WorldWideScience

Sample records for lfa-1-targeted nanoparticles prevents

  1. Silymarin nanoparticle prevents paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Suvadra Das, Partha Roy, Runa Ghosh Auddy, Arup MukherjeeDepartment of Chemical Technology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, West Bengal, IndiaAbstract: Silymarin (Sm is a polyphenolic component extracted from Silybum marianum. It is an antioxidant, traditionally used as an immunostimulant, hepatoprotectant, and dietary supplement. Relatively recently, Sm has proved to be a valuable chemopreventive and a useful antineoplastic agent. Medical success for Sm is, however, constrained by very low aqueous solubility and associated biopharmaceutical limitations. Sm flavonolignans are also susceptible to ion-catalyzed degradation in the gut. Proven antihepatotoxic activity of Sm cannot therefore be fully exploited in acute chemical poisoning conditions like that in paracetamol overdose. Moreover, a synchronous delivery that is required for hepatic regeneration is difficult to achieve by itself. This work is meant to circumvent the inherent limitations of Sm through the use of nanotechnology. Sm nanoparticles (Smnps were prepared by nanoprecipitation in polyvinyl alcohol stabilized Eudragit RS100® polymer (Rohm Pharma GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany. Process parameter optimization provided 67.39% entrapment efficiency and a Gaussian particle distribution of average size 120.37 nm. Sm release from the nanoparticles was considerably sustained for all formulations. Smnps were strongly protective against hepatic damage when tested in a paracetamol overdose hepatotoxicity model. Nanoparticles recorded no animal death even when administered after an established paracetamol-induced hepatic necrosis. Preventing progress of paracetamol hepatic damage was traced for an efficient glutathione regeneration to a level of 11.3 µmol/g in hepatic tissue due to Smnps.Keywords: silymarin, paracetamol, nanoparticle, glutathione, mouse hepatotoxicity

  2. Effect of Biosynthesized Silver Nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Quenching and Prevention of Biofilm Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pratik R. Chaudhari∗; Shalaka A. Masurkar; Vrishali B. Shidore; Suresh P. Kamble

    2012-01-01

    The development of green experimental processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles is a need in the field of nanotechnology. The synthesis of silver nanoparticles was achieved using Bacillus cereus supernatant and 1 mM silver nitrate. 100 mM glucose was found to quicken the rate of reaction of silver nanoparticles synthesis. UV-visible spectrophotometric analysis was carried out to assess the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were further characterized by using Nanoparticle Tracking Analyzer (NTA), Transmission Electron Microscope and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectra. These silver nanoparticles showed enhanced quorum quenching activity against Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and prevention of biofilm formation which can be seen under inverted microscope (40 X). The synergistic effect of silver nanoparticles along with antibiotics in biofilm quenching was found to be effective. In the near future, silver nanoparticles could be used in the treatment of infections caused by highly antibiotic resistant biofilm.

  3. Challenging nanoparticles: a target of personalized adhesion prevention strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mynbaev OA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ospan A Mynbaev,1–4 Marina Yu Eliseeva,2 Antonio Malvasi,5 Andrea Tinelli6 1International Translational Medicine and Biomodeling Research Team, MIPT Center for Human Physiology, Department of Applied Mathematics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region, Russia; 2Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine, Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia, Moscow, Russia; 3Laboratory of Pilot Projects, Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry, Moscow, Russia; 4The New European Surgical Academy, Berlin, Germany; 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Santa Maria Hospital, Bari, Italy; 6Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Experimental Endoscopic Surgery, Imaging, Minimally Invasive Therapy and Technology, Vito Fazzi Hospital, Lecce, ItalyWith great interest we have read an article by Wu et al1 recently published in the International Journal of Nanomedicine aimed to estimate cytotoxicity, toxicity, and histopathological changes, as well as the postsurgical antiadhesion potential of biodegradable and thermosensitive micelles by combining in vitro and in vivo models.Our congratulations to Wu et al1 for their new, precisely designed, and promising study of nanoparticles used in the prevention of postsurgical adhesions. Even more so when we know that in most clinical studies the adhesion prevention adjuvants have failed. Taking into account medical and financial problems associated with postsurgical adhesions worldwide in the health care system, new developments in this area are welcomed and call for further investigation.View orginal paper by Wu et al

  4. Tolerogenic nanoparticles to induce immunologic tolerance: Prevention and reversal of FVIII inhibitor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-Hong; Rossi, Robert J; Yoon, Jeongheon; Wang, Hong; Scott, David W

    2016-03-01

    The immune response of hemophilia A patients to administered FVIII is a major complication that obviates this very therapy. We have recently described the use of synthetic, biodegradable nanoparticles carrying rapamycin and FVIII peptide antigens, to induce antigen-specific tolerance. Herein we test the tolerogenicity of nanoparticles that contains full length FVIII protein in hemophilia A mice, focusing on anti-FVIII humoral immune response. As expected, recipients of tolerogenic nanoparticles remained unresponsive to FVIII despite multiple challenges for up to 6 months. Furthermore, therapeutic treatments in FVIII-immunized mice with pre-existing anti-FVIII antibodies resulted in diminished antibody titers, albeit efficacy required longer therapy with the tolerogenic nanoparticles. Interestingly, durable FVIII-specific tolerance was also achieved in animals co-administered with FVIII admixed with nanoparticles encapsulating rapamycin alone. These results suggest that nanoparticles carrying rapamycin and FVIII can be employed to induce specific tolerance to prevent and even reverse inhibitor formation.

  5. Effect of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm quenching and prevention of biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masurkar, S A; Chaudhari, P R; Shidore, V B; Kamble, S P

    2012-09-01

    The development of green experimental processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles is a need in the field of nanotechnology. In the present study, the authors reported rapid synthesis of silver nanoparticles using fresh leaves extract of Cymbopogan citratus (lemongrass) with increased stability. The synthesised silver nanoparticles were found to be stable for several months. UV-visible spectrophotometric analysis was carried out to assess the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The synthesised silver nanoparticles were further characterised by using nanoparticle tracking analyser (NTA), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectra (EDX). The NTA results showed that the mean size was found to be 32 nm. Silver nanoparticles with controlled size and shape were observed under TEM micrograph. The EDX of the nanoparticles confirmed the presence of elemental silver. These silver nanoparticles showed enhanced quorum quenching activity against Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and prevention of biofilm formation which can be seen under inverted microscope (40X). In the near future, silver nanoparticles synthesised using green methods may be used in the treatment of infections caused by a highly antibiotic resistant biofilm.

  6. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  7. Pirfenidone nanoparticles improve corneal wound healing and prevent scarring following alkali burn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushovan Chowdhury

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of pirfenidone nanoparticles on corneal re-epithelialization and scarring, major clinical challenges after alkali burn. METHODS: Effect of pirfenidone on collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA synthesis by TGFβ induced primary corneal fibroblast cells was evaluated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Pirfenidone loaded poly (lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA nanoparticles were prepared, characterized and their cellular entry was examined in primary corneal fibroblast cells by fluorescence microscopy. Alkali burn was induced in one eye of Sprague Dawley rats followed by daily topical treatment with free pirfenidone, pirfenidone nanoparticles or vehicle. Corneal re-epithelialization was assessed daily by flourescein dye test; absence of stained area indicated complete re-epithelialization and the time for complete re-epithelialization was determined. Corneal haze was assessed daily for 7 days under slit lamp microscope and graded using a standard method. After 7 days, collagen I deposition in the superficial layer of cornea was examined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Pirfenidone prevented (P<0.05 increase in TGF β induced collagen I and α-SMA synthesis by corneal fibroblasts in a dose dependent manner. Pirfenidone could be loaded successfully within PLGA nanoparticles, which entered the corneal fibroblasts within 5 minutes. Pirfenidone nanoparticles but not free pirfenidone significantly (P<0.05 reduced collagen I level, corneal haze and the time for corneal re-epithelialization following alkali burn. CONCLUSION: Pirfenidone decreases collagen synthesis and prevents myofibroblast formation. Pirfenidone nanoparticles improve corneal wound healing and prevent fibrosis. Pirfenidone nanoparticles are of potential value in treating corneal chemical burns and other corneal fibrotic diseases.

  8. Application of nanophotosensitizers (aluminum phthalocyanine nanoparticles) for early diagnosis and prevention of inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, J. O.; Makarov, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with a possibility of new types of photosensitizers application - Aluminum Phthalocyanine nanoparticles (nAlPc) in clinical practice for diagnosis, prevention and therapy of inflammatory diseases in dentistry and traumatology. It was detected that the aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPc) fluoresces in the nanoparticle form in the presence of pathologic microflora or inflammation process. It will make possible to detect the local accumulation of pathological microflora on the enamel surface and also for diagnostics and treatment of inflammatory diseases. Experimental studies of interaction of NP-AlPc with tooth enamel and with biological joint tissue at arthrosis are presented.

  9. Fullerenol nanoparticles prevents doxorubicin-induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacevic, Vesna; Djordjevic, Aleksandar; Srdjenovic, Branislava; Milic-Tores, Vukosava; Segrt, Zoran; Dragojevic-Simic, Viktorija; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-03-16

    Doxorubicin (DOX), commonly used antineoplastic agent, affects bone marrow, intestinal tract and heart, but it also has some hepatotoxic effects. Main mechanism of its toxicity is the production of free reactive oxygen species. Polyhidroxilated C60 fullerene derivatives, fullerenol nanoparticles (FNP), act as free radical scavengers in in vitro systems. The aim of the study was to investigate potential FNP protective role against DOX-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Experiments were performed on adult male Wistar rats. Animals were divided into five groups: (1) 0.9% NaCl (control), (2) 100mg/kg ip FNP, (3) 10mg/kg DOX iv, (4) 50mg/kg ip FNP 30min before 10mg/kg iv DOX, (5) 100mg/kg ip FNP 30min before 10mg/kg iv DOX. A general health condition, body and liver weight, TBARS level and antioxidative enzyme activity, as well as pathohistological examination of the liver tissue were conducted on days 2 and 14 of the study. FNP, applied alone, did not alter any examinated parameters. However, when used as a pretreatment it significantly increased survival rate, body and liver weight, and decreased TBARS level, antioxidative enzyme activity and hepatic damage score in DOX-treated rats. FNP administered at a dose of 100mg/kg significantly attenuated effects of doxorubicin administered in a single high dose in rats, concerning general condition, body and liver weight, lipid peroxidation level and antioxidative enzyme activity as well as structural alterations of the hepatic tissue.

  10. Polyelectrolyte coatings prevent interferences from charged nanoparticles in SPME speciation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielińska, Katarzyna, E-mail: kzielinska@gmail.com; Leeuwen, Herman P. van

    2014-09-24

    Highlights: • For the first time SPME fiber is coated with polyelectrolyte layer. • Sorption of nanoparticles on the solid phase surface is prevented. • Polyelectrolyte-modified fiber enables extraction of free analyte in presence of sorbing nanoparticles. - Abstract: In this work we present a new approach for protection of the fiber in solid phase microextraction (SPME) from interfering charged particles present in the sample medium. It involves coating of commercial poly(dimethylsiloxane) extraction phase with polyelectrolyte layer composed of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate). The modified fiber provides reproducible, convenient and fast extraction capabilities toward the model analyte, triclosan (TCS). A negatively charged polyelectrolyte coating prevents sorbing oxidic nanoparticles from both partitioning into the PDMS phase and aggregation at its surface. The results for the TCS/nanoparticle sample show that the polyelectrolyte layer-modified solid phase extracts just the free form of the organic compound and enables dynamic speciation analysis of the nanoparticulate target analyte complex.

  11. Chitosan-based nanoparticles for survivin targeted siRNA delivery in breast tumor therapy and preventing its metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming; Fan, Bo; Kang, Lin; Gao, Zhonggao

    Nanoparticle-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery is a promising therapeutic strategy in various cancers. However, it is difficult to deliver degradative siRNA to tumor tissue, and thus a safe and efficient vector for siRNA delivery is essential for cancer therapy. In this study, poly(ethylene glycol)-modified chitosan (PEG-CS) was synthesized successfully for delivering nucleic acid drug. We deemed that PEGylated CS could improve its solubility by forming a stable siRNA loaded in nanoparticles, and enhancing transfection efficiency of siRNA-loaded CS nanoparticles in cancer cell line. The research results showed that siRNA loaded in PEGylated CS (PEG-CS/siRNA) nanoparticles with smaller particle size had superior structural stability in the physical environment compared to CS nanoparticles. The data of in vitro antitumor activity revealed that 4T1 tumor cell growth was significantly inhibited and cellular uptake of PEG-CS/siRNA nanoparticles in 4T1 cells was dramatically enhanced compared to naked siRNA groups. The results from flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that PEG-CS/siRNA nanoparticles were more easily taken up than naked siRNA. Importantly, PEG-CS/siRNA nanoparticles significantly reduced the growth of xenograft tumors of 4T1 cells in vivo. It has been demonstrated that the PEG-CS is a safe and efficient vector for siRNA delivery, and it can effectively reduce tumor growth and prevent metastasis.

  12. Chitosan-based nanoparticles for survivin targeted siRNA delivery in breast tumor therapy and preventing its metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming; Fan, Bo; Kang, Lin; Gao, Zhonggao

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery is a promising therapeutic strategy in various cancers. However, it is difficult to deliver degradative siRNA to tumor tissue, and thus a safe and efficient vector for siRNA delivery is essential for cancer therapy. In this study, poly(ethylene glycol)-modified chitosan (PEG-CS) was synthesized successfully for delivering nucleic acid drug. We deemed that PEGylated CS could improve its solubility by forming a stable siRNA loaded in nanoparticles, and enhancing transfection efficiency of siRNA-loaded CS nanoparticles in cancer cell line. The research results showed that siRNA loaded in PEGylated CS (PEG-CS/siRNA) nanoparticles with smaller particle size had superior structural stability in the physical environment compared to CS nanoparticles. The data of in vitro antitumor activity revealed that 4T1 tumor cell growth was significantly inhibited and cellular uptake of PEG-CS/siRNA nanoparticles in 4T1 cells was dramatically enhanced compared to naked siRNA groups. The results from flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that PEG-CS/siRNA nanoparticles were more easily taken up than naked siRNA. Importantly, PEG-CS/siRNA nanoparticles significantly reduced the growth of xenograft tumors of 4T1 cells in vivo. It has been demonstrated that the PEG-CS is a safe and efficient vector for siRNA delivery, and it can effectively reduce tumor growth and prevent metastasis. PMID:27729789

  13. Prevention of PVDF ultrafiltration membrane fouling by coating MnO2 nanoparticles with ozonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenzheng; Brown, Matthew; Graham, Nigel. J. D.

    2016-07-01

    Pre-treatment is normally required to reduce or control the fouling of ultrafiltration (UF) membranes in drinking water treatment process. Current pre-treatment methods, such as coagulation, are only partially effective to prevent long-term fouling. Since biological activities are a major contributor to accumulated fouling, the application of an oxidation/disinfection step can be an effective complement to coagulation. In this study, a novel pre-treatment method has been evaluated at laboratory scale consisting of the addition of low dose ozone into the UF membrane tank after coagulation and the use of a hollow-fibre membrane coated with/without MnO2 nanoparticles over a test period of 70 days. The results showed that there was minimal fouling of the MnO2 coated membrane (0.5 kPa for 70 days), while the uncoated membrane experienced both reversible and irreversible fouling. The difference was attributed to the greatly reduced presence of bacteria and organic matter because of the catalytic decomposition of ozone to hydroxyl radicals and increase of the hydrophilicity of the membrane surface. In particular, the MnO2 coated membrane had a much thinner cake layer, with significantly less polysaccharides and proteins, and much less accumulated organic matter within the membrane pores.

  14. nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Hui; Liu, Xu-Jun; Guan, Lei-Lei; Li, Yan-Li; Sun, Jian; Ying, Zhi-Feng; Wu, Jia-Da; Xu, Ning

    2014-06-01

    Evenly separated crystalline CuIn0.8Ga0.2Se2 (CIGS) nanoparticles are deposited on ITO-glass substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Such CIGS layers are introduced between conjugated polymer layers and ITO-glass substrates for enhancing light absorbance of polymer solar cells. The P3HT:PCBM absorbance between 300 and 650 nm is enhanced obviously due to the introduction of CIGS nanoparticles. The current density-voltage curves of a P3HT:PCBM/CIGS solar cell demonstrate that the short-circuit current density is improved from 0.77 to 1.20 mA/cm2. The photoluminescence spectra show that the excitons in the polymer are obviously quenched, suggesting that the charge transfer between the P3HT:PCBM and CIGS occurred. The results reveal that the CIGS nanoparticles may exhibit the localized surface plasmon resonance effect just as metallic nanostructures.

  15. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Fanny; de Nicola, Milena; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Giovanetti, Anna; Bejarano, Ignacio; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2015-09-01

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which mediates toxic effects on cells. Therefore, improvements in cosmetic solar shield technology are a strong priority. CeO2 nanoparticles are not only UV refractors but also potent biological antioxidants due to the surface 3+/4+ valency switch, which confers anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing and therapeutic properties. Herein, UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of CeO2vs. TiO2 nanoparticles on reporter cells. TiO2 irradiated with UV (especially UVA) exerted strong photocatalytic effects, superimposing their pro-oxidant, cell-damaging and mutagenic action when induced by UV, thereby worsening the UV toxicity. On the contrary, irradiated CeO2 nanoparticles, via their Ce3+/Ce4+ redox couple, exerted impressive protection on UV-treated cells, by buffering oxidation, preserving viability and proliferation, reducing DNA damage and accelerating repair; strikingly, they almost eliminated mutagenesis, thus acting as an important tool to prevent skin cancer. Interestingly, CeO2 nanoparticles also protect cells from the damage induced by irradiated TiO2, suggesting that these two particles may also complement their effects in solar lotions. CeO2 nanoparticles, which intrinsically couple UV shielding with biological and genetic protection, appear to be ideal candidates for next-generation sun shields.

  16. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Caputo, Fanny

    2015-08-20

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which mediates toxic effects on cells. Therefore, improvements in cosmetic solar shield technology are a strong priority. CeO2 nanoparticles are not only UV refractors but also potent biological antioxidants due to the surface 3+/4+ valency switch, which confers anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing and therapeutic properties. Herein, UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of CeO2vs. TiO2 nanoparticles on reporter cells. TiO2 irradiated with UV (especially UVA) exerted strong photocatalytic effects, superimposing their pro-oxidant, cell-damaging and mutagenic action when induced by UV, thereby worsening the UV toxicity. On the contrary, irradiated CeO2 nanoparticles, via their Ce3+/Ce4+ redox couple, exerted impressive protection on UV-treated cells, by buffering oxidation, preserving viability and proliferation, reducing DNA damage and accelerating repair; strikingly, they almost eliminated mutagenesis, thus acting as an important tool to prevent skin cancer. Interestingly, CeO2 nanoparticles also protect cells from the damage induced by irradiated TiO2, suggesting that these two particles may also complement their effects in solar lotions. CeO2 nanoparticles, which intrinsically couple UV shielding with biological and genetic protection, appear to be ideal candidates for next-generation sun shields. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  17. Pirfenidone Nanoparticles Improve Corneal Wound Healing and Prevent Scarring Following Alkali Burn

    OpenAIRE

    Sushovan Chowdhury; Rajdeep Guha; Ruchit Trivedi; Kompella, Uday B.; Aditya Konar; Sarbani Hazra

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of pirfenidone nanoparticles on corneal re-epithelialization and scarring, major clinical challenges after alkali burn. METHODS: Effect of pirfenidone on collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) synthesis by TGFβ induced primary corneal fibroblast cells was evaluated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Pirfenidone loaded poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles were prepared, characterized and their cellular entry was examined in primary cor...

  18. nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Cabedo, Patricia; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Martinez-Cuenca, Raul; Cabedo, Luis; Julia, J. Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable.

  19. Applications of functional polymer brushes for nanoparticle uptake and prevention of protein adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifuzzaman, Shafi M.

    The central theme of this Ph.D. dissertation is to develop novel multifunctional polymer coatings for understanding partition of proteins and nanoparticles on polymers grafted to flat surfaces (so-called brushes). Systematic investigation of the adsorption phenomena is accomplished by utilizing surface-anchored assemblies comprising grafted polymers with variation in physical properties (i.e., length or/and grafting density) and chemical functionality. The chemical composition of the brush is tailored by either "chemical coloring" of a parent homopolymer brush with selective chemical moieties or by sequential growth of two chemically dissimilar polymer blocks. We present preparation of two types of tailor-made, surface-grafted copolymers: (1) those composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic blocks (so-called amphiphilic polymer brushes), and (2) those comprising of anionic and cationic polymer segments (so-called polyampholyte brushes). We describe the organization of functionality in the grafted polymer brushes and the partitioning of proteins and nanoparticles using a battery of complementary analytical probes. Specifically, we address how varying the molecular weight, grafting density, and chemical composition of the brush affects adsorbtion and desorbtion of model proteins and gold nanoparticles. Our observations indicate densely-populated responsive amphiphilic polymers are very efficient in suppressing protein adsorption. In addition, we have established that the length of poly(ethylene glycol) spacers attached to a parent homopolymer brush is a key factor governing uptake of gold nanoparticles. Both grafting density and molecular weight of the coating are important in controlling the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption on surfaces. Our findings and methodologies can lead to the development of next generation environmentally friendly antifouling surfaces and will find application in medical devices, antifouling coatings and anti reflection finishes.

  20. The effectiveness of heparin, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and silver nanoparticles on prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesion formation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarchian, Hamid Reza; Kasraianfard, Amir; Ghaderzadeh, Pezhman; Javadi, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Ghorbanpoor, Manoochehr

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of heparin, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and silver nanoparticles on prevention of postoperative adhesion in animal models. Sixty males Albino Wistar rats aged 5 to 6 weeks were classified into five groups receiving none, heparin, PRP, silver nanoparticles, PRP plus silver nanoparticles intraperitoneally. After 2 weeks, the animals underwent laparotomy and the damaged site was assessed for peritoneal adhesions severity. The mean severity scores were 2.5 ± 0.9, 2.16 ± 0.7, 1.5 ± 0.5, 2.66 ± 0.88, and 2.25 ± 0.62 in the control, heparin, PRP, silver and PRP plus silver groups, respectively with significant intergroup difference (p = 0.004). The highest effective material for preventing adhesion formation was PRP followed by heparin and PRP plus silver. Moreover, compared to the controls, only use of PRP was significantly effective, in terms of adhesion severity (p = 0.01) . Platelet-rich plasma alone may have the highest efficacy for preventing postoperative peritoneal adhesions in comparison with heparin, silver nanoparticles and PRP plus silver nanoparticles.

  1. Efficacy and safety of selenium nanoparticles administered intraperitoneally for the prevention of growth of cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Kang; Tan, Yanping; Wu, Shanshan; Zhang, Jinsong

    2014-07-01

    Peritoneal implantation of cancer cells, particularly postoperative seeding metastasis, frequently occurs in patients with primary tumors in the stomach, colon, liver, and ovary. Peritoneal carcinomatosis is associated with poor prognosis. In this work, we evaluated the prophylactic effect of intraperitoneal administration of selenium (Se), an essential trace element and a putative chemopreventive agent, on peritoneal implantation of cancer cells. Elemental Se nanoparticles were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice, into which highly malignant H22 hepatocarcinoma cells had previously been inoculated. Se concentrations in the cancer cells and tissues, as well as the efficacy of proliferation inhibition and safety, were evaluated. Se was mainly concentrated in cancer cells compared to Se retention in normal tissues, showing at least an order of magnitude difference between the drug target cells (the H22 cells) and the well-recognized toxicity target of Se (the liver). Such a favorable selective distribution resulted in strong proliferation suppression without perceived host toxicity. The mechanism of action of the Se nanoparticle-triggered cytotoxicity was associated with Se-mediated production of reactive oxygen species, which impaired the glutathione and thioredoxin systems. Our results suggest that intraperitoneal administration of Se is a safe and effective means of preventing growth of cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity for the above-mentioned high-risk populations.

  2. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  3. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  4. Targeted nanoparticles encapsulating (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate for prostate cancer prevention and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Vanna; Singh, Chandra K.; Jashari, Rahime; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Rady, Islam; Sechi, Mario; Mukhtar, Hasan; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.

    2017-01-01

    Earlier we introduced the concept of ‘nanochemoprevention’ i.e. the use of nanotechnology to improve the outcome of cancer chemoprevention. Here, we extended our work and developed polymeric EGCG-encapsulated nanoparticles (NPs) targeted with small molecular entities, able to bind to prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a transmembrane protein that is overexpressed in prostate cancer (PCa), and evaluated their efficacy in preclinical studies. First, we performed a molecular recognition of DCL- and AG-PEGylation on ligand binding on PSMA active site. Next, the biocompatible polymers PLGA-PEG-A were synthesized and used as base to conjugate DCL or AG to obtain the respective copolymers, needed for the preparation of targeted NPs. The resulting EGCG encapsulating NPs led to an enhanced anti-proliferative activity in PCa cell lines compared to the free EGCG. The behavior of EGCG encapsulated in NPs in modulating apoptosis and cell-cycle, was also determined. Then, in vivo experiments, in mouse xenograft model of prostatic tumor, using EGCG-loaded NPs, with a model of targeted nanosystems, were conducted. The obtained data supported our hypothesis of target-specific enhanced bioavailability and limited unwanted toxicity, thus leading to a significant potential for probable clinical outcome. PMID:28145499

  5. Targeted nanoparticles encapsulating (‑)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate for prostate cancer prevention and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Vanna; Singh, Chandra K.; Jashari, Rahime; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Rady, Islam; Sechi, Mario; Mukhtar, Hasan; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.

    2017-02-01

    Earlier we introduced the concept of ‘nanochemoprevention’ i.e. the use of nanotechnology to improve the outcome of cancer chemoprevention. Here, we extended our work and developed polymeric EGCG-encapsulated nanoparticles (NPs) targeted with small molecular entities, able to bind to prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a transmembrane protein that is overexpressed in prostate cancer (PCa), and evaluated their efficacy in preclinical studies. First, we performed a molecular recognition of DCL- and AG-PEGylation on ligand binding on PSMA active site. Next, the biocompatible polymers PLGA-PEG-A were synthesized and used as base to conjugate DCL or AG to obtain the respective copolymers, needed for the preparation of targeted NPs. The resulting EGCG encapsulating NPs led to an enhanced anti-proliferative activity in PCa cell lines compared to the free EGCG. The behavior of EGCG encapsulated in NPs in modulating apoptosis and cell-cycle, was also determined. Then, in vivo experiments, in mouse xenograft model of prostatic tumor, using EGCG-loaded NPs, with a model of targeted nanosystems, were conducted. The obtained data supported our hypothesis of target-specific enhanced bioavailability and limited unwanted toxicity, thus leading to a significant potential for probable clinical outcome.

  6. Signalling-dependent adverse health effects of carbon nanoparticles are prevented by the compatible solute mannosylglycerate (firoin in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Autengruber

    Full Text Available The inhalation of combustion-derived nanoparticles leads to adverse health effects in the airways. In this context the induction of membrane-coupled signalling is considered as causative for changes in tissue homeostasis and pro-inflammatory reactions. The identification of these molecular cell reactions allowed to seek for strategies which interfere with these adverse effects. In the current study, we investigated the structurally different compatible solutes mannosylglycerate (firoin from thermophilic bacteria and ectoine from halophilic bacteria for their capability to reduce signalling pathways triggered by carbon nanoparticles in target cells in the lung. The pre-treatment of lung epithelial cells with both substances decreased the particle-specific activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and also the endpoints proliferation and apoptosis. Firoin applied into the lungs of animals, like ectoine, led to a significant reduction of the neutrophilic lung inflammation induced by particle exposure. The pro-inflammatory effect of carbon nanoparticles on human neutrophil granulocytes ex vivo was significantly reduced by both substances via the reduction of the anti-apoptotic membrane-dependent signalling. The data of this study together with earlier studies demonstrate that two structurally non-related compatible solutes are able to prevent pathogenic reactions of the airways to carbon nanoparticles by interfering with signalling events. The findings highlight the preventive or therapeutic potential of compatible solutes for adverse health effects caused by particle exposure of the airways.

  7. Fabrication of high quality carbonaceous coating on Cu nanoparticle using poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) and its application for oxidation prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Youngjun; Choi, Dahyun; Son, Yeon-Ho; Kang, Suhee; Yoon, Eric H.; Jung, Seung-Boo; Kim, Yongil; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    A novel method of carbonaceous coating on the surface of copper particles was developed through a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process to prevent the oxidation of copper nanoparticles (CNPs). The types of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) used were K-12 (M W 3,500) and K-30 (M W 45,000). The amounts of PVP used ranged from 10 to 50 wt %. Additionally, processing temperatures of 900 and 875 °C were tested and compared. The optimum CVD process conditions for the carbonaceous coating were as follows: 875 °C processing temperature, 50 wt % K12 PVP solution, and gas conditions of \\text{Ar}:\\text{H}2 = 1:1. The resistivity change in the fabricated copper pattern was confirmed that the initial resistivity value of the ink with a mixing ratio of carbonaceous-coated CNPs to 1-octanethiol-coated CNPs of 4:6 (w/w) maintained its initial resistivity value of 2.93 × 10-7 Ω·m for more than 210 days.

  8. Study of Antibacterial Efficacy of Hybrid Chitosan-Silver Nanoparticles for Prevention of Specific Biofilm and Water Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath Ghosh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial efficacy of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs deposited alternatively layer by layer (LBL on chitosan polymer in the form of a thin film over a quartz plate and stainless steel strip has been studied. An eight-bilayer chitosan/silver (Cs/Ag8 hybrid was prepared having a known concentration of silver. Techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES, and atomic force microscopy (AFM were carried out to understand and elucidate the physical nature of the film. Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli, were used as a test sample in saline solution for antibacterial studies. The growth inhibition at different intervals of contact time and, more importantly, the antibacterial properties of the hybrid film on repeated cycling in saline solution have been demonstrated. AFM studies are carried out for the first time on the microbe to know the morphological changes affected by the hybrid film. The hybrid films on aging (3 months are found to be as bioactive as before. Cytotoxicity experiments indicated good biocompatibility. The hybrid can be a promising bioactive material for the prevention of biofilms specific to E. coli and in purification of water for safe drinking.

  9. Agglomeration of tungsten carbide nanoparticles in exposure medium does not prevent uptake and toxicity toward a rainbow trout gill cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnel, Dana; Busch, Wibke; Meissner, Tobias; Springer, Armin; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Gelinsky, Michael; Scholz, Stefan; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-06-28

    dissolve from the WC-Co nanoparticles, with cells reacting much more sensitively toward cobalt ions in the absence of FBS. However, the toxicity observed by ionic cobalt alone did not explain the toxicity of the WC-Co nanoparticles, suggesting that the combination of metallic Co and WC is the cause of the increased particle toxicity of WC-Co. Taken together, our findings indicate that minimal exposure media can lead to rapid agglomeration of nanoparticles but that agglomeration does not prevent uptake into cells and the expression of toxicity.

  10. Edible ginger-derived nanoparticles: A novel therapeutic approach for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and colitis-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Viennois, Emilie; Prasad, Meena; Zhang, Yunchen; Wang, Lixin; Zhang, Zhan; Han, Moon Kwon; Xiao, Bo; Xu, Changlong; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Merlin, Didier

    2016-09-01

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In this study, we characterized a specific population of nanoparticles derived from edible ginger (GDNPs 2) and demonstrated their efficient colon targeting following oral administration. GDNPs 2 had an average size of ∼230 nm and exhibited a negative zeta potential. These nanoparticles contained high levels of lipids, a few proteins, ∼125 microRNAs (miRNAs), and large amounts of ginger bioactive constituents (6-gingerol and 6-shogaol). We also demonstrated that GDNPs 2 were mainly taken up by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and macrophages, and were nontoxic. Using different mouse colitis models, we showed that GDNPs 2 reduced acute colitis, enhanced intestinal repair, and prevented chronic colitis and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). 2D-DIGE/MS analyses further identified molecular target candidates of GDNPs 2 involved in these mouse models. Oral administration of GDNPs 2 increased the survival and proliferation of IECs and reduced the pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β), and increased the anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and IL-22) in colitis models, suggesting that GDNPs 2 has the potential to attenuate damaging factors while promoting the healing effect. In conclusion, GDNPs 2, nanoparticles derived from edible ginger, represent a novel, natural delivery mechanism for improving IBD prevention and treatment with an added benefit of overcoming limitations such as potential toxicity and limited production scale that are common with synthetic nanoparticles.

  11. Core-shell polymer nanoparticles for prevention of GSH drug detoxification and cisplatin delivery to breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surnar, Bapurao; Sharma, Kavita; Jayakannan, Manickam

    2015-10-01

    Platinum drug delivery against the detoxification of cytoplasmic thiols is urgently required for achieving efficacy in breast cancer treatment that is over expressed by glutathione (GSH, thiol-oligopeptide). GSH-resistant polymer-cisplatin core-shell nanoparticles were custom designed based on biodegradable carboxylic functional polycaprolactone (PCL)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) diblock copolymers. The core of the nanoparticle was fixed as 100 carboxylic units and the shell part was varied using various molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ethers (MW of PEGs = 100-5000 g mol-1) as initiator in the ring-opening polymerization. The complexation of cisplatin aquo species with the diblocks produced core-shell nanoparticles of 75 nm core with precise size control the particles up to 190 nm. The core-shell nanoparticles were found to be stable in saline solution and PBS and they exhibited enhanced stability with increase in the PEG shell thickness at the periphery. The hydrophobic PCL layer on the periphery of the cisplatin core behaved as a protecting layer against the cytoplasmic thiol residues (GSH and cysteine) and exhibited cisplatin and polymer drug core-shell nanoparticles showed similar cytotoxicity effects in the HeLa cells. In MCF-7 cells, the free cisplatin drug exhibited 50% cell death whereas complete cell death (100%) was accomplished by the polymer-cisplatin core-shell nanoparticles. Confocal microscopic images confirmed that the core-shell nanoparticles were taken up by the MCF-7 and HeLa cells and they were accumulated both at the cytoplasm as well at peri-nuclear environments. The present investigation lays a new foundation for the polymer-based core-shell nanoparticles approach for overcoming detoxification in platinum drugs for the treatment of GSH over-expressed breast cancer cells.Platinum drug delivery against the detoxification of cytoplasmic thiols is urgently required for achieving efficacy in breast cancer treatment that is over

  12. Effect of Silver Nanoparticle-Added Pit and Fissure Sealant in the Prevention of Dental Caries in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-López, Enid Karina; Pierdant-Pérez, Mauricio; Hernández-Sierra, Juan Francisco; Ruíz, Facundo; Mandeville, Peter; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury J

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of pit and fissure sealant mixed with silver nanoparticles on dental caries, by means of monthly measurement of fluorescence with DIAGNOdent over six months. This study was divided in two phases: experimental and clinical. In the experimental phase, the adhesion and microleakage of the pit and fissure sealant experiment were evaluated. Two groups of 10 teeth, without serious carious lesions, were included. Conventional (group A) and silver nanoparticles (group B) were added to the pit and fissure sealant. For the clinical phase, a split-mouth study was performed on 40 children aged 6-10 years old with healthy, erupted permanent first molars. A conventional pit and fissure sealant or a silver nanoparticle-mixed sealant was randomly placed. Repeated measures analysis was performed. Conventional sealant presented an average microleakage of 30.6%, and the silver nanoparticle-mixed sealant showed 33.6% (P=NS). A three times greater reduction in fluorescence was found in the silver nanoparticles group compared to the conventional group (P<0.05). No sex- or age-based associations were found. The silver nanoparticle-mixed sealant reduced tooth demineralization significantly and likely increased remineralization, compared to the conventional sealant.

  13. Core-shell polymer nanoparticles for prevention of GSH drug detoxification and cisplatin delivery to breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surnar, Bapurao; Sharma, Kavita; Jayakannan, Manickam

    2015-11-14

    Platinum drug delivery against the detoxification of cytoplasmic thiols is urgently required for achieving efficacy in breast cancer treatment that is over expressed by glutathione (GSH, thiol-oligopeptide). GSH-resistant polymer-cisplatin core-shell nanoparticles were custom designed based on biodegradable carboxylic functional polycaprolactone (PCL)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) diblock copolymers. The core of the nanoparticle was fixed as 100 carboxylic units and the shell part was varied using various molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ethers (MW of PEGs = 100-5000 g mol(-1)) as initiator in the ring-opening polymerization. The complexation of cisplatin aquo species with the diblocks produced core-shell nanoparticles of 75 nm core with precise size control the particles up to 190 nm. The core-shell nanoparticles were found to be stable in saline solution and PBS and they exhibited enhanced stability with increase in the PEG shell thickness at the periphery. The hydrophobic PCL layer on the periphery of the cisplatin core behaved as a protecting layer against the cytoplasmic thiol residues (GSH and cysteine) and exhibited drug detoxification. In vitro drug-release studies revealed that the core-shell nanoparticles were ruptured upon exposure to lysosomal enzymes like esterase at the intracellular compartments. Cytotoxicity studies were performed both in normal wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (Wt-MEFs), and breast cancer (MCF-7) and cervical cancer (HeLa) cell lines. Free cisplatin and polymer drug core-shell nanoparticles showed similar cytotoxicity effects in the HeLa cells. In MCF-7 cells, the free cisplatin drug exhibited 50% cell death whereas complete cell death (100%) was accomplished by the polymer-cisplatin core-shell nanoparticles. Confocal microscopic images confirmed that the core-shell nanoparticles were taken up by the MCF-7 and HeLa cells and they were accumulated both at the cytoplasm as well at peri-nuclear environments

  14. Carbon nanoparticles induce ceramide- and lipid raft-dependent signalling in lung epithelial cells: a target for a preventive strategy against environmentally-induced lung inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peuschel Henrike

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particulate air pollution in lung epithelial cells induces pathogenic endpoints like proliferation, apoptosis, and pro-inflammatory reactions. The activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a key event responsible for signalling events involving mitogen activated protein kinases specific for these endpoints. The molecular events leading to receptor activation however are not well understood. These events are relevant for the toxicological evaluation of inhalable particles as well as for potential preventive strategies in situations when particulate air pollution cannot be avoided. The current study therefore had the objective to elucidate membrane-coupled events leading to EGFR activation and the subsequent signalling cascade in lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, we aimed to identify the molecular target of ectoine, a biophysical active substance which we described to prevent carbon nanoparticle-induced lung inflammation. Methods Membrane signalling events were investigated in isolated lipid rafts from lung epithelial cells with regard to lipid and protein content of the signalling platforms. Using positive and negative intervention approaches, lipid raft changes, subsequent signalling events, and lung inflammation were investigated in vitro in lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN and in vivo in exposed animals. Results Carbon nanoparticle treatment specifically led to an accumulation of ceramides in lipid rafts. Detailed analyses demonstrated a causal link of ceramides and subsequent EGFR activation coupled with a loss of the receptor in the lipid raft fractions. In vitro and in vivo investigations demonstrate the relevance of these events for carbon nanoparticle-induced lung inflammation. Moreover, the compatible solute ectoine was able to prevent ceramide-mediated EGFR phosphorylation and subsequent signalling as well as lung inflammation in vivo. Conclusion The data identify a so far unknown event in pro

  15. Self-Healable Sensors Based Nanoparticles for Detecting Physiological Markers via Skin and Breath: Toward Disease Prevention via Wearable Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Han; Huynh, Tan-Phat; Haick, Hossam

    2016-07-13

    Flexible and wearable electronic sensors are useful for the early diagnosis and monitoring of an individual's health state. Sampling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) derived from human breath/skin or monitoring abrupt changes in heart-beat/breath rate should allow noninvasive monitoring of disease states at an early stage. Nevertheless, for many reported wearable sensing devices, interaction with the human body leads incidentally to unavoidable scratches and/or mechanical cuts and bring about malfunction of these devices. We now offer proof-of-concept of nanoparticle-based flexible sensor arrays with fascinating self-healing abilities. By integrating a self-healable polymer substrate with 5 kinds of functionalized gold nanoparticle films, a sensor array gives a fast self-healing (device, with a desirable performance in the possible detection and/or clinical application for a number of different purposes.

  16. Photocatalytic antibacterial effect of ZnO nanoparticles into coaxial electrospun PCL fibers to prevent infections from skin injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado-Prone, G.; Silva-Bermúdez, P.; García-Macedo, J. A.; Almaguer-Flores, A.; Ibarra, C.; Velasquillo-Martínez, C.

    2017-02-01

    Antibacterial studies of inorganic nanoparticles (nps) have become important due to the increased bacterial resistance against antibiotics. We used Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO nps), which possess excellent photocatalytic properties with a wide band gap (Eg), are listed as "generally recognized as safe" by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and have shown antibacterial activity (AA) against many bacterial strains. The AA of ZnO nps is partly attributed to the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) by photocatalysis. When ZnO nps in aqueous media are illuminated with an energy E. coli of different electrospun ZnO nps/PCL fibers under two different conditions: UVA pre-illumination and darkness. Preliminary results suggest that the AA against E. coli is better when electrospun ZnO nps/PCL were preilluminated with UVA than under darkness conditions.

  17. Ultrasound-targeted transfection of tissue-type plasminogen activator gene carried by albumin nanoparticles to dog myocardium to prevent thrombosis after heart mechanical valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ji Jun, Ji Shang-Yi, Yang Jian-An, He Xia, Yang Xiao-Han, Ling Wen-Ping, Chen Xiao-LingDepartment of Pathology and Cardiovascular Surgery, Shenzhen Sun Yat-Sen Cardiovascular Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: There are more than 300,000 prosthetic heart valve replacements each year worldwide. These patients are faced with a higher risk of thromboembolic events after heart valve surgery and long-term or even life-long anticoagulative and antiplatelet therapies are necessary. Some severe complications such as hemorrhaging or rebound thrombosis can occur when the therapy ceases. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA is a thrombolytic agent. One of the best strategies is gene therapy, which offers a local high expression of t-PA over a prolonged time period to avoid both systemic hemorrhaging and local rebound thrombosis. There are some issues with t-PA that need to be addressed: currently, there is no up-to-date report on how the t-PA gene targets the heart in vivo and the gene vector for t-PA needs to be determined.Aims: To fabricate an albumin nano-t-PA gene ultrasound-targeted agent and investigate its targeting effect on prevention of thrombosis after heart mechanic valve replacement under therapeutic ultrasound.Methods: A dog model of mechanical tricuspid valve replacement was constructed. A highly expressive t-PA gene plasmid was constructed and packaged by nanoparticles prepared with bovine serum albumin. This nanopackaged t-PA gene plasmid was further cross-linked to ultrasonic microbubbles prepared with sucrose and bovine serum albumin to form the ultrasonic-targeted agent for t-PA gene transfection. The agent was given intravenously followed by a therapeutic ultrasound treatment (1 MHz, 1.5 w/cm2, 10 minutes of the heart soon after valve replacement had been performed. The expression of t-PA in myocardium was detected with multiclonal antibodies to t-PA by the indirect immunohistochemical method

  18. Colloidal metal oxide nanoparticle systems: the new promising way to prevent antibiotic resistance during treatment of local infectious processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasenkov, Y.; Frolov, G.; Pogorelsky, I.; Latuta, N.; Gusev, A.; Kuznetsov, D.; Leont'ev, V.

    2015-11-01

    New bactericidal containing nanoparticles colloids for application in dentistry, maxillofacial surgery, urology, obstetrics, gynaecology, ENT, proctology have been developed. The various water colloidal nanodispersive systems of metals and oxides have been obtained by means of electric impulse - condensation (electroerosion) method. These systems are based pure elements and alloys of argentum (Ag), titanium dioxide (TiO2), iron oxide (Fe2O3), tantalum oxide (TaO), vanadium oxide (VO2), cobalt oxide (CoO), tantalum dioxide TaO2, zinc oxide (ZnO), copper oxide (CuO) and mixed suspensions of titanium, aluminium and molybdenum oxides. The research has been made on culture of dentobacterial plaque and mixed culture issued from gingival spaces. The composition of culture was identified with S.aureus, S.epidermidis and nonfermentable kinds of E.coli. The observation period lasted more than nineteen days. All solutions showed highly prolonged bactericidal activity in dilutions from the whole solution 1-20 mg/L. The bactericidal activity of powder specimen of silica containing Ag and Fe2O3 nanoparticles used as dental filling material and disintegrates of composite materials (produced by “StomaDent” CJSC) have been studied. Tested materials have long (up to 19 days and more) bactericidal activity.

  19. Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Aegle marmelos (Bael Fruit Extract and Its Application to Prevent Adhesion of Bacteria: A Strategy to Control Microfouling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nithya Deva Krupa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine biofilms formed due to adhesion of bacteria and other microorganisms on submerged surfaces are generally considered to be a major form of microfouling. Subsequent attachment of larvae of higher organisms like barnacles, mussels, and so forth, on marine biofilms, causes macrofouling. Several approaches have been used to prevent micro- and macrofouling. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs are known to exhibit strong inhibitory and antimicrobial activity. Biological synthesis of AgNPs is rapidly gaining importance due to its growing success. Hence, the present study is focused on the biosynthesis of AgNPs using fruit extract of Aegle marmelos and its characterization through UV-Vis spectrophotometer, X-ray diffractometer (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Further isolation and identification of marine biofilm forming bacteria were carried out through 16S rDNA analysis. The antimicrofouling effect of the biosynthesized AgNPs was tested against marine biofilm forming bacteria and the results suggested that it could effectively inhibit biofilm formation. This preliminary study has proved that AgNPs may be used as antimicrofouling agent for the prevention of biofouling in the early stages.

  20. Nanoparticle Delivery of Natural Products in the Prevention and Treatment of Cancers: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharali, Dhruba J. [The Pharmaceutical Research Institute at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, 1 Discovery Drive, Rensselaer, NY 12144 (United States); Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Chamcheu, Jean Christopher [Department of Dermatology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Aldahmash, Abdullah M. [Stem Cell Unit, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, 11461 (Saudi Arabia); University Hospital of Odense & Medical Biotechnology Center, Winslowsparken 25, DK-5000, Odense (Denmark); Mukhtar, Hasan [Department of Dermatology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Mousa, Shaker A., E-mail: shaker.mousa@acphs.edu [The Pharmaceutical Research Institute at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, 1 Discovery Drive, Rensselaer, NY 12144 (United States); Stem Cell Unit, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, 11461 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-10-26

    The advent of nanotechnology has had a revolutionary impact on many aspects of 21{sup st} century life. Nanotechnology has provided an opportunity to explore new avenues that conventional technologies have been unable to make an impact on for diagnosis, prevention, and therapy of different diseases, and of cancer in particular. Entities in nanometer sizes are excellent platforms to incorporate various drugs or active materials that can be delivered effectively to the desired action site without compromising the activity of the incorporated drug or material. In particular, nanotechnology entities can be used to deliver conventional natural products that have poor solubility or a short half life. Conventional natural products used with entities in nanometer sizes enable us to solve many of the inherent problems (stability, solubility, toxicity) associated with natural products, and also provide a platform for targeted delivery to tumor sites. We recently introduced the novel concept of using nanotechnology for enhancing the outcome of chemoprevention, which we called ‘nanochemoprevention’. This idea was subsequently exploited by several laboratories worldwide and has now become an advancing field in chemoprevention research. This review examines some of the applications of nanotechnology for cancer prevention and therapy using natural products.

  1. Nanoparticle Delivery of Natural Products in the Prevention and Treatment of Cancers: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Mukhtar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The advent of nanotechnology has had a revolutionary impact on many aspects of 21st century life. Nanotechnology has provided an opportunity to explore new avenues that conventional technologies have been unable to make an impact on for diagnosis, prevention, and therapy of different diseases, and of cancer in particular. Entities in nanometer sizes are excellent platforms to incorporate various drugs or active materials that can be delivered effectively to the desired action site without compromising the activity of the incorporated drug or material. In particular, nanotechnology entities can be used to deliver conventional natural products that have poor solubility or a short half life. Conventional natural products used with entities in nanometer sizes enable us to solve many of the inherent problems (stability, solubility, toxicity associated with natural products, and also provide a platform for targeted delivery to tumor sites. We recently introduced the novel concept of using nanotechnology for enhancing the outcome of chemoprevention, which we called ‘nanochemoprevention’. This idea was subsequently exploited by several laboratories worldwide and has now become an advancing field in chemoprevention research. This review examines some of the applications of nanotechnology for cancer prevention and therapy using natural products.

