This work presents the proposed algorithm for energy estimation during LHC Run 2. The method is based on the same approach used during LHC Run 1, namely the Optimal Filter (OF). The only difference is that the signal baseline (pedestal) will be subtracted from the received digitized samples, while in Run 1 this quantity was estimated on an event-by-event basis. The pedestal value is estimated through special calibration runs and it is stored in a data base for online and offline usage. Addi...

  5. Impact picture for near-forward elastic scattering up to LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Soffer, Jacques; Wu, Tai Tsun

    2015-01-01

    We will recall the main feaatures of an accurate phenomenological model to describe successfully near-forward elastic scattering in a wide energy range, including ISR, SPS and Tevatron colliders. A large step in energy domain is accomplished with the LHC collider, presently running, giving the opportunity to confront the new data with the predictions of our theoretical approach.

  6. Z Production as a Test of Nuclear Effects at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, X; Zhang, Xiaofei; Fai, George

    2002-01-01

    We predict the Z transverse momentum distribution from proton-proton and nuclear collisions at the LHC. After demonstrating that higher-twist nuclear effects are very small, we propose $Z^0$ production as a precision test for leading-twist pQCD in the TeV energy region. We also point out that shadowing may result in unexpected phenomenology at the LHC.

  7. Quarkonium+{gamma} production in coherent hadron-hadron interactions at LHC energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, V.P. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Caixa Postal 354, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Machado, M.M. [IF - Farroupilha, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia, Sao Borja, RS (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    In this paper we study the H+{gamma} (H=J/{Psi} and and upsilon;) production in coherent hadron-hadron interactions at LHC energies. Considering the ultrarelativistic protons as a source of photons, we estimate the {gamma}+p{yields}H+{gamma}+X cross section using the non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization formalism and considering different sets of values for the matrix elements. Our results for the total p+p{yields}p+H+{gamma}+X cross sections and rapidity distributions at {radical}(s) = 7 and 14 TeV demonstrate that the experimental analysis of the J/{Psi}+{gamma} production at LHC is feasible. (orig.)

  8. Chiral magnetic currents with QGP medium response in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Duan; Feng, Sheng-Qin; Zhong, Yang; Yin, Zhong-Bao

    2018-03-01

    We calculate the electromagnetic current with a more realistic approach in the RHIC and LHC energy regions in the article. We take the partons formation time as the initial time of the magnetic field response of QGP medium. The maximum electromagnetic current and the time-integrated current are two important characteristics of the chiral magnetic effect (CME), which can characterize the intensity and duration of fluctuations of CME. We consider the finite frequency response of CME to a time-varying magnetic field, find a significant impact from QGP medium feedback, and estimate the generated electromagnetic current as a function of time, beam energy and impact parameter.

  9. Most critical collimator-mask-magnet sequence in the SPS-to-LHC transfer lines: energy deposition study.

    CERN Document Server

    Marzo, Matteo; Lechner, Anton; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2017-01-01

    This technical note refers to a study on the relation between the impact conditions of the SPS 450GeV proton beam and the energy deposited downstream the Target Collimator Dump In- jection Long (TCDIL) collimators [1], in the SPS-to-LHC transfer lines TI2 and TI8. Such an analysis is relevant in order to simulate the worst scenario of failure, in case the beam impacts on the TCDIL collimator’s jaw, in the frame of the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU), in view of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) phase. Previous studies already showed the dependency of the energy deposited in the downstream masks on the collimators-masks distance [2]. In absence of a (realistic) impact parameter, we perform now a study to select the most pessimistic one, trying to understand the origin of the various components responsible for the energy deposition on the downstream mask and magnet. The set up of the Monte Carlo FLUKA [3] [4] simulations and the most relevant results will be presented in this document. A sensitivity analysis was a...

  10. Transverse energy-energy correlations in next-to-leading order in {alpha}{sub s} at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Wei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Barreiro, Fernando; Llorente, Javier [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica

    2012-05-15

    We compute the transverse energy-energy correlation (EEC) and its asymmetry (AEEC) in next-to-leading order (NLO) in {alpha}{sub s} in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with the center-of-mass energy E{sub c.m.}=7 TeV. We show that the transverse EEC and the AEEC distributions are insensitive to the QCD factorization- and the renormalization-scales, structure functions of the proton, and for a judicious choice of the jet-size, also the underlying minimum bias events. Hence they can be used to precisely test QCD in hadron colliders and determine the strong coupling {alpha}{sub s}. We illustrate these features by defining the hadron jets using the anti-k{sub T} jet algorithm and an event selection procedure employed in the analysis of jets at the LHC and show the {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z})-dependence of the transverse EEC and the AEEC in the anticipated range 0.11{<=} {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}){<=}0.13.

  11. Using permanent magnets to boost the dipole field for the High-Energy LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The High-Energy LHC (HE-LHC) will be a new accelerator in the LHC tunnel based on novel dipole magnets, with a field up to 20 T, which are proposed to be realized by a hybrid-coil design, comprising blocks made from Nb- Ti, Nb$_{3}$Sn and HTS, respectively. Without the HTS the field would be only 15 T. In this note we propose and study the possibility of replacing the inner HTS layer by (weaker) permanent magnets that might contribute a field of 1-2 T, so that the final field would reach 16-17 T. Advantages would be the lower price of permanent magnets compared with HTS magnets and their availability in principle.

  12. Multiple Jets at the LHC with High Energy Jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Rosenkrantz; Smillie, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a flexible Monte Carlo implementation of the perturbative framework of High Energy Jets, describing multi-jet events at hadron colliders. The description includes a resummation which ensures leading logarithmic accuracy for large invariant mass between jets, and is matched to tree......-level accuracy for multiplicities up to 4 jets. The resummation includes all-order hard corrections, which become important for increasing centre-of-mass energy of the hadronic collision. We discuss observables relevant for confronting the perturbative framework with 7 TeV data from the LHC, and the impact...

  13. Predicted and Totally Unexpected in the Energy Frontier Opened by LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zichichi, Antonino

    2011-01-01

    Opening lectures. Sid Coleman and Erice / A. Zichichi. Remembering Sidney Coleman / G.'t Hooft -- Predicted signals at LHC. From extra-dimensions: Multiple branes scenarios and their contenders / I. Antoniadis. Predicted signals at the LHC from technicolor / A. Martin. The one-parameter model at LHC / J. Maxin, E. Mayes and D. V. Nanopoulos. How supercritical string cosmology affects LHC / D. V. Nanopoulos. High scale physics connection to LHC data / P. Nath. Predicted signatures at the LHC from U(I) extensions of the standard model / P. Nath -- Hot theoretical topics. Progress on the ultraviolet finiteness of supergravity / Z. Bern. Status of supersymmetry: Foundations and applications / S. Ferrara and A. Marrani. Quantum gravity from dynamical triangulation / R. Loll. Status of superstring and M-theory / J. H. Schwarz. Some effects of instantons in QCD / G.'t Hooft. Crystalline gravity / G.'t Hooft -- QCD problems. Strongly coupled gauge theories / R. Kenway. Strongly interacting matter at high energy density / L. McLerran. Seminars on specialized topics. The nature and the mass of neutrinos. Majorana vs. Dirac / A. Bettini. The anomalous spin distributions in the nucleon / A. Deshpande. Results from PHENIX at RHIC / M. J. Tannenbaum -- Highlights from laboratories. Highlights from RHIC / Y. Akiba. News from the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory / E. Coccia. Highlights from TRIUMF / N. S. Lockyer. Highlights from Superkamiokande / M. Koshiba. Highlights from Fermilab / P. J. Oddone. Highlights from IHEP / Y. Wang -- Special sessions for new talents. Fake supergravity and black hole evolution / A. Gnecchi. Track-based improvement in the jet transverse momentum resolution for ATLAS / Z. Marshall. Searches for supersymmetric dark matter with XENON / K. Ni. Running of Newton's constant and quantum gravitational effects / D. Reeb.

  14. Energy Extraction Resistors for the Main Dipole and Quadrupole Circuits of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Popov, V; Sytchev, V V; Vasilev, L B; Zubko, V G

    2000-01-01

    When the LHC will be operating at its maximum beam energy, its superconducting dipole chains store a total magnetic energy of more than 11 GJ. At the same time, the QF and QD quadrupole circuits store a total energy of 400 MJ. Even with the sectorisation of each of the three principal power circuits into eight individually powered segments, the stored energy of a single circuit is considerable. During normal operation the energy in the dipole circuits is safely returned to the mains grid, using the thyristor-based, 'booster' unit of the power converters, operating in inversion. For the quadrupole chains, where the converter is of a mono-polar topology, the stored energy is dissipated into the resistive part of the warm d.c. power lines (busbars and cables) in a slow, controlled run-down. When a magnet quenches, however, such a slow energy transfer, taking 20 minutes from the rated LHC current, will not be possible. The 'cold' diode, taking over the magnet current in case of a quench, will not survive this slo...

  15. Double-quarkonium production at a fixed-target experiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions for double-quarkonium production in the kinematical region relevant for the proposed fixed-target experiment using the LHC beams (dubbed as AFTER@LHC). These include all spin-triplet S -wave charmonium and bottomonium pairs, i.e. Psi(n_1S) + Psi(n_2S), Psi(n_1S) + Upsilon(m_1S) and Upsilon(m_1S) + Upsilon(m_2S ) with n_1,n_2 = 1,2 and m_1,m_2 = 1,2,3. We calculate the contributions from double-parton scatterings and single-parton scatterings. With an integrated luminosity of 20 fb-1 to be collected at AFTER@LHC, we find that the yields for double-charmonium production are large enough for differential distribution measurements. We discuss some differential distributions for J/Psi + J/Psi production, which can help to study the physics of double-parton and single-parton scatterings in a new energy range and which might also be sensitive to double intrinsic c-bar(c) coalescence at large negative Feynman x.

  16. LHC Report: LHC smashes collision records

    CERN Multimedia

    Sarah Charley

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is now producing more than a billion proton-proton collisions per second.   The LHC is colliding protons at a faster rate than ever before: approximately 1 billion times per second. Since April 2016, the LHC has delivered more than 30 inverse femtobarns (fb-1) to both ATLAS and CMS. This means that around 2.4 quadrillion (2.4 million billion) collisions have been seen by each of the experiments this year. The inverse femtobarn is the unit of measurement for integrated luminosity, indicating the cumulative number of potential collisions. This compares with the total of 33.2 fb-1 produced between 2010 and 2015. The unprecedented performance this year is the result of both the incremental increases in collision rate and the sheer amount of time the LHC has been up and running. This comes after a slow start-up in 2015, when scientists and engineers still needed to learn how to operate the machine at a much higher energy. “With more energy, the machine is much more sen...

  17. Data Analysis of Transient Energy Releases in the LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Calvi, M; Bottura, L; Di Castro, M; Masi, A; Siemko, A

    2007-01-01

    Premature training quenches are caused by transient energy released within the LHC dipole magnet coils while it is energized. Voltage signals recorded across the magnet coils and on the so-called quench antenna carry information about these disturbances. The transitory events correlated to transient energy released are extracted making use of continuous wavelet transform. Several analyses are performed to understand their relevance to the so called training phenomenon. The statistical distribution of the signals amplitude, the number of events occurring at a given current level, the average frequency content of the events are the main parameters on which the analysis have been focalized. Comparisons among different regions of the magnet, among different quenches in the same magnet and among magnets made by different builders are reported. Conclusions about the efficiency of the raw data treatment and the relevance of the parameters developed with respect to the magnet global behavior are finally given.

  18. Overview of LHC Beam Loss Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Fadakis, E; Holzer, E B; Jackson, S; Kruk, G; Kurfuerst, C; Marsili, A; Misiowiec, M; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Priebe, A; Roderick, C; Sapinski, M; Zamantzas, C; Grishin, V; Griesmayer, E

    2011-01-01

    The LHC beam loss monitoring system provides measurements with an update rate of 1 Hz and high time resolution data by event triggering. These informations are used for the initiation of beam aborts, fixed displays and the off line analysis. The analysis of fast and localized loss events resulted in the determination of its rate, duration, peak amplitudes, its scaling with intensity, number of bunches and beam energy. The calibration of the secondary shower beam loss signal in respect to the needed beam energy deposition to quench the magnet coil is addressed at 450GeV and 3.5T eV . The adjustment of collimators is checked my measuring the loss pattern and its variation in the collimation regions of the LHC. Loss pattern changes during a fill allow the observation of non typical fill parameters.

  19. Bounds on $Z^\\prime$ from 3-3-1 model at the LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Coutinho, Y A; Nepomuceno, A A

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider will restart with higher energy and luminosity in 2015. This achievement opens the possibility of discovering new phenomena hardly described by the Standard Model, that is based on two neutral gauge bosons: the photon and the $Z$. This perspective imposes a deep and systematic study of models that predicts the existence of new neutral gauge bosons. One of such models is based on the gauge group $SU(3)_C \\times SU(3)_L \\times U(1)_N$ called 3-3-1 model for short. In this paper we perform a study with $Z^\\prime$ predicted in two versions of the 3-3-1 model and compare the signature of this resonance in each model version. By considering the present and future LHC energy regimes, we obtain some distributions and the total cross section for the process $p + p \\longrightarrow \\ell^{+} + \\ell^{-} + X$. Additionally, we derive lower bounds on $Z^\\prime$ mass from the latest LHC results. Finally we analyze the LHC potential for discovering this neutral gauge boson at 14 TeV center-of-mass en...

  20. HL-LHC and HE-LHC Upgrade Plans and Opportunities for US Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollinari, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    The US HEP community has identified the exploitation of physics opportunities at the High Luminosity-LHC (HL-LHC) as the highest near-term priority. Thanks to multi-year R&D programs, US National Laboratories and Universities have taken the leadership in the development of technical solutions to increase the LHC luminosity, enabling the HL-LHC Project and uniquely positioning this country to make critical contributions to the LHC luminosity upgrade. This talk will describe the shaping of the US Program to contribute in the next decade to HL-LHC through newly developed technologies such as Nb3Sn focusing magnets or superconducting crab cavities. The experience gained through the execution of the HL-LHC Project in the US will constitute a pool of knowledge and capabilities allowing further developments in the future. Opportunities for US participations in proposed hadron colliders, such as a possible High Energy-LHC (HE-LHC), will be described as well.

  1. Unified model for small-t and high-t scattering at high energies: predictions at RHIC and LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martynov, E. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, N.N. Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kiev (Ukraine); Nicolescu, B. [CNRS and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Theory Group, Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies (LPNHE), Paris (France)

    2008-07-15

    The urgency of predictions in the large-t region at LHC stimulated us to present a unified model of small- and high-t scattering at high energies. Our model is based on safe theoretical ground: analyticity, unitarity, Regge behavior, gluon exchange and saturation of bounds established in axiomatic quantum field theory. We make precise predictions for the behavior of the differential cross sections at high t, the evolution of the dip-shoulder structure localized in the region 0.5

  2. Energy Deposition and DPA in the Superconducting Links for the HILUMI LHC Project at the LHC Interaction Points

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2092158; Broggi, Francesco; Santini, C; Ballarino, Amalia; Cerutti, Francesco; Esposito, Luigi Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the upgrade of the LHC machine, the powering of the LHC magnets foresees the removal of the power converters and distribution feedboxes from the tunnel and its location at the surface[1]. The Magnesium Diboride (MgB2) connecting lines in the tunnel will be exposed to the debris from 7+7 TeV p-p interaction. The Superconducting (SC) Links will arrive from the surface to the tunnel near the separation dipole, at about 80 m from the Interaction Point at IP1 and IP5. The Connection Box (where the cables of the SC Links are connected to the NbTi bus bar) will be close to the beam pipe. The debris and its effect on the MgB2 SC links in the connection box (energy deposition and displacement per atom) are presented. The effect of thermal neutrons on the Boron consumption and the contribution of the lithium nucleus and the alpha particle on the DPA are evaluated. The results are normalized to an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1, value that represents the LHC High Luminosity lifetime. The dose de...

  3. Electron and photon energy calibration with the ATLAS detector using LHC Run 1 data

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horii, Yasuyuki; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Struebig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the electron and photon energy calibration achieved with the ATLAS detector using about 25 fb$^{-1}$ of LHC proton--proton collision data taken at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 8 TeV. The reconstruction of electron and photon energies is optimised using multivariate algorithms. The response of the calorimeter layers is equalised in data and simulation, and the longitudinal profile of the electromagnetic showers is exploited to estimate the passive material in front of the calorimeter and reoptimise the detector simulation. After all corrections, the $Z$ resonance is used to set the absolute energy scale. For electrons from $Z$ decays, the achieved calibration is typically accurate to 0.05% in most of the detector acceptance, rising to 0.2% in regions with large amounts of passive material. The remaining inaccuracy is less than 0.2-1% for electrons with a transverse energy of 10 GeV, and is on average 0.3% for photons. The detector resolution is determined with a relative in...

  4. The LHCf experiment modelling cosmic rays at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tricomi, A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Castellini, G; D'Alessandro, R; Faus, A; Fukui, K; Haguenauer, M; Itow, Y; Kasahara, K; Macina, D; Mase, T; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Mizuishi, M; Menjo, H; Muraki, Y; Papini, P; Perrot, A L; Ricciarini, S B; Sako, T; Shimizu, Y; Tamura, T; Taki, K; Torii, S; Tricomi, A; Turner, W C; Velasco, J; Watanabe, H; Yoshida, K

    2008-01-01

    The LHCf experiment at LHC has been designed to provide a calibration of nuclear interaction models used in cosmic ray physics up to energies relevant to test the region between the knee and the GZK cut-off. Details of the detector and its performances are discussed.

  5. ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Performance in LHC Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsenko, Elena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to 1034 cm−2 s−1. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are employed for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region |η| < 3.2, and for hadronic calorimetry in the region from |η| = 1.5 to |η| = 4.9. In the first LHC run a total luminosity of 27 fb−1 has been collected at center-of-mass energies of 7-8 TeV between year of 2010 to 2012. Following a period of detector consolidation during a long shutdown, Run-2 started with approximately 3.9 fb-1 and 35.6 fb-1 of data at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV recorded in 2015 and 2016, respectively. In order to realize the level-1 acceptance rate of 100 kHz in Run-2 data taking, number of read-out samples for the energy and the time measurement has been modified from five to four with keeping the expected performance. The well calibrated and highly granular Liquid Ar...

  6. The LHC is safe

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2008-01-01

    Concerns have been expressed from time to time about the safety of new high-energy colliders, and the LHC has been no exception. The LHC Safety Assessment Group (LSAG)(*) was asked last year by the CERN management to review previous LHC safety analyses in light of additional experimental results and theoretical understanding. LSAG confirms, updates and extends previous conclusions that there is no basis for any conceivable threat from the LHC. Indeed, recent theoretical and experimental developments reinforce this conclusion. In this Colloquium, the basic arguments presented by LSAG will be reviewed. Cosmic rays of much higher effective centre-of-mass energies have been bombarding the Earth and other astronomical objects for billions of years, and their continued existence shows that the Earth faces no dangers from exotic objects such as hypothetical microscopic black holes that might be produced by the LHC - as discussed in a detailed paper by Giddings and Mangano(**). Measurements of strange particle produc...

  7. $Z^{0}$ production as a test of nuclear effects at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao Fei Zhang

    2002-01-01

    We predict the Z/sup 0/ transverse momentum distribution from proton- proton and nuclear collisions at the LHC. After demonstrating that higher-twist nuclear effects are very small, we propose Z/sup 0/ production as a precision test for leading-twist pQCD in the TeV energy region. We also point out that shadowing may result in unexpected phenomenology at the LHC. (21 refs).

  8. Inter-comparison of MARS and FLUKA: Predictions on Energy Deposition in LHC IR Quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Hoa, C; Cerutti, F; Ferrai, A

    2008-01-01

    Detailed modellings of the LHC insertion regions (IR) have earlier been performed to evaluate energy deposition in the IR superconducting magnets [1-4]. Proton-proton collisions at 14 TeV in the centre of mass lead to debris, depositing energy in the IR components. To evaluate uncertainties in those simulations and gain further confidence in the tools and approaches used, inter-comparison calculations have been performed with the latest versions of the FLUKA (2006.3b) [5, 6] and MARS15 [7, 8] Monte Carlo codes. These two codes, used worldwide for multi particle interaction and transport in accelerator, detector and shielding components, have been thoroughly benchmarked by the code authors and the user community (see, for example, recent [9, 10]). In the study described below, a better than 5% agreement was obtained for energy deposition calculated with these two codes - based on different independent physics models - for the identical geometry and initial conditions of a simple model representing the IR5 and ...

  9. Inter-comparison of MARS and FLUKA: Predictions on energy deposition in LHC IR quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoa, Christine; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Mokhov, N.V.

    2008-01-01

    Detailed modelings of the LHC insertion regions (IR) have earlier been performed to evaluate energy deposition in the IR superconducting magnets [1-4]. Proton-proton collisions at 14 TeV in the centre of mass lead to debris, depositing energy in the IR components. To evaluate uncertainties in those simulations and gain further confidence in the tools and approaches used, inter-comparison calculations have been performed with the latest versions of the FLUKA (2006.3b) [5, 6] and MARS15 [7, 8] Monte Carlo codes. These two codes, used worldwide for multi particle interaction and transport in accelerator, detector and shielding components, have been thoroughly benchmarked by the code authors and the user community (see, for example, recent [9, 10]). In the study described below, a better than 5% agreement was obtained for energy deposition calculated with these two codes--based on different independent physics models--for the identical geometry and initial conditions of a simple model representing the IR5 and its first quadrupole

  10. Total and inelastic cross-sections at LHC at CM energy of 7 TeV and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Achilli, Andrea; Grau, Agnes; Pancheri, Giulia; Shekhovtsova, Olga; Srivastava, Yogendra N

    2011-01-01

    We discuss expectations for the total and inelastic cross-sections at LHC CM energies $\\sqrt{s}\\ =\\ 7\\ TeV$ {and $ 14\\ TeV$} obtained in an eikonal minijet model augmented by soft gluon $k_t$-resummation, which we describe in some detail. We present a band of predictions which encompass recent LHC data and suggest that the inelastic cross-section described by two channel eikonal models include only uncorrelated processes. We show that this interpretation of the model is supported by the LHC data.

  11. Performance of the CMS Jets and Missing Transverse Energy Trigger at LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Nachtman, Jane; Dordevic, Milos; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Kirschenmann, Henning; Zhang, Fengwangdong

    2017-01-01

    In preparation for collecting proton-proton collisions from the LHC at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV and rate of 40MHz with increasing instantaneous luminosity, the CMS collaboration prepared an array of triggers utilizing jets and missing transverse energy for searches for new physics at the energy frontier as well as for SM precision measurements. The CMS trigger system must be able to sift through the collision events in order to extract events of interest at a rate of 1kHz, applying sophisticated algorithms adapted for fast and effective operation. Particularly important is the calibration of the trigger objects, as corrections to the measured energy may be substantial. Equally important is the development of improved reconstruction algorithms to mitigate negative effects due to high numbers of overlapping proton-proton collisions and increased levels of beam-related effects. Work by the CMS collaboration on upgrading the high-level trigger for jets and missing transverse energy for the upgraded LHC o...

  12. Performance of the CMS precision electromagnetic calorimeter at LHC Run II and prospects for High-Luminosity LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhicai

    2018-04-01

    Many physics analyses using the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the LHC require accurate, high-resolution electron and photon energy measurements. Following the excellent performance achieved during LHC Run I at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is operating at the LHC with proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy. The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC during Run II has achieved unprecedented levels. The average number of concurrent proton-proton collisions per bunch-crossing (pileup) has reached up to 40 interactions in 2016 and may increase further in 2017. These high pileup levels necessitate a retuning of the ECAL readout and trigger thresholds and reconstruction algorithms. In addition, the energy response of the detector must be precisely calibrated and monitored. We present new reconstruction algorithms and calibration strategies that were implemented to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run II. We will show performance results from the 2015-2016 data taking periods and provide an outlook on the expected Run II performance in the years to come. Beyond the LHC, challenging running conditions for CMS are expected after the High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) . We review the design and R&D studies for the CMS ECAL and present first test beam studies. Particular challenges at HL-LHC are the harsh radiation environment, the increasing data rates, and the extreme level of pile-up events, with up to 200 simultaneous proton-proton collisions. We present test beam results of hadron irradiated PbWO crystals up to fluences expected at the HL-LHC . We also report on the R&D for the new readout and trigger electronics, which must be upgraded due to the increased trigger and latency requirements at the HL-LHC.

  13. Operation of the LHC with Protons at High Luminosity and High Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Papotti, Giulia; Alemany-Fernandez, Reyes; Crockford, Guy; Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Giachino, Rossano; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Hemelsoet, Georges-Henry; Höfle, Wolfgang; Jacquet, Delphine; Lamont, Mike; Nisbet, David; Normann, Lasse; Pojer, Mirko; Ponce, Laurette; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; Suykerbuyk, Ronaldus; Uythoven, Jan; Wenninger, Jorg

    2016-01-01

    In 2015 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) entered the first year in its second long Run, after a 2-year shutdown that prepared it for high energy. The first two months of beam operation were dedicated to setting up the nominal cycle for proton-proton operation at 6.5 TeV/beam, and culminated with the first physics with 3 nominal bunches/ring at 13 TeV CoM on 3 June. The year continued with a stepwise intensity ramp up that allowed reaching 2244 bunches/ring for a peak luminosity of ~5·10³³ cm⁻²s^{−1} and a total of just above 4 fb-1 delivered to the high luminosity experiments. Beam operation was shaped by the high intensity effects, e.g. electron cloud and macroparticle-induced fast losses (UFOs), which on a few occasions caused the first beam induced quenches at high energy. This paper describes the operational experience with high intensity and high energy at the LHC, together with the issues that had to be tackled along the way.

  14. Do we understand elastic scattering up to LHC energies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soffer, Jacques [Physics Department, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122-6082 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The measurements of high energy (bar sign)pp and pp elastic at ISR, SPS, and Tevatron colliders have provided usefull informations on the behavior of the scattering amplitude. A large step in energy domain is accomplished with the LHC collider presently running, giving a unique opportunity to improve our knowledge on the asymptotic regime of the elastic scattering amplitude and to verify the validity of our theoretical approach, to describe the total cross section {sigma}{sub tot}(s), the total elastic cross section {sigma}{sub el}(s), the ratio of the real to imaginary parts of the forward amplitude {rho}(s) and the differential cross section d{sigma} (s,t)/dt.

  15. Do we understand elastic scattering up to LHC energies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soffer, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The measurements of high energy (bar sign)pp and pp elastic at ISR, SPS, and Tevatron colliders have provided usefull informations on the behavior of the scattering amplitude. A large step in energy domain is accomplished with the LHC collider presently running, giving a unique opportunity to improve our knowledge on the asymptotic regime of the elastic scattering amplitude and to verify the validity of our theoretical approach, to describe the total cross section σ tot (s), the total elastic cross section σ el (s), the ratio of the real to imaginary parts of the forward amplitude ρ(s) and the differential cross section dσ (s,t)/dt.

  16. Transverse energy and charged particle production in heavy-ion collisions: from RHIC to LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Raghunath; Mishra, Aditya Nath

    2014-01-01

    We study the charged particle and transverse energy production mechanism from AGS, SPS, Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) to Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies in the framework of nucleon and quark participants. At RHIC and LHC energies, the number of nucleons-normalized charged particle and transverse energy density in pseudorapidity, which shows a monotonic rise with centrality, turns out to be an almost centrality independent scaling behavior when normalized to the number of participant quarks. A universal function which is a combination of logarithmic and power-law, describes well the charged particle and transverse energy production both at nucleon and quark participant level for the whole range of collision energies. Energy dependent production mechanisms are discussed both for nucleonic and partonic level. Predictions are made for the pseudorapidity densities of transverse energy, charged particle multiplicity and their ratio (the barometric observable, [dE T /dη]/[dN ch /dη] ≡ E T /N ch ) at mid-rapidity for Pb + Pb collisions at √s NN = 5.5 TeV. A comparison with models based on gluon saturation and statistical hadron gas is made for the energy dependence of E T /N ch . (author)

  17. LHC@home is ready to support HiLumi LHC: take part!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Recently relaunched, the LHC@home volunteer computing project is now ready to support the HiLumi LHC project, the design phase of the planned upgrade of the LHC that will increase its luminosity by a factor of 5 to 10 beyond its original design value. HiLumi will need massive simulations to test the beam dynamics. Whether you are at home or at work, you can help experts design the future LHC by connecting your computer to LHC@home. Go for it!   LHC@home is aimed at involving the public in real science. If you have a computer that is connected to the Internet, you can join the large team of volunteers who are already supporting its two main projects: Test4Theory, which runs computer simulations of high-energy particle collisions, and SixTrack, which is aimed at optimizing the LHC performance by performing beam dynamics simulations. In both cases, the software is designed to run only when your computer is idle and causes no disruption to your normal activities. To the simulations run by the Six...

  18. NEEDS for LHC experiment planning from results of very high energy cosmic ray Investigations (NEEDS-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrukhin A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 12 years ago, at 12th ISVHECRI, a special NEEDS workshop was held to discuss future LHC data required for interpretation of cosmic ray experiments. Now, when the main task of LHC is solved – the Higgs boson is discovered – the question “What will be the next?” is very actual. In this paper the results of cosmic ray experiments at LHC energies are considered. Their possible explanation in the frame of a new model of production of quark-gluon matter blobs is discussed. The necessity to pass in LHC experiments from investigations of pp-interactions to investigations of nucleus-nucleus interactions is underlined since cosmic rays consist mainly of nuclei (≈ 60% which interact with nuclei of air. But namely in these nucleus-nucleus interactions many unusual results were obtained in cosmic ray investigations. Corresponding tasks for future LHC experiments are proposed.

  19. CERN receives its first US-built component for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    In a milestone for global science collaboration, CERN has taken delivery of the first US-built contribution to the LHC. The 25-tonne interaction-region dipole magnet, which will guide the LHC's two counter-rotating beams of protons into collision, was built at the US Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is the first of 20 that the laboratory will ultimately provide and took nine months for more than 100 scientists, engineers and technicians to construct. Brookhaven's Superconducting Magnet Division is now building the remaining 19 magnets, which will be shipped to CERN later this year. They are provided for the LHC under the terms of a 1998 agreement between CERN and the US Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  20. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC): The Energy Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brianti, Giorgio; Jenni, Peter

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Superconducting Magnets: Powerful, Precise, Plentiful * LHC Cryogenics: Quantum Fluids at Work * Current Leads: High Temperature Superconductors to the Fore * A Pumping Vacuum Chamber: Ultimate Simplicity * Vertex Detectors at LHC: In Search of Beauty * Large Silicon Trackers: Fast, Precise, Efficient * Two Approaches to High Resolution Electromagnetic Calorimetry * Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber: Chronometry of Particles * The LHCb RICH: The Lord of the Cherenkov Rings * Signal Processing: Taming the LHC Data Avalanche * Giant Magnets for Giant Detectors

  1. Minimal Z' models: present bounds and early LHC reach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvioni, Ennio; Zwirner, Fabio; Villadoro, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    We consider 'minimal' Z' models, whose phenomenology is controlled by only three parameters beyond the Standard Model ones: the Z' mass and two effective coupling constants. They encompass many popular models motivated by grand unification, as well as many arising in other theoretical contexts. This parameterization takes also into account both mass and kinetic mixing effects, which we show to be sizable in some cases. After discussing the interplay between the bounds from electroweak precision tests and recent direct searches at the Tevatron, we extend our analysis to estimate the early LHC discovery potential. We consider a center-of-mass energy from 7 towards 10 TeV and an integrated luminosity from 50 to several hundred pb -1 , taking all existing bounds into account. We find that the LHC will start exploring virgin land in parameter space for M Z' around 700 GeV, with lower masses still excluded by the Tevatron and higher masses still excluded by electroweak precision tests. Increasing the energy up to 10 TeV, the LHC will start probing a wider range of Z' masses and couplings, although several hundred pb -1 will be needed to explore the regions of couplings favored by grand unification and to overcome the Tevatron bounds in the mass region around 250 GeV.

  2. Electron and photon energy calibration with the ATLAS detector using LHC Run 1 data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Němeček, Stanislav; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Vrba, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 10 (2014), "3071-1"-"3071-48" ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photon * energy * calibration * detector * resolution * showers * electromagnetic * electron * transverse energy * CERN LHC Coll * calorimeter Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.084, year: 2014

  3. HL-LHC alternatives

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; White, S

    2014-01-01

    The HL-LHC parameters assume unexplored regimes for hadron colliders in various aspects of accelerator beam dynamics and technology. This paper reviews three alternatives that could potentially improve the LHC performance: (i) the alternative filling scheme 8b+4e, (ii) the use of a 200 MHz RF system in the LHC and (iii) the use of proton cooling methods to reduce the beam emittance (at top energy and at injection). The alternatives are assessed in terms of feasibility, pros and cons, risks versus benefits and the impact on beam availability.

  4. The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter: upgrade plans for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Novgorodova, O; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to 1034cm-2s-1. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are employed for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudorapidity region |η|<3.2, and for hadronic calorimetry in the region from |η|=1.5 to |η|=4.9. Although the nominal LHC experimental programme is still in progress, plans for a High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) are already being developed for operation of the collider and associated detectors at luminosities of up to (5-7)×1034 cm-2s-1, with the goal of accumulating an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1. The proposed instantaneous and integrated luminosities are both well beyond the values for which the detectors were designed. The electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters will be able to tolerate the increased particle flux, but the performance of the forward calorimeter (FCal) will be affected. Two solutions for this are un...

  5. ATLAS LAr Calorimeters Performance in LHC Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Camincher, Clement; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities above 1034 cm−2 s−1. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are employed for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region |η| < 3.2, and for hadronic and forward calorimetry in the region from |η| = 1.5 to |η| = 4.9. In the first LHC run a total luminosity of 27 fb−1 has been collected at center-of-mass energies of 7-8 TeV between year of 2010 to 2012. After a period of detector consolidation during a long shutdown, Run-2 started in 2015 and 3.9 fb-1, 35.6 fb-1 and 46.9 fb-1 of data at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV have been recorded up to now per year. In order to realize the level-1 acceptance rate of 100 kHz in Run-2 data taking, the number of read-out samples recorded and used for the energy and the time measurement has been modified from five to four while keeping the expected performance. The well calibra...

  6. LHC superconducting strand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    This cross-section through a strand of superconducting matieral as used in the LHC shows the 8000 Niobium-Titanium filaments embedded like a honeycomb in copper. When cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in the LHC accelerator, these filaments will have zero resistance and so will carry a high electric current with no energy loss.

  7. Acoustic measurements in the collimation region of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Deboy, D; Baccigalupi, C; Burkart, F; Cauchi, M; Derrez, C S; Lendaro, J; Masi, A; Spiezia, G; Wollmann, D

    2011-01-01

    The LHC accelerator at CERN has the most advanced collimation system ever being installed. The collimators intercept unavoidable particle losses and therefore are essential to avoid beam induced quenches of the superconducting magnets. In addition, they provide passive machine protection against mis-kicked beams. During material robustness tests on a LHC collimator prototype in 2004 and 2006, vibration and acoustic measurements have shown that a beam impact detection system should be feasible using accelerometers and microphones as sensors in the LHC. Recently, such sensors have been installed close to the primary collimators in the LHC tunnel. First analyses of raw data show that the system is sensitive enough to detect beam scraping on collimators. Therefore, the implementation of a sophisticated acousticmonitoring system is under investigation. It may be useful not only to detect beam impacts on primary collimators in case of failure, but also to derive further information on beam losses that occur during ...

  8. Exclusive ϒ photoproduction in hadronic collisions at CERN LHC energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, V.P., E-mail: barros@ufpel.edu.br [High and Medium Energy Group, Instituto de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Moreira, B.D.; Navarra, F.S. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-06

    The exclusive ϒ photoproduction in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at LHC energies is investigated using the color dipole formalism and considering different models for the ϒ wave function and forward dipole–target scattering amplitude. Our goal is to update the color dipole predictions and estimate the theoretical uncertainty present in these predictions. We present predictions for the kinematical ranges probed by the ALICE, CMS and LHCb Collaborations.

  9. Other Exotic Scenarios at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Benslama, K

    2006-01-01

    The considerable center-of-mass energy and luminosity at the LHC will ensure a discovery reach for new particles which extends well into the mlti-TeV region. ATLAS and CMS carried out many studies of the implications of this capability for Beyond the Standard Model Physics. In this talk, I will focus on studies involving extra-dimensions, little higgs, strong symmetry breaking, compositeness and new gauge bosons.

  10. Influence of Micro-Damage on Reliability of Cryogenic Bellows in the LHC Interconnections

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2008-01-01

    To achieve maximum beam energy in the LHC the accumulated length of the interconnections between LHC main magnets has been limited to around 3% of the total magnetic length in the Arcs and Dispersion Suppressors. Such a low ratio leads to a very compact design of components located in the LHC interconnections. This implies development and evolution of high intensity plastic strain fields in the stainless steel expansion bellows subjected to thermo-mechanical loads at low temperatures. These components have been optimised to ensure high reliability standards required for the LHC. Nevertheless, initial damage can occur and lead to a premature fatigue failure. For structures in which plasticity is not confined to the crack tip region, standard failure mechanics, based classically on the stress intensity factor or the strain energy density release rate, can not be used. In the present paper, a constitutive model taking into account plastic strain induced g->a' phase transformation and orthotropic ductile damage i...

  11. Introduction to the HL-LHC Project

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi , L

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of largest scientific instruments ever built. It has been exploring the new energy frontier since 2010, gathering a global user community of 7,000 scientists. To extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s to increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond its design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor of ten. As a highly complex and optimized machine, such an upgrade of the LHC must be carefully studied and requires about ten years to implement. The novel machine configuration, called High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovative technologies, representing exceptional technological challenges, such as cutting-edge 11–12 tesla superconducting magnets, very compact superconducting cavities for beam rotation with ultra-precise phase control, new technology for beam collimation and 300-meter-long high-power superconducting links with negligible energy dissipation. HL-LHC federa...

  12. High-Current Bus Splice Resistances and Implications for the Operating Energy of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Koratzinos, M; Charifoulline, Z; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Denz, R; Flora, R H; Pfeffer, H; Scheuerlein, C; Schmidt, R; Siemko, A; Strait, J; Verweij, A

    2010-01-01

    At each interconnection between LHC main magnets a low-resistance solder joint must be made between superconducting cables in order to provide a continuous current path through the superconductor and also to the surrounding copper stabilizer in case the cable quenches [1]. About 10,000 such joints exist in the LHC. An extensive campaign has been undertaken to characterize and map the resistances of these joints. All of the superconducting cable splices were measured at 1.9 K and no splices were found with a resistance larger than 3 nW. Non-invasive measurements of the stabilizer joints were made at 300 K in 5 of the 8 sectors, and at 80 K in 3 sectors. More precise local measurements were made on suspect interconnects that were opened up, and poor joints were repaired. However, it is likely that additional imperfect stabilizer joints still exist in the LHC. A statistical analysis is used to place bounds on the remaining worst-case resistances. This sets limits on the maximum operating energy of the LHC, prior...

  13. ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Performance and Commissioning for LHC Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Spettel, Fabian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton colli- sions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and in- stantaneous luminosities up to $10^{34} \\text{cm}^{-2} \\text{s}^{-1}$. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are employed for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudorapidity region $|\\eta|<3.2$, and for hadronic calorimetry in the region from $|\\eta|=1.5$ to $|\\eta|=4.9$. In the first LHC run a total luminosity of 27 $\\text{fb}^{-1}$ as been collected at center-of-mass energies of 7-8 TeV with very high operational efficiency of the LAr Calorimeters and excellent performance. The well calibrated and highly granular detector achieved its design values both in energy measurement as well as in direction resolution, which was a main ingredient for the successul discovery of a Higgs boson in the di-photon decay channel. The talk will give an overview of the procedures applied to calibrate the 180.000 read-out channels electronically as well as from using refe...

  14. Performance of the CMS precision electromagnetic calorimeter at LHC Run II and prospects for High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhicai

    2017-01-01

    Many physics analyses using the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the LHC require accurate, high-resolution electron and photon energy measurements. Following the excellent performance achieved during LHC Run I at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is operating at the LHC with proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy. The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC during Run II has achieved unprecedented levels. The average number of concurrent proton-proton collisions per bunch-crossing (pileup) has reached up to 40 interactions in 2016 and may increase further in 2017. These high pileup levels necessitate a retuning of the ECAL readout and trigger thresholds and reconstruction algorithms. In addition, the energy response of the detector must be precisely calibrated and monitored. We present new reconstruction algorithms and calibration strategies that were implemented to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run...

  15. LHC main dipole magnet circuits: sustaining near-nominal beam energies

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085621; Auchmann, Bernhard; Knox, Andrew; O'Shea, Valentine

    2016-11-04

    Crossing the Franco-Swiss border, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), designed to collide 7 TeV proton beams, is the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator the operation of which was originally intended to commence in 2008. Unfortunately, due to an interconnect discontinuity in one of the main dipole circuit's 13 kA superconducting busbars, a catastrophic quench event occurred during initial magnet training, causing significant physical system damage. Furthermore, investigation into the cause found that such discontinuities were not only present in the circuit in question, but throughout the entire LHC. This prevented further magnet training and ultimately resulted in the maximum sustainable beam energy being limited to approximately half that of the design nominal, 3.5-4 TeV, for the first three years of operation (Run 1, 2009-2012) and a major consolidation campaign being scheduled for the first long shutdown (LS 1, 2012-2014). Throughout Run 1, a series of studies attempted to predict the amo...

  16. LHC collimator controls for a safe LHC operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redaelli, S.; Assmann, R.; Losito, R.; Donze, M.; Masi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system is designed to protect the machine against beam losses and consists of 108 collimators, 100 of which are movable, located along the 27 km long ring and in the transfer lines. The cleaning performance and machine protection role of the system depend critically on accurate jaw positioning. A fully redundant control system has been developed to ensure that the collimators dynamically follow optimum settings in all phases of the LHC operational cycle. Jaw positions and collimator gaps are interlocked against dump limits defined redundantly as functions of time, beam energy and the β functions, which describe the focusing property of the beams. In this paper, the architectural choices that guarantee a safe LHC operation are presented. Hardware and software implementations that ensure the required performance are described. (authors)

  17. Supersymmetry, Dark Matter and the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tata, Xerxes

    2010-01-01

    The conceptually simplest scenario for dark matter (DM) is that it is a stable thermal relic from standard Big Bang cosmology, in many SUSY models the lightest neutralino. The relic density determination selects special regions in SUSY model parameter space with concomitant implications for collider physics, dark matter searches and low energy measurements. By studying various one-parameter extensions of the much-studied mSUGRA model (where we relax the untested universality assumptions) constructed to be in accord with the measured relic density, we show that these implications are in general model-dependent, so that LHC and DM measurements will provide clues to how sparticles acquire their masses. We point out some relatively robust implications for LHC and DM searches and conclude with an outlook for the future.

  18. Minimum Bias Measurements at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00022031; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive charged particle measurements at hadron colliders probe the low-energy nonperturbative region of QCD. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged-particles produced in pp collisions at 13 TeV have been measured by the CMS experiment. The ATLAS collaboration has measured the inclusive charged particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC beam current, recorded at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The measurements present the first detailed studies in inclusive phase spaces with a minimum transverse momentum of 100 MeV and 500 MeV. The distribution of electromagnetic and hadronic energy in the very forward phase-space has been measured with the CASTOR calorimeters located at a pseudorapidity of -5.2 to -6.6 in the very forward region of CMS. The energy distributions are very powerful benchmarks to study the performance of MPI in hadronic interactions models at 13 TeV collision energy. All measurements are compared with predictions of ...