  2. Zein nanoparticles for oral delivery of quercetin: Pharmacokinetic studies and preventive anti-inflammatory effects in a mouse model of endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penalva, Rebeca; González-Navarro, Carlos J; Gamazo, Carlos; Esparza, Irene; Irache, Juan M

    2017-01-01

    Zein nanoparticles were evaluated as nanocarriers to promote the oral bioavailability of quercetin and, thus, improve its anti-inflammatory effect on a mouse model of induced endotoxemia. For this purpose, the flavonoid and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin were encapsulated in zein nanoparticles. The resulting nanoparticles displayed a mean size of about 300nm and the payload was calculated to be close to 70μg/mg nanoparticle. The release of quercetin from zein nanoparticles followed a zero-order kinetic. After oral administration, nanoparticles provided high and sustained levels of quercetin in plasma and the relative oral bioavailability was calculated to be approx. 60%. Animals treated with quercetin-loaded nanoparticles (1 dose every two days; 1week) presented endotoxic symptoms less severe than those observed in animals treated with the oral solution of the flavonoid (1 dose every day; 1week). This was further corroborated by the significantly low circulating TNF-alpha in the quercetin-loaded nanoparticles treated mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkum, S.; Dee, J.T.; Philipse, A.P.; Erné, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking

  4. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkum, S.; Dee, J.T.; Philipse, A.P.; Erné, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking o

  5. Effect of the pillar ligand on preventing agglomeration of ZnO nanoparticles prepared from Zn(II metal-organic frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Moeinian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs represent a new class of highly porous materials. On this regard,  two nano porous metal-organic frameworks of [Zn2(1,4-bdc2(H2O2∙(DMF2]n (1 and [Zn2(1,4-bdc2(dabco]·4DMF·1⁄2H2O (2, (1,4-bdc = benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate, dabco = 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane and DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide were synthesized and characterized. They were used for preparation of ZnO nanomaterials. With calcination of 1, agglomerated ZnO nanoparticles could be fabricated, but by the same process on 2, the tendency of ZnO nanoparticles to agglomeration was decreased. In addition, the ZnO nanoparticles prepared from compound 2 had smaller diameter than those obtained from compound 1. In fact, the role of organic dabco ligands in 2 is similar to the role of polymeric stabilizers in formation of nanoparticles. Finally, considering the various applications of ZnO nanomaterials such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, photodiodes, gas sensors and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs, it seems that preparation of ZnO nanomaterials from their MOFs could be one of the simple and effective methods which may be applied for preparation of them.

  6. Prevention of Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein-Induced Endothelial Cell Injury by DA-PLGA-PEG-cRGD Nanoparticles Combined with Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaojun; Huang, Hui; Huang, Lili; Du, Lianfang; Sun, Ying; Duan, Yourong

    2017-04-13

    In general, atherosclerosis is considered to be a form of chronic inflammation. Dexamethasone has anti-inflammatory effects in atherosclerosis, but it was not considered for long-term administration on account of a poor pharmacokinetic profile and adverse side effects. Nanoparticles in which drugs can be dissolved, encapsulated, entrapped or chemically attached to the particle surface have abilities to incorporate dexamethasone and to be used as controlled or targeted drug delivery system. Long circulatory polymeric nanoparticles present as an assisting approach for controlled and targeted release of the encapsulated drug at the atherosclerotic site. Polymeric nanoparticles combined with ultrasound (US) are widely applied in cancer treatment due to their time applications, low cost, simplicity, and safety. However, there are few studies on atherosclerosis treatment using polymeric nanoparticles combined with US. In this study, targeted dexamethasone acetate (DA)-loaded poly (lactide-glycolide)-polyethylene glycol-cRGD (PLGA-PEG-cRGD) nanoparticles (DA-PLGA-PEG-cRGD NPs) were prepared by the emulsion-evaporation method using cRGD modified PLGA-PEG polymeric materials (PLGA-PEG-cRGD) prepared as the carrier. The average particle size of DA-PLGA-PEG-cRGD NPs was 221.6 ± 0.9 nm. Morphology of the nanoparticles was spherical and uniformly dispersed. In addition, the DA released profiles suggested that ultrasound could promote drug release from the nanocarriers and accelerate the rate of release. In vitro, the cellular uptake process of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)@DA-PLGA-PEG-cRGD NPs combined with US into the damaged human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) indicated that US promoted rapid intracellular uptake of FITC@DA- PLGA-PEG-cRGD NPs. The cell viability of DA-PLGA-PEG-cRGD NPs combined with US reached 91.9% ± 0.2%, which demonstrated that DA-PLGA-PEG-cRGD NPs combined with US had a positive therapeutic effect on damaged HUVECs. Overall, DA

  7. Microemulsion Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotić, M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles and nanomaterials have wide applications in electronics, physics, material design, being also utilized as sensors, catalysts, and more and more in biomedicine. Microemulsions are an exceptionally suitable medium for the synthesis of nanoparticles due to their thermodynamical stability, great solubility of both polar and nonpolar components, as well as their ability to control the size, dispersity and shape of the particles. This review presents microemulsion techniques for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles. It takes place in water-in-oil microemulsions by mixing one microemulsion with a cationic precursor, and the other with a precipitating or reducing agent, or by direct addition of reducing agents or gas (O2, NH3 ili CO2 into microemul sion (Fig. 1. Metal nanoparticles are used as catalysts, sensors, ferrofluids etc. They are produced by reducing the metal cation with a suitable reducing agent. In a similar way, one can prepare nanoparticles of alloys from the metal salts, provided that the metals are mutually soluble. The microemulsion technique is also suitable for depositing nanoparticles onto various surfaces. Highly active catalysts made from nanoparticles of Pt, Pd, Rh and other noble metals may be obtained in this way. Metal oxides and hydroxides may be prepared by hydrolysis or precipitation in the water core of microemulsion. Precipitation can be initiated by adding the base or precipitating agent into the microemulsion with water solution of metal ions. Similarly, nanoparticles may be prepared of sulphides, halogenides, cyanides, carbonates, sulphates and other insoluble metal salts. To prevent oxidation of nanoparticles, especially Fe, the particles are coated with inert metals, oxides, various polymers etc. Coating may provide additional functionality; e.g. coating with gold allows subsequent functionalization with organic compounds containing sulphur, due to the strong Au–S bond. Polymer coatings decrease

  8. Silver nanoparticles are broad-spectrum bactericidal and virucidal compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lara, Humberto H; Garza-Treviño, Elsa N; Ixtepan-Turrent, Liliana; Singh, Dinesh K

    2011-01-01

    .... Interactions between viral biomolecules and silver nanoparticles suggest that the use of nanosystems may contribute importantly for the enhancement of current prevention of infection and antiviral therapies...

  9. Lapatinib-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles for the prevention and treatment of triple-negative breast cancer metastasis to the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xu; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Pang, Xiaoyin; Pang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhang, Zheming; Jiang, Tao; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis from triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has continued to lack effective clinical treatments until present. However, the feature of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) frequently overexpressed in TNBC offers the opportunity to employ lapatinib, a dual-tyrosine kinase inhibitor of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) and EGFR, in the treatment of brain metastasis of TNBC. Unfortunately, the low oral bioavailability of lapatinib and drug efflux by blood-brain barrier have resulted in low drug delivery efficiency into the brain and limited therapeutic effects for patients with brain metastasis in clinical trials. To overcome such disadvantages, we developed lapatinib-loaded human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles, named LHNPs, by modified nanoparticle albumin-bound (Nab) technology. LHNPs had a core-shell structure and the new HSA/phosphatidylcholine sheath made LHNPs stable in bloodstream. Compared to free lapatinib, LHNPs could inhibit the adhesion, migration and invasion ability of high brain-metastatic 4T1 cells more effectively in vitro. Tissue distribution following intravenous administration revealed that LHNPs (i.v., 10 mg/kg) achieved increased delivery to the metastatic brain at 5.43 and 4.36 times the levels of Tykerb (p.o., 100 mg/kg) and lapatinib solution (LS, i.v., 10 mg/kg), respectively. Compared to the marketed Tykerb group, LHNPs had markedly better inhibition effects on brain micrometastasis and significantly extended the median survival time of 4T1 brain metastatic mice in consequence. The improved anti-tumor efficacy of LHNPs could be partly ascribed to down-regulating metastasis-related proteins. Therefore, these results clearly indicated that LHNPs could become a promising candidate for clinical applications against brain metastasis of TNBC. PMID:27086917

  10. Zinc nanoparticles in solution by laser ablation technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Singh; R Gopal

    2007-06-01

    Colloidal zinc metallic nanoparticles are synthesized using pulsed laser ablation of metal plate in an aqueous solution of suitable surfactant to prevent aggregation. UV-visible absorption, TEM, small angle X-ray diffraction and wide-angle X-ray diffraction are used for the characterization of colloidal zinc metallic nanoparticles. Colloidal nanoparticles are found highly stable for a long time.

  11. Development of shampoo, soap and ointment formulated by green synthesised silver nanoparticles functionalised with antimicrobial plants oils in veterinary dermatology: treatment and prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansod, Sunita Dashrath; Bawaskar, Manisha Subrashrao; Gade, Aniket Krishnarao; Rai, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Many scientists have focused their research on the role of nanotechnology for the control of human pathogens, but there are also many topical pathogens present in animals, which infect animals and transfer to humans. Topical therapy is extremely important for the management of dermatological condition in animals. Therefore, the present study aims to evaluate the efficacy of biogenic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in combination with herbal oils against animal skin infections which may be responsible for causing infections in human beings. Here, the authors synthesised and characterised the AgNPs from Azadirachta indica. The oils were extracted from medicinal plants including Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon martini, Eucalyptus globules, A. indica and Ocimum sanctum and the antifungal and antibacterial activity of plant oils along with AgNPs were evaluated. An excision wound model was used for the study of wound healing activity in rabbits. AgNPs functionalised oil has demonstrated remarkable antimicrobial activity against pathogens present on the skin of animals. The nano-functionalised antimicrobial oils were used in the formulation of shampoo, soap and ointment for veterinary dermatology. Antimicrobial products of plant origin with AgNPs are valuable, safe and have a specific role in controlling diseases. The authors believe that this approach will be a good alternative therapy to solve the continuous antibiotic resistance developed by many bacterial pathogens and will be utilised in various animal contacting areas in medicine.

  12. Endocytosis of indium-tin-oxide nanoparticles by macrophages provokes pyroptosis requiring NLRP3-ASC-Caspase1 axis that can be prevented by mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Abderrahim; Muzembo, Basilua André; Yagyu, Ken-Ichi; Baba, Nobuyasu; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Sensebé, Luc; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2016-05-19

    The biological effects of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) are of considerable importance because workers exposed to indium compounds have been diagnosed with interstitial lung disease or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; however, the pathophysiology of these diseases is undefined. Here, mice intraperitoneally inoculated with ITO-nanoparticles (ITO-NPs) resulted in peritonitis dependent in NLRP3 inflammasome, with neutrophils recruitment and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Withal peritoneal macrophages exposed ex vivo to ITO-NPs caused IL-1β secretion and cytolysis. Further, alveolar macrophages exposed to ITO-NPs in vitro showed ITO-NP endocytosis and production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-1β, ensued cell death by cytolysis. This cell death was RIPK1-independent but caspase1-dependent, and thus identified as pyroptosis. Endocytosis of ITO-NPs by activated THP-1 cells induced pyroptosis with IL-1β/TNF-α production and cytolysis, but not in activated THP-1 cells with knockdown of NLRP3, ASC, or caspase1. However, exposing activated THP-1 cells with NLRP3 or ASC knockdown to ITO-NPs resulted in cell death but without cytolysis, with deficiency in IL-1β/TNF-α, and revealing features of apoptosis. While, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) co-cultured with macrophages impaired both inflammation and cell death induced by ITO-NPs. Together, our findings provide crucial insights to the pathophysiology of respiratory diseases caused by ITO particles, and identify MSCs as a potent therapeutic.

  13. Microwave assisted template synthesis of silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K J Sreeram; M Nidhin; B U Nair

    2008-12-01

    Easier, less time consuming, green processes, which yield silver nanoparticles of uniform size, shape and morphology are of interest. Various methods for synthesis, such as conventional temperature assisted process, controlled reaction at elevated temperatures, and microwave assisted process have been evaluated for the kind of silver nanoparticles synthesized. Starch has been employed as a template and reducing agent. Electron microscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance have been employed to characterize the silver nanoparticles synthesized. Compared to conventional methods, microwave assisted synthesis was faster and provided particles with an average particle size of 12 nm. Further, the starch functions as template, preventing the aggregation of silver nanoparticles.

  14. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules L.

    2017-01-03

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  15. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules

    2015-07-14

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  16. Nitric Oxide Releasing Nanoparticles prevent Propionibacterium acnes induced inflammation by both clearing the organism and inhibiting microbial stimulation of the innate immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Min; Landriscina, Angelo; Rosen, Jamie; Wei, Gabrielle; Kao, Stephanie; Olcott, William; Agak, George W.; Paz, Karin Blecher; Bonventre, Josephine; Clendaniel, Alicea; Harper, Stacey; Adler, Brandon; Krausz, Aimee; Friedman, Joel; Nosanchuk, Joshua; Kim, Jenny; Friedman, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes induction of IL-1 cytokines through the NLRP3 inflammasome was recently highlighted as a dominant etiological factor for acne vulgaris. Therefore, therapeutics targeting both the stimulus and the cascade would be ideal. Nitric oxide (NO), a potent biological messenger, has documented broad-spectrum antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties. To harness these characteristics to target acne, we utilized an established nanotechnology capable of generating/releasing nitric oxide over time (NO-np). P. acnes was found to be highly sensitive to all concentrations of NO-np tested, though human keratinocyte, monocyte, and embryonic zebra fish assays revealed no cytotoxicity. NO-np significantly suppressed IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-6 from human monocytes and IL-8 and IL-6 from human keratinocytes respectively. Importantly, silencing of NLRP3 expression by small interfering RNA did not limit NO-np inhibition of IL-1 β secretion from monocytes, and neither TNF-α, nor IL-6 secretion nor inhibition by NO-np was found to be dependent on this pathway. The observed mechanism by which NO-np impacts IL-1β secretion was through inhibition of caspase-1 and IL-1β gene expression. Together, these data suggest that NO-np can effectively prevent P. acnes induced inflammation by both clearing the organism and inhibiting microbial stimulation of the innate immune response. PMID:26172313

  17. Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nanoparticles Prevent Propionibacterium acnes-Induced Inflammation by Both Clearing the Organism and Inhibiting Microbial Stimulation of the Innate Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Min; Landriscina, Angelo; Rosen, Jamie M; Wei, Gabrielle; Kao, Stephanie; Olcott, William; Agak, George W; Paz, Karin B; Bonventre, Josephine; Clendaniel, Alicea; Harper, Stacey; Adler, Brandon L; Krausz, Aimee E; Friedman, Joel M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Kim, Jenny; Friedman, Adam J

    2015-11-01

    Propionibacterium acnes induction of IL-1 cytokines through the NLRP3 (NLR, nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptor) inflammasome was recently highlighted as a dominant etiological factor for acne vulgaris. Therefore, therapeutics targeting both the stimulus and the cascade would be ideal. Nitric oxide (NO), a potent biological messenger, has documented broad-spectrum antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties. To harness these characteristics to target acne, we used an established nanotechnology capable of generating/releasing NO over time (NO-np). P. acnes was found to be highly sensitive to all concentrations of NO-np tested, although human keratinocyte, monocyte, and embryonic zebra fish assays revealed no cytotoxicity. NO-np significantly suppressed IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-8, and IL-6 from human monocytes, and IL-8 and IL-6 from human keratinocytes, respectively. Importantly, silencing of NLRP3 expression by small interfering RNA did not limit NO-np inhibition of IL-1 β secretion from monocytes, and neither TNF-α nor IL-6 secretion, nor inhibition by NO-np was found to be dependent on this pathway. The observed mechanism by which NO-np impacts IL-1β secretion was through inhibition of caspase-1 and IL-1β gene expression. Together, these data suggest that NO-np can effectively prevent P. acnes-induced inflammation by both clearing the organism and inhibiting microbial stimulation of the innate immune response.

  18. Preventing stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke - prevention; CVA - prevention; cerebral vascular accident - prevention; TIA - prevention, transient ischemic attack - prevention ... something that increases your chance of having a stroke. You cannot change some risk factors for stroke. ...

  19. Nanoparticle-blood interactions: the implications on solid tumour targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarovits, James; Chen, Yih Yang; Sykes, Edward A; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-02-18

    Nanoparticles are suitable platforms for cancer targeting and diagnostic applications. Typically, less than 10% of all systemically administered nanoparticles accumulate in the tumour. Here we explore the interactions of blood components with nanoparticles and describe how these interactions influence solid tumour targeting. In the blood, serum proteins adsorb onto nanoparticles to form a protein corona in a manner dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. These serum proteins can block nanoparticle tumour targeting ligands from binding to tumour cell receptors. Additionally, serum proteins can also encourage nanoparticle uptake by macrophages, which decreases nanoparticle availability in the blood and limits tumour accumulation. The formation of this protein corona will also increase the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size or induce aggregation, which makes nanoparticles too large to enter into the tumour through pores of the leaky vessels, and prevents their deep penetration into tumours for cell targeting. Recent studies have focused on developing new chemical strategies to reduce or eliminate serum protein adsorption, and rescue the targeting potential of nanoparticles to tumour cells. An in-depth and complete understanding of nanoparticle-blood interactions is key to designing nanoparticles with optimal physicochemical properties with high tumour accumulation. The purpose of this review article is to describe how the protein corona alters the targeting of nanoparticles to solid tumours and explains current solutions to solve this problem.

  20. Robust Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-21

    SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) (ES) ARO U.S. Anny Research Office 11 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT...Lawrence, Gregory M. Grason, Todd Emrick, Alfred J. Crosby. Stretching of assembled nanoparticle helical springs, Physical Chemistry Chemical...par with thermally sintered conductive adhesives. C. Examination of stretching of nanoparticle-based springs. This part of the project

  1. Electrospray deposition of isolated chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, Pierre; Meffre, Anca; Lacroix, Lise-Marie; Ugnati, Damien [Université de Toulouse (France); INSA, UPS, CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-objets (LPCNO) (France); Ondarçuhu, Thierry [Centre d’Elaboration de Matériaux et d’Etudes Structurales (CEMES-CNRS) (France); Respaud, Marc; Lassagne, Benjamin, E-mail: lassagne@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse (France); INSA, UPS, CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-objets (LPCNO) (France)

    2016-01-15

    The deposition of isolated magnetic nanoparticles onto a substrate was performed using electrohydrodynamic spraying. Two kinds of nanoparticles were sprayed, 11 nm CoFe carbide nanospheres and 10.5 nm Fe nanocubes. By studying carefully the evolution of the sprayed charged droplets and the mechanism of nanoparticle dispersion in them, we could optimize the nanoparticle concentration within the initial nanoparticle solution (i) to reduce the magnetic interaction and therefore prevent agglomeration and (ii) to obtain in a relatively short period (1 h) a deposit of isolated magnetic nanoparticles with a density of up to 400 nanoparticles per µm{sup 2}. These results open great perspectives for magnetic measurements on single objects using advanced magnetometry techniques as long as spintronics applications based on single chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles.

  2. 负载万古霉素纳米微球缓释系统的β-磷酸三钙修复感染性骨缺损的实验研究%A experimental study on preventing infection of vancomycin nanoparticles loaded β-TCP artifical bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冰; 陈鹏

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨应用负载万古霉素纳米微球缓释系统的β-TCP材料预防感染及修复骨缺损的可行性.方法:采用改良的乳液聚合法制得万古霉素纳米微球并将其与β-TCP材料复合,将此复合材料置于接种有金葡菌的培养基中,检测其体外及模拟体内缓释特性及抗菌活性;将其植入金葡菌污染的兔颅骨缺损区,通过大体观察和组织病理检查评价其骨缺损修复能力及抗感染能力.结果:载药β-TCP人工骨在体外模拟体内环境下持续释放高浓度抗菌素长达22天;植入金葡菌污染的骨缺损后可有效预防骨感染并修复骨缺损.结论:负载缓释万古霉素纳米微球的β-TCP人工骨是伴有污染或感染骨缺损较理想的修复材料.%Objective: To explore the possibility of preventing infection and repairing bone defect with vancomycin nanoparticles loaded 3-TCP composite. Methods: Vancomycin nanoparticles loaded β-TCP artifical bone was made from vancomycin nanoparticles putting into β-TCP by vacuum adsorption and freeze-drying techniques. The sustaining period of effective drug concentration in vitro and in mimesis vivo was detected by inhabiting bacteria. Vancomycin nanoparticles loaded β-TCP artifical bones were implanted into rabbit calvarial defects contaminated with staphylococcus aureus, and β-TCP alone was implanted as control. The results were observed by histopathology at 2 and 4 weeks after operation. Results: Vancomycin nanoparticles loaded β-TCP artifical bones sustained a high concentration level of antibiotics for 31 days in vitro and 22 days in mimesis vivo. Local tissue inflammatory reaction was very slight after implantation of Vancomycin nanoparticles loaded β-TCP artifical bones, and the incidence of osseous infection was siginificantly lower than control group. Conclusions: Vancomycin nanoparticles loaded β-TCP artifical bones is ideal as a bone graft substitute for bone defect with contamination or

  3. Biopolymeric nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmitha Sundar, Joydip Kundu and Subhas C Kundu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review on nanoparticles highlights the various biopolymers (proteins and polysaccharides which have recently revolutionized the world of biocompatible and degradable natural biological materials. The methods of their fabrication, including emulsification, desolvation, coacervation and electrospray drying are described. The characterization of different parameters for a given nanoparticle, such as particle size, surface charge, morphology, stability, structure, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, drug loading and drug release, is outlined together with the relevant measurement techniques. Applications in the fields of medicine and biotechnology are discussed along with a promising future scope.

  4. Nanoparticle standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, George Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-08

    We will purchase a COTS materials printer and adapt it for solution printing of known elemental concentration solutions. A methodology will be developed to create deposits of known mass in known locations on selected substrates. The deposits will be characterized for deposited mass, physical morphology, thickness and uniformity. Once an acceptable methodology has been developed and validated, we will create round robin samples to be characterized by LGSIMS instruments at LANL, PNNL and NIST. We will demonstrate the feasibility of depositing nanoparticles in known masses with the goal of creating separated nanoparticles in known locations.

  5. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in the lipid bilayer, the local temperature and membrane fluidity could be observed. DLNAs were encapsulated with different sized nanoparticles and concentrations in order to observe the effect of the bilayer nanoparticles on the lipid bilayer's phase behavior and leakage. Two different sized nanoparticles were used, a 2 nm gold nanoparticle (GNP) much smaller than the thickness of the bilayer and a 4 nm GNP near the thickness of the lipid bilayer. The 2 nm GNPs were shown to affect the lipid bilayer differently than the 4 nm GNP. Specifically, the two nanoparticles altered the phase behavior and leakage differently in a temperature dependent fashion, demonstrating that embedded nanoparticle size can be used induce or inhibit bilayer leakage. A dual solvent exchange method was used to control the lipid surface composition of an iron oxide nanoparticle with a cationic lipid and a polyethylene glycol (PEG) lipid to produce lipid coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). PEG is well known for its ability to enhance the pharmacokinetics of nanostructures by preventing uptake by the immune system. By controlling the lipid surface composition, the surface charge and PEG conformation can be controlled which allowed the LMNPs to be used as an MRI contrast agent and a delivery system for siRNA that could be triggered with temperature.

  6. Gold-quercetin nanoparticles prevent metabolic endotoxemia-induced kidney injury by regulating TLR4/NF-κB signaling and Nrf2 pathway in high fat diet fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min-Xuan; Wang, Ming; Yang, Wei-Wei

    2017-01-01

    High-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome followed by chronic kidney disease caused by intestinal endotoxemia have received extensive attention. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and oxidative stress-related Nrf2/Keap1 were regarded as the key target points involved in metabolic inflammation and kidney injury. However, the molecular mechanism of interaction between TLR4/NF-κB and Nrf2 activation in high-fat diet-induced renal injury is not absolutely understood. Quercetin, a natural product, has been reported to possess antitumor and anti-inflammatory effects. In this regard, this study attempted to prepare poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide)-loaded gold nanoparticles precipitated with quercetin (GQ) to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress effects in high-fat diet-induced kidney failure. For this study, C57BL/6 mice fed fat-rich fodder were used as the metabolic syndrome model to evaluate the protective effects of GQ on kidney injury and to determine whether TLR4/NF-κB and Nrf2 pathways were associated with the process. Moreover, histological examinations, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, and basic blood tests and systemic inflammation-related indicators were used to investigate the inhibitory effects of GQ and underlying molecular mechanism by which it may reduce renal injury. Of note, podocyte injury was found to participate in endotoxin-stimulated inflammatory response. TLR4/NF-κB and Nrf2 pathways were upregulated with high-fat diet intake in mice, resulting in reduction of superoxide dismutase activity and increase in superoxide radical, H2O2, malondialdehyde, XO, XDH, and XO/XDH ratio. In addition, upregulation of TLR4/NF-κB and oxidative stress by endotoxin were observed in vitro, which were suppressed by GQ administration, ultimately alleviating podocyte injury. These findings indicated that GQ could restore the metabolic disorders caused by high-fat diet, which suppresses insulin resistance

  7. Gold-quercetin nanoparticles prevent metabolic endotoxemia-induced kidney injury by regulating TLR4/NF-κB signaling and Nrf2 pathway in high fat diet fed mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min-Xuan; Wang, Ming; Yang, Wei-Wei

    2017-01-01

    High-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome followed by chronic kidney disease caused by intestinal endotoxemia have received extensive attention. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and oxidative stress-related Nrf2/Keap1 were regarded as the key target points involved in metabolic inflammation and kidney injury. However, the molecular mechanism of interaction between TLR4/NF-κB and Nrf2 activation in high-fat diet-induced renal injury is not absolutely understood. Quercetin, a natural product, has been reported to possess antitumor and anti-inflammatory effects. In this regard, this study attempted to prepare poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide)-loaded gold nanoparticles precipitated with quercetin (GQ) to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress effects in high-fat diet-induced kidney failure. For this study, C57BL/6 mice fed fat-rich fodder were used as the metabolic syndrome model to evaluate the protective effects of GQ on kidney injury and to determine whether TLR4/NF-κB and Nrf2 pathways were associated with the process. Moreover, histological examinations, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, and basic blood tests and systemic inflammation-related indicators were used to investigate the inhibitory effects of GQ and underlying molecular mechanism by which it may reduce renal injury. Of note, podocyte injury was found to participate in endotoxin-stimulated inflammatory response. TLR4/NF-κB and Nrf2 pathways were upregulated with high-fat diet intake in mice, resulting in reduction of superoxide dismutase activity and increase in superoxide radical, H2O2, malondialdehyde, XO, XDH, and XO/XDH ratio. In addition, upregulation of TLR4/NF-κB and oxidative stress by endotoxin were observed in vitro, which were suppressed by GQ administration, ultimately alleviating podocyte injury. These findings indicated that GQ could restore the metabolic disorders caused by high-fat diet, which suppresses insulin resistance

  8. Endotoxin hitchhiking on polymer nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Mason L.; Lyon, Andrew J.; Mormile, Melanie R.; Barua, Sutapa

    2016-07-01

    The control of microbial infections is critical for the preparation of biological media including water to prevent lethal septic shock. Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. More than half a million patients suffer from sepsis every year. Both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria are responsible for septic infection by the most common organisms i.e., Escherichia coli and Pseuodomonas aeruginosa. The bacterial cell membrane releases negatively charged endotoxins upon death and enzymatic destruction, which stimulate antigenic response in humans to gram-negative infections. Several methods including distillation, ethylene oxide treatment, filtration and irradiation have been employed to remove endotoxins from contaminated samples, however, the reduction efficiency remains low, and presents a challenge. Polymer nanoparticles can be used to overcome the current inability to effectively sequester endotoxins from water. This process is termed endotoxin hitchhiking. The binding of endotoxin on polymer nanoparticles via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions offers efficient removal from water. However, the effect of polymer nanoparticles and its surface areas has not been investigated for removal of endotoxins. Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) polymer was tested for its ability to effectively bind and remove endotoxins from water. By employing a simple one-step phase separation technique, we were able to synthesize PCL nanoparticles of 398.3 ± 95.13 nm size and a polydispersity index of 0.2. PCL nanoparticles showed ∼78.8% endotoxin removal efficiency, the equivalent of 3.9 × 105 endotoxin units (EU) per ml. This is 8.34-fold more effective than that reported for commercially available membranes. Transmission electron microscopic images confirmed binding of multiple endotoxins to the nanoparticle surface. The concept of using nanoparticles may be applicable not only to eliminate gram-negative bacteria, but also for any gram

  9. APPLICATION OF NANOPARTICLES IN BIOMEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Telegeeva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The advances in nanotechnology, particularly, application in biomedicine are described in the review. The characteristic of the new drug delivery systems is given including lipid, protein and polymer nanoparticles which provide stable delivery of drugs to the target of distribution in the body and prevent their rapid degradation. The advantages of nanometer scale vectors were analyzed. Due to their small size, structure and large surface area, nanoscale materials acquire necessary physico-chemical properties. These properties allow the nanoparticles, containing specific agents, to overcome the limitations existing for the forms of large sizes. This significantly facilitates the intracellular transport to specific cellular targets. Controlled deli very to the place of action and reduction of exposure time on non-target tissues increases efficacy and reduces toxicity and other side effects, which improves the patient's overall health. Use of different ways to deliver nanoparticles allows to deliver low-molecular drugs, proteins, peptides or nucleic acids to specific tissues. Various ways of nanodrugs delivery to a cell and the possibility of modifying their surface by target ligands are discussed in the review. Types of drug delivery systems: microsponges, viruses, imunoconjugates, liposomes, metal nanoparticles and quantum dots, dendrimers, natural and synthetic polymeric nanoparticles, etc are discussed. A large variety of nanovectors, as well as their modification, and loading of various drugs (the methods of inclusion and adsorption are examined, control of their release into the cell, opens prospects for their wide application for visualization of biological processes, diagnosis and therapy of wide range of diseases.

  10. Chemoelectronic circuits based on metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Warren, Scott C; Fuller, Patrick; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2016-07-01

    To develop electronic devices with novel functionalities and applications, various non-silicon-based materials are currently being explored. Nanoparticles have unique characteristics due to their small size, which can impart functions that are distinct from those of their bulk counterparts. The use of semiconductor nanoparticles has already led to improvements in the efficiency of solar cells, the processability of transistors and the sensitivity of photodetectors, and the optical and catalytic properties of metal nanoparticles have led to similar advances in plasmonics and energy conversion. However, metals screen electric fields and this has, so far, prevented their use in the design of all-metal nanoparticle circuitry. Here, we show that simple electronic circuits can be made exclusively from metal nanoparticles functionalized with charged organic ligands. In these materials, electronic currents are controlled by the ionic gradients of mobile counterions surrounding the 'jammed' nanoparticles. The nanoparticle-based electronic elements of the circuitry can be interfaced with metal nanoparticles capable of sensing various environmental changes (humidity, gas, the presence of various cations), creating electronic devices in which metal nanoparticles sense, process and ultimately report chemical signals. Because the constituent nanoparticles combine electronic and chemical sensing functions, we term these systems 'chemoelectronic'. The circuits have switching times comparable to those of polymer electronics, selectively transduce parts-per-trillion chemical changes into electrical signals, perform logic operations, consume little power (on the scale of microwatts), and are mechanically flexible. They are also 'green', in the sense that they comprise non-toxic nanoparticles cast at room temperature from alcohol solutions.

  11. Chemoelectronic circuits based on metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Warren, Scott C.; Fuller, Patrick; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2016-07-01

    To develop electronic devices with novel functionalities and applications, various non-silicon-based materials are currently being explored. Nanoparticles have unique characteristics due to their small size, which can impart functions that are distinct from those of their bulk counterparts. The use of semiconductor nanoparticles has already led to improvements in the efficiency of solar cells, the processability of transistors and the sensitivity of photodetectors, and the optical and catalytic properties of metal nanoparticles have led to similar advances in plasmonics and energy conversion. However, metals screen electric fields and this has, so far, prevented their use in the design of all-metal nanoparticle circuitry. Here, we show that simple electronic circuits can be made exclusively from metal nanoparticles functionalized with charged organic ligands. In these materials, electronic currents are controlled by the ionic gradients of mobile counterions surrounding the ‘jammed’ nanoparticles. The nanoparticle-based electronic elements of the circuitry can be interfaced with metal nanoparticles capable of sensing various environmental changes (humidity, gas, the presence of various cations), creating electronic devices in which metal nanoparticles sense, process and ultimately report chemical signals. Because the constituent nanoparticles combine electronic and chemical sensing functions, we term these systems ‘chemoelectronic’. The circuits have switching times comparable to those of polymer electronics, selectively transduce parts-per-trillion chemical changes into electrical signals, perform logic operations, consume little power (on the scale of microwatts), and are mechanically flexible. They are also ‘green’, in the sense that they comprise non-toxic nanoparticles cast at room temperature from alcohol solutions.

  12. Injury Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Visits Prevent Poison! ACEP Observes 50th National Poison Prevention Week Small, Shiny and Dangerous: ACEP Puts the Spotlight on Children Swallowing Objects Like Magnets, Coins or Batteries School & Sports Injuries Safety Helmets Save Lives, Prevent Traumatic Brain Injury ...

  13. Prevent Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Roles Kids Play Other Types of Aggressive Behavior CYBER BULLYING What is Cyberbullying? Prevent Cyberbullying Report Cyberbullying WHO ... More Than a Bystander GET HELP NOW Home > Cyber Bullying > Prevent Cyberbullying CYBER BULLYING What is Cyberbullying? Prevent ...

  14. Rape prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date rape - prevention; Sexual assault - prevention ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexual assault and abuse and STDs. In: 2015 sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines 2015. Updated June 4, 2015. www.cdc.gov/ ...

  15. Dengue Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This photograph ... medications to treat a dengue infection. This makes prevention the most important step, and prevention means avoiding ...

  16. Biosynthesis of nanoparticles using microbes- a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulkoti, Nasreen I; Taranath, T C

    2014-09-01

    The biosynthesis of nanoparticles by microorganism is a green and eco-friendly technology. This review focuses on the use of consortium of diverse microorganisms belonging to both prokaryotes and eukaryotes for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles viz. silver, gold, platinum, zirconium, palladium, iron, cadmium and metal oxides such as titanium oxide, zinc oxide, etc. These microorganisms include bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi and algae. The synthesis of nanoparticles may be intracellular or extracellular. The several workers have reported that NADH dependent nitrate reductase enzyme plays a vital role in the conversion of metallic ions to nanoparticles. The FTIR study reveals that diverse biomolecules viz. carboxyl group, primary and secondary amines, amide I, II, and III bands etc serve as a tool for bioreduction and capping agents there by offering stability to particles by preventing agglomeration and growth. The size and shape of the nanoparticles vary with the organism employed and conditions employed during the synthesis which included pH, temperature and substrate concentration. The microorganisms provide diverse environment for biosynthesis of nanoparticles. These particles are safe and eco-friendly with a lot of applications in medicine, agriculture, cosmetic industry, drug delivery and biochemical sensors. The challenges for redressal include optimal production and minimal time to obtain desired size and shape, to enhance the stability of nanoparticles and optimization of specific microorganisms for specific application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Choking Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Pediatrician Newsletters Symptom Checker Apps E-Magazine Webinars Our Mission Our ... Prevention Page Content Article Body Choking can be prevented. Food accounts for over 50% of choking episodes. Be ...

  18. Poison Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play On ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Poison Prevention Page Content Article Body Post the Poison Help ...

  19. HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Prevention Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... All Is abstinence the only 100% effective HIV prevention option? Yes. Abstinence means not having oral, vaginal, ...

  20. Environmental Transformations of Engineered Nanoparticles: Implications for Nanoparticle Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, G. V.; Levard, C.; Reinsch, B.; Ma, R.; Kirschling, T.; Brown, G. E.; Tilton, R.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical transformations that engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) may undergo in different environments very poorly characterized. Sulfidation of metallic nanoparticles (NPs), particularly class B soft metals such as Ag NPs, is expected in the environment. Transformation will alter the surface properties and fate of Ag NPs. ENMs are often coated with a polymeric coating to prevent aggregation or to provide specific functionality. These coatings dramatically impact their transport properties. The potential for biological processes to remove covalently bound polymeric coatings from nanoparticles, and the effect of coating loss on the particle's transport properties is not known. The objectives of this work were to 1) better understand the environmental conditions that would promote sufidation of class B soft metal nanoparticles (Ag NPs and ZnO NPs), and to determine the effect that this has on their surface properties and aggregation potential, and 2) to determine if microbes can access covalently bound polymeric coatings from an engineered NP, and the effect on their surface properties and aggregation potential. Ag and ZnO NPs were synthesized and characterized for size, shape, coating mass, charge, crystal structure, and chemical composition using a range of analytical methods (TEM, DLS, TGA, EPM, XAS). These particles were sulfidized in the laboratory, biosolids, and wetland soils and the transformed materials were characterized. Sulfidation was rapid in all cases and resulted in a mixed crystalline/amorphous Ag2S/Ag2O particle depending on the ratio of Ag to HS- in the system. Sulfidation decreased surface charge and displayed significant aggregation compared to the unsulfidized materials. Sulfidation also occurred in biosolids and in wetland soils. Polymer coatings covalently bound to ENMs are bioavailable. Model poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) brush-coated nanoparticles (30 nm hydrodynamic radius) were synthesized to obtain a nanomaterial in which biodegradation was

  1. Synthesis of Aluminium Nanoparticles in A Water/Polyethylene Glycol Mixed Solvent using μ-EDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, R. K.; Hiremath, Somashekhar S.

    2017-08-01

    Nanoparticles present a practical way of retaining the results of the property at the atomic or molecular level. Due to the recent use of nanoparticles in scientific, industrial and medical applications, synthesis of nanoparticles and their characterization have become considerably important. Currently, aluminium nanoparticles have attracted significant research attention because of their reasonable cost, unique properties and interdisciplinary emerging applications. The present paper reports the synthesis of aluminium nanoparticles in the mixture of Deionized water (DI water) and Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) using a developed micro-Electrical Discharge Machining (μ-EDM) method. PEG was used as a stabilizer to prevent nanoparticles from agglomeration produced during the μ -EDM process. The synthesized aluminium nanoparticles were examined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive Analysis by X-rays (EDAX) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) pattern to determine their size, shape, chemical nature and crystal structure. The average size of the polyhedral aluminium nanoparticles is found to be 196 nm.

  2. Sustainable steric stabilization of colloidal titania nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbasuney, Sherif

    2017-07-01

    A route to produce a stable colloidal suspension is essential if mono-dispersed particles are to be successfully synthesized, isolated, and used in subsequent nanocomposite manufacture. Dispersing nanoparticles in fluids was found to be an important approach for avoiding poor dispersion characteristics. However, there is still a great tendency for colloidal nanoparticles to flocculate over time. Steric stabilization can prevent coagulation by introducing a thick adsorbed organic layer which constitutes a significant steric barrier that can prevent the particle surfaces from coming into direct contact. One of the main features of hydrothermal synthesis technique is that it offers novel approaches for sustainable nanoparticle surface modification. This manuscript reports on the sustainable steric stabilization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Nanoparticle surface modification was performed via two main approaches including post-synthesis and in situ surface modification. The tuneable hydrothermal conditions (i.e. temperature, pressure, flow rates, and surfactant addition) were optimized to enable controlled steric stabilization in a continuous fashion. Effective post synthesis surface modification with organic ligand (dodecenyl succinic anhydride (DDSA)) was achieved; the optimum surface coating temperature was reported to be 180-240 °C to ensure DDSA ring opening and binding to titania nanoparticles. Organic-modified titania demonstrated complete change in surface properties from hydrophilic to hydrophobic and exhibited phase transfer from the aqueous phase to the organic phase. Exclusive surface modification in the reactor was found to be an effective approach; it demonstrated surfactant loading level 2.2 times that of post synthesis surface modification. Titania was also stabilized in aqueous media using poly acrylic acid (PAA) as polar polymeric dispersant. PAA-titania nanoparticles demonstrated a durable amorphous polymeric layer of 2 nm thickness. This

  3. Nanoparticles: Uncertainty Risk Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Scientific uncertainty plays a major role in assessing the potential environmental risks of nanoparticles. Moreover, there is uncertainty within fundamental data and information regarding the potential environmental and health risks of nanoparticles, hampering risk assessments based on standard a...

  4. Influence of formulation factors on the preparation of zein nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podaralla, Satheesh; Perumal, Omathanu

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of various formulation parameters on the preparation of zein nanoparticles. 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin (DHC) was used as a model hydrophobic compound. The influence of pH of the aqueous phase, buffer type, ionic strength, surfactant, and zein concentration on particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential of DHC-loaded zein nanoparticles were studied. Smaller nanoparticles were formed when the pH was close to the isoelectric point of zein. DHC-loaded zein nanoparticles prepared using citrate buffer (pH 7.4) was better than phosphate buffer in preventing particle aggregation during lyophilization. The ionic strength did not have a significant influence on the particle size of DHC-loaded zein nanoparticles. A combination of Pluronic F68 and lecithin in 2:1 ratio stabilized the zein nanoparticles. An increase in zein concentration led to increase in particle size of DHC-loaded zein nanoparticles. The use of optimal conditions produced DHC-loaded nanoparticles of 256 ± 30 nm and an encapsulation efficiency of 78 ± 7%. Overall, the study demonstrated the optimal conditions to prepare zein nanoparticles for drug encapsulation.

  5. Nanoparticles for photothermal therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaque, D; Martínez Maestro, L; del Rosal, B; Haro-Gonzalez, P; Benayas, A; Plaza, J L; Martín Rodríguez, E; García Solé, J

    2014-08-21

    The current status of the use of nanoparticles for photothermal treatments is reviewed in detail. The different families of heating nanoparticles are described paying special attention to the physical mechanisms at the root of the light-to-heat conversion processes. The heating efficiencies and spectral working ranges are listed and compared. The most important results obtained in both in vivo and in vitro nanoparticle assisted photothermal treatments are summarized. The advantages and disadvantages of the different heating nanoparticles are discussed.

  6. O3 Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Juan

    2016-11-16

    Ti2O3 nanoparticles with high performance of photothermal conversion are demonstrated for the first time. Benefiting from the nanosize and narrow-bandgap features, the Ti2O3 nanoparticles possess strong light absorption and nearly 100% internal solar–thermal conversion efficiency. Furthermore, Ti2O3 nanoparticle-based thin film shows potential use in seawater desalination and purification.

  7. Shape tunable plasmonic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; El-Sayed, Ivan Homer

    2017-03-07

    Noble metal nanoparticles and methods of their use are provided. Certain aspects provided solid noble metal nanoparticles tuned to the near infrared. The disclosed nanoparticles can be used in molecular imaging, diagnosis, and treatment. Methods for imaging cells are also provided.

  8. Shape tunable plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; El-Sayed, Ivan Homer

    2017-03-07

    Noble metal nanoparticles and methods of their use are provided. Certain aspects provided solid noble metal nanoparticles tuned to the near infrared. The disclosed nanoparticles can be used in molecular imaging, diagnosis, and treatment. Methods for imaging cells are also provided.

  9. Prevention Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Tips Post-Exposure Treatment  Blood Tests and Diagnosis Hepatitis B Blood Tests Understanding Your Hepatitis B Test Results ... acupuncture Home About Us Quick Links What Is Hepatitis B? Prevention & Diagnosis Treatment & Management Resources & Support Research & Programs News & Events ...

  10. Preventive Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwiak, Dick

    1998-01-01

    Argues the importance of regularly inspecting thermoplastic roofs to avoid costly repairs. Preventive measures such as access restriction and the use of protective mats and pads to prevent third-party accidents are discussed as is the importance of checking for drain blockages. (GR)

  11. Surface Organic Modification of Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Sheng; SHEN Xiaodong; LIN Benlan; JIANG Guodong; ZHANG Weihua

    2008-01-01

    The surface organic modification of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with silane coupling reagent KH570 was studied.The modified and unmodified nanoparticles were characterized by FT-IR,XPS and TEM.The spectra of FT-IR and XPS revealed that KH570 was coated onto the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticles to get Fe-O-Si bond and an organic coating layer also was formed.Fe3O4 nanoparticles were spheres partly with mean size of 18.8 nm studied by TEM,which was consistent with the result 17.9 nm calculated by Scherrer'S equation.KH570 was adsorbed on surface and formed chemistry bond to be steric hindrance repulsion which prevented nanoparticles from reuniting.Then glycol-based Fe3O4 magnetic liquids dispersed stably was gained.

  12. Monodisperse magnesium hydride nanoparticles uniformly self-assembled on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guanglin; Tan, Yingbin; Chen, Xiaowei; Sun, Dalin; Guo, Zaiping; Liu, Huakun; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Zhu, Min; Yu, Xuebin

    2015-10-21

    Monodisperse MgH2 nanoparticles with homogeneous distribution and a high loading percent are developed through hydrogenation-induced self-assembly under the structure-directing role of graphene. Graphene acts not only as a structural support, but also as a space barrier to prevent the growth of MgH2 nanoparticles and as a thermally conductive pathway, leading to outstanding performance.

  13. Green synthesis of rifampicin-loaded copper nanoparticles with enhanced antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak-Budych, Marta J; Przysiecka, Łucja; Langer, Krzysztof; Peplińska, Barbara; Jarek, Marcin; Wiesner, Maciej; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Jurga, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    The antimicrobial properties of copper and rifampicin-loaded copper nanoparticles were investigated using four strains: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus pumilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Spherical-shaped copper nanoparticles were synthesized via green reduction method from the peppermint extract. It was found that adsorption of rifampicin on the copper nanosurface enhances its biological activity and prevents the development of resistance. The interactions between rifampicin-copper nanoparticles and bacteria cells were monitored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). It was proven that loaded with rifampicin copper nanoparticles were able to damage the S. aureus cell membrane and facilitate the bacteria biofilm matrix disintegration. Moreover, the DNA decomposition of S. aureus treated with copper and rifampicin-copper nanoparticles was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The results obtained indicate that adsorption of rifampicin on the copper nanoparticles surface might provide the reduction of antibiotic dosage and prevent its adverse side effects.

  14. Biosynthesis, characterization and cytotoxic effect of plant mediated silver nanoparticles using Morinda citrifolia root extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, T Y; Radhika Rajasree, S R; Kanchana, A; Elizabeth, S Beena

    2013-06-01

    Silver has been used since time to control bodily infection, prevent food spoilage and heal wounds by preventing infection. The present study aims at an environmental friendly method of synthesizing silver nanoparticles, from the root of Morinda citrifolia; without involving chemical agents associated with environmental toxicity. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy with an intense surface plasmon resonance band at 413 nm clearly reveals the formation of silver nanoparticles. Fourier transmission infra red spectroscopy (FTIR) showed nanopartilces were capped with plant compounds. Field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the spherical nature of the silver nanoparticles with a size of 30-55 nm. The X-ray diffraction spectrum XRD pattern clearly indicates that the silver nanoparticles formed in the present synthesis were crystalline in nature. In addition these biologically synthesized nanoparticles were also proved to exhibit excellent cytotoxic effect on HeLa cell.

  15. Preventive analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jørgen B; Kehlet, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    findings: The nature of central sensitization during acute and chronic postsurgical pain share common features, and there may be interactions between acute and persistent postoperative pain. The term ‘pre-emptive analgesia’ should be abandoned and replaced by the term ‘preventive analgesia’. Recent studies......This paper will discuss the concepts of pre-emptive and preventive analgesia in acute and persistent postsurgical pain, based on the most recent experimental and clinical literature, with a special focus on injury-induced central sensitization and the development from acute to chronic pain. Recent...... of preventive analgesia for persistent postoperative pain are promising. However, clinicians must be aware of the demands for improved design of their clinical studies in order to get more conclusive answers regarding the different avenues for intervention. Summary: The concept of preventive analgesia is still...

  16. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A SPECIALIST Prevention Strengthening Exercise Committee Exercise Committee Core Strengthening Many popular forms of exercise focus on ... acute pain, you should stop doing it. Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that cross from ...

  17. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Peter [Houston, TX; Koh, Shirlaine [Houston, TX; Mani, Prasanna [Houston, TX; Ratndeep, Srivastava [Houston, TX

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  18. HIV Prevention

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, talks about steps people can take to protect their health from HIV.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  19. Synthesis and applications of novel silver nanoparticle structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, Kyle

    The field of nanotechnology is rapidly expanding across disciplines as each new development is realized. New exciting technologies are being driven by advances in the application of nanotechnology; including biochemical, optical, and semiconductors research. This thesis will focus on the use of silver nanoparticles as optical labels on cells, methods of forming different small structures of silver nanoparticles, as well as the use of silver nanoparticles in the development of a photovoltaic cell. Silver nanoparticles have been modified with self-assembled monolayers of hydroxyl-terminated long chain thiols and encapsulated with a silica shell. The resulting core-shell nanoparticles were used as optical labels for cell analysis using flow cytometry and microscopy. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanoparticles results in strong depolarized scattering of visible light permitting detection at the single nanoparticle level. The nanoparticles were modified with neutravidin via epoxide-azide coupling chemistry and biotinylated antibodies targeting cell surface receptors were bound to the nanoparticle surface. The nanoparticle labels exhibited long-term stability under physiological conditions without aggregation or silver ion leaching. Labeled cells exhibited two orders of magnitude enhancement of the scattering intensity compared to unlabeled cells. Dimers of silver nanoparticles have been fabricated by first immobilizing a monolayer of single silver nanoparticles onto poly(4-vinylpyridine) covered glass slides. The monolayer was then exposed to adenine, which has two amines which will bind to silver. The nanoparticle monolayer, now modified with adenine, is exposed to a second suspension of nanoparticles which will bind with the amine modified monolayer. Finally, a thin silica shell is formed about the structure via solgel chemistry to prevent dissolution or aggregation upon sonication/striping. Circular arrays of silver nanoparticels are developed using a

  20. Modifications in nanoparticle-protein interactions by varying the protein conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sugam; Yadav, I.; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2017-05-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering has been used to study the interaction of silica nanoparticle with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein without and with a protein denaturing agent urea. The measurements have been carried out at pH 7 where both the components (nanoparticle and protein) are similarly charged. We show that the interactions in nanoparticle-protein system can be modified by changing the conformation of protein through the presence of urea. In the absence of urea, the strong electrostatic repulsion between the nanoparticle and protein prevents protein adsorption on nanoparticle surface. This non-adsorption, in turn gives rise to depletion attraction between nanoparticles. However, with addition of urea the depletion attraction is completely suppressed. Urea driven denaturation of protein is utilized to expose the positively charged patched of the BSA molecules which eventually leads to adsorption of BSA on nanoparticles eliminating the depletion interaction.

  1. Investigation of Nanoparticles Dispersion in Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Sia Chee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the study on nanoparticles application in enhanced oil recovery (EOR starts to growth. Nanoparticles have given better indication for EOR development such as in foam stability as its nano size particles can be feasibly dispersed in aqueous solution and easily flow through porous media. Aggregation of nanoparticles are said to be a major contributor for paralyzing nanoparticles dispersion deep into the formation. Hence, in this research sodium hydroxide (NaOH is used as stabilizing solvents or carrier fluids in enhancing nanoparticles properties to prevent coagulation of nanoparticles when mixed to create a nanofluid. The dispersion of various concentration of silica oxide (SiO2 and aluminium oxide (Al2O3 are examined by using turbidity test. Results from this research show that the silicon dioxide nanoparticles are at best to be mixed in NaOH solvent to retain longer retention time.

  2. Photophysical properties of luminescent silicon nanoparticles surface-modified with organic molecules via hydrosilylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, Mari; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Wada, Satoshi; Kawashima, Akira; Nakajima, Ayako; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Ishioka, Junya; Shibayama, Tamaki; Watanabe, Seiichi; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent silicon nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention for their potential uses in various applications. Many approaches have been reported to protect the surface of silicon nanoparticles and prevent their easy oxidation. Various air-stable luminescent silicon nanoparticles have been successfully prepared. However, the effect of interactions of the π-electron system with the silicon surface on the excited state properties of silicon nanoparticles is unclear. In this study, we have successfully prepared silicon nanoparticles protected with three organic compounds (styrene, 1-decene, and 1-vinyl naphthalene) and have examined their photophysical properties. The ligand π-electron systems on the silicon surface promoted the light harvesting ability for the luminescence through a charge transfer transition between the protective molecules and silicon nanoparticles and also enhanced the radiative rate of the silicon nanoparticles.

  3. Antibacterial Nanoparticles in Endodontics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Annie; Kishen, Anil

    2016-10-01

    A major challenge in root canal treatment is the inability of the current cleaning and shaping procedures to eliminate bacterial biofilms surviving within the anatomic complexities and uninstrumented portions of the root canal system. Nanoparticles with their enhanced and unique physicochemical properties, such as ultrasmall sizes, large surface area/mass ratio, and increased chemical reactivity, have led research toward new prospects of treating and preventing dental infections. This article presents a comprehensive review on the scientific knowledge that is available on the application of antibacterial nanoparticles in endodontics. The application of nanoparticles in the form of solutions for irrigation, medication, and as an additive within sealers/restorative materials has been evaluated to primarily improve the antibiofilm efficacy in root canal and restorative treatments. In addition, antibiotic or photosensitizer functionalized nanoparticles have been proposed recently to provide more potent antibacterial efficacy. The increasing interest in this field warrants sound research based on scientific and clinical collaborations to emphasize the near future potential of nanoparticles in clinical endodontics. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Physical gels based on charge-driven bridging of nanoparticles by triblock copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmers, M.; Spruijt, E.; Akerboom, S.; Voets, I.K.; Aelst, van A.C.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Gucht, van der J.

    2012-01-01

    We have prepared an aqueous physical gel consisting of negatively charged silica nanoparticles bridged by ABA triblock copolymers, in which the A blocks are positively charged and the B block is neutral and water-soluble. Irreversible aggregation of the silica nanoparticles was prevented by

  5. Multifunctional nanoparticles: Analytical prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dios, Alejandro Simon de [University of Oviedo, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Av. Julian Claveria, 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Diaz-Garcia, Marta Elena, E-mail: medg@uniovi.es [University of Oviedo, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Av. Julian Claveria, 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-05-07

    Multifunctional nanoparticles are among the most exciting nanomaterials with promising applications in analytical chemistry. These applications include (bio)sensing, (bio)assays, catalysis and separations. Although most of these applications are based on the magnetic, optical and electrochemical properties of multifunctional nanoparticles, other aspects such as the synergistic effect of the functional groups and the amplification effect associated with the nanoscale dimension have also been observed. Considering not only the nature of the raw material but also the shape, there is a huge variety of nanoparticles. In this review only magnetic, quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, carbon and inorganic nanotubes as well as silica, titania and gadolinium oxide nanoparticles are addressed. This review presents a narrative summary on the use of multifuncional nanoparticles for analytical applications, along with a discussion on some critical challenges existing in the field and possible solutions that have been or are being developed to overcome these challenges.

  6. Stimulus Responsive Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Darran Robert (Inventor); Huebsch, Wade W. (Inventor); Sierros, Konstantinos A. (Inventor); Shafran, Matthew S. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Disclosed are various embodiments of methods and systems related to stimulus responsive nanoparticles. In one embodiment including a stimulus responsive nanoparticle system, the system includes a first electrode, a second electrode, and a plurality of elongated electro-responsive nanoparticles dispersed between the first and second electrodes, the plurality of electro-responsive nanorods configured to respond to an electric field established between the first and second electrodes.

  7. Stimulus Responsive Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Darran Robert (Inventor); Huebsch, Wade W. (Inventor); Sierros, Konstantinos A. (Inventor); Shafran, Matthew S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed are various embodiments of methods and systems related to stimulus responsive nanoparticles. In one embodiment includes a stimulus responsive nanoparticle system, the system includes a first electrode, a second electrode, and a plurality of elongated electro-responsive nanoparticles dispersed between the first and second electrodes, the plurality of electro-responsive nanorods configured to respond to an electric field established between the first and second electrodes.

  8. Digestive ripening of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irzhak, V. I.

    2017-08-01

    A relatively new method of regulating the size distribution function of nanoparticles—digestive ripening— was described. A hypothetical mechanism of dissolution of nanoparticles was proposed. It includes the effect of the ligand layer on the internal stability of the nanoparticle nucleus: the change in the structure of the ligand layer caused by a decrease in the nanoparticle size determines the kinetics of digestive ripening.

  9. Prevent Pneumonia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-06

    CDC’s Matthew Westercamp explains what pneumonia is, its symptoms, and how to prevent it.  Created: 8/6/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Respiratory Diseases Branch (RDB).   Date Released: 8/6/2015.

  10. Bullying Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the milestone project is to focus on bridging the gap of bullying and classroom instruction methods. There has to be a defined expectations and level of accountability that has to be defined when supporting and implementing a plan linked to bullying prevention. All individuals involved in the student's learning have to be aware of…

  11. Kaempferol nanoparticles achieve strong and selective inhibition of ovarian cancer cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haitao; Jiang, Bingbing; Li, Bingyun; Li, Zhaoliang; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death for women throughout the Western world. Kaempferol, a natural flavonoid, has shown promise in the chemoprevention of ovarian cancer. A common concern about using dietary supplements for chemoprevention is their bioavailability. Nanoparticles have shown promise in increasing the bioavailability of some chemicals. Here we developed five different types of nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol and tested their efficacy in the inhibition of viability of cancerous and normal ovarian cells. We found that positively charged nanoparticle formulations did not lead to a significant reduction in cancer cell viability, whereas nonionic polymeric nanoparticles resulted in enhanced reduction of cancer cell viability. Among the nonionic polymeric nanoparticles, poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol led to significant reduction in cell viability of both cancerous and normal cells. Poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol resulted in enhanced reduction of cancer cell viability together with no significant reduction in cell viability of normal cells compared with kaempferol alone. Therefore, both PEO-PPO-PEO and PLGA nanoparticle formulations were effective in reducing cancer cell viability, while PLGA nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol had selective toxicity against cancer cells and normal cells. A PLGA nanoparticle formulation could be advantageous in the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. On the other hand, PEO-PPO-PEO nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol were more effective inhibitors of cancer cells, but they also significantly reduced the viability of normal cells. PEO-PPO-PEO nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol may be suitable as a cancer-targeting strategy, which could limit the effects of the nanoparticles on normal cells while retaining their potency against cancer cells. We

  12. Highly stable, protein capped gold nanoparticles as effective drug delivery vehicles for amino-glycosidic antibiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Lori; Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Arunachalam, J., E-mail: aruncccm@gmail.com

    2012-08-01

    A method for the production of highly stable gold nanoparticles (Au NP) was optimized using sodium borohydride as reducing agent and bovine serum albumin as capping agent. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic light scattering techniques. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of pink colour and an absorption maximum at 532 nm. These protein capped nanoparticles exhibited excellent stability towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape, nearly monodispersed and with an average particle size of 7.8 {+-} 1.7 nm. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles in face centered cubic structure is confirmed from the selected-area electron diffraction and XRD patterns. The nanoparticles were functionalized with various amino-glycosidic antibiotics for utilizing them as drug delivery vehicles. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the possible functional groups of antibiotics bound to the nanoparticle surface have been examined. These drug loaded nanoparticle solutions were tested for their antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains, by well diffusion assay. The antibiotic conjugated Au NP exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity, compared to pure antibiotic at the same concentration. Being protein capped and highly stable, these gold nanoparticles can act as effective carriers for drugs and might have considerable applications in the field of infection prevention and therapeutics. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Method for NaBH{sub 4} reduced and BSA capped gold nanoparticle was standardized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles were spherical and nearly monodispersed with a size of 7.8 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles are extremely stable towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. Black

  13. Use of Agave tequilana-lignin and zinc oxide nanoparticles for skin photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Hernández, José Manuel; Escalante, Alfredo; Murillo-Vázquez, Raquel Nalleli; Delgado, Ezequiel; González, Francisco Javier; Toríz, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    The use of sunscreens is essential for preventing skin damage and the potential appearance of skin cancer in humans. Inorganic active components such as zinc oxide (ZnO) have been used commonly in sunscreens due to their ability to block UVA radiation. This ultraviolet (UV) protection might be enhanced to cover the UVB and UVC bands when combined with other components such as titanium dioxide (TiO2). In this work we evaluate the photoprotection properties of organic nanoparticles made from lignin in combination with ZnO nanoparticles as active ingredients for sunscreens. Lignin nanoparticles were synthesized from Agave tequilana lignin. Two different pulping methods were used for dissolving lignin from agave bagasse. ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by the precipitation method. All nanoparticles were characterized by SEM, UV-Vis and FT-IR spectroscopy. Nanoparticles were mixed with a neutral vehicle in different concentrations and in-vitro sun protection factor (SPF) values were calculated. Different sizes of spherical lignin nanoparticles were obtained from the spent liquors of two different pulping methods. ZnO nanoparticles resulted with a flake shape. The mixture of all components gave SPF values in a range between 4 and 13. Lignin nanoparticles showed absorption in the UVB and UVC regions which can enhance the SPF value of sunscreens composed only of zinc oxide nanoparticles. Lignin nanoparticles have the added advantage of being of organic nature and its brown color can be used to match the skin tone of the person using it.

  14. Preventing suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, William H

    2010-03-01

    About 35,000 people commit suicide every year in the United States. Almost all are seriously, but treatably, mentally ill. Most come to the attention of a physician, in an emergency room, primary practice setting, or psychiatric hospital or office, during the days, weeks or months before they die. Since 1995, suicide has been the second most commonly reported of all Joint Commission hospital sentinel events (not just psychiatric events). Suicide is involved in the majority of psychiatric malpractice lawsuits. It takes life from patients, parents from children, children from families, and valuable people from society. Suicide is a terrible way to lose a relative or friend, leaving much greater damage than most natural or accidental death. This paper discusses four points to be considered by those who want to improve this situation: 1) Suicide is rarely "voluntary" in any clinical sense of the term; 2) A great many suicides are preventable once a clinician becomes involved; 3) Suicide is worth preventing; 4) There are practical approaches to prevention that work.

  15. Optical properties of nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At the NBI I am involved in projects relating to optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in particular with respect to plasmonic heating with direct applications to photothermal cancer therapy. For this purpose we have developed heating assays that can be used to measure the heating of any...... nanoscopic heat source like an irradiated nanoparticle...

  16. Separation of nanoparticles: Filtration and scavenging from waste incineration plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Henning; Thajudeen, Thaseem; Funk, Christine; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Increased amounts of nanoparticles are applied in products of everyday life and despite material recycling efforts, at the end of their life cycle they are fed into waste incineration plants. This raises the question on the fate of nanoparticles during incineration. In terms of environmental impact the key question is how well airborne nanoparticles are removed by separation processes on their way to the bag house filters and by the existing filtration process based on pulse-jet cleanable fibrous filter media. Therefore, we investigate the scavenging and the filtration of metal nanoparticles under typical conditions in waste incineration plants. The scavenging process is investigated by a population balance model while the nanoparticle filtration experiments are realized in a filter test rig. The results show that depending on the particle sizes, in some cases nearly 80% of the nanoparticles are scavenged by fly ash particles before they reach the bag house filter. For the filtration step dust cakes with a pressure drop of 500Pa or higher are found to be very effective in preventing nanoparticles from penetrating through the filter. Thus, regeneration of the filter must be undertaken with care in order to guarantee highly efficient collection of particles even in the lower nanometre size regime.

  17. Excipient-assisted vinpocetine nanoparticles: experiments and molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai-Xia; Wang, Hao-Bo; Oppong, Daniel; Wang, Jie-Xin; Chen, Jian-Feng; Le, Yuan

    2014-11-03

    Hydrophilic excipients can be used to increase the solubility and bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In this work, the conventional water-soluble pharmaceutical excipients hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and lactose (LAC) were used as solid supports to prevent drug nanoparticles from aggregation and enhance drug dissolution. Excipient-assisted vinpocetine (VIN) nanoparticles were prepared by reactive precipitation. The analysis results indicated that HPMC was a suitable excipient to prepare VIN nanoparticles. VIN/HPMC nanoparticles had a mean size of 130 nm within a narrow distribution. The dissolution rate of VIN nanoparticles was significantly faster than those of a physical mixture of VIN/HPMC and raw VIN. VIN/HPMC nanoparticles had a higher dissolution profile than VIN/PVP and VIN/LAC nanoparticles. Besides, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was applied to investigate the molecular interactions between VIN and excipients. The calculated results revealed that VIN interacted with excipients by Coulomb and Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. Few hydrogen bonds were formed between VIN and excipients. The HPMC affording smaller particle size may be a result of the stronger interactions between VIN and HPMC (mainly LJ interaction) and the property of HPMC. These characteristics may greatly influence the adsorption behavior and may be the crucial parameter for the better performance of HPMC.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of magnetic nanoparticle composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Akeem Armand

    To effectively and accurately deliver drugs within the human body, both new designs and components for implantable micropumps are being studied. Designs must ensure high biocompatibility, drug compatibility, accuracy and small power consumption. The focus of this thesis was to fabricate a prototype magnetic nanoparticle membrane for eventual incorporation into a biomedical pump and then determine the relationship between this membrane deflection and applied pneumatic or magnetic force. The magnetic nanoparticle polymer composite (MNPC) membranes in this study were composed of crosslinked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). An optimal iron oxide fabrication route was identified and particle size in each batch was approximately 24.6 nm. Once these nanoparticles were incorporated into a membrane (5 wt. %), the nanoparticle formed agglomerates with an average diameter of 2.26 +/-1.23 microm. Comparisons between the 0 and 5 wt. % loading of particles into the membranes indicated that the elastic modulus of the composite decreased with increasing particle concentration. The pressure- central deflection of the membranes could not be predicated by prior models and variation between magnetic and pneumatic pressure-deflection curves was quantified. Attempts to fabricate membranes with above 5 wt. % nanoparticles were not successful (no gelation). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy results suggest that excess oleic acid on the nanoparticles prior to mixing might have prevented crosslinking.

  19. Synthesis of high purity metal oxide nanoparticles for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C.; Kim, W.; Friebele, E. J.; Villalobos, G.; Frantz, J.; Shaw, L. B.; Sadowski, B.; Fontana, J.; Dubinskii, M.; Zhang, J.; Sanghera, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we present our recent research results in synthesizing various metal oxide nanoparticles for use as laser gain media (solid state as well as fiber lasers) and transparent ceramic windows via two separate techniques, co-precipitation and flame spray pyrolysis. The nanoparticles were pressed into ceramic discs that exhibited optical transmission approaching the theoretical limit and showed very high optical-to-optical lasing slope efficiency. We have also synthesized sesquioxide nanoparticles using a Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) technique that leads to the synthesis of a metastable phase of sesquioxide which allows fabricating excellent optical quality transparent windows with very fine grain sizes. Finally, we present our research in the synthesis of rare earth doped boehmite nanoparticles where the rareearth ion is encased in a cage of aluminum and oxygen to prevent ion-ion proximity and energy transfer. The preforms have been drawn into fibers exhibiting long lifetimes and high laser efficiencies.

  20. Energy breathing of nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dynich, Raman A., E-mail: dynich@solo.by [Institute of Social Educational Technologies (Belarus)

    2015-06-15

    The paper considers the energy exchange process of the electromagnetic wave with a spherical metal nanoparticle. Based on the account of the temporal dependencies of electric and magnetic fields, the author presents an analytical dependence of the energy flow passing through the spherical surface. It is shown that the electromagnetic energy, localized in metal nanoparticles, is not a stationary value and periodically varies with time. A consequence of the energy nonstationarity is a nonradiating exit of the electromagnetic energy out of the nanoparticle. During the time equal to the period of wave oscillations, the electromagnetic energy is penetrating twice into the particle and quits it twice. The particle warms up because of the difference in the incoming and outgoing energies. Such “energy breathing” is presented for spherical Ag and Au nanoparticles with radii of 10 and 33 nm, respectively. Calculations were conducted for these nanoparticles embedded into the cell cytoplasm near the frequencies of their surface plasmon resonances.

  1. Magnetic interactions between nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2010-01-01

    We present a short overview of the influence of inter-particle interactions on the properties of magnetic nanoparticles. Strong magnetic dipole interactions between ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic particles, that would be superparamagnetic if isolated, can result in a collective state...... of nanoparticles. This collective state has many similarities to spin-glasses. In samples of aggregated magnetic nanoparticles, exchange interactions are often important and this can also lead to a strong suppression of superparamagnetic relaxation. The temperature dependence of the order parameter in samples...... of strongly interacting hematite nanoparticles or goethite grains is well described by a simple mean field model. Exchange interactions between nanoparticles with different orientations of the easy axes can also result in a rotation of the sub-lattice magnetization directions....

  2. Industrial applications of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, W J; Stoessel, P R; Wohlleben, W; Hafner, A

    2015-08-21

    Research efforts in the past two decades have resulted in thousands of potential application areas for nanoparticles - which materials have become industrially relevant? Where are sustainable applications of nanoparticles replacing traditional processing and materials? This tutorial review starts with a brief analysis on what makes nanoparticles attractive to chemical product design. The article highlights established industrial applications of nanoparticles and then moves to rapidly emerging applications in the chemical industry and discusses future research directions. Contributions from large companies, academia and high-tech start-ups are used to elucidate where academic nanoparticle research has revolutionized industry practice. A nanomaterial-focused analysis discusses new trends, such as particles with an identity, and the influence of modern instrument advances in the development of novel industrial products.

  3. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed.

  4. Reverse Microemulsion-mediated Synthesis of Monometallic and Bimetallic Early Transition Metal Carbide and Nitride Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sean T; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-11-27

    A reverse microemulsion is used to encapsulate monometallic or bimetallic early transition metal oxide nanoparticles in microporous silica shells. The silica-encapsulated metal oxide nanoparticles are then carburized in a methane/hydrogen atmosphere at temperatures over 800 °C to form silica-encapsulated early transition metal carbide nanoparticles. During the carburization process, the silica shells prevent the sintering of adjacent carbide nanoparticles while also preventing the deposition of excess surface carbon. Alternatively, the silica-encapsulated metal oxide nanoparticles can be nitridized in an ammonia atmosphere at temperatures over 800 °C to form silica-encapsulated early transition metal nitride nanoparticles. By adjusting the reverse microemulsion parameters, the thickness of the silica shells, and the carburization/nitridation conditions, the transition metal carbide or nitride nanoparticles can be tuned to various sizes, compositions, and crystal phases. After carburization or nitridation, the silica shells are then removed using either a room-temperature aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution or a 0.1 to 0.5 M NaOH solution at 40-60 °C. While the silica shells are dissolving, a high surface area support, such as carbon black, can be added to these solutions to obtain supported early transition metal carbide or nitride nanoparticles. If no high surface area support is added, then the nanoparticles can be stored as a nanodispersion or centrifuged to obtain a nanopowder.

  5. Magnetic Nanoparticles in Cancer Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbo, Oliviero L; Sjaastad, Kristine; Radomski, Marek W; Volkov, Yuri; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2015-01-01

    In a report from 2008, The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicted a tripled cancer incidence from 1975, projecting a possible 13-17 million cancer deaths worldwide by 2030. While new treatments are evolving and reaching approval for different cancer types, the main prevention of cancer mortality is through early diagnosis, detection and treatment of malignant cell growth. The last decades have seen a development of new imaging techniques now in widespread clinical use. The development of nano-imaging through fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to detect and diagnose cancer at an earlier stage than with current imaging methods. The characteristic properties of nanoparticles result in their theranostic potential allowing for simultaneous detection of and treatment of the disease. This review provides state of the art of the nanotechnological applications for cancer therapy. Furthermore, it advances a novel concept of personalized nanomedical theranostic therapy using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles in conjunction with MRI imaging. Regulatory and industrial perspectives are also included to outline future perspectives in nanotechnological cancer research.

  6. Cholera Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... name="commit" type="submit" value="Submit" /> Prevention & Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prevention of ... of cholera and other diarrheal disease prevention. Prevention Control Topics Six Basic Cholera Prevention Messages I nfection ...

  7. Efficacy of nanoparticles in achieving hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Carrie Catherine

    Uncontrollable hemorrhage is significant cause of preventable death in the military and civilian setting. Hemostatic wound dressings have been created in an attempt to rectify this problem, but none currently on the market are highly effective at controlling hemorrhage resulting in a need for an effective hemostatic wound dressing. This study investigated the effects of gold, silver, and silica nanoparticles on blood coagulation time in order to determine if nanoparticle incorporation into a hemostatic wound dressing would effectively achieve hemostasis. Gold, silver, and silica nanoparticles were experimented with two different ex vivo studies to determine their effects on coagulation. A modified Lee White Method and a rotational viscometer were utilized to assess the nanoparticles ability to clot blood. Results obtained from the modified Lee White Method proved inconsistent and inconclusive demonstrating a need for improved testing methods. Results acquired from viscometer testing demonstrated that silica was effective in decreasing coagulation time indicating its potential use as a hemostatic agent and its prospective incorporation into a hemostatic wound dressing.

  8. Novel nanoparticle vaccines for Listeriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Marradi, Marco; Garcia, Isabel; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Alvarez-Dominguez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nanomedicine has transformed many areas of traditional medicine, and enabled fresh insights into the prevention of previously difficult to treat diseases. An example of the transformative power of nanomedicine is a recent nano-vaccine against listeriosis, a serious bacterial infection affecting not only pregnant women and their neonates, but also immune-compromised patients with neoplastic or chronic autoimmune diseases. There is a major unmet need for an effective and safe vaccine against listeriosis, with the challenge that an effective vaccine needs to generate protective T cell immunity, a hitherto difficult to achieve objective. Now utilizing a gold nanoparticle antigen delivery approach together with a novel polysaccharide nanoparticulate adjuvant, an effective T-cell vaccine has been developed that provides robust protection in animal models of listeriosis, raising the hope that one day this nanovaccine technology may protect immune-compromised humans against this serious opportunistic infection.

  9. Biocidal effects of silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles on the bioluminescent bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, M. V.; Starodub, N. F.; Katsev, A. M.; Guidotti, M.; Khranovskyy, V. D.; Babanin, A. A.; Melnychuk, M. D.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles in combination with alginate on bioluminescent Photobacterium leiognathi Sh1 bacteria was investigated. Silver nanoparticles were found to be more toxic than zinc oxide nanoparticles on bioluminescent bacteria. The nanoparticles and their ions released results in the same effect, however, it was absent in combination with alginate. The effective inhibiting concentration (EC50) for silver nanoparticles was found about 0.3 - 0.4 μg mL-1, which was up to two times larger then for zinc oxide nanoparticles. The absence of sodium chloride in the tested media prevented the formation of colloidal particles of larger size and the effective inhibition concentrations of metal derivatives were lower than in the presence of sodium chloride.

  10. Cytocompatible and multifunctional polymeric nanoparticles for transportation of bioactive molecules into and within cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Chen, Weixin; Liu, Yihua; Tsukamoto, Yuriko; Inoue, Yuuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Multifunctional polymeric nanoparticles are materials with great potential for a wide range of biomedical applications. For progression in this area of research, unfavorable interactions of these nanoparticles with proteins and cells must be avoided in biological environments, for example, through treatment of the nanoparticle surfaces. Construction of an artificial cell membrane structure based on polymers bearing the zwitterionic phosphorylcholine group can prevent biological reactions at the surface effectively. In addition, certain bioactive molecules can be immobilized on the surface of the polymer to generate enough affinity to capture target biomolecules. Furthermore, entrapment of inorganic nanoparticles inside polymeric matrices enhances the nanoparticle functionality significantly. This review summarizes the preparation and characterization of cytocompatible and multifunctional polymeric nanoparticles; it analyzes the efficiency of their fluorescence function, the nature of the artificial cell membrane structure, and their performance as in-cell devices; and finally, it evaluates both their chemical reactivity and effects in cells. PMID:27877883

  11. Silver nanoparticles-induced cytotoxicity requires ERK activation in human bladder carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglioni, Sara; Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Perrotta, Cristiana; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2015-09-17

    Silver nanoparticles are toxic both in vitro and in vivo. We have investigated the possibility to exploit the cytotoxic potential of silver nanoparticles in T24 bladder carcinoma cells using both bare and PolyVinylPyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles. We show that the two types of silver nanoparticles promote morphological changes and cytoskeletal disorganization, are cytotoxic and induce cell death. These effects are due to the increased production of reactive oxygen species which are responsible, at least in part, for the sustained activation of ERK1/2. Indeed, both cytotoxicity and ERK1/2 activation are prevented by exposing the cells to the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine. Also blocking the ERK1/2 pathway with the MEK inhibitor PD98059 protects the cells from nanoparticles' cytotoxicity. Our findings suggest that ERK activation plays a role in silver nanoparticle-mediated cytotoxicity in T24 cells. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. In situ transmission electron microscopy of solid-liquid phase transition of silica encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianjun; Hong, Yan; Muratore, Chris; Su, Ming; Voevodin, Andrey A.

    2011-09-01

    The solid-liquid phase transition of silica encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles was studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nanoparticles were prepared by a two-step chemical synthesis process involving thermal decomposition of organometallic precursors for nucleating bismuth and a sol-gel process for growing silica. The microstructural and chemical analyses of the nanoparticles were performed using high-resolution TEM, Z-contrast imaging, focused ion beam milling, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. Solid-liquid-solid phase transitions of the nanoparticles were directly recorded by electron diffractions and TEM images. The silica encapsulation of the nanoparticles prevented agglomeration and allowed particles to preserve their original volume upon melting, which is desirable for applications of phase change nanoparticles with consistently repeatable thermal properties.

  13. Antibacterial Properties of Copper Nanoparticle Dispersions: Influence of Synthesis Conditions and Physicochemical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godymchuk, A.; Frolov, G.; Gusev, A.; Zakharova, O.; Yunda, E.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The production of bactericidal plasters, bandages and medicines with the inclusion of copper nanoparticles and copper ions may have a great potential in terms of their biomedical application. The work considers the influence of the synthesis conditions, size, aggregation status, and charge of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions as well as the type of microorganisms to the antibacterial properties of water suspensions of electroexplosive copper nanoparticles in the conditions in vitro in relation to strains Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus. Water dispersions of copper nanoparticles were shown to inhibit the growth of test cells for both G+ and G- microbacteria but the degree of such an influence strongly depended on the type of a test strain. The authors have demonstrated that use of deeply purified water and alcohol-containing stabilizers at the synthesis of nanoparticles via metals electric erosion in the liquid prevents the copper nanoparticles coagulation and significantly influences on their physicochemical characteristics and, consequently, antibacterial properties.

  14. Precise Quantification of Nanoparticle Internalization

    OpenAIRE

    Gottstein, Claudia; Wu, Guohui; Wong, Benjamin J.; Zasadzinski, Joseph Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles have opened new exciting avenues for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications in human disease, and targeted nanoparticles are increasingly used as specific drug delivery vehicles. The precise quantification of nanoparticle internalization is of importance to measure the impact of physical and chemical properties on the uptake of nanoparticles into target cells or into cells responsible for rapid clearance. Internalization of nanoparticles has been measured...

  15. Metallofullerene nanoparticles promote osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells through BMP signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kangning; Cao, Weipeng; Hao, Xiaohong; Xue, Xue; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Juan; Zhao, Yuliang; Meng, Jie; Sun, Baoyun; Zhang, Jinchao; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Although endohedral metallofullerenol [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles have anti-tumor efficiency and mostly deposit in the bones of mice, how these nanoparticles act in bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) remains largely unknown. Herein, we observed that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles facilitated the differentiation of MSCs toward osteoblasts, as evidenced by the enhancement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation upon [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle treatment. Mechanistically, the effect of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles on ALP activity was inhibited by the addition of noggin as an inhibitor of the BMP signaling pathway. Moreover, the in vivo results of the ovariectomized rats further indicated that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles effectively improved bone density and prevented osteoporosis.Although endohedral metallofullerenol [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles have anti-tumor efficiency and mostly deposit in the bones of mice, how these nanoparticles act in bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) remains largely unknown. Herein, we observed that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles facilitated the differentiation of MSCs toward osteoblasts, as evidenced by the enhancement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation upon [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle treatment. Mechanistically, the effect of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles on ALP activity was inhibited by the addition of noggin as an inhibitor of the BMP signaling pathway. Moreover, the in vivo results of the ovariectomized rats further indicated that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles effectively improved bone density and prevented osteoporosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33575a

  16. Antibacterial surfaces by adsorptive binding of polyvinyl-sulphonate-stabilized silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilev, Krasimir; Sah, Vasu R; Goreham, Renee V; Short, Robert D [Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia); Ndi, Chi; Griesser, Hans J, E-mail: Krasimir.vasilev@unisa.edu.au [Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2010-05-28

    This paper presents a novel and facile method for the generation of efficient antibacterial coatings which can be applied to practically any type of substrate. Silver nanoparticles were stabilized with an adsorbed surface layer of polyvinyl sulphonate (PVS). This steric layer provided excellent colloidal stability, preventing aggregation over periods of months. PVS-coated silver nanoparticles were bound onto amine-containing surfaces, here produced by deposition of an allylamine plasma polymer thin film onto various substrates. SEM imaging showed no aggregation upon surface binding of the nanoparticles; they were well dispersed on amine surfaces. Such nanoparticle-coated surfaces were found to be effective in preventing attachment of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria and also in preventing biofilm formation. Combined with the ability of plasma polymerization to apply the thin polymeric binding layer onto a wide range of materials, this method appears promising for the fabrication of a wide range of infection-resistant biomedical devices.

  17. Photochemical synthesis of mono and bimetallic nanoparticles and their use in catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardoe, Andrea

    2011-07-01

    Nanomaterials have become a popular topic of research over the years because of their many important applications. It can be a challenge to stabilize the particles at a nanometer size, while having control over their surface features. Copper nanoparticles were synthesized photochemically using a photogenerated radical allowing spatial and temporal control over their formation. The synthesis was affected by the stabilizers used, which changed the size, dispersity, rate of formation, and oxidation rate. Copper nanoparticles suffer from their fast oxidation in air, so copper-silver bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized in attempts to overcome the oxidation of copper nanoparticles. Bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized, but preventing the oxidation of the copper nanoparticles proved difficult. One important application of nanoparticles that was explored here is in catalyzing organic reactions. Because of the fast oxidation of copper nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles were synthesized photochemically on different supports including TiO2 and hydrotalcite (HTC). Their catalytic efficiency was tested using alcohol oxidations. Different silver nanoparticle shapes (decahedra and plates) were compared with the spheres to see the different catalytic efficiencies.

  18. Synthesis of iron nanoparticles via chemical reduction with palladium ion seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Ehrman, Sheryl H

    2007-01-30

    We report on the synthesis of highly monodisperse iron nanoparticles, using a chemical reduction method. Iron nanoparticles with an average diameter of 6 nm and a geometric standard deviation of 1.3 were synthesized at a pH of 9.50 from ferric chloride precursor with sodium borohydride as the reducing agent, polyacrylic acid as the dispersing agent, and palladium ions as seeds for iron nanoparticle nucleation. The resulting nanoparticles were ferromagnetic at 5 K and superparamagnetic at 350 K. The dispersing agent polyacrylic acid (PAA) was shown to prevent iron nanoparticles and possibly palladium clusters from aggregating; in the absence of PAA, only aggregated iron nanoparticles were obtained. The addition of palladium ions decreased the diameter of iron nanoparticles presumably by providing sites for heterogeneous nucleation onto palladium clusters. In the absence of palladium ions, the mean diameter of iron nanoparticles was approximately 110 nm and the standard deviation increased to 2.0. The pH of the solution also was found to have a significant effect on the particle diameter, likely by affecting PAA ionization and altering the conformation of the polymer chains. At lower pH (8.75), the PAA is less ionized and its ability to disperse palladium clusters is reduced, so the number of palladium seeds decreases. Therefore, the resulting iron nanoparticles were larger, 59 nm in diameter, versus 6 nm for nanoparticles formed at a pH of 9.50.

  19. Precisely Size-Tunable Monodisperse Hairy Plasmonic Nanoparticles via Amphiphilic Star-Like Block Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yihuang; Yoon, Young Jun; Pang, Xinchang; He, Yanjie; Jung, Jaehan; Feng, Chaowei; Zhang, Guangzhao; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-12-01

    In situ precision synthesis of monodisperse hairy plasmonic nanoparticles with tailored dimensions and compositions by capitalizing on amphiphilic star-like diblock copolymers as nanoreactors are reported. Such hairy plasmonic nanoparticles comprise uniform noble metal nanoparticles intimately and perpetually capped by hydrophobic polymer chains (i.e., "hairs") with even length. Interestingly, amphiphilic star-like diblock copolymer nanoreactors retain the spherical shape under reaction conditions, and the diameter of the resulting plasmonic nanoparticles and the thickness of polymer chains situated on the surface of the nanoparticle can be readily and precisely tailored. These hairy nanoparticles can be regarded as hard/soft core/shell nanoparticles. Notably, the polymer "hairs" are directly and permanently tethered to the noble metal nanoparticle surface, thereby preventing the aggregation of nanoparticles and rendering their dissolution in nonpolar solvents and the homogeneous distribution in polymer matrices with long-term stability. This amphiphilic star-like block copolymer nanoreactor-based strategy is viable and robust and conceptually enables the design and synthesis of a rich variety of hairy functional nanoparticles with new horizons for fundamental research on self-assembly and technological applications in plasmonics, catalysis, energy conversion and storage, bioimaging, and biosensors.

  20. Nanoparticle-based Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Khanna

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles exhibit several unique properties that can be applied to develop chemical and biosensorspossessing desirable features like enhanced sensitivity and lower detection limits. Gold nanoparticles arecoated with sugars tailored to recognise different biological substances. When mixed with a weak solution ofthe sugar-coated nanoparticles, the target substance, e.g., ricin or E.coli, attaches to the sugar, thereby alteringits properties and changing the colour. Spores of bacterium labeled with carbon dots have been found to glowupon illumination when viewed with a confocal microscope. Enzyme/nanoparticle-based optical sensors forthe detection of organophosphate (OP compounds employ nanoparticle-modified fluorescence of an inhibitorof the enzyme to generate the signal for the OP compound detection. Nanoparticles shaped as nanoprisms,built of silver atoms, appear red on exposure to light. These nanoparticles are used as diagnostic labels thatglow when target DNA, e.g., those of anthrax or HIV, are present. Of great importance are tools like goldnanoparticle-enhanced surface-plasmon resonance sensor and silver nanoparticle surface-enhanced portableRaman integrated tunable sensor. Nanoparticle metal oxide chemiresistors using micro electro mechanical systemhotplate are very promising devices for toxic gas sensing. Chemiresistors comprising thin films of nanogoldparticles, encapsulated in monomolecular layers of functionalised alkanethiols, deposited on interdigitatedmicroelectrodes, show resistance changes through reversible absorption of vapours of harmful gases. Thispaper reviews the state-of-the-art sensors for chemical and biological terror agents, indicates their capabilitiesand applications, and presents the future scope of these devices.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.608-616, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1683

  1. Cytotoxicity of selenium nanoparticles in rat dermal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos JF

    2012-07-01

    great selectivity between bacteria and healthy cells, and are a viable option for coating endotracheal tubes in order to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia.Keywords: selenium, nanoparticle, cytotoxicity, fibroblast, ventilator-associated pneumonia

  2. Nanoparticle flotation collectors II: the role of nanoparticle hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Songtao; Pelton, Robert

    2011-09-20

    The ability of polystyrene nanoparticles to facilitate the froth flotation of glass beads was correlated to the hydrophobicity of the nanoparticles. Contact angle measurements were used to probe the hydrophobicity of hydrophilic glass surfaces decorated with hydrophobic nanoparticles. Both sessile water drop advancing angles, θ(a), and attached air bubble receding angle measurements, θ(r), were performed. For glass surfaces saturated with adsorbed nanoparticles, flotation recovery, a measure of flotation efficiency, increased with increasing values of each type of contact angle. As expected, the advancing water contact angle on nanoparticle-decorated, dry glass surfaces increased with surface coverage, the area fraction of glass covered with nanoparticles. However, the nanoparticles were far more effective at raising the contact angle than the Cassie-Baxter prediction, suggesting that with higher nanoparticle coverages the water did not completely wet the glass surfaces between the nanoparticles. A series of polystyrene nanoparticles was prepared to cover a range of surface energies. Water contact angle measurements, θ(np), on smooth polymer films formed from organic solutions of dissolved nanoparticles were used to rank the nanoparticles in terms of hydrophobicity. Glass spheres were saturated with adsorbed nanoparticles and were isolated by flotation. The minimum nanoparticle water contact angle to give high flotation recovery was in the range of 51° < θ(np(min)) ≤ 85°.

  3. Nanoparticles from Degradation of Biodegradable Plastic Mulch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Markus; Sintim, Henry; Bary, Andy; English, Marie; Schaefer, Sean

    2017-04-01

    Plastic mulch films are commonly used in crop production. They provide multiple benefits, including control of weeds and insects, increase of soil and air temperature, reduction of evaporation, and prevention of soil erosion. The use of plastic mulch film in agriculture has great potential to increase food production and security. Plastic mulch films must be retrieved and disposed after usage. Biodegradable plastic mulch films, who can be tilled into the soil after usage offer great benefits as alternative to conventional polyethylene plastic. However, it has to be shown that the degradation of these mulches is complete and no micro- and nanoparticles are released during degradation. We conducted a field experiment with biodegradable mulches and tested mulch degradation. Mulch was removed from the field after the growing season and composted to facilitate degradation. We found that micro- and nanoparticles were released during degradation of the mulch films in compost. This raises concerns about degradation in soils as well.

  4. Electrolyte-Mediated Assembly of Charged Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kewalramani, Sumit; Bedzyk, Michael; Guerrero-García, Guillermo; Moreau, Liane; Zwanikken, Jos; Mirkin, Chad; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    Solutions at high salt concentrations are used to crystallize or segregate colloids, proteins and polyelectrolytes via an unknown mechanism referred to as ``salting-out''. Here, we show salting-out is a long-range interaction controlled by electrolyte concentration and nanoparticle charge density. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) shows that DNA-coated Au nanoparticles designed to prevent inter-particle assembly via Watson-Crick hybridization undergo ``gas'' to FCC to ``glass-like'' transitions with increasing NaCl or CaCl2 concentration. Simulations reveal that the crystallization is concomitant with inter-particle interactions changing from purely repulsive to a long-range potential well condition. Liquid-state theory explains this attraction as a sum of cohesive and depletion forces. Our work reveals the mechanism behind salting-out and suggests new routes for the successful crystallization of colloids and proteins using concentrated salts.

  5. BIOSYNTHESIS OF NANOPARTICLES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    K Vithiya; S Sen

    2011-01-01

    Biosynthesis of nanoparticles is reviewed in detail in this study. Comparison of different synthesis methods, namely physical, chemical and green methods giving emphasis to biological synthesis is documented here...

  6. Metallic Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernando

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we reviewed some relevant aspects of the magnetic properties of metallic nanoparticles with small size (below 4 nm, covering the size effects in nanoparticles of magnetic materials, as well as the appearance of magnetism at the nanoscale in materials that are nonferromagnetic in bulk. These results are distributed along the text that has been organized around three important items: fundamental magnetic properties, different fabrication procedures, and characterization techniques. A general introduction and some experimental results recently obtained in Pd and Au nanoparticles have also been included. Finally, the more promising applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine are indicated. Special care was taken to complete the literature available on the subject.

  7. Functionalized diamond nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Beaujuge, Pierre M.

    2014-10-21

    A diamond nanoparticle can be functionalized with a substituted dienophile under ambient conditions, and in the absence of catalysts or additional reagents. The functionalization is thought to proceed through an addition reaction.

  8. Nanoparticles deliver RNAi therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C. Woodle

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology-based advanced materials are rapidly expanding development of better medicines. Long-standing efforts with lipid and polymer colloidal delivery systems, i.e. nanoparticles, have yielded better imaging and therapy. These benefits of nanotechnology, though limited, have driven efforts to develop advanced nanoparticles. This is particularly the case for targeted nucleic acid (gene therapeutics based on short interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA, which is a new gene inhibitor that is highly potent and selective. Here, we evaluate the use of modular conjugates to construct targeted nanoparticle therapeutics for nucleic acids. These nanoparticles are beginning to emulate the sophistication of virus particles – nature's own nanoscale assemblies for nucleic acids. For medicine, they promise the creation of a new generation of ‘targeted’ therapeutics that can offer multiple levels of selectivity.

  9. Spiral microfluidic nanoparticle separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Kuntaegowdanahalli, Sathyakumar S.; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Papautsky, Ian

    2008-02-01

    Nanoparticles have potential applications in many areas such as consumer products, health care, electronics, energy and other industries. As the use of nanoparticles in manufacturing increases, we anticipate a growing need to detect and measure particles of nanometer scale dimensions in fluids to control emissions of possible toxic nanoparticles. At present most particle separation techniques are based on membrane assisted filtering schemes. Unfortunately their efficiency is limited by the membrane pore size, making them inefficient for separating a wide range of sizes. In this paper, we propose a passive spiral microfluidic geometry for momentum-based particle separations. The proposed design is versatile and is capable of separating particulate mixtures over a wide dynamic range and we expect it will enable a variety of environmental, medical, or manufacturing applications that involve rapid separation of nanoparticles in real-world samples with a wide range of particle components.

  10. Predicting toxicity of nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    BURELLO ENRICO; Worth, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    A statistical model based on a quantitative structure–activity relationship accurately predicts the cytotoxicity of various metal oxide nanoparticles, thus offering a way to rapidly screen nanomaterials and prioritize testing.

  11. Nanoparticles in a box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Sarah; Grotheer, Sarah; Tielke, Julia

    2017-01-01

    A concept is introduced that allows for the isolation, storage and re-use of surfactant-free precious metal nanoparticles (NPs) of catalytic relevance (Pt and Ru). “Surfactant-free NPs” well-defined in size (1–2 nm) are prepared in alkaline ethylene glycol. After synthesis these NPs are stabilized...... to handle “surfactant-free” catalytic nanoparticles like a normal solid chemical...

  12. Functional Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Campioli, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents an extensive study on fluorescent organic nanoparticles and fluorescent organic binary and ternary nanoassemblies. In particular the attention is focused on the preparation and characterization of organic nanoparticles and new nanocomposites obtained from different types of small organic molecules, their stabilization and the use of these materials for biological and optoelectronics applications. The work deals at the beginning with the description of some methods used...

  13. Antifungal nanoparticles and surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Cristiana S O; Vidal, Maria; Ferreira, Lino S

    2010-10-11

    Nosocomial fungal infections, an increasing healthcare concern worldwide, are often associated with medical devices. We have developed antifungal nanoparticle conjugates that can act in suspension or attach to a surface, efficiently killing fungi. For that purpose, we immobilized covalently amphotericin B (AmB), a potent antifungal agent approved by the FDA, widely used in clinical practice and effective against a large spectrum of fungi, into silica nanoparticles. These antifungal nanoparticle conjugates are fungicidal against several strains of Candida sp., mainly by contact. In addition, they can be reused up to 5 cycles without losing their activity. Our results show that the antifungal nanoparticle conjugates are more fungistatic and fungicidal than 10 nm colloidal silver. The antifungal activity of the antifungal nanoparticle conjugates is maintained when they are immobilized on a surface using a chemical adhesive formed by polydopamine. The antifungal nanocoatings have no hemolytic or cytotoxic effect against red blood cells and blood mononuclear cells, respectively. Surfaces coated with these antifungal nanoparticle conjugates can be very useful to render medical devices with antifungal properties.

  14. Immunosensing using nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo de la Escosura-Muñiz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Immunosensing technology is taking advantage of the lastest developments in materials science and inparticular from the nanomaterials field. Because of their unprecedented optical tunability as well as electrical and electrochemical qualities, we are seeing significant developments in the design of novel immunoassays; various conventional optical and electrical platforms which allow for future applications in several fields are being used. Properties of nanoparticles such as light absorption and dispersion are bringing interesting immunosensing alternatives. Nanoparticles are improving the sensitivity of existing techniques used for protein detection in immunoassays based on Surface Plasmon Resonance, Quartz Crystal Microbalance, Fluorescence spectroscopy etc. Electrochemical techniques are also taking advantage of electrical properties of nanoparticles. Redox properties of metal based nanoparticles, surface impedance change and conductance changes once nanoparticles are present as labelling tags or modifiers of transducer surfaces are also improving the technology. In most of the examples nanoparticle based biosensing systems are being offered as excellent screening and superior alternatives to existing conventional strategies/assays with interest for fields in clinical analysis, food quality, safety and security.

  15. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems.