  19. Upgrade of the beam extraction system of the GTS-LHC electron cyclotron resonance ion source at CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivanen, V; Bellodi, G; Dimov, V; Küchler, D; Lombardi, A M; Maintrot, M

    2016-02-01

    Linac3 is the first accelerator in the heavy ion injector chain of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing multiply charged heavy ion beams for the CERN experimental program. The ion beams are produced with GTS-LHC, a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, operated in afterglow mode. Improvement of the GTS-LHC beam formation and beam transport along Linac3 is part of the upgrade program of the injector chain in preparation for the future high luminosity LHC. A mismatch between the ion beam properties in the ion source extraction region and the acceptance of the following Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section has been identified as one of the factors limiting the Linac3 performance. The installation of a new focusing element, an einzel lens, into the GTS-LHC extraction region is foreseen as a part of the Linac3 upgrade, as well as a redesign of the first section of the LEBT. Details of the upgrade and results of a beam dynamics study of the extraction region and LEBT modifications will be presented.

  20. Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitoring for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kurfuerst, C; Sapinski, M

    A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system was installed on the outside surface of the LHC magnet cryostats to protect the accelerator equipment from beam losses. The protection is achieved by extracting the beam from the ring in case thresholds imposed on measured radiation levels are exceeded. Close to the interaction regions of the LHC, the present BLM system is sensitive to particle showers generated in the interaction region of the two beams. In the future, with beams of higher energy and brightness resulting in higher luminosity, distinguishing between these interaction products and possible quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams will be challenging. The particle showers measured by the present BLM configuration are partly shielded by the cryostat and the iron yoke of the magnets. The system can hence be optimised by locating beam loss monitors as close as possible to the protected element, i. e. the superconducting coils, inside the cold mass of the magnets in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. T...

  1. Inelastic quarkonium photoproduction in hadron-hadron interactions at LHC energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, V.P. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Machado, M.M. [Ciencia e Tecnologia, IF - Farroupilha, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Sao Borja, RS (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper we study the inelastic quarkonium photoproduction in coherent pp/p Pb/PbPb interactions. Considering the ultra-relativistic hadrons as a source of photons, we estimate the total h{sub 1}+h{sub 2} → h x V+X (V=J/Ψ and Υ) cross sections and rapidity distributions at LHC energies. Our results demonstrate that the experimental analysis of this process can be used to understand the underlying mechanism governing heavy quarkonium production. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of CMS Resistive Plate Chambers performance during LHC RUN-1 and RUN-2

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00207984

    2016-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers detector system at the CMS experiment at the LHC provides robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region < 1.6. The main detector parameters and environmental conditions are constantly and closely monitored to achieve operational stability and high quality data in the harsh conditions of the second run period of the LHC with center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. First results of overall detector stability with 2015 data and comparisons with data from the LHC RUN-1 period at 8 TeV are presented.

  3. Comparison of CMS Resistive Plate Chambers performance during LHC RUN-1 and RUN-2

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Mehar Ali

    2016-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers detector system at the CMS experiment at the LHC provides robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region lt 1.6. The main detector parameters and environmental conditions are constantly and closely monitored to achieve operational stability and high quality data in the harsh conditions of the second run period of the LHC with center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. First results of overall detector stability with 2015 data and comparisons with data from the LHC RUN-1 period at 8 TeV are presented.

  4. Crystal Collimation with Lead Ion Beams at Injection Energy in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Roberto; Andreassen, Arvid; Butcher, Mark; Dionisio Barreto, Cristovao Andre; Masi, Alessandro; Mirarchi, Daniele; Montesano, Simone; Lamas Garcia, Inigo; Redaelli, Stefano; Scandale, Walter; Serrano Galvez, Pablo; Rijllart, Adriaan; Valentino, Gianluca; Galluccio, Francesca; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    During this MD, performed on December 2nd 2015, bent silicon crystals were tested with ion beams for a possible usage of crystal-assisted collimation. Tests were performed at injection energy, using both horizontal and vertical crystals. Ion channeling was observed for the first time with LHC beams at the record energy of 450 GeV and the channeled beams were probed with scans performed with secondary collimators. Measurements of cleaning efficiency of a crystal-based collimation system were also performed.

  5. Energy deposited in the high luminosity inner triplets of the LHC by collision debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildner, E.; Broggi, F.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Hoa, C.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Mokhov, N.V.

    2008-01-01

    The 14 TeV center of mass proton-proton collisions in the LHC produce not only debris interesting for physics but also showers of particles ending up in the accelerator equipment, in particular in the superconducting magnet coils. Evaluations of this contribution to the heat, that has to be transported by the cryogenic system, have been made to guarantee that the energy deposition in the superconducting magnets does not exceed limits for magnet quenching and the capacity of the cryogenic system. The models of the LHC base-line are detailed and include description of, for energy deposition, essential elements like beam-pipes and corrector magnets. The evaluations made using the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA are compared to previous studies using MARS. For the consolidation of the calculations, a dedicated comparative study of these two codes was performed for a reduced setup

  6. Results of 3-dimensional structural FE-modeling of the coil end-regions of the LHC main dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeck, U; Schillo, M; Perini, D; Siegel, N

    2000-01-01

    The transition region between the straight part and the ends of the coils of the LHC model and prototype dipole magnets are often identified as the origin of training quenches. In order to study how the discontinuities in the material properties of these regions affect coil pre-stress and possibly gain more insight in the quench behavior, a program was set up at CERN to analyze by 3D-FEM these particular regions. The ACCEL team, who performed a similar analysis for the main quadrupoles of the Superconducting Supercollider SSC, is entrusted with this program. In this paper we report on the results of 3D-modeling and analysis of the coil return end region, including the complete coil mass, of a 1-m single bore model magnet. This magnet represents all relevant features of the "two-in-one" LHC main dipole design concerning the winding configuration, the collar pack, the yoke, and the outer shell representing the He-vessel. The transition region between coil ends and straight section is modeled by slicing the magn...

  7. Connecting LHC, ILC, and quintessence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Daniel J.H.; Everett, Lisa L.; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2007-01-01

    If the cold dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), anticipated measurements of the WIMP properties at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) will provide an unprecedented experimental probe of cosmology at temperatures of order 1 GeV. It is worth emphasizing that the expected outcome of these tests may or may not be consistent with the picture of standard cosmology. For example, in kination-dominated quintessence models of dark energy, the dark matter relic abundance can be significantly enhanced compared to that obtained from freeze out in a radiation-dominated universe. Collider measurements then will simultaneously probe both dark matter and dark energy. In this article, we investigate the precision to which the LHC and ILC can determine the dark matter and dark energy parameters under those circumstances. We use an illustrative set of four benchmark points in minimal supergravity in analogy with the four LCC benchmark points. The precision achievable together at the LHC and ILC is sufficient to discover kination-dominated quintessence, under the assumption that the WIMPs are the only dark matter component. The LHC and ILC can thus play important roles as alternative probes of both dark matter and dark energy

  8. The LHC road at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    To explore the 1 TeV energy scale where fundamental particle interactions should encounter new conditions, two major routes were proposed - a high magnetic field proton collider in the LEP tunnel, dubbed LHC for Large Hadron Collider, and the CERN Linear Collider (CLIC) to supply beams of electrons and positrons. Exploratory studies have shown that while CLIC remains a valid long-term goal, LHC appears as the most cost-effective way for CERN to enter the 1 TeV arena. High-field superconducting magnet prototype work demonstrates that a 'two-in-one' design supplying the 10 tesla fields needed to handle LHC's 8 TeV proton beams (collision energy 16 TeV) is a practical proposition. (orig./HSI).

  9. LHC luminosity upgrade detector challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; de Roeck, Albert; Bortoletto, Daniela; Wigmans, Richard; Riegler, Werner; Smith, Wesley H

    2006-01-01

    LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges The upgrade of the LHC machine towards higher luminosity (1035 cm -2s-1) has been studied over the last few years. These studies have investigated scenarios to achieve the increase in peak luminosity by an order of magnitude, as well as the physics potential of such an upgrade and the impact of a machine upgrade on the LHC DETECTORS. This series of lectures will cover the following topics: • Physics motivation and machine scenarios for an order of magnitude increase in the LHC peak luminosity (lecture 1) • Detector challenges including overview of ideas for R&D programs by the LHC experiments: tracking and calorimetry, other new detector developments (lectures 2-4) • Electronics, trigger and data acquisition challenges (lecture 5) Note: the much more ambitious LHC energy upgrade will not be covered

  10. LHC France 2013: French Meeting on High Energy Physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Cette 1ère édition des rencontres françaises sur la physique des hautes énergies au Large Hadron Collider réunira près de 300 physiciens membres des laboratoires IN2P3-CNRS et IRFU-CEA, participants aux collaborations Atlas, CMS, LHCb et Alice. La rencontre LHC France, aura lieu à une période particulièrement cruciale pour la discipline, les derniers résultats des expériences LHC, basés sur toutes les données collectées en 2011 et 2012 y seront présentés et discutés. Elle sera l'occasion de faire le point et le bilan des avancées des diverses thématiques de recherche: boson de Higgs, les interactions électrofaibles, le quark top, la Supersymétrie, les saveurs lourdes, la violation de CP et le Plasma de Quarks et de Gluons. Elle sera aussi l'occasion de discuter des plans d'amélioration des détecteurs en vue des futures phases de fonctionnement du LHC ainsi que les perspectives pour la physique. Cette rencontre se veut un moment d'échange privilégié pour la communauté française des ...

  11. Top-quark production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David; Paukkunen, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Single and pair top-quark production in proton-lead (p-Pb) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and future circular collider (FCC) energies, are studied with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations including nuclear parton distribution functions. At the LHC, the pair-production cross sections amount to sigma(t-tbar) = 3.4 mub in Pb-Pb at sqrt(s) = 5.5 TeV, and sigma(t-tbar) = 60 nb in p-Pb at sqrt(s) = 8.8 TeV. At the FCC energies of sqrt(s) = 39 and 63 TeV, the same cross sections are factors of 90 and 55 times larger respectively. In the leptonic final-state t-tbar --> W+b W-bbar --> b bbar l+l- nu+nu-, after typical acceptance and efficiency cuts, one expects about 90 and 300 top-quarks per nominal LHC-year and 4.7 10^4 and 10^5 per FCC-year in Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions respectively. The total t-tbar cross sections, dominated by gluon fusion processes, are enhanced by 3--8% in nuclear compared to p-p collisions due to an overall net gluon antishadowing, altho...

  12. LHC Report: The beam is back at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Reyes Alemany

    2015-01-01

    A series of sector beam tests paved the way for the start-up of the LHC in 2008 and 2009. These tests and the follow-up of the issues that arose were part of the process that led to a smooth start-up with beam.   Given this experience, sector tests were scheduled to take place several weeks before the 2015 start-up. On the weekend of 6-9 March, beam from the SPS was injected into both LHC injection regions, followed by a first pass through the downstream LHC sectors. For the clockwise LHC beam (called “beam 1”) this meant passing through ALICE and into Sector 2-3, while the anticlockwise beam (called “beam 2”) was threaded through LHCb and all the way from Point 8 to Point 6, where it was extracted by the beam dump kickers onto the beam dump block. The dry runs in the previous weeks were mainly targeted at preparation for the sector tests. The systems tested included: injection, timing, synchronisation and beam instrumentation. The beam interlock ...

  13. Run II of the LHC: The Accelerator Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    In 2015 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) starts its Run II operation. After the successful Run I at 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV in the 2010-2013 period, a first long shutdown (LS1) was mainly dedicated to the consolidation of the LHC magnet interconnections, to allow the LHC to operate at its design beam energy of 7 TeV. Other key accelerator systems have also been improved to optimize the performance reach at higher beam energies. After a review of the LS1 activities, the status of the LHC start-up progress is reported, addressing in particular the status of the LHC hardware commissioning and of the training campaign of superconducting magnets that will determine the operation beam energy in 2015. Then, the plans for the Run II operation are reviewed in detail, covering choice of initial machine parameters and strategy to improve the Run II performance. Future prospects of the LHC and its upgrade plans are also presented.

  14. Development of a high gradient quadrupole for the LHC Interaction Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossert, R.; Feher, S.; Gourlay, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    A collaboration of Fermilab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory is engaged in the design of a high gradient quadrupole suitable for use in the LHC interaction regions. The cold iron design incorporates a two-layer, cos(2θ) coil geometry with a 70 mm aperture operating in superfluid helium. This paper summarizes the progress on a magnetic, mechanical and thermal design that meets the requirements of maximum gradient above 250 T/m, high field quality and provision for adequate cooling in a high radiation environment

  15. Design of a High Gradient Quadrupole for the LHC Interaction Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossert, R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Heger, T.; Huang, Y.; Kerby, J.; Lamm, M.J.; Limon, P.J.; Mazur, P.O.; Nobrega, F.; Ozelis, J.P.; Sabbi, G.; Strait, J.; Zlobin, A.V.; Caspi, S.; Dell'orco, D.; McInturff, A.D.; Scanlan, R.M.; Van Oort, J.M.; Gupta, R.C.

    1997-03-01

    A collaboration of Fermilab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently engaged in the design of a high gradient quadrupole suitable for use in the LHC interaction regions. The cold iron design incorporates a two-shell, cos2θ coil geometry with a 70 mm aperture. This paper summarizes the progress on a magnetic and mechanical design that meets the requirements of maximum gradient ≥250 T/m, operation at 1.8K, high field quality and provision for adequate cooling in a high radiation environment

  16. Latin American collaboration to the CERN-LHC accelerator assembly and its projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo B, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Summary of Latin American (LA) scientists main contributions to the construction of a heavy ion detector assembly currently operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva,Switzerland is given with description of the provided support for posterior data analysis. This joint effort highlights the much needed recognition of LA as a technologically emerging region. It has also shown a net benefit in development of science for our region. Details are given on the LHC-Alice experiment where several LA countries have contributed with innovative technological solutions. These include the ability to build part of the numerous detectors, including the central barrel as well as acquired knowledge on aspects concerning high energy dosimetry and radiation damage. (Author)

  17. Latin American collaboration to the CERN-LHC accelerator assembly and its projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo B, L.

    2016-10-01

    Summary of Latin American (LA) scientists main contributions to the construction of a heavy ion detector assembly currently operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva,Switzerland is given with description of the provided support for posterior data analysis. This joint effort highlights the much needed recognition of LA as a technologically emerging region. It has also shown a net benefit in development of science for our region. Details are given on the LHC-Alice experiment where several LA countries have contributed with innovative technological solutions. These include the ability to build part of the numerous detectors, including the central barrel as well as acquired knowledge on aspects concerning high energy dosimetry and radiation damage. (Author)

  18. The DFBX cryogenic distribution boxes for the LHC straight sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbasnik, Jon P.; Corradi, Carol A.; Green, Michael A.; Kajiyama, Y.; Knolls, Michael J.; LaMantia, Roberto F.; Rasson, Joseph E.; Reavill, Dulie; Turner, William C.

    2002-01-01

    The DFBX distribution boxes are designed to connect the LHC cryogenic distribution system to the interaction region quadrupoles [1] and dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The DFBX distribution boxes also have the current leads for the superconducting interaction region magnets and the LHC interaction region correction coils. The DFBX boxes also connect the magnet and cryogenic instrumentation to the CERN data collection system. The DFBX boxes serve as the cryogenic circulation center and the nerve center for four of the LHC straight sections. This report describes primarily the cryogenic function of the DFBXs

  19. Influence of mechanical vibrations on the field quality measurements of LHC interaction region quadrupole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Di Marco, J; Schlabach, P; Sylvester, C D; Tompkins, J C; Krzywinski, J

    2000-01-01

    The high gradient quadrupole magnets being developed by the US-LHC Accelerator Project for the LHC Interaction Regions have stringent field quality requirements. The field quality of these magnets will be measured using a rotating coil system presently under development. Mechanical vibrations of the coil during field quality measurements are of concern because such vibrations can introduce systematic errors in measurement results. This paper presents calculations of the expected influence of vibrations on field quality measurements and a technique to measure vibrations present in data acquired with standard "tangential-style" probes. Measured vibrations are reported and compared to simulations. Limits on systematic errors in multipole measurements are discussed along with implications for probe and measurement system design. (3 refs).

  20. Vacuum system for LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groebner, O.

    1995-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is planned at CERN will be housed in the tunnel of the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) and will store two counter-rotating proton beams with energies of up to 7 TeV in a 27 km accelerator/storage ring with superconducting magnets. The vacuum system for the LHC will be at cryogenic temperatures (between 1.9 and 20 K) and will be exposed to synchrotron radiation emitted by the protons. A stringent limitation on the vacuum is given by the energy deposition in the superconducting coils of the magnets due to nuclear scattering of the protons on residual gas molecules because this may provoke a quench. This effect imposes an upper limit to a local region of increased gas density (e.g. a leak), while considerations of beam lifetime (100 h) will determine more stringent requirements on the average gas density. The proton beam creates ions from the residual gas which may strike the vacuum chamber with sufficient energy to lead to a pressure 'run-away' when the net ion induced desorption yield exceeds a stable limit. These dynamic pressure effects will be limited to an acceptable level by installing a perforated 'beam screen' which shields the cryopumped gas molecules at 1.9 K from synchrotron radiation and which also absorbs the synchrotron radiation power at a higher and, therefore, thermodynamically more efficient temperature. (author)

  1. Introduction to the HL-LHC Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, L.; Brüning, O.

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of largest scientific instruments ever built. It has been exploring the new energy frontier since 2010, gathering a global user community of 7,000 scientists. To extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s to increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond its design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor of ten. As a highly complex and optimized machine, such an upgrade of the LHC must be carefully studied and requires about ten years to implement. The novel machine configuration, called High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovative technologies, representing exceptional technological challenges, such as cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, very compact superconducting cavities for beam rotation with ultra-precise phase control, new technology for beam collimation and 300-meter-long high-power superconducting links with negligible energy dissipation. HL-LHC federates efforts and R&D of a large community in Europe, in the US and in Japan, which will facilitate the implementation of the construction phase as a global project.

  2. Electrons identification in the forward region of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter at the LHC and first data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chareyre, E.

    2010-09-01

    The start up of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC has been done during the autumn 2009. During the construction and integration of the detector, combined beam tests grouping several subsystems have been carried out. In the forward region of the detector (η > 2.5), a combined beam test with electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters has been done, whose data (pions and electrons) has been analyzed. Identification of electrons in this region can be used to study decays of Z and W bosons and also to develop some tools to understand the background noises. A method to estimate rejection of pions and electrons identification efficiency is presented using a discriminant analysis based on the methods of Fisher discriminant and on Boosted Decision Trees. It is shown that a pion rejection higher than 200 with an efficiency of electron identification of 50% can be obtained. Moreover the tools and methods developed during the beam tests have been applied on the first data of the LHC with collisions at 7 TeV. Since the present luminosity of the LHC is not yet sufficient to study precisely production of Z and W bosons by using data, a study using the Pythia generator has been done on electrons physics in the forward region. (author)

  3. Links between astroparticle physics and the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinfold, James L

    2005-01-01

    Research into the fundamental nature of matter at the high energy frontier takes place in three main areas: accelerator-based particle physics, high energy astrophysics, and the cosmology of the early universe. As a consequence the study of astroparticle physics can have significant implications for collider physics at the LHC. Likewise, the LHC project provides the laboratory to perform measurements of great importance for cosmic ray astrophysics and cosmology. This paper reviews some of the important synergistic links between astroparticle and LHC physics. (topical review)

  4. Accelerator physics studies on the effects from an asynchronous beam dump onto the LHC experimental region collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Boccone, V; Bruce, R; Cerutti, F; Rossi, A; Vlachoudis, V; Mereghetti, A; Faus-Golfe, A

    2012-01-01

    Asynchronous beam aborts at the LHC are estimated to occur on average once per year. Accelerator physics studies of asynchronous dumps have been performed at different beam energies and beta-stars. The loss patterns are analyzed in order to identify the losses in particular on the Phase 1 Tertiary Collimators (TCT), since their tungsten-based active jaw insert has a lower damage threshold than the carbon-based other LHC collimators. Settings of the tilt angle of the TCTs are discussed with the aim of reducing the thermal loads on the TCT themselves.

  5. High Energy pp Elastic Scattering in Condensate Enclosed Chiral Bag Model and TOTEM Elastic Measurements at LHC at 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M M

    2013-01-01

    We study high energy $\\small{\\rm{pp}}$ and $\\small{\\rm{\\bar {p}p}}$ elastic scattering in the TeV region based on an effective field theory model of the proton. We phenomenologically investigate the main processes underlying elastic scattering and quantitatively describe the measured elastic d$\\small{\\sigma}$/dt at energies 7.0 TeV (LHC $\\small{\\rm{pp}}$), 1.96 TeV (Tevatron $\\small{\\rm{\\bar {p}p}}$), and 0.630 TeV (SPS $\\small{\\rm{\\bar {p}p}}$). Finally, we give our prediction for $\\small{\\rm{pp}}$ elastic d$\\small{\\sigma}$/dt at 14 TeV that will be measured by the TOTEM Collaboration.

  6. FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements for the LHC beam loss monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarchiapone, L.; Brugger, M.; Dehning, B.; Kramer, D.; Stockner, M.; Vlachoudis, V.

    2007-01-01

    One of the crucial elements in terms of machine protection for CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is its beam loss monitoring (BLM) system. On-line loss measurements must prevent the superconducting magnets from quenching and protect the machine components from damages due to unforeseen critical beam losses. In order to ensure the BLM's design quality, in the final design phase of the LHC detailed FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the betatron collimation insertion. In addition, benchmark measurements were carried out with LHC type BLMs installed at the CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field facility (CERF). This paper presents results of FLUKA calculations performed for BLMs installed in the collimation region, compares the results of the CERF measurement with FLUKA simulations and evaluates related uncertainties. This, together with the fact that the CERF source spectra at the respective BLM locations are comparable with those at the LHC, allows assessing the sensitivity of the performed LHC design studies

  7. FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements for the LHC beam loss monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarchiapone, L.; Brugger, M.; Dehning, B.; Kramer, D.; Stockner, M.; Vlachoudis, V.

    2007-10-01

    One of the crucial elements in terms of machine protection for CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is its beam loss monitoring (BLM) system. On-line loss measurements must prevent the superconducting magnets from quenching and protect the machine components from damages due to unforeseen critical beam losses. In order to ensure the BLM's design quality, in the final design phase of the LHC detailed FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the betatron collimation insertion. In addition, benchmark measurements were carried out with LHC type BLMs installed at the CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field facility (CERF). This paper presents results of FLUKA calculations performed for BLMs installed in the collimation region, compares the results of the CERF measurement with FLUKA simulations and evaluates related uncertainties. This, together with the fact that the CERF source spectra at the respective BLM locations are comparable with those at the LHC, allows assessing the sensitivity of the performed LHC design studies.

  8. Intensity issues and machine protection of the HE-LHC

    OpenAIRE

    Assmann, R.

    2011-01-01

    The HE-LHC study investigates the possibilities for upgrading the beam energy of the Large Hadron Collider CERN from 7 TeV to 16.5 TeV. This paper presents a preliminary investigation of intensity issues and machine protection for the HE-LHC. The HE-LHC study investigates the possibilities for upgrading the beam energy of the Large Hadron Collider CERN from 7 TeV to 16.5 TeV. This paper presents a preliminary investigation of intensity issues and machine protection for the HE-LHC.

  9. Simplified Models for Dark Matter and Missing Energy Searches at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, Jalal [Academia Sinica, Taipei (Taiwan). Inst. of Physics; Ashkenazi, Adi [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Physics; Boveia, Antonio [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.; Busoni, Giorgio [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste (Italy); National Inst. for Nuclear Physics (INFN), Trieste (Italy); De Simone, Andrea [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste (Italy); National Inst. for Nuclear Physics (INFN), Trieste (Italy); Doglioni, Caterina [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland). Physics Dept.; Efrati, Aielet [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics and Astrophysics; Etzion, Erez [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Physics; Gramling, Johanna [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland). Physics Dept.; Jacques, Thomas [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland). Physics Dept.; Lin, Tongyan [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Kavli Inst. for Cosmological Physics. Enrico Fermi Inst.; Morgante, Enrico [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland). Physics Dept.; Papucci, Michele [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group; Penning, Bjoern [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.; Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Riotto, Antonio Walter [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland). Physics Dept.; Rizzo, Thomas [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Salek, David [National Inst. for Subatomic Physics (NIKHEF), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gravitation and AstroParticle Physics in Amsterdam (GRAPPA), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schramm, Steven [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Slone, Oren [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Physics; Soreq, Yotam [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics and Astrophysics; Vichi, Alessandro [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group; Volansky, Tomer [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Physics; Yavin, Itay [Perimeter Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Zhou, Ning [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Zurek, Kathryn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group

    2014-10-01

    The study of collision events with missing energy as searches for the dark matter (DM) component of the Universe are an essential part of the extensive program looking for new physics at the LHC. Given the unknown nature of DM, the interpretation of such searches should be made broad and inclusive. This report reviews the usage of simplified models in the interpretation of missing energy searches. We begin with a brief discussion of the utility and limitation of the effective field theory approach to this problem. The bulk of the report is then devoted to several different simplified models and their signatures, including s-channel and t-channel processes. A common feature of simplified models for DM is the presence of additional particles that mediate the interactions between the Standard Model and the particle that makes up DM. We consider these in detail and emphasize the importance of their inclusion as final states in any coherent interpretation. We also review some of the experimental progress in the field, new signatures, and other aspects of the searches themselves. We conclude with comments and recommendations regarding the use of simplified models in Run-II of the LHC.

  10. Simplified Models for Dark Matter and Missing Energy Searches at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, Jalal; De Simone, Andrea; Doglioni, Caterina; Riotto, Antonio Walter; Salek, David; Schramm, Steven; Slone, Oren; Soreq, Yotam; Vichi, Alessandro; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab.; Volansky, Tomer; Yavin, Itay; McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON; Zhou, Ning; Zurek, Kathryn; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab.

    2014-01-01

    The study of collision events with missing energy as searches for the dark matter (DM) component of the Universe are an essential part of the extensive program looking for new physics at the LHC. Given the unknown nature of DM, the interpretation of such searches should be made broad and inclusive. This report reviews the usage of simplified models in the interpretation of missing energy searches. We begin with a brief discussion of the utility and limitation of the effective field theory approach to this problem. The bulk of the report is then devoted to several different simplified models and their signatures, including s-channel and t-channel processes. A common feature of simplified models for DM is the presence of additional particles that mediate the interactions between the Standard Model and the particle that makes up DM. We consider these in detail and emphasize the importance of their inclusion as final states in any coherent interpretation. We also review some of the experimental progress in the field, new signatures, and other aspects of the searches themselves. We conclude with comments and recommendations regarding the use of simplified models in Run-II of the LHC.

  11. TEST RESULTS FOR LHC INSERTION REGION DEPOLE MAGNETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MURATORE, J.; JAIN, A.; ANERELLA, M.; COSSOLINO, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has made 20 insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. These 9.45 m-long, 8 cm aperture magnets have the same coil design as the arc dipoles now operating in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL and are of single aperture, twin aperture, and double cold mass configurations. They are required to produce fields up to 4.14 T for operation at 7.56 TeV. Eighteen of these magnets have been tested at 4.5 K using either forced flow supercritical helium or liquid helium. The testing was especially important for the twin aperture models, whose construction was very different from the RHIC dipoles, except for the coil design. This paper reports on the results of these tests, including spontaneous quench performance, verification of quench protection heater operation, and magnetic field quality

  12. Integration of a neutral absorber for the LHC point 8

    CERN Document Server

    Santamaria, A; Alemany, R; Burkhardt, H; Cerutti, F

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the second long shutdown (LS2) of the LHC machine, in order to increase its statistical precision significantly. The upgraded LHCb foresees a peak luminosity of LHL = 1-21033cm-2s-11, with a pileup of ~5. This represents ten times more luminosity and five times more pile up than in the present LHC. With these conditions, the pp-collisions and beam losses will produce a non-negligeable beam-induced energy deposition in the interaction region. More precisely, studies [1] have shown that the energy deposition will especially increase on the D2 recombination dipole, which could bring them close to their safety thresholds. To avoid this, the placement of a minimal neutral absorber has been proposed. This absorber will have the same role as the TAN in the high luminosity Interaction Regions (IR) 1 and 5. This study shows the possible dimensions and location of this absorber, and how it would reduce both the peak power density and total heat load.

  13. LHC status report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Following the great success of the first 3.5 TeV collisions in all four LHC experiments on 30 March, the focus of the LHC commissioning teams has turned to consolidating the beam injection and acceleration procedures.   During the last two weeks, the operators have adopted a cycle of beam commissioning studies by day and the preparation and delivery of collisions during the night shifts. The injection and acceleration processes for the beams are by now well established and almost all feedback systems, which are an essential ingredient for establishing reliable and safe machine operation, have been commissioned. Thanks to special current settings for the quadrupoles that are situated near the collision points, the LHC luminosity at high energy has been increased by a factor of 5 in three of the four experiments. Similar improvements are under way for the fourth experiment. The next steps include adjustments of the LHC machine protection and collimation devices, which will ensure 'stable beam' co...

  14. HL-LHC updates in Japan

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    At a recent meeting in Japan, updates on the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project were presented, including the progress made so far and the deadlines still to be met for the upgraded machine to be operational from 2020.   New magnets made with advanced superconductor Nb3Sn in the framework of the HL-LHC project. These magnets are currently under construction at CERN by the TE-MSC group. The LHC is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, and in 2015 it will reach yet another new record for the energy of its colliding beams. One key factor of its discovery potential is its ability to produce collisions described in mathematical terms by the parameter known as “luminosity”. In 2025, the HL-LHC project will allow the total number of collisions in the LHC to increase by a factor of 10. The first step in this rich upgrade programme is the delivery of the Preliminary Design Report (PDR), which is also a key milestone of the HiLumi LHC Design Study partly fund...

  15. Application of diamond based beam loss monitors at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempel, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was conceived in the 1980s and started the operation in 2008. It needed more than 20 years to plan and construct this accelerator and its experiments. Four main experiments are located around the ring, Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), A Toroidal LHC Apparatus(ATLAS), A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) and LHC beauty (LHCb). Two beams that traveling in opposite direction in the LHC tunnel, collide in each of the experiments to study the questions: ''What is mass?'', ''What is the universe made of?'' and ''Why is there no antimatter?''. The four experiments take data of the collision products and try to answer the fundamental questions of physics. The two larger detectors, CMS and ATLAS, are looking for the Higgs boson to study the electroweak symmetry breaking. Both detectors were built with contrasting concepts to exclude potential error sources and to rea rm the results. The smaller experiment LHCb studies the matter-antimatter asymmetry with a focus of the beauty quark. Another smaller experiment is ALICE that studies the conditions right after the Big Bang by colliding heavy ions. The navigation of the beams is done by over 10000 magnets and each beam has a stored energy of 362MJ which correspond to the kinetic energy of a train like the TGV travelling of 150 km/h. Only a small percentage of that energy can damage the material in the LHC ring or the magnets. This would mean a repair time of months or years, without taking any data. To avoid such a scenario, it is important to monitor the beam condition and measure the amount of losses of the beam. Such losses can for example happen due to dust particles in the vacuum chambers or due to deviations of the beam parameters. Several systems called beam loss monitors (BLMs) can measure beam losses. This thesis concentrates on two of them, ionization chambers and diamond detectors. Over 3600 ionization chambers are installed in the LHC, especially near each quadrupole and next to

  16. Role of multiparton interactions on J /ψ production in p +p collisions at LHC energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Dhananjaya; De, Sudipan; Sahoo, Raghunath; Dansana, Soumya

    2018-05-01

    The production mechanism of quarkonia states in hadronic collisions is still to be understood by the scientific community. In high-multiplicity p +p collisions, underlying event observables are of major interest. The multiparton interactions (MPIs) are underlying event observables, in which several interactions occur at the partonic level in a single p +p event. This leads to dependence of particle production on event multiplicity. If the MPI occurs in a harder scale, there will be a correlation between the yield of quarkonia and total charged-particle multiplicity. The ALICE experiment at the LHC in p +p collisions at √{s }=7 and 13 TeV has observed an approximate linear increase of relative J /ψ yield, (d/NJ /ψ/d y ⟨d NJ /ψ/d y ⟩ ), with relative charged-particle multiplicity density, (d/Nch/d y ⟨d Nch/d y ⟩ ). In our present work, we have performed a comprehensive study of the production of charmonia as a function of charged-particle multiplicity in p +p collisions at LHC energies using the perturbative QCD-inspired multiparton interaction model, pythia8 tune 4C, with and without the color reconnection scheme. A detailed multiplicity and energy-dependent study is performed to understand the effects of MPI on J /ψ production. The ratio of ψ (2 S ) to J /ψ is also studied as a function of charged-particle multiplicity at LHC energies.

  17. Upgrade Plans for ATLAS Forward Calorimetry for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton (pp) collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to $10^{34}{\\rm cm}^{-2}{\\rm s}^{-1}$. At the higher instantaneous luminosity ($5\\times 10^{34}{\\rm cm}^{-2}{\\rm s}^{-1}$) proposed for the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), some components of ATLAS will not operate properly, while others may not survive the dose that will be accumulated while collecting the proposed 3000 fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data. For the ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter, problems are anticipated in the forward region where the particle flux is particularly high. The existing Forward Calorimeter (FCal) was designed with very narrow LAr gaps (250-500 $\\mu$m) in order to avoid problems due to ion build-up that would distort the electric field. At HL-LHC luminosities, these gaps are no longer sufficiently narrow. The resulting distortions of the electric field in the gaps would be exacerbated b...

  18. The BRAN luminosity detectors for the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matis, H.S.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bravin, E. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Miyamoto, R. [European Spallation Source, ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2017-03-11

    This paper describes the several phases which led, from the conceptual design, prototyping, construction and tests with beam, to the installation and operation of the BRAN (Beam RAte of Neutrals) relative luminosity monitors for the LHC. The detectors have been operating since 2009 to contribute, optimize and maintain the accelerator performance in the two high luminosity interaction regions (IR), the IR1 (ATLAS) and the IR5 (CMS). The devices are gas ionization chambers installed inside a neutral particle absorber 140 m away from the Interaction Points in IR1 and IR5 and monitor the energy deposited by electromagnetic showers produced by high-energy neutral particles from the collisions. The detectors have the capability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity at the 40 MHz bunch rate, as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation during the nominal LHC operation. The devices have operated since the early commissioning phase of the accelerator over a broad range of luminosities reaching 1.4×10{sup 34} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} with a peak pileup of 45 events per bunch crossing. Even though the nominal design luminosity of the LHC has been exceeded, the BRAN is operating well. After describing how the BRAN can be used to monitor the luminosity of the collider, we discuss the technical choices that led to its construction and the different tests performed prior to the installation in two IRs of the LHC. Performance simulations are presented together with operational results obtained during p-p operations, including runs at 40 MHz bunch rate, Pb-Pb operations and p-Pb operations.

  19. The LHC quench protection system

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The new quench protection system (QPS) has the crucial roles of providing an early warning for any part of the superconducting coils and busbars that develop high resistance, as well as triggering the switch-off of the machine. Over 2000 new detectors will be installed around the LHC to make sure every busbar segment between magnets is monitored and protected. One of the major consolidation activities for the LHC is the addition of two new detectors to the quench protection system. A magnet quench occurs when part of the superconducting cable becomes normally-conducting. When the protection system detects an increased resistance the huge amount of energy stored in the magnet chains is safely extracted and ‘dumped’ into specially designed resistors. In the case of the main dipole chain, the stored energy in a single LHC sector is roughly the same as the kinetic energy of a passenger jet at cruising speed. The first new detector is designed to monitor the superconducting...

  20. Multiparticle production at RHIC and LHC: a classical point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnitz, A.; Venugopalan, R.

    2000-01-01

    We report results of our ongoing nonperturbative numerical study of a classical effective theory describing low-x partons in the central region of a heavy-ion collision. In particular, we give estimates of the initial transverse energies and multiplicities for a wide range of collision regimes, including those at RHIC and at LHC

  1. LHC: Past, Present, and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Landsberg, Greg

    2013-01-01

    In this overview talk, I give highlights of the first three years of the LHC operations at high energy, spanning heavy-ion physics, standard model measurements, and searches for new particles, which culminated in the discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments in 2012. I'll discuss what we found about the properties of the new particle in 10 months since the discovery and then talk about the future LHC program and preparations to the 2015 run at the center-of-mass energy of ~13 TeV. These proceedings are meant to be a snapshot of the LHC results as of May 2013 - the time of the conference. Many of the results shown in these proceedings have been since updated (sometimes significantly) just 4 months thereafter, when these proceedings were due. Nevertheless, keeping this writeup in sync with the results shown in the actual talk has some historical value, as, for one, it tells the reader how short is the turnaround time to update the results at the LHC. To help an appreciation of this fact, I b...

  2. The ATLAS Level-1 Trigger System with 13TeV nominal LHC collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Helary, Louis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Level-1 (L1) Trigger system of the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) plays a key role in the ATLAS detector data-taking. It is a hardware system that selects in real time events containing physics-motivated signatures. Selection is purely based on calorimetry energy depositions and hits in the muon chambers consistent with muon candidates. The L1 Trigger system has been upgraded to cope with the more challenging run-II LHC beam conditions, including increased centre-of-mass energy, increased instantaneous luminosity and higher levels of pileup. This talk summarises the improvements, commissioning and performance of the L1 ATLAS Trigger for the LHC run-II data period. The acceptance of muon triggers has been improved by increasing the hermiticity of the muon spectrometer. New strategies to obtain a better muon trigger signal purity were designed for certain geometrically difficult transition regions by using the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter. Algorithms to reduce noise spikes in muon trig...

  3. Searching dark matter at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Mihoko M.

    2007-01-01

    We now believe that the dark matter in our Universe must be an unknown elementary particle, which is charge neutral and weakly interacting. The standard model must be extended to include it. The dark matter was likely produced in the early universe from the high energy collisions of the particles. Now LHC experiment starting from 2008 will create such high energy collision to explore the nature of the dark matter. In this article we explain how dark matter and LHC physics will be connected in detail. (author)

  4. LHC signals of radiatively-induced neutrino masses and implications for the Zee-Babu model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide, Julien; Chala, Mikael; Santamaria, Arcadi

    2018-04-01

    Contrary to the see-saw models, extended Higgs sectors leading to radiatively-induced neutrino masses do require the extra particles to be at the TeV scale. However, these new states have often exotic decays, to which experimental LHC searches performed so far, focused on scalars decaying into pairs of same-sign leptons, are not sensitive. In this paper we show that their experimental signatures can start to be tested with current LHC data if dedicated multi-region analyses correlating different observables are used. We also provide high-accuracy estimations of the complicated Standard Model backgrounds involved. For the case of the Zee-Babu model, we show that regions not yet constrained by neutrino data and low-energy experiments can be already probed, while most of the parameter space could be excluded at the 95% C.L. in a high-luminosity phase of the LHC.

  5. Mueller-Navelet jets at LHC: BFKL versus high-energy DGLAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celiberto, F.G.; Murdaca, B.; Papa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Cosenza (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato, Cosenza (Italy); Ivanov, D.Yu. [Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-15

    The production of forward jets separated by a large rapidity gap at LHC, the so-called Mueller-Navelet jets, is a fundamental testfield for perturbative QCD in the high-energy limit. Several analyses have already provided us with evidence about the compatibility of theoretical predictions, based on collinear factorization and BFKL resummation of energy logarithms in the next-to-leading approximation, with the CMS experimental data at 7 TeV of center-of-mass energy. However, the question if the same data can be described also by fixed-order perturbative approaches has not yet been fully answered. In this paper we provide numerical evidence that the mere use of partially asymmetric cuts in the transverse momenta of the detected jets allows for a clear separation between BFKL-resummed and fixed-order predictions in some observables related with the Mueller-Navelet jet production process. (orig.)

  6. Electron cloud studies for the LHC and future proton colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Domínguez Sánchez de la Blanca, César Octavio; Zimmermann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest and most powerful particle collider. Its main objectives are to explore the validity of the standard model of particle physics and to look for new physics beyond it, at unprecedented collision energies and rates. A good luminosity performance is imperative to attain these goals. In the last stage of the LHC commissioning (2011-2012), the limiting factor to achieving the design bunch spacing of 25 ns has been the electron cloud effects. The electron cloud is also expected to be the most important luminosity limitation after the first Long Shut-Down of the LHC (LS1), when the machine should be operated at higher energy and with 25-ns spacing, as well as for the planned luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC) and future high energy proton colliders (HE-LHC and VHE-LHC). This thesis contributes to the understanding of the electron cloud observations during the first run of the LHC (2010-2012), presents the first beam dynamics analysis for the next generation of high en...

  7. Vol. 31 - Crystal Collimation for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mirarchi, Daniele; Scandale, Walter; Hall, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Future upgrades of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may demand improved cleaning performance of its collimation system. Very efficient collimation is required during regular operations at high intensities, because even a small amount of energy deposited on superconducting magnets can cause an abrupt loss of superconducting conditions (quench). The present collimation system has accomplished its tasks during the LHC Run I very well, where no quench with circulating beam took place with up to 150 MJ of stored energy at 4 TeV. On the other hand, uncertainty remains on the performance at the design energy of 7 TeV and with 360 MJ of stored energy. In particular, a further increase up to about 700 MJ is expected for the high luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC), where improved cleaning performance may be needed together with a reduction of collimator impedance. The possibility to use a crystal-based collimation system represents an option for improving both cleaning performance and impedance compared to the present s...

  8. Superconducting magnet development for the LHC upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    LHC is now delivering proton and heavy ion collisions at the highest energy. Upgrading the LHC beyond its design performance is a long term program that started during the LHC construction, with some fundamental R and D programs. The upgrade program is based on a vigorous superconductor and magnet R and D, aimed at increasing the field in accelerator magnets from 8 T to 12 T for the luminosity upgrade, with the scope of increasing the collider luminosity by a factor 5 to 10 from 2022. The upgrade program might continue with the LHC energy upgrade, which would require magnets producing field in the range of 16-20 T. The results obtained so far and the future challenges are discussed together with the possible plan to reach the goals. (author)

  9. MSSM Forecast for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera, Maria Eugenia; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    We perform a forecast of the MSSM with universal soft terms (CMSSM) for the LHC, based on an improved Bayesian analysis. We do not incorporate ad hoc measures of the fine-tuning to penalize unnatural possibilities: such penalization arises from the Bayesian analysis itself when the experimental value of $M_Z$ is considered. This allows to scan the whole parameter space, allowing arbitrarily large soft terms. Still the low-energy region is statistically favoured (even before including dark matter or g-2 constraints). Contrary to other studies, the results are almost unaffected by changing the upper limits taken for the soft terms. The results are also remarkable stable when using flat or logarithmic priors, a fact that arises from the larger statistical weight of the low-energy region in both cases. Then we incorporate all the important experimental constrains to the analysis, obtaining a map of the probability density of the MSSM parameter space, i.e. the forecast of the MSSM. Since not all the experimental i...