  16. Preventing diabetic cardiomyopathy in diabetic rats by combined therapy of basic fibroblast growth factor-loaded nanoparticles and ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction technique%包载碱性成纤维细胞生长因子纳米粒结合超声微泡爆破技术预防糖尿病心肌病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张明; 马卫成; 徐锦龙; 王井玲; 俞璐; 赵应征

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the preventive effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) using nanoparticles combined with ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction technique (UTMD). Method The bFGF-loaded nanoparticles (bFGF-NPs) was prepared by lyophilization technique. Among 75 SD rats, 15 were assigned to control group using random number table after adaptive feeding for 1 week. The rest 60 rats developed type 1 diabetes with intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 70 mg/kg). The diabetic rats were divided to 4 groups (15 rats per group): diabetic model, bFGF solution treatment, bFGF nanoparticles treatment, bFGF nanoparticles + UTMD treatment. Before and twelve weeks after intervention, all rats underwent the transthoracic echocardiography. The left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVIDd), left ventricular posterior wall (LVPW) and left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS) were measured. At last, the rats were sacrificed and myocardial tissue of all rats were stained with masson staining and CD31 immunohistochemistry staining to quantify myocardial collagen fraction (CVF) and myocardial microvascular density (MVD). One-way ANOVA was used for multiple comparison. LSD-t test were used for comparison between two groups. Results bFGF-NPs showed good morphology and high encapsulation efficiency (84.3%± 2.8%) with high stability. The animal experiments demonstrated that after 12-week treatment, LVIDd ((7.37 ± 0.43) vs (5.82 ± 0.24), (6.65 ± 0.28), (6.73 ± 0.25) mm;t=8.09, 4.83, 3.51, all P<0.05) and LVFS ((50±4) vs (38±4), (44±4), (43±4) mm, t=6.79, 3.93, 3.54, all P<0.05) increased, and LVPW ((1.59 ± 0.08) vs (1.86 ± 0.09), (1.72 ± 0.11), (1.73 ± 0.08) mm, t=5.42, 3.34, 3.12, all P<0.05) decreased significantly in bFGF-NP+UTMD group, compared with diabetic group, bFGF solution goups and bFGF nanoparticles group. In addition, after 12-week treatment myocardial masson staining and CD31

  17. Crosslinking to enhance colloidal stability and redispersity of layered double hydroxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Huali; Gu, Zi; Cooper, Helen; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-12-01

    This article introduces a strategy for stabilizing and redispersing layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles by crosslinking bovine serum albumin (BSA) coated onto the surface. The strategy involves optimization of the amount of the crosslinking agent glutaraldehyde (GTA) to achieve minimal aggregation and ready redispersion. LDH nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and hydrothermal treatment, with subsequent BSA coating at the BSA/LDH mass ratio of 5:2. BSA coated onto LDH nanoparticles was crosslinked with different amounts of GTA. Aggregation studies using dilution assays, dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential analysis indicated that severe aggregation at lower LDH nanoparticle concentrations can be prevented by proper crosslinking of BSA with GTA. The GTA-crosslinked BSA-coated nanoparticles showed excellent redispersity compared to the non-crosslinked nanoparticles. In vitro cytotoxicity and cell uptake were found to be minimally affected by GTA-crosslinking. The new strategy therefore provides a much more effective method for the prevention of LDH nanoparticle aggregation and improved LDH nanoparticle redispersion for use in a wide variety of bio-applications in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Heteroaggregation of cerium oxide nanoparticles and nanoparticles of pyrolyzed biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heteroaggregation with indigenous particles is an important process controlling the mobility of engineered nanomaterials in the environment. We studied heteroaggregation of cerium oxide nanoparticles (n-CeO2), which are widely used commercially, with nanoparticles of pyrogenic carbonaceous material ...

  19. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles against bacteria, yeast, and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorobantu, Loredana S., E-mail: loredana@ualberta.ca; Fallone, Clara [University of Alberta, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering (Canada); Noble, Adam J. [Trent University, Department of Biology (Canada); Veinot, Jonathan; Ma, Guibin [University of Alberta, Department of Chemistry (Canada); Goss, Greg G. [University of Alberta, Department of Biological Sciences (Canada); Burrell, Robert E. [University of Alberta, Department of Biomedical Engineering (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    The toxicity mechanism employed by silver nanoparticles against microorganisms has captivated scientists for nearly a decade and remains a debatable issue. The question most frequently asked is whether silver nanoparticles exert specific effects on microorganisms beyond the well-documented antimicrobial activity of Ag{sup +}. Here, we study the effects of citrate- (d = 17.5 ± 9.4 nm) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (d = 38.8 ± 3.6 nm)-capped silver nanoparticles on microorganisms belonging to various genera. The antimicrobial effect of Ag{sup +} was distinguished from that of nanosilver by monitoring microbial growth in the presence and absence of nanoparticles and by careful comparison of the responses of equimolar silver nitrate solution. The results show that when using equimolar silver solutions, silver nitrate has higher toxic potential on all microorganisms than both nanoparticles tested. Furthermore, some microorganisms are more susceptible to silver than others and the choice of capping agent is relevant in the toxicity. Atomic force microscopy disclosed that AgNO{sub 3} had a destructive effect on algae. The antimicrobial activity of nanosilver could be exploited to prevent microbial colonization of medical devices and to determine the fate of nanoparticles in the environment.

  20. Zinc oxide nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhobale, Sandip; Thite, Trupti; Laware, S. L.; Rode, C. V.; Koppikar, Soumya J.; Ghanekar, Ruchika-Kaul; Kale, S. N.

    2008-11-01

    Amylase inhibitors, also known as starch blockers, contain substances that prevent dietary starches from being absorbed by the body via inhibiting breakdown of complex sugars to simpler ones. In this sense, these materials are projected as having potential applications in diabetes control. In this context, we report on zinc oxide nanoparticles as possible alpha-amylase inhibitors. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized using soft-chemistry approach and 1-thioglycerol was used as a surfactant to yield polycrystalline nanoparticles of size ˜18 nm, stabilized in wurtzite structure. Conjugation study and structural characterization have been done using x-ray diffraction technique, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity studies on human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) and skin carcinoma (A-431) cell lines as well as mouse primary fibroblast cells demonstrate that up to a dose of 20 μg/ml, ZnO nanoparticles are nontoxic to the cells. We report for the first time the alpha-amylase inhibitory activity of ZnO nanoparticles wherein an optimum dose of 20 μg/ml was sufficient to exhibit 49% glucose inhibition at neutral pH and 35 °C temperature. This inhibitory activity was similar to that obtained with acarbose (a standard alpha-amylase inhibitor), thereby projecting ZnO nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors.

  1. Photoresponsive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles for controlled doxorubicin release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Cuiping; Wu, Ming; Zhang, Cecheng; Lin, Xinyi; Wei, Zuwu; Zheng, Youshi; Zhang, Da; Zhang, Zhenxi; Liu, Xiaolong

    2017-06-01

    Currently, photoresponsive nanomaterials are particularly attractive due to their spatial and temporal controlled drug release abilities. In this work, we report a photoresponsive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticle for remote controlled delivery of anticancer drugs. This hybrid nanoparticle comprises three distinct functional components: (i) a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) core to encapsulate doxorubicin; (ii) a soybean lecithin monolayer at the interface of the core and shell to act as a molecular fence to prevent drug leakage; (iii) a photoresponsive polymeric shell with anti-biofouling properties to enhance nanoparticle stability, which could be detached from the nanoparticle to trigger the drug release via a decrease in the nanoparticle’s stability under light irradiation. In vitro results revealed that this core-shell nanoparticle had excellent light-controlled drug release behavior (76% release with light irradiation versus 10% release without light irradiation). The confocal microscopy and flow cytometry results also further demonstrated the light-controlled drug release behavior inside the cancer cells. Furthermore, a CCK8 assay demonstrated that light irradiation could significantly improve the efficiency of killing cancer cells. Meanwhile, whole-animal fluorescence imaging of a tumor-bearing mouse also confirmed that light irradiation could trigger drug release in vivo. Taken together, our data suggested that a hybrid nanoparticle could be a novel light controlled drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  2. Antioxidant Effects of Quercetin and Catechin Encapsulated into PLGA Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Pool

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric nanoparticles (PLGA have been developed for the encapsulation and controlled release of quercetin and catechin. Nanoparticles were fabricated using a solvent displacement method. Physicochemical properties were measured by light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and ζ-potential, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Encapsulation efficiency and in vitro release profiles were obtained from differential pulse voltammetry experiments. Antioxidant properties of free and encapsulated flavonoids were determined by TBARS, fluorescence spectroscopy and standard chelating activity methods. Relatively small (d≈ 400 nm polymeric nanoparticles were obtained containing quercetin or catechin in a non-crystalline form (EE ≈ 79% and the main interactions between the polymer and each flavonoid were found to consist of hydrogen bonds. In vitro release profiles were pH-dependant, the more acidic pH, the faster release of each flavonoid from the polymeric nanoparticles. The inhibition of the action of free radicals and chelating properties, were also enhanced when quercetin and catechin were encapsulated within PLGA nanoparticles. The information obtained from this study will facilitate the design and fabrication of polymeric nanoparticles as possible oral delivery systems for encapsulation, protection and controlled release of flavonoids aimed to prevent oxidative stress in human body or food products.

  3. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Suicide Prevention We Can All Prevent Suicide Mental Health & Suicide Prevention Glossary Stories of Hope and Recovery Get Involved Participate Social Media Hub Promote National Suicide Prevention Month Providers & Professionals ...

  4. Investigation of the antimicrobial effect of silver doped Zinc Oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzane Hoseyni Dowlatababdi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial effect of metal nanoparticles such as zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles has been taken into great consideration separately during recent years. The useful application of these nanoparticles in the areas of medicine, biotechnology, and professional prevention of microbes motivated us. The aim of this study was to evaluate antibacterial activity properties of silver doped zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO: Ag by synthesizing them.Materials and Methods: The silver doped zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO:Ag were provided with wet chemical method in an aqueous solution, and mercaptoethanol. The physical properties of the sample were investigated with UV, XRD, and TEM techniques. Then, the antibacterial activity of 50 to 3.12 concentrations of the silver doped zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO:Ag was investigated against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis by well diffusion method. Moreover, the MIC and MBC values of these nanoparticles were assessed by microdilution method.Results: The size of the nanoparticles was obtained as between 12 and 13 nanometers in average. The optical study of the nanoparticles demonstrated that the band gap of the silver doped nanostructures is higher than that of the pure sample. The zone of inhibition diameter in the presence of 50 mg/ml density was 19, 15 and 8 mm against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively.Conclusion: The results showed that silver doped zinc oxide nanoparticles prevented Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but did not affect Enterococcus faecalis. The zone of inhibition diameter increases as the density of the nanoparticles does.

  5. Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

    2014-07-22

    The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

  6. Preparation and structure of carbon encapsulated copper nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chuncheng; Xiao, Feng; Cui, Zuolin

    2008-01-01

    Carbon-encapsulated copper nanoparticles were synthesized by a modified arc plasma method using methane as carbon source. The particles were characterized in detail by transmission electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry. The encapsulated copper nanoparticles were about 30 nm in diameter with 3-5 nm graphitic carbon shells. The outside graphitic carbon layers effectively prevented unwanted oxidation of the copper inside. The effect of the ratio of He/CH4 on the morphologies and the formation of the carbon shell were investigated.

  7. Preparation and structure of carbon encapsulated copper nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Chuncheng, E-mail: clx@qust.edu.cn; Xiao Feng; Cui Zuolin [Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Shandong Key Lab for Nanostructured Materials (China)

    2008-01-15

    Carbon-encapsulated copper nanoparticles were synthesized by a modified arc plasma method using methane as carbon source. The particles were characterized in detail by transmission electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry. The encapsulated copper nanoparticles were about 30 nm in diameter with 3-5 nm graphitic carbon shells. The outside graphitic carbon layers effectively prevented unwanted oxidation of the copper inside. The effect of the ratio of He/CH{sub 4} on the morphologies and the formation of the carbon shell were investigated.

  8. Polymer and spherical nanoparticle diffusion in nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatrantos, Argyrios; Composto, Russell J.; Winey, Karen I.; Clarke, Nigel

    2017-05-01

    Nanoparticle and polymer dynamics in nanocomposites containing spherical nanoparticles were investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the polymer diffusivity decreases with nanoparticle loading due to an increase of the interfacial area created by nanoparticles, in the polymer matrix. We show that small sized nanoparticles can diffuse much faster than that predicted from the Stokes-Einstein relation in the dilute regime. We show that the nanoparticle diffusivity decreases at higher nanoparticle loading due to nanoparticle-polymer interface. Increase of the nanoparticle radius slows the nanoparticle diffusion.

  9. Nanoparticle incorporation of melittin reduces sperm and vaginal epithelium cytotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Jallouk

    Full Text Available Melittin is a cytolytic peptide component of bee venom which rapidly integrates into lipid bilayers and forms pores resulting in osmotic lysis. While the therapeutic utility of free melittin is limited by its cytotoxicity, incorporation of melittin into the lipid shell of a perfluorocarbon nanoparticle has been shown to reduce its toxicity in vivo. Our group has previously demonstrated that perfluorocarbon nanoparticles containing melittin at concentrations <10 µM inhibit HIV infectivity in vitro. In the current study, we assessed the impact of blank and melittin-containing perfluorocarbon nanoparticles on sperm motility and the viability of both sperm and vaginal epithelial cells. We found that free melittin was toxic to sperm and vaginal epithelium at concentrations greater than 2 µM (p<0.001. However, melittin nanoparticles were not cytotoxic to sperm (p = 0.42 or vaginal epithelium (p = 0.48 at an equivalent melittin concentration of 10 µM. Thus, nanoparticle formulation of melittin reduced melittin cytotoxicity fivefold and prevented melittin toxicity at concentrations previously shown to inhibit HIV infectivity. Melittin nanoparticles were toxic to vaginal epithelium at equivalent melittin concentrations ≥20 µM (p<0.001 and were toxic to sperm at equivalent melittin concentrations ≥40 µM (p<0.001. Sperm cytotoxicity was enhanced by targeting of the nanoparticles to the sperm surface antigen sperm adhesion molecule 1. While further testing is needed to determine the extent of cytotoxicity in a more physiologically relevant model system, these results suggest that melittin-containing nanoparticles could form the basis of a virucide that is not toxic to sperm and vaginal epithelium. This virucide would be beneficial for HIV serodiscordant couples seeking to achieve natural pregnancy.

  10. Comparative study of gum arabic and PVP as stabilizing agents for synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Andressa A.; Leal, Jessica; Geraldes, Adriana N.; Lugao, Ademar B., E-mail: andressa_alvess@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Use Colloidal metallic nanoparticles such as gold nanoparticles have received a great attention, due in part to their specific properties and potential applications. Control of size and uniformity of nanoparticles is important to prevent aggregation. High-molecular-weight polymers were used as stabilizer agents. Natural polymers, such as gum Arabic, are used as stabilizer because of capping nanoparticles behavior and present advantages such as solubility, non- toxicity and its compatibility for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. Previous studies showed that the hydrophilic group of Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) caused repulsion on gold nanoparticles surface because steric interactions with polymer, for this reason this kind of polymers could be used as stabilizer agent. The aim of this work is to study the synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles with PVP and gum Arabic using gamma radiation. The results obtained by samples analysis using UV-Visible showed that the gamma irradiation doses influenced the nanoparticles formation by PVP but that is not the case with the GA, because for smaller quantity of Arabic gum in different doses produced and stabilized nanoparticles. The samples were observed for 20 days and showed stability. We have obtained preliminary results showed that the use of radiation is applicable to the formation of gold nanoparticles. (author)

  11. Green Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Ghorbani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is an increased interest in understanding the toxicity and rational design of gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications in recent years. In this study gold nanoparticles were synthesized using dextrose as a reducing agent. The gold nanoparticles displayed characteristic Surface Plasmon Resonance peak at around 550 nm having a mean particle size of 75±30 nm. In order to identify and analyze nanoparticles, UV–Vis spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and dynamic light scattering (DLS were used.

  12. Chemistry for oncotheranostic gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouiller, Anne Juliette; Hebié, Seydou; El Bahhaj, Fatima; Napporn, Teko W; Bertrand, Philippe

    2015-06-24

    This review presents in a comprehensive ways the chemical methods used to functionalize gold nanoparticles with focus on anti-cancer applications. The review covers the parameters required for the synthesis gold nanoparticles with defined shapes and sizes, method for targeted delivery in tumours, and selected examples of anti-cancers compounds delivered with gold nanoparticles. A short survey of bioassays for oncology based on gold nanoparticles is also presented.

  13. Evaluation of nanoparticle-ligand distributions to determine nanoparticle concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Shergill, Ravi T; Krull, Ulrich J

    2015-01-20

    The concentration of nanoparticles in solution is an important, yet challenging, parameter to quantify. In this work, a facile strategy for the determination of nanoparticle concentration is presented. The method relies on the quantitative analysis of the inherent distribution of nanoparticle-ligand conjugates that are generated when nanoparticles are functionalized with ligands. Validation of the method was accomplished by applying it to gold nanoparticles and semiconductor nanoparticles (CdSe/ZnS; core/shell). Poly(ethylene glycol) based ligands, with functional groups that quantitatively react with the nanoparticles, were incubated with the nanoparticles at varying equivalences. Agarose gel electrophoresis was subsequently used to separate and quantify the nanoparticle-ligand conjugates of varying valences. The distribution in the nanoparticle-ligand conjugates agreed well with that predicted by the Poisson model. A protocol was then developed, where a series of only eight different ligand amounts could provide an estimate of the nanoparticle concentration that spans 3 orders of magnitude (1 μM to 1 mM). For the gold nanoparticles and semiconductor nanoparticles, the measured concentrations were found to deviate by only 7% and 2%, respectively, from those determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. The precision of the assay was evaluated, resulting in a coefficient of variation of 5-7%. Finally, the protocol was used to determine the extinction coefficient of alloyed semiconductor nanoparticles (CdSxSe1-x/ZnS), for which a reliable estimate is currently unavailable, of three different emission wavelengths (525, 575, and 630 nm). The extinction coefficient of the nanoparticles of all emission wavelengths was similar and was found to be 2.1 × 10(5) M(-1)cm(-1).

  14. Safety of nanoparticles in sunscreens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, L.

    2009-01-01

    Sunscreens may contain ZnO or TiO2 nanoparticles to absorb UV radiation. Available data do not allow for precisely establishing risk associated with these nanoparticles. However, there is substantial evidence that the hazard of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles probably comes from their ability to generate

  15. Surface chemistry of "unprotected" nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrader, Imke; Warneke, Jonas; Neumann, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of colloidal nanoparticles in alkaline ethylene glycol is a powerful approach for the preparation of model catalysts and ligand-functionalized nanoparticles. For these systems the term "unprotected" nanoparticles has been established because no strongly binding stabilizers are req...

  16. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, Kelsie E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Christian, Jonathan H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coopersmith, Kaitlin [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, II, Aaron L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murph, Simona H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-27

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves for gold nanoparticle synthesis; however, polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, and a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute; this maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.

  17. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, Kelsie E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Christian, Jonathan H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coopersmith, Kaitlin [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, II, Aaron L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murph, Simona H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-27

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves for gold nanoparticle synthesis; however polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute, maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.

  18. Enhanced Immunomodulatory Activity of Gelatin-Encapsulated Rubus coreanus Miquel Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yong Chang; Choi, Woon Yong; Lee, Choon Geun; Cha, Seon Woo; Kim, Young Ock; Kim, Jin-Chul; Drummen, Gregor P. C.; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the immunomodulatory activities of Rubus coreanus Miquel extract-loaded gelatin nanoparticles. The mean size of the produced nanoparticles was 143 ± 18 nm with a bandwidth of 76 nm in the size distribution and a maximum size of ~200 nm, which allows effective nanoparticle uptake by cells. Confocal imaging confirmed this, since the nanoparticles were internalized within 30 min and heterogeneously distributed throughout the cell. Zeta-potential measurements showed that from pH = 5 onwards, the nanoparticles were highly negatively charged, which prevents agglomeration to clusters by electrostatic repulsion. This was confirmed by TEM imaging, which showed a well dispersed colloidal solution. The encapsulation efficiency was nearly 60%, which is higher than for other components encapsulated in gelatin nanoparticles. Measurements of immune modulation in immune cells showed a significant effect by the crude extract, which was only topped by the nanoparticles containing the extract. Proliferation of B-, T- and NK cells was notably enhanced by Rubus coreanus-gelatin nanoparticles and in general ~2–3 times higher than control and on average ~2 times higher than ferulic acid. R. coreanus-gelatin nanoparticles induced cytokine secretion (IL-6 and TNF-α) from B- and T-cells on average at a ~2–3 times higher rate compared with the extract and ferulic acid. In vivo immunomodulatory activity in mice fed with R. coreanus-gelatin nanoparticles at 1 mL/g body weight showed a ~5 times higher antibody production compared to control, a ~1.3 times higher production compared to the extract only, and a ~1.6 times higher production compared to ferulic acid. Overall, our results suggest that gelatin nanoparticles represent an excellent transport vehicle for Rubus coreanus extract and extracts from other plants generally used in traditional Asian medicine. Such nanoparticles ensure a high local concentration that results in enhancement of immune

  19. Computational ecotoxicology: simultaneous prediction of ecotoxic effects of nanoparticles under different experimental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleandrova, Valeria V; Luan, Feng; González-Díaz, Humberto; Ruso, Juan M; Melo, André; Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2014-12-01

    Nanotechnology has brought great advances to many fields of modern science. A manifold of applications of nanoparticles have been found due to their interesting optical, electrical, and biological/chemical properties. However, the potential toxic effects of nanoparticles to different ecosystems are of special concern nowadays. Despite the efforts of the scientific community, the mechanisms of toxicity of nanoparticles are still poorly understood. Quantitative-structure activity/toxicity relationships (QSAR/QSTR) models have just started being useful computational tools for the assessment of toxic effects of nanomaterials. But most QSAR/QSTR models have been applied so far to predict ecotoxicity against only one organism/bio-indicator such as Daphnia magna. This prevents having a deeper knowledge about the real ecotoxic effects of nanoparticles, and consequently, there is no possibility to establish an efficient risk assessment of nanomaterials in the environment. In this work, a perturbation model for nano-QSAR problems is introduced with the aim of simultaneously predicting the ecotoxicity of different nanoparticles against several assay organisms (bio-indicators), by considering also multiple measures of ecotoxicity, as well as the chemical compositions, sizes, conditions under which the sizes were measured, shapes, and the time during which the diverse assay organisms were exposed to nanoparticles. The QSAR-perturbation model was derived from a database containing 5520 cases (nanoparticle-nanoparticle pairs), and it was shown to exhibit accuracies of ca. 99% in both training and prediction sets. In order to demonstrate the practical applicability of our model, three different nickel-based nanoparticles (Ni) with experimental values reported in the literature were predicted. The predictions were found to be in very good agreement with the experimental evidences, confirming that Ni-nanoparticles are not ecotoxic when compared with other nanoparticles. The results

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Polymer-Templated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamakloe, Beatrice

    This research reports on the investigation into the synthesis and stabilization of iron oxide nanoparticles for theranostic applications using amine-epoxide polymers. Although theranostic agents such as magnetic nanoparticles have been designed and developed for a few decades, there is still more work that needs to be done with the type of materials that can be used to stabilize or functionalize these particles if they are to be used for applications such as drug delivery, imaging and hyperthermia. For in-vivo applications, it is crucial that organic coatings enclose the nanoparticles in order to prevent aggregation and facilitate efficient removal from the body as well as protect the body from toxic material. The objective of this thesis is to design polymer coated magnetite nanoparticles with polymers that are biocompatible and can stabilize the iron oxide nanoparticle to help create mono-dispersed particles in solution. It is desirable to also have these nanoparticles possess high magnetic susceptibility in response to an applied magnetic field. The co-precipitation method was selected because it is probably the simplest and most efficient chemical pathway to obtain magnetic nanoparticles. In literature, cationic polymers such as Polyethylenimine (PEI), which is the industry standard, have been used to stabilize IONPs because they can be used in magnetofections to deliver DNA or RNA. PEI however is known to interact very strongly with proteins and is cytotoxic, so as mentioned previously the Iron Oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) synthesized in this study were stabilized with amine-epoxide polymers because of the limitations of PEI. Four different amine-epoxide polymers which have good water solubility, biodegradability and less toxic than PEI were synthesized and used in the synthesis and stabilization of the magnetic nanoparticles and compared to PEI templated IONPs. These polymer-templated magnetic nanoparticles were also characterized by size, surface charge, Iron

  1. Silver Nanoparticles as Potential Antibacterial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Franci

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance is a growing problem in the treatment of infectious diseases and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has produced antibiotic resistance for many human bacterial pathogens. Advances in nanotechnology have opened new horizons in nanomedicine, allowing the synthesis of nanoparticles that can be assembled into complex architectures. Novel studies and technologies are devoted to understanding the mechanisms of disease for the design of new drugs, but unfortunately infectious diseases continue to be a major health burden worldwide. Since ancient times, silver was known for its anti-bacterial effects and for centuries it has been used for prevention and control of disparate infections. Currently nanotechnology and nanomaterials are fully integrated in common applications and objects that we use every day. In addition, the silver nanoparticles are attracting much interest because of their potent antibacterial activity. Many studies have also shown an important activity of silver nanoparticles against bacterial biofilms. This review aims to summarize the emerging efforts to address current challenges and solutions in the treatment of infectious diseases, particularly the use of nanosilver antimicrobials.

  2. Reducing infections through nanotechnology and nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Erik Taylor1, Thomas J Webster1,21School of Engineering, 2Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: The expansion of bacterial antibiotic resistance is a growing problem today. When medical devices are inserted into the body, it becomes especially difficult for the body to clear robustly adherent antibiotic-resistant biofilm infections. In addition, concerns about the spread of bacterial genetic tolerance to antibiotics, such as that found in multiple drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, have significantly increased of late. As a growing direction in biomaterial design, nanomaterials (materials with at least one dimension less than 100 nm may potentially prevent bacterial functions that lead to infections. As a first step in this direction, various nanoparticles have been explored for improving bacteria and biofilm penetration, generating reactive oxygen species, and killing bacteria, potentially providing a novel method for fighting infections that is nondrug related. This review article will first examine in detail the mechanisms and applications of some of these nanoparticles, then follow with some recent material designs utilizing nanotechnology that are centered on fighting medical device infections.Keywords: nanomaterials, medical device infection, antibacterial, antibiotic resistance, nanoparticle, biofilms 

  3. Singlet oxygen mediated DNA degradation by copper nanoparticles: potential towards cytotoxic effect on cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The DNA degradation potential and anti-cancer activities of copper nanoparticles of 4-5 nm size are reported. A dose dependent degradation of isolated DNA molecules by copper nanoparticles through generation of singlet oxygen was observed. Singlet oxygen scavengers such as sodium azide and Tris [hydroxyl methyl] amino methane were able to prevent the DNA degradation action of copper nanoparticles confirming the involvement of activated oxygen species in the degradation process. Additionally, it was observed that the copper nanoparticles are able to exert cytotoxic effect towards U937 and Hela cells of human histiocytic lymphoma and human cervical cancer origins, respectively by inducing apoptosis. The growth characteristics of U937 and Hela cells were studied applying various concentrations of the copper nanoparticles. PMID:21439072

  4. Nanoparticle Filtration in a RTM Processed Epoxy/Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Micham, Logan; Copa, Christine C.; Criss, James M., Jr.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    Several epoxy matrix composite panels were fabricated by resin transfer molding (RTM) E862/W resin onto a triaxially braided carbon fiber pre-form. Nanoparticles including carbon nanofiber, synthetic clay, and functionalized graphite were dispersed in the E862 matrix, and the extent of particle filtration during processing was characterized. Nanoparticle dispersion in the resin flashing on both the inlet and outlet edges of the panel was compared by TEM. Variation in physical properties such as Tg and moisture absorption throughout the panel were also characterized. All nanoparticle filled panels showed a decrease in Tg along the resin flow path across the panel, indicating nanoparticle filtration, however there was little change in moisture absorption. This works illustrates the need to obtain good nano-particle dispersion in the matrix resin to prevent particle agglomeration and hence particle filtration in the resultant polymer matrix composites (PMC).

  5. A Study On Dispersion Stability Of Nickel Nanoparticles Synthesized By Wire Explosion In Liquid Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim C.K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nickel nanoparticles were synthesized in ethanol using portable pulsed wire evaporation, which is a one-step physical method. From transmission electron microscopy images, it was found that the Ni nanoparticles exhibited a spherical shape with an average diameter of 7.3 nm. To prevent aggregation of the nickel nanoparticles, a polymer surfactant was added into the ethanol before the synthesis of nickel nanoparticles, and adsorbed on the freshly synthesized nickel nanoparticles during the wire explosion. The dispersion stability of the prepared nickel nanofluids was investigated by zeta-potential analyzer and Turbiscan optical analyzer. As a result, the optimum concentration of polymer surfactant to be added was suggested for the maximized dispersion stability of the nickel nanofluids.

  6. Production of Oxidation-Resistant Cu-Based Nanoparticles by Wire Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Go; Alvarez, Samuel; Stewart, Ian E.; Catenacci, Matthew; Chen, Zuofeng; Ha, Yoon-Cheol

    2015-12-01

    The low performance or high cost of commercially available conductive inks limits the advancement of printed electronics. This article studies the explosion of metal wires in aqueous solutions as a simple, low-cost, and environmentally friendly method to prepare metallic nanoparticles consisting of Cu and Cu alloys for use in affordable, highly conductive inks. Addition of 0.2 M ascorbic acid to an aqueous explosion medium prevented the formation of Cu2O shells around Cu nanoparticles, and allowed for the printing of conductive lines directly from these nanoparticles with no post-treatment. Cu alloy nanoparticles were generated from metal wires that were alloyed as purchased, or from two wires of different metals that were twisted together. Cu nanoparticles alloyed with 1% Sn, 5% Ag, 5% Ni and 30% Ni had electrical conductivities similar to Cu but unlike Cu, remained conductive after 24 hrs at 85 °C and 85% RH.

  7. Semi-quantitative determination of cationic surfactants in aqueous solutions using gold nanoparticles as reporter probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuong, Chi-Lap; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2007-03-01

    Concentrations of cationic surfactants in aqueous solutions have been estimated on the basis of changes in the color of gold nanoparticles, used as reporter probes. We have shown that the colors of gold nanoparticles with anionic protective groups on their surfaces shift from red to indigo/purple and then back to red in a range of cationic surfactant solutions in which concentrations vary from very low to above the theoretical CMCs. The color changes occur near the theoretical CMCs, presumably because the presence of surfactant micelles in the solution prevents the gold nanoparticles from aggregating. We have used gold nanoparticles as reporter probes to determine the concentrations of cationic surfactants in products such as hair conditioners, which often contain large amounts of alkyltrimethylammonium halides. Although this approach can only provide an estimate, it can be performed simply by addition of a given amount of gold nanoparticles to a series of diluted solutions, without the need for instruments or labor-intensive procedures.

  8. Singlet oxygen mediated DNA degradation by copper nanoparticles: potential towards cytotoxic effect on cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Tapas K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The DNA degradation potential and anti-cancer activities of copper nanoparticles of 4-5 nm size are reported. A dose dependent degradation of isolated DNA molecules by copper nanoparticles through generation of singlet oxygen was observed. Singlet oxygen scavengers such as sodium azide and Tris [hydroxyl methyl] amino methane were able to prevent the DNA degradation action of copper nanoparticles confirming the involvement of activated oxygen species in the degradation process. Additionally, it was observed that the copper nanoparticles are able to exert cytotoxic effect towards U937 and Hela cells of human histiocytic lymphoma and human cervical cancer origins, respectively by inducing apoptosis. The growth characteristics of U937 and Hela cells were studied applying various concentrations of the copper nanoparticles.

  9. Superparamagnetic calcium ferrite nanoparticles synthesized using a simple sol-gel method for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, N H; Ghazali, M J; Majlis, B Y; Yunas, J; Razali, M

    2015-01-01

    The calcium ferrite nano-particles (CaFe2O4 NPs) were synthesized using a sol-gel method for targeted drug delivery application. The proposed nano-particles were initially prepared by mixing calcium and iron nitrates that were added with citric acid in order to prevent agglomeration and subsequently calcined at a temperature of 550°C to obtain small particle size. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by using an XRD (X-ray diffraction), which revealed the configuration of orthorhombic structures of the CaFe2O4 nano-particles. A crystallite size of ~13.59 nm was obtained using a Scherer's formula. Magnetic analysis using a VSM (Vibrating Sample Magnetometer analysis), revealed that the synthesized particles exhibited super-paramagnetic behavior having magnetization saturation of approximately 88.3emu/g. Detailed observation via the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the calcium ferrite nano-particles were spherical in shape.

  10. Superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Iñigo; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Ziolkowski, Richard W

    2015-07-10

    The theory and design of superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers are presented. We analytically derive the optimal configurations and the upper bound of their backscattering cross-sections. In particular, it is demonstrated that electrically small nanoparticle dimers can enhance the backscattering by a factor of 6.25 with respect to single dipolar particles. We demonstrate that optimal designs approaching this theoretical limit can be found by using a simple circuit model. The study of practical implementations based on plasmonic and high-permittivity particles has been also addressed. Moreover, the numerical examples reveal that the dimers can attain close to a fourfold enhancement of the single nanoparticle response even in the presence of high losses.

  11. Exploiting Receptor Competition to Enhance Nanoparticle Binding Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticles functionalized with multiple ligands can be programed to bind biological targets depending on the receptors they express, providing a general mechanism exploited in various technologies, from selective drug delivery to biosensing. For binding to be highly selective, ligands should exclusively interact with specific targeted receptors, because the formation of bonds with other, untargeted ones would lead to nonspecific binding and potentially harmful behavior. This poses a particular problem for multivalent nanoparticles, because even very weak bonds can collectively lead to strong binding. A statistical mechanical model is used here to describe how competition between different receptors together with multivalent effects can be harnessed to design ligand-functionalized nanoparticles insensitive to the presence of untargeted receptors, preventing nonspecific binding.

  12. Nanoparticle shuttle memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alex Karlwalter [Kensington, CA

    2012-03-06

    A device for storing data using nanoparticle shuttle memory having a nanotube. The nanotube has a first end and a second end. A first electrode is electrically connected to the first end of the nanotube. A second electrode is electrically connected to the second end of the nanotube. The nanotube has an enclosed nanoparticle shuttle. A switched voltage source is electrically connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby a voltage may be controllably applied across the nanotube. A resistance meter is also connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby the electrical resistance across the nanotube can be determined.

  13. Potencial risks of nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Forbe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanotoxicology is an emergent important subdiscipline of Nanosciences, which refers to the study of the interactions of nanostructures with biological systems giving emphasis to the elucidation of the relationship between the physical and chemical properties of nanostructures with induction of toxic biological responses. Although potential beneficial effects of nanotechnologies are generally well described, the potential (eco toxicological effects and impacts of nanoparticles have so far received little attention. This is the reason why some routes of expousure, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, as well as toxicological effects of nanoparticles are discussed in this review.

  14. Dynamics of Catalyst Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    under gas exposure, dynamic phenomena such as sintering and growth can be observed with sub-Ångstrøm resolution. Metal nanoparticles contain the active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, which are important for many industrial applications including the production of clean fuels, chemicals...... and pharmaceuticals, and the cleanup of exhaust from automobiles and stationary power plants. Sintering, or thermal deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. In order to initiate a systematic study of the dynamics and sintering of nanoparticles, various catalytic systems have been...

  15. Superbackscattering Nanoparticle Dimers

    CERN Document Server

    Liberal, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Ziolkoski, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    The theory and design of superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers are presented. We analytically derive the optimal configurations and the upper bound of their backscattering cross-sections. In particular, it is demonstrated that electrically small nanoparticle dimers can enhance the backscattering by a factor of 6.25 with respect to single dipolar particles. We demonstrate that optimal designs approaching this theoretical limit can be found by using a simple circuit model. The study of practical implementations based on plasmonic and high-permittivity particles reveal that fourfold enhancement factors might be attainable even with realistic losses.

  16. NANOPARTICLES IN NUCLEAR IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Vicky V Mody PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review article summarizes the current state radiolabeled nanoparticles for molecular imaging applications mainly targeting cancer. Due to their enormous flexibility, and versatility the radiolabeled nanoparticles have shown their potential in the diagnosis and therapy. As the matter of fact, these radiolabeled imaging agents enable the visualization of the cellular function and the follow-up of the molecular process in living organisms. Moreover, the rapidly advancing field of nanotechnology has provided various innovative radionuclides and delivery systems, such as liposomes, magnetic agents, polymers, dendrimers, quantum dots, and carbon nanotubes to cope up with the hurdles which have been posed by various disease states.

  17. Biomimetic magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Klem

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles are of considerable interest because of their potential use in high-density memory devices, spintronics, and applications in diagnostic medicine. The conditions for synthesis of these materials are often complicated by their high reaction temperatures, costly reagents, and post-processing requirements. Practical applications of magnetic nanoparticles will require the development of alternate synthetic strategies that can overcome these impediments. Biomimetic approaches to materials chemistry have provided a new avenue for the synthesis and assembly of magnetic nanomaterials that has great potential for overcoming these obstacles.

  18. Nanoparticles from Renewable Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, Frederik; Weiss, Clemens

    2014-07-01

    The use of polymers from natural resources can bring many benefits for novel polymeric nanoparticle systems. Such polymers have a variety of beneficial properties such as biodegradability and biocompatibility, they are readily available on large scale and at low cost. As the amount of fossil fuels decrease, their application becomes more interesting even if characterization is in many cases more challenging due to structural complexity, either by broad distribution of their molecular weights polysaccharides, polyesters, lignin) or by complex structure (proteins, lignin). This review summarizes different sources and methods for the preparation of biopolymer-based nanoparticle systems for various applications.

  19. Synthesis of copper nanoparticles in a fluoropolymer matrix by annealing in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonov, Alexey; Sulyaeva, Veronica; Timoshenko, Nikolay; Starinskiy, Sergey

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a method for synthesizing copper nanoparticles in a fluoropolymer matrix is proposed which prevents the reduction in the plasmonic properties due to the oxidation of the metal. The basic idea of the proposed method of nanoparticle synthesis is to anneal of thin metal film coated with a thin layer of fluoropolymer. The morphology and optical properties of the resulting composites were determined. The optical properties remained unchanged after several months of storage under standard conditions.

  20. A novel 'green' synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles (SNP) using Dillenia indica fruit extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Susmita; Saikia, Jyoti P; Buragohain, Alak K

    2013-02-01

    In the present research we have defined a novel green method of silver nanoparticles synthesis using Dillenia indica fruit extract. D. indica is an edible fruit widely distributed in the foothills of Himalayas and known for its antioxidant and further predicted for cancer preventive potency. The maximum absorbance of the colloidal silver nanoparticle solution was observed at 421 nm when examined with UV-vis spectrophotometer.

  1. MOF nanoparticles coated by lipid bilayers and their uptake by cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Stefan; Braig, Simone; Preiß, Tobias; Zimpel, Andreas; Sicklinger, Johannes; Bellomo, Claudia; Rädler, Joachim O; Vollmar, Angelika M; Bein, Thomas

    2015-11-11

    We report the synthesis of MOF@lipid nanoparticles as a versatile and powerful novel class of nanocarriers based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). We show that the MOF@lipid system can effectively store dye molecules inside the porous scaffold of the MOF while the lipid bilayer prevents their premature release. Efficient uptake of the MOF@lipid nanoparticles by cancer cells makes these nanocarriers promising for drug delivery and diagnostic purposes.

  2. Polymer-stabilized palladium nanoparticles for catalytic membranes: ad hoc polymer fabrication

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles are known as highly effective catalysts although their immobilization on solid supports is frequently required to prevent aggregation and to facilitate the catalyst application, recovery, and reuse. This paper reports the intermatrix synthesis of Pd0 nanoparticles in sulfonated polyethersulfone with Cardo group membranes and their use as nanocomposite catalytic membrane reactors. The synthesized polymer and the corresponding nanocomposite were characterized by spectr...

  3. Enzyme/pH dual sensitive polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to the inflamed colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Muhammad; Kim, Wooseong; Cao, Jiafu; Jung, Yunjin; Yoo, Jin-Wook

    2014-11-01

    Novel nanoparticles whose drug release profiles are controlled by both enzyme and pH were prepared for the colon-specific drug delivery using a polymeric mixture of enzyme-sensitive azo-polyurethane and pH-sensitive Eudragit S100 (ES-Azo.pu). The enzyme/pH dual sensitive nanoparticles were designed to release a drug based on a two-fold approach which specifically aimed to target drug delivery to the inflamed colon while preventing the burst release of drugs in the stomach and small intestine. Single pH-sensitive (ES) and dual sensitive (ES-Azo.pu) nanoparticles were prepared using an oil-in-water emulsion solvent evaporation method and coumarin-6 (C-6) was used as a model drug. The successful formation of ES and ES-azo.pu nanoparticles that have 214 nm and 244 nm in mean particle size, respectively, was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and qNano. ES nanoparticles showed almost 100% of burst drug release at pH 7.4, whereas ES-Azo.pu nanoparticles prevented the burst drug release at pH 7.4, followed by a sustained release phase thereafter. Furthermore, ES-Azo.pu nanoparticles exhibited enzyme-triggered drug release in the presence of rat cecal contents obtained from a rat model of colitis. An in vivo localization study in rat gastrointestinal tract demonstrated that ES-Azo.pu nanoparticles were selectively distributed in the inflamed colon, showing 5.5-fold higher C-6 than ES nanoparticles. In conclusion, the enzyme/pH dual sensitive nanoparticles presented in this study can serve as a promising strategy for colon-specific drug delivery against inflammatory bowel disease and other colon disorders.

  4. Silver Nanoparticles in Alveolar Bone Surgery Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sivolella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver (Ag ions have well-known antimicrobial properties and have been applied as nanostrategies in many medical and surgical fields, including dentistry. The use of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs may be an option for reducing bacterial adhesion to dental implant surfaces and preventing biofilm formation, containing the risk of peri-implant infections. Modifying the structure or surface of bone grafts and membranes with Ag NPs may also prevent the risk of contamination and infection that are common when alveolar bone augmentation techniques are used. On the other hand, Ag NPs have revealed some toxic effects on cells in vitro and in vivo in animal studies. In this setting, the aim of the present paper is to summarize the principle behind Ag NP-based devices and their clinical applications in alveolar bone and dental implant surgery.

  5. Thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2012-11-13

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  6. Nanoparticle-Based Biosensors and Bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Joseph

    2007-10-11

    In this book chapter, we review the recent advances in nanoparticles based bioassay. The nanoparticles include quantum dots, silica nanoparticles and apoferritin nanoparticles. The new nanoparticles-based labels hold great promise for multiplex protein and DNA detection and for enhancing the sensitivity of other bioassays.

  7. Nanoparticles as a tool in capillary electrochromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Two different types of molecularly imprinted nanoparticles against (R)-propranolol were used to separate the enantiomers of propranolol in capillary electrochromatography mode, methacrylic acid based nanoparticles and core-shell molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles. Partial filling technique was used to avoid interference of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles in UV detection. With methacrylic acid based nanoparticles it was not possible to obtain enantiomer s...

  8. Localized surface plasmon resonance-based hybrid Au-Ag nanoparticles for detection of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaoli; Du, ChunLei; Fu, Yongqi

    2009-09-01

    A triangular hybrid Au-Ag nanoparticles array was proposed for the purpose of biosensing in this paper. Constructing the hybrid nanoparticles, an Au thin film is capped on the Ag nanoparticles which are attached on glass substrate. The hybrid nanoparticles array was designed by means of finite-difference and time-domain (FDTD) algorithm-based computational numerical calculation and optimization. Sensitivity of refractive index of the hybrid nanoparticles array was obtained by the computational calculation and experimental detection. Moreover, the hybrid nanoparticles array can prevent oxidation of the pure Ag nanoparticles from atmosphere environment because the Au protective layer was deposited on top of the Ag nanoparticles so as to isolate the Ag particles from the atmosphere. We presented a novel surface covalent link method between the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect-based biosensors with hybrid nanoparticles array and the detected target molecules. The generated surface plasmon wave from the array carries the biological interaction message into the corresponding spectra. Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB), a small protein toxin was directly detected at nanogramme per milliliter level using the triangular hybrid Au-Ag nanoparticles. Hence one more option for the SEB detection is provided by this way.

  9. Kaempferol nanoparticles achieve strong and selective inhibition of ovarian cancer cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo H

    2012-07-01

    advantageous in the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. On the other hand, PEO-PPO-PEO nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol were more effective inhibitors of cancer cells, but they also significantly reduced the viability of normal cells. PEO-PPO-PEO nanoparticles incorporating kaempferol may be suitable as a cancer-targeting strategy, which could limit the effects of the nanoparticles on normal cells while retaining their potency against cancer cells. We have identified two nanoparticle formulations incorporating kaempferol that may lead to breakthroughs in cancer treatment. Both PEO-PPO-PEO and PLGA nanoparticle formulations had superior effects compared with kaempferol alone in reducing cancer cell viability.Keywords: nanochemoprevention, kaempferol, ovarian cancer, nanoparticles, viability, natural compound

  10. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease ...

  11. Risk Factors and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Factors & Prevention Back to Patient Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Even people who look healthy and free of ... as possible. Share: The Normal Heart Risk Factors & Prevention Heart Diseases & Disorders Substances & Heart Rhythm Disorders Symptoms & ...

  12. Cervical Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Cervical Cancer Prevention Cervical Cancer Screening Research Cervical Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Cervical Cancer Cervical cancer is a disease in which malignant ( ...

  13. Skin Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? ... prevent cancer are being studied. General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  14. Supercooled smectic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Westesen, K; Drechsler, M

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of preparing nanoparticles in the supercooled thermotropic liquid crystalline state from cholesterol esters with saturated acyl chains as well as the incorporation of model drugs into the dispersions was investigated using cholesteryl myristate (CM) as a model cholesterol ester....

  15. Molecularly Imprinted Biodegradable Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Bertero, Alice; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are promising carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine applications. Molecu- lar imprinting is a potential strategy to target polymer nanoparticles through binding of endogenous ligands that may promote recognition and active transport into specific cells and tissues. However, the lock-and-key mechanism of molecular imprinting requires relatively rigid cross-linked structures, unlike those of many biodegradable polymers. To date, no fully biodegradable molecularly imprinted particles have been reported in the literature. This paper reports the synthesis of a novel molecularly- imprinted nanocarrier, based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and acrylic acid, that combines biodegradability and molec- ular recognition properties. A novel three-arm biodegradable cross-linker was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of glycolide and lactide initiated by glycerol. The resulting macromer was functionalized by introduction of end-functions through reaction with acryloyl chloride. Macromer and acrylic acid were used for the synthesis of narrowly-dispersed nanoparticles by radical polymerization in diluted conditions in the presence of biotin as template molecule. The binding capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles towards biotin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was twentyfold that of non-imprinted nanoparti- cles. Degradation rates and functional performances were assessed in in vitro tests and cell cultures, demonstrating effective biotin-mediated cell internalization.

  16. Asymmetric Hybrid Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumanov, George [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2015-11-05

    Hybrid Nanoparticles (AHNs) are rationally-designed multifunctional nanostructures and novel building blocks for the next generation of advanced materials and devices. Nanoscale materials attract considerable interest because of their unusual properties and potential for practical applications. Most of the activity in this field is focused on the synthesis of homogeneous nanoparticles from metals, metal oxides, semiconductors, and polymers. It is well recognized that properties of nanoparticles can be further enhanced if they are made as hybrid structures. This program is concerned with the synthesis, characterization, and application of such hybrid structures termed AHNs. AHNs are composed of a homogeneous core and several caps of different materials deposited on its surface (Fig. 1). Combined properties of the core and the caps as well as new properties that arise from core-cap and cap-cap interactions render AHNs multifunctional. In addition, specific chemical reactivity of the caps enables directional self-assembly of AHNs into complex architectures that are not possible with only spherical nanoparticles.

  17. Molecularly Imprinted Biodegradable Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Bertero, Alice; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are promising carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine applications. Molecu- lar imprinting is a potential strategy to target polymer nanoparticles through binding of endogenous ligands that may promote recognition and active transport into specific cells and tissues. However, the lock-and-key mechanism of molecular imprinting requires relatively rigid cross-linked structures, unlike those of many biodegradable polymers. To date, no fully biodegradable molecularly imprinted particles have been reported in the literature. This paper reports the synthesis of a novel molecularly- imprinted nanocarrier, based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and acrylic acid, that combines biodegradability and molec- ular recognition properties. A novel three-arm biodegradable cross-linker was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of glycolide and lactide initiated by glycerol. The resulting macromer was functionalized by introduction of end-functions through reaction with acryloyl chloride. Macromer and acrylic acid were used for the synthesis of narrowly-dispersed nanoparticles by radical polymerization in diluted conditions in the presence of biotin as template molecule. The binding capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles towards biotin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was twentyfold that of non-imprinted nanoparti- cles. Degradation rates and functional performances were assessed in in vitro tests and cell cultures, demonstrating effective biotin-mediated cell internalization. PMID:28071745

  18. Supercooled smectic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Westesen, K; Drechsler, M

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of preparing nanoparticles in the supercooled thermotropic liquid crystalline state from cholesterol esters with saturated acyl chains as well as the incorporation of model drugs into the dispersions was investigated using cholesteryl myristate (CM) as a model cholesterol ester....