  10. Baseline review of the U.S. LHC Accelerator project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Review of the U.S. Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Accelerator project was conducted February 23--26, 1998, at the request of Dr. John R. O'Fallon, Director, Division of High Energy Physics, Office of Energy Research, U.S. DOE. This is the first review of the U.S. LHC Accelerator project. Overall, the Committee found that the U.S. LHC Accelerator project effort is off to a good start and that the proposed scope is very conservative for the funding available. The Committee recommends that the project be initially baselined at a total cost of $110 million, with a scheduled completion data of 2005. The U.S. LHC Accelerator project will supply high technology superconducting magnets for the interaction regions (IRs) and the radio frequency (rf) straight section of the LHC intersecting storage rings. In addition, the project provides the cryogenic support interface boxes to service the magnets and radiation absorbers to protect the IR dipoles and the inner triplet quadrupoles. US scientists will provide support in analyzing some of the detailed aspects of accelerator physics in the two rings. The three laboratories participating in this project are Brookhaven National Laboratory, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Committee was very impressed by the technical capabilities of the US LHC Accelerator project team. Cost estimates for each subsystem of the US LHC Accelerator project were presented to the Review Committee, with a total cost including contingency of $110 million (then year dollars). The cost estimates were deemed to be conservative. A re-examination of the funding profile, costs, and schedules on a centralized project basis should lead to an increased list of deliverables. The Committee concluded that the proposed scope of US deliverables to CERN can be readily accomplished with the $110 million total cost baseline for the project. The current deliverables should serve as

  11. WZ di-boson measurements with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC and performance of resistive Micromegas in view of HL-LHC applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjarres-Ramos, Joany

    2013-01-01

    During the past two years, the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has performed exceptionally. The data collected by ATLAS made possible the first Standard Model physics measurements and produced a number of important experimental results. In the first part of this document the measurement of the WZ production with the ATLAS detector is presented and the second part is devoted to the study of resistive Micromegas properties, in view of the installation in the ATLAS spectrometer forward regions for the first phase of High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The measurement of the WZ production probes the electroweak sector of the Standard Model at high energies and allows for generic tests for New Physics beyond the Standard Model. Two datasets of LHC proton-proton collisions were analyzed, 4.8 fb -1 of integrated luminosity at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and 13 fb -1 at 8 TeV, collected in 2011 and the first half of 2012 respectively. Fully leptonic decay events are selected with electrons, muons and missing transverse momentum in the final state. Different date-driven estimates of the background were developed in the context of this analysis. The fiducial and total cross section of WZ production are measured and limits on anomalous triple gauge boson couplings are set. The second part of the document is devoted to the upgrade of the ATLAS detector. The conditions at the High Luminosity LHC calls for detectors capable of operating in a flux of collisions and background particles approximately ten times larger compared to today's conditions. The efficiency, resolution and robustness of resistive Micromegas were studied, as part of the R and D project aimed at the construction of large-area spark-resistant muon chambers using the Micromegas technology. (author) [fr

  12. The LHC enters a new phase

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    After achieving the world record energy of 1.18 TeV per proton beam last November, the LHC is now preparing for higher energy and luminosity.   The teams are working in the tunnel to improve the electrical reliability of the magnet protection system.   Before the 2009 running period began, all the necessary preparations to run the LHC at the collision energy of 1.18 TeV per beam had been carried out. The goal of the technical stop, which will end mid-February, is to prepare the machine for running at 3.5 TeV per beam. In order to achieve that, a current as high as 6 kAmps will have to flow into the LHC magnets. The main work is taking place on the new quench protection system (nQPS) where teams are improving the electrical reliability of the connection between the Instrumentation Feedthrough Systems (IFS) on the magnets and the nQPS equipment. There are around 500 of these connectors for each of the eight sectors in the LHC that need to be repaired. These operations are necessary to en...

  13. Precision studies of proton structure and jet energy scale with the CMS detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haitz, Dominik

    2016-05-20

    +jet events can be utilized for studies of the proton structure. In the parton model, this structure is expressed by the parton distribution functions (PDFs) which predict the probability to nd a certain proton constituent (a parton) with a proton momentum fraction x at an energy scale Q. The PDFs are not predicted by perturbative QCD but have to be experimentally determined. In this thesis, a method to constrain the parameters of the PDFs by measuring the distributions of kinematic quantities of Z bosons is explored. This method exploits the correlation between the PDFs and the expected number of events with Z bosons in particular phase space regions. By fitting the PDFs to these data, the PDF parameters can be determined. If the measurement is precise enough, the uncertainties in the PDFs can be reduced. Z+jet events can also be used for jet energy calibration: All physics analyses at the LHC rely on the precise reconstruction of the objects produced in a collision. Among the most important of these objects are jets, collimated streams of particles produced by the hadronization of partons. As there are numerous effects that bias the jet measurement, the precise determination of jet energies is among the most challenging experimental tasks. Sophisticated techniques have been developed to deal with the various systematic biases. One of the most important steps is the data-driven calibration with balancing methods: Exploiting momentum conservation, the jet transverse momentum is compared with the transverse momentum of a well-measured reference object and consequently corrected. In this thesis, the jet energy scale is calibrated by studying Z(→μ{sup +}μ{sup -})+jet events.

  14. Application of diamond based beam loss monitors at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempel, Maria

    2013-04-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was conceived in the 1980s and started the operation in 2008. It needed more than 20 years to plan and construct this accelerator and its experiments. Four main experiments are located around the ring, Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), A Toroidal LHC Apparatus(ATLAS), A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) and LHC beauty (LHCb). Two beams that traveling in opposite direction in the LHC tunnel, collide in each of the experiments to study the questions: ''What is mass?'', ''What is the universe made of?'' and ''Why is there no antimatter?''. The four experiments take data of the collision products and try to answer the fundamental questions of physics. The two larger detectors, CMS and ATLAS, are looking for the Higgs boson to study the electroweak symmetry breaking. Both detectors were built with contrasting concepts to exclude potential error sources and to rea rm the results. The smaller experiment LHCb studies the matter-antimatter asymmetry with a focus of the beauty quark. Another smaller experiment is ALICE that studies the conditions right after the Big Bang by colliding heavy ions. The navigation of the beams is done by over 10000 magnets and each beam has a stored energy of 362MJ which correspond to the kinetic energy of a train like the TGV travelling of 150 km/h. Only a small percentage of that energy can damage the material in the LHC ring or the magnets. This would mean a repair time of months or years, without taking any data. To avoid such a scenario, it is important to monitor the beam condition and measure the amount of losses of the beam. Such losses can for example happen due to dust particles in the vacuum chambers or due to deviations of the beam parameters. Several systems called beam loss monitors (BLMs) can measure beam losses. This thesis concentrates on two of them, ionization chambers and diamond detectors. Over 3600 ionization chambers are installed in

  15. Lead-ion collisions: the LHC achieves a new energy record

    CERN Multimedia

    John Jowett

    2015-01-01

    After the Bevatron (Berkeley, 1954) – which broke the energy barrier of billions of electronvolts – and the Tevatron (Fermilab, 1987) – which reached a trillion electronvolts – the LHC is now reaching the peta- (quadrillion) electronvolt level with its heavy-ion collisions (see here). However, one should remember that the average energy per colliding nucleon pair, within the 1 PeV “fireball”, is 5 TeV (compared to 13 TeV in the recent proton-proton collisions).   Heavy-ion collision events from the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments. Two of the great particle accelerators of the past were named after the symbolic energy barrier that they broke. The Bevatron (for "billions of electronvolts synchrotron"), at Berkeley in 1954, was the first to break the barrier of a billion electronvolts or BeV (now known as a gigaelectronvolt or GeV) in the centre-of-mass, by a large enough margin to create the laboratory’s ...

  16. Scenarios for the LHC Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2008-01-01

    The projected lifetime of the LHC low-beta quadrupoles, the evolution of the statistical error halving time, and the physics potential all call for an LHC luminosity upgrade by the middle of the coming decade. In the framework of the CARE-HHH network three principal scenarios have been developed for increasing the LHC peak luminosity by more than a factor of 10, to values above 1035 cm−2s−1. All scenarios imply a rebuilding of the high-luminosity interaction regions (IRs) in combination with a consistent change of beam parameters. However, their respective features, bunch structures, IR layouts, merits and challenges, and luminosity variation with β∗ differ substantially. In all scenarios luminosity leveling during a store would be advantageous for the physics experiments. An injector upgrade must complement the upgrade measures in the LHC proper in order to provide the beam intensity and brightness needed as well as to reduce the LHC turnaround time for higher integrated luminosity.

  17. Exclusive photoproduction of Upsilon in pPb collisions at LHC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Dipanwita; Chudasama, Ruchi; Mohanty, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent results of exclusive photoproduction of heavy vector mesons at LHC energies by ALICE and LHCb in pp, pPb and PbPb Ultraperipheral collisions (UPC) confirmed the expectations that UPCs are a very promising probe to study the gluon distributions in nucleons and in nuclei at small x. In this work, we have estimated the photoproduction of γ in pPb collisions at √s NN = 5.02 TeV in the framework of perturbative two-gluon exchange formalism employing various parametrization of gluon distributions functions

  18. Low missing mass, single- and double diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2014-01-01

    Low missing mass, single- and double diffraction dissociation is calculated for the LHC energies from a dual-Regge model, dominated by a Pomeron Regge pole exchange. The model reproduces the rich resonance structure in the low missing mass Mx region. The diffractionly excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single- and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given. The model predicts a possible turn-down of the cross section towards, t -> 0 in a region probably accessible in future experiments in the nearly forward direction. The present work is a continuation and extension (e.g. with double diffraction) of a previous work using the dual Regge approach.

  19. LHC data and cosmic ray coplanarity at superhigh energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhamedshin R.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new phenomenological model FANSY 2.0 is designed, which makes it possible to simulate hadron interactions via traditional and coplanar generation of most energetic particles as well as to reproduce a lot of LHC (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, TOTEM, LHCf data. Features of the model are compared with LHC data. Problems of coplanarity are considered and a testing experiment is proposed.

  20. Operation of the ATLAS end-cap calorimeters at sLHC luminosities, an experimental study

    CERN Document Server

    Ferencei, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The expected increase of luminosity at sLHC by a factor of ten with respect to LHC luminosities has serious consequences for the signal reconstruction, radiation hardness requirements and operations of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters (EMEC, HEC, FCAL) in the endcap, respectively forward region. Small modules of each type of calorimeter have been built. The layout and the components used are very close to the ones used in the construction of the ATLAS calorimeter. The goal is to simulate in the high intensity proton beam at IHEP /Protvino the particle impact as expected for ATLAS in sLHC. Depending on the position in pseudorapidity |η|, each forward calorimeter has to cope with a different particle and energy flux. Placing absorber elements in-between the various small calorimeter modules, the particle and energy flux as expected in ATLAS later - given the variation due to |η| and longitudinal position - can be simulated very well.

  1. Performance Studies for Protection Against Asynchronous Dumps in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, T; Bracco, C; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M

    2010-01-01

    The LHC beam dump system has to safely dispose all beams in a wide energy range of 450 GeV to 7 TeV. A 3 ms abort gap in the beam structure for the switch-on of the extraction kicker field ideally allows a loss-free extraction under normal operating conditions. However, a low number of asynchronous beam aborts is to be expected from reliability calculations and from the first year's operational experience with the beam dump kickers. For such cases, MAD-X simulations including all optics and alignment errors have been performed to determine loss patterns around the LHC as a function of the position of the main protection elements in interaction region six. Special attention was paid to the beam load on the tungsten collimators which protect the triplets in the LHC experimental insertions, and the tracking results compared with semi-analytical numerical estimates. The simulations are also compared to the results of beam commissioning of these protection devices.

  2. Measurements of jet-related observables at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkas, P.

    2015-11-01

    During the first years of the LHC operation a large amount of jet data was recorded by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. In this review several measurements of jet-related observables are presented, such as multi-jet rates and cross sections, ratios of jet cross sections, jet shapes and event shape observables. All results presented here are based on jet data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Data are compared to various Monte Carlo generators, as well as to theoretical next-to-leading-order calculations allowing a test of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics in a previously unexplored energy region.

  3. Physics at LHC and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The topics addressed during this Conference are as follows. ---An overview of the legacy results of the LHC experiments with 7 and 8 TeV data on Standard Model physics, Scalar sector and searches for New Physics. ---A discussion of the readiness of the CMS, ATLAS, and LHCb experiments for the forthcoming high-energy run and status of the detector upgrades ---A review of the most up-to-date theory outcome on cross-sections and uncertainties, phenomenology of the scalar sector, constraints and portals for new physics. ---The presentation of the improvements and of the expected sensibilities for the Run 2 of the LHC at 13 TeV and beyond. ---A comparison of the relative scientific merits of the future projects for hadron and e+e- colliders (HL-LHC, HE-LHC, ILC, CLIC, TLEP, VHE-LHC) towards precision measurements of the Scalar boson properties and of the Electroweak-Symmetry-Breaking parameters, and towards direct searches for New Physics.

  4. Exclusive photoproduction of quarkonium at the LHC energies within the color dipole approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducati, M. B. Gay; Griep, M. T.; Machado, M. V. T. [High Energy Physics Phenomenology Group, GFPAE IF-UFRGS, Caixa Postal 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-04-10

    The exclusive photoproduction of ψ(2S) meson was investigated and the coherent and the incoherent contributions were evaluated. The light-cone dipole formalism was considered in this analysis and predictions are done for PbPb collisions at the CERN-LHC energy of 2.76 TeV. A comparison is done to the recent ALICE Collaboration data for the ψ(1S) state photoproduction with good agreement.

  5. Full transverse-momentum spectra of low-mass Drell-Yan pairs at LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Fái, G; Zhang, X; Fai, George; Qiu, Jianwei; Zhang, Xiaofei

    2003-01-01

    The transverse momentum distribution of low-mass Drell-Yan pairs is calculated in QCD perturbation theory with all-order resummation. We argue that at LHC energies the results should be reliable for the entire transverse momentum range. We demonstrate that the transverse momentum distribution of low-mass Drell-Yan pairs is an advantageous source of constraints on the gluon distribution and its nuclear dependence.

  6. Physics with heavy ions at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarik, K.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the motivation to study heavy ion collisions at LHC, and the experimental conditions under which detectors will have to operate. A short description of the detectors under construction is given. Physics performance is illustrated in two examples, which will become accessible at LHC energies, jet quenching and heavy-flavor production. (author)

  7. Cryogenics for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavian, L.; Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Wagner, U.; van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This chapter will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  8. LHC related projects and studies - Part (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, L.; De Maria, R.

    2012-01-01

    The session was devoted to address some aspects of the HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) project and explore ideas on new machines for the long term future. The session had two parts. The former focused on some of the key issues of the HL-LHC projects: beam current limits, evolution of the collimation system, research plans for the interaction region magnets and crab cavities. The latter explored the ideas for the long term future projects (LHeC and HE-LHC) and how the current research-development program for magnets and RF structures could fit in the envisaged scenarios

  9. Heavy ion physics at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, R.

    2004-01-01

    The ion-ion center of mass energies at the LHC will exceed that at RHIC by nearly a factor of 30, providing exciting opportunities for addressing unique physics issues in a completely new energy domain. Some highlights of this new physics domain are presented here. We briefly describe how these collisions will provide new insights into the high density, low momentum gluon content of the nucleus expected to dominate the dynamics of the early state of the system. We then discuss how the dense initial state of the nucleus affects the lifetime and temperature of the produced system. Finally, we explain how the high energy domain of the LHC allows abundant production of ''rare'' processes, hard probes calculable in perturbative quantum chromodynamics, QCD. At the LHC, high momentum jets and b(bar b) bound states, the Υ family, will be produced with high statistics for the first time in heavy ion collisions

  10. LHC Data and its Impact on nCTEQ15 PDFs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D. B. [Southern Methodist U.; Godat, E. [Southern Methodist U.; Ježo, T.; Keppel, C. [Jefferson Lab; Kovarík, K. [Munster U., ITP; Kusina, A. [Cracow, INP; Lyonnet, F. [Southern Methodist U.; Morfin, J. G. [Fermilab; Olness, F. I. [Southern Methodist U.; Owens, J. F. [Florida State U.; Schienbein, I. [LPSC, Grenoble; Yu, J. Y. [Southern Methodist U.

    2018-01-10

    The LHC heavy ion data for W/Z production can provide new incisive information on the PDFs. This data is sensitive to the heavier quark flavors (strange and charm) in a high energy kinematic region; this can facilitate the determination of PDFs in the small x region where previous data was limited. At present, the flavor separation of the proton PDFs is dependent on DIS data from nuclear targets. Therefore, improved nuclear corrections can also yield enhanced flavor determination of both the proton and nuclear PDFs.

  11. CERN looks to the long-term future: might a 100km circular collider follow the LHC around mid-century?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Particle physics is a long-term field of research: the LHC was originally conceived in the 1980s, but did not start running until 25 years later. An accelerator unlike any other, it is now just at the start of a programme that is set to run for another 20 years. While the LHC programme is already well defined for the next two decades, it is now time to look even further ahead, and so CERN is initiating an exploratory study for a future long-term project centred on a next-generation circular collider with a circumference of 80 to 100 kilometres. A worthy successor to the LHC, whose collision energies will reach 13 TeV in 2015, such an accelerator would allow particle physicists to push the boundaries of knowledge even further. The Future Circular Collider (FCC) programme will focus on studies for a hadron collider, like the LHC, capable of reaching unprecedented energies in the region of 100 TeV. It will also study electron-positron and electron-proton options. Opening with an introduction to the LHC and its...

  12. The LHC can probe small x PDFs; the treatment of the infrared region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A. D.; De Oliveira, E. G.; Ryskin, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    First, we show how to reduce the sensitivity of the NLO predictions of the Drell-Yan production of low-mass, lepton-pairs, at high rapidity, to the choice of factorization scale. In this way, observations of this process at the LHC can make direct measurements of parton distribution functions in the low x domain; x≲10 −4 . Second, we find an inconsistency in the conventional NLO treatment of the infrared region. We illustrate the problem using the NLO coefficient function of Drell-Yan production.

  13. LHC beam dumping system Extraction channel layout and acceptance

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B; Uythoven, J; Veness, R; Weterings, W

    2003-01-01

    The LHC beam dumping system must safely abort the LHC beams under all conditions, including those resulting from abnormal behaviour of machine elements or subsystems of the beam dumping system itself. The extraction channels must provide sufficient aperture both for the circulating and extracted beams, over the whole energy range and under various beam parameters. These requirements impose tight constraints on the tolerances of various extraction channel components, and also on the allowed range of beam positions in the region of these components. Operation of the beam dumping system under various fault states has been considered, and the resulting apertures calculated. After describing briefly the beam dumping system and the extraction channel geometry, the various assumptions made in the analysis are presented, before deriving tolerance limits for the relevant equipment and beam parameters.

  14. Measurements of very forward particles production spectra at LHC: the LHCf experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, Eugenio; Bonechi, Lorenzo; Bongi, Massimo; Castellini, Guido; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Haguenauer, Maurice; Itow, Yoshitaka; Iwata, Taiki; Kasahara, Katsuaki; Makino, Yuya; Masuda, Kimiaki; Matsubayashi, Eri; Menjo, Hiroaki; Muraki, Yasushi; Papini, Paolo; Ricciarini, Sergio; Sako, Takashi; Suzuki, Takuya; Tamura, Tadahisa; Tiberio, Alessio; Torii, Shoji; Tricomi, Alessia; Turner, W C; Ueno, Mana; Zhou, Qi Dong

    2017-01-01

    Thanks to two small sampling calorimeters installed in the LHC tunnel at ±140 m from IP1, the LHC forward (LHCf) experiment is able to detect neutral particles produced by high energy proton-ion collisions in the very forward region (pseudo-rapidity η > 8.4). The main aim of LHCf is to provide precise measurements of the production spectra relative to these particles, in order to tune hadronic interaction models used by ground-based cosmic rays experiments. In this paper we will present the current status of the LHCf experiment, regarding in particular collected data and analysis results, as well as future prospects

  15. Searching for supersymmetry in the first LHC data with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Koetsveld, Folkert

    In recent years cosmological measurements have shown indications that the particles of the Standard Model (SM) can only account for 4% of the total energy content of the universe. The two other main contributions have been dubbed Dark Energy (74%) and Dark Matter (DM, 22 %). It is fascinating that the theory that is unsurpassed in precision of its predictions by any physical theory turns out to be so limited in scope. Now the remaining 96% of the energy content of the universe can be examined, and a working theory for its makeup can be developed. One theory predicting a particle that could be the main constituent of DM is Supersym- metry (SUSY). Although no evidence of this theory has been found so far, there is still a large region of the vast SUSY phase space that is unexplored. The ATLAS detector, one of four experiments on CERN's LHC, is well equipped to do just that. With the data delivered by the LHC during 2010, when two beams of protons were collided at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV, ATLAS can expl...

  16. LHC magnet quench protection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coull, L.; Hagedorn, D.; Remondino, V.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.

    1994-07-01

    The quench protection system for the superconducting magnets of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The system is based on the so called 'cold diode' concept. In a group of series connected magnets if one magnet quenches then the magnetic energy of all the magnets will be dissipated in the quenched magnet so destroying it. This is avoided by by-passing the quenched magnet and then rapidly de-exciting the unquenched magnets. For the LHC machine it is foreseen to use silicon diodes situated inside the cryostat as by-pass elements - so called 'cold diodes'. The diodes are exposed to some 50 kGray of radiation during a 10 year operation life-time. The high energy density of the LHC magnets (500 kJ/m) coupled with the relatively slow propagation speed of a 'natural' quench (10 to 20 m/s) can lead to excessive heating of the zone where the quench started and to high internal voltages. It is therefore necessary to detect quickly the incipient quench and fire strip heaters which spread the quench out more quickly over a large volume of the magnet. After a quench the magnet chain must be de-excited rapidly to avoid spreading the quench to other magnets and over-heating the by-pass diode. This is done by switching high-power energy-dump resistors in series with the magnets. The LHC main ring magnet will be divided into 16 electrically separated units which has important advantages.

  17. LHC magnet quench protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coull, L.; Hagedorn, D.; Remondino, V.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.

    1994-01-01

    The quench protection system for the superconducting magnets of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The system is based on the so called ''cold diode'' concept. In a group of series connected magnets if one magnet quenches then the magnetic energy of all the magnets will be dissipated in the quenched magnet so destroying it. This is avoided by by-passing the quenched magnet and then rapidly de-exciting the unquenched magnets. For the LHC machine it is foreseen to use silicon diodes situated inside the cryostat as by-pass elements--so called ''cold diodes''. The diodes are exposed to some 50 kGray of radiation during a 10 year operation life-time. The high energy density of the LHC magnets (500 kJ/m) coupled with the relatively slow propagation speed of a ''natural'' quench (10 to 20 m/s) can lead to excessive heating of the zone where the quench started and to high internal voltages. It is therefore necessary to detect quickly the incipient quench and fire strip heaters which spread the quench out more quickly over a large volume of the magnet. After a quench the magnet chain must be de-excited rapidly to avoid spreading the quench to other magnets and over-heating the by-pass diode. This is done by switching high-power energy-dump resistors in series with the magnets. The LHC main ring magnet will be divided into 16 electrically separated units which has important advantages

  18. Dynamic Aperture Studies for the LHC High Luminosity Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    De Maria, R; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Mcintosh, Eric; Cai, Y; Nosochkov, Y; Wang, M H

    2015-01-01

    Since quite some time, dynamic aperture studies have been undertaken with the aim of specifying the required field quality of the new magnets that will be installed in the LHC ring in the framework of the high-luminosity upgrade. In this paper the latest results concerning the specification work will be presented, taking into account both injection and collision energies and the field quality contribution from all the magnets in the newly designed interaction regions.

  19. HERA and the LHC: A Workshop on the implications of HERA for LHC physics: Proceedings Part A

    CERN Document Server

    De Roeck, A.; Startup Meeting; Working Group Meeting; Mid-term Review Meeting; Working Group Meeting; Working Group Meeting; Final Meeting

    2005-01-01

    The HERA electron--proton collider has collected 100 pb$^{-1}$ of data since its start-up in 1992, and recently moved into a high-luminosity operation mode, with upgraded detectors, aiming to increase the total integrated luminosity per experiment to more than 500 pb$^{-1}$. HERA has been a machine of excellence for the study of QCD and the structure of the proton. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will collide protons with a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV, will be completed at CERN in 2007. The main mission of the LHC is to discover and study the mechanisms of electroweak symmetry breaking, possibly via the discovery of the Higgs particle, and search for new physics in the TeV energy scale, such as supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Besides these goals, the LHC will also make a substantial number of precision measurements and will offer a new regime to study the strong force via perturbative QCD processes and diffraction. For the full LHC physics programme a good understanding of QCD phenomena and the ...

  20. Detector technologies for LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Hansl-Kozanecka, Traudl

    1999-01-01

    Abstract The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will provide proton-proton collisions ata centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV with a design luminosity of 10^34cm^-2s^-1. The exploitation of the rich physics potential is illustrated using the expected performance of the two general-purpose detectors ATLAS and CMS.The lecture introduces the physics motivation for experiments at the LHC energy.The design parameters and expected performance of the LHC machine are then discussed, followed by the design objectives for the detectors. The technical solutions are presented for each detector system (calorimetry, muon system, inner tracker, trigger). For each system the requirements, the technology choices and the achieved and expected performance are discussed. Lectures given at Herbstschule fu:r Hochenergiephysik, Maria Laach, 1999Copies of the transparencies are available in reduced format (black-and-white) from the secretariats of ATLAS and CMS (1999-093 Talk). A full-size colour version is available for consultation.e...

  1. Regional research exploitation of the LHC a case-study of the required computing resources

    CERN Document Server

    Almehed, S; Eerola, Paule Anna Mari; Mjörnmark, U; Smirnova, O G; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Åkesson, T

    2002-01-01

    A simulation study to evaluate the required computing resources for a research exploitation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been performed. The evaluation was done as a case study, assuming existence of a Nordic regional centre and using the requirements for performing a specific physics analysis as a yard-stick. Other imput parameters were: assumption for the distribution of researchers at the institutions involved, an analysis model, and two different functional structures of the computing resources.

  2. Prospects for early discoveries at the LHC with dileptons, jets and no missing energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciaccio, A. di; Thompson, E.

    2009-01-01

    Final states with high p T leptons and jets, without missing energy, are predicted by several BSM models at the LHC, including LR symmetric models and Leptoquarks. The prospects for an early discovery of particles predicted by these models, using the ATLAS experiment, are discussed. These particles include in particular first and second generation leptoquarks, right-handed W and heavy neutrinos. (author)

  3. Hybrid beams in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The first proton-ion beams were successfully circulated in the LHC a couple of weeks ago. Everything went so smoothly that the LHC teams had planned the first p-Pb collisions for Wednesday, 16 November. Unfortunately, a last-minute problem with a component of the PS required for proton acceleration prevented the LHC teams from making these new collisions. However, the way is open for a possible physics run with proton-lead collisions in 2012.   Members of the LHC team photographed when the first hybrid beams got to full energy. The proton and lead beams are visible on the leftmost screen up on the wall (click to enlarge the photo). The technical challenge of making different beams circulate in the LHC is by no means trivial. Even if the machine is the same, there are a number of differences when it is operated with beams of protons, beams of lead or beams of proton and lead. Provided that the beams are equal, irrespective of whether they consist of protons or lead nuclei, they revolve at the...

  4. Technological challenges for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Rossi, Lucio; Lebrun, Philippe; Bordry, Frederick; Mess, Karl Hubert; Schmidt, Rüdiger

    2003-01-01

    For the LHC to provide particle physics with proton-proton collisions at the centre of mass energy of 14 TeV with a luminosity of 1034 cm-2s-1, the machine will operate with high-field dipole magnets using NbTi superconductors cooled to below the lambda point of helium. In order to reach design performance, the LHC requires both, the use of existing technologies pushed to the limits as well as the application of novel technologies. The construction follows a decade of intensive R&D and technical validation of major collider sub-systems. The first lecture will focus on the required LHC performance, and on the implications on the technologies. In the following lectures several examples for LHC technologies will be discussed: the superconducting magnets to deflect and focus the beams, the cryogenics to cool the magnets to a temperature below the lambda point of helium along most of the LHC circumference, the powering system supplying about 7000 magnets connected in 1700 electrical circuits with a total curr...

  5. Measurement of the very-forward photon production in 13 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Makino, Yuya

    A key to resolving the mystery of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays is the measurement of the mass composition by air shower experiments. However, the interpretation of the observed data strongly relies on the choice of the hadronic interaction models used in the air shower simulations to compare with the data. The uncertainty arising from the interaction models has been one of the largest systematic uncertainties in the mass composition measurements. The Large Hadron Collider forward experiment (LHCf) measures the very forward rapidity region of hadron collisions at the LHC. Since the bulk of the energy flow concentrates on the forward rapidity region, LHCf has the capability to verify the interaction models in the phase space relevant to the air shower development. In particular, at $\\sqrt{s}=$13~TeV, the peak of the energy flow moves forward in the pseudorapidity range covered by LHCf in contrast to previous runs at the LHC owing to Lorentz boost. The detectors, conversely, have to face the serious radiation p...

  6. Lecture | CERN prepares its long-term future: a 100-km circular collider to follow the LHC? | CERN Globe | 11 March

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Particle physics is a long-term field of research: the LHC was originally conceived in the 1980s, but did not start running until 25 years later. An accelerator unlike any other, it is now just at the start of a programme that is set to run for another 20 years.   Frédérick Bordry. While the LHC programme is already well defined for the next two decades, it is now time to look even further ahead, and so CERN is initiating an exploratory study for a future long-term project centred on a next-generation circular collider with a circumference of 80 to 100 kilometres. A worthy successor to the LHC, whose collision energies will reach 13 TeV in 2015, such an accelerator would allow particle physicists to push the boundaries of knowledge even further. The Future Circular Collider (FCC) programme will focus especially on studies for a hadron collider, like the LHC, capable of reaching unprecedented energies in the region of 100 TeV. Opening with an introduction to the LHC and...

  7. Transverse emittance measurement and preservation at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Maria

    2016-06-20

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a high energy storage ring that provides proton and heavy ion collisions to study fundamental particle physics. The luminosity production is closely linked to emittance preservation in the accelerator. The transverse emittance is the phase space density of the beam and should be conserved when the particle beam is transformed through the accelerator. Perturbing effects, however, can lead to emittance increase and hence luminosity degradation. Measuring the emittance growth is a complex task with high intensity beams and changing energies. The machine optics and the transverse beam size have to be measured as accurately as possible. Beta function measurements with k-modulation are discussed. With this method the quadrupole focussing strength is varied and the resulting tune change is traced to determine the beta function at the quadrupole. A new k-modulation measurement tool was developed for the LHC. The fully automatic and online measurement system takes constraints of various systems such as tune measurement precision and powering limitations of the LHC superconducting circuits into account. With sinusoidal k-modulation record low beta function measurement uncertainties in the LHC have been reached. 2015 LHC beta function and β*, which is the beta function at the collision point, measurements with k-modulation will be presented. Wire scanners and synchrotron light monitors are presently used in the LHC to measure the transverse beam size. Accuracy and limitations of the LHC transverse profile monitors are discussed. During the 2012 LHC proton run it was found that wire scanner photomultiplier saturation added significant uncertainty on all measurements. A large discrepancy between emittances from wire scanners and luminosity was discovered but not solved. During Long Shutdown 1 the wire scanner system was upgraded with new photomultipliers. A thorough study of LHC wire scanner measurement precision in 2015 is presented

  8. The LHC can probe small x PDFs; the treatment of the infrared region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A. D.; De Oliveira, E. G.; Ryskin, M. G. [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    First, we show how to reduce the sensitivity of the NLO predictions of the Drell-Yan production of low-mass, lepton-pairs, at high rapidity, to the choice of factorization scale. In this way, observations of this process at the LHC can make direct measurements of parton distribution functions in the low x domain; x Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10{sup -4}. Second, we find an inconsistency in the conventional NLO treatment of the infrared region. We illustrate the problem using the NLO coefficient function of Drell-Yan production.

  9. On the precise determination of the Tsallis parameters in proton–proton collisions at LHC energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, T.; Cleymans, J.; Marques, L.; Mogliacci, S.; Paradza, M. W.

    2018-05-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of the precise values of the Tsallis parameters obtained in p–p collisions for identified particles, pions, kaons and protons at the LHC at three beam energies \\sqrt{s}=0.9,2.76 and 7 TeV. Interpolated data at \\sqrt{s}=5.02 TeV have also been included. It is shown that the Tsallis formula provides reasonably good fits to the p T distributions in p–p collisions at the LHC using three parameters dN/dy, T and q. However, the parameters T and q depend on the particle species and are different for pions, kaons and protons. As a consequence there is no m T scaling and also no universality of the parameters for different particle species.

  10. Radiation protection issues after 20 years of LHC operation

    CERN Document Server

    Forkel-Wirth, D.; Roesler, S.; Theis, C.; Ulrici, L.; Vincke, H.; Vincke, Hz.

    2011-01-01

    Since November 2009, the LHC commissioning progresses very well, both with proton and lead beams. It will continue in 2011 and nominal LHC operation is expected to be attained in 2013. In parallel, plans for various LHC upgrades are under discussion, suggesting a High-Luminosity (HL) upgrade first and a High-Energy (HE) upgrade in a later state. Whereas the upgrade in luminosity would require the modification of only some few key accelerator components like the inner triplets, the upgrade in beam energy from 7 TeV to 16.5 TeV would require the exchange of all dipoles and of numerous other accelerator components. The paper gives an overview of the radiation protection issues related to the dismantling of LHC components prior to the installation of the HE-LHC components, i.e. after about 20 years of LHC operation. Two main topics will be discussed: (i) the exposure of workers to ionizing radiation during the dismantling of dipoles, inner triplets or collimators and experiments and (ii) the production, condition...

  11. Accounting for soft cross sections at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotsman, Errol

    2013-01-01

    We describe briefly the elements of the GLM model that successfully describes soft hadronic interactions at energies from ISR to LHC. This model is based on a single Pomeron with a large intercept Δ IP = 0.23 and slope α′ IP = 0, and so provides a natural matching with perturbative QCD. We summarize themain features and results of competing models for soft interactions at LHC energies.

  12. Investigations on a Q0 Doublet Optics for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Laface, E; Scandale, Walter; Wildner, E

    2008-01-01

    The Q0 scheme of the LHC insertion region is based on the introduction of a doublet of quadrupoles at 13 m from the IP. We present here the doublet optics and the magnets layout such as gradients, lengths, positions and apertures. In this scheme we show the gain in luminosity and chromaticity, with respect to a nominal layout with $\\beta^{*}$ = 0.25 m (i.e. LHC phase 1 upgrade) and $\\beta^{*} = 0.15 m, due to a smaller beta-max. We show the alignment tolerance and the energy deposition issues, in Q0A-Q0B. We also consider shielding the magnets with liners. The capability of Q0 optics to limit the b function could be exploited after the LHC Phase 1 upgrade in order to reduce the $\\beta^{*}$ below 0.25 m, leaving the upgraded triplet unchanged

  13. Protection against Accidental Beam Losses at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Protection of the LHC against uncontrolled beam losses is of prime importance due to the very high stored beam energy. For nominal beam intensities, each of the two 7 TeV/c proton beams has a stored energy of 360 MJ threatening to damage accelerator equipment. At injection a number of passive beam absorbers must be correctly positioned and specific procedures have been proposed to ensure safe injection of high intensity. The LHC beam dump block being the only LHC element that can safety absorb the full LHC beam, it is essential that the beams are extracted unto the dump block in case of emergency. The failure time constants extend from 100 microseconds to few seconds depending on the equipment. Failures must be detected at a sufficiently early stage and transmitted to the beam interlock system that triggers the beam dumping system. To ensure safe operation the machine protection system uses a variety of systems to detect such failures. The strategy for protection of the LHC will be illustrated, with emphasis ...

  14. First Results of the LHC Collision Rate Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Burger, S; Bart Pedersen, S; Boccardi, A; Dutriat, C; Miyamoto, R; Doolittle, L; Matis, H S; Placidi, M; Ratti, A; Stezelberger, T; Yaver, H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of CERN large hadron collider (LHC) is to collide protons and heavy ions with centre of mass energies up to 14 zTeV. In order to monitor and optimize the collision rates special detectors have been developed and installed around the four luminous interaction regions. Due to the different conditions at the high luminosity experiments (ATLAS and CMS) and the low luminosity experiments (ALICE and LHC-b) two very different types of monitors are used: a fast ionisation chamber (BRAN-A) and a Cd-Te solid state detector (BRAN-B respectively. Moreover, in order to cope with the low collision rates foreseen for the initial run, a third type of monitor, based on a simple scintillating pad, was installed in parallel with the BRAN-A (BRAN-P). This contribution illustrates the results obtained during the 2010 run with an outlook for 2011 and beyond.

  15. Photoproduction of lepton pairs in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, B. D.; Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study coherent interactions as a probe of the nonlinear effects in the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we study the multiphoton effects in the production of leptons pairs for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions for heavy nuclei. In the proton-nucleus we assume the ultrarelativistic proton as a source of photons and estimate the photoproduction of lepton pairs on nuclei at RHIC and LHC energies considering the multiphoton effects associated to multiple rescattering of the projectile photon on the proton of the nucleus. In nucleus - nucleus colllisions we consider the two nuclei as a source of photons. As each scattering contributes with a factor {alpha}Z to the cross section, this contribution must be taken into account for heavy nuclei. We consider the Coulomb corrections to calculate themultiple scatterings and estimate the total cross section for muon and tau pair production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  16. Coherent J/ψ production-A novel feature at LHC?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsene, I.C.; Bravina, L.; Kaidalov, A.B.; Tywoniuk, K.; Zabrodin, E.

    2008-01-01

    Energy dependence of heavy quarkonia production in hadron-nucleus collisions is studied in the framework of the Glauber-Gribov theory. We emphasize a change in the space-time picture of heavy-quark state production on nuclei with energy. Longitudinally ordered scattering of a heavy-quark system takes place at low energies, while with increasing energy it transforms to a coherent scattering of projectile partons on the nuclear target. The characteristic energy scale for this transition depends on masses and rapidities of produced particles. For J/ψ, produced in the central rapidity region, the transition happens at RHIC energies. The parameter-free calculation of J/ψ in dAu collisions is in good agreement with recent RHIC data. We use distributions of gluons in nuclei to predict suppression of heavy quarkonia at LHC

  17. Estimates of power generated from synchrotron radiation in the HL-LHC experimental insertion regions

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Adriana; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The power generated in single magnets of the HL-LHC experimental regions is estimated for collision optics HLLHCV1.2 β*=15 cm Round and HLLHCV1.2 Flat. Note that the layout used for the computations presented here is that before the recent change of baseline. These values should serve as input to Monte-Carlo codes (i.e., PHOTON [ ], Synrad [ ] or others), able to calculate the heat load distribution along the machine and in particular the Long Straight Sections (LSS).

  18. The LHC Project Status and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Faugeras, Paul E

    2001-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN's future major facility for high-energy physics, has entered into the construction and preparation for installation phases. After recalling briefly the main machine design choices and challenges, one will review the progress of civil works for the machine and experimental areas and the status of the main LHC components, which are presently series-built and for some of them procured in kind through world-wide collaborations. Report will also be given on the full-scale prototype of an elementary LHC lattice cell, called String 2, which is being commissioned and used for optimising the installation and testing procedures of the LHC. The size and duration of the LHC Project, its intrinsic complexity and the large number of world-wide collaborations involved require rather elaborate project management tools, which will be shortly described. Finally, following the extended running of the LEP and the delay for emptying of the machine tunnel, a new planning for project completion...

  19. Accounting for soft cross sections at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotsman, Errol [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2013-04-15

    We describe briefly the elements of the GLM model that successfully describes soft hadronic interactions at energies from ISR to LHC. This model is based on a single Pomeron with a large intercept {Delta}{sub IP}= 0.23 and slope {alpha} Prime {sub IP}= 0, and so provides a natural matching with perturbative QCD. We summarize themain features and results of competing models for soft interactions at LHC energies.

  20. New U.S. LHC Web site launched

    CERN Multimedia

    Katie Yurkewicz

    2007-01-01

    On September 12, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science launched a new Web site, www.uslhc.us, to tell the story of the U.S. role in the LHC. The site provides general information for the public about the LHC and its six experiments, as well as detailed information about the participation of physicists, engineers and students from the United States. The U.S. site joins the UK's LHC site in providing information for a national audience, with sites from several more countries expected to launch within the next year. The US LHC site features news and information about the LHC, along with high-resolution images and resources for students and educators. The site also features blogs by four particle physicists, including ATLAS collaborators Monica Dunford from the University of Chicago and Peter Steinberg from Brookhaven National Laboratory. More than 1,300 scientists from over 90 U.S. institutions participate in the LHC and its experiments, representing universities and national laboratories from...

  1. LHC Report: Full data production mode

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The LHC is accumulating as much data as possible for the experiments before the summer conferences. Performance is impressive, with 1380 bunches of around 1.5x1011 protons per bunch giving a peak luminosity of 6.8 x1033 cm-2s-1 and with integrated rates topping 20 pb-1 an hour at the start of fill.  As of today (13 June), the LHC has delivered more collisions in 2012 than it did in the whole of 2011. Not only that, the collisions have been at the higher energy of 4 TeV. In 2011, the LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of around 5.6 fb-1 to both ATLAS and CMS. Now, just a few months after the machine began its 2012 run, these integrated luminosity levels have been past. Follow the LHC performance and statistics on the dedicated page. The step-up in particle collision rates compared with 2011 is due to further reduction in the beam sizes at the interaction point, in conjunction with the use of tight collimator settings, the increase in energy to 4 TeV and the continued excellent beam quality from...

  2. Longitudinal Beam measurements at the LHC: The LHC Beam Quality Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Papotti, G; Follin, F; Wehrle, U

    2011-01-01

    The LHC Beam Quality Monitor is a system that measures individual bunch lengths and positions, similarly to the twin system SPS Beam Quality Monitor, from which it was derived. The pattern verification that the system provides is vital during the injection process to verify the correctness of the injected pattern, while the bunch length measurement is fed back to control the longitudinal emittance blow up performed during the energy ramp and provides a general indication of the health of the RF system. The algorithms used, the hardware implementation and the system integration in the LHC control infrastructure are presented in this paper, along with possible improvements.

  3. Proceedings of Chamonix 2012 workshop on LHC Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carli, C.

    2012-01-01

    During this workshop on LHC performance, operation of the machine in 2012, activities during the first long shutdown LS1 aiming at preparing for operation at 7 TeV per beam and substantial long term upgrades of both the injector chain and the LHC have been discussed. After a session dedicated to observations and lessons from the run 2011, strategies for the run 2012 have been discussed in order to optimize the machine performance and, in particular, the maximum and integrated luminosity provided to the main experiments. Two session were dedicated to the preparation of the first long shutdown (LS1) followed by a session aiming at optimizing the performance to be expected after this first shutdown. The last two session of the workshop were dedicated to substantial upgrades of the injector complex and the LHC aiming at increasing the integrated luminosity to 250 inverse femto-barn per year after implementation in a second long shutdown. Improvements of the injector complex comprise increased injection energies in the PS Booster and the PS, an upgrade of the SPS vacuum chamber to alleviate limitations due to electron cloud build up and many more upgrades required for the generation of beams with higher brightness and smaller emittances than possible with the present machines. Plans for the LHC comprise an upgrade of the interaction regions to allow for a smaller beta*, crab cavities for luminosity levelling and, upgrades of the collimation and other systems

  4. Plan of SPS to LHC transfer tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    This diagram shows the LHC and the SPS pre-accelerator (in blue) and the transfer lines that will connect them (in red). Spanning the France-Swiss border (shown by green crosses), the 27-km LHC tunnel will receive a beam that has been pre-accelerated to 450 GeV in the smaller SPS storage ring. The transfer lines will remove each beam from the SPS and inject them into the LHC where they will be accelerated to the full energy of 7 TeV.