  19. Nanoparticles in forensic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Antonio A.

    2008-10-01

    Nanoparticles appear in several areas of forensic science including security documents, paints, inks, and reagents that develop latent prints. One reagent (known as the silver physical developer) that visualizes the water insoluble components of latent print residue is based on the formation of highly charged silver nanoparticles. These attach to and grow on the residue and generate a silver image. Another such reagent involves highly charged gold nanoparticles. These attach to the residue forming a weak gold image which can be amplified with a silver physical developer. Nanoparaticles are also used in items such as paints, printing inks, and writing inks. Paints and most printing inks consist of nano-sized pigments in a vehicle. However, certain modern ink jet printing inks now contain nano-sized pigments to improve their light fastness and most gel inks are also based on nano scale pigments. These nanoparticlecontaining materials often appear as evidence and are thus subject to forensic characterization. Both luminescent (quantum dots), up-converting nano scale phosphors, and non luminescent nanoparticles are used as security tags to label product, add security to documents, and as anti counterfeiting measures. These assist in determining if an item is fraudulently made.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of bone cements embedded with organic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perni, Stefano; Thenault, Victorien; Abdo, Pauline; Margulis, Katrin; Magdassi, Shlomo; Prokopovich, Polina

    2015-01-01

    Infections after orthopedic surgery are a very unwelcome outcome; despite the widespread use of antibiotics, their incidence can be as high as 10%. This risk is likely to increase as antibiotics are gradually losing efficacy as a result of bacterial resistance; therefore, novel antimicrobial approaches are required. Parabens are a class of compounds whose antimicrobial activity is employed in many cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. We developed propylparaben nanoparticles that are hydrophilic, thus expanding the applicability of parabens to aqueous systems. In this paper we assess the possibility of employing paraben nanoparticles as antimicrobial compound in bone cements. The nanoparticles were embedded in various types of bone cement (poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA], hydroxyapatite, and brushite) and the antimicrobial activity was determined against common causes of postorthopedic surgery infections such as: Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Nanoparticles at concentrations as low as 1% w/w in brushite bone cement were capable of preventing pathogens growth, 5% w/w was needed for hydroxyapatite bone cement, while 7% w/w was required for PMMA bone cement. No detrimental effect was determined by the addition of paraben nanoparticles on bone cement compression strength and cytocompatibility. Our results demonstrate that paraben nanoparticles can be encapsulated in bone cement, providing concentration-dependent antimicrobial activity; furthermore, lower concentrations are needed in calcium phosphate (brushite and hydroxyapatite) than in acrylic (PMMA) bone cements. These nanoparticles are effective against a wide spectrum of bacteria, including those already resistant to the antibiotics routinely employed in orthopedic applications, such as gentamicin. PMID:26487803

  1. Silver nanoparticles are broad-spectrum bactericidal and virucidal compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ixtepan-Turrent Liliana

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The advance in nanotechnology has enabled us to utilize particles in the size of the nanoscale. This has created new therapeutic horizons, and in the case of silver, the currently available data only reveals the surface of the potential benefits and the wide range of applications. Interactions between viral biomolecules and silver nanoparticles suggest that the use of nanosystems may contribute importantly for the enhancement of current prevention of infection and antiviral therapies. Recently, it has been suggested that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs bind with external membrane of lipid enveloped virus to prevent the infection. Nevertheless, the interaction of AgNPs with viruses is a largely unexplored field. AgNPs has been studied particularly on HIV where it was demonstrated the mechanism of antiviral action of the nanoparticles as well as the inhibition the transmission of HIV-1 infection in human cervix organ culture. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the biocidal mechanisms of action of silver Nanoparticles.

  2. Latex nanoparticles for multimodal imaging and detection in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartier, R [Clinic for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin University Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Kaufner, L [Clinic for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin University Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Paulke, B R [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research, Potsdam (Germany); Wuestneck, R [Clinic for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin University Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Pietschmann, S [Clinic for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin University Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Michel, R [Department of Radiology, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin University Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Bruhn, H [Department of Radiology, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin University Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Pison, U [Clinic for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin University Medical School, Berlin (Germany)

    2007-05-16

    The aim of the present work was to develop a multimodal imaging and detection approach to study the behaviour of nanoparticles in animal studies. Highly carboxylated 144 nm-sized latex nanoparticles were labelled with {sup 68}Ga for positron emission tomography, {sup 111}In for quantitative gamma scintigraphy or Gd{sup 3+} for magnetic resonance imaging. Following intravenous injection into rats, precise localization was achieved revealing the tracer in the blood compartment with a time-dependent accumulation in the liver. In addition, rhodamine B was also incorporated to examine specific interactions with blood cells. Flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy show uptake of nanoparticles by leucocytes and, unexpectedly, thrombocytes, but not erythrocytes. Cellular internalization was an active and selective process. Further incorporation of polyethylene glycol into the nanoparticle corona could prevent uptake by thrombocytes but not macrophages or monocytes. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of a multimodal approach and its usefulness to analyse the fate of nanoparticles at the macroscopic and cellular level. It will facilitate the development of functionalized nanocarrier systems and extend their biomedical applications.

  3. Mechanically Milled Irregular Zinc Nanoparticles for Printable Bioresorbable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Bikram K; Yu, Xiaowei; Shou, Wan; Pan, Heng; Huang, Xian

    2017-02-20

    Bioresorbable electronics is predominantly realized by complex and time-consuming anhydrous fabrication processes. New technology explores printable methods using inks containing micro- or nano-bioresorbable particles (e.g., Zn and Mg). However, these particles have seldom been obtained in the context of bioresorbable electronics using cheap, reliable, and effective approaches with limited study on properties essential to printable electronics. Here, irregular nanocrystalline Zn with controllable sizes and optimized electrical performance is obtained through ball milling approach using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a process control agent to stabilize Zn particles and prevent cold welding. Time and PVP dependence of the ball milled particles are studied with systematic characterizations of morphology and composition of the nanoparticles. The results reveal crystallized Zn nanoparticles with a size of ≈34.834 ± 1.76 nm and low surface oxidation. The resulting Zn nanoparticles can be readily printed onto bioresorbable substrates and sintered at room temperature using a photonic sintering approach, leading to a high conductivity of 44 643 S m(-1) for printable zinc nanoparticles. The techniques to obtain Zn nanoparticles through ball milling and processing them through photonic sintering may potentially lead to a mass fabrication method for bioresorbable electronics and promote its applications in healthcare, environmental protection, and consumer electronics.

  4. Preparation of novel magnetic fluorescent nanoparticles using amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Ghasemi, Younes; Rasoul-Amini, Sara; Barar, Jaleh; Davaran, Soodabeh

    2013-02-01

    Nanotechnology has opened new gates to pharmaceutical sciences and medicine from the aspect of drug delivery and imaging systems. Currently, bimodal fluorescent-magnetic nanoparticles are of great interest to biomedical scientists. In order to constructing these kinds of nanoparticles, fluorescent molecules should be linked to a magnetic core, while luminescence quenching is prevented. In order to alleviate this effect, usually fluorescent molecules are attached to a magnetic core after a multistep hydrocarbon, polymer or silica coating, which significantly increases the particle's size and reduces its magnetic saturation value. In this study, for the first time, amino acids (L-lysine and L-arginine) have been used as a linker and spacer between a fluorescent molecule (FITC) and a magnetic nanoparticle (Fe(3)O(4)) in a simple, two-step synthesis. Also, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) was used without any previous silica coating for fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles construction. Routinely APTES is used after silica coating by tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). Either of L-lysine, L-arginine and APTES coating provides surface functional groups which interact with the isothiocyanate group of FITC. According to the obtained results, amino acids could be used for successful construction of fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles in a simple synthesis pathway, without any significant impact on the excitation and emission properties of fluorescent molecule.

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Dental Cements Containing Quaternary Ammonium Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Beyth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs are commonly used for cementing full cast crown restorations. Regrettably, although the dental cements fill the gap between the tooth and the crown, bacterial microleakage may occur, resulting in secondary caries. As microleakage cannot be completely prevented, GICs possessing antibacterial properties are in demand. In the present study the antibacterial activity of insoluble, cross-linked quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI nanoparticles incorporated at 1% w/w in two clinically available GICs were studied. The antibacterial activity was tested against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei using the direct contact test (DCT and the agar diffusion test (ADT. Using the direct contact test, antibacterial activity (<0.05 was found in both tested GICs with incorporated QPEI nanoparticles, the effect lasting for at least one month. However, the ADT showed no inhibition halo in the test bacteria, indicating that the antimicrobial nanoparticles do not diffuse into the agar. The results show that the incorporation of QPEI nanoparticles in glass ionomer cements has a long-lasting antibacterial effect against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei. Changing the antibacterial properties of glass ionomer cements by incorporating QPEI antibacterial nanoparticles may prolong the clinical performance of dental crowns.

  6. Nitric oxide-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, A. B.; Kitice, N. A.; Pelegrino, M. T.; Lancheros, C. A. C.; Yamauchi, L. M.; Pinge-Filho, P.; Yamada-Ogatta, S. F.

    2015-05-01

    NO-releasing nanoparticle-treated cells was observed. Taken together, our results reveal a potent toxic effect of NO-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against different life cycle forms of T. cruzi, indicating that the encapsulation of the NO donor S-nitroso-MSA represents an interesting approach to combat and to prevent Chagas disease.

  7. Frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility of magnetite and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles embedded in PAA hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkum, Susanne; Dee, Joris T; Philipse, Albert P; Erné, Ben H

    2013-05-14

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid)-based hydrogels (PAA). To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network.

  8. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben H. Erné

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid-based hydrogels (PAA. To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network.

  9. Use of a polyol liquid collection medium to obtain ultrasmall magnetic nanoparticles by laser pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, G; Malumbres, A; Mallada, R; Hueso, J L; Irusta, S; Bomatí-Miguel, O; Santamaría, J

    2012-10-26

    The present work addresses the main bottleneck in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles by laser pyrolysis. Since the introduction of laser pyrolysis for the production of nanoparticles nearly three decades ago, this method has been repeatedly presented as a highly promising alternative, on account of two main characteristics: (i) its flexibility, since nanoparticles can be formed from a wide variety of precursors in both gas and liquid phase, and (ii) its continuous nature, avoiding the intrinsic variability of batch processing. However, the results reported to date invariably show considerable aggregation of the obtained nanoparticles, which strongly limits their application in most fields. In this work, we have been able to circumvent this problem by collecting the particles in a polyol liquid medium. This method prevents the formation of aggregates and renders a uniform distribution of well dispersed ultrasmall nanoparticles (<4 nm) in a water-compatible solvent. We consider that the effectiveness of this novel collection method for the production of well-dispersed magnetic nanoparticles will be of high interest to a wide range of scientists working in the nanoparticle synthesis field and may enable new applications wherever there is a strict requirement for non-agglomerated nanoparticles.

  10. Cadmium removal from aqueous solution by green synthesis iron oxide nanoparticles with tangerine peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrampoush, Mohammad Hassan; Miria, Mohammad; Salmani, Mohammad Hossien; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption process by metal oxide nanoparticles has been investigated an effective agent for removing organic and inorganic contaminants from water and wastewater. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized in the presence of tangerine peel extract as adsorbent for cadmium ions removal from contaminated solution. Iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by co-precipitation method and tangerine peel extract was used to prevent accumulation and reduce the diameter of the particles. Effect of various parameters such as contact time, pH, metal concentration and adsorbent dosage was determined on the removal efficiency. The different concentrations of tangerine peel had an impact on the size of nanoparticles. As, increasing the concentration of tangerine peel extract from 2 to 6 % the average size of synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles decreased 200 nm to 50 nm. The maximum removal of cadmium ions (90 %) occurred at pH of 4 and adsorbent dose of 0.4 g/100 ml. Adsorption of cadmium ions by synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles followed Freundlich adsorption model and pseudo-second-order equation. The cadmium ions are usually soluble in acidic pH and the maximum removal of cadmium by green synthesis iron oxide nanoparticles was obtained in the pH of 4, so these nanoparticles can be a good adsorbent for the removal of cadmium from wastewater.

  11. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkum, Susanne; Dee, Joris T.; Philipse, Albert P.; Erné, Ben H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid)-based hydrogels (PAA). To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network. PMID:23673482

  12. Photochemical arrays formed by spatial compartmentalization of colloidal nanoparticles in a polymer-based hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, M. A.; Rajh, T.; Makarova, O. V.; Seifert, S.; Tiede, D. M.; Thurnauer, M. C.

    2000-01-13

    The development of practical strategies for the assembly of semiconductor and metal colloid nanoparticles into ordered architectures is an area of considerable current interest, since it offers an opportunity for exploiting the optical and electronic properties of these colloids for device development. Prior research has explored creating such organized nanoparticle assemblies by Langmuir-Blodgett techniques or controlled solvent evaporation on suitable substrates. These approaches suffer from several limitations, however, most notably the generation of relatively simple structures and the lack of structural tailorability, preventing full exploitation of these materials. More recently, directed assembly using chemisorption of streptavidin-biotin or thiol-derivatized gold nanoparticles onto substrates has been described. Alternative approaches to achieving two-dimensional confinement of nanoparticles that do not involve substrate-supported materials, but rather organize the nanoparticles into mesoscopically-ordered soft condensed matter, may offer the advantage of enhanced processability and may permit construction of nanocomposite structures based on functional nanoparticles embedded in a processable, polymer-based matrix. This work describes the development of an alternative strategy for constructing 2-D arrays of functional metal and semiconductor nanoparticles. The approach involves directing the organization of nanocrystals into a processable (i.e., by externally applied magnetic and electric fields) polymer-grafted lipid-based complex fluid. By altering the surface chemistry of the nanoparticles, they can be selectively placed into defined regions encapsulating matrix.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles: effect on phytopathogen Colletotrichum gloesporioides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Mendez, Miguel A., E-mail: maguilarme@ipn.mx; San Martin-Martinez, Eduardo; Ortega-Arroyo, Lesli [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada (Mexico); Cobian-Portillo, Georgina [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigacion para el Desarrollo Integral Regional (Mexico); Sanchez-Espindola, Esther [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, Prolongacion Manuel M. Carpio s/n, esq. Plan de Ayala (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles were synthesized by reducing silver nitrate solutions with glucose, in the presence of gelatin as capping agent. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by means of UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The response surface methodology (RSM) was also used to determine the influence of the variables on the size of the nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the silver nanoparticles was evaluated on the phytopathogen Colletotrichum gloesporioides, which causes anthracnose in a wide range of fruits. The UV-Vis spectra indicated the formation of silver nanoparticles preferably spherical and of relatively small size (<20 nm). The above-mentioned was confirmed by TEM, observing a size distribution of 5-24 nm. According to RSM the synthesis variables influenced on the size of the silver nanoparticles. By means of FTIR spectroscopy it was determined that gelatin, through their amide and hydroxyl groups, interacts with nanoparticles preventing their agglomeration. The growth of C. gloesporioides in the presence of silver nanoparticles was significantly delayed in a dose dependent manner.

  14. DNA templated magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Joseph M.

    Recent discoveries in nanoscience are predicted to potentially revolutionize future technologies in an extensive number of fields. These developments are contingent upon discovering new and often unconventional methods to synthesize and control nanoscale components. Nature provides several examples of working nanotechnology such as the use of programmed self assembly to build and deconstruct complex molecular systems. We have adopted a method to control the one dimensional assembly of magnetic nanoparticles using DNA as a scaffold molecule. With this method we have demonstrated the ability to organize 5 nm particles into chains that stretch up to ˜20 mum in length. One advantage of using DNA compared is the ability of the molecule to interact with other biomolecules. After assembling particles onto DNA we have been able to cleave the molecule into smaller fragments using restriction enzymes. Using ligase enzymes we have re-connected these fragments, coated with either gold or iron oxide, to form long one-dimensional arrangements of the two different types of nanoparticles on a single molecular guide. We have also created a sensitive magnetic field sensor by incorporating magnetic nanoparticle coated DNA strands with microfabricated electrodes. The IV characteristics of the aligned nanoparticles are dependant on the magnitude of an externally applied magnetic field. This transport phenomenon known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) shows room temperature resistance of our devices over 80% for cobalt ferrite coated DNA when a field of 20 kOe is applied. In comparison, studies using two dimensional nanoparticle films of irox oxides xii only exhibit a 35% MR effect. Confinement into one dimension using the DNA guide produces a TMR mechanism which produces significant increases in magnetoresistance. This property can be utilized for applications in magnetic field sensing, data storage, and logic elements.

  15. Nanoparticle fouling and its combination with organic fouling during forward osmosis process for silver nanoparticles removal from simulated wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanxiao; Wang, Xinhua; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Xiufen; Ren, Yueping

    2016-05-01

    The increasing and wide application of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) has resulted in their appearance in wastewater. In consideration of their potential toxicity and environmental impacts, it is necessary to find effective technology for their removal from wastewater. Here, forward osmosis (FO) membrane was applied for Ag NPs removal from wastewater, and single and combined fouling of nanoparticles and organic macromolecules were further investigated during the FO process. The findings demonstrated that FO membrane can effectively remove Ag NPs from wastewater due to its high rejection performance. Fouling tests indicated that water flux declined appreciably even at the beginning of the single Ag NPs fouling test, and more remarkable flux decline and larger amounts of deposited Ag NPs were observed with an increase of Ag NPs concentration. However, the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) could effectively alleviate the FO membrane fouling induced by Ag NPs. The interaction between Ag NPs and BSA was responsible for this phenomenon. BSA can easily form a nanoparticle-protein corona surrounded nanoparticles, which prevented nanoparticles from aggregation due to the steric stabilization mechanism. Furthermore, the interaction between BSA and Ag NPs occurred not only in wastewater but also on FO membrane surface.

  16. Magnetoacoustic Sensing of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Rosenthal, Amir; Myklatun, Ahne; Westmeyer, Gil G; Sergiadis, George; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-11

    The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles and electromagnetic fields can be determined through electrical signal induction in coils due to magnetization. However, the direct measurement of instant electromagnetic energy absorption by magnetic nanoparticles, as it relates to particle characterization or magnetic hyperthermia studies, has not been possible so far. We introduce the theory of magnetoacoustics, predicting the existence of second harmonic pressure waves from magnetic nanoparticles due to energy absorption from continuously modulated alternating magnetic fields. We then describe the first magnetoacoustic system reported, based on a fiber-interferometer pressure detector, necessary for avoiding electric interference. The magnetoacoustic system confirmed the existence of previously unobserved second harmonic magnetoacoustic responses from solids, magnetic nanoparticles, and nanoparticle-loaded cells, exposed to continuous wave magnetic fields at different frequencies. We discuss how magnetoacoustic signals can be employed as a nanoparticle or magnetic field sensor for biomedical and environmental applications.

  17. In situ synthesis of porous silica nanoparticles for covalent immobilization of enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaowei; Cai, Zhengwei; Ye, Zhangmei; Chen, Sheng; Yang, Yu; Wang, Haifang; Liu, Yuanfang; Cao, Aoneng

    2012-01-01

    A simple method is used to covalently encapsulate enzymes in silica nanoparticles. The encapsulation is highlighted by the high enzyme loading and porous channels that provide efficient diffusion for small substrate and product molecules while preventing protease degradation.A simple method is used to covalently encapsulate enzymes in silica nanoparticles. The encapsulation is highlighted by the high enzyme loading and porous channels that provide efficient diffusion for small substrate and product molecules while preventing protease degradation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures and the result of the surface-grafted catalase control experiment. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr11153a

  18. Nanobiotechnology today: focus on nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soloviev Mikhail

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years the nanobiotechnology field and the Journal of Nanobiotechnology readership have witnessed an increase in interest towards the nanoparticles and their biological effects and applications. These include bottom-up and molecular self-assembly, biological effects of naked nanoparticles and nano-safety, drug encapsulation and nanotherapeutics, and novel nanoparticles for use in microscopy, imaging and diagnostics. This review highlights recent Journal of Nanobiotechnology publications in some of these areas http://www.jnanobiotechnology.com.

  19. Nanobiotechnology today: focus on nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Mikhail

    2007-12-30

    In the recent years the nanobiotechnology field and the Journal of Nanobiotechnology readership have witnessed an increase in interest towards the nanoparticles and their biological effects and applications. These include bottom-up and molecular self-assembly, biological effects of naked nanoparticles and nano-safety, drug encapsulation and nanotherapeutics, and novel nanoparticles for use in microscopy, imaging and diagnostics. This review highlights recent Journal of Nanobiotechnology publications in some of these areas http://www.jnanobiotechnology.com.

  20. Green Nanoparticles for Mosquito Control

    OpenAIRE

    Namita Soni; Soam Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Here, we have used the green method for synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. In the present study the silver (Ag) and gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by using the aqueous bark extract of Indian spice dalchini (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) (C. zyelanicum or C. verum J. Presl). Additionally, we have used these synthesized nanoparticles for mosquito control. The larvicidal activity has been tested against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and filariasis vector Culex quinquef...

  1. Prevention and Control of Cryptosporidiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Address Submit Button What's this? Parasites Home Prevention & Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prevention & Control Topics Prevention & Control - General Public Prevention & Control - ...

  2. Lung toxicity of biodegradable nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattal, Elias; Grabowski, Nadége; Mura, Simona; Vergnaud, Juliette; Tsapis, Nicolas; Hillaireau, Hervé

    2014-10-01

    Biodegradable nanoparticles exhibit high potentialities for local or systemic drug delivery through lung administration making them attractive as nanomedicine carriers. However, since particulate matter or some inorganic manufactured nanoparticles exposed to lung cells have provoked cytotoxic effects, inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, it becomes important to investigate nanomedicine toxicity towards the lungs. This is the reason why, in the present review, the behavior of biodegradable nanoparticles towards the different parts of the respiratory tract as well as the toxicological consequences, measured on several models in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo, are described. Taken all together, the different studies carried out so far conclude on no or slight toxicity of biodegradable nanoparticles.

  3. Glucose biosensor enhanced by nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Glucose biosensors have been formed with glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilized in composite immobilization membrane matrix, which is composed of hydrophobic gold, or hydrophilic gold, or hydrophobic silica nanoparticles, or the combination of gold and silica nanoparticles, and polyvinyl butyral (PVB) by a sol-gel method. The experiments show that nanoparticles can significantly enhance the catalytic activity of the immobilization enzyme. The current response can be increased from tens of nanoamperometer (nA) to thousands of nanoamperometer to the same glucose concentration, and the electrodes respond very quickly, to about 1 min. The function of nanoparticles effect on immobilization enzyme has been discussed.

  4. Glucose biosensor enhanced by nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐芳琼; 孟宪伟; 陈东; 冉均国; 郑昌琼

    2000-01-01

    Glucose biosensors have been formed with glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilized in composite immobilization membrane matrix, which is composed of hydrophobic gold, or hydro-philic gold, or hydrophobic silica nanoparticles, or the combination of gold and silica nanoparticles, and polyvinyl butyral (PVB) by a sol-gel method. The experiments show that nanoparticles can significantly enhance the catalytic activity of the immobilization enzyme. The current response can be increased from tens of nanoamperometer (nA) to thousands of nanoamperometer to the same glucose concentration, and the electrodes respond very quickly, to about 1 min. The function of nanoparticles effect on immobilization enzyme has been discussed.

  5. The Interaction between Zein and Lecithin in Ethanol-Water Solution and Characterization of Zein–Lecithin Composite Colloidal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Sun, Cuixia; Wang, Di; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Lecithin, a naturally small molecular surfactant, which is widely used in the food industry, can delay aging, enhance memory, prevent and treat diabetes. The interaction between zein and soy lecithin with different mass ratios (20:1, 10:1, 5:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2) in ethanol-water solution and characterisation of zein and lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles prepared by antisolvent co-precipitation method were investigated. The mean size of zein-lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles was firstly increased with the rise of lecithin concentration and then siginificantly decreased. The nanoparticles at the zein to lecithin mass ratio of 5:1 had the largest particle size (263 nm), indicating that zein and lecithin formed composite colloidal nanoparticles, which might aggregate due to the enhanced interaction at a higher proportion of lecithin. Continuing to increase lecithin concentration, the zein-lecithin nanoparticles possibly formed a reverse micelle-like or a vesicle-like structure with zein in the core, which prevented the formation of nanoparticle aggregates and decreased the size of composite nanoparticles. The presence of lecithin significantly reduced the ζ-potential of zein-lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles. The interaction between zein and lecithin enhanced the intensity of the fluorescence emission of zein in ethanol-water solution. The secondary structure of zein was also changed by the addition of lecithin. Differential scanning calorimetry thermograms revealed that the thermal stability of zein-lecithin nanoparticles was enhanced with the rise of lecithin level. The composite nanoparticles were relatively stable to elevated ionic strengths. Possible interaction mechanism between zein and lecithin was proposed. These findings would help further understand the theory of the interaction between the alcohol soluble protein and the natural small molecular surfactant. The composite colloidal nanoparticles formed in this study can

  6. The Interaction between Zein and Lecithin in Ethanol-Water Solution and Characterization of Zein-Lecithin Composite Colloidal Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Sun, Cuixia; Wang, Di; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Lecithin, a naturally small molecular surfactant, which is widely used in the food industry, can delay aging, enhance memory, prevent and treat diabetes. The interaction between zein and soy lecithin with different mass ratios (20:1, 10:1, 5:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2) in ethanol-water solution and characterisation of zein and lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles prepared by antisolvent co-precipitation method were investigated. The mean size of zein-lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles was firstly increased with the rise of lecithin concentration and then siginificantly decreased. The nanoparticles at the zein to lecithin mass ratio of 5:1 had the largest particle size (263 nm), indicating that zein and lecithin formed composite colloidal nanoparticles, which might aggregate due to the enhanced interaction at a higher proportion of lecithin. Continuing to increase lecithin concentration, the zein-lecithin nanoparticles possibly formed a reverse micelle-like or a vesicle-like structure with zein in the core, which prevented the formation of nanoparticle aggregates and decreased the size of composite nanoparticles. The presence of lecithin significantly reduced the ζ-potential of zein-lecithin composite colloidal nanoparticles. The interaction between zein and lecithin enhanced the intensity of the fluorescence emission of zein in ethanol-water solution. The secondary structure of zein was also changed by the addition of lecithin. Differential scanning calorimetry thermograms revealed that the thermal stability of zein-lecithin nanoparticles was enhanced with the rise of lecithin level. The composite nanoparticles were relatively stable to elevated ionic strengths. Possible interaction mechanism between zein and lecithin was proposed. These findings would help further understand the theory of the interaction between the alcohol soluble protein and the natural small molecular surfactant. The composite colloidal nanoparticles formed in this study can

  7. Supercooled smectic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Koch, Michel H J; Fahr, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    , laser diffraction combined with polarizing intensity differential scattering, DSC and SAXS. The morphology of selected formulations was studied by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. All smectic nanoparticles with a mixed cholesterol ester matrix were stable against recrystallization when stored...... in the bulk was studied by polarizing light microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Colloidal dispersions with pure and mixed cholesterol ester matrices were prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization and characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy...... administration of lipophilic drugs, the cytotoxicity of selected formulations was compared with that of a clinically used colloidal fat emulsion (Lipofundin MCT) in the murine fibroblast cell line L929 using the sulforhodamine B assay. The supercooled smectic nanoparticle formulations display a good overall cell...

  8. Metallic nanoparticles meet metadynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, L.; Rossi, K.; Baletto, F.

    2015-11-01

    Metadynamics coupled with classical molecular dynamics has been successfully applied to sample the configuration space of metallic and bimetallic nanoclusters. We implement a new set of collective variables related to the pair distance distribution function of the nanoparticle to achieve an exhaustive isomer sampling. As paradigmatic examples, we apply our methodology to Ag147, Pt147, and their alloy AgshellPtcore at 2:1 and 1:1 chemical compositions. The proposed scheme is able to reproduce the known solid-solid structural transformation pathways, based on the Lipscomb's diamond-square-diamond mechanisms, both in mono and bimetallic nanoparticles. A discussion of the free energy barriers involved in these processes is provided.

  9. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  10. Hydrogel nanoparticle based immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Lance A; Luchini, Alessandra; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Espina, Virginia

    2015-04-21

    An immunoassay device incorporating porous polymeric capture nanoparticles within either the sample collection vessel or pre-impregnated into a porous substratum within fluid flow path of the analytical device is presented. This incorporation of capture particles within the immunoassay device improves sensitivity while removing the requirement for pre-processing of samples prior to loading the immunoassay device. A preferred embodiment is coreshell bait containing capture nanoparticles which perform three functions in one step, in solution: a) molecular size sieving, b) target analyte sequestration and concentration, and c) protection from degradation. The polymeric matrix of the capture particles may be made of co-polymeric materials having a structural monomer and an affinity monomer, the affinity monomer having properties that attract the analyte to the capture particle. This device is useful for point of care diagnostic assays for biomedical applications and as field deployable assays for environmental, pathogen and chemical or biological threat identification.

  11. Nanoparticles and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Stevenson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of nanoscale molecular probes capable of diagnosis, characterization, and clinical treatment of disease is leading to a new generation of imaging technologies. Such probes are particularly relevant to inflammation, where the detection of subclinical, early disease states could facilitate speedier detection that could yield enhanced, tailored therapies. Nanoparticles offer robust platforms capable of sensitive detection, and early research has indicated their suitability for the detection of vascular activation and cellular recruitment at subclinical levels. This suggests that nanoparticle techniques may provide excellent biomarkers for the diagnosis and progression of inflammatory diseases with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, fluorescent quantum dots (QDs, and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS probes being just some of the new methodologies employed. Development of these techniques could lead to a range of sensitive probes capable of ultrasensitive, localized detection of inflammation. This article will discuss the merits of each approach, with a general overview to their applicability in inflammatory diseases.

  12. [Prevention of dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakami, Katsuya

    2016-03-01

    The dementia prevention consists of three steps, primary prevention of dementia is to prevent from normal and mild cognitive impairment to dementia, secondary prevention is early detection and early treatment of dementia, and tertiary prevention is three stages of progress prevention of dementia. Primary prevention of dementia had been considered impossible until recently, but potential scientific evidence has been shown recently. The fact that 4.62 million people are person with dementia and 400 million people are person with mild cognitive impairment are considered to be urgent problem and we must intend to perform dementia prevention from primary to tertiary prevention thoroughly. We perform dementia screening using touch panel type computer and we recommend person with mild cognitive impairment to join dementia prevention classroom. Therefore, we can prevent progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia (primary prevention). Early diagnosis and introduction to the specialized medical institution are needed if you find early stage of dementia and treat early (secondary prevention). To prevent progression by the appropriate drug treatment and care for dementia is required (tertiary prevention).

  13. Characterization of starch nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymońska, J.; Targosz-Korecka, M.; Krok, F.

    2009-01-01

    Nanomaterials already attract great interest because of their potential applications in technology, food science and medicine. Biomaterials are biodegradable and quite abundant in nature, so they are favoured over synthetic polymer based materials. Starch as a nontoxic, cheap and renewable raw material is particularly suitable for preparation of nanoparticles. In the paper, the structure and some physicochemical properties of potato and cassava starch particles of the size between 50 to 100 nm, obtained by mechanical treatment of native starch, were presented. We demonstrated, with the aim of the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (nc-AFM), that the shape and dimensions of the obtained nanoparticles both potato and cassava starch fit the blocklets - previously proposed as basic structural features of native starch granules. This observation was supported by aqueous solubility and swelling power of the particles as well as their iodine binding capacity similar to those for amylopectin-type short branched polysaccharide species. Obtained results indicated that glycosidic bonds of the branch linkage points in the granule amorphous lamellae might be broken during the applied mechanical treatment. Thus the released amylopectin clusters could escape out of the granules. The starch nanoparticles, for their properties qualitatively different from those of native starch granules, could be utilized in new applications.

  14. Surface functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wydra, Robert John

    Despite recent advances, cancer remains the second leading cause of deaths in the United States. Magnetic nanoparticles have found various applications in cancer research as drug delivery platforms, enhanced contrast agents for improved diagnostic imaging, and the delivery of thermal energy as standalone therapy. Iron oxide nanoparticles absorb the energy from an alternating magnetic field and convert it into heat through Brownian and Neel relaxations. To better utilize magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy, surface functionalization is essential for such factors as decreasing cytotoxicity of healthy tissue, extending circulation time, specific targeting of cancer cells, and manage the controlled delivery of therapeutics. In the first study, iron oxide nanoparticles were coated with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based polymer shell. The PEG coating was selected to prevent protein adsorption and thus improve circulation time and minimize host response to the nanoparticles. Thermal therapy application feasibility was demonstrated in vitro with a thermoablation study on lung carcinoma cells. Building on the thermal therapy demonstration with iron oxide nanoparticles, the second area of work focused on intracellular delivery. Nanoparticles can be appropriately tailored to enter the cell and deliver energy on the nanoscale eliminating individual cancer cells. The underlying mechanism of action is still under study, and we were interested in determining the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) catalytically generated from the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles in this measured cytotoxicity. When exposed to an AMF, the nanoscale heating effects are capable of enhancing the Fenton-like generation of ROS determined through a methylene blue degradation assay. To deliver this enhanced ROS effect to cells, monosaccharide coated nanoparticles were developed and successfully internalized by colon cancer cell lines. Upon AMF exposure, there was a measured increase in

  15. The formation of magnetic carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles using precipitation from an aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makovec, Darko [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gyergyek, Sašo, E-mail: saso.gyergyek@ijs.si [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Primc, Darinka [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Plantan, Ivan [Lek Pharmaceuticals d.d., Mengeš (Slovenia)

    2015-03-01

    The formation of spinel iron-oxide nanoparticles during the co-precipitation of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ions from an aqueous solution in the presence of carboxymethyldextrane (CMD) was studied. To follow the formation of the nanoparticles, a mixture of the Fe ions, CMD and ammonia was heated to different temperatures, while the samples were taken, quenched in liquid nitrogen, freeze-dried and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and magnetometry. The CMD plays a role in the reactions of the Fe ions' precipitation by partially immobilizing the Fe{sup 3+} ions into a complex. At room temperature, the amorphous material is precipitated. Then, above approximately 30 °C, the spinel nanoparticles form inside the amorphous matrix, and at approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles. The CMD bonded to the nanoparticles' surfaces hinders the mass transport and thus prevents their growth. - Highlights: • The carboxymethyl-dextrane coated iron-oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • The carboxymethyl-dextrane significantly modifies formation of the spinel nanoparticles. • The spinel nanoparticles are formed inside the amorphous matrix. • At approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles.

  16. Size-dependent properties of silica nanoparticles for Pickering stabilization of emulsions and foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ijung; Worthen, Andrew J.; Johnston, Keith P.; DiCarlo, David A.; Huh, Chun

    2016-04-01

    Nanoparticles are a promising alternative to surfactants to stabilize emulsions or foams in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes due to their effectiveness in very harsh environments found in many of the oilfields around the world. While the size-dependent properties of nanoparticles have been extensively studied in the area of optics or cellular uptake, little is known on the effects of nanoparticle size on emulsion/foam generation, especially for EOR applications. In this study, silica nanoparticles with four different sizes (5, 12, 25, and 80 nm nominal diameter) but with the same surface treatment were employed to test their emulsion or foam generation behavior in high-salinity conditions. The decane-in-brine emulsion generated by sonication or flowing through sandpack showed smaller droplet size and higher apparent viscosity as the nanoparticle size decreased. Similarly, the CO2-in-brine foam generation in sandstone or sandpacks was also significantly affected by the nanoparticle size, exhibiting higher apparent foam viscosity as the nanoparticle size decreased. In case of foam generation in sandstone cores with 5 nm nanoparticles, a noticeable hysteresis occurred when the flow velocity was initially increased and then decreased, implying a strong foam generation initially; and then the trapping of the generated foam in the rock pores, as the flow velocity decreased. On the other hand, weak foams stabilized with larger nanoparticles indicated a rapid coalescence of bubbles which prevented foam generation. Overall, stable emulsions/foams were achievable by the smaller particles as a result of greater diffusivity and/or higher number concentration, thus allowing more nanoparticles with higher surface area to volume ratio to be adsorbed at the fluid/fluid interfaces of the emulsion/foam dispersion.

  17. Palladium and platinum nanoparticles attenuate aging-like skin atrophy via antioxidant activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Shuichi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Izuo, Naotaka; Toda, Toshihiko; Yokote, Koutaro; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2014-01-01

    Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) loss causes a redox imbalance as it leads to excess superoxide generation, which results in the appearance of various aging-related phenotypes, including skin atrophy. Noble metal nanoparticles, such as palladium (Pd) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles, are considered to function as antioxidants due to their strong catalytic activity. In Japan, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles called PAPLAL has been used to treat chronic diseases over the past 60 years. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of PAPLAL against aging-related skin pathologies in mice. Transdermal PAPLAL treatment reversed skin thinning associated with increased lipid peroxidation in Sod1-/- mice. Furthermore, PAPLAL normalized the gene expression levels of Col1a1, Mmp2, Has2, Tnf-α, Il-6, and p53 in the skin of the Sod1-/- mice. Pt nanoparticles exhibited marked SOD and catalase activity, while Pd nanoparticles only displayed weak SOD and catalase activity in vitro. Although the SOD and catalase activity of the Pt nanoparticles significantly declined after they had been oxidized in air, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation. Importantly, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles with a molar ratio of 3 or 4 to 1 continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation, indicating that Pd nanoparticles prevent the oxidative deterioration of Pt nanoparticles. These findings indicate that PAPLAL stably suppresses intrinsic superoxide generation both in vivo and in vitro via SOD and catalase activity. PAPLAL is a potentially powerful tool for the treatment of aging-related skin diseases caused by oxidative damage.

  18. Palladium and platinum nanoparticles attenuate aging-like skin atrophy via antioxidant activity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Shibuya

    Full Text Available Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1 loss causes a redox imbalance as it leads to excess superoxide generation, which results in the appearance of various aging-related phenotypes, including skin atrophy. Noble metal nanoparticles, such as palladium (Pd and platinum (Pt nanoparticles, are considered to function as antioxidants due to their strong catalytic activity. In Japan, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles called PAPLAL has been used to treat chronic diseases over the past 60 years. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of PAPLAL against aging-related skin pathologies in mice. Transdermal PAPLAL treatment reversed skin thinning associated with increased lipid peroxidation in Sod1-/- mice. Furthermore, PAPLAL normalized the gene expression levels of Col1a1, Mmp2, Has2, Tnf-α, Il-6, and p53 in the skin of the Sod1-/- mice. Pt nanoparticles exhibited marked SOD and catalase activity, while Pd nanoparticles only displayed weak SOD and catalase activity in vitro. Although the SOD and catalase activity of the Pt nanoparticles significantly declined after they had been oxidized in air, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation. Importantly, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles with a molar ratio of 3 or 4 to 1 continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation, indicating that Pd nanoparticles prevent the oxidative deterioration of Pt nanoparticles. These findings indicate that PAPLAL stably suppresses intrinsic superoxide generation both in vivo and in vitro via SOD and catalase activity. PAPLAL is a potentially powerful tool for the treatment of aging-related skin diseases caused by oxidative damage.

  19. Preparation of ZrO2 nano-particles by the hydrolysis of ZrOCl2 solution in the reverse micelles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chensha Li; Tongxiang Liang; Tianyong Luo

    2006-01-01

    Zirconia nano-particles have been produced by the hydrolysis of ZrOGl2 solution in the reverse micelles of a liquid-liquid two-phase system, in which sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinite (AOT) and toluene were chosen as the surfactant and organic phase, respectively. The reverse micelles prevented the aggregation of primary particles and reduced the diameters of zirconia nanoparticles. Superfine zirconia powders soft-aggregated by the zirconia nano-particles were obtained. The diameters of zirconia nanoparticles were influenced by the quantity of the surfactant.

  20. Reflections on preventive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Olli S

    2014-10-01

    Having thought much about medicine in my career-long effort to understand it and the research for its advancement, I have come to views rather different form the now-prevailing ones in respect to what preventive medicine is about; what epidemiology is in relation to preventive medicine; what distinguishes preventive medicine in preventive healthcare at large; the relation of preventive medicine to public health; the concept of health promotion; and also the core principles of preventive medicine. All of these views I set forth in this article, for the readers' critical reflection.

  1. Surface Effects in Magnetic Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorani, Dino

    2005-01-01

    This volume is a collection of articles on different approaches to the investigation of surface effects on nanosized magnetic materials, with special emphasis on magnetic nanoparticles. The book aims to provide an overview of progress in the understanding of surface properties and surface driven effects in magnetic nanoparticles through recent results of different modeling, simulation, and experimental investigations.

  2. Thermal treatment of magnetite nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Kalska-Szostko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a thermal treatment process for magnetite nanoparticles in the temperature range of 50–500 °C. The tested magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using three different methods that resulted in nanoparticles with different surface characteristics and crystallinity, which in turn, was reflected in their thermal durability. The particles were obtained by coprecipitation from Fe chlorides and decomposition of an Fe(acac3 complex with and without a core–shell structure. Three types of ferrite nanoparticles were produced and their thermal stability properties were compared. In this study, two sets of unmodified magnetite nanoparticles were used where crystallinity was as determinant of the series. For the third type of particles, a Ag shell was added. By comparing the coated and uncoated particles, the influence of the metallic layer on the thermal stability of the nanoparticles was tested. Before and after heat treatment, the nanoparticles were examined using transmission electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, it was observed that the fabrication methods determine, to some extent, the sensitivity of the nanoparticles to external factors.

  3. Synthesizing nanoparticles by mimicking nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    As particulate matter with at least one dimension that is less than 100 nm, nanoparticles are the minuscule building blocks of new commercial products and consumer materials in the emerging field of nanotechnology. Nanoparticles are being discovered and introduced in the marketpl...

  4. Synthesizing nanoparticles by mimicking nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    As particulate matter with at least one dimension that is less than 100 nm, nanoparticles are the minuscule building blocks of new commercial products and consumer materials in the emerging field of nanotechnology. Nanoparticles are being discovered and introduced in the marketpl...

  5. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  6. Gluing Soft Interfaces by Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhen; Dobrynin, Andrey

    Using a combination of the molecular dynamics simulations and scaling analysis we studied reinforcement of interface between two soft gel-like materials by spherical nanoparticles. Analysis of the simulations shows that the depth of penetration of a nanoparticle into a gel is determined by a balance of the elastic energy of the gel and nanoparticle deformations and the surface energy of nanoparticle/gel interface. In order to evaluate work of adhesion of the reinforced interface, the potential of mean force for separation of two gels was calculated. These simulations showed that the gel separation proceeds through formation of necks connecting nanoparticle with two gels. The shapes of the necks are controlled by a fine interplay between nanoparticle/gel surface energies and elastic energy of the neck deformation. Our simulations showed that by introducing nanoparticles at soft interfaces, the work required for separation of two gels could be 10-100 times larger than the work of adhesion between two gels without nanoparticle reinforcement. These results provide insight in understanding the mechanism of gluing soft gels and biological tissues by nano- and micro-sized particles. NSF DMR-1409710.

  7. Effect of the Titanium Nanoparticle on the Quantum Chemical Characterization of the Liquid Sodium Nanofluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ai; Bonnaud, Patrick; Williams, Mark C; Selvam, Parasuraman; Aoki, Nobutoshi; Miyano, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Akira; Saito, Jun-ichi; Ara, Kuniaki

    2016-04-14

    Suspension state of a titanium nanoparticle in the liquid sodium was quantum chemically characterized by comparing physical characteristics, viz., electronic state, viscosity, and surface tension, with those of liquid sodium. The exterior titanium atoms on the topmost facet of the nanoparticle were found to constitute a stable Na-Ti layer, and the Brownian motion of a titanium nanoparticle could be seen in tandem with the surrounding sodium atoms. An electrochemical gradient due to the differences in electronegativity of both titanium and sodium causes electron flow from liquid sodium atoms to a titanium nanoparticle, Ti + Na → Ti(δ-) + Na(δ+), making the exothermic reaction possible. In other words, the titanium nanoparticle takes a role as electron-reservoir by withdrawing free electrons from sodium atoms and makes liquid sodium electropositive. The remaining electrons in the liquid sodium still make Na-Na bonds and become more stabilized. With increasing size of the titanium nanoparticle, the deeper electrostatic potential, the steeper electric field, and the larger Debye atmosphere are created in the electric double layer shell. Owing to electropositive sodium-to-sodium electrostatic repulsion between the external shells, naked titanium nanoparticles cannot approach each other, thus preventing the agglomeration.

  8. Synthesis of Colloidal ZnO Nanoparticles and Deposit of Thin Films by Spin Coating Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Alberto Alvarado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO colloidal nanoparticles were synthesized, the average size of these nanoparticles is around 25 nm with hexagonal form. It was noted that stabilization depends directly on the purifying process; in this work we do not change the nature of the solution as a difference from Meulekamp's method, and we do not use any alkanes to remove the byproducts; only a centrifuge to remove those ones was used, thereby the stabilization increases up to 24 days. It is observed from the results that only three times of washing is enough to prevent the rapid aging process. The effect of annealing process on the composition, size, and geometrical shape of ZnO nanoparticles was studied in order to know whether the annealing process affects the crystallization and growth of the nanoparticles. After the synthesis, the colloidal nanoparticles were deposited by spin coating technique showing that the formed nanoparticles have no uniformly deposition pattern. But is possible to deposit those ones in glass substrates. A possible deposition process of the nanoparticles is proposed.

  9. Fluorescent proteins as efficient tools for evaluating the surface PEGylation of silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ma, Minyan; Zhang, Xiao-ai; Zhang, Ze-yu; Saleh, Sayed M.; Wang, Xu-dong

    2017-06-01

    Surface PEGylation is essential for preventing non-specific binding of biomolecules when silica nanoparticles are utilized for in vivo applications. Methods for installing poly(ethylene glycol) on a silica surface have been widely explored but varies from study to study. Because there is a lack of a satisfactory method for evaluating the properties of silica surface after PEGylation, the prepared nanoparticles are not fully characterized before use. In some cases, even non-PEGylated silica nanoparticles were produced, which is unfortunately not recognized by the end-user. In this work, a fluorescent protein was employed, which acts as a sensitive material for evaluating the surface protein adsorption properties of silica nanoparticles. Eleven different methods were systematically investigated for their reaction efficiency towards surface PEGylation. Results showed that both reaction conditions (including pH, catalyst) and surface functional groups of parent silica nanoparticles play critical roles in producing fully PEGylated silica nanoparticles. Great care needs to be taken in choosing the proper coupling chemistry for surface PEGylation. The data and method shown here will guarantee high-quality PEGylated silica nanoparticles to be produced and guide their applications in biology, chemistry, industry and medicine.

  10. Glucose-coated gold nanoparticles transfer across human brain endothelium and enter astrocytes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Gromnicova

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier prevents the entry of many therapeutic agents into the brain. Various nanocarriers have been developed to help agents to cross this barrier, but they all have limitations, with regard to tissue-selectivity and their ability to cross the endothelium. This study investigated the potential for 4 nm coated gold nanoparticles to act as selective carriers across human brain endothelium and subsequently to enter astrocytes. The transfer rate of glucose-coated gold nanoparticles across primary human brain endothelium was at least three times faster than across non-brain endothelia. Movement of these nanoparticles occurred across the apical and basal plasma membranes via the cytosol with relatively little vesicular or paracellular migration; antibiotics that interfere with vesicular transport did not block migration. The transfer rate was also dependent on the surface coating of the nanoparticle and incubation temperature. Using a novel 3-dimensional co-culture system, which includes primary human astrocytes and a brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, we demonstrated that the glucose-coated nanoparticles traverse the endothelium, move through the extracellular matrix and localize in astrocytes. The movement of the nanoparticles through the matrix was >10 µm/hour and they appeared in the nuclei of the astrocytes in considerable numbers. These nanoparticles have the correct properties for efficient and selective carriers of therapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier.

  11. Characterisation of the antibacterial effect of polyethyleneimine nanoparticles in relation to particle distribution in resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvero, Dana Kesler; Zatlsman, Nathan; Hazan, Ronen; Weiss, Ervin I; Beyth, Nurit

    2015-02-01

    To characterise the antibacterial effect of resin composite incorporating cross-linked quaternised polyethyleneimine (QPEI) nanoparticles in relation to their distribution in the bulk material. The antibacterial effect of resin composite incorporating QPEI nanoparticle was tested against various oral pathogens, including Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces viscousus, Lactobacilus casei and whole saliva. Nanoparticle distribution in the modified resin composite was assessed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, the degree of conversion was recorded. Total bacterial inhibition was detected against all the tested pathogens following direct contact with the outer surface of the modified resin composite. Similarly, the inner surface of the modified resin composite caused total inhibition. Electron microscope images showed bacterial death. XPS revealed surface I(-) ions on both the outer and the inner surfaces of the modified composite. No I(-) ions were detected in the unmodified composite. Nanoparticle distribution was higher on the inner surface of the modified composite. The composite's degree of conversion was unaffected by nanoparticle addition. QPEI nanoparticles represent a new generation of antibacterial nanoparticles which are highly promising in preventing bacterial recontamination when restoring teeth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bio-degradable highly fluorescent conjugated polymer nanoparticles for bio-medical imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repenko, Tatjana; Rix, Anne; Ludwanowski, Simon; Go, Dennis; Kiessling, Fabian; Lederle, Wiltrud; Kuehne, Alexander J C

    2017-09-07

    Conjugated polymer nanoparticles exhibit strong fluorescence and have been applied for biological fluorescence imaging in cell culture and in small animals. However, conjugated polymer particles are hydrophobic and often chemically inert materials with diameters ranging from below 50 nm to several microns. As such, conjugated polymer nanoparticles cannot be excreted through the renal system. This drawback has prevented their application for clinical bio-medical imaging. Here, we present fully conjugated polymer nanoparticles based on imidazole units. These nanoparticles can be bio-degraded by activated macrophages. Reactive oxygen species induce scission of the conjugated polymer backbone at the imidazole unit, leading to complete decomposition of the particles into soluble low molecular weight fragments. Furthermore, the nanoparticles can be surface functionalized for directed targeting. The approach opens a wide range of opportunities for conjugated polymer particles in the fields of medical imaging, drug-delivery, and theranostics.Conjugated polymer nanoparticles have been applied for biological fluorescence imaging in cell culture and in small animals, but cannot readily be excreted through the renal system. Here the authors show fully conjugated polymer nanoparticles based on imidazole units that can be bio-degraded by activated macrophages.

  13. Silver nanoparticles: synthesis and application in mineralization of pesticides using membrane support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimegalai, G.; Shanthakumar, S.; Sharma, Chandan

    2014-05-01

    Pesticides are deliberately used for controlling the pests in agriculture and public health, due to which, a part of it is present in the drinking water. Due to their widespread use, they are present in both surface and ground water. Most of the pesticides are resistant to biodegradation and are found to be carcinogenic in nature even at trace levels. Conventional methods of pesticide removal are disadvantageous due to their inherent time consumption or expensiveness. Nanoparticles alleviate both of these drawbacks and hence, they can be effectively utilized for the mineralization of pesticides. To prevent the presence of nanoparticles in the purified water after mineralization of pesticides, they need to be incorporated on a support. In earlier studies, researchers employed activated carbon and alumina as support for silver nanoparticles in pesticide mineralization. However, not many studies have been carried out on polymeric membranes as support for silver nanoparticles in the mineralization of pesticides (chlorpyrifos and malathion). With this in view, a detailed study has been carried out to estimate the mineralization potential of silver nanoparticles (synthesized using glucose) supported on cellulose acetate membrane. It is observed that the silver nanoparticles can effectively mineralize the pesticides, and the concentration of nanoparticles enhances the rate of mineralization.

  14. Spectral luminescent properties of bacteriochlorin and aluminum phthalocyanine nanoparticles as hydroxyapatite implant surface coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Maklygina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and the spectral research of unique coating as crystalline nanoparticles of IR photosensitizers were performed for the creation of hydroxyapatite implants with photobactericidal properties. It has been proved that by the interaction of nanoparticles covering implant with the polar solvent, which simulates the interaction of the implant with the biocomponents in vivo (fast proliferating and with immunocompetent cells, photosensitizers nanoparticles change the spectroscopic properties, becoming fluorescent and phototoxic. Thus, the developed coating based on crystalline photosensitizer nanoparticles with studied specific properties should have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory effect by the photodynamic treatment in the near implant area. This research opens the prospect of the local prevention of inflammatory and autoimmune reactions in the area of implantation. The results of the study suggest a promising this technology in order to create implants with photobactericidal properties.

  15. Scattering of long wavelengths into thin silicon photovoltaic films by plasmonic silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osgood, R. M.; Bullion, K. M.; Giardini, S. A.; Carlson, J. B.; Stenhouse, P.; Kingsborough, R.; Liberman, V.; Parameswaran, L.; Rothschild, M.; Miller, O.; Kooi, S.; Joannopoulos, J.; Jeffrey, F.; Braymen, S.; Gill, H. Singh; Kumar, J.

    2014-10-01

    Nanoparticles and nanostructures with plasmonic resonances are currently being employed to enhance the efficiency of solar cells. 1-3 Ag stripe arrays have been shown theoretically to enhance the short-circuit current of thin silicon layers. 4 Monolayers of Ag nanoparticles with diameter d thin polymer layers with thicknesses thin (100 nm films deposited on glass and flexible polymer substrates, the latter originating in a roll-to-roll manufacturing process. Ag nanoparticles are held in place and aggregation is prevented with a polymer overcoat. We observe interesting wavelength shifts between maxima in specular and diffuse scattering that depend on particle size and shape, indicating that the nanoparticles substantially modify the scattering into the thin silicon film.

  16. Characterisation and catalytic properties of Ni, Co, Ce and Ru nanoparticles in mesoporous carbon spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Francisco A. A. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica, Langmuir Lab de Adsorcao e Catalise (Brazil); Castro, Antonio J. R.; Filho, Josue M. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Viana, Bartolomeu C. [Universidade Federal do Piaui, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Campos, Adriana [CETENE Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, Cidade Universitaria (Brazil); Oliveira, Alcineia C., E-mail: alcineia@ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica, Langmuir Lab de Adsorcao e Catalise (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Ni, Co, Ce and Ru nanoparticles were inserted into templated carbon using a nanocasting technique and evaluated for the dehydration of glycerol. NiO and CeO{sub 2} preferentially yielded 5 nm uniformly sized particles that filled the mesoporous carbon via a geometric confinement effect. Ru generated Ru{sup o} and RuO{sub 2} nanoparticles that selectively migrated towards the carbon surface and did not undergo sintering, whereas Co nanoparticles containing CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} showed the opposite behaviour. The stabilising effects of the Ce and Ru nanoparticles on the carbon matrix effectively prevented the aggregation of small particles, resulting in superior catalytic performance in glycerol dehydration.

  17. Observation of field emission from GeSn nanoparticles epitaxially grown on silicon nanopillar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolomeo, Antonio; Passacantando, Maurizio; Niu, Gang; Schlykow, Viktoria; Lupina, Grzegorz; Giubileo, Filippo; Schroeder, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We apply molecular beam epitaxy to grow GeSn-nanoparticles on top of Si-nanopillars patterned onto p-type Si wafers. We use x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm a metallic behavior of the nanoparticle surface due to partial Sn segregation as well as the presence of a superficial Ge oxide. We report the observation of stable field emission (FE) current from the GeSn-nanoparticles, with turn on field of 65 {{V}} μ {{{m}}}-{{1}} and field enhancement factor β ˜ 100 at anode-cathode distance of ˜0.6 μm. We prove that FE can be enhanced by preventing GeSn nanoparticles oxidation or by breaking the oxide layer through electrical stress. Finally, we show that GeSn/p-Si junctions have a rectifying behavior.

  18. Effect of PEG6000 on magnetic properties of the Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huanque; Hua, Fei; Zhang, Xuelin; Suo, Qiangqiang; Peng, Huifen; Wang, Xin

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, PEG6000 was used as a surfactant to prevent the MnZn ferrite nanoparticles from aggregation. Introduction of PEG6000 didn't affect structure of the products, but modified their dispersion state and decreased their particle size. Furthermore, saturated magnetization of the MnZn ferrite nanoparticles increased with an increase in the PEG6000 content, and presented the maximum of 110.3 emu/g at the PEG6000 content of 0.006 mol/l. This value is about 40% higher than that without any PEG6000, and almost the highest one reported to date for the MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. Hence the obtained results proved that the PEG6000 was a powerful surfactant to improve magnetic properties of the MnZn ferrite nanoparticles.

  19. SANS study of interaction of silica nanoparticles with BSA protein and their resultant structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Indresh, E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in; Aswal, V. K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Kohlbrecher, J. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 PSI Villigen Switzerland (Switzerland)

    2014-04-24

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been carried out to study the interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles (88 Å) with globular protein Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) (M.W. 66.4 kD) in aqueous solution. The measurements have been carried out on fixed concentration (1 wt %) of Ludox silica nanoparticles with varying concentration of BSA (0–5 wt %) at pH7. Results show that silica nanoparticles and BSA coexist as individual entities at low concentration of BSA where electrostatic repulsive interactions between them prevent their aggregation. However, as the concentration of BSA increases (≥ 0.5 wt %), it induces the attractive depletion interaction among nanoparticles leading to finally their aggregation at higher BSA concentration (2 wt %). The aggregates are found to be governed by the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) morphology of fractal nature having fractal dimension about 2.4.

  20. Friction stir spot welding of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy with SiC nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paidar, Moslem; Sarab, Mahsa Laali [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy with 1.6 mm thickness was investigated. The effects of the silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles on the metallurgical and mechanical properties were discussed. The effects of particles on tension shear and wear tests were also investigated. The process was conducted at a constant rotational speed of 1000 rpm. Results showed that adding SiC nanoparticles to the weld during FSSW had a major effect on the mechanical properties. In fact, the addition of nanoparticles as barriers prevented grain growth in the Stir zone (SZ). The data obtained in the tensile-shear and wear tests showed that tensile-shear load and wear resistance increased with the addition of SiC nanoparticles, which was attributed to the fine grain size produced in the SZ.

  1. Gas phase synthesis of core-shell Fe@FeO x magnetic nanoparticles into fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Sitki; Thornton, Stuart C.; Binns, Chris; Denby, Phil

    2016-12-01

    Sorbitol, short chain molecules, have been used to stabilise of Fe@FeO x nanoparticles produced in the gas phase under the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. The sorbitol coated Fe@FeO x nanoparticles produced by our method have a narrow size distribution with a hydrodynamic diameter of 35 nm after NaOH is added to the solution. Magnetisation measurement shows that the magnetic nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at 100 K and demonstrate hysteresis at 5 K with an anisotropy constant of 5.31 × 104 J/m3 (similar to bulk iron). Also, it is shown that sorbitol is only suitable for stabilising the Fe@FeO x suspensions, and it does not prevent further oxidation of the metallic Fe core. According to MRI measurement, the nanoparticles have a high transverse relaxation rate of 425 mM-1 s-1.

  2. Tyrosine- and tryptophan-coated gold nanoparticles inhibit amyloid aggregation of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Kriti; Anand, Bibin G; Badhwar, Rahul; Bagler, Ganesh; Navya, P N; Daima, Hemant Kumar; Kar, Karunakar

    2015-12-01

    Here, we have strategically synthesized stable gold (AuNPs(Tyr), AuNPs(Trp)) and silver (AgNPs(Tyr)) nanoparticles which are surface functionalized with either tyrosine or tryptophan residues and have examined their potential to inhibit amyloid aggregation of insulin. Inhibition of both spontaneous and seed-induced aggregation of insulin was observed in the presence of AuNPs(Tyr), AgNPs(Tyr), and AuNPs(Trp) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles also triggered the disassembly of insulin amyloid fibrils. Surface functionalization of amino acids appears to be important for the inhibition effect since isolated tryptophan and tyrosine molecules did not prevent insulin aggregation. Bioinformatics analysis predicts involvement of tyrosine in H-bonding interactions mediated by its C=O, -NH2, and aromatic moiety. These results offer significant opportunities for developing nanoparticle-based therapeutics against diseases related to protein aggregation.

  3. Nanotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedea B. Seabra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in the synthesis, characterization and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained mainly through biogenic (green processes. The in vitro and in vivo toxicities of these oxides are discussed including a consideration of the factors important for safe use of these nanomaterials. The toxicities of different metal oxide nanoparticles are compared. The importance of biogenic synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles has been increasing in recent years; however, more studies aimed at better characterizing the potent toxicity of these nanoparticles are still necessary for nanosafely considerations and environmental perspectives. In this context, this review aims to inspire new research in the design of green approaches to obtain metal oxide nanoparticles for biomedical and technological applications and to highlight the critical need to fully investigate the nanotoxicity of these particles.

  4. Fundamental investigations of catalyst nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Christian Fink

    fundamental understanding of catalytic processes and our ability to make use of that understanding. This thesis presents fundamental studies of catalyst nanoparticles with particular focus on dynamic processes. Such studies often require atomic-scale characterization, because the catalytic conversion takes...... place on the molecular and atomic level. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has the ability to image nanostructures with atomic resolution and reveal the atomic configuration of the important nanoparticle surfaces. In the present work, TEM has been used to study nanoparticles in situ at elevated...... different topics, each related to different aspects of nanoparticle dynamics and catalysis. The first topic is the reduction of a homogeneous solid state precursor to form the catalytically active phase which is metal nanoparticles on an inert support. Here, we have reduced Cu phyllosilicate to Cu on silica...

  5. Uniform magnetic excitations in nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Hansen, Britt Rosendahl

    2005-01-01

    We have used a spin-wave model to calculate the temperature dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization of magnetic nanoparticles. The uniform precession mode, corresponding to a spin wave with wave vector q=0, is predominant in nanoparticles and gives rise to an approximately linear temperature...... dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization well below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature for both ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic particles. This is in accordance with the results of a classical model for collective magnetic excitations in nanoparticles. In nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic...... materials, quantum effects give rise to a small deviation from the linear temperature dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization at very low temperatures. The complex nature of the excited precession states of nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic materials, with deviations from antiparallel orientation...

  6. Solid lipid nanoparticles for parenteral drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, S.A.; Kayser, Oliver; Muller, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    This review describes the use of nanoparticles based on solid lipids for the parenteral application of drugs. Firstly, different types of nanoparticles based on solid lipids such as "solid lipid nanoparticles" (SLN), "nanostructured lipid carriers" (NLC) and "lipid drug conjugate" (LDC) nanoparticle

  7. PREPARATIONS AND APPLICATION OF METAL NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adlim Adlim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Terminology of metal nanoparticles, the uniqueness properties in terms of the surface atom, the quantum dot, and the magnetism are described. The further elaboration was on the synthesis of nanoparticles. Applications of metal nanoparticles in electronic, ceramic medical and catalysis were overviewed. The bibliography includes 81 references with 99% are journal articles.   Keywords: metal nanoparticles

  8. Perylene Nanoparticles Prepared by Reprecipitation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI,Xue-Hai(纪学海); FU,Hong-Bing(付红兵); XIE,Rui-Min(谢锐敏); XIAO,De-Bao(肖德宝); YAO,Jian-Nian(姚建年)

    2002-01-01

    Perylene nanoparticles with different sizes were prepared by reprecipitation method. It is found that the nanoparticles show size-dependent optical property. Electron diffraction patterns indicate that all the nanoparticles of different sizes are in crystalline state. The rapid growth of the nanoparticles during the agingg process could be slowed down effectively by the addition of cationic or anionic surfactants.

  9. Conjugated polymer nanoparticles, methods of using, and methods of making

    KAUST Repository

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2017-03-16

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for conjugated polymer nanoparticle, method of making conjugated polymer nanoparticles, method of using conjugated polymer nanoparticle, polymers, and the like.

  10. Host thin films incorporating nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Uzma

    The focus of this research project was the investigation of the functional properties of thin films that incorporate a secondary nanoparticulate phase. In particular to assess if the secondary nanoparticulate material enhanced a functional property of the coating on glass. In order to achieve this, new thin film deposition methods were developed, namely use of nanopowder precursors, an aerosol assisted transport technique and an aerosol into atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition system. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) was used to deposit 8 series of thin films on glass. Five different nanoparticles silver, gold, ceria, tungsten oxide and zinc oxide were tested and shown to successfully deposit thin films incorporating nanoparticles within a host matrix. Silver nanoparticles were synthesised and doped within a titania film by AACVD. This improved solar control properties. A unique aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) into atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) system was used to deposit films of Au nanoparticles and thin films of gold nanoparticles incorporated within a host titania matrix. Incorporation of high refractive index contrast metal oxide particles within a host film altered the film colour. The key goal was to test the potential of nanopowder forms and transfer the suspended nanopowder via an aerosol to a substrate in order to deposit a thin film. Discrete tungsten oxide nanoparticles or ceria nanoparticles within a titanium dioxide thin film enhanced the self-cleaning and photo-induced super-hydrophilicity. The nanopowder precursor study was extended by deposition of zinc oxide thin films incorporating Au nanoparticles and also ZnO films deposited from a ZnO nanopowder precursor. Incorporation of Au nanoparticles within a VO: host matrix improved the thermochromic response, optical and colour properties. Composite VC/TiC and Au nanoparticle/V02/Ti02 thin films displayed three useful

  11. Cancer treatment - preventing infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation - preventing infection; Bone marrow transplant - preventing infection; Cancer treatment - immunosuppression ... this is a short-lived side effect of cancer treatment. Your provider may give you medicines to help ...

  12. Preventing Diabetes Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Preventing Diabetes Problems View or Print All Sections Heart Disease & ... prevent or delay sexual and urologic problems. Depression & Diabetes Depression is common among people with a chronic, ...

  13. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiatives Best Practices Our Network Media Resources National Suicide Prevention Lifeline We can all help prevent suicide. ... About The Lifeline Anyone could be struggling with suicide. Find more specific resources below. I'm Struggling ...

  14. Can Vaginitis Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the treatments? Are there complications? Does it affect pregnancy? How is it prevented? NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Can vaginitis be prevented? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content These steps can ...

  15. Marine Pollution Prevention Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Pollution Prevention Act of 2008 implements the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, including related Protocols (MARPOL)...

  16. Men's Health: Violence Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health This information in Spanish ( en español ) Violence prevention for men Get help for violence in your ... help. Return to top More information on Violence prevention for men Explore other publications and websites Are ...

  17. Prevent Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... professional printing [PDF-1.5MB] Cancer Home “Prevent Cervical Cancer” Infographic Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prevent Cervical Cancer with the Right Test at the Right Time ...

  18. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Stomach Cancer Key Points Stomach (gastric) cancer is a ...

  19. Preventing cervical cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevention of disease. Disease prevention strategies can be categorised into primary ... decrease drastically. These may include measures like education about safe sexual practices ... In many First-World countries the introduction of the ...

  20. Home Injury Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fax mgfa@myasthenia.org • www.myasthenia.org HOME INJURY PREVENTION Home Injur y Prevention A helpful guide for patients and their caregivers. www.myasthenia.org General cont’d. •Be alert ...

  1. Prevent Bite Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Prevention > Prevent Bite Wounds ... animals or other humans. Consider the following statistics: there are about 4.5 million dog bites reported annually in the United States, along ...

  2. Traditional preventive treatment options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longbottom, C; Ekstrand, K; Zero, D

    2009-01-01

    Preventive treatment options can be divided into primary, secondary and tertiary prevention techniques, which can involve patient- or professionally applied methods. These include: oral hygiene (instruction), pit and fissure sealants ('temporary' or 'permanent'), fluoride applications (patient...

  3. High Blood Cholesterol Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Prevention and Management of High LDL Cholesterol: What You Can Do Recommend on ... like eating a healthy diet, can help prevent high cholesterol. High low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol increases ...

  4. Antioxidants and Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Antioxidants and Cancer Prevention On This Page What are free radicals, and ... nine trials are summarized below. Linxian General Population Nutrition Intervention Trial : This trial was the first large- ...

  5. Jet lag prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000719.htm Jet lag prevention To use the sharing features on this page, ... Headache Irritability Stomach upset Sore muscles Tips for Prevention Before your trip: Get plenty of rest, eat ...

  6. CANCER CAN BE PREVENTED

    OpenAIRE

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-01-01

    Life style factors are contributing significantly in cancer prevention. With the intake of proper and balanced diet ,cancer prevention is possible. Many foods are associated either with incidence or prevention of cancer. Plant based foods like fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains rich in fiber, b-carotene, vitamins and antioxidants can prevent cancer. Fiber rich foods increase bowel movement, decreasing the absorption of cholesterol. Pumpkin, carrots contain b-carotenes. Leafy vegetables...

  7. Influence of particle size and reactive oxygen species on cobalt chrome nanoparticle-mediated genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Devey, Michael; Hawkins, Sue; Hails, Lauren; Davis, Sean A; Mann, Stephen; Chang, Isaac T; Ingham, Eileen; Malhas, Ashraf; Vaux, David J; Lane, Jon D; Case, Charles P

    2013-05-01

    Patients with cobalt chrome (CoCr) metal-on-metal (MOM) implants may be exposed to a wide size range of metallic nanoparticles as a result of wear. In this study we have characterised the biological responses of human fibroblasts to two types of synthetically derived CoCr particles [(a) from a tribometer (30 nm) and (b) thermal plasma technology (20, 35, and 80 nm)] in vitro, testing their dependence on nanoparticle size or the generation of oxygen free radicals, or both. Metal ions were released from the surface of nanoparticles, particularly from larger (80 nm) particles generated by thermal plasma technology. Exposure of fibroblasts to these nanoparticles triggered rapid (2 h) generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that could be eliminated by inhibition of NADPH oxidase, suggesting that it was mediated by phagocytosis of the particles. The exposure also caused a more prolonged, MitoQ sensitive production of ROS (24 h), suggesting involvement of mitochondria. Consequently, we recorded elevated levels of aneuploidy, chromosome clumping, fragmentation of mitochondria and damage to the cytoskeleton particularly to the microtubule network. Exposure to the nanoparticles resulted in misshapen nuclei, disruption of mature lamin B1 and increased nucleoplasmic bridges, which could be prevented by MitoQ. In addition, increased numbers of micronuclei were observed and these were only partly prevented by MitoQ, and the incidence of micronuclei and ion release from the nanoparticles were positively correlated with nanoparticle size, although the cytogenetic changes, modifications in nuclear shape and the amount of ROS were not. These results suggest that cells exhibit diverse mitochondrial ROS-dependent and independent responses to CoCr particles, and that nanoparticle size and the amount of metal ion released are influential.

  8. Graphene-bonded and -encapsulated si nanoparticles for lithium ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yang; Zhu, Yujie; Langrock, Alex; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Ehrman, Sheryl H; Wang, Chunsheng

    2013-08-26

    Silicon (Si) has been considered a very promising anode material for lithium ion batteries due to its high theoretical capacity. However, high-capacity Si nanoparticles usually suffer from low electronic conductivity, large volume change, and severe aggregation problems during lithiation and delithiation. In this paper, a unique nanostructured anode with Si nanoparticles bonded and wrapped by graphene is synthesized by a one-step aerosol spraying of surface-modified Si nanoparticles and graphene oxide suspension. The functional groups on the surface of Si nanoparticles (50-100 nm) not only react with graphene oxide and bind Si nanoparticles to the graphene oxide shell, but also prevent Si nanoparticles from aggregation, thus contributing to a uniform Si suspension. A homogeneous graphene-encapsulated Si nanoparticle morphology forms during the aerosol spraying process. The open-ended graphene shell with defects allows fast electrochemical lithiation/delithiation, and the void space inside the graphene shell accompanied by its strong mechanical strength can effectively accommodate the volume expansion of Si upon lithiation. The graphene shell provides good electronic conductivity for Si nanoparticles and prevents them from aggregating during charge/discharge cycles. The functionalized Si encapsulated by graphene sample exhibits a capacity of 2250 mAh g⁻¹ (based on the total mass of graphene and Si) at 0.1C and 1000 mAh g⁻¹ at 10C, and retains 85% of its initial capacity even after 120 charge/discharge cycles. The exceptional performance of graphene-encapsulated Si anodes combined with the scalable and one-step aerosol synthesis technique makes this material very promising for lithium ion batteries.

  9. Prevention IS Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-03-26

    This podcast provides an overview of the Prevention IS Care campaign, which provides HIV prevention tools for medical care providers to use on a daily basis with patients who are living with HIV.  Created: 3/26/2009 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/26/2009.

  10. Sustainability of prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, J D; Clayton, R

    2000-01-01

    This paper outlines the guidelines for sustaining prevention and makes suggestions for getting from the field's current status to greater levels of permanence for prevention. The paper begins by reviewing the status of prevention, then focuses on major considerations for achieving sustainability, including two processes of institutionalization, comprehensive programming and professionalism.

  11. Chickenpox Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Multimedia Related Links Medline Plus Healthfinder.gov Shingles Prevention & Treatment Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... by Your Doctor Español: Prevención y tratamiento Prevention The best way to prevent chickenpox is to ...

  12. Preventive Medicine Redefined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, George

    1981-01-01

    Departments of preventive medicine can survive through unity, which can be achieved through majority agreement on a new and specific definition of preventive medicine. A definition is proposed that is based on a review and analysis of recent progress in the prevention of the major causes of mortality. (MLW)

  13. Prevention of Food Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Army Quartermaster School, Ft. Lee, VA.

    The programed text provides a single lesson, four-hour, correspondence subcourse on the prevention of food poisoning. It covers the following areas: a definition of food poisoning; chemical food poisoning; biological food poisoning; causes and prevention of trichinosis; six factors controlling bacteria growth; bacterial infection; prevention of…

  14. Smart nanoparticles as targeting platforms for HIV infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Rishi Rajat; More, Prachi; Banerjee, Rinti

    2015-04-01

    While Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections are reducing in incidence with the advent of Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy (HAART), there remain a number of challenges including the existence of reservoirs, drug resistance and anatomical barriers to antiretroviral therapy. To overcome these, smart nanoparticles with stimuli responsive release are proposed for delivery of anti-retroviral agents. The paper highlights the strategic similarities between the design of smart antiretroviral nanocarriers and those optimized for cancer chemotherapy. This includes the development of nanoparticles capable of passive and active targeting as well as those that are responsive to various internal and external triggers. For antiretroviral therapy, the relevant triggers for stimuli responsive release of drugs include semen, enzymes, endosomal escape, temperature and magnetic field. Deriving from the experience of cancer chemotherapy, additional potential triggers are light and ultrasound which remain hitherto unexplored in HIV therapy. In addition, the roles of nanomicrobicides (nanogels) and virus mimetic nanoparticles are discussed from the point of view of prevention of HIV transmission. The challenges associated with translation of smart nanoparticles for HIV infections to realize the Millennium Development Goal of combating HIV infections are discussed.

  15. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Brain Tumor Diagnosis and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu; Morshed, Ramin; Auffinger, Brenda; Tobias, Alex L.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2013-01-01

    Brain tumors are a diverse group of neoplasms that often carry a poor prognosis for patients. Despite tremendous efforts to develop diagnostic tools and therapeutic avenues, the treatment of brain tumors remains a formidable challenge in the field of neuro-oncology. Physiological barriers including the blood-brain barrier result in insufficient accumulation of therapeutic agents at the site of a tumor, preventing adequate destruction of malignant cells. Furthermore, there is a need for improvements in brain tumor imaging to allow for better characterization and delineation of tumors, visualization of malignant tissue during surgery, and tracking of response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Multifunctional nanoparticles offer the potential to improve upon many of these issues and may lead to breakthroughs in brain tumor management. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of nanoparticles for brain tumors with an emphasis on innovative approaches in tumor targeting, tumor imaging, and therapeutic agent delivery. Clinically feasible nanoparticle administration strategies for brain tumor patients are also examined. Furthermore, we address the barriers towards clinical implementation of multifunctional nanoparticles in the context of brain tumor management. PMID:24060923

  16. Nanoparticles reduce nickel allergy by capturing metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Anderson, R. Rox; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-05-01

    Approximately 10% of the population in the USA suffer from nickel allergy, and many are unable to wear jewellery or handle coins and other objects that contain nickel. Many agents have been developed to reduce the penetration of nickel through skin, but few formulations are safe and effective. Here, we show that applying a thin layer of glycerine emollient containing nanoparticles of either calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate on an isolated piece of pig skin (in vitro) and on the skin of mice (in vivo) prevents the penetration of nickel ions into the skin. The nanoparticles capture nickel ions by cation exchange, and remain on the surface of the skin, allowing them to be removed by simple washing with water. Approximately 11-fold fewer nanoparticles by mass are required to achieve the same efficacy as the chelating agent ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Using nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 500 nm in topical creams may be an effective way to limit the exposure to metal ions that can cause skin irritation.

  17. Curcuminoids-loaded lipid nanoparticles: novel approach towards malaria treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Aditya P; Tiyaboonchai, Waree; Patankar, Swati; Madhusudhan, Basavaraj; Souto, Eliana B

    2010-11-01

    In the present work, curcuminoids-loaded lipid nanoparticles for parenteral administration were successfully prepared by a nanoemulsion technique employing high-speed homogenizer and ultrasonic probe. For the production of nanoparticles, trimyristin, tristerin and glyceryl monostearate were selected as solid lipids and medium chain triglyceride (MCT) as liquid lipid. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the spherical nature of the particles with sizes ranging between 120 and 250 nm measured by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS). The zeta potential of the particles ranged between -28 and -45 mV depending on the nature of the lipid matrix produced, which also influenced the entrapment efficiency (EE) and drug loading capacity (LC) found to be in the range of 80-94% and 1.62-3.27%, respectively. The LC increased reciprocally on increasing the amount of MCT as confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC analyses revealed that increasing imperfections within the lipid matrix allowed for increasing encapsulation parameters. Nanoparticles were further sterilized by filtration process which was found to be superior over autoclaving in preventing thermal degradation of thermo-sensitive curcuminoids. The in vivo pharmacodynamic activity revealed 2-fold increase in antimalarial activity of curcuminoids entrapped in lipid nanoparticles when compared to free curcuminoids at the tested dosage level. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biosynthesized silver nanoparticles to control fungal infections in indoor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyá, Cecilia; Bellotti, Natalia

    2017-06-01

    Fungi grow especially in dark and moist areas, deteriorating the indoor environment and causing infections that particularly affect immunosuppressed individuals. Antimicrobial coatings have as principal objective to prevent biofilm formation and infections by incorporation of bioactive additives. In this sense, metallic nanoparticles, such as silver, have proven to be active against different microorganisms specially bacteria. Biosynthesized method is a promising environmentally friendly option to obtain nanoparticles. The aim of this research was assess the employment of plants extracts of Aloysia triphylla (cedrón), Laurelia sempervirens (laurel) and Ruta chalepensis (ruda) to obtain silver nanoparticles to be used as an antimicrobial additive to a waterborne coating formulation. The products obtained were assessed against fungal isolates from biodeteriorated indoor coatings. The fungi were identified by conventional and molecular techniques as Chaetomium globosum and Alternaria alternate. The results revealed that the coating with silver nanoparticles obtained with L. sempervirens extract at 60 °C with a size of 9.8 nm was the most efficient against fungal biofilm development.

  19. Studies of aggregated nanoparticles steering during magnetic-guided drug delivery in the blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshiar, Ali Kafash; Le, Tuan-Anh; Amin, Faiz Ul; Kim, Myeong Ok; Yoon, Jungwon

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic-guided targeted drug delivery (TDD) systems can enhance the treatment of diverse diseases. Despite the potential and promising results of nanoparticles, aggregation prevents precise particle guidance in the vasculature. In this study, we developed a simulation platform to investigate aggregation during steering of nanoparticles using a magnetic field function. The magnetic field function (MFF) comprises a positive and negative pulsed magnetic field generated by electromagnetic coils, which prevents adherence of particles to the vessel wall during magnetic guidance. A commonly used Y-shaped vessel was simulated and the performance of the MFF analyzed; the experimental data were in agreement with the simulation results. Moreover, the effects of various parameters on magnetic guidance were evaluated and the most influential identified. The simulation results presented herein will facilitate more precise guidance of nanoparticles in vivo.

  20. Applications of inorganic nanoparticles in diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhabush, Nada Atiya Omar

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is an endocrine and metabolic disease that has become a global emergency because of the rapid rise in morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Since the direct delivery of biomolecules, such as insulin, to treat DM is inefficient and subjected to enzymatic degradation, nanotechnology and nanomedicine research have been devoted to the development of more effective methods to treat DM. Nanoparticles (NP), organic, inorganic, or hybrid, have served as potential carrier for safe and efficient transport for insulin. Additionally, several NP have biological activities that help treat and/or prevent DM and diabetes complications, such as antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, or insulin-mimetic activities. Moreover, physicochemical properties of some NP allow them to be used in diagnostic tools for potential diagnosis or monitoring purposes. This work highlights the applications of inorganic NP such as, gold, selenium, silver, calcium phosphate, zinc oxide, cerium oxide, and iron oxide and in the treatment or diagnosis of DM.

  1. A sunblock based on bioadhesive nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yang; Ediriwickrema, Asiri; Yang, Fan; Lewis, Julia; Girardi, Michael; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2015-12-01

    The majority of commercial sunblock preparations use organic or inorganic ultraviolet (UV) filters. Despite protecting against cutaneous phototoxicity, direct cellular exposure to UV filters has raised a variety of health concerns. Here, we show that the encapsulation of padimate O (PO)--a model UV filter--in bioadhesive nanoparticles (BNPs) prevents epidermal cellular exposure to UV filters while enhancing UV protection. BNPs are readily suspended in water, facilitate adherence to the stratum corneum without subsequent intra-epidermal or follicular penetration, and their interaction with skin is water resistant yet the particles can be removed via active towel drying. Although the sunblock based on BNPs contained less than 5 wt% of the UV-filter concentration found in commercial standards, the anti-UV effect was comparable when tested in two murine models. Moreover, the BNP-based sunblock significantly reduced double-stranded DNA breaks when compared with a commercial sunscreen formulation.

  2. The suppression of prostate LNCaP cancer cells growth by Selenium nanoparticles through Akt/Mdm2/AR controlled apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ling; Yuan, Qing; Zhu, Huarui; Li, Ying; Guo, Quanyi; Wang, Qin; Bi, Xiaolin; Gao, Xueyun

    2011-09-01

    The trace element Selenium is suggested having cancer prevention activity and used as food supplement. Previous results had shown Selenium nanoparticles are safer compared with other Selenium compounds like selenomethionine, sodium selenite and monomethylated Selenium, however, its anticancer activity and intrinsic mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we prepared Selenium nanoparticles and investigated its inherent anticancer mechanisms. We found Selenium nanoparticles inhibit growth of prostate LNCaP cancer cells partially through caspases mediated apoptosis. Selenium nanoparticles suppress transcriptional activity of androgen receptor via down-regulating its mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, Selenium nanoparticles activate Akt kinase by increasing its phosphorylation, promote Akt-dependent androgen receptor phosphorylation and Mdm2 regulated degradation through proteasome pathway. We suggest Selenium nanoparticles suppress prostate cancer cells growth by disrupting androgen receptor, implicating a potential application in cancer treatment.

  3. Nanocalorimetry of bismuth nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Eric Ashley

    The properties of nanosized bismuth particles are investigated using a nanocalorimetric technique. A brief description of the experimental method and data analysis procedures is reported. Bismuth nanoparticles are found to melt at a temperature below that of bulk material, but higher than expected using the standard model. Also included is the results of a finite element analysis and simulated melting of bismuth films on various kinds of sensors. Temperature distributions are found to be nonuniform for calorimetric sensors with Al metallizations, but much more uniform for Pt metallized sensors. The consequences of this nonuniformity on caloric data are discussed.

  4. Antibacterial properties of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajipour, Mohammad J; Fromm, Katharina M; Ashkarran, Ali Akbar; Jimenez de Aberasturi, Dorleta; de Larramendi, Idoia Ruiz; Rojo, Teofilo; Serpooshan, Vahid; Parak, Wolfgang J; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2012-10-01

    Antibacterial agents are very important in the textile industry, water disinfection, medicine, and food packaging. Organic compounds used for disinfection have some disadvantages, including toxicity to the human body, therefore, the interest in inorganic disinfectants such as metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) is increasing. This review focuses on the properties and applications of inorganic nanostructured materials and their surface modifications, with good antimicrobial activity. Such improved antibacterial agents locally destroy bacteria, without being toxic to the surrounding tissue. We also provide an overview of opportunities and risks of using NPs as antibacterial agents. In particular, we discuss the role of different NP materials.

  5. Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

    2014-08-12

    A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassim, Aqilah; Rachmawati, Heni

    2010-10-01

    Taking calcium supplements can reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis, but they are not readily absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Nanotechnology is expected to resolve this problem. In this study, we prepared and characterized calcium carbonate nanoparticle to improve the solubility by using bottom-up method. The experiment was done by titrating calcium chloride with sodium carbonate with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as stabilizer, using ultra-turrax. Various concentrations of calcium chloride and sodium carbonate as well as various speed of stirring were used to prepare the calcium carbonate nanoparticles. Evaluations studied were including particle size, polydispersity index (PI) and zeta potential with particle analyzer, surface morphology with scanning electron microscope, and saturated solubility. In addition, to test the ability of PVP to prevent particles growth, short stability study was performed by storing nano CaCO3 suspension at room temperature for 2 weeks. Results show that using 8000 rpm speed of stirring, the particle size tends to be bigger with the range of 500-600 nm (PI between 0.2-0.4) whereas with stirring speed of 4000 rpm, the particle size tends to be smaller with 300-400 nm (PI between 0.2-0.4). Stirring speed of 6000 rpm produced particle size within the range of 400-500 nm (PI between 0.2-0.4). SEM photograph shows that particles are monodisperse confirming that particles were physically stable without any agglomeration within 2 weeks storage. Taken together, nano CaCO3 is successfully prepared by bottom-up method and PVP is a good stabilizer to prevent the particle growth.

  7. Improved thermal stability of gas-phase Mg nanoparticles for hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnan, Gopi; Palasantzas, G.; Kooi, B. J.

    2010-01-01

    This work focuses on improving the thermal stability of Mg nanoparticles (NPs) for use in hydrogen storage. Three ways are investigated that can achieve this goal. (i) Addition of Cu prevents void formation during NP production and reduces the fast evaporation/voiding of Mg during annealing. (ii) Al

  8. Synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadory, Mozhgan

    Improved methods were developed for the synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles. Laboratory experiments were designed for introducing of nanotechnology into the undergraduate curriculum. An optimal set of conditions for the synthesis of clear yellow colloidal silver was investigated. Silver nanoparticles were obtained by borohydride reduction of silver nitrate, a method which produces particles with average size of 12+/-2 nm, determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The plasmon absorbance is at 397 nm and the peak width at half maximum (PWHM) is 70-75 nm. The relationship between aggregation and optical properties was determined along with a method to protect the particles using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). A laboratory experiment was designed in which students synthesize yellow colloidal silver, estimate particle size using visible spectroscopy, and study aggregation effects. The synthesis of the less stable copper nanoparticles is more difficult because copper nanopaticles are easily oxidized. Four methods were used for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles, including chemical reduction with sodium borohydride, sodium borohydride with potassium iodide, isopropyl alcohol with cetyltrimethylammonium bormide (CTAB) and reducing sugars. The latter method was also the basis for an undergraduate laboratory experiment. For each reaction, the dependence of stability of the copper nanoparticles on reagent concentrations, additives, relative amounts of reactants, and temperature is explored. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM and UV-Visible Spectroscopy were used to characterize the copper nanoparticles. A laboratory experiment to produce copper nanoparticles from household chemicals was developed.

  9. Solventless synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Peña, Nidia G. [Departmento de Tecnociencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cd. Universitaria A.P. 70-186, C.P. 04510 Coyoacán, México D.F. (Mexico); Redón, Rocío, E-mail: rredon@unam.mx [Departmento de Tecnociencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cd. Universitaria A.P. 70-186, C.P. 04510 Coyoacán, México D.F. (Mexico); Herrera-Gomez, Alberto [Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Campus Juriquilla, Querétaro (Mexico); Fernández-Osorio, Ana Leticia [FES-Cuautitlán, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Bravo-Sanchez, Mariela; Gomez-Sosa, Gustavo [Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Campus Juriquilla, Querétaro (Mexico)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Successful synthesis of Ru nanoparticles by a cheap, fast and solventless approach was achieved. • The zero-valent state as well as the by-product/impurity free of the mechanochemical obtained Ru nanoparticles was proven by XPS, TEM and XRD. • Compared to two other synthesis strategies, the above-mentioned synthesis was more suitable to obtain smaller particles with fewer impurities in shorter time. - Abstract: This paper presents a novel solventless method for the synthesis of zero-valent ruthenium nanoparticles Ru(0). The proposed method, although not entirely new in the nanomaterials world, was used for the first time to synthesize zero-valent ruthenium nanoparticles. This new approach has proved to be an environmentally friendly, clean, cheap, fast, and reproducible technique which employs low amounts of solvent. It was optimized through varying amounts of reducing salt on a determined quantity of precursor and measuring the effect of this variation on the average particle size obtained. The resulting products were fully characterized by powder XRD, TEM, HR-TEM, and XPS studies, all of which corroborated the purity of the nanoparticles achieved. In order to verify the advantages of our method over other techniques, we compared our nanoparticles with two common colloidal-synthesized ruthenium nanoparticles.

  10. Precise quantification of nanoparticle internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottstein, Claudia; Wu, Guohui; Wong, Benjamin J; Zasadzinski, Joseph Anthony

    2013-06-25

    Nanoparticles have opened new exciting avenues for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications in human disease, and targeted nanoparticles are increasingly used as specific drug delivery vehicles. The precise quantification of nanoparticle internalization is of importance to measure the impact of physical and chemical properties on the uptake of nanoparticles into target cells or into cells responsible for rapid clearance. Internalization of nanoparticles has been measured by various techniques, but comparability of data between different laboratories is impeded by lack of a generally accepted standardized assay. Furthermore, the distinction between associated and internalized particles has been a challenge for many years, although this distinction is critical for most research questions. Previously used methods to verify intracellular location are typically not quantitative and do not lend themselves to high-throughput analysis. Here, we developed a mathematical model which integrates the data from high-throughput flow cytometry measurements with data from quantitative confocal microscopy. The generic method described here will be a useful tool in biomedical nanotechnology studies. The method was then applied to measure the impact of surface coatings of vesosomes on their internalization by cells of the reticuloendothelial system (RES). RES cells are responsible for rapid clearance of nanoparticles, and the resulting fast blood clearance is one of the major challenges in biomedical applications of nanoparticles. Coating of vesosomes with long chain polyethylene glycol showed a trend for lower internalization by RES cells.

  11. Prevention Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  12. Polymeric nanoparticles for the intracellular delivery of paclitaxel in lung and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubris, Kimberly Ann Veronica

    Nanoparticles are useful for addressing many of the difficulties encountered when administering therapeutic compounds. Nanoparticles are able to increase the solubility of hydrophobic drugs, improve pharmacokinetics through sustained release, alter biodistribution, protect sensitive drugs from low pH environments or enzymatic alteration, and, in some cases, provide targeting of the drug to the desired tissues. The use of functional nanocarriers can also provide controlled intracellular delivery of a drug. To this end, we have developed functional pH-responsive expansile nanoparticles for the intracellular delivery of paclitaxel. The pH-responsiveness of these nanoparticles occurs due to a hydrophobic to hydrophilic transition of the polymer occurring under mildly acidic conditions. These polymeric nanoparticles were systematically evaluated for the delivery of paclitaxel in vitro and in vivo to improve local therapy for lung and breast cancers. Nanoparticles were synthesized using a miniemulsion polymerization process and were subsequently characterized and found to swell when exposed to acidic environments. Paclitaxel was successfully encapsulated within the nanoparticles, and the particles exhibited drug release at pH 5 but not at pH 7.4. In addition, the uptake of nanoparticles was observed using flow cytometry, and the anticancer efficacy of the paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles was measured using cancer cell lines in vitro. The potency of the paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles was close to that of free drug, demonstrating that the drug was effectively delivered by the particles and that the particles could act as an intracellular drug depot. Following in vitro characterization, murine in vivo studies demonstrated the ability of the paclitaxel-loaded responsive nanoparticles to delay recurrence of lung cancer and to prevent establishment of breast cancer in the mammary fat pads with higher efficacy than paclitaxel alone. In addition, the ability of nanoparticles to

  13. Superparamagnetic Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles: one-pot synthesis, biofunctionalization and toxicity evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariti, A.; Desai, P.; Maddirala, S. K. Y.; Ercal, N.; Katti, K. V.; Liang, X.; Nath, M.

    2014-09-01

    Superparamagnetic Au-Fe3O4 bifunctional nanoparticles have been synthesized using a single step hot-injection precipitation method. The synthesis involved using Fe(CO)5 as iron precursor and HAuCl4 as gold precursor in the presence of oleylamine and oleic acid. Oleylamine helps in reducing Au3+ to Au0 seeds which simultaneously oxidizes Fe(0) to form Au-Fe3O4 bifunctional nanoparticles. Triton® X-100 was employed as a highly viscous solvent to prevent agglomeration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Detailed characterization of these nanoparticles was performed by using x-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning tunneling electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, Mössbauer and magnetometry studies. To evaluate these nanoparticles’ applicability in biomedical applications, L-cysteine was attached to the Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles and cytotoxicity of Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles was tested using CHO cells by employing MTS assay. L-cysteine modified Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles were qualitatively characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy; and quantitatively using acid ninhydrin assay. Investigations reveal that that this approach yields Au-Fe3O4 bifunctional nanoparticles with an average particle size of 80 nm. Mössbauer studies indicated the presence of Fe in Fe3+ in A and B sites (tetrahedral and octahedral, respectively) and Fe2+ in B sites (octahedral). Magnetic measurements also indicated that these nanoparticles were superparamagnetic in nature due to Fe3O4 region. The saturation magnetization for the bifunctional nanoparticles was observed to be ˜74 emu g-1, which is significantly higher than the previously reported Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Mössbauer studies indicated that there was no significant Fe(0) impurity that could be responsible for the superparamagnetic nature of these nanoparticles. None of the investigations showed any presence of other impurities such as Fe2O3 and FeOOH. These Au-Fe3O4 bifunctional

  14. Polyethylene Nanocomposites for the Next Generation of Ultralow-Transmission-Loss HVDC Cables: Insulation Containing Moisture-Resistant MgO Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourrahimi, Amir Masoud; Pallon, Love K H; Liu, Dongming; Hoang, Tuan Anh; Gubanski, Stanislaw; Hedenqvist, Mikael S; Olsson, Richard T; Gedde, Ulf W

    2016-06-15

    The use of MgO nanoparticles in polyethylene for cable insulation has attracted considerable interest, although in humid media the surface regions of the nanoparticles undergo a conversion to a hydroxide phase. A facile method to obtain MgO nanoparticles with a large surface area and remarkable inertness to humidity is presented. The method involves (a) low temperature (400 °C) thermal decomposition of Mg(OH)2, (b) a silicone oxide coating to conceal the nanoparticles and prevent interparticle sintering upon exposure to high temperatures, and (c) heat treatment at 1000 °C. The formation of the hydroxide phase on these silicone oxide-coated MgO nanoparticles after extended exposure to humid air was assessed by thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The nanoparticles showed essentially no sign of any hydroxide phase compared to particles prepared by the conventional single-step thermal decomposition of Mg(OH)2. The moisture-resistant MgO nanoparticles showed improved dispersion and interfacial adhesion in the LDPE matrix with smaller nanosized particle clusters compared with conventionally prepared MgO. The addition of 1 wt % moisture-resistant MgO nanoparticles was sufficient to decrease the conductivity of polyethylene 30 times. The reduction in conductivity is discussed in terms of defect concentration on the surface of the moisture-resistant MgO nanoparticles at the polymer/nanoparticle interface.

  15. Nanopore and nanoparticle catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J M; Raja, R

    2001-01-01

    The design, atomic characterization, performance, and relevance to clean technology of two distinct categories of new nanocatalysts are described and interpreted. Exceptional molecular selectivity and high activity are exhibited by these catalysts. The first category consists of extended, crystallographically ordered inorganic solids possessing nanopores (apertures, cages, and channels), the diameters of which fall in the range of about 0.4 to about 1.5 nm, and the second of discrete bimetallic nanoparticles of diameter 1 to 2 nm, distributed more or less uniformly along the inner walls of mesoporous (ca. 3 to 10 nm diameter) silica supports. Using the principles and practices of solid-state and organometallic chemistry and advanced physico-chemical techniques for in situ and ex situ characterization, a variety of powerful new catalysts has been evolved. Apart from those that, inter alia, simulate the behavior of enzymes in their specificity, shape selectivity, regio-selectivity, and ability to function under ambient conditions, many of these new nanocatalysts are also viable as agents for effecting commercially significant processes in a clean, benign, solvent-free, single-step fashion. In particular, a bifunctional, molecular sieve nanopore catalyst is described that converts cyclohexanone in air and ammonia to its oxime and caprolactam, and a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst that selectively converts cyclic polyenes into desirable intermediates. Nanocatalysts in the first category are especially effective in facilitating highly selective oxidations in air, and those in the second are well suited to effecting rapid and selective hydrogenations of a range of organic compounds.