  5. Volunteer Clouds and Citizen Cyberscience for LHC Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguado Sanchez, Carlos; Blomer, Jakob; Buncic, Predrag; Ellis, John; Harutyunyan, Artem; Marquina, Miguel; Mato, Pere; Schulz, Holger; Segal, Ben; Sharma, Archana; Skands, Peter; Chen Gang; Wu Jie; Wu Wenjing; Garcia Quintas, David; Grey, Francois; Lombrana Gonzalez, Daniel; Rantala, Jarno; Weir, David; Yadav, Rohit

    2011-01-01

    Computing for the LHC, and for HEP more generally, is traditionally viewed as requiring specialized infrastructure and software environments, and therefore not compatible with the recent trend in v olunteer computing , where volunteers supply free processing time on ordinary PCs and laptops via standard Internet connections. In this paper, we demonstrate that with the use of virtual machine technology, at least some standard LHC computing tasks can be tackled with volunteer computing resources. Specifically, by presenting volunteer computing resources to HEP scientists as a v olunteer cloud , essentially identical to a Grid or dedicated cluster from a job submission perspective, LHC simulations can be processed effectively. This article outlines both the technical steps required for such a solution and the implications for LHC computing as well as for LHC public outreach and for participation by scientists from developing regions in LHC research.

  6. UFOs in the LHC after LS1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, T.; Barnes, M.J.; Carlier, E.; Cerutti, F.; Dehning, B.; Ducimetiere, L.; Ferrari, A.; Garrel, N.; Gerardin, A.; Goddard, B.; Holzer, E.B.; Jackson, S.; Jimenez, J.M.; Kain, V.; Lechner, A.; Mertens, V.; Misiowiec, M.; Moron Ballester, R.; Nebot del Busto, E.; Norderhaug Drosdal, L.; Nordt, A.; Uythoven, J.; Velghe, B.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wenninger, J.; Zamantzas, C.; Zimmermann, F.; Fuster Martinez, N.

    2012-01-01

    UFOs (Unidentified Falling Objects) are potentially a major luminosity limitation for nominal LHC operation. With large-scale increases of the BLM thresholds, their impact on LHC availability was mitigated in the second half of 2011. For higher beam energy and lower magnet quench limits, the problem is expected to be considerably worse, though. Therefore, in 2011, the diagnostics for UFO events were significantly improved, dedicated experiments and measurements in the LHC and in the laboratory were made and complemented by FLUKA simulations and theoretical studies. In this paper, the state of knowledge is summarized and extrapolations for LHC operation after LS1 are presented. Mitigation strategies are proposed and related tests and measures for 2012 are specified. (authors)

  7. UFOs in the LHC after LS1

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, T; Carlier, E; Cerutti, F; Dehning, B; Ducimetière, L; Ferrari, A; Garrel, N; Gérardin, A; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Jackson, S; Jimenez, J M; Kain, V; Lechner, A; Mertens, V; Misiowiec, M; Morón Ballester, R; Nebot del Busto, E; Norderhaug Drosdal, L; Nordt, A; Uythoven, J; Velghe, B; Vlachoudis, V; Wenninger, J; Zamantzas, C; Zimmermann, F; Fuster Martinez, N

    2012-01-01

    UFOs (Unidentified Falling Objects) are potentially a major luminosity limitation for nominal LHC operation. With large-scale increases of the BLM thresholds, their impact on LHC availability was mitigated in the second half of 2011. For higher beam energy and lower magnet quench limits, the problem is expected to be considerably worse, though. Therefore, in 2011, the diagnostics for UFO events were significantly improved, dedicated experiments and measurements in the LHC and in the laboratory were made and complemented by FLUKA simulations and theoretical studies. In this paper, the state of knowledge is summarized and extrapolations for LHC operation after LS1 are presented. Mitigation strategies are proposed and related tests and measures for 2012 are specified.

  8. Electron efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using 2012 LHC proton–proton collision data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Hladík, Ondřej; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Němeček, Stanislav; Penc, Ondřej; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Vrba, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 3 (2017), s. 1-45, č. článku 195. ISSN 1434-6044 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : CERN LHC Col * ATLAS * central region * experimental results Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 5.331, year: 2016

  9. Fast crab cavity failures in HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Yee-Rendon, B; Calaga, R; Tomas, R; Zimmermann, F; Barranco, J

    2014-01-01

    Crab cavities (CCs) are a key ingredient of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) to ensure head on collisions at the main experiments (ATLAS and CMS) and fully profit from the smaller provided by the ATS optics [1]. At KEKB, CCs have exhibited abrupt changes of phase and voltage during a time period of few LHC turns and considering the large energy stored in the HL-LHC beam, CC failures represent a serious risk to the LHC machine protection. In this paper, we discuss the effect of CC voltage or phase changes on a time interval similar to, or longer than, the one needed to dump the beam. The simulations assume a realistic steady-state distribution to assess the beam losses for the HL-LHC. Additionally, some strategies are studied in order to reduce the damage caused by the CC failures.

  10. Concerning effects of fringe fields and longitudinal distribution of b10 in LHC low-β regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meot, F.; Paris, A.

    1997-08-01

    Effects of fringe fields in separation dipoles D1/D2 and low-β quadrupoles Q1-Q3 of LHC interaction regions in collision optics are investigated by means of stepwise ray-tracing in terms of aberrations, beam envelopes and other detunings. Effects of the longitudinal distribution of b 10 error coefficient are next investigated in a similar way for assessment and comparison

  11. Keeping the LHC in power

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    The critical safety equipment around the LHC, including the machine protection systems, is connected to Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS).  In case of mains failure, the UPS systems continue to power, for a limited time, these critical systems and ensure a safe shutdown of the accelerator. This week, work began to upgrade and replace over 100 UPS systems in the LHC.   The new UPS installations. For the LHC, even a perturbation on the mains is more than just an inconvenience: it often results in beam dumps and, in some cases, requires an energy extraction from superconducting circuits. When this occurs, machine protection systems, and in particular the Quench Protection System, must remain active to correctly carry out the shutdown procedure. With the UPS systems, 10 minutes of crucial power can be provided to the protection systems during this critical phase. There are currently two UPS systems in place in each one of the 32 LHC UPS zones. Originally one was used as a backup if ...

  12. Heavy feet for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The first 800 jacks (adjustable supports) for one sector of the LHC have arrived from India in recent weeks. After the final acceptance of the preseries jacks at the end of October, they can now be used to support the LHC cryo-magnets. How do you move the weight of eight adult Indian elephants by the breadth of a human hair? If you are a surveyor at CERN who has to adjust the 32 ton LHC dipoles with a resolution of 1/20 of a millimetre, you use the 80 kg jacks which were designed and are being procured by the Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT) in India. The jacks are undergoing final pre-shipment inspection by CAT engineers in India. More than 800 jacks have arrived in recent weeks from India, enough to equip the first sector of the LHC (one octant of the ring). For all the cryo-magnets (dipoles and quadrupoles) of the LHC 7000 jacks are needed in total. They are now being continuously delivered to CERN up to mid-2005. The close collaboration between the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) in India and CE...

  13. Energy Efficiency of large Cryogenic Systems: the LHC Case and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Claudet, S; Ferlin, G; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2013-01-01

    Research infrastructures for high-energy and nuclear physics, nuclear fusion and production of high magnetic fields are increasingly based on applied superconductivity and associated cryogenics in their quest for scientific breakthroughs at affordable capital and operation costs, a condition for their acceptance and sustained funding by society. The thermodynamic penalty for operating at low temperature makes energy efficiency a key requirement for their large cryogenic systems, from conceptual design to procurement, construction and operation. Meeting this requirement takes a combined approach on several fronts in parallel: management of heat loads and sizing of cooling duties, distribution of cooling power matching the needs of the superconducting devices, efficient production of refrigeration, optimal control resting on precise instrumentation and diagnostics, as well as a targeted industrial procurement policy. The case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is presented. Potential improvements for fu...

  14. ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Performance in LHC Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenstern, Stefanie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Liquid-argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are employed by ATLAS for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region $\\eta<3.2$, and for hadronic and forward calorimetry in the region from $\\eta=1.5$ to $\\eta=4.9$. In the first LHC run a total luminosity of $27\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ has been collected at centre-of-mass energies of $7-8\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$. After detector consolidation during a long shutdown, Run-2 started in 2015 and $86.4\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of data at a centre-of-mass energy of $13\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$ have been recorded. In order to realize the level-1 acceptance rate of $100\\,\\mathrm{kHz}$ in Run-2 data taking, the number of readout samples recorded and used for the energy and the time measurement has been modified from five to four while keeping the expected performance. The well calibrated and highly granular LAr calorimeter reached its design values both in energy measurement as well as in direction resolution. This contribution will give an overview of the detector operation, hardware...

  15. STATISTICAL CHALLENGES FOR SEARCHES FOR NEW PHYSICS AT THE LHC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CRANMER, K.

    2005-09-12

    Because the emphasis of the LHC is on 5{sigma} discoveries and the LHC environment induces high systematic errors, many of the common statistical procedures used in High Energy Physics are not adequate. I review the basic ingredients of LHC searches, the sources of systematics, and the performance of several methods. Finally, I indicate the methods that seem most promising for the LHC and areas that are in need of further study.

  16. High energy beam impact tests on a LHC tertiary collimator at the CERN high-radiation to materials facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely operate highly energetic particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. The requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, investigating the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting tertiary collimators (TCTs in the experimental regions is a fundamental issue for machine protection. An experimental test was designed to investigate the robustness and effects of beam accidents on a fully assembled collimator, based on accident scenarios in the LHC. This experiment, carried out at the CERN High-Radiation to Materials (HiRadMat facility, involved 440 GeV proton beam impacts of different intensities on the jaws of a horizontal TCT. This paper presents the experimental setup and the preliminary results obtained, together with some first outcomes from visual inspection and a comparison of such results with numerical simulations.

  17. High energy beam impact tests on a LHC tertiary collimator at the CERN high-radiation to materials facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchi, Marija; Aberle, O.; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Cornelis, K.; Dallocchio, A.; Deboy, D.; Lari, L.; Redaelli, S.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2014-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely operate highly energetic particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, investigating the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting tertiary collimators (TCTs) in the experimental regions is a fundamental issue for machine protection. An experimental test was designed to investigate the robustness and effects of beam accidents on a fully assembled collimator, based on accident scenarios in the LHC. This experiment, carried out at the CERN High-Radiation to Materials (HiRadMat) facility, involved 440 GeV proton beam impacts of different intensities on the jaws of a horizontal TCT. This paper presents the experimental setup and the preliminary results obtained, together with some first outcomes from visual inspection and a comparison of such results with numerical simulations.

  18. The development of diamond tracking detectors for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Boer, W. de; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Doroshenko, J.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fischer, P.; Fizzotti, F.; Furetta, C.; Gan, K.K.; Ghodbane, N.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Keil, M.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Menichelli, D.; Meuser, S.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Perera, L.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Polesello, P.; Potenza, R.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rudge, A.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Tuve, C.; Vincenzo, B.; Weilhammer, P.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition diamond has been discussed extensively as an alternate sensor material for use very close to the interaction region of the LHC where extreme radiation conditions exist. During the last few years diamond devices have been manufactured and tested with LHC electronics with the goal of creating a detector usable by all LHC experiment. Extensive progress on diamond quality, on the development of diamond trackers and on radiation hardness studies has been made. Transforming the technology to the LHC specific requirements is now underway. In this paper we present the recent progress achieved

  19. The development of diamond tracking detectors for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Bergonzo, P; de Boer, Wim; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, M; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Doroshenko, J; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fischer, P; Fizzotti, F; Furetta, C; Gan, K K; Ghodbane, N; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Keil, M; Knöpfle, K T; Koeth, T W; Krammer, M; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Menichelli, D; Meuser, S; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Noomen, J; Oh, A; Perera, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, M; Polesello, P; Potenza, R; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rudge, A; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Sutera, C; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Tuvé, C; Vincenzo, B; Weilhammer, P; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; Zeuner, W; Zöller, M

    2003-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition diamond has been discussed extensively as an alternate sensor material for use very close to the interaction region of the LHC where extreme radiation conditions exist. During the last few years diamond devices have been manufactured and tested with LHC electronics with the goal of creating a detector usable by all LHC experiment. Extensive progress on diamond quality, on the development of diamond trackers and on radiation hardness studies has been made. Transforming the technology to the LHC specific requirements is now underway. In this paper we present the recent progress achieved.

  20. The development of diamond tracking detectors for the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Boer, W. de; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D' Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Doroshenko, J.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fischer, P.; Fizzotti, F.; Furetta, C.; Gan, K.K.; Ghodbane, N.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H. E-mail: harris.kagan@cern.ch; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Keil, M.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Menichelli, D.; Meuser, S.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Perera, L.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Polesello, P.; Potenza, R.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rudge, A.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Tuve, C.; Vincenzo, B.; Weilhammer, P.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M

    2003-11-21

    Chemical vapor deposition diamond has been discussed extensively as an alternate sensor material for use very close to the interaction region of the LHC where extreme radiation conditions exist. During the last few years diamond devices have been manufactured and tested with LHC electronics with the goal of creating a detector usable by all LHC experiment. Extensive progress on diamond quality, on the development of diamond trackers and on radiation hardness studies has been made. Transforming the technology to the LHC specific requirements is now underway. In this paper we present the recent progress achieved.

  1. The development of diamond tracking detectors for the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; de Boer, W.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Doroshenko, J.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fischer, P.; Fizzotti, F.; Furetta, C.; Gan, K. K.; Ghodbane, N.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Keil, M.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R. D.; Meier, D.; Menichelli, D.; Meuser, S.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Perera, L.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Polesello, P.; Potenza, R.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Rudge, A.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Tuve, C.; Vincenzo, B.; Weilhammer, P.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.; RD42 Collaboration

    2003-11-01

    Chemical vapor deposition diamond has been discussed extensively as an alternate sensor material for use very close to the interaction region of the LHC where extreme radiation conditions exist. During the last few years diamond devices have been manufactured and tested with LHC electronics with the goal of creating a detector usable by all LHC experiment. Extensive progress on diamond quality, on the development of diamond trackers and on radiation hardness studies has been made. Transforming the technology to the LHC specific requirements is now underway. In this paper we present the recent progress achieved.

  2. Scintillating Fibre Calorimetry at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. The lead/scintillating fibre calorimeter technique provides a fast signal response well matched to the LHC rate requirements. It can be made to give equal response for electrons and hadrons (compensation) with good electromagnetic and hadronic energy resolutions.\\\\ \\\\ The aim of this R&D proposal is to study in detail the aspects that are relevant for application of this type of calorimeter in an LHC environment, including its integration in a larger system of detectors, e.g.~projective geometry, radiation hardness, light detection, calibration and stability monitoring, electron/hadron separation.....

  3. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP), Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev, 03680, Ukraine and Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences 1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Orava, Risto [Institute of Physics, Division of Elementary Particle Physics, P.O. Box 64 (Gustaf Haellstroeminkatu 2a), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland and CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Salii, Andrii [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP), Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine)

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  4. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkovszky, László; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-01-01

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  5. Fluorescence spectral properties of outer antenna LHC II

    CERN Document Server

    He Jun Fang; Zhang, Shu; He Fang Tao; Ren Zhao You; Li Liang Bi; Kuang Ting Yun

    2002-01-01

    Outer antenna LHC II acts to absorb and transfer energy for photosynthesis. The authors studied the fluorescence properties of LHC II of spinach with scanning imaging fluorescence spectroscopy. After it had been excited by 514.5 nm laser, the integral fluorescence spectrum of LHC II was detected. It was shown that energy transfer existed between carotenoid and chlorophyll. Seven bands of LHC II fluorescence emission were resolved by Gauss combination, viz. 656.7, 664.6, 671.5, 677.2, 683.5, 689.6, 695.3 nm, and the percentages of them were 3.0%, 13.1%,13.3%, 21.1%, 13.2%, 33.3%, 3.0% respectively. The emission of 658.7 nm was attributed to chlorophyll b, the other emission bands were produced by chlorophyll a molecules with the maximum absorption 662, 670/671, 676, 680 nm and over 690 nm. The band 656.7 nm, whose percentage was 3.0%, shows that the most energy was absorbed by chlorophyll a. The percentage of band 689.6 nm was the most, which was possibly correlated with one type of self protective mechanism o...

  6. Exploring heavy-quark energy loss via b-tagging in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klay, Jennifer L

    2005-01-01

    A strategy to study flavour-dependent parton energy loss by tagging heavy quark jets in p+p, p+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC is discussed. Estimates for production cross-sections and experimental techniques employed at collider detectors to search QQ-bar jets are presented and a brief evaluation of the capabilities of CMS, ALICE and ATLAS detectors are given

  7. Upgrades to the SPS-to-LHC Transfer Line Beam Stoppers for the LHC High-Luminosity Era

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, Verena; Fraser, Matthew; Goddard, Brennan; Meddahi, Malika; Perillo Marcone, Antonio; Steele, Genevieve; Velotti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Each of the 3 km long transfer lines between the SPS and the LHC is equipped with two beam stoppers (TEDs), one at the beginning of the line and one close to the LHC injection point, which need to absorb the full transferred beam. The beam stoppers are used for setting up the SPS extractions and transfer lines with beam without having to inject into the LHC. Energy deposition and thermo-mechanical simulations have, however, shown that the TEDs will not be robust enough to safely absorb the high intensity beams foreseen for the high-luminosity LHC era. This paper will summarize the simulation results and limitations for upgrading the beam stoppers. An outline of the hardware upgrade strategy for the TEDs together with modifications to the SPS extraction interlock system to enforce intensity limitations for beam on the beam stoppers will be given.

  8. School on QCD and LHC Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    With the start of Run II of the LHC, 2015 will be an exciting year for high-energy physics. The higher energies and larger luminosity will open new vistas for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model, through direct searches and through precision measurements of Standard-Model observables. Besides a poster session, attendants will be also invited to give short talks about their research activity. This school is aimed at preparing graduate students for theoretical research in quantum chromodynamics as applied to the future research program at the LHC. Aspects of the school will also be valuable to younger postdoctoral fellows and graduate students in experimental high-energy physics. There is no registration fee and limited funds are available for travel and local expenses

  9. The LHC detector challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Virdee, Tejinder S

    2004-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) from CERN, scheduled to come online in 2007, is a multi-TeV proton-proton collider with vast detectors. Two of the more significant detectors for LHC are ATLAS and CMS. Currently, both detectors are more than 65% complete in terms of financial commitment, and the experiments are being assembled at an increasing pace. ATLAS is being built directly in its underground cavern, whereas CMS is being assembled above ground. When completed, both detectors will aid researchers in determining what lies at the high-energy frontier, in particular the mechanism by which particles attain mass. (Edited abstract).

  10. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  11. Configuration of the Beam Loss Monitors for the LHC arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Arauzo-Garcia, A

    2000-01-01

    A revised configuration for a beam loss detection system is given for the arcs of the LHC. The last modifications of the LHC arc layout have been taken into account, LHC optics version 6.2. A set of 6 Loss Detectors will be placed outside the cryostat around each short straight section. Quench alarm thresholds are estimated for each detector in all possible LHC arc layout configurations. Threshold values are proposed for top and injection energy beam loss.

  12. Single hadron response measurement and calorimeter jet energy scale uncertainty with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aad, G.; et al., [Unknown; Bentvelsen, S.; Berglund, E.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bos, K.; Boterenbrood, H.; Colijn, A.P.; de Jong, P.; de Nooij, L.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Doxiadis, A.D.; Ferrari, P.; Garitaonandia, H.; Geerts, D.A.A.; Gosselink, M.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N.P.; Igonkina, O.; Kayl, M.S.; Klous, S.; Kluit, P.; Koffeman, E.; Lee, H.; Lenz, T.; Linde, F.; Luijckx, G.; Massaro, G.; Mechnich, J.; Mussche, I.; Ottersbach, J.P.; Reichold, A.; Rijpstra, M.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Snuverink, J.; Ta, D.; Tsiakiris, M.; Turlay, E.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vreeswijk, M.

    2013-01-01

    The uncertainty on the calorimeter energy response to jets of particles is derived for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). First, the calorimeter response to single isolated charged hadrons is measured and compared to the Monte Carlo simulation using proton-proton collisions at

  13. LHC Abort Gap Cleaning with the Transverse Damper

    CERN Document Server

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E; Höfle, Wolfgang; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Shaposhnikova, E; Koschik, A

    2010-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider, LHC, particles not captured by the RF system at injection or leaking out of the RF bucket may quench the superconducting magnets during beam abort. The problem, common to other superconducting machines, is particularly serious for the LHC due to the very large stored energy in the beam. For the LHC a way of removing the unbunched beam has been studied and it uses the existing damper kickers to excite resonantly the particles travelling along the abort gap. In this paper we describe the results of simulations performed with MAD X for various LHC optics configurations, including the estimated multipolar errors.

  14. Strongly coupled models at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, Maikel de

    2014-10-01

    physics and direct searches at the LHC. These tests provide stringent limits on f and the parameter space is slowly driven into the TeV range. Furthermore, a strategy on how to optimise present supersymmetry searches for the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity is presented, with the goal to improve the constraints and yield more stringent limits on f. Finally, the robustness of translating effective operator constraints to beyond the Standard Model (BSM) theories is treated and turns out to crucially depend on the mass and coupling of BSM particles. This is especially relevant for hadron colliders where the partonic centre of mass energy is around the typical energy scales of natural BSM theories. The caveats in applying limits from effective operators are discussed using Z' and G' models, illustrating the effects for a large class of models. This analysis shows that the applicability of effective operators mainly depends on the ratio of the transfer energy in the events and the mass scale of the full theory. Moreover, based on these results a method is developed to recast existing experimental limits on effective operators to the full theory parameter space. It is concluded that strongly coupled models of electroweak symmetry breaking are still natural and compatible with LHC results. Moreover, these types of models provide new and interesting final state topologies for experimental searches at the LHC. For the high energy runs of the LHC these new searches will prove useful in determining the faith of composite models and maybe thereby the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking.

  15. High-luminosity LHC prospects with the upgraded ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Slawinska, Magdalena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run-I at the LHC was very successful with the discovery of a new boson with properties compatible with those of the Higgs boson predicted by Standard Model. Precise measurements of the boson properties, and the discovery of physics beyond the Standard Model, are primary goals of the just restarted LHC running at 13 TeV collision energy and all future running at the LHC. The physics prospects with a pp centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV are presented for 300 and 3000 fb-1 at the high-luminosity LHC. The ultimate precision attainable on measurements of the couplings of the 125 GeV boson to elementary fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as perspectives on the searches for partners associated with it. Supersymmetry is one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Model. The current searches at the LHC have yielded sensitivity to TeV scale gluinos and 1st and 2nd generation squarks, as well as to 3rd generation squarks and electro-weakinos in the hundreds of GeV mass range. Benchmark studies are presente...

  16. High Luminosity LHC: challenges and plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.; Brüning, O.; Buffat, X.; Cai, Y.; Carver, L. R.; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, M.; Iadarola, G.; Li, K.; Lechner, A.; Medina Medrano, L.; Métral, E.; Nosochkov, Y.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pellegrini, D.; Pieloni, T.; Qiang, J.; Redaelli, S.; Romano, A.; Rossi, L.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Schenk, M.; Tambasco, C.; Tomás, R.; Valishev, S.; Van der Veken, F. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb3Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. The dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  17. High Luminosity LHC: Challenges and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11–12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb 3 Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. As a result, the dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  18. Forward Physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A D; Khoze, V A

    2009-01-01

    We review two inter-related topics. First, we consider the behaviour of "soft" scattering observables, such as sigma_{tot}, dsigma_{el}/dt, dsigma_{SD}/dtdM^2, particle multiplicities etc., at high-energy proton-(anti)proton colliders. We emphasize the sizeable effects of absorption on high-energy `soft' processes, and, hence, the necessity to include multi-Pomeron-Pomeron interactions in the usual multi-channel eikonal description. We describe a multi-component model which has been tuned to the available data for soft processes in the CERN-ISR to Tevatron energy range, and which therefore allows predictions to be made for `soft' observables at the LHC. The second topic concerns the calculation of the rate of exclusive processes of the form pp --> p+A+p at high energy colliders, where A is a heavy system. In particular, we discuss the survival probability of the rapidity gaps (denoted by the + signs) to both eikonal and enhanced soft rescattering effects. At the LHC energy, the most topical case is when A is ...

  19. Beam Loss Monitoring for LHC Machine Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Eva Barbara; Dehning, Bernd; Effnger, Ewald; Emery, Jonathan; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Hajdu, Csaba; Jackson, Stephen; Kurfuerst, Christoph; Marsili, Aurelien; Misiowiec, Marek; Nagel, Markus; Busto, Eduardo Nebot Del; Nordt, Annika; Roderick, Chris; Sapinski, Mariusz; Zamantzas, Christos

    The energy stored in the nominal LHC beams is two times 362 MJ, 100 times the energy of the Tevatron. As little as 1 mJ/cm3 deposited energy quenches a magnet at 7 TeV and 1 J/cm3 causes magnet damage. The beam dumps are the only places to safely dispose of this beam. One of the key systems for machine protection is the beam loss monitoring (BLM) system. About 3600 ionization chambers are installed at likely or critical loss locations around the LHC ring. The losses are integrated in 12 time intervals ranging from 40 μs to 84 s and compared to threshold values defined in 32 energy ranges. A beam abort is requested when potentially dangerous losses are detected or when any of the numerous internal system validation tests fails. In addition, loss data are used for machine set-up and operational verifications. The collimation system for example uses the loss data for set-up and regular performance verification. Commissioning and operational experience of the BLM are presented: The machine protection functionality of the BLM system has been fully reliable; the LHC availability has not been compromised by false beam aborts.

  20. LS1 to LHC Report: LHC key handed back to Operations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    This week, after 23 months of hard work involving about 1000 people every day, the key to the LHC was symbolically handed back to the Operations team. The first long shutdown is over and the machine is getting ready for a restart that will bring its beam to full energy in early spring.   Katy Foraz, LS1 activities coordinator, symbolically hands the LHC key to the operations team, represented, left to right, by Jorg Wenninger, Mike Lamont and Mirko Pojer. All the departments, all the machines and all the experimental areas were involved in the first long shutdown of the LHC that began in February 2013. Over the last two years, the Bulletin has closely followed  all the work and achievements that had been carefully included in the complex general schedule drawn up and managed by the team led by Katy Foraz from the Engineering Department. “The work on the schedule began two years before the start of LS1 and one of the first things we realised was that there was no commercial...

  1. CERN - the W and the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rodgers, P

    2003-01-01

    Construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its detectors at the CERN laboratory in Geneva is a challenge of Himalayan proportions. The LHC will collide protons at energies of 14 TeV (14 million million electrons volts) and two detectors - ATLAS and CMS - will survey the debris of these collisions for signs of the Higgs boson, supersymmetric particles, large extra dimensions and other evidence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. (U.K.)

  2. Energy versus centrality dependence of the jet quenching parameter q at RHIC and LHC: a new puzzle?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, Carlota; Armesto, Nestor; Salgado, Carlos A.; Zurita, Pia [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias IGFAE, Galicia (Spain); Luzum, Matthew [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias IGFAE, Galicia (Spain); Instituto de Fisica-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    The central goal of jet quenching studies in high-energy nuclear collisions is the characterization of those QCD medium properties that are accessible by these probes. Most of the discussion in the last years has been focused on the determination of the jet quenching parameter, q. We present here an extraction of this parameter using data of inclusive particle suppression at RHIC and LHC energies for different centralities. Our approach consists in fitting a K factor that quantifies the departure of this parameter from an ideal estimate, K ≡ q/(2ε{sup 3/4}), where q is determined by the local medium quantities as provided by hydrodynamical calculations. We find that this K factor is larger at RHIC than at the LHC, as obtained already in previous analyses, but, surprisingly, it is almost independent of the centrality of the collision. Taken at face value, the K factor would not depend on the local properties of the medium as energy density or temperature, but on global collision quantities such as the center of mass energy. This is a very intriguing, unexpected possibility for which we cannot yet provide a clear interpretation. We also comment on the limitations of the formalism that may affect this conclusion. (orig.)

  3. Physics at the LHC - From Standard Model measurements to Searches for New Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobs, Karl [Freiburg University (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The successful operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during the past two years allowed to explore particle interaction in a new energy regime. Measurements of important Standard Model processes like the production of high-p{sub T} jets, W and Z bosons and top and b-quarks were performed by the LHC experiments. In addition, the high collision energy allowed to search for new particles in so far unexplored mass regions. Important constraints on the existence of new particles predicted in many models of physics beyond the Standard Model could be established. With integrated luminosities reaching values around 5 fb{sup −1} in 2011, the experiments reached as well sensitivity to probe the existence of the Standard Model Higgs boson over a large mass range. In the present report the major physics results obtained by the two general-purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are summarized.

  4. Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology, operational challenges and theoretical predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Gilles, Abelin R

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the highest-energy particle collider ever constructed and is considered "one of the great engineering milestones of mankind." It was built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) from 1998 to 2008, with the aim of allowing physicists to test the predictions of different theories of particle physics and high-energy physics, and particularly prove or disprove the existence of the theorized Higgs boson and of the large family of new particles predicted by supersymmetric theories. In this book, the authors study the phenomenology, operational challenges and theoretical predictions of LHC. Topics discussed include neutral and charged black hole remnants at the LHC; the modified statistics approach for the thermodynamical model of multiparticle production; and astroparticle physics and cosmology in the LHC era.

  5. Slice through an LHC bending magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Slice through an LHC superconducting dipole (bending) magnet. The slice includes a cut through the magnet wiring (niobium titanium), the beampipe and the steel magnet yokes. Particle beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have the same energy as a high-speed train, squeezed ready for collision into a space narrower than a human hair. Huge forces are needed to control them. Dipole magnets (2 poles) are used to bend the paths of the protons around the 27 km ring. Quadrupole magnets (4 poles) focus the proton beams and squeeze them so that more particles collide when the beams’ paths cross. There are 1232 15m long dipole magnets in the LHC.

  6. ATLAS LAr calorimeter performance and LHC Run-2 commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00366625; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was built to study proton-proton collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center of mass energy of up to 14 TeV. The Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry as well as the hadronic calorimetry in the endcap and forward regions. They have shown excellent performance during the first LHC data taking campaign, from 2010 to 2012, so-called Run 1, at a peak luminosity of $8 \\times 10^{33} \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$. During the next run, peak luminosities of $1.5 \\times 10^{34} \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$ and even higher are expected at a 25ns bunch spacing. Such a high collision rate may have an impact on the quality of the energy reconstruction which is attempted to be maintained at a high level using a calibration procedure described in this contribution. It also poses major challenges to the first level of the trigger system which is constrained to a maximal rate of 100 kHz. For Run-3, scheduled to start in 2019, instantaneous luminos...

  7. EU supports the LHC high-luminosity study

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The design collision energy and luminosity of the LHC are already at record numbers, making the machine one of the most complex scientific instruments ever built. However, to extend its discovery potential even further, a major upgrade of the LHC will be required around 2020. This will increase its average luminosity by a factor of 5 to 10 beyond its design value. Fifteen worldwide institutions and the European Union are supporting the initial design phase of the project through the HiLumi LHC programme, whose kick-off meeting will take place on 16-18 November.   The CERN team that has successfully built and tested the Short Magnet Coil – a small 40 cm long magnet capable of producing a 12.5 T magnetic field. The upgrade of the LHC will require about 10 years of design, construction and implementation. The new machine configuration will be called “High Luminosity LHC” (HL-LHC). The similarly named “HiLumi LHC” is the EU programme that supports...

  8. LHC Report: imaginative injectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Pierre Freyermuth for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    A new bunch injection scheme from the PS to the SPS allowed the LHC to achieve a new peak luminosity record.   Figure 1: PSB multi-turn injection principle: to vary the parameters during injection with the aim of putting the newly injected beam in a different region of the transverse phase-space plan. The LHC relies on the injector complex to deliver beam with well-defined bunch populations and the necessary transverse and longitudinal characteristics – all of which fold directly into luminosity performance. There are several processes taking place in the PS Booster (PSB) and the Proton Synchrotron (PS) acting on the beam structure in order to obtain the LHC beam characteristics. Two processes are mainly responsible for the beam brightness: the PSB multi-turn injection and the PS radio-frequency (RF) gymnastics. The total number of protons in a bunch and the transverse emittances are mostly determined by the multi-turn Booster injection, while the number of bunches and their time spacin...

  9. Evaluation of Beam Loss and Energy Depositions for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, L.; Assmann, R.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Doyle, E.; Ferrari, A.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Mauri, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Smith, J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Weiler, T.

    2011-01-01

    The LHC beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can survive the expected conditions during LHC stable physics runs, in order to avoid quenches of the SC magnets and to protect other LHC equipments.

  10. Evolution of the CMS ECAL Performance and R&D Studies for Calorimetry Options at High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Auffray, Etiennette

    During the past years the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN operated with a maximum center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$~TeV, a peak luminosity of around $7\\times 10^{33}$~cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ and collected about $23$~fb$^{-1}$ of data which lead to the discovery of a Higgs Boson in July 2012. To further constrain the properties of the newly discovered Higgs boson, the decision to extend the LHC program has recently been made. In this framework, a major upgrade of the beam optics in the interaction region will take place around 2022 to achieve a leveled peak luminosity of $\\mathcal{L} = 5\\times10^{34}$~cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. These will be the operating conditions during the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) which is expected to deliver an integrated luminosity of 3000~fb$^{-1}$ by 2035. During HL-LHC phase the radiation levels will become much higher with respect to the nominal values for which the CMS detector was designed. Therefore it is of crucial importance to identify and quantify the effects ofradiation damag...

  11. The TileCal Online Energy Estimation for the Next LHC Operation Period

    CERN Document Server

    Peralva, B S; The ATLAS collaboration; Cerqueira, A S; Seixas, J M

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a study on the TileCal online energy estimation for the next LHC operation period (Run2). Due to hardware limitation, the algorithm that performs the online energy estimation must remain based on the linear and fast Optimal Filter (OF) technique, which envisages the use of the background covariance matrix in its design. During Run1, TileCal made use of an identity matrix to describe and the background covariance matrix, which showed to be a reasonable approximation for the low luminosity scenario. Under such conditions, the background for most of its cells comprised mainly electronic noise which can be approximated as a uncorrelated Gaussian process. However, as the pile-up introduces a non-Gaussian component to the background, the OF method presents larger variance and it becomes biased. The use of the background covariance matrix in the design of the OF weights is expected to improve the energy estimation performance. The results for the scenario considered show that for high occupancy ce...

  12. UFOs in the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grob, Laura [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) localized and recurring beam losses have been observed, which usually persist for several hundred microseconds. With increasing beam energy these losses were found to pose a serious risk to the machine availability, as some of these events can cause quenches in the superconducting magnets. The current understanding is that these losses are caused by falling microparticles that interact with the proton beam. To describe these so-called UFOs (unidentified falling objects) and their dynamics, a model was developed starting from the approach that only gravitational and electrostatic forces act on a neutrally charged particle. However, the model's results cannot reproduce the actual data from the LHC's beam loss monitors (BLMs), which indicates a more complex UFO dynamic. Experimental studies and further analysis of the BLM data are planned to investigate the UFO dynamics in greater detail and to understand origins and release mechanisms for microparticles in the LHC beam pipe.

  13. QCD@LHC International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The particle physics groups of UZH and ETH will host the QCD@LHC2016 conference (22.8.-26.8., UZH downtown campus), which is part of an annual conference series bringing together theorists and experimentalists working on hard scattering processes at the CERN LHC, ranging from precision studies of Standard Model processes to searches for new particles and phenomena. The format of the conference is a combination of plenary review talks and parallel sessions, with the latter providing a particularly good opportunity for junior researchers to present their results. The conference will take place shortly after the release of the new data taken by the LHC in sping 2016 at a collision energy of 13TeV, expected to more than double the currently available data set. It will be one of the first opportunities to discuss these data in a broader context, and we expect the conference to become a very lively forum at the interface of phenomenology and experiment.

  14. Lectures on LHC physics

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the LHC experiments have closed the most important gap in our understanding of fundamental interactions, confirming that such interactions between elementary particles can be described by quantum field theory, more specifically by a renormalizable gauge theory. This theory is a priori valid for arbitrarily high energy scales and does not require an ultraviolet completion. Yet, when trying to apply the concrete knowledge of quantum field theory to actual LHC physics - in particular to the Higgs sector and certain regimes of QCD - one inevitably encounters an intricate maze of phenomenological know-how, common lore and other, often historically developed intuitions about what works and what doesn’t. These lectures cover three aspects to help understand LHC results in the Higgs sector and in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model: they discuss the many facets of Higgs physics, which is at the core of this significantly expanded second edition; then QCD, to the deg...

  15. Switch on to the LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The LHC is preparing to collide beams at 3.5 TeV for the first time ever! Be part of the event and follow live what goes on at the world’s most powerful particle accelerator by connecting to LHC1. Hereafter we give you a key to understand the display as well as a typical event display from the ATLAS and CMS experiments. Click on the image to enlarge it 1. This is the energy of beams. 1 TeV=1000 GeV. The LHC set the energy world’s record of 3.48 TeV per beam, today, 19 March 2010. 2. Intensity of, respectively, B1 (blue) and B2 (red). 3. The information in these boxes can vary. Operators display the graphs that are relevant to the specific operation. 4. Most of the flags are set automatically. They provide a quick summary of the machine status. In order to have collisions the ‘Stable Beams’ flag must be set to green. 5. Here operators write down their messages to the experiments. Often, they write the ongoing activity, followed by the plan for the coming hou...

  16. Hard Pomeron-odderon interference effects in the production of π+π- pairs in high energy γγ collisions at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pire, B.; Schwennsen, F.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2008-01-01

    We estimate the production of two meson pairs in high energy photon-photon collisions produced in ultraperipheral collisions at LHC. We show that the study of charge asymmetries may reveal the existence of the perturbative Odderon and discuss the concrete event rates expected at the LHC. Sizable rates and asymmetries are expected in the case of proton-proton collisions and medium values of γγ energies √(s γγ )≅20 GeV. Proton-proton collisions will benefit from a high rate due to a large effective γγ luminosity and ion-ion collisions with a somewhat lower rate from the possibility to trigger on ultraperipheral collisions and a reduced background from strong interactions.

  17. Machine Protection for the Experiments of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R B

    2010-01-01

    The LHC stored beam contains 362 MJ of energy at the top beam energy of 7 TeV/c, presenting a significant risk to the components of the machine and the detectors. In response to this threat, a sophisticated system of machine protection has been developed to minimize the danger, and detect potentially dangerous situations. In this paper, the protection of the experiments in the LHC from the machine is considered, focusing on pilot beam strikes on the experiments during injection and on the dynamics of hardware failure with a circulating beam, with detailed time-domain calculations performed for LHC ring power converter failures and magnet quenches. The prospects for further integration of the machine protection and experimental protection systems are considered, along with the risk to nearbeam detectors from closed local bumps.

  18. Anatomy of the inert two-Higgs-doublet model in the light of the LHC and non-LHC dark matter searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Alexander; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Ivanov, Igor P.; Rojas-Abatte, Felipe; Thomas, Marc

    2018-02-01

    The inert two-Higgs-doublet model (i2HDM) is a theoretically well-motivated example of a minimal consistent dark matter (DM) model which provides monojet, mono-Z , mono-Higgs, and vector-boson-fusion +ETmiss signatures at the LHC, complemented by signals in direct and indirect DM search experiments. In this paper we have performed a detailed analysis of the constraints in the full five-dimensional parameter space of the i2HDM, coming from perturbativity, unitarity, electroweak precision data, Higgs data from the LHC, DM relic density, direct/indirect DM detection, and LHC monojet analysis, as well as implications of experimental LHC studies on disappearing charged tracks relevant to a high DM mass region. We demonstrate the complementarity of the above constraints and present projections for future LHC data and direct DM detection experiments to probe further i2HDM parameter space. The model is implemented into the CalcHEP and micrOMEGAs packages, which are publicly available at the HEPMDB database, and it is ready for a further exploration in the context of the LHC, relic density, and DM direct detection.

  19. Hunting for neutral, long-lived exotica at the LHC using a missing transverse energy signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, Alexander; Moretti, Stefano; Nickel, Kilian; Thomas, Marc C.; Tomalin, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Searches at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for neutral, long-lived particles have historically relied on the detection of displaced particles produced by their decay within the detector volume. In this paper we study the potential of the complementary signature comprising of the missing transverse energy (E T miss ) signal, traditionally used to look for dark matter, e.g., the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), to extend the LHC coverage to models with long-lived (LL) particles when they decay outside the detector. Using CMS and ATLAS analyses at the 8 TeV LHC, we set an upper limit at the 95% confidence level (CL) on the production cross sections for two specific scenarios: (i) a model with a heavy non-standard model Higgs boson decaying to a LL scalar and (ii) an R-parity violating (RPV) SUSY model with a LL neutralino. We show that this method can significantly extend the LHC sensitivity to neutral, LL particles with arbitrary large lifetimes and that the limits obtained from a E T miss signal are comparable to those from displaced particle searches for decay distances above a few meters. Results obtained in this study do not depend on the specific decay channel of the LL particle and therefore are model-independent in this sense. We provide limits for the whole two-dimensional plane in terms of the mass of the LL particle and the mass of the mediator up to masses of 2 TeV including particular benchmarks studied in the original experimental papers. We have made these limits available in the form of a grid which can be used for the interpretation of various other new physics models.

  20. The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aamodt, K [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Abrahantes Quintana, A [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), Madrid/Havana, Spain (Cuba); Achenbach, R [Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany BMBF (Germany); Acounis, S [SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, Universite de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Nantes (France); Adamova, D [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Nuclear Physics Institute, Rez/Prague (Czech Republic); Adler, C [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany BMBF (Germany); Aggarwal, M [Physics Department, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Agnese, F [IPHC, Universite Louis Pasteur, CNRS/IN2P3, Strasbourg (France); Rinella, G Aglieri [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Reasearch, Geneva (Switzerland); Ahammed, Z [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India); Ahmad, A; Ahmad, N; Ahmad, S [Department of Physics Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (India); Akindinov, A [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Akishin, P [JINR, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, (Russian Federation); Aleksandrov, D [Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alessandro, B; Alfarone, G [Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Alfaro, R [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Alici, A [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: Hans-Ake.Gustafsson@hep.lu.se (and others)

    2008-08-15

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a general-purpose, heavy-ion detector at the CERN LHC which focuses on QCD, the strong-interaction sector of the Standard Model. It is designed to address the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at extreme values of energy density and temperature in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Besides running with Pb ions, the physics programme includes collisions with lighter ions, lower energy running and dedicated proton-nucleus runs. ALICE will also take data with proton beams at the top LHC energy to collect reference data for the heavy-ion programme and to address several QCD topics for which ALICE is complementary to the other LHC detectors. The ALICE detector has been built by a collaboration including currently over 1000 physicists and engineers from 105 Institutes in 30 countries. Its overall dimensions are 16 x 16 x 26 m{sup 3} with a total weight of approximately 10 000 t. The experiment consists of 18 different detector systems each with its own specific technology choice and design constraints, driven both by the physics requirements and the experimental conditions expected at LHC. The most stringent design constraint is to cope with the extreme particle multiplicity anticipated in central Pb-Pb collisions. The different subsystems were optimized to provide high-momentum resolution as well as excellent Particle Identification (PID) over a broad range in momentum, up to the highest multiplicities predicted for LHC. This will allow for comprehensive studies of hadrons, electrons, muons, and photons produced in the collision of heavy nuclei. Most detector systems are scheduled to be installed and ready for data taking by mid-2008 when the LHC is scheduled to start operation, with the exception of parts of the Photon Spectrometer (PHOS), Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) and Electro Magnetic Calorimeter (EMCal). These detectors will be completed for the high-luminosity ion run expected in 2010

  1. ATLAS physics prospects with the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Khanov, Alexander; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run-I at the LHC was very successful with the discovery of a new boson of about 125 GeV mass with properties compatible with those of the Higgs boson predicted by Standard Model.Precise measurements of the properties of this new boson, and the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model, are primary goals of the just restarted LHC running at 13 TeV collision energy and all future running at the LHC, including its luminosity upgrade, HL-LHC, that should allow the collection of 3000 fb-1 of data per experiment. The physics prospects with a pp centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV are presented for 300 and 3000 fb-1. The ultimate precision attainable on measurements of the couplings of the 125 GeV boson to elementary fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as perspectives on the searches for partners associated with it. The electroweak sector is further studied with the analysis of the vector boson scattering, testing the SM predictions. Supersymmetry is one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Mode...

  2. Turning the LHC Ring into a New Physics Search Machine

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliokoski, Matti; Mieskolainen, Mikael; Orava, Risto

    2016-01-01

    By combining the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system with the LHC experiments, a powerful search machine for new physics beyond the standard model can be realised. The pair of final state protons in the central production process, exit the LHC beam vacuum chamber at locations determined by their fractional momentum losses and will be detected by the BLM detectors. By mapping out the coincident pairs of the BLM identified proton candidates around the four LHC interaction regions, a scan for centrally produced particle states can be made independently of their decay modes.

  3. LHC: l'entrée en matière

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Mobilizing the greatest part of the budgets and the energies of CERN, LHC should be brought into service in 2007. This project carries the hopes of a lot of physicists, who hope to obtain from the LHC, answers to a lot of questions about universe (1 page)

  4. High precision electromagnetic calorimetry with 40 MHz readout: the CMS crystal ECAL for the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Orimoto, Toyoko Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment (CMS) will be upgraded to meet the challenging running conditions expected after the High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC). Particular challenges at HL-LHC are the harsh radiation environment, the increasing data rates and the extreme level of pile-up events, with up to 200 simultaneous proton-proton collisions. The detector will have to sustain an instantaneous luminosity of above $5 \\times 10^{34} cm^2 s^{-1}$, maintaining a performance similar to the one of LHC Run I for an integrated luminosity of 3 to 5 $ab^{-1}$. This poses stringent requirements on the radiation resistance of detector components, the readout and data transfer from the front end to the back end electronics, as well as the latency of the trigger system. The barrel region of the CMS ECAL will be able to retain the current lead tungstate crystals and avalanche photodiode detectors which will meet the energy measurement performance requirements throughout t...

  5. TOTEM, a different LHC experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    TOTEM will pursue a physics program (complementary to that of the other LHC detectors) spanning a wide range from total cross-section and elastic scattering measurements to the study of diffractive and forward phenomena. The TOTEM program will lead to a better understanding of the fundamental aspects of strong interactions. For the first time at hadron colliders, the very forward rapidity range, containing 90% of the energy flow and explored in high-energy cosmic ray experiments, is covered, allowing the search for unusual phenomena hinted at by cosmic ray experiments. The technical implementation of all TOTEM detectors is described. Silicon sensors housed in so-called Roman pots allow measurements of elastic and diffractive protons at distances as small as 1 mm from the beam centre. A scheme to tag events from Double-Pomeron-Exchange by diffractive protons on both sides transforms the LHC into an almost clean “gluon” collider, where the centre-of-mass energy is determined by the momentum losses of the ...

  6. The LHC Superconducting RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), the largest high energy physics laboratory worldwide, is constructing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the existing 27 km circumference LEP (Large Electron Positron) collider tunnel. For the LHC, superconducting cavities, operating at 4.5 K, will provide the required acceleration field for ramping the beam energy up to 7 TeV and for keeping the colliding proton beams tightly bunched. Superconducting cavities were chosen, not only because of their high acceleration field leading to a small contribution to the machine impedance, but also because of their high stored energy which minimises the effects of periodic transient beam loading associated with the high beam intensity (0.5 A). There will be eight single-cell cavities per beam, each delivering 2 MV (5.3 MV/m) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industrial firms, using niobium on copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A complete cavity prototype assembly in...

  7. Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Barrel Trigger for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Marino; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The present ATLAS muon trigger in the barrel region (|eta|<1.05) is based on three layers of RPC chambers. It was designed to run for 10 years at the LHC luminosity of 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1} and operated successfully and with high selectivity during the first run of the LHC. In order to ensure a stable performance of the RPCs until 2035 at the higher rates and at luminosities of 5-7x10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1} provided by HL-LHC, the chambers will have to be operated with reduced gas gain to respect the original design limits on currents and integrated charge. The ATLAS muon collaboration proposes an upgrade of the system by installing an inner layer of new generation RPCs during the LHC shutdown expected for the year 2023. This new layer will increase the system redundancy and therefore allow operation with high efficiency and high selectivity during the HL-LHC phase. The insertion of this new layer will also increase the geometrical acceptance in the barrel region from 75% to 95%. Moreover, the additional measu...

  8. Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Barrel Trigger for HL-LHC.

    CERN Document Server

    Biondi, Silvia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The present ATLAS muon trigger in the barrel region (|η | < 1.05) is based on three layers of RPC chambers. It was designed to run for 10 years at the LHC luminosity of 1034cm−2s−1 and operated successfully and with high selectivity during the first run of the LHC. In order to ensure a stable performance of the RPCs until 2035 at the higher rates and at luminosities of 5−7x1034cm−2s−1 provided by HL-LHC, the chambers will have to be operated with reduced gas gain to respect the original design limits on currents and integrated charge. The ATLAS muon collaboration proposes an upgrade of the system by installing an inner layer of new generation RPCs during the LHC shutdown expected for the year 2023. This new layer will increase the system redundancy and therefore allow operation with high efficiency and high selectivity during the HL-LHC phase. The insertion of this new layer will also increase the geometrical acceptance in the barrel region from 75% to 95%. Moreover, the additional measurements ...

  9. The LHC Physics Centre at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    As the LHC goes on line for its first exploration of the new high-energy frontier, CERN is also getting ready to enhance the support it provides for the analysis and interpretation of the emerging data.    The LHC Physics Centre at CERN (LPCC) has started up over the past couple of months, beginning with a series of initiatives ranging from Workshops to lectures for students. More details about the LPCC will be featured in a forthcoming Bulletin article. In the meantime, you can consult the LPCC web page, now available at http://cern.ch/lpcc. This offers the high energy physics community a portal to the LPCC's activities, as well as to useful resources, tools and information about the LHC physics programme, the progress of accelerator operations, relevant workshops and events around the world, and much more. The LPCC will shortly begin issuing a weekly bulletin of its own, distributed by e-mail. Members of the CERN physics community and subscribers to the CERN Bulletin will receive the ...

  10. LHC physics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Binoth, T

    2012-01-01

    "Exploring the phenomenology of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, LHC Physics focuses on the first years of data collected at the LHC as well as the experimental and theoretical tools involved...

  11. ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Performance in LHC Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenstern, Stefanie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are employed by ATLAS for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region eta<3.2, and for hadronic and forward calorimetry in the region from eta=1.5 to eta=4.9. In the first LHC run a total luminosity of 27 fb-1 has been collected at c.o.m energies of 7-8 TeV. After detector consolidation during a long shutdown, Run-2 started in 2015 and 86.4fb-1 of data at a c.o.m energy of 13 TeV have been recorded. In order to realize the level-1 acceptance rate of 100 kHz in Run-2 data taking, the number of read-out samples recorded and used for the energy and the time measurement has been modified from five to four while keeping the expected performance. The well calibrated and highly granular LAr Calorimeter reached its design values both in energy measurement as well as in direction resolution. This contribution will give an overview of the detector operation, hardware improvements, changes in the monitoring and data quality procedures, to cope with increased ...

  12. Correction of vertical crossing induced dispersion in LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meot, F.

    1997-11-01

    Beam crossing schemes in the LHC interaction regions impose non-zero vertical closed orbit in the low-β triplets, which excite a perturbative periodic dispersion; the phenomenon is described and quantified in detail. It is shown that this dispersion reaches values at the limit of tolerances in the nominal optics of Version 5.0 of the LHC ring, and prohibitively large values in particular in the low- β quadrupoles and interaction regions in the foreseen extreme β-squeeze case (β * = 0.25 m). Such behaviour justifies including a local correction in the LHC design, in order to damp the effect and confine it as much as possible in the vicinity of the excitation sources (the low-β triplets). An optical compensation scheme based on the use of skew quadrupoles is described in detail, as well as the entailed residual dispersion

  13. Correction of vertical crossing induced dispersion in LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meot, F.

    1997-11-01

    Beam crossing schemes in the LHC interaction regions impose non-zero vertical closed orbit in the low-β triplets, which excite a perturbative periodic dispersion; the phenomenon is described and quantified in detail. It is shown that this dispersion reaches values at the limit of tolerances in the nominal optics of Version 5.0 of the LHC ring, and prohibitively large values in particular in the low-β quadrupoles and interaction regions in the foreseen extreme β-squeeze case (β * = 0.25 m). Such behavior justifies including a local correction in the LHC design, in order to damp the effect and confine it has such as possible in the vicinity of the excitation sources (the low-β triplets). An optical compensation scheme based on the use of skew quadrupoles is described in detail, as well as entailed residual dispersion. (author)

  14. Status and perspectives of ALICE at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corral, Gerardo H. [Physics Department, CINVESTAV, P.O. Box 14740, Mexico, D.F (Mexico); Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    ALICE is one of the four large experiments at the LHC. It focuses on the study of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Its main goal is to study in great detail the properties of matter under extreme energy densities. We discuss some aspects of the ALICE research program, the experiment future plans as well as some general items of the ALICE upgrade. The present detector allows to study diffractive physics and photon induced processes. A proposal to install detectors in the forward region is presented here. These detectors would allow to study processes with rapidity gaps larger than those presently covered.

  15. Status and perspectives of ALICE at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corral, Gerardo H.

    2013-01-01

    ALICE is one of the four large experiments at the LHC. It focuses on the study of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Its main goal is to study in great detail the properties of matter under extreme energy densities. We discuss some aspects of the ALICE research program, the experiment future plans as well as some general items of the ALICE upgrade. The present detector allows to study diffractive physics and photon induced processes. A proposal to install detectors in the forward region is presented here. These detectors would allow to study processes with rapidity gaps larger than those presently covered.

  16. Results from the first heavy ion run at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schukraft, J

    2012-01-01

    Early November 2010, the LHC collided for the first time heavy ions, Pb on Pb, at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV/nucleon. This date marked both the end of almost 20 years of preparing for nuclear collisions at the LHC, as well as the start of a new era in ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics at energies exceeding previous machines by more than an order of magnitude. This contribution summarizes some of the early results from all three experiments participating in the LHC heavy ion program (ALICE, ATLAS, and CMS), which show that the high density matter created at the LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like the very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid discovered at RHIC. Some surprising and even puzzling results are seen in particle ratios, jet-quenching, and Quarkonia suppression observables. The overall experimental conditions at the LHC, together with its set of powerful and state-of-the-art detectors, should allow for precision measurements of quark-gluon-plasma parameters like v...

  17. An improved scattering routine for collimation tracking studies at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tambasco, Claudia; Salvachua Ferrando, Maria Belen; Cavoto, Gianluca

    The present Master thesis work has been carried out at CERN in the framework of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) Collimation project. The LHC accelerates proton beams up to 7 TeV colliding in the experiment detectors installed in four points of the accelerator ring. The LHC is built to store a energy of 360MJ for each beam. The energy deposition induced by local beam losses could quench the superconducting magnets located around the accelerator beam pipes. To prevent and keep under control dangerous beam losses, an efficient collimation system is required. In addition, the achievable LHC beam intensity is related to the beam loss rate and, consequently, to the cleaning efficiency of the collimation system. Collimation studies at LHC are carried out also by means of simulations by using SixTrack, a dedicated simulation tool that tracks a large numbers of particles for many turns around the ring. The SixTrack code includes a scattering routine to model proton interactions with the material of the collimators j...

  18. Combined Ramp and Squeeze to 6.5 TeV in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; Tomás, Rogelio; Wenninger, Jorg

    2016-01-01

    The cycle of the LHC is composed of an energy ramp followed by a betatron squeeze, needed to reduce the beta- star value in the interaction points. Since Run 1, studies have been carried out to investigate the feasibility of combining the two operations, thus considerably reducing the duration of the operational cycle. In Run 2, the LHC is operating at the energy of 6.5 TeV that requires a much longer cycle than that of Run 1. Therefore, the performance gains from a Combined Ramp and Squeeze (CRS) is more interesting. Merging the energy ramp and the betatron squeeze could result in a gain of several minutes for each LHC cycle. With increasing maturity of LHC operation, it is now possible to envisage more complex beam manipulations; this paper describes the first machine experiment with beam, aiming at validating the combination of ramp and squeeze, which was performed in 2015, during a machine development phase. The operation experience with the LHC run at 2.51 TeV, when CRS down to 4 meters was deployed and ...

  19. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; /CERN; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Jakobs, K.; /Freiburg U.; Weiglein, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Azuelos, G.; /TRIUMF; Dawson, S.; /Brookhaven; Gripaios, B.; /CERN; Han, T.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Hewett, J.; /SLAC; Lancaster, M.; /University Coll. London; Mariotti, C.; /INFN, Turin; Moortgat, F.; /Zurich, ETH; Moortgat-Pick, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Polesello, G.; /INFN, Pavia; Riemann, S.; /DESY; Assamagan, K.; /Brookhaven; Bechtle, P.; /DESY; Carena, M.; /Fermilab; Chachamis, G.; /PSI, Villigen /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /INFN, Florence /Bonn U. /CERN /Bonn U. /Freiburg U. /Oxford U. /Louvain U., CP3 /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /INFN, Milan Bicocca /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Frascati /Fermilab /Warsaw U. /Florida U. /Orsay, LAL /LPSC, Grenoble /Warsaw U. /Yale U. /Stockholm U., Math. Dept. /Durham U., IPPP /DESY /Rome U. /University Coll. London /UC, San Diego /Heidelberg U. /Florida State U. /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /McGill U. /Durham U., IPPP; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, theWorking Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  20. Probing light nonthermal dark matter at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Gao, Yu; Kamon, Teruki

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the collider phenomenology of a minimal nonthermal dark matter model with a 1-GeV dark matter candidate, which naturally explains baryogenesis. Since the light dark matter is not parity protected, it can be singly produced at the LHC. This leads to large missing energy associated with an energetic jet whose transverse momentum distribution is featured by a Jacobian-like shape. The monojet, dijet, paired dijet, and two jets + missing energy channels are studied. Currently existing data at the Tevatron and LHC offer significant bounds on our model.

  1. Electron Cloud Parameterization Studies in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, O; Baglin, V; Bregliozzi, G; Jimenez, J M; Metral, E; Rumolo, G; Schulte, D; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    During LHC beam commissioning with 150, 75 and 50-ns bunch spacing, important electron-cloud effects, like pressure rise, cryogenic heat load, beam instabilities or emittance growth, were observed. The main strategy to combat the LHC electron cloud, defined about ten years ago, relies on the surface conditioning arising from the chamber-surface bombardment with cloud electrons. In a standard model, the conditioning state of the beam-pipe surface is characterized by three parameters: 1. most importantly, the secondary emission yield δmax; 2. the incident electron energy at which the yield is maximum, ε_max; and 3. the probability of elastic reflection of low-energy primary electrons hitting the chamber wall, R. Since at the LHC no in-situ secondary-yield measurements are available, we compare the relative local pressure-rise measurements taken for different beam configurations against simulations in which surface parameters are scanned. This benchmarking of measurements and simulations is used to infer the s...

  2. LHC Report: Tests of new LHC running modes

    CERN Document Server

    Verena Kain for the LHC team

    2012-01-01

    On 13 September, the LHC collided lead ions with protons for the first time. This outstanding achievement was key preparation for the planned 2013 operation in this mode. Outside of two special physics runs, the LHC has continued productive proton-proton luminosity operation.   Celebrating proton-ion collisions. The first week of September added another 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity to ATLAS’s and CMS’s proton-proton data set. It was a week of good and steady production mixed with the usual collection of minor equipment faults. The peak performance was slightly degraded at the start of the week but thanks to the work of the teams in the LHC injectors the beam brightness – and thus the LHC peak performance – were restored to previous levels by the weekend. The LHC then switched to new running modes and spectacularly proved its potential as a multi-purpose machine. This is due in large part to the LHC equipment and controls, which have been designed wi...

  3. UFOs in the LHC: Observations, studies and extrapolations

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, T; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Garrel, N; Goddard, B; Holzer, EB; Jackson, S; Lechner, A; Mertens, V; Misiowiec, M; Nebot del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Uythoven, J; Vlachoudis, V; Wenninger, J; Zamantzas, C; Zimmermann, F; Fuster, N

    2012-01-01

    Unidentified falling objects (UFOs) are potentially a major luminosity limitation for nominal LHC operation. They are presumably micrometer sized dust particles which lead to fast beam losses when they interact with the beam. With large-scale increases and optimizations of the beam loss monitor (BLM) thresholds, their impact on LHC availability was mitigated from mid 2011 onwards. For higher beam energy and lower magnet quench limits, the problem is expected to be considerably worse, though. In 2011/12, the diagnostics for UFO events were significantly improved: dedicated experiments and measurements in the LHC and in the laboratory were made and complemented by FLUKA simulations and theoretical studies. The state of knowledge, extrapolations for nominal LHC operation and mitigation strategies are presented

  4. Experiential learning in high energy physics: a survey of students at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Tiziano; Catalano, Gelsomina; Florio, Massimo; Giffoni, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    More than 36 000 students and post-docs will be involved until 2025 in research at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) mainly through international collaborations. To what extent they value the skills acquired? Do students expect that their learning experience will have an impact on their professional future? By drawing from earlier literature on experiential learning, we have designed a survey of current and former students at LHC. To quantitatively measure the students’ perceptions, we compare the salary expectations of current students with the assessment of those now employed in different jobs. Survey data are analysed by ordered logistic regression models, which allow multivariate statistical analyses with limited dependent variables. Results suggest that experiential learning at LHC positively correlates with both current and former students’ salary expectations. Those already employed clearly confirm the expectations of current students. At least two not mutually exclusive explanations underlie the results. First, the training at LHC is perceived to provide students valuable skills, which in turn affect the salary expectations; secondly, the LHC research experience per se may act as signal in the labour market. Respondents put a price tag on their learning experience, a ‘LHC salary premium’ ranging from 5% to 12% compared with what they would have expected for their career without such an experience at CERN.

  5. From Rindler horizon to mini black holes at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaffary, Tooraj [Islamic Azad University, Department of Science, Shiraz Branch, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Recently researchers (A. Sepehri et al., Astrophys. Space Sci. 344, 79 (2013)) have considered the signature of superstring balls near mini black holes at LHC and calculate the information loss for these types of strings. Motivated by their work, we consider the evolution of events in high energy experiments from lower energies for which the Rindler horizon is formed to higher energies in which mini black holes and string balls are emerged. Extending the Gottesman and Preskill method to string theory, we find the information loss for excited strings ''string balls'' in mini black holes at LHC and calculate the information transformation from the collapsing matter to the state of outgoing Hawking radiation for strings. We come to the conclusion that information transformation for high energy strings is complete. Then the thermal distribution of excited strings near mini black holes at LHC is calculated. In order to obtain the total string cross section near black holes produced in proton-proton collision, we multiply the black hole production cross section by the thermal distribution of strings. It is observed that many high energy excited strings are produced near the event horizon of TeV black holes. These excited strings evaporate to standard model particles like Higgs boson and top quark at Hagedorn temperature. We derive the production cross section for these particles due to string ball decay at LHC and consider their decay to light particles like bottom quarks and gluons. (orig.)

  6. Cryogenics for LHC experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic systems will be used by LHC experiments to maximize their performance. Institutes around the world are collaborating with CERN in the construction of these very low temperature systems. The cryogenic test facility in hall 180 for ATLAS magnets. High Energy Physics experiments have frequently adopted cryogenic versions of their apparatus to achieve optimal performance, and those for the LHC will be no exception. The two largest experiments for CERN's new flagship accelerator, ATLAS and CMS, will both use large superconducting magnets operated at 4.5 Kelvin - almost 270 degrees below the freezing point of water. ATLAS also includes calorimeters filled with liquid argon at 87 Kelvin. For the magnets, the choice of a cryogenic version was dictated by a combination economy and transparency to emerging particles. For the calorimeters, liquid argon was selected as the fluid best suited to the experiment's physics requirements. High Energy Physics experiments are the result of worldwide collaborations and...

  7. High-Luminosity LHC moves to the next phase

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This week saw several meetings vital for the medium-term future of CERN.    From Monday to Wednesday, the Resource Review Board, RRB, that oversees resource allocation in the LHC experiments, had a series of meetings. Thursday then saw the close-out meeting for the Hi-Lumi LHC design study, which was partially funded by the European Commission. These meetings focused on the High Luminosity upgrade for the LHC, which responds to the top priority of the European Strategy for Particle Physics adopted by the CERN Council in 2013. This upgrade will transform the LHC into a facility for precision studies, the logical next step for the high-energy frontier of particle physics. It is a challenging upgrade, both for the LHC and the detectors. The LHC is already the highest luminosity hadron collider ever constructed, generating up to a billion collisions per second at the heart of the detectors. The High Luminosity upgrade will see that number rise by a factor of five from 2025. For the detectors...

  8. Specifications of the Field Quality at Injection Energy of the New Magnets for the HL-LHC Upgrade Project

    CERN Document Server

    De Maria, R; Giovannozzi, M

    2013-01-01

    The HL-LHC project relies on new magnet designs and technologies to achieve very small beta* values. In particular, Nb$_{3}$Sn magnets show large allowed multipole imperfections at low current. These field imperfections may have a non-negligible impact on the dynamic aperture and beam life time in the HL-LHC, also because of the smaller-than- nominal beta* values foreseen IR1 and IR5 at injection energy, which aims at decreasing the dynamic range of the squeeze and therefore contributing to optimize the turn around time. The paper describes an analysis of the machine performance based on analytical estimates and tracking simulations with the goal of providing field quality specifications for the new magnets.

  9. Higgs physics at LHC

    OpenAIRE

    Unal, G

    2006-01-01

    This is a review of Higgs physics at LHC. The topics covered are the search of the Standard Model Higgs boson (with emphasis on the low mass region), the measurements of the Higgs boson properties (mass, width, spin, CP and couplings) and the Higgs sector of the MSSM.

  10. Top-philic Z ' forces at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Patrick J.; Low, Ian; Zhang, Yue

    2018-03-01

    Despite extensive searches for an additional neutral massive gauge boson at the LHC, a Z ' at the weak scale could still be present if its couplings to the first two generations of quarks are suppressed, in which case the production in hadron colliders relies on tree-level processes in association with heavy flavors or one-loop processes in association with a jet. We consider the low-energy effective theory of a top-philic Z ' and present possible UV completions. We clarify theoretical subtleties in evaluating the production of a top-philic Z ' at the LHC and examine carefully the treatment of ananomalous Z ' current in the low-energy effective theory. Recipes for properly computing the production rate in the Z ' + j channel are given. We discuss constraints from colliders and low-energy probes of new physics. As an application, we apply these considerations to models that use a weak-scale Z ' to explain possible violations of lepton universality in B meson decays, and show that the future running of a high luminosity LHC can potentially cover much of the remaining parameter space favored by this particular interpretation of the B physics anomaly.

  11. Snapshots to shed light on LHC performance

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the impressive size and unprecedented power of the LHC, it is all too easy to overlook the smaller devices that have the difficult task of monitoring the new accelerator. You don't have to stand too far back from the big picture to see examples of clever technology inside the LHC. One of the undulators installed in the LHC tunnel can be seen on the right of the photo. From right to left, back row: Lucio Rossi (group leader, MCS), Davide Tommasini (conceptual design, MCS), Thierry Tenaglia (integration design,TS-MME), Remo Maccaferri (project leader, MCS) and Hans Kummer (MCS/ME); front row: Gilles Trachez (MCS-ME) and Bruno Meunier (FSU-AT12). In contrast to the usual articles about the LHC's big number statistics, examples of clever problem-solving found in beam monitoring machinery show that smaller things can be beautiful too. The design of the LHC accelerator brought new challenges for monitoring the shape of the particle beam, known as the beam profile. The size of the beam shrinks as higher energi...

  12. Top Physics at CMS/LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daskalakis Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results on the inclusive and differential production cross sections of top-quark pair and single top-quark processes are presented, obtained using data from proton-proton collisions collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The large centre-of-mass energies available at LHC allow for the copious production of top-quark pairs in association with other final state particles at high transverse momentum. Measurements of such processes as well as of the top-quark mass and other properties will be discussed. The results are compared with the most up-to-date standard model theory predictions.

  13. Search for new phenomena in jets plus missing transverse energy final states at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Caminal Armadans, Roger

    This Thesis presents a search for new phenomena in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC collider. The final state under investigation is defined by the presence of a very energetic jet, large missing transverse energy, a maximum of three reconstructed jets, and no reconstructed leptons, leading to a monojet-like configuration. The monojet final state constitutes a very clean and distinctive signature for new physics processes. After the discovery of the Higgs and the constraints on the masses of first and second generation squarks and gluinos up to the TeV scale, much attention has been put to searches for third generation squarks. These searches are motivated by naturalness arguments, which point to relatively light stops and sbottoms, and therefore allowing their production at the LHC. The monojet analysis is interpreted in terms of pair production of stops and sbottoms, and in terms of inclusive searches for pair production of squarks, and gluinos. In particula...

  14. Beam Optics Studies in the Large Hadron Collider Observations on an Anomalous Octupolar Resonance Line in the LHC -- and -- Accuracy & Feasibility of the $\\beta^*$ Measurement for LHC and HL-LHC Using K-Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Carlier, F S

    While linear LHC dynamics are mostly understood and under control, non-linear beam dynamics will play an increasingly important role in the challenging regimes of future LHC operation. In 2012, turn-by-turn measurements of large betatron excitations of LHC Beam 2 at injection energy were carried out. These measurements revealed an unexpectedly large spectral line in the horizontal motion with frequency $-Q_x-2Q_y$. Detailed analyses and simulations are presented to understand the nature of this spectral line. -- ABSTRACT II -- The future regimes of operation of the LHC will require improved control of $\\beta^*$ measurements to succesfully level the luminosities in the interaction points. The method of K-modulation has been widely used in other machines such as, LEP, HERA, Tevatron and ALBA to measure lattice beta functions. In the LHC, K-modulation of the last quadrupoles of the IP is the method to measure $\\beta^*$ in the IP. This paper highlights the challenge of high precision tune measurements (up to $10...

  15. Evaluation of Beam Losses And Energy Deposition for a Possible Phase II Design for LHC Collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, L.; Bracco, C.; Assmann, R.W.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Mauri, M.; Redaelli, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, V.; Weiler, T.; Doyle, J.E.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.A.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Smith, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beams are designed to have high stability and to be stored for many hours. The nominal beam intensity lifetime is expected to be of the order of 20h. The Phase II collimation system has to be able to handle particle losses in stable physics conditions at 7 TeV in order to avoid beam aborts and to allow correction of parameters and restoration to nominal conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are needed in order to evaluate the behavior of metallic high-Z collimators during operation scenarios using a realistic distribution of losses, which is a mix of the three limiting halo cases. Moreover, the consequences in the IR7 insertion of the worst (case) abnormal beam loss are evaluated. The case refers to a spontaneous trigger of the horizontal extraction kicker at top energy, when Phase II collimators are used. These studies are an important input for engineering design of the collimation Phase II system and for the evaluation of their effect on adjacent components. The goal is to build collimators that can survive the expected conditions during LHC stable physics runs, in order to avoid quenches of the SC magnets and to protect other LHC equipments.

  16. Transversal momentum of the electroweak gauge boson and forward jets in high energy factorisation at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deak, Michal

    2010-06-15

    Fixed order perturbation theory is not able to describe the transversal momentum spectrum of a electro-weak gauge boson. It is needed to resum whole classes of enhanced logarithmic terms. Depending on the phase space region different classes of logarithmic terms can be important. There are different approaches to sum such logarithmic terms including evolution equations of parton density functions. The evolution equation DGLAP which is valid for integrated parton density functions can be used to effectively produce unintegrated parton density functions using parton shower algorithm, but this approach involves kinematical approximations. With opening of phase space region {lambda}{sup 2}{sub QCD} << {mu}{sup 2} << s at the LHC approaches based on the BFKL and the CCFM equations are becoming more relevant. The BFKL and the CCFM equations define genuine unintegrated parton density functions which can be convoluted with matrix elements with off-shell initial state gluons. The off-shell matrix element for Z/W+Q anti Q production was calculated the Monte Carlo Cascade based on the CCFM evolution equation was used to study the phenomenology of this process concentrated on observables connected with the electro-weak gauge boson for the LHC kinematics. The widening of the peak of the transversal momentum spectrum of the electroweak boson is observed and discussed. The forward jet production using unintegrated parton density functions and off-shell matrix elements at the LHC was studied as a probe for small-x dynamics. Differences in azimuthal decorrelation and harder forward jet transversal momentum spectrum are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Transversal momentum of the electroweak gauge boson and forward jets in high energy factorisation at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deak, Michal

    2010-06-01

    Fixed order perturbation theory is not able to describe the transversal momentum spectrum of a electro-weak gauge boson. It is needed to resum whole classes of enhanced logarithmic terms. Depending on the phase space region different classes of logarithmic terms can be important. There are different approaches to sum such logarithmic terms including evolution equations of parton density functions. The evolution equation DGLAP which is valid for integrated parton density functions can be used to effectively produce unintegrated parton density functions using parton shower algorithm, but this approach involves kinematical approximations. With opening of phase space region Λ 2 QCD 2 << s at the LHC approaches based on the BFKL and the CCFM equations are becoming more relevant. The BFKL and the CCFM equations define genuine unintegrated parton density functions which can be convoluted with matrix elements with off-shell initial state gluons. The off-shell matrix element for Z/W+Q anti Q production was calculated the Monte Carlo Cascade based on the CCFM evolution equation was used to study the phenomenology of this process concentrated on observables connected with the electro-weak gauge boson for the LHC kinematics. The widening of the peak of the transversal momentum spectrum of the electroweak boson is observed and discussed. The forward jet production using unintegrated parton density functions and off-shell matrix elements at the LHC was studied as a probe for small-x dynamics. Differences in azimuthal decorrelation and harder forward jet transversal momentum spectrum are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Auchmann, B.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P.P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E.B.; Lechner, A.; Del Busto, E. Nebot; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-25

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam- induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy depositio...

  19. Stepping outside the neighborhood of Tc at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    ' As you are well aware, many in the RHIC community are interested in the LHC heavy-ion program, but have several questions: What can we learn at the LHC that is qualitatively new? Are collisions at LHC similar to RHIC ones, just with a somewhat hotter/denser initial state? If not, why not? These questions are asked in good faith, and this talk is an opportunity to answer them directly to much of the RHIC community.' With these words, the organizers of Quark Matter 2009 in Knoxville invited me to discuss the physics opportunities for heavy ion collisions at the LHC without recalling the standard arguments, which are mainly based on the extended kinematic reach of the machine. In response, I emphasize here that lattice QCD indicates characteristic qualitative differences between thermal physics in the neighborhood of the critical temperature (T c 400-500MeV), for which the relevant energy densities will be solely attainable at the LHC.

  20. Shaping Collaboration 2006: action items for the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, S [CERN-PH, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Herr, J; Neal, H A [Assistant Research Scientist, University of Michigan (United States); Research Process Manager, University of Michigan (United States); Professor of Physics, University of Michigan (United States)], E-mail: steven.goldfarb@cern.ch

    2008-07-15

    Shaping Collaboration 2006 [1] was a workshop held in Geneva, on December 11-13, 2006, to examine the status and future of collaborative tool technology and its usage for large global scientific collaborations, such as those of the CERN LHC [2]. The workshop brought together some of the leading experts in the field of collaborative tools (WACE 2006) [3] with physicists and developers of the LHC collaborations and HENP (High-Energy and Nuclear Physics). We highlight important presentations and key discussions held during the workshop, then focus on a large and aggressive set of goals and specific action items targeted at institutes from all levels of the LHC organization. This list of action items, assembled during a panel discussion at the close of the LHC sessions, includes recommendations for the LHC Users, their Universities, Project Managers, Spokespersons, National Funding Agencies and Host Laboratories. We present this list, along with suggestions for priorities in addressing the immediate and long-term needs of HENP.

  1. Shaping Collaboration 2006: action items for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfarb, S; Herr, J; Neal, H A

    2008-01-01

    Shaping Collaboration 2006 [1] was a workshop held in Geneva, on December 11-13, 2006, to examine the status and future of collaborative tool technology and its usage for large global scientific collaborations, such as those of the CERN LHC [2]. The workshop brought together some of the leading experts in the field of collaborative tools (WACE 2006) [3] with physicists and developers of the LHC collaborations and HENP (High-Energy and Nuclear Physics). We highlight important presentations and key discussions held during the workshop, then focus on a large and aggressive set of goals and specific action items targeted at institutes from all levels of the LHC organization. This list of action items, assembled during a panel discussion at the close of the LHC sessions, includes recommendations for the LHC Users, their Universities, Project Managers, Spokespersons, National Funding Agencies and Host Laboratories. We present this list, along with suggestions for priorities in addressing the immediate and long-term needs of HENP

  2. VUV photoemission studies of candidate LHC vacuum chamber materials

    CERN Document Server

    Baglin, V; Collins, I R

    1998-01-01

    In the context of future accelerators and, in particular, the beam vacuum of the LargeHadron Collider (LHC), a 27 km circumference proton collider to be built at CERN, VUVsynchrotron radiation (SR) has been used to study both qualitatively and quantitatively candidatevacuum chamber materials. Emphasis is given to show that angle and energy resolvedphotoemission is an extremely powerful tool to address important issues relevant to the LHC, suchas the emission of electrons that contribute to the creation of an electron cloud which may causeserious beam instabilities. Here we present not only the measured photoelectron yields (PY)from the proposed materials, prepared on an industrial scale, but also the energy and, in some cases,the angular dependence of the emitted electrons when excited with either a white light (WL)spectrum, simulating that in the arcs of the LHC or monochromatic light in the photon energy rangeof interest. The effects on the materials examined of WL irradiation and/or ion sputtering,simulati...

  3. Higgs physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mariotti, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The first measurements of the mass, the width, and the couplings of the newly discovered Higgs boson at LHC at 7 and 8 TeV center of mass energy will be reviewed. Recent results at 13 TeV center of mass energy will be presented. Finally, searches for additional Higgs bosons in models beyond the standard model will be summarised.

  4. The effective Standard Model after LHC Run I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, John; Sanz, Verónica; You, Tevong

    2015-01-01

    We treat the Standard Model as the low-energy limit of an effective field theory that incorporates higher-dimensional operators to capture the effects of decoupled new physics. We consider the constraints imposed on the coefficients of dimension-6 operators by electroweak precision tests (EWPTs), applying a framework for the effects of dimension-6 operators on electroweak precision tests that is more general than the standard S,T formalism, and use measurements of Higgs couplings and the kinematics of associated Higgs production at the Tevatron and LHC, as well as triple-gauge couplings at the LHC. We highlight the complementarity between EWPTs, Tevatron and LHC measurements in obtaining model-independent limits on the effective Standard Model after LHC Run 1. We illustrate the combined constraints with the example of the two-Higgs doublet model.

  5. The Effective Standard Model after LHC Run I

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; You, Tevong

    2015-01-01

    We treat the Standard Model as the low-energy limit of an effective field theory that incorporates higher-dimensional operators to capture the effects of decoupled new physics. We consider the constraints imposed on the coefficients of dimension-6 operators by electroweak precision tests (EWPTs), applying a framework for the effects of dimension-6 operators on electroweak precision tests that is more general than the standard $S,T$ formalism, and use measurements of Higgs couplings and the kinematics of associated Higgs production at the Tevatron and LHC, as well as triple-gauge couplings at the LHC. We highlight the complementarity between EWPTs, Tevatron and LHC measurements in obtaining model-independent limits on the effective Standard Model after LHC Run~1. We illustrate the combined constraints with the example of the two-Higgs doublet model.

  6. Real-Time Schottky Measurements in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2241943; Aune, D.

    The accelerator complex at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) is a diverse collection of machines, tailored for different energy ranges, and concatenated in order to accelerate/decelerate particle beams. Leading up to CERN’s flagship accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), every accelerator in the chain boosts the particles to higher energies before they are injected into the next machine in the sequence. The LHC is a circular synchrotron accelerator consisting of two 27-kilometer vacuum tubes equipped with superconducting magnets and accelerating RF cavities in order to increase the energy of the particles along the way. Inside the vacuum tubes, two counter-rotating high-energy particle beams travel at velocities close to the speed of light before they are made to collide inside particle detectors at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. As the particles are accelerated, they experience various external and internal forces. RF cavities are used to boost the speed of the particles an...

  7. Simulation of Electron-Cloud Build-Up for the Cold Arcs of the LHC and Comparison with Measured Data

    CERN Document Server

    Maury Cuna, H; Rumolo, G; Tavian, L; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    The electron cloud generated by synchrotron radiation or residual gas ionization is a concern for LHC operation and performance. We report the results of simulations studies which examine the electron cloud build-up, at injection energy, 3.5 TeV for various operation parameters. In particular, we determine the value of the secondary emission yield corresponding to the multipacting threshold, and investigate the electron density, and heat as a function of bunch intensity for dipoles and field-free regions. We also include a comparison between simulations results and measured heat-load data from the LHC scrubbing runs in 2011.

  8. Beam-Beam Interaction Studies at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumann, Michaela; Alemany Fernandez, R

    2011-01-01

    The beam-beam force is one of the most important limiting factors in the performance of a collider, mainly in the delivered luminosity. Therefore, it is essential to measure the effects in LHC. Moreover, adequate understanding of LHC beam-beam interaction is of crucial importance in the design phases of the LHC luminosity upgrade. Due to the complexity of this topic the work presented in this thesis concentrates on the beam-beam tune shift and orbit effects. The study of the Linear Coherent Beam-Beam Parameter at the LHC has been determined with head-on collisions with small number of bunches at injection energy (450 GeV). For high bunch intensities the beam-beam force is strong enough to expect orbit effects if the two beams do not collide head-on but with a crossing angle or with a given offset. As a consequence the closed orbit changes. The closed orbit of an unperturbed machine with respect to a machine where the beam-beam force becomes more and more important has been studied and the results are as well ...

  9. LHC experiences close encounters with UFOs

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    On 29 May, yet another record was set as 1092 bunches per beam were injected into the LHC, hitting a peak luminosity of 1.26x1033 cm-2 s-1. While running at 3.5 TeV each beam now packs a total energy of over 70 MJ – equivalent to a TGV travelling at a 70 kph.   Operators in the LHC Control Centre happily show off their display screens after succesfully injecting 1092 bunches injected into the machine for the first time.  As the total beam intensity has been pushed up, the LHC has encountered a number of related problems, such as the so-called UFOs (Unidentified Falling Objects). These are thought to be dust particles falling through the beam, causing localized beam loss. The losses can push nearby beam loss monitors over the threshold and dump the beam. This is more of an annoyance than a danger for the LHC, but UFOs do reduce the operational efficiency of the machine. Despite this, the luminosity delivered to the experiments has steadily increased. On three occasions there ha...

  10. Performance of the ATLAS hadronic Tile Calorimeter in Run-2 and its upgrade for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00223789; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tauparticles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudo-rapidity up to 1.7, with almost 10000 channels measuring energies ranging from ∼30 MeV to ∼2 TeV. Each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction, is monitored and calibrated. The performance of the Tile calorimeter has been studied in-situ employing cosmic ray muons and a large sample of proton-proton collisions, acquired during the operations of the LHC. Prompt isolated muons of high momentum from electroweak bosons decays are employed to study the energy response of the calorimeter at the electromagnetic scale. The calorimeter response to hadronic particles is evaluated with a sample of isolated hadrons. The modelling of the response by the Monte Carlo simulation is discussed. T...

  11. $pp$ Elastic Scattering at LHC and Nucleon Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M M; Prokudin, A V

    2003-01-01

    High energy elastic pp differential cross section at LHC at the c.m. energy 14 TeV is predicted using the asymptotic behavior of sigma-tot(s) and rho(s), and the measured pbar-p differential cross section at sqrt{s}=546 GeV. The phenomenological investigation has progressively led to an effective field theory model that describes the nucleon as a chiral bag embedded in a quark-antiquark condensed ground state. The measurement of pp elastic scattering at LHC up to large |t| >~ 10 GeV^2 by the TOTEM group will be crucial to test this structure of the nucleon.

  12. pp Elastic Scattering at LHC and Nucleon Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M M; Prokudin, A V

    2003-01-01

    High energy elastic pp differential cross section at LHC at the c.m. energy 14 TeV is predicted using the asymptotic behavior of tot(s) and (s), and the measured p differential cross section at =546 GeV. The phenomenological investigation has progressively led to an effective field theory model that describes the nucleon as a chiral bag embedded in a quark-antiquark condensed ground state. The measurement of pp elastic scattering at LHC up to large |t| 10 GeV2 by the TOTEM group will be crucial to test this structure of the nucleon.

  13. Fluka studies of the Asynchronous Beam Dump Effects on LHC Point 6

    CERN Document Server

    Versaci, R; Goddard, B; Mereghetti, A; Schmidt, R; Vlachoudis, V; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is a record-breaking machine for beam energy and intensity. An intense effort has therefore been deployed in simulating critical operational scenarios of energy deposition. Using FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, we have investigated the effects of an asynchronous beam dump at the LHC Point 6 where beams, with a stored energy of 360 MJ, can instantaneously release up to a few J cm^-3 in the cryogenic magnets which have a quench limit of the order of the mJ cm^-3. In the present paper we will describe the simulation approach, and discuss the evaluated maximum energy release onto the superconducting magnets during an asynchronous beam dump. We will then analyze the shielding provided by collimators installed in the area and discuss safety limits for the operation of the LHC.

  14. Little Higgs model limits from LHC - Input for Snowmass 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, Juergen; Tonini, Marco; Vries, Maikel de

    2013-07-01

    The status of the most prominent model implementations of the Little Higgs paradigm, the Littlest Higgs with and without discrete T parity as well as the Simplest Little Higgs are reviewed. For this, we are taking into account a fit to 21 electroweak precision observables from LEP, SLC, Tevatron together with the full 25 fb -1 of Higgs data reported from ATLAS and CMS at Moriond 2013. We also - focusing on the Littlest Higgs with T parity - include an outlook on corresponding direct searches at the 8 TeV LHC and their competitiveness with the EW and Higgs data regarding their exclusion potential. This contribution to the Snowmass procedure serves as a guideline which regions in parameter space of Little Higgs models are still compatible for the upcoming LHC runs and future experiments at the energy frontier. For this we propose two different benchmark scenarios for the Littlest Higgs with T parity, one with heavy mirror quarks, one with light ones.

  15. Little Higgs model limits from LHC - Input for Snowmass 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuter, Juergen; Tonini, Marco; Vries, Maikel. de

    2013-07-15

    The status of the most prominent model implementations of the Little Higgs paradigm, the Littlest Higgs with and without discrete T parity as well as the Simplest Little Higgs are reviewed. For this, we are taking into account a fit to 21 electroweak precision observables from LEP, SLC, Tevatron together with the full 25 fb{sup -1} of Higgs data reported from ATLAS and CMS at Moriond 2013. We also - focusing on the Littlest Higgs with T parity - include an outlook on corresponding direct searches at the 8 TeV LHC and their competitiveness with the EW and Higgs data regarding their exclusion potential. This contribution to the Snowmass procedure serves as a guideline which regions in parameter space of Little Higgs models are still compatible for the upcoming LHC runs and future experiments at the energy frontier. For this we propose two different benchmark scenarios for the Littlest Higgs with T parity, one with heavy mirror quarks, one with light ones.

  16. Loss Control and Collimation for the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, H.

    2005-06-01

    The total energy stored in the LHC is expected to reach 360 Mega Joule, which is about two orders of magnitude higher than in HERA or the Tevatron. Damage and quench protection in the LHC require a highly efficient and at the same time very robust collimation system. The currently planned system, the status of the project and the expected performance of the collimation system from injection up to operation with colliding beams will be presented.