  16. Nanoparticle optical notch filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinadhuni, Pradeep Kumar

    Developing novel light blocking products involves the design of a nanoparticle optical notch filter, working on the principle of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). These light blocking products can be used in many applications. One such application is to naturally reduce migraine headaches and light sensitivity. Melanopsin ganglion cells present in the retina of the human eye, connect to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN-the body's clock) in the brain, where they participate in the entrainment of the circadian rhythms. As the Melanopsin ganglion cells are involved in triggering the migraine headaches in photophobic patients, it is necessary to block the part of visible spectrum that activates these cells. It is observed from the action potential spectrum of the ganglion cells that they absorb light ranging from 450-500nm (blue-green part) of the visible spectrum with a λmax (peak sensitivity) of around 480nm (blue line). Currently prescribed for migraine patients is the FL-41 coating, which blocks a broad range of wavelengths, including wavelengths associated with melanopsin absorption. The nanoparticle optical notch filter is designed to block light only at 480nm, hence offering an effective prescription for the treatment of migraine headaches.

  17. Cyclodextrin-grafted barium titanate nanoparticles for improved dispersion and stabilization in water-based systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra-Gómez, R. [Universidad de Navarra, Departamento de Química y Edafología (Spain); Martinez-Tarifa, J. M. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica (Spain); González-Benito, J. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Departamento de Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales e Ingeniería Química, IQMAAB (Spain); González-Gaitano, G., E-mail: gaitano@unav.es [Universidad de Navarra, Departamento de Química y Edafología (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Ceramic nanoparticles with piezoelectric properties, such as BaTiO{sub 3} (BT), constitute a promising approach in the fields of nanocomposite materials and biomaterials. In the latter case, to be successful in their preparation, the drawback of their fast aggregation and practically null stability in water has to be overcome. The objective of this investigation has been the surface functionalization of BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles with cyclodextrins (CDs) as a way to break the aggregation and improve the stability of the nanoparticles in water solution, preventing and minimizing their fast precipitation. As a secondary goal, we have achieved extra-functionality of the nanoparticles, bestowed from the hydrophobic cavity of the macrocycle, which is able to lodge guest molecules that can form inclusion complexes with the oligosaccharide. The nanoparticle functionalization has been fully tracked and characterized, and the cytotoxicity of the modified nanoparticles with fibroblasts and pre-osteoblasts cell lines has been assessed with excellent results in a wide range of concentrations. The modified nanoparticles were found to be suitable for the easy preparation of nanocomposite hydrogels, via dispersion in hydrophilic polymers of typical use in biomedical applications (PEG, Pluronics, and PEO), and further processed in the form of films via water casting, showing very good results in terms of homogeneity in the dispersion of the filler. Likewise, as examples of application and with the aim of exploring a different range of nanocomposites, rhodamine B was included in the macrocycles as a model molecule, and films prepared from a thermoplastic matrix (EVA) via high-energy ball milling have been tested by impedance spectroscopy to discuss their dielectric properties, which indicated that even small modifications in the surface of the nanoparticles generate a different kind of interaction with the polymeric matrix. The CD-modified nanoparticles are thus suitable for easy

  18. Synthesis of monodisperse TiO2-paraffin core-shell nanoparticles for improved dielectric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Balamurugan; Kraemer, Kristin L; Reding, Nicholas A; Skomski, Ralph; Ducharme, Stephen; Sellmyer, David J

    2010-04-27

    Core-shell structures of oxide nanoparticles having a high dielectric constant, and organic shells with large breakdown field are attractive candidates for large electrical energy storage applications. A high growth temperature, however, is required to obtain the dielectric oxide nanoparticles, which affects the process of core-shell formation and also leads to poor control of size, shape, and size-distribution. In this communication, we report a new synthetic process to grow core-shell nanoparticles by means of an experimental method that can be easily adapted to synthesize core-shell structures from a variety of inorganic-organic or inorganic-inorganic materials. Monodisperse and spherical TiO2 nanoparticles were produced at room temperature as a collimated cluster beam in the gas phase using a cluster-deposition source and subsequently coated with uniform paraffin nanoshells using in situ thermal evaporation, prior to deposition on substrates for further characterization and device processing. The paraffin nanoshells prevent the TiO2 nanoparticles from contacting each other and also act as a matrix in which the volume fraction of TiO2 nanoparticles was varied by controlling the thickness of the nanoshells. Parallel-plate capacitors were fabricated using dielectric core-shell nanoparticles having different shell thicknesses. With respect to the bulk paraffin, the effective dielectric constant of TiO2-paraffin core-shell nanoparticles is greatly enhanced with a decrease in the shell thickness. The capacitors show a minimum dielectric dispersion and low dielectric losses in the frequency range of 100 Hz-1 MHz, which are highly desirable for exploiting these core-shell nanoparticles for potential applications.

  19. Watching nanoparticle kinetics in liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yugang Sun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Real-time monitoring of reaction kinetics involved in nanoparticle growth and transformation in liquid environments is crucial for understanding the complex chemical and physical events associated with nanophase evolution. Accordingly, in situ techniques that can “see through” liquids to probe nanomaterial variation are in high demand, as they will help us understand reaction mechanisms and design better synthetic strategies for building nanoparticles with precisely tailored properties. In this review, in situ transmission x-ray microscopy and time-resolved high-energy x-ray scattering techniques are discussed, highlight their capabilities in studying the dynamic processes of nanoparticles.

  20. [Toxicity of nanoparticles on reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, F; Courbière, B; Rose, J; Orsière, T; Sari-Minodier, I; Bottero, J-Y; Auffan, M; Perrin, J

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are sized between 1 and 100nm. Their size allows new nanoscale properties of particular interest for industrial and scientific purpose. Over the past twenty years, nanotechnology conquered many areas of use (electronic, cosmetic, textile…). While, human is exposed to an increasing number of nanoparticles sources, health impacts and, particularly on reproductive function, remains poorly evaluated. Indeed, traceability of nanoparticles use is lacking and nanotoxicology follows different rules than classical toxicology. This review focuses on the impact of NPs on health and particularly on fertility and addresses potential risks of chronic exposure to NPs on human fertility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Uniform excitations in magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Frandsen, Cathrine; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2010-01-01

    We present a short review of the magnetic excitations in nanoparticles below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. In this temperature regime, the magnetic dynamics in nanoparticles is dominated by uniform excitations, and this leads to a linear temperature dependence of the magnetization...... and the magnetic hyperfine field, in contrast to the Bloch T3/2 law in bulk materials. The temperature dependence of the average magnetization is conveniently studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The energy of the uniform excitations of magnetic nanoparticles can be studied by inelastic neutron scattering....

  2. Spin Structures in Magnetic Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Brok, Erik; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Spin structures in nanoparticles of ferrimagnetic materials may deviate locally in a nontrivial way from ideal collinear spin structures. For instance, magnetic frustration due to the reduced numbers of magnetic neighbors at the particle surface or around defects in the interior can lead to spin...... canting and hence a reduced magnetization. Moreover, relaxation between almost degenerate canted spin states can lead to anomalous temperature dependences of the magnetization at low temperatures. In ensembles of nanoparticles, interparticle exchange interactions can also result in spin reorientation....... Here, we give a short review of anomalous spin structures in nanoparticles....

  3. Uniform excitations in magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Frandsen, Cathrine; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2010-01-01

    We present a short review of the magnetic excitations in nanoparticles below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. In this temperature regime, the magnetic dynamics in nanoparticles is dominated by uniform excitations, and this leads to a linear temperature dependence of the magnetization...... and the magnetic hyperfine field, in contrast to the Bloch T3/2 law in bulk materials. The temperature dependence of the average magnetization is conveniently studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The energy of the uniform excitations of magnetic nanoparticles can be studied by inelastic neutron scattering....

  4. Directed Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerlund, Axel Rune Fredrik; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a complement to common "top-down" lithography techniques, "bottom-up" assembly techniques are emerging as promising tools to build nanoscale structures in a predictable way. Gold nanoparticles that are stable and relatively easy to synthesize are important building blocks in many such structures...... due to their useful optical and electronic properties. Programmed assembly of gold nanoparticles in one, two, and three dimensions is therefore of large interest. This review focuses on the progress from the last three years in the field of directed gold nanoparticle and nanorod assembly using...

  5. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  6. Pulmonary Delivery of Voriconazole Loaded Nanoparticles Providing a Prolonged Drug Level in Lungs: A Promise for Treating Fungal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pranab Jyoti; Paul, Paramita; Mukherjee, Biswajit; Mazumder, Bhaskar; Mondal, Laboni; Baishya, Rinku; Debnath, Mita Chatterjee; Dey, Kumar Saurav

    2015-08-03

    Current therapies are insufficient to prevent recurrent fungal infection especially in the lower part of the lung. A careful and systematic understanding of the properties of nanoparticles plays a significant role in the design, development, optimization, and in vivo performances of the nanoparticles. In the present study, PLGA nanoparticles containing the antifungal drug voriconazole was prepared and two best formulations were selected for further characterization and in vivo studies. The nanoparticles and the free drug were radiolabeled with technetium-99m with 90% labeling efficiency, and the radiolabeled particles were administered to investigate the effect on their blood clearance, biodistribution, and in vivo gamma imaging. In vivo deposition of the drug in the lobes of the lung was studied by LC-MS/MS study. The particles were found to be spherical and had an average hydrodynamic diameter of 300 nm with a smooth surface. The radiolabeled particles and the free drug were found to accumulate in various major organs. Drug accumulation was more pronounced in the lung in the case of administration of the nanoparticles than that of the free drug. The free drug was found to be excreted more rapidly than the nanoparticle containing drug following the inhalation route as assessed by gamma scintigraphy study. Thus, the study reveals that pulmonary administration of nanoparticles containing voriconazole could be a better therapeutic choice even as compared to the iv route of administration of the free drug and/or the drug loaded nanoparticles.

  7. Preparation and Flame Retardant and Smoke Suppression Properties of Bamboo-Wood Hybrid Scrimber Filled with Calcium and Magnesium Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The physical and mechanical properties of bamboo-wood hybrid scrimber filled with different loadings of nanoparticles were studied. The effects of nanoparticles on flame retardant and smoke suppression properties of bamboo-wood hybrid scrimber were studied by means of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, cone calorimeter (CONE, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results showed that the physical and mechanical properties of bamboo-wood hybrid scrimber were improved by adding a moderate loading of nanoparticles; the optimal loading of nanoparticles was 10%. The heat transfer in bamboo-wood hybrid scrimber was prevented and the escaping channel of combustible gas was blocked by the uniformly filling effect of nanoparticles. The gas concentration was diluted by the noncombustible gas produced by pyrolysis of nanoparticles; the combustion chain reaction was suppressed by highly reactive free radicals produced by pyrolysis of nanoparticles. The residual mass of bamboo-wood hybrid scrimber filled with nanoparticles in thermogravimetric (TG curve at 900 s and burned by method of cone calorimeter (CONE at 600 s was increased compared to that of untreated one, which showed that inorganic mineral powder has the effect of catalytic charring.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles coated with fucan polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, V.A.J.; Andrade, P.L. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências de Materiais, Centro de Ciências Exatas e da Natureza, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil); Laboratório de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami (LIKA), Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil); Silva, M.P.C. [Laboratório de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami (LIKA), Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil); Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-420 Recife-PE (Brazil); Bustamante D, A. [Laboratorio de Cerámicos y Nanomateriales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Ap. Postal 14-0149 Lima (Peru); De Los Santos Valladares, Luis [Laboratório de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami (LIKA), Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil); Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Albino Aguiar, J., E-mail: albino@df.ufpe.br [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências de Materiais, Centro de Ciências Exatas e da Natureza, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife-PE (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    In this work we report the preparation of fucan-coated magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles by the co-precipitation method. These nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. The nanoparticles showed quasi-spherical morphology with mean sizes around 10 nm. XRD and FT-IR confirmed the functionalization of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with the fucan polysaccharide. Room temperature magnetization measurements and Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic behavior at 300 K and the magnetic properties of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} are partly screened by the coating preventing aggregation. - Highlights: • Syntheses of fucan-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were made by co-precipitation method. • The efficiency of polysaccharide coated was analyzed by XRD and FT-IR. • The magnetic nanoparticles mean size was 10–20 nm. • The fucan-coated magnetite nanoparticles showed superparamagnetic behavior.

  9. Electrochemiluminescent metallopolymer-nanoparticle composites: nanoparticle size effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadoss, Anitha; Dickinson, Calum; Keyes, Tia E; Forster, Robert J

    2011-03-15

    Metallopolymer-gold nanocomposites have been synthesized in which the metal complex-Au nanoparticle (NP) mole ratio is systematically varied by mixing solutions of 4-(dimethylamino) pyridine protected gold nanoparticles and a [Ru(bpy)(2)PVP(10)](2+) metallopolymer; bpy is 2,2'-bipyridyl and PVP is poly-(4-vinylpyridine). The impact of changing the gold nanoparticle diameter ranging from 4.0 ± 0.5 to 12.5 ± 1 nm has been investigated. The photo induced emission of the metallopolymer undergoes static quenching by the metal nanoparticles irrespective of their size. When the volume ratio of Au NP-Ru is 1, the quenching efficiency increases from 38% to 93% on going from 4.0 ± 0.5 to 12.5 ± 1 nm diameter nanoparticles while the radius of the quenching sphere remains unaffected at 75 ± 5 Å. The conductivity of thin films is initially unaffected by nanoparticle incorporation until a percolation threshold is reached at a mole ratio of 4.95 × 10(-2) after which the conductivity increases before reaching a maximum. For thin films of the nanocomposites on electrodes, the electrochemiluminescence intensity of the nanocomposite initially increases as nanoparticles are added before decreasing for the highest loadings. The electrochemiluminescence intensity increases with increasing nanoparticle diameter. The electrochemiluminescence (ECL) emission intensity of the nanocomposite formed using 12.5 nm particles at mole ratios between 5 × 10(-3) and 10 × 10(-3) is approximately 7-fold higher than that found for the parent metallopolymer. The application of these materials for low cost ECL-based point of care devices is discussed.

  10. On the Toxicity of Therapeutically Used Nanoparticles: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. El-Ansary

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human beings have been exposed to airborne nanosized particles throughout their evolutionary stages, and such exposures have increased dramatically over the last century. The rapidly developing field of nanotechnology will result in new sources of this exposure, through inhalation, ingestion, and injection. Although nanomaterials are currently being widely used in modern technology, there is a serious lack of information concerning the human health and environmental implications of manufactured nanomaterials. Since these are relatively new particles, it is necessary to investigate their toxicological behavior. The objective of this review was to trace the cellular response to nanosized particle exposure. Therapeutic application of selected nanoparticles together with their range of toxic doses was also reviewed. Effect of therapeutically used nanoparticles on cell membrane, mitochondrial function, prooxidant/antioxidant status, enzyme leakage, DNA, and other biochemical endpoints was elucidated. This paper highlights the need for caution during the use and disposal of such manufactured nanomaterials to prevent unintended environmental impacts.

  11. Quantum Electrodynamics of Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticles Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ridolfo, A; Fina, N; Saija, R; Savasta, S

    2010-01-01

    We study theoretically the quantum optical properties of hybrid molecules composed of an individual quantum dot and a metallic nanoparticle. We calculate the resonance fluorescence of this hybrid system. Its incoherent part, the one arising from nonlinear quantum processes, results to be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude as compared to that in the absence of the metallic nanoparticle. Scattering spectra at different excitation powers and nonperturbative calculations of intensity-field correlation functions show that this system can act as a nonlinear ultra-compact two-photon switch for incident photons, where the presence (or absence) of a single incident photon field is sufficient to allow (or prevent) the scattering of subsequent photons. We also find that a small frequency shift of the incident light field may cause changes in the intensity field correlation function of orders of magnitude.

  12. Gold nanoparticles - the theranostic challenge for PPPM: nanocardiology application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Mykola Ya; Bubnov, Rostyslav V; Yemets, Ilya M; Lazarenko, Liudmyla M; Tymoshok, Natalia O; Ulberg, Zoia R

    2013-06-24

    The article overviews the potential biomedical applications of nanoscale gold particles for predictive, preventive and personalised nanomedicine in cardiology. The review demonstrates the wide opportunities for gold nanoparticles due to their unique biological properties. The use of gold nanoparticles in cardiology is promising to develop fundamentally new methods of diagnosis and treatment. The nanotheranostics in cardiovascular diseases allows the non-invasive imaging associated with simultaneous therapeutic intervention and predicting treatment outcomes. Imaging may reflect the effectiveness of treatment and has become a fundamental optimisation setting for therapeutic protocol. Combining the application of biomolecular and cellular therapies with nanotechnologies foresees the development of complex integrated nanodevices. Nanocardiology may challenge existing healthcare system and economic benefits as cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality at present.

  13. Cellular Binding of Anionic Nanoparticles is Inhibited by Serum Proteins Independent of Nanoparticle Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Candace C; Kumar, Umesh; Payne, Christine K

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticles used in biological applications encounter a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. Adsorption of these proteins on the nanoparticle surface results in the formation of a "protein corona," which can dominate the interaction of the nanoparticle with the cellular environment. The goal of this research was to determine how nanoparticle composition and surface modification affect the cellular binding of protein-nanoparticle complexes. We examined the cellular binding of a collection of commonly used anionic nanoparticles: quantum dots, colloidal gold nanoparticles, and low-density lipoprotein particles, in the presence and absence of extracellular proteins. These experiments have the advantage of comparing different nanoparticles under identical conditions. Using a combination of fluorescence and dark field microscopy, flow cytometry, and spectroscopy, we find that cellular binding of these anionic nanoparticles is inhibited by serum proteins independent of nanoparticle composition or surface modification. We expect these results will aid in the design of nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

  14. SOLID LIPID NANOPARTICLES: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudavath Hanumanaik*, Sandeep Kumar Patel and K. Ramya Sree

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN are at the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery and research. Due to their unique size dependent properties, lipid nanoparticles offer possibility to develop new therapeutics. The ability to incorporate drugs into nanocarriers offers a new prototype in drug delivery that could use for drug targeting. Hence solid lipid nanoparticles hold great promise for reaching the goal of controlled and site specific drug delivery and hence attracted wide attention of researchers. This review presents a broad treatment of solid lipid nanoparticles discussing their aims, production procedures, advantages, limitations and their possible remedies. Appropriate analytical techniques for the characterization of SLN like Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and Differential Scanning Calorimetry are highlighted. Aspects of SLN route of administration and the in vivo fate of the carriers are also discussed.

  15. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisterna, Bruno A.; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could...... take advantage of differentially expressed molecules on the surface of tumor cells, providing effective release of cytotoxic drugs. Several efforts have recently reported the use of diverse molecules as ligands on the surface of nanoparticles to interact with the tumor cells, enabling the effective...... delivery of antitumor agents. Here, we present recent advances in targeted nanoparticles against CRC and discuss the promising use of ligands and cellular targets in potential strategies for the treatment of CRCs....

  16. Missing Fe: hydrogenated iron nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Bilalbegovic, G; Mohacek-Grosev, V

    2016-01-01

    Although it was found that the FeH lines exist in the spectra of some stars, none of the spectral features in the ISM have been assigned to this molecule. We suggest that iron atoms interact with hydrogen and produce Fe-H nanoparticles which sometimes contain many H atoms. We calculate infrared spectra of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles using density functional theory methods and find broad, overlapping bands. Desorption of H2 could induce spinning of these small Fe-H dust grains. Some of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles posses magnetic and electric moments and should interact with electromagnetic fields in the ISM. Fe_nH_m nanoparticles could contribute to the polarization of the ISM and the anomalous microwave emission. We discuss the conditions required to form FeH and Fe_nH_m in the ISM.

  17. Missing Fe: hydrogenated iron nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilalbegović, G.; Maksimović, A.; Mohaček-Grošev, V.

    2017-03-01

    Although it was found that the FeH lines exist in the spectra of some stars, none of the spectral features in the interstellar medium (ISM) have been assigned to this molecule. We suggest that iron atoms interact with hydrogen and produce Fe-H nanoparticles which sometimes contain many H atoms. We calculate infrared spectra of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles using density functional theory methods and find broad, overlapping bands. Desorption of H2 could induce spinning of these small Fe-H dust grains. Some of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles possess magnetic and electric moments and should interact with electromagnetic fields in the ISM. FenHm nanoparticles could contribute to the polarization of the ISM and the anomalous microwave emission. We discuss the conditions required to form FeH and FenHm in the ISM.

  18. ADSORPTION OF PROTEIN ON NANOPARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qi

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption of protein on nanoparticles was studied by using dynamic light scattering to measure the hydrodynamic size of both pure protein and nanoparticles adsorbed with different amounts of protein. The thickness of the adsorbed protein layer increases as protein concentration, but decreases as the initial size of nanoparticles. After properly scaling the thickness with the initial diameter, we are able to fit all experimental data with a single master curve. Our experimental results suggest that the adsorbed proteins form a monolayeron the nanoparticle surface and the adsorbed protein molecules are attached to the particle surface at many points through a possible hydrogen-bonding. Our results also indicate that as protein concentration increases, the overall shape of the adsorbed protein molecule continuously changes from a flat layer on the particle surface to a stretched coil extended into water. During the change, the hydrodynamic volume of the adsorbed protein increases linearly with protein concentration.

  19. Imaging techniques: Nanoparticle atoms pinpointed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farle, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The locations of atoms in a metallic alloy nanoparticle have been determined using a combination of electron microscopy and image simulation, revealing links between the particle's structure and magnetic properties. See Letter p.75

  20. Prevention of suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is a major public health problem in India, probably even bigger than in the West. Suicidal behavior is the best conceptualized as a multifaceted complex problem involving social factors and mental illnesses. Broadly, there are two approaches to suicide prevention; population preventive strategies and high-risk preventive strategies. Population preventive strategies include reducing availability of means for suicide, education of primary care physicians, influencing media portrayal of suicidal behavior, education of the public, telephone helplines, and addressing economic issues associated with suicidal behavior. High-risk preventive strategy includes identifying individuals with high risk of committing suicide, intensively treating mental illness if present, and providing psychosocial support. Thus, prevention requires a multipronged effort with collaboration from various sectors including mental health professionals, social justice department, and macroeconomic policy makers.

  1. Cellular interactions with tissue-engineered microenvironments and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi

    Tissue-engineered hydrogels composed of intermolecularlly crosslinked hyaluronan (HA-DTPH) and fibronectin functional domains (FNfds) were applied as a physiological relevant ECM mimic with controlled mechanical and biochemical properties. Cellular interactions with this tissue-engineered environment, especially physical interactions (cellular traction forces), were quantitatively measured by using the digital image speckle correlation (DISC) technique and finite element method (FEM). By correlating with other cell functions such as cell morphology and migration, a comprehensive structure-function relationship between cells and their environments was identified. Furthermore, spatiotemporal redistribution of cellular traction stresses was time-lapse measured during cell migration to better understand the dynamics of cell mobility. The results suggest that the reinforcement of the traction stresses around the nucleus, as well as the relaxation of nuclear deformation, are critical steps during cell migration, serving as a speed regulator, which must be considered in any dynamic molecular reconstruction model of tissue cell migration. Besides single cell migration, en masse cell migration was studied by using agarose droplet migration assay. Cell density was demonstrated to be another important parameter to influence cell behaviors besides substrate properties. Findings from these studies will provide fundamental design criteria to develop novel and effective tissue-engineered constructs. Cellular interactions with rutile and anatase TiO2 nanoparticles were also studied. These particles can penetrate easily through the cell membrane and impair cell function, with the latter being more damaging. The exposure to nanoparticles was found to decrease cell area, cell proliferation, motility, and contractility. To prevent this, a dense grafted polymer brush coating was applied onto the nanoparticle surface. These modified nanoparticles failed to adhere to and penetrate

  2. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-24

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.  Created: 10/24/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 10/24/2011.

  3. Preventing food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Silva, Debra; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Thusu, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology is developing guidelines about how to prevent and manage food allergy. As part of the guidelines development process, a systematic review is planned to examine published research about the prevention of food allergy. This systematic review...... recommendations. The aim of this systematic review will be to assess the effectiveness of approaches for the primary prevention of food allergy....

  4. Prevention of Prosthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremin O.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevention in prosthetic dentistry is not just a regular oral hygiene and the prevention of caries in the early stages of its development. The initial goal of orthopedic and dental should be the ability to convey to the patient's sense of pros-thetics that proteziruya one saved more. An example is included prosthetic dental arch defects with bridges or single artificial crowns on implants that will prevent movement of teeth and the continuity of the dentition

  5. Organophosphorous functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalska-Szostko, B; Rogowska, M; Satuła, D

    2013-11-01

    In this work magnetite nanoparticles covered by gold and silver shell were obtained. Analyzed particles were modified by two kinds of organophosphorous compounds: 3-phosphonopropionic acid and 16-phosphonohexadecanoic acid. Enzyme immobilization on particles modified in such a way was tested. The crystal structure of obtained nanoparticles was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Possible changes on the surfaces were analyzed by the use of infrared spectroscopy. Magnetic properties were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  6. Count, size and visualize nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Malloy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale materials including nanotubes, nanowires, ceramics, quantum dots etc. can be produced from a huge variety of substances. Responsible development of new materials requires that risks to health and the environment associated with the development, production, use and disposal of these materials are fully addressed. Characterization of particles at the nanoscale thus becomes extremely important and new tools are being made available including the nanoparticle characterization systems from NanoSight and their technology, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis.

  7. Herbal nanoparticles: A patent review

    OpenAIRE

    Namdeo R Jadhav; Trupti Powar; Santosh Shinde; Sameer Nadaf

    2014-01-01

    Design and development of herbal nanoparticles has become a frontier research in the nanoformulation arena. To update researchers, an attempt has been made to review nanoformulation-based herbal patents. This article mainly covers herbal medicines are used for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, Parkinsonism, pulmonary diseases, proliferative diseases, Alzheimer′s disease, diabetes, cancer therapy, anti-osteoporosis, and the like. It has been revealed that nanoparticles of Curcumin have...

  8. Exposure to Nanoparticles and Hormesis

    OpenAIRE

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Calabrese, Edward J.; Nascarella, Marc A.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles are particles with lengths that range from 1 to 100 nm. They are increasingly being manufactured and used for commercial purpose because of their novel and unique physicochemical properties. Although nanotechnology-based products are generally thought to be at a pre-competitive stage, an increasing number of products and materials are becoming commercially available. Human exposure to nanoparticles is therefore inevitable as they become more widely used and, as a result, nanotox...

  9. Multiscaffold DNA Origami Nanoparticle Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami templated self-assembly has shown its potential in creating rationally designed nanophotonic devices in a parallel and repeatable manner. In this investigation, we employ a multiscaffold DNA origami approach to fabricate linear waveguides of 10 nm diameter gold nanoparticles. This approach provides independent control over nanoparticle separation and spatial arrangement. The waveguides were characterized using atomic force microscopy and far-field polarization spectroscopy. This work provides a path toward large-scale plasmonic circuitry. PMID:23841957

  10. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  11. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  12. Sunburn: Treatment and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ...

  13. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle Photodetector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Po Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticle photodetector was fabricated using a simple method. Under a 5 V applied bias, its dark current and photocurrent were 1.98×10-8 and 9.42×10-7 A, respectively. In other words, a photocurrent-to-dark-current contrast ratio of 48 was obtained. Under incident light at a wavelength of 375 nm and a 5 V applied bias, the detector’s measured responsivity was 3.75 A/W. The transient time constants measured during the turn-ON and turn-OFF states were τON=204 s and τOFF=486 s, respectively.

  14. Doped barium titanate nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Kundu; A Jana; P Barik

    2008-06-01

    We have synthesized nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) ion doped BaTiO3 nanoparticles through a chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The concentration of dopant varies from 0 to 2 mole% in the specimens. The results from X-ray diffractograms and transmission electron micrographs show that the particle diameters in the specimen lie in the range 24–40 nm. It is seen that the dielectric permittivity in doped specimens is enhanced by an order of magnitude compared to undoped barium titanate ceramics. The dielectric permittivity shows maxima at 0.3 mole% doping of Fe ion and 0.6 mole% of Ni ion. The unusual dielectric behaviour of the specimens is explained in terms of the change in crystalline structure of the specimens.

  15. Polyelemental nanoparticle libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng-Cheng; Liu, Xiaolong; Hedrick, James L.; Xie, Zhuang; Wang, Shunzhi; Lin, Qing-Yuan; Hersam, Mark C.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2016-06-01

    Multimetallic nanoparticles are useful in many fields, yet there are no effective strategies for synthesizing libraries of such structures, in which architectures can be explored in a systematic and site-specific manner. The absence of these capabilities precludes the possibility of comprehensively exploring such systems. We present systematic studies of individual polyelemental particle systems, in which composition and size can be independently controlled and structure formation (alloy versus phase-separated state) can be understood. We made libraries consisting of every combination of five metallic elements (Au, Ag, Co, Cu, and Ni) through polymer nanoreactor-mediated synthesis. Important insight into the factors that lead to alloy formation and phase segregation at the nanoscale were obtained, and routes to libraries of nanostructures that cannot be made by conventional methods were developed.

  16. Sonoelectrochemical Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Sáez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the nanomaterials that have been prepared to date by pulsed sonoelectrochemistry. The majority of nanomaterials produced by this method are pure metals such as silver, palladium, platinum, zinc, nickel and gold, but more recently the syntheses have been extended to include the preparation of nanosized metallic alloys and metal oxide semiconductors. A major advantage of this methodology is that the shape andsize of the nanoparticles can be adjusted by varying the operating parameters which include ultrasonic power, current density, deposition potential and the ultrasonic vs electrochemical pulse times. Together with these, it is also possible to adjust the pH, temperature and composition of the electrolyte in the sonoelectrochemistry cell.

  17. Biosensors Incorporating Bimetallic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Rick

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a review of electrochemical bio-sensing for target analytes based on the use of electrocatalytic bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs, which can improve both the sensitivity and selectivity of biosensors. The review moves quickly from an introduction to the field of bio-sensing, to the importance of biosensors in today’s society, the nature of the electrochemical methods employed and the attendant problems encountered. The role of electrocatalysts is introduced with reference to the three generations of biosensors. The contributions made by previous workers using bimetallic constructs, grouped by target analyte, are then examined in detail; following which, the synthesis and characterization of the catalytic particles is examined prior to a summary of the current state of endeavor. Finally, some perspectives for the future of bimetallic NPs in biosensors are given.

  18. Biosensors Incorporating Bimetallic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, John; Tsai, Meng-Che; Hwang, Bing Joe

    2015-12-31

    This article presents a review of electrochemical bio-sensing for target analytes based on the use of electrocatalytic bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs), which can improve both the sensitivity and selectivity of biosensors. The review moves quickly from an introduction to the field of bio-sensing, to the importance of biosensors in today's society, the nature of the electrochemical methods employed and the attendant problems encountered. The role of electrocatalysts is introduced with reference to the three generations of biosensors. The contributions made by previous workers using bimetallic constructs, grouped by target analyte, are then examined in detail; following which, the synthesis and characterization of the catalytic particles is examined prior to a summary of the current state of endeavor. Finally, some perspectives for the future of bimetallic NPs in biosensors are given.

  19. Different endocytotic uptake mechanisms for nanoparticles in epithelial cells and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar A. Kuhn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Precise knowledge regarding cellular uptake of nanoparticles is of great importance for future biomedical applications. Four different endocytotic uptake mechanisms, that is, phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis, were investigated using a mouse macrophage (J774A.1 and a human alveolar epithelial type II cell line (A549. In order to deduce the involved pathway in nanoparticle uptake, selected inhibitors specific for one of the endocytotic pathways were optimized regarding concentration and incubation time in combination with fluorescently tagged marker proteins. Qualitative immunolocalization showed that J774A.1 cells highly expressed the lipid raft-related protein flotillin-1 and clathrin heavy chain, however, no caveolin-1. A549 cells expressed clathrin heavy chain and caveolin-1, but no flotillin-1 uptake-related proteins. Our data revealed an impeded uptake of 40 nm polystyrene nanoparticles by J774A.1 macrophages when actin polymerization and clathrin-coated pit formation was blocked. From this result, it is suggested that macropinocytosis and phagocytosis, as well as clathrin-mediated endocytosis, play a crucial role. The uptake of 40 nm nanoparticles in alveolar epithelial A549 cells was inhibited after depletion of cholesterol in the plasma membrane (preventing caveolin-mediated endocytosis and inhibition of clathrin-coated vesicles (preventing clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Our data showed that a combination of several distinguishable endocytotic uptake mechanisms are involved in the uptake of 40 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in both the macrophage and epithelial cell line.

  20. Polymeric and Solid Lipid Nanoparticles for Sustained Release of Carbendazim and Tebuconazole in Agricultural Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Estefânia Vangelie Ramos; Oliveira, Jhones Luiz de; da Silva, Camila Morais Gonçalves; Pascoli, Mônica; Pasquoto, Tatiane; Lima, Renata; Abhilash, P. C.; Fernandes Fraceto, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Carbendazim (MBC) (methyl-2-benzimidazole carbamate) and tebuconazole (TBZ) ((RS)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)pentan-3-ol) are widely used in agriculture for the prevention and control of fungal diseases. Solid lipid nanoparticles and polymeric nanocapsules are carrier systems that offer advantages including changes in the release profiles of bioactive compounds and their transfer to the site of action, reduced losses due to leaching or degradation, and decreased toxicity in the environment and humans. The objective of this study was to prepare these two types of nanoparticle as carrier systems for a combination of TBZ and MBC, and then investigate the release profiles of the fungicides as well as the stabilities and cytotoxicities of the formulations. Both nanoparticle systems presented high association efficiency (>99%), indicating good interaction between the fungicides and the nanoparticles. The release profiles of MBC and TBZ were modified when the compounds were loaded in the nanoparticles, and cytotoxicity assays showed that encapsulation of the fungicides decreased their toxicity. These fungicide systems offer new options for the treatment and prevention of fungal diseases in plants. PMID:26346969

  1. Preventing head injuries in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concussion - preventing in children; Traumatic brain injury - preventing in children; TBI - children; Safety - preventing head injury ... Helmets help to prevent head injuries. Your child should wear a ... sports or activities: Playing contact sports, such as lacrosse, ...

  2. Prevention of High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Prevention of High Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle habits, proper use of medicines, and ... prevent high blood pressure or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high ...

  3. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? Most people with thyroid cancer have ... Cancer? Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  4. Study of the Performance of the Organic Extracts of Chenopodium ambrosioides for Ag Nanoparticle Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Carrillo-López

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many ways to obtain metal nanoparticles: biological, physical, and chemical ways and combinations of these approaches. Synthesis assisted with plant extracts has been widely documented. However, one issue that is under discussion refers to the metabolites responsible for reduction and stabilization that confine nanoparticle growth and prevent coalescence between nanoparticles in order to avoid agglomeration/precipitation. In this study, Ag nanoparticles were synthesized using organic extracts of Chenopodium ambrosioides with different polarities (hexane, dichloromethane, and methanol. Each extract was phytochemically characterized to identify the nature of the metabolites responsible for nanoparticle formation. With methanol extract, the compounds responsible for reducing and stabilizing silver nanoparticle were associated with the presence of phenolic compounds (flavonoids and tannins, while, with dichloromethane and hexane extracts, the responsible compounds were mainly terpenoids. Large part of the reducing activity of secondary metabolites in C. ambrosioides is closely related to compounds with antioxidant capacity, such as phenolic compounds (flavone glycoside and isorhamnetin, which are the main constituents of the methanol extracts. Otherwise, terpenoids (trans-diol, α-terpineol, monoterpene hydroperoxides, and apiole are the central metabolites present in dichloromethane and hexane extracts.

  5. A novel bone cement impregnated with silver–tiopronin nanoparticles: its antimicrobial, cytotoxic, and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopovich, Polina; Leech, Ralph; Carmalt, Claire J; Parkin, Ivan P; Perni, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Post-operatory infections in orthopedic surgeries pose a significant risk. The common approach of using antibiotics, both parenterally or embedded in bone cement (when this is employed during surgery) faces the challenge of the rising population of pathogens exhibiting resistance properties against one or more of these compounds; therefore, novel approaches need to be developed. Silver nanoparticles appear to be an exciting prospect because of their antimicrobial activity and safety at the levels used in medical applications. In this paper, a novel type of silver nanoparticles capped with tiopronin is presented. Two ratios of reagents during synthesis were tested and the effect on the nanoparticles investigated through TEM, TGA, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Once encapsulated in bone cement, only the nanoparticles with the highest amount of inorganic fraction conferred antimicrobial activity against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at concentrations as low as 0.1% w/w. No other characteristics of the bone cement, such as cytotoxicity or mechanical properties, were affected by the presence of the nanoparticles. Our work presents a new type of silver nanoparticles and demonstrates that they can be embedded in bone cement to prevent infections once the synthetic conditions are tailored for such applications. PMID:23818779

  6. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts: Disordering versus Removal of Organic Capping

    KAUST Repository

    Krier, James M.

    2012-08-23

    Recent work with nanoparticle catalysts shows that size and shape control on the nanometer scale influences reaction rate and selectivity. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying heterogeneous catalysis because it enables the observation of surface intermediates during catalytic reactions. To control the size and shape of catalytic nanoparticles, an organic ligand was used as a capping agent to stabilize nanoparticles during synthesis. However, the presence of an organic capping agent presents two major challenges in SFG and catalytic reaction studies: it blocks a significant fraction of active surface sites and produces a strong signal that prevents the detection of reaction intermediates with SFG. Two methods for cleaning Pt nanoparticles capped with poly (vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) are examined in this study: solvent cleaning and UV cleaning. Solvent cleaning leaves more PVP intact and relies on disordering with hydrogen gas to reduce the SFG signal of PVP. In contrast, UV cleaning depends on nearly complete removal of PVP to reduce SFG signal. Both UV and solvent cleaning enable the detection of reaction intermediates by SFG. However, solvent cleaning also yields nanoparticles that are stable under reaction conditions, whereas UV cleaning results in aggregation during reaction. The results of this study indicate that solvent cleaning is more advantageous for studying the effects of nanoparticle size and shape on catalytic selectivity by SFG vibrational spectroscopy. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. Size control of semimetal bismuth nanoparticles and the UV-visible and IR absorption spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y W; Hong, Byung Hee; Kim, Kwang S

    2005-04-21

    We introduced a simple chemical method to synthesize semimetal bismuth nanoparticles in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) by reducing Bi(3+) with sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)) in the presence of poly(vinylpyrroldone) (PVP) at room temperature. The size and dispersibility of Bi nanoparticles can be easily controlled by changing the synthetic conditions such as the molar ratio of PVP to BiCl(3) and the concentration of BiCl(3). The UV-visible absorption spectra of Bi nanoparticles of different diameters are systematically studied. The surface plasmon peaks broaden with the increasing molar ratio of PVP to BiCl(3) as the size of bismuth nanoparticles decreases. Infrared (IR) spectra of the complexes with different molar ratios of PVP/BiCl(3) show a strong interaction between the carboxyl oxygen (C=O) of PVP and Bi(3+) ion and a weak interaction between the carboxyl oxygen (C=O) of PVP and the Bi atom in nanoparticles. This indicates that PVP serves as an effective capping ligand, which prevents the nanoparticles from aggregation.

  8. Reduced Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in the presence of chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Si-Feng; Jia, Jing-Fu; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Chen, De-Sheng; Guo, Yong-Yuan; Zhang, Xian-Long

    Staphylococcus aureus can adhere to most foreign materials and form biofilm on the surface of medical devices. Biofilm infections are difficult to resolve. The goal of this in vitro study was to explore the use of chitosan-coated nanoparticles to prevent biofilm formation. For this purpose, S. aureus was seeded in 96-well plates to incubate with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in order to study the efficiency of biofilm formation inhibition. The biofilm bacteria count was determined using the spread plate method; biomass formation was measured using the crystal violet staining method. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the biofilm formation. The results showed decreased viable bacteria numbers and biomass formation when incubated with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at all test concentrations. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed increased dead bacteria and thinner biofilm when incubated with nanoparticles at a concentration of 500 µg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles inhibited biofilm formation in polystyrene plates. Future studies should be performed to study these nanoparticles for anti-infective use.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of metal based nanoparticles against microbes associated with diseases in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, P; Nayak, S K; Sasmal, A; Behera, T; Barik, S K; Swain, S K; Mishra, S S; Sen, A K; Das, J K; Jayasankar, P

    2014-09-01

    The emergence of diseases and mortalities in aquaculture and development of antibiotics resistance in aquatic microbes, has renewed a great interest towards alternative methods of prevention and control of diseases. Nanoparticles have enormous potential in controlling human and animal pathogens and have scope of application in aquaculture. The present investigation was carried out to find out suitable nanoparticles having antimicrobial effect against aquatic microbes. Different commercial as well as laboratory synthesized metal and metal oxide nanoparticles were screened for their antimicrobial activities against a wide range of bacterial and fungal agents including certain freshwater cyanobacteria. Among different nanoparticles, synthesized copper oxide (CuO), zinc oxide (ZnO), silver (Ag) and silver doped titanium dioxide (Ag-TiO2) showed broad spectrum antibacterial activity. On the contrary, nanoparticles like Zn and ZnO showed antifungal activity against fungi like Penicillium and Mucor species. Since CuO, ZnO and Ag nanoparticles showed higher antimicrobial activity, they may be explored for aquaculture use.

  10. A comparative study of non-covalent encapsulation methods for organic dyes into silica nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auger Aurélien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerous luminophores may be encapsulated into silica nanoparticles (< 100 nm using the reverse microemulsion process. Nevertheless, the behaviour and effect of such luminescent molecules appear to have been much less studied and may possibly prevent the encapsulation process from occurring. Such nanospheres represent attractive nanoplatforms for the development of biotargeted biocompatible luminescent tracers. Physical and chemical properties of the encapsulated molecules may be affected by the nanomatrix. This study examines the synthesis of different types of dispersed silica nanoparticles, the ability of the selected luminophores towards incorporation into the silica matrix of those nanoobjects as well as the photophysical properties of the produced dye-doped silica nanoparticles. The nanoparticles present mean diameters between 40 and 60 nm as shown by TEM analysis. Mainly, the photophysical characteristics of the dyes are retained upon their encapsulation into the silica matrix, leading to fluorescent silica nanoparticles. This feature article surveys recent research progress on the fabrication strategies of these dye-doped silica nanoparticles.

  11. Catalytically Active Bimetallic Nanoparticles Supported on Porous Carbon Capsules Derived From Metal-Organic Framework Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Bradley, Siobhan J; Chan, Andrew; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Nann, Thomas; Kruger, Paul E; Telfer, Shane G

    2016-09-14

    We report a new methodology for producing monometallic or bimetallic nanoparticles confined within hollow nitrogen-doped porous carbon capsules. The capsules are derived from metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals that are coated with a shell of a secondary material comprising either a metal-tannic acid coordination polymer or a resorcinol-formaldehyde polymer. Platinum nanoparticles are optionally sandwiched between the MOF core and the shell. Pyrolysis of the MOF-shell composites produces hollow capsules of porous nitrogen-doped carbon that bear either monometallic (Pt, Co, and Ni) or alloyed (PtCo and PtNi) metal nanoparticles. The Co and Ni components of the bimetallic nanoparticles are derived from the shell surrounding the MOF crystals. The hollow capsules prevent sintering and detachment of the nanoparticles, and their porous walls allow for efficient mass transport. Alloyed PtCo nanoparticles embedded in the capsule walls are highly active, selective, and recyclable catalysts for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes to anilines.

  12. Enhanced photodynamic therapy efficacy of methylene blue-loaded calcium phosphate nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Da-Young; Kim, Young-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Although methylene blue (MB) is the most inexpensive photosensitizer with promising applications in the photodynamic therapy (PDT) for its high quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation, the clinical use of MB has been limited by its rapid enzymatic reduction in the biological environment. To enhance PDT efficacy of MB by preventing the enzymatic reduction, we have developed a new mineralization method to produce highly biocompatible MB-loaded calcium phosphate (CaP-MB) nanoparticles in the presence of polymer templates. The resulting CaP-MB nanoparticles exhibited spherical shape with a size of under 50 nm. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and zeta-potential analyses confirmed the insertion of MB into the CaP-MB nanoparticles. The encapsulation of MB in CaP nanoparticles could effectively protect MB from the enzymatic reduction. In addition, the CaP-MB nanoparticles exhibited a good biocompatibility in the dark condition and significantly enhanced PDT efficacy due to apoptotic cell death against human breast cancer cells as compared with free MB, implying that CaP-MB nanoparticle system might be potentially applicable in PDT.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis of platinum-group-metal nanoparticles by using HEPES as a reductant and stabilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Man-Ho; Ho, Chi-Ming; Chen, Rong; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-06-01

    Platinum-group-metal (Ru, Os, Rh, Ir, Pd and Pt) nanoparticles are synthesized in an aqueous buffer solution of 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) (200 mM, pH 7.4) under hydrothermal conditions (180 degrees C). Monodispersed (monodispersity: 11-15%) metal nanoparticles were obtained with an average particle size of less than 5 nm (Ru: 1.8+/-0.2, Os: 1.6+/-0.2, Rh: 4.5+/-0.5, Ir: 2.0+/-0.3, Pd: 3.8+/-0.4, Pt: 1.9+/-0.2 nm). The size, monodispersity, and stability of the as-obtained metal nanoparticles were affected by the HEPES concentration, pH of the HEPES buffer solution, and reaction temperature. HEPES with two tertiary amines (piperazine groups) and terminal hydroxyl groups can act as a reductant and stabilizer. The HEPES molecules can bind to the surface of metal nanoparticles to prevent metal nanoparticles from aggregation. These platinum-group-metal nanoparticles could be deposited onto the surface of graphite, which catalyzed the aerobic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes.

  14. Homogeneous nanoparticle dispersion prepared with impurity-free dispersant by the ball mill technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingyun Zhou; Hui Zhang; Hui Zhang; Zhong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The homogeneous dispersion of nanoparticles in solvents or polymer matrices is essential tor prac tical application of nanocomposites.In this study,the planetary ball milling technique was used to de-agglomerate silica nanoparticles in butyl acetate.The size of the nanosilica aggregates was evaluated by TEM and SEM.With the addition of polyacrylate polymer to the organic solvent,the nanoparticle agglomerates were effectively broken up by planetary ball milling at the proper milling time; however,re-agglomeration occurred after a longer milling time.The results of TGA and FTIR indicated that the polyacrylate molecules could be adsorbed in situ onto the nanoparticles.Behaving similar to a dispersant,the adsorbed polyacrylate reduced the blend viscosity significantly and prevented re-agglomeration of the nanoparticles.Utilizing the polyacrylate polymer both as the dispersant and the polymer matrix,the polyacrylate-based nanocoatings were further prepared.The optical transmittance and haze value of the nanocoatings were found to be sensitive to the dispersion level of the nanoparticles,and the elastic modulus and hardness of the nanocoatings were improved in comparison with those of the neat polymer coating.

  15. Model for acid-base chemistry in nanoparticle growth (MABNAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yli-Juuti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Climatic effects of newly-formed atmospheric secondary aerosol particles are to a large extent determined by their condensational growth rates. However, all the vapors condensing on atmospheric nanoparticles and growing them to climatically relevant sizes are not identified yet and the effects of particle phase processes on particle growth rates are poorly known. Besides sulfuric acid, organic compounds are known to contribute significantly to atmospheric nanoparticle growth. In this study a particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid-Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth was developed to study the effect of salt formation on nanoparticle growth, which has been proposed as a potential mechanism lowering the equilibrium vapor pressures of organic compounds through dissociation in the particle phase and thus preventing their evaporation. MABNAG is a model for monodisperse aqueous particles and it couples dynamics of condensation to particle phase chemistry. Non-zero equilibrium vapor pressures, with both size and composition dependence, are considered for condensation. The model was applied for atmospherically relevant systems with sulfuric acid, one organic acid, ammonia, one amine and water in the gas phase allowed to condense on 3–20 nm particles. The effect of dissociation of the organic acid was found to be small under ambient conditions typical for a boreal forest site, but considerable for base-rich environments (gas phase concentrations of about 1010 cm−3 for the sum of the bases. The contribution of the bases to particle mass decreased as particle size increased, except at very high gas phase concentrations of the bases. The relative importance of amine versus ammonia did not change significantly as a function of particle size. While our results give a reasonable first estimate on the maximum contribution of salt formation to nanoparticle growth, further studies on, e.g. the thermodynamic properties of the atmospheric organics

  16. Antimicrobial activity of bone cements embedded with organic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perni S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Perni,1,2 Victorien Thenault,1 Pauline Abdo,1 Katrin Margulis,3 Shlomo Magdassi,3 Polina Prokopovich1,2 1School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 2Center for Biomedical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; 3Casali Institute, Institute of Chemistry, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, IsraelAbstract: Infections after orthopedic surgery are a very unwelcome outcome; despite the widespread use of antibiotics, their incidence can be as high as 10%. This risk is likely to increase as antibiotics are gradually losing efficacy as a result of bacterial resistance; therefore, novel antimicrobial approaches are required. Parabens are a class of compounds whose antimicrobial activity is employed in many cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. We developed propylparaben nanoparticles that are hydrophilic, thus expanding the applicability of parabens to aqueous systems. In this paper we assess the possibility of employing paraben nanoparticles as antimicrobial compound in bone cements. The nanoparticles were embedded in various types of bone cement (poly(methyl methacrylate [PMMA], hydroxyapatite, and brushite and the antimicrobial activity was determined against common causes of postorthopedic surgery infections such as: Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Nanoparticles at concentrations as low as 1% w/w in brushite bone cement were capable of preventing pathogens growth, 5% w/w was needed for hydroxyapatite bone cement, while 7% w/w was required for PMMA bone cement. No ­detrimental effect was determined by the addition of paraben nanoparticles on bone cement compression strength and cytocompatibility. Our results demonstrate that paraben nanoparticles can be encapsulated in bone cement, providing concentration-dependent antimicrobial

  17. Model for acid-base chemistry in nanoparticle growth (MABNAG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yli-Juuti, T.; Barsanti, K.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Kieloaho, A.-J.; Makkonen, U.; Petäjä, T.; Ruuskanen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Riipinen, I.