  17. Loss Control and Collimation for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, H.

    2005-01-01

    The total energy stored in the LHC is expected to reach 360 Mega Joule, which is about two orders of magnitude higher than in HERA or the Tevatron. Damage and quench protection in the LHC require a highly efficient and at the same time very robust collimation system. The currently planned system, the status of the project and the expected performance of the collimation system from injection up to operation with colliding beams will be presented

  18. MSSM A-funnel and the galactic center excess: prospects for the LHC and direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freese, Katherine [Nordita (Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics),KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Center for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Center,University of Stockholm,10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); López, Alejandro [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Shah, Nausheen R. [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University,Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Shakya, Bibhushan [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-04-11

    The pseudoscalar resonance or “A-funnel' in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is a widely studied framework for explaining dark matter that can yield interesting indirect detection and collider signals. The well-known Galactic Center excess (GCE) at GeV energies in the gamma ray spectrum, consistent with annihilation of a ≲40 GeV dark matter particle, has more recently been shown to be compatible with significantly heavier masses following reanalysis of the background. In this paper, we explore the LHC and direct detection implications of interpreting the GCE in this extended mass window within the MSSM A-funnel framework. We find that compatibility with relic density, signal strength, collider constraints, and Higgs data can be simultaneously achieved with appropriate parameter choices. The compatible regions give very sharp predictions of 200–600 GeV CP-odd/even Higgs bosons at low tan β at the LHC and spin-independent cross sections ≈10{sup −11} pb at direct detection experiments. Regardless of consistency with the GCE, this study serves as a useful template of the strong correlations between indirect, direct, and LHC signatures of the MSSM A-funnel region.

  19. Half way round the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    The LHC operations teams are preparing the machine for circulating beams and things are going very smoothly. ALICE and LHCb are getting used to observing particle tracks coming from the LHC beams. During the weekend of 7-8 November, CMS also  saw its first signals from beams dumped just upstream of  the experiment cavern.   Operators in the CMS control room observe the good performance of their detector. Particles are smoothly making their way around the 27 km circumference of the LHC. Last weekend (7-8 November), the first bunches of injection energy protons completed their journey (anti-clockwise) through three octants of the LHC’s circumference and were dumped in a collimator just before entering the CMS cavern. The particles produced by the impact of the protons on the tertiary collimators (used to stop the beam) left their tracks in the calorimeters and the muon chambers of the experiment. The more delicate inner detectors were switched off for protection reasons....

  20. The LHC machine-experiment interface

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Tsesmelis, Emmanuel; Brüning, Oliver Sim

    2002-01-01

    This series of three lectures will provide an overview of issues arising at the interface between the LHC machine and the experiments, which are required for guiding the interaction between the collider and the experiments when operation of the LHC commences. A basic description of the LHC Collider and its operating parameters, such as its energy, currents, bunch structure and luminosity, as well as variations on these parameters, will be given. Furthermore, the optics foreseen for the experimental insertions, the sources and intensities of beam losses and the running-in scenarios for the various phases of operation will be discussed. A second module will cover the specific requirements and expectations of each experiment in terms of the layout of experimental areas, the matters related to radiation monitoring and shielding, the design of the beam pipe and the vacuum system, alignment issues and the measurement of the total cross-section and absolute luminosity by the experiments. Finally an analysis of infor...

  1. LHC physics: challenges for QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Frixione, S.

    2003-01-01

    I review the status of the comparisons between a few measurements at hadronic colliders and perturbative QCD predictions, which emphasize the need for improving the current computations. Such improvements will be mandatory for a satisfactory understanding of high-energy collisions at the LHC

  2. First operational experience with the LHC machine protection system when operating with beam energies beyond the 100MJ range

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Goddard, B; Lamont, M; Schmidt, R; Siemko, A; Uythoven, J; Wenninger, J; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has made remarkable progress during 2011, surpassing its ambitious goal for the year in terms of luminosity delivered to the LHC experiments. This achievement was made possible by a progressive increase of beam intensities by more than 5 orders of magnitude during the first months of operation, reaching stored beam energies beyond the 100MJ range at the end of the year, less than a factor of 4 from the nominal design value. The correct functioning of the machine protection systems is vital during the different operational phases, for initial operation and even more when approaching nominal beam parameters where already a small fraction of the stored energy is sufficient to damage accelerator equipment or experiments in case of uncontrolled beam loss. Safe operation of the machine in presence of such high intensity proton beams is guaranteed by the interplay of many different systems: beam dumping system, beam interlocks, beam instrumentation, equipment monitoring, colli...

  3. Coherence Phenomena in Charmonium Production off Nuclei at the Energies of RHIC and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeliovich, V B; Hüfner, J

    2001-01-01

    In the energy range of RHIC and LHC the mechanisms of nuclear suppression of charmonia are expected to be strikingly different from what is known for the energy of the SPS. One cannot think any more of charmonium produced on a bound nucleon which then attenuates as it passes through the rest of the nucleus. The coherence length of charmonium production substantially exceeds the nuclear radius in the new energy range. Therefore the production amplitudes on different nucleons, rather than the cross sections, add up and interfere, i.e. shadowing is at work. So far no theoretical tool has been available to calculate nuclear effects for charmonium production in this energy regime. We develop a light-cone Green function formalism which incorporates the effects of the coherence of the production amplitudes and of charmonium wave function formation, and is the central result of this paper. We found a substantial deviation from QCD factorization, namely, gluon shadowing is much stronger for charmonium production than ...

  4. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) : Preliminary Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Béjar Alonso, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Brüning, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Lamont, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Rossi, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-12-17

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cavities for beam rotation with ultra-precise phase control, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation and 300 metre-long high-power superconducting links with negligible energy dissipation. The present document describes the technologies and components that will be used to realise the project and is intended to serve as the basis for the detailed engineering design of HL-LHC.

  5. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) : Preliminary Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apollinari, G.; Béjar Alonso, I.; Brüning, O.; Lamont, M.; Rossi, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cavities for beam rotation with ultra-precise phase control, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation and 300 metre-long high-power superconducting links with negligible energy dissipation. The present document describes the technologies and components that will be used to realise the project and is intended to serve as the basis for the detailed engineering design of HL-LHC.

  6. Literature in Focus Perspectives on LHC Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Library invites you to a book presentation, a Literature in Focus event. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be the world’s largest, highest energy and highest intensity particle accelerator. This is a timely book with several perspectives on the hoped-for discoveries from the LHC. This book provides an overview of the techniques that will be crucial for finding new physics at the LHC, as well as perspectives on the importance and implications of the discoveries. Among the accomplished contributors to this book are leaders and visionaries in the field of particle physics beyond the Standard Model, including two Nobel Laureates (Steven Weinberg and Frank Wilczek). With its blend of popular and technical contents, the book will have wide appeal, not only to physical scientists but also to those in related fields. Perspectives on LHC Physics (World Scientific Publishing) Gordon Kane and Aaron Pierce (eds.) Tuesday 12 August, 4.30pm Council Chamber Refresh...

  7. Electron cloud buildup studies for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160803; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    Electron clouds can develop in accelerators operating with positively charged particles. The con- sequences of e-cloud related effects are very important for the operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and for the design of future accelerators including the LHC luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). High electron densities are generated by an interaction between the beam and the confining chamber. Primary electrons, that can be generated through various mecha- nisms, are accelerated by the beam and impinge on the chamber walls, thereby extracting more electrons from the material. Furthermore they also deposit their kinetic energy in the process, which has to be compensated by the cooling system. Especially in cryogenic environments, as it is the case for a large part of the LHC, high heat loads can pose a serious problem. In order to improve the understanding of the electron cloud, simulation studies are performed with the code PyECLOUD, developed at CERN. The work of the first half of the project is desc...

  8. Radiation-hard Optoelectronics for LHC detector upgrades.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00375195; Newbold, Dave

    A series of upgrades foreseen for the LHC over the next decade will allow the proton-proton collisions to reach the design center of mass energy of 14 TeV and increase the luminosity to five times (High Luminosity-LHC) the design luminosity by 2027. Radiation-tolerant high-speed optical data transmission links will continue to play an important role in the infrastructure of particle physics experiments over the next decade. A new generation of optoelectronics that meet the increased performance and radiation tolerance limits imposed by the increase in the intensity of the collisions at the interaction points are currently being developed. This thesis focuses on the development of a general purpose bi-directional 5 Gb/s radiation tolerant optical transceiver, the Versatile Transceiver (VTRx), for use by the LHC experiments over the next five years, and on exploring the radiation-tolerance of state-of-the art silicon photonics modulators for HL-LHC data transmission applications. The compliance of the VTRx ...

  9. CMS RPC muon detector performance with 2010-2012 LHC data

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00316302; Ban, Y.; Cai, J.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Qian, S.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Choi, Y.; Kim, D.; Goh, J.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Kang, J.W.; Kang, M.; Kwon, J.H.; Lee, K.S.; Lee, S.K.; Park, S.K.; Pant, L.M.; Mohanty, A.K.; Chudasama, R.; Singh, J.B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Mehta, A.; Kumar, R.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Costantini, S.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Ocampo, A.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Doninck, W.V.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro, L.; Gomez, J.P.; Gomez, B.; Sanabria, J.C.; Avila, C.; Ahmad, A.; Muhammad, S.; Shoaib, M.; Hoorani, H.; Awan, I.; Ali, I.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M.I.; Shahzad, H.; Sayed, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Elkafrawy, T.; Sharma, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Radogna, R.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Paolucci, P.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Merola, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, O.M.; Braghieri, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Vai, I.; Magnani, A.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Stoykova, S.; Hadjiiska, R.; Ibargüen, H.S.; Morales, M.I.P.; Bernardino, S.C.; Bagaturia, I.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Crotty, I.; Kim, M.S.

    2014-12-05

    The muon spectrometer of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is equipped with a redundant system made of Resistive Plate Chambers and Drift Tube in barrel and RPC and Cathode Strip Chamber in endcap region. In this paper, the operations and performance of the RPC system during the first three years of LHC activity will be reported. The integrated charge was about 2 mC/cm$^{2}$, for the most exposed detectors. The stability of RPC performance, with particular attention on the stability of detector performance such as efficiency, cluster size and noise, will be reported. Finally, the radiation background levels on the RPC system have been measured as a function of the LHC luminosity. Extrapolations to the LHC design conditions and HL-LHC are also discussed.

  10. Strangeness production in Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies with ALICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šefčík Michal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The results on the production of strange and multi-strange hadrons (K0S, Λ, Ξ and Ω measured with ALICE in Pb-Pb collisions at the top LHC energy of SNN = 5.02 TeV are reported. Thanks to its excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities, ALICE is able to measure weakly decaying particles through the topological reconstruction of the identified hadronic decay products. Results are presented as a function of centrality and include transverse momentum spectra measured at central rapidity, pT-dependent Λ/K0S ratios and integrated yields. A systematic study of strangeness production is of fundamental importance for determining the thermal properties of the system created in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. In order to study strangeness enhancement, the yields of studied particles are normalised to the corresponding measurement of pion production in the various centrality classes. The results are compared to measurements performed at lower energies, as well as to different systems and to predictions from statistical hadronization models.

  11. The LHC and its electrotechnical challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordry, F.

    2010-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the CERN, the European organization for nuclear research, this article presents the LHC, the Large Hadron Collider, the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world. The project somehow started in 1984 and relies on several technological challenges which are herein described: superconducting magnets (their characteristics and cryogenic operation), operation security with particularly high energies stored in magnets and beams, LHC electricity supply (electric circuits with high time constant, a required precision and reproducibility of the magnetic field during all the operation phases, importance of power converters). Then the author evokes the starting procedures, some serious damages which occurred, and the restart of the operation period with spectacular results in terms of beam energy. Future experiments and expected results are also evoked

  12. Spin and diffractive physics with a fixed-target experiment at the LHC (AFTER-LHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorce, C.; Chambert, V.; Didelez, J. P.; Genolini, B.; Hadjidakis, C.; Lansberg, J. P.; Rosier, P. [IPNO, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91406, Orsay (France); Anselmino, M.; Arnaldi, R.; Scomparin, E. [INFN Sez. Torino, Via P. Giuria 1,1-10125, Torino (Italy); Brodsky, S. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford U, Stanford, CA 94309, (United States); Ferreiro, E. G. [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Univ. de Santiago de C, 15782 Santiago de C (Spain); Fleuret, F. [Laboratoire Leprince Ringuet, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Rakotozafindrabe, A. [IRFU/SPhN, CFA Society, 91191 Gifsur-Yvette Cedex (France); Schienbein, I. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier, CNRS/IN2P3/INPG, F-38026 Grenoble (France); Uggerhoj, U. I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus (Denmark)

    2013-04-15

    We report on the spin and diffractive physics at a future multi-purpose f xed-target experiment with proton and lead LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. The LHC multi-TeV beams allow for the most energetic f xed-target experiments ever performed, opening new domains of particle and nuclear physics and complementing that of collider physics, in particular that of RHIC and the EIC projects. The luminosity achievable with AFTER using typical targets would surpass that of RHIC by more than 3 orders of magnitude. The f xed-target mode has the advantage to allow for measurements of single-spin asymmetries with polarized target as well as of single-diffractive processes in the target region.

  13. Spin and diffractive physics with a fixed-target experiment at the LHC (AFTER-LHC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorcé, C.; Chambert, V.; Didelez, J. P.; Genolini, B.; Hadjidakis, C.; Lansberg, J. P.; Rosier, P.; Anselmino, M.; Arnaldi, R.; Scomparin, E.; Brodsky, S. J.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Fleuret, F.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Schienbein, I.; Uggerhøj, U. I.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the spin and diffractive physics at a future multi-purpose f xed-target experiment with proton and lead LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. The LHC multi-TeV beams allow for the most energetic f xed-target experiments ever performed, opening new domains of particle and nuclear physics and complementing that of collider physics, in particular that of RHIC and the EIC projects. The luminosity achievable with AFTER using typical targets would surpass that of RHIC by more than 3 orders of magnitude. The f xed-target mode has the advantage to allow for measurements of single-spin asymmetries with polarized target as well as of single-diffractive processes in the target region.

  14. Bringing the LHC and ATLAS to a regional planetarium

    CERN Document Server

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    An outreach effort has started at Michigan State University to bring particle physics, the Large Hadron Collider, and the ATLAS experiment to a general audience at the Abrams planetarium on the MSU campus. A team of undergraduate students majoring in physics, communications arts & sciences, and journalism are putting together short clips about ATLAS and the LHC to be shown at the planetarium.

  15. Tool-chain for online modeling of the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.J.; Buffat, X.; Fuchsberger, K.; Giovannozzi, M.; Redaelli, S.; Schmidt, F.

    2012-01-01

    The control of high intensity beams in a high energy, superconducting machine with complex optics like the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is challenging not only from the design aspect but also for operation towards physics production. To support the LHC beam commissioning, efforts were devoted to the design and implementation of a software infrastructure aimed at using the computing power of the beam dynamics code MAD-X in the framework of the JAVA-based LHC control and measurement environment. Alongside interfaces to measurement data as well as to settings of the control system, the best knowledge of machine aperture and optic models is provided. In this paper, we will present the status of the tool chain and illustrate how it has been used during commissioning and operation of the LHC. Possible future implementations will be discussed. (authors)

  16. Very forward measurements at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Berretti, Mirko

    2017-01-01

    In this talk we present a selection of forward physics results recently obtained with the run-1 and run-2 LHC data by the CMS, LHCf and TOTEM experiments. The status of the very forward LHC proton spectrometer, CT-PPS, is discussed: emphasis is given to the physics potential of CT-PPS and to the analyses that are currently ongoing with the data collected in 2016. Very recent forward measurements obtained with the LHCf and the CMS-CASTOR calorimeter are then addressed. In particular, CMS measured the inclusive energy spectrum in the very forward direction for proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV and the jet cross sections for p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. The LHCf experiment has instead recently published the inclusive energy spectra of forward photons for pp collisions at 13 TeV. Finally, the new measurements of the total, elastic and inelastic cross sections obtained by the TOTEM collaboration at 2.76 and 13 TeV center of mass energy are presented.

  17. Search for new physics in final states with a high energy electron and large missing transverse energy

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00345099

    The most successful and comprehensive theory describing the microcosm is the Standard Model of particle physics (SM). It comprises all known elementary particles and describes in high precision the basic processes of three of the four fundamental interactions. But still, not all experimental observations and theoretical challenges are covered. Many models exist that take the SM as a good approximation of natural phenomena in already discovered energy regions, but extend it in various ways. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provides the opportunity to look into these high energy regions using proton-proton collisions at significantly higher center-of-mass energies than previous experiments. This dissertation searches for physics beyond the SM especially in final states with one highly energetic electron (respectively positron) and large missing transverse energy. With the data set recorded in 2012 by the ATLAS detector, a large multi-purpose detector making use of the LHC, the spectrum of the related combined ...

  18. LHC Results on Charmonium in Heavy Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Byungsik

    2012-01-01

    In heavy-ion collisions at high energies, the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) predicts the production of the deconfined quark-gluon plasma (QGP) state. Quarkonia ($c\\bar{c}$ or $b\\bar{b}$ bound states) are a useful means to probe QGP and to investigate the behavior of QCD under the high parton-density environment. Up to now, the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN provided two runs for PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV in the years 2010 and 2011. The ALICE, ATLAS, and CMS experiments at LHC have analyzed the yields and spectra of the $J/\\psi$ and $\\Upsilon$ families. In this article, we review particularly the recent charmonium results in PbPb collisions at LHC from the 2010 run.

  19. Study of multi-strange baryon production with ALICE at the LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Colella, Domenico

    This thesis reports on the measurement of the multi-strange baryon production in lead-lead (Pb-Pb) and proton-proton (pp) collisions at the centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per nucleon pair using the ALICE detector. The cascade identification technique, based on the topological reconstruction of weak decays into charged particles only is very effective thanks to the excellent particle identification and tracking capability of the ALICE central barrel detectors. The comparison of the transverse momentum (p$_T$) spectra for the $\\Xi^{-}$ and $\\Omega^{-}$ (and corresponding anti-particle) in Pb-Pb collisions with expectations from recent hydro models confirms the importance of an hydrodynamical approach in the description of the created system evolution. In addition, recent PYTHIA tunes results to underestimate the yields for the cascades in pp collisions. The measurements of the strangeness enhancement, one of the predicted signatures of the QGP formation, for the $\\Xi$ and $\\Omega$ at the LHC energy have been...

  20. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Performance at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Molander, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. The TileCal pays a major role in detecting hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and measuring the missing transverse energy. Due to the very good signal to noise ratio it assists the muon spectrometer in the identification and reconstruction of muons, which are also a tool for the in situ energy scale validation. The results presented here stem from the data collection in dedicated calibration runs, in cosmic rays data-taking and in LHC collisions along 3 years of operation. The uniformity, stability and precision of the energy scale, the time measurement capabilities and the robustness of the performance against pile-up are exposed through the usage of hadronic and muon final states and confirm the design expectations.

  1. HL-LHC Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    The tentative schedule, key ingredients, as well as progress of pertinent R&D and component prototypes for the LHC luminosity upgrade, "HL-LHC," are reviewed. Also alternative scenarios based on performance-improving consolidations (PICs) instead of a full upgrade are discussed. Tentative time schedules and expected luminosity evolutions for the different scenarios are sketched. The important role of HL-LHC development as a step towards a future HE-LHC or VHE-LHC is finally highlighted. Presented at "Higgs & Beyond" Conference Tohoku University, Sendai 7 June 2013.

  2. Low-scale gravity black holes at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Regos, E; Gamsizkan, H; Trocsanyi, Z

    2009-01-01

    We search for extra dimensions by looking for black holes at LHC. Theoretical investigations provide the basis for the collider experiments. We use black hole generators to simulate the experimental signatures (colour, charge, spectrum of emitted particles, missing transverse energy) of black holes at LHC in models with TeV scale quantum gravity, rotation, fermion splitting, brane tension and Hawking radiation. We implement the extra-dimensional simulations at the CMS data analysis and test further beyond standard models of black holes too.

  3. Azimuthal anisotropy of jet quenching at LHC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We analyze the azimuthal anisotropy of jet spectra due to energy loss of hard partons in quark–gluon plasma, created initially in nuclear overlap zone in collisions with non-zero impact parameter. The calculations are performed for semi-central Pb–Pb collisions at LHC energy.

  4. Reliability Analysis of the new Link between the Beam Interlock System and the LHC Beam Dumping System Zuverlässigkeitsanalyse der neuen Verbindung zwischen dem Beam Interlock System und dem LHC Beam Dumping System

    CERN Document Server

    Vatansever, Volkan

    The nominal stored energy in each LHC beam is 360 MJ, surpassing the beam energy of other accelerators by orders of magnitude. This energy threatens to damage accelerator components in case of uncontrolled beam losses To avoid damage of accelerator equipment due to impacting beam, the controlled removal of the LHC beams from the collider rings towards the dump block must be guaranteed at all times. Therefore, the LHC Beam Dumping System was built according to high reliability standards. To further reduce the risk of incapability to dump the beams in case of correlated failures in the redundant system, a new direct link from the LHC Beam Interlock System to the Re-triggering Lines of the LHC Beam Dumping System will be implemented for the startup with beam in 2015. This link represents a diverse redundancy to the current implementation, which should neither significantly increase the risk for so-called Asynchronous Beam Dumps nor compromise machine availability. Therefore, a reliability analysis down to the co...

  5. Beleaguered LHC gears up for restart

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartwright, Jon

    2009-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is finally set to restart in mid-November following last year's accident. Initially it will collide protons at an energy of only 3.5 TeV per beam, and staff at Cern will have to wait until late next year before trying to run the collider at its maximum energy" (0.75 page)

  6. Review of 2011 LHC run from the experiments perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro-Luzzi, M [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The 2011 LHC run is reviewed from the experiments' perspective. The LHC achievements directly related to physics production are summarized. This includes high luminosity p-p and Pb-Pb running, special activities (such as intermediate energy p-p physics, 90 m optics, luminosity calibrations) and other experiments (for example satellite-main bunch collisions in IP2, 25 ns stable beams tests, etc.). (author)

  7. CERN prepares for the LHC and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, Peter

    2000-01-01

    structure: an inner tracker to measure the paths of electrically charged particles; a calorimeter to measure the energy of charged and neutral particles; and a spectrometer to track muons, the only particles apart from neutrinos that will reach the outer region of the detector. The construction of the magnet will drive the rest of the schedule, says CMS spokesperson Michel Della Negra. The magnet will be tested around March 2004 and, if all goes well, the detector will be lowered 100 metres below ground. A major challenge for CMS is its scintillator crystals. The L3 detector at LEP used bismuth germanium oxide (BGO) crystals, explains Della Negra, but BGO is too slow for the LHC and would not survive the intense radiation levels either. That is why a new crystal material, lead tungstate, had to be developed specially for the LHC. Moreover, CMS needs 11 m 3 of lead tungstate about 80 000 crystals whereas L3 needed only 1 m 3 of BGO. Half of the crystals will come from Russia and half from China. One of the major challenges when building the detectors is to ensure that the electronics for the inner tracker can survive the intense radiation produced there, and also take up as little volume inside the detector as possible, explains Peter Jenni, spokesperson for ATLAS. Many of the components for ATLAS have already been built, he says. For instance, 12 of the 64 modules needed for the barrel of the hadronic tile calorimeter have been completed and are now at CERN. ATLAS is budgeted to cost SwFr 475m. Both collaborations are also now looking closely at the issue of computing and how to cope with the enormous amounts of data that will flow from the LHC detectors. Although fundamental physics is CERN's top priority, the lab has started to pay more attention to technology transfer in recent years. ''Technology transfer has always happened at CERN, but now it is more proactive and explicit'', says Juan Antonio Rubio, head of CERN's newly created education and technology transfer

  8. ATLAS Physics Prospects at the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bindi, Marcello; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The physics prospects at the luminosity upgrade of LHC, HL-LHC, with a data set equivalent to 3000 fb-1 simulated in the ATLAS detector, are presented and discussed. The ultimate precision attainable on measurements of 125 GeV Higgs boson couplings to elementary fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as the searches for partners associated with this new particle. The electroweak sector is further studied with the analysis of the vector boson scattering, testing the SM predictions at the LHC energy scale. Supersymmetry is still one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Model. The current searches at the LHC have yielded sensitivity to TeV scale gluinos and 1st and 2nd generation squarks, as well as to 3rd generation squarks. The sensitivity to electro-weakinos has reached the hundreds of GeV mass range. Benchmark studies are presented to show how the sensitivity improves at the future high-luminosity LHC runs. Prospects for searches for new heavy bosons and dark matter candidates at 14 TeV pp col...

  9. Study of the multi-strange resonance $\\Xi(1530)^{0}$ production with ALICE at the LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080748

    The primary goal of the relativistic heavy-ion physics program at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland is to study the nuclear matter under extreme conditions. The measurement of resonances in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions allows one to study the properties of the hadronic medium. Resonances with short lifetimes compared to the duration of the time span between chemical and kinetic freeze-out are good candidates to prove the interplay of particle re-scattering and regeneration in the hadronic phase, which result in a modification of their measured yields. The ALICE detector and its subsystem used for the analysis presented in this thesis are explained. Particle identification method and a coordinate system of ALICE are provided. Measurements of multi-strange resonance $\\Xi(1530)^{0}$ were performed with the ALICE detector in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC energies. The ${p_{\\mathrm{T}}}$-spectra of $\\Xi(1530)^{0}$ are obtained and compared with model predictions. The y...

  10. First beam test of a combined ramp and squeeze at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, Jorg; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Gorzawski, Arkadiusz; Redaelli, Stefano; Schaumann, Michaela; Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    With increasing maturity of LHC operation it is possible to envisage more complex beam manipulations. At the same time operational efficiency receives increasing attention. So far ramping the beams to their target energy and squeezing the beams to smaller or higher beta are decoupled at the LHC. (De-)squeezing is always performed at the target energy, currently 6.5 TeV. Studies to combine the ramp and squeeze processes have been made for the LHC since 2011, but so far no experimental test with beam had ever performed. This note describes the first machine experiment with beam aiming at validating the combination of ramp and squeeze, the so-called combined ramp and squeeze (CRS).

  11. Regional profile, energy-impacted communities: Region VIII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-03-01

    This report has data on population, administration, finance, housing, health and safety, human services, education, and water and sewage for 325 energy-impacted communities. A review of current and potential energy developments in the region shows over 900 energy resource impacts listed for the 325 impacted communities. Coal development represents over one-third of the developments listed. Communities reporting coal development are distributed as follows: Colorado (36), Montana (42), North Dakota (61), South Dakota (13), Utah (73), and Wyoming (35). Energy-conversion initiatives represent another high incidence of energy-resource impact, with uranium development following closely with 83 communities reporting uranium development impact in the region. These projections indicate continued development of regional energy resources to serve national energy requirements. The 325 impacted communities as reported: Colorado (46), Montana (73), North Dakota (62), South Dakota (21), Utah (80), and Wyoming (43) follow a distribution pattern similar to that of future projects which illustrates that no area of the region will escape the impacts of energy development. (ERA citation 04:041706)

  12. Introducing the LHC in the classroom: an overview of education resources available

    CERN Document Server

    Wiener, Gerfried J; Brown, Alexander; Jende, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the recent re-start of CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the challenge presented by unidentified falling objects (UFOs), we seek to facilitate the introduction of high energy physics in the classroom. Therefore, this paper provides an overview of the LHC and its operation, highlighting existing education resources, and linking principal components of the LHC to topics in physics curricula.

  13. A High-Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) in ATLAS: Performance at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Makovec, Nikola; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The expected increase of the particle flux at the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) with instantaneous luminosities up to L ≃ 7.5 × 1034 cm−2 s−1 will have a severe impact on the ATLAS deetctor performance. The pile-up is expected to increase on average to 200 interactions per bunch crossing resulting in a vertex density that can be larger than 1.5 per mm. The reconstruction and performance for electrons, photons, jets and transverse missing energy will be severely degraded in the end-cap and forward region, where the liquid Argon based electromagnetic calorimeter has coarser granularity compared to the central region. The High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) is proposed in front of the liquid Argon end-cap calorimeters for pile-up mitigation. Using the high granularity and the excellent timing capabilities of the detector with 30 ps per MIP, electron and jet reconstruction (b tagging) are presented as well as the impact on the pileup jet suppression and missing ET. The expected improvement ...

  14. Reliability of the Quench Protection System for the LHC Superconducting Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Vergara-Fernández, A; Rodríguez-Mateos, F

    2003-01-01

    The huge energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could potentially cause severe damage when the superconducting state disappears (quench) if precautions are not taken. Most of the superconducting elements in this accelerator require protection in case of resistive transition. The reliability of the Quench Protection System will have a very important impact on the overall LHC performance. Existing high energy accelerators were conceived as prototypes whose main objective was not the e...

  15. Stepping outside the neighborhood of $T_c$ at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    "As you are well aware, many in the RHIC community are interested in the LHC heavy-ion program, but have several questions: What can we learn at the LHC that is qualitatively new? Are collisions at LHC similar to RHIC ones, just with a somewhat hotter/denser initial state? If not, why not? These questions are asked in good faith, and this talk is an opportunity to answer them directly to much of the RHIC community." With these words, the organizers of Quark Matter 2009 in Knoxville invited me to discuss the physics opportunities for heavy ion collisions at the LHC without recalling the standard arguments, which are mainly based on the extended kinematic reach of the machine. In response, I emphasize here that lattice QCD indicates characteristic qualitative differences between thermal physics in the neighborhood of the critical temperature (T_c 400-500 MeV), for which the relevant energy densities will be solely attainable at the LHC.

  16. LHC Report: LHC hit the target!

    CERN Multimedia

    Enrico Bravin for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    Last week, the accumulated integrated luminosity reached the target value for 2016 of 25 fb-1 in both ATLAS and CMS.   The integrated luminosity delivered to ATLAS and CMS reached (and already passed!) 25 fb-1– the target for the whole year! Tuesday, 30 August was just a regular day for the 2016 LHC run. However,  on that day, the integrated luminosity delivered to ATLAS and CMS reached 25 fb-1 – the target for the whole year! How did we get here? A large group of committed scientists and technical experts work behind the scenes at the LHC, ready to adapt to the quirks of this truly impressive machine. After the push to produce as many proton-proton collisions as possible before the summer conferences, several new ideas and production techniques (such as Bunch Compression Multiple Splitting, BCMS) have been incorporated in the operation of LHC in order to boost its performance even further. Thanks to these improvements, the LHC was routinely operated with peak luminos...

  17. Black Holes at the LHC: Progress since 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Chan

    2008-01-01

    We review the recent noticeable progresses in black hole physics focusing on the up-coming super-collider, the LHC. We discuss the classical formation of black holes by particle collision, the greybody factors for higher dimensional rotating black holes, the deep implications of black hole physics to the 'energy-distance' relation, the security issues of the LHC associated with black hole formation and the newly developed Monte-Carlo generators for black hole events.

  18. Optimizing Chromatic Coupling Measurement in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Persson, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing chromatic coupling measurement in the LHC Chromatic coupling introduces a dependency of transverse coupling with energy. LHC is equipped with skew sextupoles to compensate the possible adverse effects of chromatic coupling. In 2012 a beam-based correction was calculated and applied successfully for the fist time. However, the method used to reconstruct the chromatic coupling was dependent on stable tunes and equal chromaticities between the horizontal and vertical planes. In this article an improved method to calculate the chromatic coupling without these constraints is presented.

  19. QCD are we ready for the LHC?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    The LHC energy regime poses a serious challenge to our capability of predicting QCD reactions to the level of accuracy necessary for a successful programme of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In these lectures, I'll introduce basic concepts in QCD, and present techniques based on perturbation theory, such as fixed-order and resummed computations, and Monte Carlo simulations. I'll discuss applications of these techniques to hadron-hadron processes, concentrating on recent trends in perturbative QCD aimed at improving our understanding of LHC phenomenology.

  20. Beam Loss Monitors at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main functions of the LHC beam loss measurement system is the protection of equipment against damage caused by impacting particles creating secondary showers and their energy dissipation in the matter. Reliability requirements are scaled according to the acceptable consequences and the frequency of particle impact events on equipment. Increasing reliability often leads to more complex systems. The downside of complexity is a reduction of availability; therefore, an optimum has to be found for these conflicting requirements. A detailed review of selected concepts and solutions for the LHC system will be given to show approaches used in various parts of the system from the sensors, signal processing, and software implementations to the requirements for operation and documentation.

  1. Machine Induced Experimental Background Conditions in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Levinsen, Yngve Inntjore; Stapnes, Steinar

    2012-09-19

    The Large Hadron Collider set a new energy record for particle accelerators in late 2009, breaking the previous record held by Tevatron of 2 TeV collision energy. The LHC today operates at a collision energy of 7 TeV. With higher beam energy and intensity, measures have to be taken to ensure optimal experimental conditions and safety of the machine and detectors. Machine induced experimental background can severely reduce the quality of experimental triggers and track reconstruction. In a worst case, the radiation levels can be damaging for some of the subdetectors. The LHC is a particular challenge in this regard due to the vastly different operating conditions of the different experiments. The nominal luminosity varies by four orders of magnitude. The unprecedented stored beam energy and the amount of superconducting elements can make it challenging to protect the accelerator itself as well. In this work we have simulated and measured the machine induced background originating from various sources: the beam...

  2. Virtual reality visualization algorithms for the ALICE high energy physics experiment on the LHC at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrcha, Julian; Trzciński, Tomasz; Rokita, Przemysław

    2017-08-01

    Analyzing massive amounts of data gathered during many high energy physics experiments, including but not limited to the LHC ALICE detector experiment, requires efficient and intuitive methods of visualisation. One of the possible approaches to that problem is stereoscopic 3D data visualisation. In this paper, we propose several methods that provide high quality data visualisation and we explain how those methods can be applied in virtual reality headsets. The outcome of this work is easily applicable to many real-life applications needed in high energy physics and can be seen as a first step towards using fully immersive virtual reality technologies within the frames of the ALICE experiment.

  3. Performance of the ATLAS Hadronic Tile Calorimeter in Run-2 and its Upgrade for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Solovyanov, Oleg; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is the central hadronic calorimeter designed for energy reconstruction of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. TileCal is a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter and it covers the region of pseudorapidity < 1.7. The scintillation light produced in the scintillator tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The analog signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The TileCal frontend electronics reads out the signals produced by about 10000 channels measuring energies ranging from ~30 MeV to ~2 TeV. Each stage of the signal production from scintillation light to the signal reconstruction is monitored and calibrated. The performance of the Tile calorimeter has been studied in-situ employing cosmic ray muons and a large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the operations of the LHC. Prompt isolated muons of high moment...

  4. Performance of the CMS Hadron Calorimeter with Cosmic Ray Muons and LHC Beam Data

    CERN Document Server

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Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Hadron Calorimeter in the barrel, endcap and forward regions is fully commissioned. Cosmic ray data were taken with and without magnetic field at the surface hall and after installation in the experimental hall, hundred meters underground. Various measurements were also performed during the few days of beam in the LHC in September 2008. Calibration parameters were extracted, and the energy response of the HCAL determined from test beam data has been checked.

  5. Evaluation of the NEG Coating Saturation Level after 3 Years of LHC Beam Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bregliozzi, G; Jimenez, J M; Lanza, G; Porcelli, T

    2013-01-01

    The room temperature vacuum system of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has been designed to ensure vacuum stability and beam lifetime of 100 h with nominal current of 0.56 A per beam at 7 TeV of energy. The requirements for the interaction regions are moreover driven to minimize the background noise of the experiments, to keep the equivalent hydrogen gas density below 1013 molecules of H2 per m3. \

  6. Post LHC7 SUSY benchmark points for ILC physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Howard [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    We re-evaluate prospects for supersymmetry at the proposed International Linear e{sup +}e{sup -} Collider (ILC) in light of the first year of serious data taking at LHC with {radical}(s)=7 TeV and {proportional_to}5 fb{sup -1} of pp collisions (LHC7). Strong new limits from LHC SUSY searches, along with a hint of a Higgs boson signal around m{sub h}{proportional_to}125 GeV, suggest a paradigm shift from previously popular models to ones with new and compelling signatures. We present a variety of new ILC benchmark models, including: natural SUSY, hidden SUSY, NUHM2 with low m{sub A}, non-universal gaugino mass (NUGM) model, pMSSM, Kallosh-Linde model, Bruemmer-Buchmueller model, normal scalar mass hierarchy (NMH) plus one surviving case from mSUGRA/CMSSM in the far focus point region. While all these models at present elude the latest LHC limits, they do offer intriguing case study possibilities for ILC operating at {radical}(s){proportional_to}0.25-1 TeV, and present a view of some of the diverse SUSY phenomena which might be expected at both LHC and ILC in the post LHC7 era.

  7. Post LHC7 SUSY benchmark points for ILC physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, Howard; List, Jenny

    2012-05-01

    We re-evaluate prospects for supersymmetry at the proposed International Linear e + e - Collider (ILC) in light of the first year of serious data taking at LHC with √(s)=7 TeV and ∝5 fb -1 of pp collisions (LHC7). Strong new limits from LHC SUSY searches, along with a hint of a Higgs boson signal around m h ∝125 GeV, suggest a paradigm shift from previously popular models to ones with new and compelling signatures. We present a variety of new ILC benchmark models, including: natural SUSY, hidden SUSY, NUHM2 with low m A , non-universal gaugino mass (NUGM) model, pMSSM, Kallosh-Linde model, Bruemmer-Buchmueller model, normal scalar mass hierarchy (NMH) plus one surviving case from mSUGRA/CMSSM in the far focus point region. While all these models at present elude the latest LHC limits, they do offer intriguing case study possibilities for ILC operating at √(s)∝0.25-1 TeV, and present a view of some of the diverse SUSY phenomena which might be expected at both LHC and ILC in the post LHC7 era.

  8. A full acceptance detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avati, V.; Eggert, K.; Taylor, C.

    1999-01-01

    The FELIX collaboration has proposed the construction of a full acceptance detector for the LHC, to be located at Intersection Region 4, and to be commissioned concurrently with the LHC. The primary mission of FELIX is QCD: to provide comprehensive and definitive observations of a very broad range of strong-interaction processes. This paper reviews the detector concept and performance characteristics, the physics menu, and plans for integration of FELIX into the collider lattice and physical environment. The current status of the FELIX Letter of Intent is discussed

  9. The LHC babies

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    With the machine restart and first collisions at 3.5 TeV, 2009 and 2010 were two action-packed years at the LHC. The events were a real media success, but one important result that remained well hidden was the ten births in the LHC team over the same period. The mothers – engineers, cryogenics experts and administrative assistants working for the LHC – confirm that it is possible to maintain a reasonable work-life balance. Two of them tell us more…   Verena Kain (left) and Reyes Alemany (right) in the CERN Control Centre. With the LHC running around the clock, LHC operations engineers have high-pressure jobs with unsociable working hours. These past two years, which will undoubtedly go down in the annals of CERN history, the LHC team had their work cut out, but despite their high-octane professional lives, several female members of the team took up no less of a challenge in their private lives, creating a mini-baby-boom by which the LHC start-up will also be remembe...

  10. LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) Project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Shaposhnikova, Elena; Damerau, Heiko; Funken, Anne; Gilardoni, Simone; Goddard, Brennan; Hanke, Klaus; Kobzeva, Lelyzaveta; Lombardi, Alessandra; Manglunki, Django; Mataguez, Simon; Meddahi, Malika; Mikulec, Bettina; Rumolo, Giovanni; Scrivens, Richard; Vretenar, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    A massive improvement program of the LHC injector chain is presently being conducted under the LIU project. For the proton chain, this includes the replacement of Linac2 with Linac4 as well as all necessary upgrades to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), the Proton Synchrotron (PS) and Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), aimed at producing beams with the challenging High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) parameters. Regarding the heavy ions, plans to improve the performance of Linac3 and the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) are also pursued under the general LIU program. The full LHC injection chain returned to operation after Long Shutdown 1, with extended beam studies taking place in Run 2. A general project Cost and Schedule Review also took place in March 2015, and several dedicated LIU project reviews were held to address issues awaiting pending decisions. In view of these developments, 2014 and 2015 have been key years to define a number of important aspects of the final LIU path. This paper will describe the reviewed LI...

  11. Warmer amps for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    CERN is working together with an Italian company to develop superconducting cables that can function at temperatures of up to 25 K (-248°C). This will make it possible to move LHC magnet power supplies out of the tunnel, protecting them from exposure to the showers of very high-energy particles produced by the accelerator.   Figure 1: devices of this type, which measure approximately 10 metres in length, are inserted between the accelerating magnets at different points along the LHC. When it comes to consuming electricity, the magnets that steer particles through large accelerators can be characterised with just one word: greedy. For the LHC, the total current can reach 1.5 million amps. At the present time, this current is brought in via copper cables of up to 10 cm in diameter. In the tunnel, these cables connect the current leads - which provide the transition between the ambient-temperature cables and the magnets in their bath of superfluid helium - to the power supply. In the a...

  12. LHC Inner Triplet Powering Strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Bordry, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    In order to achieve a luminosity in excess of 10**34 cm**-2s**-1 at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), special high gradient quadrupoles are required for the final focusing triplets. These low-b triplets, located in the four experimental insertions (ATLAS, CMS, ALICE, LHC-B), consist of four wide-aperture superconducting magnets: two outer quadrupoles, Q1 and Q3, with a maximum current of 7 kA and a central one divided into two identical magnets, Q2a and Q2b, with a maximum current of 11.5 kA. To optimise the powering of these mixed quadrupoles, it was decided to use two nested high-current power converters : [8kA, 8V] and [6kA, 8V]. This paper presents the consequence of the interaction between the two galvanically coupled circuits. A control strategy, using two independent, standard, LHC digital controllers, to decouple the two systems is proposed and described. The converter protection during the discharge of the magnet energy due to quenches or interlocks of the magnets are discussed. Simulation and experim...

  13. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, Jon; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; De Roeck, Albert; Feltesse, Joel; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+$\\alpha_s$ uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new generation of PDFs, which include substantial information from experimental data from the Run I of the LHC. We then propose a new prescription for the combination of a suitable subset of the available PDF sets, which is presented in terms of a single combined PDF set. We finally discuss tools which allow for the delivery of this combined set in terms of optimized sets of Hessian eigenvectors or Monte Carlo replicas, and their usage, and provide some examples of their application to LHC phenomenology.

  14. Phenomenology of Flavon Fields at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsumura, Koji; Velasco-Sevilla, Liliana

    2009-11-01

    We study low energy constraints from flavour violating processes, production and decay at the LHC of a scalar field φ (flavon) associated to the breaking of a non supersymmetric Abelian family symmetry at the TeV scale. This symmetry is constrained to reproduce fermion masses and mixing, up to O(1) coefficients. The non-supersymmetric gauged U(1) models considered are severely restricted by cancellation of anomalies and LEP bounds on contact interactions, consequently its phenomenology is out of the LHC reach. We therefore introduce an effective U(1) which is not gauged and it is broken explicitly by a CP odd term at the TeV scale. This help us to explore flavour violating processes, production and decay at the LHC for these kind of light scalars. In this context we first study the constraints on the flavon mass and its vacuum expectation value from low energy flavour changing processes such as μ→ eγ. We find that a flavon of about m φ φ >∼ m t , and τμ-bar for m t , which could be effectively useful to detect flavons. (author)

  15. Studying the sensitivity of monotop probes to compressed supersymmetric scenarios at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fuks, Benjamin; Wilcock, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the Large Hadron Collider to supersymmetric setups using monotop probes in which the signal is a single top quark produced in association with missing transverse energy. Our prospective study relies on Monte Carlo simulations of 300 invfb of proton- proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV and considers both leptonic and hadronic monotop decays. We present analysis strategies sensitive to regions of the supersymmetric parameter space which feature small superparticle mass splittings and illustrate their strengths in the context of a particular set of benchmark scenarios. Finally, we compare the regions of parameter space expected to be accessible with monotops probes during the next run of the LHC to the reach of more traditional search strategies employed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, where available.

  16. Regional energy observatory. Energy status - greenhouse effect in the Aquitaine region. First results; Observatoire regional de l'energie. Bilan energie - effet de serre de la region Aquitaine. Premiers resultats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    The IDEA organization (information about the environmental development in Aquitaine region) has created an energy observatory, the mission of which is to supply regularly a reliable, objective and useful information about energy and greenhouse effect in the Aquitaine region (SW France). This document presents: the end-use energy consumption, the sectorial statuses (residential, tertiary sector, industry, agriculture, transports), the energy production and the renewable energy sources in Aquitaine region. Details are given in separate files at the end of the document for the 5 departements of Aquitaine (Dordogne, Gironde, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrennees Atlantiques). (J.S.)

  17. RF upgrade program in LHC injectors and LHC machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, E.

    2012-01-01

    The main themes of the RF upgrade program are: the Linac4 project, the LLRF-upgrade and the study of a tuning-free wide-band system for PSB, the upgrade of the SPS 800 MHz amplifiers and beam controls and the upgrade of the transverse dampers of the LHC. Whilst LHC Splice Consolidation is certainly the top priority for LS1, some necessary RF consolidation and upgrade is necessary to assure the LHC performance for the next 3- year run period. This includes: 1) necessary maintenance and consolidation work that could not fit the shorter technical stops during the last years, 2) the upgrade of the SPS 200 MHz system from presently 4 to 6 cavities and possibly 3) the replacement of one LHC cavity module. On the longer term, the LHC luminosity upgrade requires crab cavities, for which some preparatory work in SPS Coldex must be scheduled during LS1. (author)

  18. Collimation in the Transfer Lines to the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Helmut; Kadi, Yacine; Kain, Verena; Risselada, Thys; Weterings, Wim

    2005-01-01

    Injection intensities for the LHC are over an order of magnitude above damage level. The TI 2 and TI 8 transfer lines between the SPS and LHC are each about 2.5 km long and comprise many active elements running in pulsed mode. The collimation system in the transfer lines is designed to dilute the beam energy sufficiently in case of accidental beam loss or mis-steered beam. A system using three collimator families spaced by 60 degrees in phase advance, both in the horizontal and the vertical plane has been chosen. We discuss the reasons for this choice, the layout and, the expected performance of the system in terms of maximum amplitudes and energy deposition.

  19. The CMS HGCAL detector for HL-LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Martelli, Arabella

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will integrate 10 times more luminosity than the LHC, posing significant challenges for radiation tolerance and event pileup on detectors, especially for forward calorimetry, and hallmarks the issue for future colliders. As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, the CMS collaboration is designing a High Granularity Calorimeter to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. It features unprecedented transverse and longitudinal segmentation for both electromagnetic (ECAL) and hadronic (HCAL) compartments. This will facilitate particle-flow calorimetry, where the fine structure of showers can be measured and used to enhance pileup rejection and particle identification, whilst still achieving good energy resolution. The ECAL and a large fraction of HCAL will be based on hexagonal silicon sensors of 0.5 - 1 cm$^2$ cell size, with the remainder of the HCAL based on highly-segmented scintillators with SiPM readout. The intrinsic high-precision timing capabilities of the silicon sensors wi...

  20. The CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mastrolorenzo, Luca

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will integrate 10 times more luminosity than the LHC, posing significant challenges for radiation tolerance and event pileup on detectors, especially for forward calorimetry, and hallmarks the issue for future colliders. As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, the CMS collaboration is designing a High Granularity Calorimeter to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. It features unprecedented transverse and longitudinal segmentation for both electromagnetic (ECAL) and hadronic (HCAL) compartments. This will facilitate particle-flow calorimetry, where the fine structure of showers can be measured and used to enhance pileup rejection and particle identification, whilst still achieving good energy resolution. The ECAL and a large fraction of HCAL will be based on hexagonal silicon sensors of 0.5 - 1 cm$^2$ cell size, with the remainder of the HCAL based on highly-segmented scintillators with SiPM readout. The intrinsic high-precision timing capabilities of the silicon sensors wi...

  1. Stress-testing the Standard Model at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    With the high-energy run of the LHC now underway, and clear manifestations of beyond-Standard-Model physics not yet seen in data from the previous run, the search for new physics at the LHC may be a quest for small deviations with big consequences. If clear signals are present, precise predictions and measurements will again be crucial for extracting the maximum information from the data, as in the case of the Higgs boson. Precision will therefore remain a key theme for particle physics research in the coming years. The conference will provide a forum for experimentalists and theorists to identify the challenges and refine the tools for high-precision tests of the Standard Model and searches for signals of new physics at Run II of the LHC. Topics to be discussed include: pinning down Standard Model corrections to key LHC processes; combining fixed-order QCD calculations with all-order resummations and parton showers; new developments in jet physics concerning jet substructure, associated jets and boosted je...

  2. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Auchmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the years 2009–2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012 instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  3. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchmann, B.; Baer, T.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P. P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E. B.; Lechner, A.; Nebot Del Busto, E.; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-01

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  4. Some LHC milestones...

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    October 1995 The LHC technical design report is published. This document details the operation and the architecture of the future accelerator. November 2000 The first of the 1232 main dipole magnets for the LHC are delivered. May 2005 The first interconnection between two magnets of the accelerator is made. To carry out the 1700 interconnections of the LHC, 123 000 operations are necessary. February 2006 The new CERN Control Centre, which combines all the control rooms for the accelerators, the cryogenics and the technical infrastructure, starts operation. The LHC will be controlled from here. October 2006 Construction of the largest refrigerator in the world is complete. The 27 km cryogenic distribution line inside the LHC tunnel will circulate helium in liquid and gas phases to provide cryogenic conditions for the superconducting magnets of the accelerator. November 2006 Magnet production for the LHC is complete. The last of t...

  5. First Attempts at using Active Halo Control at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Joschka [CERN; Bruce, Roderik [CERN; Garcia Morales, Hector [CERN; Höfle, Wolfgang [CERN; Kotzian, Gerd [CERN; Kwee-Hinzmann, Regina [CERN; Langner, Andy [CERN; Mereghetti, Alessio [CERN; Quaranta, Elena [CERN; Redaelli, Stefano [CERN; Rossi, Adriana [CERN; Salvachua, Belen [CERN; Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab; Tomás, Rogelio [CERN; Valentino, Gianluca [CERN; Valuch, Daniel [CERN

    2016-06-01

    The beam halo population is a non-negligible factor for the performance of the LHC collimation system and the machine protection. In particular this could become crucial for aiming at stored beam energies of 700 MJ in the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) project, in order to avoid beam dumps caused by orbit jitter and to ensure safety during a crab cavity failure. Therefore several techniques to safely deplete the halo, i.e. active halo control, are under development. In a first attempt a novel way for safe halo depletion was tested with particle narrow-band excitation employing the LHC Transverse Damper (ADT). At an energy of 450 GeV a bunch selective beam tail scraping without affecting the core distribution was attempted. This paper presents the first measurement results, as well as a simple simulation to model the underlying dynamics.

  6. Operational results from the LHC luminosity monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, R.; Ratti, A.; Matis, H.S.; Stezelberger, T.; Turner, W.C.; Yaver, H.; Bravin, E.

    2011-03-28

    The luminosity monitors for the high luminosity regions in the LHC have been operating to monitor and optimize the luminosity since 2009. The device is a gas ionization chamber inside the neutral particle absorber 140 m from the interaction point and monitors showers produced by high energy neutral particles from the collisions. It has the ability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation in the nominal LHC operation. We present operational results of the device during proton and lead ion operations in 2010 and make comparisons with measurements of experiments. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN can accelerate proton and lead ion beams to 7 TeV and 547 TeV and produce collisions of these particles. Luminosity measures performance of the LHC and is particularly important for experiments in high luminosity interaction points (IPs), ATLAS (IP1) and CMS (IP5). To monitor and optimize the luminosities of these IPs, BRAN (Beam RAte Neutral) detectors [1, 2] have been installed and operating since the beginning of the 2009 operation [3]. A neutral particle absorber (TAN) protects the D2 separation dipole from high energy forward neutral particles produced in the collisions [4]. These neutral particles produce electromagnetic and hadronic showers inside the TAN and their energy flux is proportional to the collision rate and hence to the luminosity. The BRAN detector is an Argon gas ionization chamber installed inside the TANs on both sides of the IP1 and IP5 and monitors the relative changes in the luminosity by detecting the ionization due to these showers. When the number of collisions per bunch crossing (multiplicity) is small, the shower rate inside the TAN is also proportional to the luminosity. Hence, the detector is designed to operate by measuring either the shower rate (counting mode for low and intermediate luminosities) or the average shower flux (pulse height mode for high luminosities). The detector is

  7. On the LHC sensitivity for non-thermalised hidden sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlhoefer, Felix

    2018-04-01

    We show under rather general assumptions that hidden sectors that never reach thermal equilibrium in the early Universe are also inaccessible for the LHC. In other words, any particle that can be produced at the LHC must either have been in thermal equilibrium with the Standard Model at some point or must be produced via the decays of another hidden sector particle that has been in thermal equilibrium. To reach this conclusion, we parametrise the cross section connecting the Standard Model to the hidden sector in a very general way and use methods from linear programming to calculate the largest possible number of LHC events compatible with the requirement of non-thermalisation. We find that even the HL-LHC cannot possibly produce more than a few events with energy above 10 GeV involving states from a non-thermalised hidden sector.

  8. Machine Protection Issues and Strategies for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Schmidt, R

    2004-01-01

    For nominal beam parameters at 7 TeV/c, each of the two LHC proton beams has a stored energy of 350 MJ threatening to damage accelerator equipment in case of uncontrolled beam loss. The energy stored in the magnet system at 7 TeV/c will exceed 10 GJ. In order to avoid damage of accelerator equipment, operation of the LHC will be strongly constrained. For the first commissioning of the complex magnet powering, quench protection and powering interlock systems must be fully operational. For safe injection, beam absorbers must be in the correct position and specific procedures for safe injection have to be applied. Since the beam dump blocks are the only element of the LHC that can withstand the impact of the full beam, it is essential that the beams are properly extracted onto the dump blocks at the end of a fill and in case of emergency. The time constants for failures leading to beam loss extend from some µs to few seconds. Requirements for safe operation throughout the cycle necessitate the use of beam instr...

  9. Supersymmetric dark matter after LHC run 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnaschi, E.A.; Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL

    2015-08-01

    Different mechanisms operate in various regions of the MSSM parameter space to bring the relic density of the lightest neutralino, χ 0 1 , assumed here to be the LSP and thus the Dark Matter (DM) particle, into the range allowed by astrophysics and cosmology. These mechanisms include coannihilation with some nearly-degenerate next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle (NLSP) such as the lighter stau τ 1 , stop t 1 or chargino χ ± 1 , resonant annihilation via direct-channel heavy Higgs bosons H/A, the light Higgs boson h or the Z boson, and enhanced annihilation via a larger Higgsino component of the LSP in the focus-point region. These mechanisms typically select lower-dimensional subspaces in MSSM scenarios such as the CMSSM, NUHM1, NUHM2 and pMSSM10. We analyze how future LHC and direct DM searches can complement each other in the exploration of the different DM mechanisms within these scenarios. We find that the τ 1 coannihilation regions of the CMSSM, NUHM1, NUHM2 can largely be explored at the LHC via searches for missing E T events and long-lived charged particles, whereas their H/A funnel, focus-point and χ ± 1 coannihilation regions can largely be explored by the LZ and Darwin DM direct detection experiments. We find that the dominant DM mechanism in our pMSSM10 analysis is χ ± 1 coannihilation: parts of its parameter space can be explored by the LHC, and a larger portion by future direct DM searches.

  10. Mechanical Design of the LHC Standard Half-Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet, A.; Brunet, J. C.; Cruikshank, P.; Genet, M.; Parma, V.; Rohmig, P.; Saban, R.; Tavian, L.; Veness, R.; Vlogaert, J.; Williams, L. R.

    1997-05-01

    The LHC Conceptual Design Report issued on 20th October 1995 (CERN/AC/95-05 (LHC) - nicknamed "Yellow Book") introduced significant changes to some fundamental features of the LHC standard half-cell, composed of one quadrupole, 3 dipoles and a set of corrector magnets. A separate cryogenic distribution line was introduced, which was previously inside the main cryostat. The dipole length has been increased from 10 to 15 m and independent powering of the focusing and defocusing quadrupole magnets was chosen. Individual quench protection diodes were introduced in magnets interconnects and many auxiliary bus bars were added to feed in series the various families of correcting superconducting magnets. The various highly intricate basic systems such as: cryostats and cryogenics feeders, superconducting magnets and their electrical feeding and protection, vacuum beam screen and its cooling, support and alignment devices have been redesigned, taking into account the very tight space available. These space constraints are given by the necessity to have maximum integral bending field strength for maximum LHC energy, and the existing LHC tunnel. Finally, cryogenic and vacuum sectorisation have been introduced to reduce downtimes and facilitate commissioning.

  11. Big advance towards the LHC upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The LHC is currently the world’s most powerful accelerator. With its technical achievements it has already set world records. However, big science looks very far ahead in time and is already preparing already for the LHC’s magnet upgrade, which should involve a 10-fold increase of the collision rates toward the end of the next decade. The new magnet technology involves the use of an advanced superconducting material that has just started to show its potential.   The first Long Quadrupole Shell (LQS01) model during assembly at Fermilab. The first important step in the qualification of the new technology for use in the LHC was achieved at the beginning of December when the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) – a consortium of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Fermilab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory founded by US Department Of Energy (DOE) in 2003 – successfully tested the first long focussing magnet th...

  12. Heavy-ion performance of the LHC and future colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaumann, Michaela

    2015-04-29

    In 2008 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments started operation at the European Centre of Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva with the main aim of finding or excluding the Higgs boson. Only four years later, on the 4th of July 2012, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle was proven and first published by the two main experiments ATLAS and CMS. Even though proton-proton collisions are the main operation mode of the LHC, it also acts as an heavy-ion collider. Here, the term ''heavy-ion collisions'' refers to the collision between fully stripped nuclei. While the major hardware system of the LHC is compatible with heavy-ion operation, the beam dynamics and performance limits of ion beams are quite different from those of protons. Because of the higher mass and charge of the ions, beam dynamic effects like intra-beam scattering and radiation damping are stronger. Also the electromagnetic cross-sections in the collisions are larger, leading to significantly faster intensity decay and thus shorter luminosity lifetimes. As the production cross-sections for various physics processes under study of the experiments are still small at energies reachable with the LHC and because the heavy-ion run time is limited to a few days per year, it is essential to obtain the highest possible collision rate, i.e. maximise the instantaneous luminosity, in order to obtain enough events and therefore low statistical errors. Within this thesis, the past performance of the LHC in lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions, at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per colliding nucleon pair, is analysed and potential luminosity limitations are identified. Tools are developed to predict future performance and techniques are presented to further increase the luminosity. Finally, a perspective on the future of high energy heavy-ion colliders is given.

  13. FLUKA Studies of the Asynchronous Beam Dump Effects on LHC Point 6

    CERN Document Server

    Versaci, R; Goddard, B; Schmidt, R; Vlachoudis, V; Mereghetti, A

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is a record-breaking machine for beam energy and intensity. An intense effort has therefore been deployed in simulating critical operational scenarios of energy deposition. FLUKA is the most widely used code for this kind of simulations at CERN because of the high reliability of its results and the ease to custom detailed simulations all along hundreds of meters of beam line. We have investigated the effects of an asynchronous beam dump on the LHC Point 6 where, beams with a stored energy of 360 MJ, can instantaneously release up to a few J cm−3 in the cryogenic magnets which have a quench limit of the order of the mJ cm−3. In the present paper we will describe the simulation approach, and discuss the evaluated maximum energy release onto the superconducting magnets during an asynchronous beam dump. We will then analyse the shielding provided by collimators installed in the area and discuss safety limits for the operation of the LHC.

  14. Jet physics at the LHC with ALICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsch, A.

    2005-01-01

    In central Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC, jet rates are expected to be high at energies at which ALICE can reconstruct jets over the background of the underlying event. This will open the possibility to quantify the effect of partonic energy loss through medium induced gluon radiation, jet quenching, by detailed measurement of the modification of the longitudinal and transverse structure of identified jets. In order to obtain probes sensitive to the properties of the QCD medium, it is mandatory to measure the high-p T parton fragments together with the low-p T particles from the radiated gluons. Hence, the excellent charged particle tracking capabilities of ALICE combined with the proposed electromagnetic calorimeter for ALICE, EMCAL, represent an ideal tool for jet quenching studies at the LHC. (orig.)

  15. Ions for LHC Beam Physics and Engineering Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Maury, Stephan; Baggiolini, Vito; Beuret, Andre; Blas, Alfred; Borburgh, Jan; Braun, Hans Heinrich; Carli, Christian; Chanel, Michel; Fowler, Tony; Gilardoni, S S; Gourber-Pace, Marine; Hancock, Steven; Hill, Charles E; Hourican, Michael; Jowett, John M; Kahle, Karsten; Kuchler, Detlef; Mahner, Edgar; Manglunki, Django; Martini, Michel; Paoluzzi, Mauro M; Pasternak, Jaroslaw; Pedersen, Flemming; Raich, Uli; Rossi, Carlo; Royer, Jean Pierre; Schindl, Karlheinz; Scrivens, Richard; Sermeus, Luc; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Tranquille, Gerard; Vretenar, Maurizio; Zickler, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The first phase of the heavy ion physics program at the LHC aims to provide lead-lead collisions at energies of 5.5 TeV per colliding nucleon pair and ion-ion luminosity of 1027 cm-2s-1. The transformation of CERN’s ion injector complex (Linac3-LEIR-PS-SPS) presents a number of beam physics and engineering challenges, which are described in this paper. In the LHC itself, there are fundamental performance limitations due to various beam loss mechanisms. To study these without risk of damage there will be an initial period of operation with a reduced number of nominal intensity bunches. While reducing the work required to commission the LHC with ions in 2008, this will still enable early physics discoveries.

  16. LHC Orbit Correction Reproducibility and Related Machine Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, T; Schmidt, R; Wenninger, J

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has an unprecedented nominal stored beam energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In order to ensure an adequate machine protection by the collimation system, a high reproducibility of the beam position at collimators and special elements like the final focus quadrupoles is essential. This is realized by a combination of manual orbit corrections, feed forward and real time feedback. In order to protect the LHC against inconsistent orbit corrections, which could put the machine in a vulnerable state, a novel software-based interlock system for orbit corrector currents was developed. In this paper, the principle of the new interlock system is described and the reproducibility of the LHC orbit correction is discussed against the background of this system.

  17. The Cryogenic Design of the Phase I Upgrade Inner Triplet Magnets for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    van Weelderen, R; Peterson, T

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is operating with beam since end 2009. However, with the present interaction region magnets it cannot reach its nominal performance and a phased approach to upgrading them to reach that nominal performance is taken. The first phase of the LHC interaction region upgrade was approved by Council in December 2007. This phase relies on the mature Nb-Ti superconducting magnet technology with the target of increasing the LHC luminosity to 2 to 3×1034 cm-2s-1, while relying on the existing infrastructure which limits the total heat removal capacity at 1.9 K to 500 W. The Phase I Upgrade LHC interaction region final focus magnets will include four superconducting quadrupoles (low-β triplets) and one superconducting dipole (D1) cooled with pressurized, static superfluid helium (HeII) at 1.9 K. The heat absorbed in pressurized HeII, which may be more than 30 W/m due to dynamic heating from the particle beam halo, will be conducted to saturated He II at about 1.9 K and removed by the low pressure vapour. This p...

  18. LHC beam stability and feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhagen, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the stability and the control of the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) two beam orbits and their particle momenta using beam-based feedback systems. The aim of this report is to contribute to a safe and reliable LHC commissioning and machine operation. The first part of the analysis gives an estimate of the expected sources of orbit and energy perturbations that can be grouped into environmental sources, machine-inherent sources and machine element failures: the slowest perturbation due to ground motion, tides, temperature fluctuations of the tunnel and other environmental influences are described in this report by a propagation model that is both qualitatively and quantitatively supported by geophone and beam motion measurements at LEP and other CERN accelerators. The second part of this analysis deals with the control of the two LHC beams' orbit and energy through automated feedback systems. Based on the reading of the more than 1056 beam position monitors (BPMs) that are distributed over the machine, a central global feedback controller calculates new deflection strengths for the more than 1060 orbit corrector magnets (CODs) that are suitable to correct the orbit and momentum around their references. this report provides an analysis of the BPMs and CODs involved in the orbit and energy feedback. The BPMs are based on a wide-band time normaliser circuit that converts the transverse beam position reading of each individual particle bunch into two laser pulses that are separated by a time delay and transmitted through optical fibres to an acquisition card that converts the delay signals into a digital position. A simple error model has been tested and compared to the measurement accuracy of LHC type BPMs, obtained through beam-based measurements in the SPS. The average beam position is controlled through 1060 superconducting and individually powered corrector dipole magnets. The proposed correction in 'time-domain' consists of a proportional

  19. IONS FOR LHC STATUS OF THE INJECTOR CHAIN

    CERN Document Server

    Manglunki, Django; Borburgh, J; Carli, C; Chanel, M; Dumas, L; Fowler, T; Gourber-Pace, M; Hancock, S; Hourican, M; Jowett, John M; Küchler, D; Mahner, E; Martini, M; Maury, S; Pasinelli, S; Raich, U; Rey, A; Royer, J-P; Scrivens, R; Sermeus, L; Tranquille, G; Vallet, J L; Vandorpe, B

    2007-01-01

    The LHC will, in addition to proton runs, be operated with Pb ions and provide collisions at energies of 5.5 TeV per nucleon pair, i.e. more than 1.1 PeV per event, to experiments. The transformation of CERN's ion injector complex (Linac3-LEIR-PS-SPS) to allow collision of ions in LHC in 2008 is well under way. The status of these modifications and the latest results of commissioning will be presented. The remaining challenges are reviewed.

  20. Search for new physics in events with same sign leptons and missing energy with ATLAS at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)715949; Pralavorio, Pascal; Alexa, Calin

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes the phenomena in the infinitesimal with great success. However, it suffers from several inadequacies~: it can not explain the neutrino masses, it has no candidate for the dark matter and it has no solution for the gauge hierarchy problem, which all require new physics and beyond the Standard Model theories. Such a theory is Supersymmetry (SUSY) and occupies a primer place in the LHC physics program. Here two proton beams are colliding at energies up to 14 TeV and gigantic detectors were built to reconstruct the collision events. For the presented studies only the data recorded with the ATLAS detector is analyzed. More details on the theoretical framework, the LHC collider and the ATLAS experiment are given in the first part of this thesis. At hadron colliders, the lepton identification and reconstruction are crucial for precise SM cross sections and coupling measurements or for new physics searches. Therefore, the second part of my thesis is dedicated to perfo...

  1. Regional energy observatory. Energy status - greenhouse effect in the Aquitaine region. First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    The IDEA organization (information about the environmental development in Aquitaine region) has created an energy observatory, the mission of which is to supply regularly a reliable, objective and useful information about energy and greenhouse effect in the Aquitaine region (SW France). This document presents: the end-use energy consumption, the sectorial statuses (residential, tertiary sector, industry, agriculture, transports), the energy production and the renewable energy sources in Aquitaine region. Details are given in separate files at the end of the document for the 5 departements of Aquitaine (Dordogne, Gironde, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrennees Atlantiques). (J.S.)

  2. Upgrade of the CMS Tracker for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinger, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity to about $ 5 \\times 10^{34}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ in 2028, possibly reaching an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$ by the end of 2037. This High Luminosity LHC scenario, HL-LHC, will require a preparation program of the LHC detectors known as Phase-2 Upgrade. The current CMS Tracker, including both inner pixel and outer strip systems, is already running beyond design specifications and will not be able to survive HL-LHC radiation conditions. CMS will need a completely new device in order to fully exploit the demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The upgrade plan includes extending the Pixel Detector in the forward region from the current coverage of $ \\lvert \\eta \\rvert < 2.4 $ to $ \\lvert \\eta \\rvert < 4$, where up to seven forward- and four extension disks will compose the new detector. Additionally, the new outer system should also have trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R\\&...

  3. Simple replacement of violaxanthin by zeaxanthin in LHC-II does not cause chlorophyll fluorescence quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreuw, Andreas; Wormit, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Recently, a mechanism for the energy-dependent component (qE) of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), the fundamental photo-protection mechanism in green plants, has been suggested. Replacement of violaxanthin by zeaxanthin in the binding pocket of the major light harvesting complex LHC-II may be sufficient to invoke efficient chlorophyll fluorescence quenching. Our quantum chemical calculations, however, show that the excited state energies of violaxanthin and zeaxanthin are practically identical when their geometry is constrained to the naturally observed structure of violaxanthin in LHC-II. Therefore, since violaxanthin does not quench LHC-II, zeaxanthin should not either. This theoretical finding is nicely in agreement with experimental results obtained by femtosecond spectroscopy on LHC-II complexes containing violaxanthin or zeaxanthin.

  4. Physics at HL-LHC with the upgraded ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dell'Acqua, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The physics prospects at the luminosity upgrade of LHC, HL-LHC, with a data set equivalent to 3000 fb-1 simulated in the ATLAS detector, are presented and discussed. The ultimate precision attainable on measurements of 125 GeV Higgs boson couplings to elementary fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as the searches for partners associated with this new particle. The electroweak sector is further studied with the analysis of the vector boson scattering, testing the SM predictions at the LHC energy scale. Supersymmetry is still one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Model. The current searches at the LHC have yielded sensitivity to TeV scale gluinos and 1st and 2nd generation squarks, as well as to 3rd generation squarks. The sensitivity to electro-weakinos has reached the hundreds of GeV mass range. Benchmark studies are presented to show how the sensitivity improves at the future high-luminosity LHC runs. Prospects for searches for new heavy bosons and dark matter candidates at 14 TeV pp col...

  5. Physics prospects at the high luminosity LHC with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Simioni, Eduard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The physics prospects at the luminosity upgrade of LHC, HL-LHC, with a data set equivalent to 3000 fb-1 simulated in the ATLAS detector, are presented and discussed. The ultimate precision attainable on measurements of 125 GeV Higgs boson couplings to elementary fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as the searches for partners associated with this new particle. The electroweak sector is further studied with the analysis of the vector boson scattering, testing the SM predictions at the LHC energy scale. Supersymmetry is still one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Model. The current searches at the LHC have yielded sensitivity to TeV scale gluinos and 1st and 2nd generation squarks, as well as to 3rd generation squarks. The sensitivity to electro-weakinos has reached the hundreds of GeV mass range. Benchmark studies are presented to show how the sensitivity improves at the future high-luminosity LHC runs. Prospects for searches for new heavy bosons and dark matter candidates at 14 TeV pp col...

  6. Reach of the high-energy LHC for gluinos and top squarks in SUSY models with light Higgsinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Gainer, James S.; Serce, Hasan; Tata, Xerxes

    2017-12-01

    We examine the top squark (stop) and gluino reach of the proposed 33 TeV energy upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC33) in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with light Higgsinos and relatively heavy electroweak gauginos. In our analysis, we assume that stops decay to Higgsinos via t˜1→t Z˜1, t˜1→t Z˜2, and t˜1→b W˜1 with branching fractions in the ratio 1 ∶1 ∶2 (expected if the decay occurs dominantly via the superpotential Yukawa coupling), while gluinos decay via g ˜→t t˜1 or via three-body decays to third-generation quarks plus Higgsinos. These decay patterns are motivated by models of natural supersymmetry where Higgsinos are expected to be close in mass to mZ, but gluinos may be as heavy as 5-6 TeV, and stops may have masses up to ˜3 TeV . We devise cuts to optimize the signals from stop and gluino pair production at LHC33. We find that experiments at LHC33 should be able to discover stops with >5 σ significance if mt˜1<2.3 (2.8) [3.2] TeV for an integrated luminosity of 0.3 (1) [3 ] ab-1 . The corresponding reach for gluinos extends to 5 (5.5) [6] TeV. These results imply that experiments at LHC33 should be able to discover at least one of the stop or gluino pair signals even with an integrated luminosity of 0.3 ab-1 for natural supersymmetry models with no worse than 3% electroweak fine-tuning and quite likely both gluinos and stops for an integrated luminosity of 3 ab-1 .

  7. Jet calibration in the ATLAS experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Francavilla, P

    2009-01-01

    Jets produced in the hadronisation of quarks and gluons play a central role in the rich physics program that will be covered by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, and are central elements of the signature for many physics channels. A well understood energy scale, which for some processes demands an uncertainty in the energy scale of order 1%, is a prerequisite. Moreover, in early data we face the challenge of dealing with the unexpected issues of a brand new detector in an unexplored energy domain. The ATLAS collaboration is carrying out a program to revisit the jet calibration strategies used in earlier hadron-collider experiments and develop a strategy which takes into account the new experimental problems introduced from higher measurement precision and from the LHC environment. The ATLAS calorimeter is intrinsically non-compensating and we will discuss the use of different offline approaches based on cell energy density and jet topology to correct the linearity response while improving the resolution. In ad...

  8. Exploring the Inert Doublet Model through the dijet plus missing transverse energy channel at the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Poulose

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study of the Inert Doublet Model (IDM, we propose that the dijet + missing transverse energy channel at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC will be an effective way of searching for the scalar particles of the IDM. This channel receives contributions from gauge boson fusion, and t-channel production, along with contributions from H+ associated production. We perform the analysis including study of the Standard Model (SM background with assumed systematic uncertainty, and optimise the selection criteria employing suitable cuts on the kinematic variables to maximise the signal significance. We find that with high luminosity option of the LHC, this channel has the potential to probe the IDM in the mass range of up to about 400 GeV, which is not accessible through other leptonic channels. In a scenario with light dark matter of mass about 65 GeV, charged Higgs in the mass range of around 200 GeV provides the best possibility with a signal significance of about 2σ at an integrated luminosity of about 3000 fb−1.

  9. Tracking in Dense Environments for the HL-LHC ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cormier, Felix; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Tracking in dense environments, such as in the cores of high-energy jets, will be key for new physics searches as well as measurements of the Standard Model at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The HL-LHC will operate in challenging conditions with large radiation doses and high pile-up (up to $\\mu=200$). The current tracking detector will be replaced with a new all-silicon Inner Tracker for the Phase II upgrade of the ATLAS detector. In this talk, characterization of the HL-LHC tracker performance for collimated, high-density charged particles arising from high-momentum decays is presented. In such decays the charged-particle separations are of the order of the tracking detector granularity, leading to challenging reconstruction. The ability of the HL-LHC ATLAS tracker to reconstruct the tracks in such dense environments is discussed and compared to ATLAS Run-2 performance for a variety of relevant physics processes.

  10. Super and ferric: the first HL-LHC component is ready

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Although the actual installation phase in the tunnel will only start in 2024, the first magnet – a sextupole – of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is ready and working according to specifications. This first component is also rather unique as, unlike the superconducting magnets currently used in the LHC, it relies on a “superferric” heart.   An expert in the LASA Laboratory (INFN Milan, Italy) works on assembling the first sextupole corrector of the HL-LHC. (Image: INFN Milan) Although the name might sound completely unfamiliar, superferric magnets were first proposed in the 1980s as a possible solution for high-energy colliders. However, many technical problems had to be overcome before the use of superferric magnets could become a reality. In its final configuration, the HL-LHC will have 36 superferric corrector magnets, of which 4 will be quadrupoles, 8 sextupoles and 24 higher order magnets. In superferric (or “iron-dominated”) magne...

  11. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) Preliminary Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Apollinari, G; Béjar Alonso, I; Brüning, O; Lamont, M; Rossi, L

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cav...

  12. Study for magnets and electronics protection in the LHC Betatron-cleaning insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magistris, Matteo; Ferrari, Alfredo; Santana, Mario; Tsoulou, Katerina; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2006-01-01

    The collimation system of the future LHC at CERN is a challenging project, since the transverse energy intensities of the LHC beams are three orders of magnitude greater than at other current facilities. The two cleaning insertions (IR3 and IR7) housing the collimators will be among the most radioactive areas of LHC. The 1.5 km long IR7 insertion was fully implemented with the Monte Carlo cascade code FLUKA. Extensive simulations were performed to estimate the radiation level along the tunnel, as well as the energy deposition in the most critical elements. In particular, this paper discusses the latest results of the FLUKA studies, including the design of passive absorbers (to protect warm magnets) and a comparison of W and Cu as material for the active absorber jaws (to protect cold magnets). Any electronic device operating in strong radiation fields such as those expected for the LHC tunnel will undergo degradation. A shielding study was done to reduce radiation damage to the electronics

  13. LHC Report: a record start for LHC ion operation

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    After the technical stop, the LHC switched over to ion operation, colliding lead-ions on lead-ions. The recovery from the technical stop was very smooth, and records for ion luminosity were set during the first days of ion operation.   The LHC technical stop ended on the evening of Friday, 11 November. The recovery from the technical stop was extremely smooth, and already that same evening ion beams were circulating in the LHC. ‘Stable beams’ were declared the same night, with 2 x 2 bunches of ions circulating in the LHC, allowing the experiments to have their first look at ion collisions this year. However, the next step-up in intensity – colliding 170 x 170 bunches – was postponed due to a vacuum problem in the PS accelerator, so the collisions on Sunday, 13 November were confined to 9 x 9 bunches. The vacuum problem was solved, and on the night of Monday, 14 November, trains of 24 lead bunches were injected into the LHC and 170 x 170 bunches were brough...

  14. Challenges to Software/Computing for Experimentation at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sunanda

    The demands of future high energy physics experiments towards software and computing have led the experiments to plan the related activities as a full-fledged project and to investigate new methodologies and languages to meet the challenges. The paths taken by the four LHC experiments ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are coherently put together in an LHC-wide framework based on Grid technology. The current status and understandings have been broadly outlined.

  15. Thermal and prompt photons at RHIC and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquet, Jean-François [Department of Physics & Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Shen, Chun [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Denicol, Gabriel [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Luzum, Matthew [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão Travessa R, no. 187, 05508-090, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo (Brazil); Schenke, Björn [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada)

    2016-12-15

    Thermal and prompt photon production in heavy ion collisions is evaluated and compared with measurements from both RHIC and the LHC. An event-by-event hydrodynamical model of heavy ion collisions that includes shear and bulk viscosities is used, along with up-to-date photon emission rates. Larger tension with measurements is observed at RHIC than at the LHC. The center-of-mass energy and centrality dependence of thermal and prompt photons is investigated.

  16. The LHC Lead Injector Chain

    CERN Document Server

    Beuret, A; Blas, A; Burkhardt, H; Carli, Christian; Chanel, M; Fowler, A; Gourber-Pace, M; Hancock, S; Hourican, M; Hill, C E; Jowett, John M; Kahle, K; Küchler, D; Lombardi, A M; Mahner, E; Manglunki, Django; Martini, M; Maury, S; Pedersen, F; Raich, U; Rossi, C; Royer, J P; Schindl, Karlheinz; Scrivens, R; Sermeus, L; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Tranquille, G; Vretenar, Maurizio; Zickler, T

    2004-01-01

    A sizeable part of the LHC physics programme foresees lead-lead collisions with a design luminosity of 1027 cm-2 s-1. This will be achieved after an upgrade of the ion injector chain comprising Linac3, LEIR, PS and SPS machines [1,2]. Each LHC ring will be filled in 10 min by almost 600 bunches, each of 7×107 lead ions. Central to the scheme is the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) [3,4], which transforms long pulses from Linac3 into high-brilliance bunches by means of multi-turn injection, electron cooling and accumulation. Major limitations along the chain, including space charge, intrabeam scattering, vacuum issues and emittance preservation are highlighted. The conversion from LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) to LEIR involves new magnets and power converters, high-current electron cooling, broadband RF cavities, and a UHV vacuum system with getter (NEG) coatings to achieve a few 10-12 mbar. Major hardware changes in Linac3 and the PS are also covered. An early ion scheme with fewer bunches (but each at nominal...

  17. Production of (anti-)(hyper-)nuclei at LHC energies with ALICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccio, Maximiliano

    2018-02-01

    The ALICE experiment at the LHC has measured a variety of (anti-)(hyper-)nuclei produced in Pb-Pb collisions at = 5.02 TeV and at 2.76 TeV. In addition, a large sample of high quality data was collected in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV and 13 TeV and in p-Pb collisions at = 5.02 TeV. These data are used to study the production of different (anti-)(hyper-)nuclei in the collisions, namely (anti-)deuteron, (anti-)3He, (anti-)alpha and (anti-)3ΛH. The identification of these (anti-)(hyper-)nuclei is based on the energy loss measurement in the Time Projection Chamber and the velocity measurement in the Time-Of-Flight detector. In addition, the Inner Tracking System is used to distinguish secondary vertices originating from weak decays from the primary vertex. New results on deuteron production as a function of multiplicity in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions will be presented, as well as the measurement of 3He in p-Pb and Pb- Pb collisions. Special emphasis will be given to the new results of the (anti-)3ΛH in its charged-two-body decay mode. The large variety of measurements at different energies and system sizes constrains the production models of light flavour baryon clusters, in particular those based on coalescence and the statistical hadronisation approaches.

  18. Jet calibration in the ATLAS experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Jets produced in the hadronisation of quarks and gluons play a central role in the rich physics program that will be covered by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, and are central elements of the signature for many physics channels. A well understood energy scale, which for some process demands an uncertainty in the energy scale of order 1%, is a prerequisite. Moreover, in early data we face the challenge of dealing with the unexpected issues of a brand new detector in an unexplored energy domain. The ATLAS collaboration is carrying out a program to revisit the jet calibration strategies used in earlier hadron-collider experiments and develop a strategy which takes account of the new experimental problems and demand for greater measurement precision which will be faced at the LHC. The ATLAS calorimeter is intrinsically non-compensating and we will present the use of different offline approaches based on cell energy density and jet topology to correct for this effect on jet energy resolution and scale. In additio...

  19. Impact analysis of TOTEM data at the LHC: black disk limit exceeded

    CERN Document Server

    Alkin, A; Kovalenko, O; Troshin, S M

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the profile of the impact--parameter dependent elastic scattering amplitude. Extraction of impact-parameter dependence from the dataset with inclusion of the experimental data on elastic scattering at the LHC energies helps to reveal the asymptotics of hadron interactions. Analysis of the data clearly indicates that the impact-parameter elastic scattering amplitude exceed the black disk limit at the LHC energy 7TeV and the inelastic overlap function reaches its maximum value at $b>0$

  20. Revisiting the real graviton effects at CERN LHC within the quantum gravity theory with large extra dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xinggang; Fang Zhenyun

    2008-01-01

    CERN LHC provides a good experimental platform to perturbatively probe the fundamental gravity scale up to several TeV, with the precise value depending on the number of extra dimensions. The leading experimental signal of the graviton at the LHC is from the process pp→jet+Ee T , where Ee T stands for the transverse missing energy. A detailed discussion on the hadronic production of the real graviton through hard subprocesses: qq→G+g, g+q→G+q, and g+g→G+g have been studied within the quantum gravity theory with large extra dimensions. The main theoretical uncertainties together with the dominant standard model background to these processes, e.g. qq→Z 0 +g and g+q→Z 0 +q with Z 0 further decaying into neutrinos, have also been discussed. It is found that only in a certain jet energy region and with a certain number of extra dimensions can the quantum gravity signal be distinguished from the background, which inversely lead to the effective scale M D to be probed up to (8.8±0.9) TeV for two extra dimensions and (5.9±0.5) TeV for four extra dimensions with sufficient integrated luminosity, e.g. 100 fb -1 , at CERN LHC.

  1. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters At The Dawn Of LHC Run-2

    CERN Document Server

    Camincher, Clement; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Calorimeters are key sub-detectors of ATLAS. They are essential to detect and measure the properties of electrons, photons and are also crucial for jets and missing transverse energy measurements. During the LHC shutdown in 2013-2014, the hardware and the software have been optimized to improve their reliability. The first collisions allows to assess the performance of the detector in the LHC Run-2 real conditions. In view of the next LHC Run in 2020, an upgrade of the level-1 trigger system is also under test. A status at the restart of the LHC Run-2 is presented in this document.

  2. Restart of the LHC. New physics. The particle physics behind the world machine illustratively explained; Neustart des LHC. Neue Physik. Die Teilchenphysik hinter der Weltmaschine anschaulich erklaert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knochel, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The ascertainment of scientific virgin territory by means of the LHC ar CERN, the study of actual questions of cosmology and astrophysics like dark matter and dark energy by means of the LHC, the presently existing anomalies in the data with regards to new phenomena together with statistical methods for the correct estimation of such observations, the supplement of other experiments for the LHC experiments, the Higgs boson, supersymmetry, higher dimensions, the study of quantum gravity in accelerator experiments with regards to the string theory. (HSI)

  3. Hadronic cosmic ray interactions near the LHC energy region and in the UHE domain of giant EAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevielle, J.N. [AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), College de France, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    The fluctuations of ray families simulated with CORSIKA in the energy region 3.10{sup 15} - 10{sup 17} eV on the basis of standard Lns collider physics exhibits alignments of secondaries in the stratosphere and at ground level. The remarkable event recorded on the Concorde does not fit well however those cases. The possible hints of new mechanisms, especially the valence diquark breaking, are considered. Observing that the extrapolation of the original cosmic ray primary spectrum derived from the size spectrum measured in the Akeno classical EAS array coincides with the spectrum measured recently by the Hires Stereo experiment, we point out a possible overestimation of the primary energy in inclined showers of the surface arrays like AGASA. (author)

  4. High-energy resummation effects in the production of Mueller-Navelet di-jets at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudoue, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2016-01-01

    We study the production of two forward jets with a large interval of rapidity at hadron colliders, which was proposed by Mueller and Navelet as a possible test of the high energy dynamics of QCD, within a complete next-to-leading logarithm framework. We show that using the Brodsky-Lepage-Mackenzie procedure to fix the renormalization scale leads to a very good description of the recent CMS data at the LHC for the azimuthal correlations of the jets. We show that the inclusion of next-to-leading order corrections to the jet vertex significantly reduces the importance of energy-momentum non-conservation which is inherent to the BFKL approach, for an asymmetric jet configuration. Finally, we argue that the double parton scattering contribution is negligible in the kinematics of actual CMS measurements. (authors)

  5. CERN prepares for the LHC and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, Peter

    2000-05-01

    of physicists are preparing the two detectors for the LHC. Both ATLAS and CMS have the same basic structure: an inner tracker to measure the paths of electrically charged particles; a calorimeter to measure the energy of charged and neutral particles; and a spectrometer to track muons, the only particles apart from neutrinos that will reach the outer region of the detector. The construction of the magnet will drive the rest of the schedule, says CMS spokesperson Michel Della Negra. The magnet will be tested around March 2004 and, if all goes well, the detector will be lowered 100 metres below ground. A major challenge for CMS is its scintillator crystals. The L3 detector at LEP used bismuth germanium oxide (BGO) crystals, explains Della Negra, but BGO is too slow for the LHC and would not survive the intense radiation levels either. That is why a new crystal material, lead tungstate, had to be developed specially for the LHC. Moreover, CMS needs 11 m{sup 3} of lead tungstate about 80 000 crystals whereas L3 needed only 1 m{sup 3} of BGO. Half of the crystals will come from Russia and half from China. One of the major challenges when building the detectors is to ensure that the electronics for the inner tracker can survive the intense radiation produced there, and also take up as little volume inside the detector as possible, explains Peter Jenni,spokesperson for ATLAS. Many of the components for ATLAS have already been built, he says. For instance, 12 of the 64 modules needed for the barrel of the hadronic tile calorimeter have been completed and are now at CERN. ATLAS is budgeted to cost SwFr 475m. Both collaborations are also now looking closely at the issue of computing and how to cope with the enormous amounts of data that will flow from the LHC detectors. Although fundamental physics is CERN's top priority, the lab has started to pay more attention to technology transfer in recent years. ''Technology transfer has always happened at CERN, but now

  6. Liquid Argon Calorimetry with LHC-Performance Specifications

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-3 Liquid Argon Calorimetry with LHC-Performance Specifications \\\\ \\\\Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. Among the techniques used so far, or under development, the liquid argon sampling calorimetry offers high radiation resistence, good energy resolution (electromagnetic and hadronic), excellent calibration stability and response uniformity. Its rate capabilities, however, do not yet match the requirements for LHC. \\\\ \\\\The aim of this proposal is to improve the technique in such a way that high granularity, good hermiticity and adequate rate capabilities are obtained, without compromising the above mentioned properties. To reach this goal, we propose to use a novel structure, the $^{\\prime\\prime}$accordion$^{\\prime\\prime}$, coupled to fast preamplifiers working at liquid argon temperature. Converter and readout electrodes are no longer planar and perpendicular to particles, as usual, but instead they are wiggled around a plane containing particles. ...

  7. Energy dependence of forward-rapidity J/psi and psi (2S) production in pp collisions at the LHC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acharya, S.; Adamová, Dagmar; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Brož, M.; Contreras, J. G.; Ferencei, Jozef; Hladký, Jan; Horák, D.; Křížek, Filip; Kučera, Vít; Kushpil, Svetlana; Lavička, R.; Mareš, Jiří A.; Petráček, V.; Pospíšil, Jan; Šumbera, Michal; Vaňát, Tomáš; Závada, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 6 (2017), č. článku 392. ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15052 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : ALICE collaboration * LHC * quarkonium production Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics; Particles and field physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 5.331, year: 2016

  8. Studying the sensitivity of monotop probes to compressed supersymmetric scenarios at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuks, Benjamin; Richardson, Peter; Wilcock, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the Large Hadron Collider to supersymmetric setups using monotop probes in which the signal is a single top quark produced in association with missing transverse energy. Our prospective study relies on Monte Carlo simulations of 300 fb -1 of proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV and considers both leptonic and hadronic monotop decays. We present analysis strategies sensitive to regions of the supersymmetric parameter space which feature small superparticle mass splittings and illustrate their strengths in the context of a particular set of benchmark scenarios. Finally, we compare the regions of parameter space expected to be accessible with monotops probes during the next run of the LHC to the reach of more traditional search strategies employed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, where available. (orig.)

  9. LHC report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    This week's Report, by Gianluigi Arduini,  will be included in the LHC Physics Day, dedicated to the reviews of the LHC physics results presented at ICHEP 2010. Seehttp://indico.cern.ch/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=102669 

  10. PDF4LHC recommendations for LHC Run II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butterworth, Jon; Carrazza, Stefano; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Roeck, Albert de; Feltesse, Joel; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Glazov, Sasha; Huston, Joey; Kassabov, Zahari; McNulty, Ronan; Morsch, Andreas; Nadolsky, Pavel; Radescu, Voica; Rojo, Juan; Thorne, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    We provide an updated recommendation for the usage of sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) and the assessment of PDF and PDF+$\\alpha_s$ uncertainties suitable for applications at the LHC Run II. We review developments since the previous PDF4LHC recommendation, and discuss and compare the new

  11. Single hadron response measurement and calorimeter jet energy scale uncertainty with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Bondioli, Mario; Boonekamp, Maarten; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Caramarcu, Costin; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kraus, Jana; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Perus, Antoine; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodriguez, Diego; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shichi, Hideharu; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Maria; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jürgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2013-03-02

    The uncertainty on the calorimeter energy response to jets of particles is derived for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). First, the calorimeter response to single isolated charged hadrons is measured and compared to the Monte Carlo simulation using proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV and 7 TeV collected during 2009 and 2010. Then, using the decay of K_s and Lambda particles, the calorimeter response to specific types of particles (positively and negatively charged pions, protons, and anti-protons) is measured and compared to the Monte Carlo predictions. Finally, the jet energy scale uncertainty is determined by propagating the response uncertainty for single charged and neutral particles to jets. The response uncertainty is 2-5% for central isolated hadrons and 1-3% for the final calorimeter jet energy scale.

  12. Confronting SUSY models with LHC data via electroweakino production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arina, Chiara [Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3),Université catholique de Louvain,B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Chala, Mikael [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron,Notkestrasse 85, D-22603, Hamburg (Germany); Martín-Lozano, Víctor [Departamento de Física Teórica & Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC,Universidad Autónoma de Madrid,E-28049, Madrid (Spain); Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics & Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bonn,Nußallee 12, 53115, Bonn (Germany); Nardini, Germano [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics,University of Bern,Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2016-12-29

    We investigate multi-lepton signals produced by ElectroWeakino (EWino) decays in the MSSM and the TMSSM scenarios with sfermions, gluinos and non Standard Model Higgses at the TeV scale, with dark matter due to electroweak-scale Binos. We recast the present LHC constraints on EWinos for these models and we find that wide MSSM and TMSSM parameter regions prove to be allowed. We forecast the number of events expected in the signal regions of the experimental multi-lepton analyses in the next LHC runs. The correlations among these numbers will help to determine whether future deviations in multi-lepton data are ascribable to the EWinos, as well as the supersymmetric model they originate from.

  13. Confronting SUSY models with LHC data via electroweakino production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arina, Chiara; Chala, Mikael; Martin-Lozano, Victor; Bonn Univ.; Nardini, Germano

    2016-12-01

    We investigate multi-lepton signals produced by ElectroWeakino (EWino) decays in the MSSM and the TMSSM scenarios with sfermions, gluinos and non Standard Model Higgses at the TeV scale, being the Bino electroweak-scale dark matter. We recast the present LHC constraints on EWinos for these models and we find that wide MSSM and TMSSM parameter regions prove to be allowed. We forecast the number of events expected in the signal regions of the experimental multi-lepton analyses in the next LHC runs. The correlations among these numbers will help to determine whether future deviations in multi-lepton data are ascribable to the EWinos, as well as the supersymmetric model they originate from.

  14. Technologies pioneered by LHC. Superconducting magnet and radiation-tolerant tracking detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Unno, Yoshinobu

    2007-01-01

    In the LHC project of proton-proton collisions exploring the energy frontier, superconducting magnets and radiation-tolerant tracking detector play fundamental roles as key technologies. The superconducting magnets contribute to bending and focusing particle beam by using high magnetic field created with the NbTi superconductor cooled to the superfluid temperature of He (1.9 K). In order to overcome the unprecedented radiation damage and to capture the particles emerging with high energy and high density, the large area and highly radiation-tolerant silicon semiconductor tracking detector has been developed for the LHC experiment. (author)

  15. FELIX. A full acceptance detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avati, V.; Eggert, K.; Taylor, C.

    1999-01-01

    The FELIX collaboration has proposed the construction of a full acceptance detector for the LHC, to be located at Intersection Region 4, and to be commissioned concurrently with the LHC. The primary mission of FELIX is QCD: to provide comprehensive and definitive observations of a very broad range of strong-interaction processes. This paper reviews the detector concept and performance characteristics, the physics menu, and plans for integration of FELIX into the collider lattice and physical environment. The current status of the FELIX letter of intent is discussed. (orig.)

  16. FELIX a full-acceptance detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Avati, V.; Taylor, C.

    1999-01-01

    The FELIX collaboration has proposed the construction of a full acceptance detector for the LHC, to be located at Intersection Region 4, and to be commissioned concurrently with the LHC. The primary mission of FELIX is QCD: to provide comprehensive and definitive observations of a very broad range of strong-interaction processes. This paper reviews the detector concept and performance characteristics, the physics menu, and plans for integration of FELIX into the collider lattice and physical environment. The current status of the FELIX Letter of Intent is discussed.

  17. Upgrade of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter for the High luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00236332; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS detector at the LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter consisting of alternating thin steel plates and scintillating tiles. Wavelength shifting fibers coupled to the tiles collect the produced light and are read out by photomultiplier tubes. An analog sum of the processed signal of several photomultipliers serves as input to the first level of trigger. Photomultiplier signals are then digitized and stored on detector and are only transferred off detector once the first trigger acceptance has been confirmed. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has envisaged a series of upgrades towards a High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) delivering five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity. The ATLAS Phase II upgrade, in 2024, will accommodate the detector and data acquisition system for the HL-LHC. In particular, TileCal will undergo a major replacement of its on- and off-detector electronics. All signals will be digitized and then...

  18. Upgrade of the ATLAS hadronic Tile calorimeter for the High luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mlynarikova, Michaela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS detector at the LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter consisting of alternating thin steel plates and scintillating tiles. Wavelength shifting fibers coupled to the tiles collect the produced light and are read out by photomultiplier tubes. Currently, an analog sum of the processed signal of several photomultipliers serves as input to the first level of trigger. Photomultiplier signals are then digitized and stored on detector and are only transferred off detector once the first trigger acceptance has been confirmed. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has envisaged a series of upgrades towards a High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) delivering five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity. The ATLAS Phase II upgrade, in 2024, will accommodate the detector and data acquisition system for the HL-LHC. In particular, TileCal will undergo a major replacement of its on- and off-detector electronics. All signals will be digitiz...

  19. Diffractive bremsstrahlung at high-β{sup *} LHC. Case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwastowski, Janusz J.; Czekierda, Sabina; Staszewski, Rafal; Trzebinski, Maciej [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland)

    2017-04-15

    Feasibility studies of the measurement of the exclusive diffractive bremsstrahlung cross-section in proton-proton scattering at the centre of mass energy of 13 TeV at the LHC are reported. Present studies were performed for the low luminosity LHC running with the betatron function value of 90 m using the ATLAS associated forward detectors ALFA and ZDC. A simplified approach to the event simulation and reconstruction is used. The background influence is also discussed. (orig.)

  20. Keeping HL-LHC accountable

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This week saw the cost and schedule of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) and LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) projects come under close scrutiny from the external review committee set up for the purpose.    HL-LHC, whose implementation requires an upgrade to the CERN injector complex, responds directly to one of the key recommendations of the updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, which urges CERN to prepare for a ‘major luminosity upgrade’, a recommendation that is also perfectly in line with the P5 report on the US strategy for the field. Responding to this recommendation, CERN set up the HL-LHC project in 2013, partially supported by FP7 funding through the HiLumi LHC Design Study (2011-2015), and coordinated with the American LARP project, which oversees the US contribution to the upgrade. A key element of HL-LHC planning is a mechanism for receiving independent expert advice on all aspects of the project.  To this end, several technical reviews h...

  1. The CMS Tracker Upgrade for HL-LHC\\\\ Sensor R$\\&$D

    CERN Document Server

    Naseri, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    At an instantaneous luminosity of 5~$\\times10^{34}~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}$, the high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) is expected to deliver a total of 3000~fb$^{-1}$ of collisions, hereby increasing the discovery potential of the LHC experiments significantly. However, the radiation environment of the tracking system will be severe, requiring new radiation hard sensors for the CMS tracker. Focusing on the upgrade of the outer tracker region, the CMS tracker collaboration has almost completed a large material investigation and irradiation campaign to identify the silicon material and design that fulfils all requirements of a new tracking detector at HL-LHC. Focusing on the upgrade of the outer tracker region, pad diodes as well as fully functional strip sensors have been implemented on silicon wafers with different material properties and thicknesses. The samples were irradiated with a mixture of neutrons and protons corresponding to fluences as expected for various positions in the future track...

  2. Energy in Italian regions. Energy balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catoni, P. G.; Perrella, G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the syntheses of regional energy balance and the elaboration of the most important energy index from 1990 to 1996 at this scope a specific methodology. Pentec (territorial energy planning ecompatible) is pointed [it

  3. Irradiation of a very forward calorimeter in the LHC environment: some consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Malinin, A.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Pojidaev; V.; Salicio, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    We have computed the level of irradiation in the very forward region (2.5< <4.7) of an LHC experimental, using the proposed CMS (Compact Solenoidal Detector for LHC) setup. Information about the induced radioactivity in the absorber of a proposed iron/gas Very Forward Calorimeter has been extracted. (Author) 11 refs

  4. LHC-B: a dedicated LHC collider beauty experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erhan, S.

    1995-01-01

    LHC-B is a forward detector optimized for the study of CP-violation and other rare phenomena in the decays of beauty particles at the LHC. An open geometry forward detector design, with good mass, vertex resolution and particle identification, will facilitate the collection of a large numbers of event samples in diverse B decay channels and allow for a thorough understanding of the systematic uncertainties. With the expected large event statistics, LHC-B will be able to test the closure of the unitarity triangle and make sensitive tests of the Standard Model description of CP-violation. Here we describe the experiment and summarize its anticipated performance. (orig.)

  5. QCD probes at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Da Silveira, G. Gil

    2018-01-01

    The LHC experiments have reported new results with respect to the dynamics of the strong interactions in $pp$, $p$A, and AA collisions over the past years. In proton-proton collisions, the data analyses have focused in exploring the nature of underlying events and double parton scattering at high energies. For large systems, the heavy-ion collisions have provided new insights on physics aspects related to azimuthal correlations, jet quenching, and particle production, such as antiprotons. This Letter reports the recent results from the ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb Collaborations on these various topics and highlights its relevant findings for the high-energy community.

  6. Measurements at LHC and their relevance for cosmic ray physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Many LHC measurements are already used to improve hadronic interaction models used in cosmic ray analyses. This already had a positive effect on the model dependence of crucial data analyses. Some of the data and the model tuning is reviewed. However, the LHC still has a lot more potential to provide crucial information. Since the start of Run2 the highest accelerator beam energies are reached and no further increase can be expected for a long time. First data of Run2 are published and the fundamental performance of cosmic ray hadronic interaction models can be scrutinized. The relevance of LHC data in general for cosmic ray data analyses is demonstrated.

  7. LHC beampipe section

    CERN Multimedia

    A short section of the LHC beam-pipe including beam screen. In the LHC, particles circulate under vacuum. The vacuum chamber can be at room temperature (for example, in the experimental areas), or at cryogenic temperature, in the superconductive magnets. This piece is located in the superconductive magnets. The outer pipe is the vacuum chamber, which is in contact with the magnets, at cryogenic temperature (1.9K). It is called the “cold bore”. The inner tube is the beam screen. Its main goal is to protect the magnets from the heat load coming from the synchrotron radiation. Indeed, when high energy protons’ trajectory is bent, photons are emitted by the beam. They are intercepted by the beam screen. The temperature of the beam screen is kept between 5 and 20K by a circulation of gaseous helium in the small pipes on both sides of the beam screen. As those surfaces are at cryogenic temperature. The residual gas present in the accelerator is sticking on the surfaces. This phenomenon called “adsorption”...

  8. Studying Radiation Tolerant ICs for LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Faccio, F; Snoeys, W; Campbell, M; Casas-cubillos, J; Gomes, P

    2002-01-01

    %title\\\\ \\\\In the recent years, intensive work has been carried out on the development of custom ICs for the readout electronics for LHC experiments. As far as radiation hardness is concerned, attention has been focussed on high total dose applications, mainly for the tracker systems. The dose foreseen in this inner region is estimated to be higher than 1~Mrad/year. In the framework of R&D projects (RD-9 and RD-20) and in the ATLAS and CMS experiments, the study of different radiation hard processes has been pursued and good contacts with the manufacturers have been established. The results of these studies have been discussed during the Microelectronics User Group (MUG) rad-hard meetings, and now some HEP groups are working to develop radiation hard ICs for the LHC experiments on some of the available rad-hard processes.\\\\ \\\\In addition, a lot of the standard commercial electronic components and ASICs which are planned to be installed near the LHC machine and in the detectors will receive total doses in ...

  9. The CMS ECAL Upgrade for Precision Crystal Calorimetry at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Petyt, David Anthony

    2018-01-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment (CMS) is operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2016 with proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy and at a bunch spacing of 25 ns. Challenging running conditions for CMS are expected after the High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC). We review the design and R and D studies for the CMS ECAL crystal calorimeter upgrade and present first test beam studies. Particular challenges at HL-LHC are the harsh radiation environment, the increasing data rates and the extreme level of pile-up events, with up to 200 simultaneous proton-proton collisions. We present test beam results of hadron irradiated PbWO$_{4}$ crystals up to fluences expected at the HL-LHC. We also report on the R and D for the new readout and trigger electronics, which must be upgraded due to the increased trigger and latency requirements at the HL-LHC.

  10. LHC Report: 1,033 bunches per beam and counting

    CERN Multimedia

    Jorg Wenninger for the LHC team

    2015-01-01

    Following the second technical stop, the first beams were injected into the LHC in the early evening of Saturday, 5 September. About ten days later, the machine was operated with around 1,000 bunches per beam.    Evolution of the stored energy per LHC beam, over time.   The first step after a technical stop consists of running through a full LHC cycle, from injection to collisions and beam dump, with a low-intensity bunch (“probe”) to check all machine settings and equipment. This is followed by a series of collimation and absorber validation tests at different points in the LHC cycle. Low-intensity beams – typically the equivalent of three nominal bunches (3 x 1011 protons) – are expanded transversely or longitudinally, or de-bunched to verify that the collimators and absorbers are correctly intercepting lost particles. The techniques for those validations have been progressively improved, and t...

  11. Beyond the Standard Model Higgs searches at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Meridiani, P

    2015-01-01

    The Run I at the LHC marks the birth of the "Higgs physics", a path which will be followed at its full extent in the future runs of the LHC. Indeed there are two complementary paths to be followed to new physics in the Higgs sector: precision measurements of the Higgs properties (couplings, mass, spin and parity), where new physics can manifest as deviation from the Standard Model, or direct search for processes not foreseen in the Standard Model (Higgs decays not foreseen in the Standard Model, additional scalars which would indicate an extended Higgs sector). The current status of these studies at the LHC is presented, focussing in particular on the direct searches for rare or invisible Higgs decays or for an extended Higgs sector. The results are based on the analysis of the proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV center-of-mass energy at the LHC by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations.

  12. The CMS HGCAL detector for the HL-LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Steen, Arnaud

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will integrate 10 times more luminosity than the LHC, posing significant challenges for radiation tolerance and event pileup on detectors, especially for forward calorimetry, and hallmarks the issue for future colliders. As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, the CMS collaboration is designing a High Granularity Calorimeter to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. It features unprecedented transverse and longitudinal segmentation for both electromagnetic (ECAL) and hadronic (HCAL) compartments. This will facilitate particle-flow calorimetry, where the fine structure of showers can be measured and used to enhance pileup rejection and particle identification, whilst still achieving good energy resolution. The ECAL and a large fraction of HCAL will be based on hexagonal silicon sensors of 0.5 - 1 cm$^2$ cell size, with the remainder of the HCAL based on highly-segmented scintillators with SiPM readout. The intrinsic high-precision timing capabilities of the silicon sensors wi...

  13. Beam Loss Patterns at the LHC Collimators Measurements & Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Böhlen, Till Tobias

    2008-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) detects particle losses of circulating beams and initiates an emergency extraction of the beam in case that the BLM thresholds are exceeded. This protection is required as energy deposition in the accelerator equipment due to secondary shower particles can reach critical levels; causing damage to the beam-line components and quenches of superconducting magnets. Robust and movable beam line elements, so-called collimators, are the aperture limitations of the LHC. Consequently, they are exposed to the excess of lost beam particles and their showers. Proton loss patterns at LHC collimators have to be determined to interpret the signal of the BLM detectors and to set adequate BLM thresholds for the protection of collimators and other equipment in case of unacceptably increased loss rates. The first part of this work investigates the agreement of BLM detector measurements with simulations for an LHC-like collimation setup. The setup consists ...

  14. LHC Higgs physics beyond the Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spannowsky, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be able to perform proton collisions at a much higher center-of-mass energy and luminosity than any other collider. Its main purpose is to detect the Higgs boson, the last unobserved particle of the Standard Model, explaining the riddle of the origin of mass. Studies have shown, that for the whole allowed region of the Higgs mass processes exist to detect the Higgs at the LHC. However, the Standard Model cannot be a theory of everything and is not able to provide a complete understanding of physics. It is at most an effective theory up to a presently unknown energy scale. Hence, extensions of the Standard Model are necessary which can affect the Higgs-boson signals. We discuss these effects in two popular extensions of the Standard Model: the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and the Standard Model with four generations (SM4G). Constraints on these models come predominantly from flavor physics and electroweak precision measurements. We show, that the SM4G is still viable and that a fourth generation has strong impact on decay and production processes of the Higgs boson. Furthermore, we study the charged Higgs boson in the MSSM, yielding a clear signal for physics beyond the Standard Model. For small tan β in minimal flavor violation (MFV) no processes for the detection of a charged Higgs boson do exist at the LHC. However, MFV is just motivated by the experimental agreement of results from flavor physics with Standard Model predictions, but not by any basic theoretical consideration. In this thesis, we calculate charged Higgs boson production cross sections beyond the assumption of MFV, where a large number of free parameters is present in the MSSM. We find that the soft-breaking parameters which enhance the charged-Higgs boson production most are just bound to large values, e.g. by rare B-meson decays. Although the charged-Higgs boson cross sections beyond MFV turn out to be sizeable, only a detailed

  15. LHC Higgs physics beyond the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spannowsky, M.

    2007-09-22

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be able to perform proton collisions at a much higher center-of-mass energy and luminosity than any other collider. Its main purpose is to detect the Higgs boson, the last unobserved particle of the Standard Model, explaining the riddle of the origin of mass. Studies have shown, that for the whole allowed region of the Higgs mass processes exist to detect the Higgs at the LHC. However, the Standard Model cannot be a theory of everything and is not able to provide a complete understanding of physics. It is at most an effective theory up to a presently unknown energy scale. Hence, extensions of the Standard Model are necessary which can affect the Higgs-boson signals. We discuss these effects in two popular extensions of the Standard Model: the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and the Standard Model with four generations (SM4G). Constraints on these models come predominantly from flavor physics and electroweak precision measurements. We show, that the SM4G is still viable and that a fourth generation has strong impact on decay and production processes of the Higgs boson. Furthermore, we study the charged Higgs boson in the MSSM, yielding a clear signal for physics beyond the Standard Model. For small tan {beta} in minimal flavor violation (MFV) no processes for the detection of a charged Higgs boson do exist at the LHC. However, MFV is just motivated by the experimental agreement of results from flavor physics with Standard Model predictions, but not by any basic theoretical consideration. In this thesis, we calculate charged Higgs boson production cross sections beyond the assumption of MFV, where a large number of free parameters is present in the MSSM. We find that the soft-breaking parameters which enhance the charged-Higgs boson production most are just bound to large values, e.g. by rare B-meson decays. Although the charged-Higgs boson cross sections beyond MFV turn out to be sizeable, only a detailed

  16. Heavy Ion Physics with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trzupek, A.

    2009-01-01

    The heavy-ion program at LHC will be pursued by three experiments including ATLAS, a multipurpose detector to study p + p collisions. A report on the potential of the ATLAS detector to uncover new physics in Pb + Pb collisions at energies thirty times larger than energy available at RHIC will be presented. Key aspects of the heavy-ion program of the ATLAS experiment, implied by measurements at RHIC, will be discussed. They include measurement capability of high-p T hadronic and electromagnetic probes, quarkonia as well as elliptic flow and other bulk phenomena. Measurements by the ATLAS experiment will provide crucial information about the formation of a quark-gluon plasma at the new energy scale accessible at the LHC. (author)

  17. Search for the Higgs boson decaying to four leptons in the ATLAS detector at LHC and studies of muon isolation and energy loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenzi, B.

    2010-01-01

    The central subject of this thesis is the evaluation of the discovery potential of the Higgs boson through its decay into four leptons (electrons and muons) in the ATLAS experiment installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC was designed to accelerate proton beams at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV and started its physics program with 7 TeV collisions in the beginning of 2010. An inclusive analysis involving all the production modes and an exclusive one aiming at production through vector boson fusion (VBF), studied for the first time in the collaboration, are presented. Both are capable of discovering the Higgs boson after a few years of LHC operation, with integrated luminosities of 30 fb -1 . The first one covers most part of a Higgs mass window from 130 to 500 GeV. The second one concentrates on masses around 180 GeV and above, exploiting the presence of high energy jets with large separations in pseudo-rapidity to increase the signal over background ratio. An important part of the document is devoted to the reconstruction of muon isolation and energy loss in the ATLAS calorimeters. A software package that optimized the way of treating the energy deposits was developed and tested on simulated data and cosmic-ray events, leading to improvements in the muon momentum resolution and the distinction between muons from heavy quark and vector boson decays. As a consequence of the last result, one of the dominant backgrounds to the H → 4μ channel, Zb b-bar, is expected to be reduced by almost a factor of two. (author) [fr

  18. Fast Automatic Beam-Based Alignment of the LHC Collimator Jaws

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080813; Assmann, R W

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland is the largest and most powerful particle accelerator ever built. With a circumference of 27 km, it is designed to collide particles in two counter-rotating beams at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV to explore the fundamental forces and constituents of matter. Due to its potentially destructive high energy particle beams, the LHC is equipped with several machine protection systems. The LHC collimation system is tasked with scattering and absorbing beam halo particles before they can quench the superconducting magnets. The 108 collimators also protect the machine from damage in the event of very fast beam losses, and shields sensitive devices in the tunnel from radiation over years of operation. Each collimator is made up of two blocks or ‘jaws’ of carbon, tungsten or copper material. The collimator jaws need be placed symmetrically on either side of the beam trajectory, to clean halo particles with maximum efficiency. The beam orbit and beam siz...

  19. LHC synchronization test successful

    CERN Multimedia

    The synchronization of the LHC's clockwise beam transfer system and the rest of CERN's accelerator chain was successfully achieved last weekend. Tests began on Friday 8 August when a single bunch of a few particles was taken down the transfer line from the SPS accelerator to the LHC. After a period of optimization, one bunch was kicked up from the transfer line into the LHC beam pipe and steered about 3 kilometres around the LHC itself on the first attempt. On Saturday, the test was repeated several times to optimize the transfer before the operations group handed the machine back for hardware commissioning to resume on Sunday. The anti-clockwise synchronization systems will be tested over the weekend of 22 August.Picture:http://lhc-injection-test.web.cern.ch/lhc-injection-test/

  20. Compressed electroweakino spectra at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we examine the sensitivity of monojet searches at the LHC to directly produced charginos and neutralinos (electroweakinos) in the limit of small mass splitting, where the traditional multilepton plus missing energy searches loose their sensitivity. We first recast the existing 8 TeV monojet search at CMS in terms of a SUSY simplified model with only light gauginos (winos and binos) or only light higgsinos. The current searches are not sensitive to MSSM like production cross sections, but would be sensitive to models with 2-20 times enhanced production cross section, for particle masses between 100 GeV and 250 GeV. Then we explore the sensitivity in the 14 TeV run of the LHC. Here we emphasise that in addition to the pure monojet search, soft leptons present in the samples can be used to increase the sensitivity. Exclusion of electroweakino masses up to 200 GeV is possible with 300 fb$^{-1}$ at the LHC, if the systematic error can be reduced to the 1% level. Discovery is possible with 3000 fb$^{-...

  1. Main improvements of LHC Cryogenics Operation during Run 2 (2015-2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delprat, L.; Bradu, B.; Brodzinski, K.; Ferlin, G.; Hafi, K.; Herblin, L.; Rogez, E.; Suraci, A.

    2017-12-01

    After the successful Run 1 (2010-2012), the LHC entered its first Long Shutdown period (LS1, 2013-2014). During LS1 the LHC cryogenic system went under a complete maintenance and consolidation program. The LHC resumed operation in 2015 with an increased beam energy from 4 TeV to 6.5 TeV. Prior to the new physics Run 2 (2015-2018), the LHC was progressively cooled down from ambient to the 1.9 K operation temperature. The LHC has resumed operation with beams in April 2015. Operational margins on the cryogenic capacity were reduced compared to Run 1, mainly due to the observed higher than expected electron-cloud heat load coming from increased beam energy and intensity. Maintaining and improving the cryogenic availability level required the implementation of a series of actions in order to deal with the observed heat loads. This paper describes the results from the process optimization and update of the control system, thus allowing the adjustment of the non-isothermal heat load at 4.5 - 20 K and the optimized dynamic behaviour of the cryogenic system versus the electron-cloud thermal load. Effects from the new regulation settings applied for operation on the electrical distribution feed-boxes and inner triplets will be discussed. The efficiency of the preventive and corrective maintenance, as well as the benefits and issues of the present cryogenic system configuration for Run 2 operational scenario will be described. Finally, the overall availability results and helium management of the LHC cryogenic system during the 2015-2016 operational period will be presented.

  2. Beam dynamics studies to develop LHC luminosity model

    CERN Document Server

    Campogiani, Giovanna; Papaphilippou, Ioannis

    The thesis project aims at studying the different physical processes that are impacting luminosity, one of the key figures of merit of a collider operation. In particular the project focuses on extracting the most relevant parameters for the high-energy part of the model, which is mostly dominated by the beam-beam effect. LHC luminosity is degraded by parasitic collisions that reduce the beam lifetime and the particles stability in the collider. This instability is due to the non-linear effects of one beam electromagnetic field on another in the interaction region. Such parasitic encounters can be as many as 16 per interaction region, piling up to around 180 000 per second. Our goal is to study the evolution of charge density distribution in the beam, by tracking particles through a symplectic integrator that includes the beam-beam effect. In particular we want to obtain data on the halo particles, which are more sensible to instability, to better characterise the beam lifetime and monitor the luminosity evol...

  3. Irradiation of a very forward calorimeter in the LHC environment: Some consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Malinin, A.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Pojidaev, V.; Salicio, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have computed the level of irradiation in the very forward region (2.5 < | η | < 4.7) 4.7) of an LHC experiment, using the proposed CMS (Compact Solenoidal Detector for LHC) setup. Information about the induced radioactivity in the absorber of a proposed iron/gas Very Forward Calorimeter has been extracted. (Author) 11 refs

  4. Irradiation of a very forward calorimeter in the LHC environment: Some consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Malinin, A.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Pojidaev, V.; Salicio, J. M.

    1994-07-01

    We have computed the level of irradiation in the very forward region (2.5 < | {eta} | < 4.7) 4.7) of an LHC experiment, using the proposed CMS (Compact Solenoidal Detector for LHC) setup. Information about the induced radioactivity in the absorber of a proposed iron/gas Very Forward Calorimeter has been extracted. (Author) 11 refs.

  5. Beam Scraping in the SPS for LHC Injection Efficiency and Robustness Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Letnes, Paul/LPA; Myrheim, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be the world's most powerful accelerator when it is commissioned in fall 2008. Operation of the LHC will require injection of very high intensity beams. Fast transverse beam scrapers have been installed in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) injector to detect and, if necessary, remove transverse beam tails. This will help to both diagnose and prevent beam quenches in the LHC. Scraping of a high intensity beam at top energy can potentially damage the scraper jaws. This has been studied with Monte Carlo simulations to find energy deposition and limits for hardware damage. Loss maps from scraping have been generated both with machine studies and tracking simulations. Time dependent Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) measurements have shown several interesting details about the beam. An analytical model of time dependent losses is compared with beam measurements and demonstrates that beam scraping can be used to estimate the beam size. Energy deposition simulations also give the ...

  6. Remote Inspection, Measurement and Handling for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kershaw, K; Coin, A; Delsaux, F; Feniet, T; Grenard, J L; Valbuena, R

    2007-01-01

    Personnel access to the LHC tunnel will be restricted to varying extents during the life of the machine due to radiation, cryogenic and pressure hazards. The ability to carry out visual inspection, measurement and handling activities remotely during periods when the LHC tunnel is potentially hazardous offers advantages in terms of safety, accelerator down time, and costs. The first applications identified were remote measurement of radiation levels at the start of shut-down, remote geometrical survey measurements in the collimation regions, and remote visual inspection during pressure testing and initial machine cool-down. In addition, for remote handling operations, it will be necessary to be able to transmit several real-time video images from the tunnel to the control room. The paper describes the design, development and use of a remotely controlled vehicle to demonstrate the feasibility of meeting the above requirements in the LHC tunnel. Design choices are explained along with operating experience to-dat...

  7. The Physics Programme Of The MoEDAL Experiment At The LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, B.; Bernabeu, J.; Campbell, M.; Cecchini, S.; Chwastowski, J.; De Montigny, M.; Derendarz, D.; De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.R.; Fairbairn, M.; Felea, D.; Frank, M.; Frekers, D.; Garcia, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.; Hasegan, D.; Hott, T.; J.Jak\\r u; Katre, A.; Kim, D-W.; King, M.G.L.; Kinoshita, K.; Lacarrere, D.; Lee, S.C.; Leroy, C.; Margiotta, A.; Mauri, N.; Mavromatos, N.E.; Mermod, P.; Mitsou, V.A.; Orava, R.; Pasqualini, L.; Patrizii, L.; Pavalas, G.E.; Pinfold, J.L.; Platkevic, M.; Popa, V.; Pozzato, M.; Pospisil, S.; Rajantie, A.; Sahnoun, Z.; Sakellariadou, M.; Sarkar, S.; Semenoff, G.; Sirri, G.; Sliwa, K.; Soluk, R.; Spurio, M.; Srivastava, Y.N.; Staszewski, R.; Swain, J.; Tenti, M.; Togo, V.; Trzebinski, M.; Tuszynski, J.A.; Vento, V.; Vives, O.; Vykydal, Z.; Widom, A.; Yoon, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    The MoEDAL experiment at Point 8 of the LHC ring is the seventh and newest LHC experiment. It is dedicated to the search for highly ionizing particle avatars of physics beyond the Standard Model, extending significantly the discovery horizon of the LHC. A MoEDAL discovery would have revolutionary implications for our fundamental understanding of the Microcosm. MoEDAL is an unconventional and largely passive LHC detector comprised of the largest array of Nuclear Track Detector stacks ever deployed at an accelerator, surrounding the intersection region at Point 8 on the LHC ring. Another novel feature is the use of paramagnetic trapping volumes to capture both electrically and magnetically charged highly-ionizing particles predicted in new physics scenarios. It includes an array of TimePix pixel devices for monitoring highly-ionizing particle backgrounds. The main passive elements of the MoEDAL detector do not require a trigger system, electronic readout, or online computerized data acquisition. The aim of this...

  8. As an introduction: Quest for New Physics in γγ interactions at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    A significant fraction of pp collisions at the lhc will involve (quasi-real) photon interactions occurring at energies well beyond the electroweak energy scale. Hence, the lhc can to some extent be considered as a high-energy photon-photon or photon-proton collider. This offers a unique possibility for novel and complementary research where the much smaller available effective luminosity relative to parton-parton interactions, is compensated by better known initial conditions and usually simpler final states. This is in a way a method for approaching some of the issues to be addressed by the future lepton collider. Such studies of photon interactions are possible at the LHC, thanks to the striking experimental signatures of events involving photon exchanges, in particular the presence of very forward scattered protons

  9. U.S. Involvement in the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Dan

    2016-12-30

    The demise of the SSC in the U.S. created an upheaval in the U.S. High energy physics (HEP) community. The subsequent redirection of HEP efforts to the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can perhaps be seen as informing on possible future paths for worldwide collaboration on future HEP megaprojects

  10. Initial test results of an ionization chamber shower detector for a LHC luminosity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datte, P.; Beche, J.-F.; Haguenauer, M.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manghisoni, M.; Millaud, J.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, L.; Riot, V.; Schmickler, H.; Speziali, V.; Turner, W.

    2002-01-01

    A novel, segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for optimization of the luminosity of the LHC. The ionization chambers are to be installed in the front quadrupole and zero degree neutral particle absorbers in the high luminosity IRs and sample the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. In this paper we report the initial results of our second test of this instrumentation in an SPS external proton beam. Single 300 GeV protons are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic shower produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC. The capability of instrumentations to measure the luminosity of individual bunches in a 40 MHz bunch train is demonstrated

  11. LHC goes global

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-09-15

    As CERN's major project for the future, the LHC sets a new scale in world-wide scientific collaboration. As well as researchers and engineers from CERN's 19 European Member States, preparations for the LHC now include scientists from several continents. Some 50 per cent of the researchers involved in one way or another with preparations for the LHC experimental programme now come from countries which are not CERN Member States. Underlining this enlarged international involvement is the recent decision by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Science and Culture ('Monbusho') to accord CERN a generous contribution of five billion yen (about 65 million Swiss francs) to help finance the construction of the LHC. This money will be held in a special fund earmarked for construction of specific LHC components and related activities. To take account of the new situation, CERN is proposing to set up a totally new 'Associate State' status. This is foreseen as a flexible bilateral framework which will be set up on a case-by-case basis to adapt to different circumstances. This proposal was introduced to CERN Council in June, and will be further discussed later this year. These developments reflect CERN's new role as a focus of world science, constituting a first step towards a wider level of international collaboration. At the June Council session, as a first step, Japan was unanimously elected as a CERN Observer State, giving them the right to attend Council meetings. Introducing the topic at the Council session, Director General Chris Llewellyn Smith sketched the history of Japanese involvement in CERN research. This began in 1957 and has gone on to include an important experiment at the LEAR low energy antiproton ring using laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms, the new Chorus neutrino experiment using an emulsion target, and a major contribution to the Opal experiment at the LEP electronpositron collider. In welcoming the development, many Council delegates looked

  12. Constraining SUSY models with Fittino using measurements before, with and beyond the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtle, Philip [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Desch, Klaus; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Wienemann, Peter [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

    2009-07-15

    We investigate the constraints on Supersymmetry (SUSY) arising from available precision measurements using a global fit approach.When interpreted within minimal supergravity (mSUGRA), the data provide significant constraints on the masses of supersymmetric particles (sparticles), which are predicted to be light enough for an early discovery at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We provide predicted mass spectra including, for the first time, full uncertainty bands. The most stringent constraint is from the measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. Using the results of these fits, we investigate to which precision mSUGRA and more general MSSM parameters can be measured by the LHC experiments with three different integrated luminosities for a parameter point which approximately lies in the region preferred by current data. The impact of the already available measurements on these precisions, when combined with LHC data, is also studied. We develop a method to treat ambiguities arising from different interpretations of the data within one model and provide a way to differentiate between values of different digital parameters of a model (e. g. sign({mu}) within mSUGRA). Finally, we show how measurements at a linear collider with up to 1 TeV centre-of-mass energy will help to improve precision by an order of magnitude. (orig.)

  13. ATLAS Tracker Upgrade: Silicon Strip Detectors for the sLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    To extend the physics potential of the Large Hadron Colider (LHC) at CERN, upgrades of the accelerator complex and the detectors towards the Super-LHC (sLHC) are foreseen. The upgrades, separated in Phase-1 and Phase-2, aim at increasing the luminosity while leaving the energy of the colliding particles (7 TeV per proton beam) unchanged. After the Phase-2 upgrade the instantaneous luminosity will be a factor of 5-10 higher than the design luminosity of the LHC. Due to the increased track rate and extreme radiation levels for the tracking detectors, upgrades of the detectors are necessary. At ATLAS, one of the two general purpose detectors at the LHC, the current inner detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracker. This article describes the plans for the Phase-2 upgrade of the silicon strip detector of ATLAS. Radiation hard n-in-p silicon detectors with shorter strips than currently installed in ATLAS are planned. Results of measurements with these sensors and plans for module designs will be discussed.

  14. Stepping outside the neighborhood of T{sub c} at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

    2009-11-01

    ' As you are well aware, many in the RHIC community are interested in the LHC heavy-ion program, but have several questions: What can we learn at the LHC that is qualitatively new? Are collisions at LHC similar to RHIC ones, just with a somewhat hotter/denser initial state? If not, why not? These questions are asked in good faith, and this talk is an opportunity to answer them directly to much of the RHIC community.' With these words, the organizers of Quark Matter 2009 in Knoxville invited me to discuss the physics opportunities for heavy ion collisions at the LHC without recalling the standard arguments, which are mainly based on the extended kinematic reach of the machine. In response, I emphasize here that lattice QCD indicates characteristic qualitative differences between thermal physics in the neighborhood of the critical temperature (T{sub c}400-500MeV), for which the relevant energy densities will be solely attainable at the LHC.

  15. Real-time data analysis at the LHC: present and future

    CERN Document Server

    Gligorov, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which collides protons at an energy of 14 TeV, produces hundreds of exabytes of data per year, making it one of the largest sources of data in the world today. At present it is not possible to even transfer most of this data from the four main particle detectors at the LHC to "offline" data facilities, much less to permanently store it for future processing. For this reason the LHC detectors are equipped with real-time analysis systems, called triggers, which process this volume of data and select the most interesting proton-proton collisions. The LHC experiment triggers reduce the data produced by the LHC by between 1/1000 and 1/100000, to tens of petabytes per year, allowing its economical storage and further analysis. The bulk of the data-reduction is performed by custom electronics which ignores most of the data in its decision making, and is therefore unable to exploit the most powerful known data analysis strategies. I cover the present status of real-time data analysis ...

  16. The Alignment Jacks of the LHC Cryomagnets

    CERN Document Server

    Dwivedi, J; Goswami, S G; Madhumurthy, V; Parma, V; Soni, H C

    2004-01-01

    The precise alignment of the 1232 dipoles, 474 Short Straight Sections (SSS) and some other components of the LHC collider, requires the use of 6800 jacks. The specific requirements and the need for a cost-effective solution for this large production, justified the development and industrialisation of a dedicated mechanical jack. The jack was developed, and is now being produced by Centre for Advanced Technology, India, in the framework of a collaboration between CERN and the Department of Atomic Energy in India. Three jacks support each of the 32-ton heavy, 15-meter long cryo-dipole of LHC, and provide the required alignment features. Identical jacks support the lighter LHC Short Straight Sections. Presently, the mass production of 6800 jacks is in progress with two Indian manufacturers, and 3545 jacks have already been delivered to CERN by April 2004. Considering the successful performance of the jacks, it is now envisaged to extend their use, with some modifications, for even higher-demanding alignment of ...

  17. LHC beam stability and feedback control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhagen, Ralph

    2007-07-20

    This report presents the stability and the control of the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) two beam orbits and their particle momenta using beam-based feedback systems. The aim of this report is to contribute to a safe and reliable LHC commissioning and machine operation. The first part of the analysis gives an estimate of the expected sources of orbit and energy perturbations that can be grouped into environmental sources, machine-inherent sources and machine element failures: the slowest perturbation due to ground motion, tides, temperature fluctuations of the tunnel and other environmental influences are described in this report by a propagation model that is both qualitatively and quantitatively supported by geophone and beam motion measurements at LEP and other CERN accelerators. The second part of this analysis deals with the control of the two LHC beams' orbit and energy through automated feedback systems. Based on the reading of the more than 1056 beam position monitors (BPMs) that are distributed over the machine, a central global feedback controller calculates new deflection strengths for the more than 1060 orbit corrector magnets (CODs) that are suitable to correct the orbit and momentum around their references. this report provides an analysis of the BPMs and CODs involved in the orbit and energy feedback. The BPMs are based on a wide-band time normaliser circuit that converts the transverse beam position reading of each individual particle bunch into two laser pulses that are separated by a time delay and transmitted through optical fibres to an acquisition card that converts the delay signals into a digital position. A simple error model has been tested and compared to the measurement accuracy of LHC type BPMs, obtained through beam-based measurements in the SPS. The average beam position is controlled through 1060 superconducting and individually powered corrector dipole magnets. The proposed correction in 'time-domain' consists of a

  18. Design of the lar