    2013-12-01

    Climatic effects of newly-formed atmospheric secondary aerosol particles are to a large extent determined by their condensational growth rates. However, all the vapours condensing on atmospheric nanoparticles and growing them to climatically relevant sizes are not identified yet and the effects of particle phase processes on particle growth rates are poorly known. Besides sulfuric acid, organic compounds are known to contribute significantly to atmospheric nanoparticle growth. In this study a particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid-Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth) was developed to study the effect of salt formation on nanoparticle growth, which has been proposed as a potential mechanism lowering the equilibrium vapour pressures of organic compounds through dissociation in the particle phase and thus preventing their evaporation. MABNAG is a model for monodisperse aqueous particles and it couples dynamics of condensation to particle phase chemistry. Non-zero equilibrium vapour pressures, with both size and composition dependence, are considered for condensation. The model was applied for atmospherically relevant systems with sulfuric acid, one organic acid, ammonia, one amine and water in the gas phase allowed to condense on 3-20 nm particles. The effect of dissociation of the organic acid was found to be small under ambient conditions typical for a boreal forest site, but considerable for base-rich environments (gas phase concentrations of about 1010 cm-3 for the sum of the bases). The contribution of the bases to particle mass decreased as particle size increased, except at very high gas phase concentrations of the bases. The relative importance of amine versus ammonia did not change significantly as a function of particle size. While our results give a reasonable first estimate on the maximum contribution of salt formation to nanoparticle growth, further studies on, e.g. the thermodynamic properties of the atmospheric organics, concentrations of low

  18. Development of polymeric-cationic peptide composite nanoparticles, a nanoparticle-in-nanoparticle system for controlled gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Arvind K; Massey, Ashley; Yusuf, Helmy; McDonald, Denise M; McCarthy, Helen O; Kett, Vicky L

    2015-01-01

    We report the formulation of novel composite nanoparticles that combine the high transfection efficiency of cationic peptide-DNA nanoparticles with the biocompatibility and prolonged delivery of polylactic acid-polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG). The cationic cell-penetrating peptide RALA was used to condense DNA into nanoparticles that were encapsulated within a range of PLA-PEG copolymers. The composite nanoparticles produced exhibited excellent physicochemical properties including size 80%. Images of the composite nanoparticles obtained with a new transmission electron microscopy staining method revealed the peptide-DNA nanoparticles within the PLA-PEG matrix. Varying the copolymers modulated the DNA release rate >6 weeks in vitro. The best formulation was selected and was able to transfect cells while maintaining viability. The effect of transferrin-appended composite nanoparticles was also studied. Thus, we have demonstrated the manufacture of composite nanoparticles for the controlled delivery of DNA.

  19. Can I Prevent Acne?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Can I Prevent Acne? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can I Prevent Acne? A A A en español ¿Puedo ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Why Do I Get Acne? Myths About Acne Should I Pop ...

  20. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Stroke Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir By living a healthy lifestyle, you can help keep your blood pressure in ...

  1. Prevent Cervical Cancer!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-08

    Cervical cancer can be prevented. Listen as two friends—one a doctor—talk about screening tests and early detection. Learn what test you might need.  Created: 1/8/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/8/2015.

  2. Prevention dependence of marihuana

    OpenAIRE

    VOJTĚCHOVÁ, Jiřina

    2012-01-01

    This diploma thesis finds out, confronts knowledge and experience with drugs at the pupils. It characterizes drug addiction, its emergence and reasons. It deals with the problems of drug prevention, their possibilities and practices applied at schools. It describes laws about using drugs. And the survey shows that the primary prevention of using marihuana cannot be underestimated.

  3. Prevention de la Poliomyelite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Baltazard

    1962-01-01

    Full Text Available In Iran, the prevention of poliomyelitis is practically limited to vaccinatton This paper, however, gives a detailed account of the preventive measures attempting to check the spread of the infection and of those aiming at the reduction of the frequency of the paralytic manifestation

  4. IMPACT Youth Crime Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Georgina; Wright, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Four models of crime prevention are discussed that arise from differing views of the causes of crime: criminal justice, situational, developmental, and social development models. Two activity-based youth crime prevention projects in Queensland (Australia) use developmental and social development models and expand local youth service…

  5. Blowout preventer; Utblaasningssikring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askeland, R.; Larsen, V.

    1997-06-16

    the invention relates to a blowout preventer particularly for use in drilling bore hole sections near the sea bed. It is adapted to prevent blowout of shallow gas in the bore hole. It consists of one annular flexibly expansible and contractible packing element, which by radially directed expansion is adapted to rest in a sealed condition against the wall of the bore hole and close the passage through the annular space of the same. The preventer comprises an inner sleeve element being limited telescopic displaceable in relation to the outer housing of the preventer and being spring loaded towards extended telescopic position when it is subjected to extra weight loading, and means which in the relative contracted telescopic position of the sleeve element and outer housing is adapted to close the passage through the inner cavity of the blowout preventer and established liquid connection to the packing element or elements for inflation thereof. 13 figs.

  6. Prevention of preterm birth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flood, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Preterm birth (delivery before 37 completed weeks of gestation) is common and rates are increasing. In the past, medical efforts focused on ameliorating the consequences of prematurity rather than preventing its occurrence. This approach resulted in improved neonatal outcomes, but it remains costly in terms of both the suffering of infants and their families and the economic burden on society. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of preterm labor has altered the approach to this problem, with increased focus on preventive strategies. Primary prevention is a limited strategy which involves public education, smoking cessation, improved nutritional status and avoidance of late preterm births. Secondary prevention focuses on recurrent preterm birth which is the most recognisable risk factor. Widely accepted strategies include cervical cerclage, progesterone and dedicated clinics. However, more research is needed to explore the role of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory treatments in the prevention of this complex problem.

  7. Interaction of nanoparticles with proteins: relation to bio-reactivity of the nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saptarshi, Shruti R; Duschl, Albert; Lopata, Andreas L

    2013-07-19

    Interaction of nanoparticles with proteins is the basis of nanoparticle bio-reactivity. This interaction gives rise to the formation of a dynamic nanoparticle-protein corona. The protein corona may influence cellular uptake, inflammation, accumulation, degradation and clearance of the nanoparticles. Furthermore, the nanoparticle surface can induce conformational changes in adsorbed protein molecules which may affect the overall bio-reactivity of the nanoparticle. In depth understanding of such interactions can be directed towards generating bio-compatible nanomaterials with controlled surface characteristics in a biological environment. The main aim of this review is to summarise current knowledge on factors that influence nanoparticle-protein interactions and their implications on cellular uptake.

  8. Composite proton exchange membrane based on sulfonated organic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitia, Emmanuel Sokiri

    As the world sets its sight into the future, energy remains a great challenge. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is part of the solution to the energy challenge because of its high efficiency and diverse application. The purpose of the PEM is to provide a path for proton transport and to prevent direct mixing of hydrogen and oxygen at the anode and the cathode, respectively. Hence, PEMs must have good proton conductivity, excellent chemical stability, and mechanical durability. The current state-of-the-art PEM is a perfluorosulfonate ionomer, Nafion®. Although Nafion® has many desirable properties, it has high methanol crossover and it is expensive. The objective of this research was to develop a cost effective two-phase, composite PEM wherein a dispersed conductive organic phase preferentially aligned in the transport direction controls proton transport, and a continuous hydrophobic phase provides mechanical durability to the PEM. The hypothesis that was driving this research was that one might expect better dispersion, higher surface to volume ratio and improved proton conductivity of a composite membrane if the dispersed particles were nanometer in size and had high ion exchange capacity (IEC, = [mmol sulfonic acid]/gram of polymer). In view of this, considerable efforts were employed in the synthesis of high IEC organic nanoparticles and fabrication of a composite membrane with controlled microstructure. High IEC, ~ 4.5 meq/g (in acid form, theoretical limit is 5.4 meq/g) nanoparticles were achieved by emulsion copolymerization of a quaternary alkyl ammonium (QAA) neutralized-sulfonated styrene (QAA-SS), styrene, and divinylbenzene (DVB). The effects of varying the counterion of the sulfonated styrene (SS) monomer (alkali metal and QAA cations), SS concentration, and the addition of a crosslinking agent (DVB) on the ability to stabilize the nanoparticles to higher IECs were assessed. The nanoparticles were ion exchanged to acid form. The extent of ion

  9. Methotrexate nanoparticle delivery system for treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacotherapy Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Benin, Benin City, ... Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of methotrexate (MTX) nanoparticles in pediatric patients ... Keywords: Pediatric patient, Methotrexate nanoparticle, Inflammatory bowel disease, ..... formulations in cell culture and small-animal.

  10. Titanium nitride nanoparticles for therapeutic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2014-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles exhibit plasmonic resonances in the biological transparency window where high absorption efficiencies can be obtained with small dimensions. Both lithographic and colloidal samples are examined from the perspective of nanoparticle thermal therapy. © 2014 OSA....

  11. Thermal resistance between amorphous silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanhe; Elsahati, Muftah; Liu, Jin; Richards, Robert F.

    2017-05-01

    Nanoparticle-based materials have been used as thermal insulation in a variety of macroscale and microscale applications. In this work, we investigate the heat transfer between nanoparticles using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the total thermal resistance and thermal boundary resistance between adjacent amorphous silica nanoparticles. Numerical results are compared to interparticle resistances determined from experimental measurements of heat transfer across packed silica nanoparticle beds. The thermal resistance between nanoparticles is shown to increase rapidly as the particle contact radius decreases. More significantly, the interparticle resistance depends strongly on the forces between particles, in particular, the presence or absence of chemical bonds between nanoparticles. In addition, the effect of interfacial force strength on thermal resistance increases as the nanoparticle diameter decreases. The simulations results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results for 20 nm silica nanoparticles.

  12. Preparation of Gold Nanoparticles Protected with Polyelectrolyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Ping SUN; Zhe Ling ZHANG; Bai Lin ZHANG; Xian Dui DONG; Shao Jun DONG; Er Kang WANG

    2003-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were synthesized through the reduction of tetrachlorauric acid (HAuCl4) by NaBH4, with polyethyleneimine(PEI) as stabilizer. The nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy(AFM).

  13. Nanoparticles from the gasphase formation, structure, properties

    CERN Document Server

    Lorke, Axel; Schmechel, Roland; Schulz, Christof

    2012-01-01

    This book offers a broad overview of the complete production and value chain from nanoparticle formation to integration in products and devices, and offers deep insight into the fabrication, characterization and application of nanoparticles from the gasphase.

  14. Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161188.html Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice Treatment might one ... News) -- New research in mice suggests that tiny nanoparticles might one day be a better way to ...

  15. In Vitro Cytotoxicity Assessment of an Orthodontic Composite Containing Titanium-dioxide Nano-particles

    OpenAIRE

    Heravi, Farzin; Ramezani, Mohammad; Poosti, Maryam; Hosseini, Mohsen; Shajiei, Arezoo; Ahrari, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Incorporation of nano-particles to orthodontic bonding systems has been considered to prevent enamel demineralization around appliances. This study investigated cytotoxicity of Transbond XT adhesive containing 1 wt% titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano-particles. Materials and methods. Ten composite disks were prepared from each of the conventional and TiO2-containg composites and aged for 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM). The extracts were obta...

  16. Plant-mediated synthesis of nanoparticles: A newer and safer tool against mosquito-borne diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Benelli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prevention and control of mosquito-borne diseases is a key challenge of huge public health importance. Plant-mediated synthesis of nanoparticles has recently gained attention as a cheap, rapid and eco-friendly method to control mosquito vector populations, with special reference to young instars. Furthermore, plant-fabricated nanoparticles have been successfully employed as dengue virus growth inhibitors. In this Editorial, parasitologists, entomologists and researchers in drug nanosynthesis are encouraged to deal with a number of crucial challenges of public health importance.

  17. Polymer-stabilized palladium nanoparticles for catalytic membranes: ad hoc polymer fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macanás Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metal nanoparticles are known as highly effective catalysts although their immobilization on solid supports is frequently required to prevent aggregation and to facilitate the catalyst application, recovery, and reuse. This paper reports the intermatrix synthesis of Pd0 nanoparticles in sulfonated polyethersulfone with Cardo group membranes and their use as nanocomposite catalytic membrane reactors. The synthesized polymer and the corresponding nanocomposite were characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The catalytic efficiency of catalytic membranes was evaluated by following the reduction of p-nitrophenol in the presence of NaBH4.

  18. Optimized dispersion of nanoparticles for biological in vitro and in vivo studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coester Conrad

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to establish and validate a practical method to disperse nanoparticles in physiological solutions for biological in vitro and in vivo studies. Results TiO2 (rutile dispersions were prepared in distilled water, PBS, or RPMI 1640 cell culture medium. Different ultrasound energies, various dispersion stabilizers (human, bovine, and mouse serum albumin, Tween 80, and mouse serum, various concentrations of stabilizers, and different sequences of preparation steps were applied. The size distribution of dispersed nanoparticles was analyzed by dynamic light scattering and zeta potential was measured using phase analysis light scattering. Nanoparticle size was also verified by transmission electron microscopy. A specific ultrasound energy of 4.2 × 105 kJ/m3 was sufficient to disaggregate TiO2 (rutile nanoparticles, whereas higher energy input did not further improve size reduction. The optimal sequence was first to sonicate the nanoparticles in water, then to add dispersion stabilizers, and finally to add buffered salt solution to the dispersion. The formation of coarse TiO2 (rutile agglomerates in PBS or RPMI was prevented by addition of 1.5 mg/ml of human, bovine or mouse serum albumin, or mouse serum. The required concentration of albumin to stabilize the nanoparticle dispersion depended on the concentration of the nanoparticles in the dispersion. TiO2 (rutile particle dispersions at a concentration lower than 0.2 mg/ml could be stabilized by the addition of 1.5 mg/ml albumin. TiO2 (rutile particle dispersions prepared by this method were stable for up to at least 1 week. This method was suitable for preparing dispersions without coarse agglomerates (average diameter 2 (rutile, ZnO, Ag, SiOx, SWNT, MWNT, and diesel SRM2975 particulate matter. Conclusion The optimized dispersion method presented here appears to be effective and practicable for preparing dispersions of nanoparticles in physiological

  19. Nanostructures of functionalized gold nanoparticles prepared by particle lithography with organosilanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusker, Kathie L; Li, Jie-Ren; Garno, Jayne C

    2011-11-01

    Periodic arrays of organosilane nanostructures were prepared with particle lithography to define sites for selective adsorption of functionalized gold nanoparticles. Essentially, the approach for nanoparticle lithography consists of procedures with two masks. First, latex mesospheres were used as a surface mask for deposition of an organosilane vapor, to produce an array of holes within a covalently bonded, organic thin film. The latex particles were readily removed with solvent rinses to expose discrete patterns of nanosized holes of uncovered substrate. The nanostructured film of organosilanes was then used as a surface mask for a second patterning step, with immersion in a solution of functionalized nanoparticles. Patterned substrates were fully submerged in a solution of surface-active gold nanoparticles coated with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane. Regularly shaped, nanoscopic areas of bare substrate produced by removal of the latex mask provided sites to bind silanol-terminated gold nanoparticles, and the methyl-terminated areas of the organosilane film served as an effective resist, preventing nonspecific adsorption on masked areas. Characterizations with atomic force microscopy demonstrate the steps for lithography with organosilanes and functionalized nanoparticles. Patterning was accomplished for both silicon and glass substrates, to generate nanostructures with periodicities of 200-300 nm that match the diameters of the latex mesospheres of the surface masks. Nanoparticles were shown to bind selectively to uncovered, exposed areas of the substrate and did not attach to the methyl-terminal groups of the organosilane mask. Billions of well-defined nanostructures of nanoparticles can be generated using this high-throughput approach of particle lithography, with exquisite control of surface density and periodicity at the nanoscale.

  20. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G.; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages’ pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages’ core and low non-specific binding to the cages’ outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage’s core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of

  1. The mutual influence of two different dyes on their sensitized fluorescence (cofluorescence) in nanoparticles from complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, L. Yu.; Sveshnikova, E. B.; Ermolaev, V. L.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the fluorescence sensitization and quenching for pairs of different dyes simultaneously incorporated into nanoparticles from complexes M(diketone)3phen, where M(III) is La(III), Lu(III), or Sc(III); diketone is p-phenylbenzoyltrifluoroacetone (PhBTA) or naphthoyltrifluoroacetone (NTA); and phen is 1,10-phenanthroline. We have shown that, upon formation of nanoparticles in the solution in the presence of two dyes the concentrations of which are either comparable with or lower than the concentration of nanoparticles (complexes decreases by an order of magnitude. The same effect is observed as 1 μM of R6G are introduced into nanoparticles with NB ([NB] ≤ 20 nM). The increase in the fluorescence of dye molecules upon their incorporation from the solution into nanoparticles from complexes is noticeably lower than that expected from the proposed ratio of concentrations of complexes and dyes in nanoparticles. Analysis of the obtained data indicates that the introduction of large concentrations of C30 or R6G dyes into nanoparticles makes it possible to prevent large energy losses due to impurities or upon transition to a triplet state that arises during the migration of the excitation energy over S 1 levels of complexes. Energy accumulated by these dyes is efficiently transferred to another dye that is present in the solution at lower concentrations and that has a lower-lying S 1 level, which makes it possible to increase its fluorescence by an order of magnitude upon its incorporation into nanoparticles.

  2. Metal matrix-metal nanoparticle composites with tunable melting temperature and high thermal conductivity for phase-change thermal storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wu, Hsinwei; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-02-24

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) are of broad interest for thermal storage and management applications. For energy-dense storage with fast thermal charging/discharging rates, a PCM should have a suitable melting temperature, large enthalpy of fusion, and high thermal conductivity. To simultaneously accomplish these traits, we custom design nanocomposites consisting of phase-change Bi nanoparticles embedded in an Ag matrix. We precisely control nanoparticle size, shape, and volume fraction in the composite by separating the nanoparticle synthesis and nanocomposite formation steps. We demonstrate a 50-100% thermal energy density improvement relative to common organic PCMs with equivalent volume fraction. We also tune the melting temperature from 236-252 °C by varying nanoparticle diameter from 8.1-14.9 nm. Importantly, the silver matrix successfully prevents nanoparticle coalescence, and no melting changes are observed during 100 melt-freeze cycles. The nanocomposite's Ag matrix also leads to very high thermal conductivities. For example, the thermal conductivity of a composite with a 10% volume fraction of 13 nm Bi nanoparticles is 128 ± 23 W/m-K, which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical thermal storage materials. We complement these measurements with calculations using a modified effective medium approximation for nanoscale thermal transport. These calculations predict that the thermal conductivity of composites with 13 nm Bi nanoparticles varies from 142 to 47 W/m-K as the nanoparticle volume fraction changes from 10 to 35%. Larger nanoparticle diameters and/or smaller nanoparticle volume fractions lead to larger thermal conductivities.

  3. Albumin pre-coating enhances intracellular siRNA delivery of multifunctional amphiphile/siRNA nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kummitha CM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available China M Kummitha, Anthony S Malamas, Zheng-Rong LuDepartment of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Nonspecific association of serum molecules with short-interfering RNA (siRNA nanoparticles can change their physiochemical characteristics, and results in reduced cellular uptake in the target tissue during the systemic siRNA delivery process. Serum albumin is the most abundant protein in the body and has been used to modify the surface of nanoparticles, to inhibit association of other serum molecules. Here, we hypothesized that surface modification of lipid-based nanoparticular siRNA delivery systems with albumin could prevent their interaction with serum proteins, and improve intracellular uptake. In this study, we investigated the influence of albumin on the stability and intracellular siRNA delivery of the targeted siRNA nanoparticles of a polymerizable and pH-sensitive multifunctional surfactant N-(1-aminoethyliminobis[N-(oleoylcysteinylhistinyl-1-aminoethylpropionamide] (EHCO in serum. Serum resulted in a significant increase in the size of targeted EHCO/siRNA nanoparticles and inhibited cellular uptake of the nanoparticles. Coating of targeted EHCO/siRNA nanoparticles with bovine serum albumin at 9.4 µM prior to cell transfection improved cellular uptake and gene silencing efficacy of EHCO/siRNA targeted nanoparticles in serum-containing media, as compared with the uncoated nanoparticles. At a proper concentration, albumin has the potential to minimize interactions of serum proteins with siRNA nanoparticles for effective systemic in vivo siRNA delivery.Keywords: multifunctional, lipid nanoparticles, RNA interference, pH-sensitive amphiphile, siRNA

  4. Dynamic nanoparticle assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libing; Xu, Liguang; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2012-11-20

    Although nanoparticle (NP) assemblies are at the beginning of their development, their unique geometrical shapes and media-responsive optical, electronic, and magnetic properties have attracted significant interest. Nanoscale assembly bridges multiple levels of hierarchy of materials: individual nanoparticles, discrete molecule-like or virus-like nanoscale agglomerates, microscale devices, and macroscale materials. The capacity to self-assemble can greatly facilitate the integration of nanotechnology with other technologies and, in particular, with microscale fabrication. In this Account, we describe developments in the emerging field of dynamic NP assemblies, which are spontaneously form superstructures containing more than two inorganic nanoscale particles that display the ability to change their geometrical, physical, chemical, and other attributes. In many ways, dynamic assemblies can represent a bottleneck in the "bottom-up" fabrication of NP-based devices because they can produce a much greater variety of assemblies, but they also provide a convenient tool for variation of geometries and dimensions of nanoparticle assemblies. Superstructures of NPs (and those held together by similar intrinsic forces)are classified into two groups: Class 1 where media and external fields can alter shape, conformation, and order of stable super structures with a nearly constant number of NPs or Class 2 where the total number of NPs changes, while the organizational motif in the final superstructure remains the same. The future development of successful dynamic assemblies requires understanding the equilibrium in dynamic NP systems. The dynamic nature of Class 1 assemblies is associated with the equilibrium between different conformations of a superstructure and is comparable to the isomerization in classical chemistry. Class 2 assemblies involve the formation or breakage of linkages between the NPs, which is analogous to the classical chemical equilibrium for the formation of

  5. Estradiol-loaded PLGA nanoparticles for improving low bone mineral density of cancellous bone caused by osteoporosis: Application of enhanced charged nanoparticles with iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Issei; Kobayashi, Shiori; Hida, Yukari; Makino, Kimiko

    2017-07-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis among older women, which occurs by an ovarian hormone deficiency, is one of the major public health problems. 17 β-estradiol (E2) is used to prevent and treat this disease as a drug of hormone replacement therapy. In oral administration, E2 is significantly affected by first-pass hepatic metabolism, and high dose administration must be needed to obtain drug efficacy. Therefore, alternative administration route is needed, and we have focused on the transdermal drug delivery system. In this study, we have prepared E2-loaded poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles for osteoporosis by using a combination of an antisolvent diffusion method with preferential solvation. The average particle diameter of the nanoparticles was 110.0±41.0nm and the surface charge number density was 82 times higher than that of conventional E2-loaded PLGA nanoparticles. Therapeutic evaluation of E2-loaded PLGA nanoparticles was carried out using ovariectomized female rats. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated to measure bone mineral density of cancellous bone using an X-ray CT system. When the E2-loaded PLGA nanoparticles were administrated once a week, bone mineral density was significantly higher than that of the non-treated group at 60days after the start of treatment. Also, in the group administered this nanoparticle twice a week, the bone mineral density increased significantly at 45days after the start of treatment. From these results, it was revealed that E2-loaded PLGA nanoparticles with iontophoresis were useful to recover bone mineral density of cancellous bone, and it was also suggested that they extend the dosing interval of E2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High surface area fibrous silica nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2014-11-11

    Disclosed are high surface area nanoparticles that have a fibrous morphology. The nanoparticles have a plurality of fibers, wherein each fiber is in contact with one other fiber and each fiber has a length of between about 1 nm and about 5000 nm. Also disclosed are applications of the nanoparticles of the present invention, and methods of fabrication of the nanoparticles of the present invention.

  7. PREPARATION OF POLYALKYLCYANOACRYLATE NANOPARTICLES WITH VARIOUS MORPHOLOGIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-lin Xu; He-xian Li; Guo-chang Wang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of various reaction conditions on the preparation of polyalkylcyanoacrylate (PACA) nanoparticles are studied. The PACA nanoparticles with different crosslinking degrees and morphology are prepared. Addition of crosslinkers can not only adjust the particle size, but also change the morphology of PACA nanoparticles. Moreover, the loose network structure of the PACA nanoparticles with “core/shell-like” morphology is investigated by AFM and TEM in detail.

  8. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Powers, Dana A.; Zhang, Zhenyuan

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  9. Iontophoresis on minoxidil sulphate-loaded chitosan nanoparticles accelerates drug release, decreasing their targeting effect to hair follicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno N. Matos

    Full Text Available The experiments described in this paper tested the hypothesis whether iontophoresis applied on a chitosan nanoparticle formulation could combine the enhanced drug accumulation into the follicular casts obtained using iontophoresis and the sustained drug release, reducing dermal exposure, provided by nanoparticles. Results showed that even though iontophoresis presented comparable minoxidil targeting potential to hair follicles than passive delivery of chitosan-nanoparticles (4.1 ± 0.9 and 5.3 ± 1.0 µg cm-2, respectively, it was less effective on preventing dermal exposure, since chitosan-nanoparticles presented a drug permeation in the receptor solution of 15.3 ± 4.3 µg cm-2 after 6 h of iontophoresis, while drug amounts from passive nanoparticle delivery were not detected. Drug release experiments showed particles were not able to sustain the drug release under the influence of a potential gradient. In conclusion, the application of MXS-loaded chitosan nanoparticles remains the best way to target MXS to the hair follicles while preventing dermal exposure.

  10. CANCER CAN BE PREVENTED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Life style factors are contributing significantly in cancer prevention. With the intake of proper and balanced diet ,cancer prevention is possible. Many foods are associated either with incidence or prevention of cancer. Plant based foods like fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains rich in fiber, b-carotene, vitamins and antioxidants can prevent cancer. Fiber rich foods increase bowel movement, decreasing the absorption of cholesterol. Pumpkin, carrots contain b-carotenes. Leafy vegetables, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, peas and beans are rich in fiber and stimulate cancer preventing enzyme induction. Vitamin C rich citrus fruits can stimulate immune system. Garlic and onions can stimulate enzymes that can suppress tumor growth. Turmeric used in cooking can prevent colorectal cancer. Topical application of turmeric can prevent breast cancer in women. On the other hand, certain foods can cause cancer. Refined foods, high fat foods, deep fried foods, processed foods and low fiber foods increase cancer risk. Red meat, processed meat and barbeques contain a carcinogen called acrylamide. Foods prepared with hydrogenated fats contain transfats which increase risk for breast, ovarian, cervical and lung cancer. Consumption of alcohol increasing the risk for cancers of digestive system. LET US EAT RIGHT FOODS AND AVOID WRONG FOODS.

  11. Prevention of hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, P J

    1993-11-30

    For a 50-year old Caucasian woman today, the risk of a hip fracture over her remaining life-time is about 17%. Tomorrow the situation will clearly be worse because the continuous increase in life expectancy will cause a three-fold increase in worldwide fracture incidence over the next 60 years. Through diagnostic bone mass measurements at the hip and assessment of biochemical parameters, a great deal has been learned in recent years about reduction of hip fracture risk. Preventive strategies are based on prevention of falls, use of hip protectors, and prevention of bone fragility. The latter includes the optimization of peak bone mass during childhood, postmenopausal estrogen replacement therapy, and also late prevention consisting in reversing senile secondary hyperparathyroidism, which plays an important role in the decrease of skeletal strength. This secondary hyperparathyroidism, which results from both vitamin D insufficiency and low calcium intake, is preventable with vitamin D3 and calcium supplements. They have recently been shown capable of providing effective prevention of hip fractures in elderly women living in nursing homes, with a reduction of about 25% in the number of hip fractures noted in a 3-year controlled study in 3,270 women (intention-to-treat analysis). In conclusion, it is never too early to reduce the risk of osteoporosis and never too late to prevent hip fractures.

  12. Tannin biosynthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Becerra, R.; Rius, J. L.; Zorrilla, C.

    2010-08-01

    In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized with gallic acid and tannic acid are characterized using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Its size, form, and structure are compared with nanoparticles obtained previously using alfalfa biomass in order to find a simpler, consistent, and environmentally friendly method in the production of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  13. [Magnetic nanoparticles and intracellular delivery of biopolymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, A A; Dubina, M V

    2014-03-01

    The basic methods of intracellular delivery of biopolymers are present in this review. The structure and synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, their stabilizing surfactants are described. The examples of the interaction of nanoparticles with biopolymers such as nucleic acids and proteins are considered. The final part of the review is devoted to problems physiology and biocompatibility of magnetic nanoparticles.

  14. Peptides and metallic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogan, M.J.; Olmedo, I.; Hosta, L.; Guerrero, A.R.; Cruz Ricondo, L.J.; Albericio, F.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we describe the contribution of peptides to the biomedical applications of metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss strategies for the preparation of peptide-nanoparticle conjugates and the synthesis of the peptides and metallic nanoparticles. An overview of the techniques used for th

  15. Solid lipid nanoparticles for parenteral drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, S.A.; Kayser, Oliver; Muller, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    This review describes the use of nanoparticles based on solid lipids for the parenteral application of drugs. Firstly, different types of nanoparticles based on solid lipids such as "solid lipid nanoparticles" (SLN), "nanostructured lipid carriers" (NLC) and "lipid drug conjugate" (LDC)

  16. Gold nanoparticles for tumour detection and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Petersen, W.; Petersen, Wilhelmina; Jose, J.; Jose, J.; van Es, P.; van Es, Peter; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Poot, Andreas A.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; van Leeuwen, Ton; Manohar, Srirang; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications is emerging rapidly. Recent developments have led to numerous studies of noble metal nanoparticles, down to the level of single molecule detection in living cells. The application of noble metal nanoparticles in diagnostics and treatment of early s

  17. Nanoparticle-mediated treatment for inflammatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides nanoparticles for treatment of inflammatory diseases. The nanoparticles preferably comprise chitosan and a siRNA targeting a mRNA encoding a pro-inflammatory cytokine, such as e.g. tnf-alfa. A preferred route of administration of the nanoparticles is by injection...

  18. Optical control of gallium nanoparticle growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, K. F.; Fedotov, V. A.; Pochon, S.; Ross, K. J.; Stevens, G. C.; Zheludev, N. I.; Brocklesby, W. S.; Emel'yanov, V. I.

    2002-03-01

    We report that low-intensity light can dramatically influence and regulate the nanoparticle self-assembly process: Illumination of a substrate exposed to a beam of gallium atoms results in the formation of gallium nanoparticles with a relatively narrow size distribution. Very low light intensities, below the threshold for thermally induced evaporation, exert considerable control over nanoparticle formation.

  19. Gold nanoparticles for tumour detection and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, L.; Petersen, W.; Jose, J.; Es, van P.; Lenferink, A.; Poot, A.A.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.; Manohar, S.; Otto, C.; Leeuwen, van T.G.

    2011-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications is emerging rapidly. Recent developments have led to numerous studies of noble metal nanoparticles, down to the level of single molecule detection in living cells. The application of noble metal nanoparticles in diagnostics and treatment of early s

  20. Incorporated Organic Modified Ag Nanoparticles in Ormocer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiping XIA; Jianli ZHANG; Jinhao WANG; Qiuhua NIE

    2004-01-01

    Ag nanoparticles coated trisodium citrate were incorporated in ormocer by sol-gel method. The doping concentration of Ag in ormocer is about 1.0% in weight. The HRTFM demonstrated that the particles disperse in ormocer, and the size of Ag nanoparticles is 5~10 nm. The absorption band of Ag nanoparticle at 410 nm was observed.

  1. Novel Properties of Photochromic Spirooxazine Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuan-Yuan; FAN Mei-Gong; ZHANG Chang-Rui; SHENG Xiao-Hai; YAO Jian-Nian

    2007-01-01

    The nanoparticles of a spirooxazine (SPO) and its photomerocyanine (PMC) were prepared through the reprecipitation method. Two distinct features were observed. One is that the decaying lifetime for PMC nanoparticles was 600 times of that for the dispersed molecules, and the other is that the fluorescence intensity of SPO nanoparticles was enhanced by 240 times of that of the dispersed monomer.

  2. Lactobacillus assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, K.; Jha, Anal K.; Kulkarni, A. R.

    2007-05-01

    An eco-friendly lactobacillus sp. (microbe) assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40 60 nm are found.

  3. The effect of coating on heat generation properties of Iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted more and more attention for their potential application as heating agents in cancer hyperthermia. The effectiveness of cancer hyperthermia can be increased by using particles that have a higher heat generation rate, quantified by specific absorption rate (SAR), at a smaller applied field. In order to optimize the functionality of nanoparticles as heating agents, it is essential to have a comprehensive understanding of factors that may influence SAR including coating and aggregation. In all biomedical applications, the magnetic particles are coated with surfactants and polymers to enhance biocompatibility, prevent agglomeration and add functionality. Coatings may profoundly influence particles' clustering behavior and magnetic properties. Yet its effect on the heat generation rate of the nanoparticles has been scarcely investigated. In this context, a systematic investigation was carried out in this dissertation in order to understand the impact of the surface coating of magnetic nanoparticles on their heat generation rate. The study also includes investigation of normal nerve cell viability in presence of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles with and without exposure to magnetic heating. Commercially available suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 10 nm and different coatings relevant to biomedical applications such as aminosilane, carboxymethyl-dextran, protein A, biotin were extensively characterized. First of all, magnetic phase reduction of magnetite nanoparticles was examined by studying the discrepancy between the volume fraction of magnetic phase calculated from magnetization curve and the magnetic core concentration obtained from Tiron chelation test. The findings indicated that coatings might interact with the surface atoms of the magnetic core and form a magnetically disordered layer reducing the total amount of the magnetic phase. Secondly, the impact of coating and aggregation

  4. Supersonic flow imaging via nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Due to influence of compressibility,shock wave,instabilities,and turbulence on supersonic flows, current flow visualization and imaging techniques encounter some problems in high spatiotemporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio(SNR)measurements.Therefore,nanoparticle based planar laser scattering method(NPLS)is developed here.The nanoparticles are used as tracer,and pulse planar laser is used as light source in NPLS;by recording images of particles in flow field with CCD, high spatiotemporal resolution supersonic flow imaging is realized.The flow-following ability of nanoparticles in supersonic flows is studied according to multiphase flow theory and calibrating experiment of oblique shock wave.The laser scattering characteristics of nanoparticles are analyzed with light scattering theory.The results of theoretical and experimental studies show that the dynamic behavior and light scattering characteristics of nanoparticles highly enhance the spatiotemporal resolution and SNR of NPLS,with which the flow field involving shock wave,expansion,Mach disk,boundary layer,sliding-line,and mixing layer can be imaged clearly at high spatiotemporal resolution.

  5. Magnetic nanoparticles for "smart liposomes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Mustapić, Mislav; Ebrahimian, Haleh; Wagner, Pawel; Kim, Jung Ho; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Horvat, Joseph; Martinac, Boris

    2015-12-01

    Liposomal drug delivery systems (LDDSs) are promising tools used for the treatment of diseases where highly toxic pharmacological agents are administered. Currently, destabilising LDDSs by a specific stimulus at a target site remains a major challenge. The bacterial mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) presents an excellent candidate biomolecule that could be employed as a remotely controlled pore-forming nanovalve for triggered drug release from LDDSs. In this study, we developed superparamagnetic nanoparticles for activation of the MscL nanovalves by magnetic field. Synthesised CoFe2O4 nanoparticles with the radius less than 10 nm were labelled by SH groups for attachment to MscL. Activation of MscL by magnetic field with the nanoparticles attached was examined by the patch clamp technique showing that the number of activated channels under ramp pressure increased upon application of the magnetic field. In addition, we have not observed any cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles in human cultured cells. Our study suggests the possibility of using magnetic nanoparticles as a specific trigger for activation of MscL nanovalves for drug release in LDDSs.

  6. Preventing Financial Crime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    This paper investigates the Swedish tax authority’s (Skatteverkets) compliance initiative called Preventing Financial Crime. In Sweden tax evasion related to organised moon-lighting is defined as a major risk to the revenue collection and to the legitimacy of Skatteverket. The traditional approach...... to abating such tax evasion has been reformed and a new mix-method approach adopted. This approach combines a proactive strategy—Preventing Financial Crime—with a reactive inspection strategy. During one a month of intensive fieldwork in Sweden, I studied the daily work in Preventing Financial Crime. Based...

  7. Primary Prevention With Statins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Martin B; Afzal, Shoaib; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend initiating primary prevention for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) with statins based on absolute ASCVD risk assessment. Recently, alternative trial-based and hybrid approaches were suggested for statin treatment eligibility. OBJECTIVES: This study...... prevention of ASCVD with statins was superior to the trial-based and hybrid approaches. Our results indicate that the ACC/AHA guidelines will prevent more ASCVD events than the trial-based and hybrid approaches, while treating fewer people compared with the trial-based approach....

  8. Prevention of lipohypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Kumar, Arun; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2016-07-01

    Lipohypertrophy is an important insulin injection site reaction, which has clinically significant sequelae, including a greater risk of glycaemic variability and higher insulin dose requirement. This article describes the prevention of lipohypertrophy, using the concept of levels of prevention. It enumerates methods of primordial, primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary prevention of lipohypertrophy. Focus on patient education, site rotation, avoidance of needle reuse, and dose titration when shifting from injection in lipohypertrophic lesions to normal subcutaneous tissue, helps minimize the development and impact of lipohypertrophy.

  9. Building in Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    this chapter devotes its focus primarily on the small bumps on the road by initially discussing how physical structural prevention can be an appropriate strategy not only to bring about behavioural change in the population as a whole but also to reduce the negative consequences of a stigmatising health...... discourse. To get an overall view of the effects of physical, structural preventive action, the second half of this chapter presents a model that, with its theoretical basis, may provide guidance in the compilation of new preventive strategies. This leads onto a concluding discussion of the ways in which...

  10. CSI cardiac prevent 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The CSI Cardiac Prevent 2015 was held at Hotel Taj Palace, New Delhi, on September 25-27, 2015. The major challenge was to create interest among cardiologists and physicians on preventive cardiology, a neglected area. The theme of the conference was "Innovations in Heart Disease Prevention.′′ This conference included "CSI at WHF Roadmap Workshop, Inauguration Ceremony, scientific program, plenary sessions, Nursing/Dietician track, Industry Exhibition, Social Events," Great India blood pressure Survey, and CSI Smart Heart App. A total of 848 delegates/faculties attended this conference against a total of 1140 people registered for the meeting.

  11. Prevention of EHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Prevention of EHI Michael S. Ferrara, Ph.D., ATC, FNATA University of Georgia Dept. of Kinesiology ACSM/DOD Conference Report Documentation Page Form...3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prevention of EHI 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...Intervention C ancel Injury Rate by Work:Rest Guide HE Rate 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 78-81.9 82-84.9 85-87.9 88-89.9 >90 EHI Prevention - Environment

  12. Metal Nanoparticle Aerogel Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Ignont, Erica; Snow, Lanee; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have fabricated sol-gels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Formation of an aerogel produces a blue shift in the surface plasmon resonance as a result of the decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix upon supercritical extraction of the solvent. However, as a result of chemical interface damping this blue shift does not obey effective medium theories. Annealing the samples in a reducing atmosphere at 400 C eliminates this discrepancy and results in narrowing and further blue shifting of the plasmon resonance. Metal particle aggregation also results in a deviation from the predictions of effective medium theories, but can be controlled through careful handling and by avoiding the use of alcohol. By applying effective medium theories to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each metal particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to inhomogeneous materials characterized by spatially dependent dielectric constants, such as aerogels. We demonstrate that the shift in the surface plasmon wavelength provides the average fractional composition of each component (air and silica) in this inhomogeneous layer, i.e. the porosity of the aerogel or equivalently, for these materials, the catalytic dispersion. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated metal clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  13. Nanoparticle Growth and Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    New particle formation (NPF) is observed around the world and is thought to contribute substantially to the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Newly formed particles must grow quickly if they are to reach the relevant size range to serve as CCN. In order to better predict the frequency, growth rates, and climatic impacts of NPF, knowledge of the chemical mechanisms by which nucleated nanoparticles grow is needed. We have constructed and tested a flow tube reactor that allows reactant concentrations and reaction times to be systematically varied. The reaction time can be as long as 40 min, making it possible to investigate processes with atmospherically relevant growth rates approaching 10 nm/hr for 10 nm dia. particles. Current experiments are focused on distinguishing the contributions of sulfuric acid and oxidized organics to particle growth using elemental composition measurements with the nano aerosol mass spectrometer and molecular composition measurements with high performance mass spectrometry. The experimental approach allows growth via organic precursors to be quantitatively assessed though comparison with condensational growth by sulfuric acid. These experiments and initial results will be presented.

  14. Nanoparticles in Cancer Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Bakhshayeshkaram

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is an interdisciplinary field as a combination of engineering, biology and medicine. It manipulates atoms and molecules to create devices at atomic, molecular and supramolecular levels for potential clinical use. Cancer nanotechnology as the latest trend in cancer diagnosis and treatment has provided nanoscale tools like biosensors, dendrimers, quantum dots and magnetic nanoparticles such as iron oxide with unique optical, magnetic and electronic properties. They are 100 to 1,000-fold smaller than cancer cells and may be conjugated with several functional molecules like imaging probes, specific ligands and antibodies. The capability of transferring through leaky blood vessels, passive and active targeting, intracellular delivery and subcellular localization has made them dual-purpose and multifunctional probes in cancer. Conventional imaging techniques such as CT and MRI using nontargeted contrast agents have limitations in early and accurate diagnosis and monitoring of treatment that may be eventually removed through the use of nanostructures' properties."nCancer diagnosis in an early stage, which influences the patient's survival, is possible earlier than ever imaginable. For example in contrast to mammography, which can detect breast cancer when it has at least 1000,000 cells, these new tools can accurately detect the tumor when it has less than 100 cells. "nThis article is a review on applications of nanotechnology, as a rapidly growing field for cancer imaging in medicine contributing to the early detection of cancer cells through available imaging techniques.

  15. Nanoparticle toxicity and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevenslik, T.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have provided significant advancements in cancer treatment. But as in any technology, there is a darkside. Experiments have shown NPs in body fluids pose a health risk by causing DNA damage that in of itself may lead to cancer. To avoid the dilemma that NPs are toxic to both cancer cells and DNA alike, the mechanism of NP toxicity must be understood so that the safe use of NPs may go forward. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) of peroxide and hydroxyl radicals damage the DNA by chemical reaction, but require NPs provide energies of about 5 eV not possible by surface effects. Only electromagnetic (EM) radiations beyond ultraviolet (UV) levels may explain the toxicity of NPs. Indeed, experiments show DNA damage from radiation, Hence, it is reasonable to hypothesize that NPs produce their own source of UV radiation, albeit at low intensity. Ionizing radiation from NPs at UV levels is consistent with the theory of QED induced EM radiation. QED stands for quantum electrodynamics. By this theory, fine radiation need not be limited to natural or man-made NPs. Extensions suggest UV radiation is produced from biological NPs within the body, e.g., enzyme induced fragmentation of epithelial tissue, exocytosis of small proteins, and ironically, the same molecular markers used to detect cancer itself.

  16. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles and silver nanoparticles via green technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zulfiqaar; Balu, S. S.

    2012-11-01

    The proposed work describes the comparison of various methods of green synthesis for preparation of Gold and Silver nanoparticles. Pure extracts of Lemon (Citrus limon) and Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) were mixed with aqueous solution of auric tetrachloride and silver nitrate. The resultant solutions were treated with four common techniques to assist in the reduction namely photo catalytic, thermal, microwave assisted reduction and solvo - thermal reduction. UV - Visible Spectroscopy results and STM images of the final solutions confirmed the formation of stable metallic nanoparticles. A preliminary account of the green synthesis work is presented here.

  17. Experimental Study and Numerical Solution of Poly Acrylic Acid Supported Magnetite Nanoparticles Transport in a One-Dimensional Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Golzar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, iron nanoparticles have attracted more attention for groundwater remediation due to its potential to reduce subsurface contaminants such as PCBs, chlorinated solvents, and heavy metals. The magnetic properties of iron nanoparticles cause to attach to each other and form bigger colloid particles of iron nanoparticles with more rapid sedimentation rate in aqueous environment. Using the surfactants such as poly acrylic acid (PAA prevents iron nanoparticles from forming large flocs that may cause sedimentation and so increases transport distance of the nanoparticles. In this study, the transport of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 stabilized with PAA in a one-dimensional porous media (column was investigated. The slurries with concentrations of 20,100 and 500 (mg/L were injected into the bottom of the column under hydraulic gradients of 0.125, 0.375, and 0.625. The results obtained from experiments were compared with the results obtained from numerical solution of advection-dispersion equation based on the classical colloid filtration theory (CFT. The experimental and simulated breakthrough curves showed that CFT is able to predict the transport and fate of iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with PAA (up to concentration 500 ppm in a porous media.

  18. Bifunctional Therapeutic High-Valence Silver-Pyridoxine Nanoparticles with Proliferative and Antibacterial Wound-Healing Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangasamy, Sabarinathan; Tak, Yu Kyung; Kim, Sunhee; Paul, Avijit; Song, Joon Myong

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial and moisturizing effects inherent to silver nanoparticles contribute greatly to their use as a topical antibacterial agent. The antibacterial property of silver nanoparticles provides topical wounds with an indirect environment for healing through the prevention of pathogenic infection. However, the direct wound-healing effects of silver nanoparticles have not been previously explored. In this work, we report a bimodal therapeutic silver nanoparticle that possesses both direct wound-healing and antibacterial properties. The nanoparticles consist of high-valence silver-pyridoxine complexes. The wound-healing efficacy was verified in diabetic mice, as well as in vitro assays. A MAPK pathway study demonstrated that silver-pyridoxine nanoparticles induced the proliferation and migration of keratinocyte and fibroblast cells. Antibacterial activities in 8 different pathogenic bacteria responsible for the infection of burn wounds were tested. The rapid wound healing occurring on skin wounds of diabetic mice attests to the utility of bimodal therapeutic silver nanoparticles as a next-generation topical therapeutic agent.

  19. DNA intercalation studies and antimicrobial activity of Ag@ZrO2 core-shell nanoparticles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanalekshmi, K I; Meena, K S

    2016-02-01

    Ag@ZrO2 core-shell nanoparticles were prepared by one pot simultaneous reduction of AgNO3 and hydrolysis of zirconium (IV) isopropoxide. The formation of core-shell nanoparticles was confirmed by absorption, XRD, and HR-TEM techniques. The antibacterial activity of Ag@ZrO2 core-shell nanoparticles against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and the antifungal properties against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus were examined by the agar diffusion method. DNA intercalation studies were carried out in CT-DNA. As a result ZrO2 supported on the surface of AgNPs not only prevented aggregation, but also proved to have enhanced antimicrobial activity and DNA intercalation than the Ag nanoparticles.

  20. Nanoparticle-detained toxins for safe and effective vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Che-Ming J.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Luk, Brian T.; Zhang, Liangfang

    2013-12-01

    Toxoid vaccines--vaccines based on inactivated bacterial toxins--are routinely used to promote antitoxin immunity for the treatment and prevention of bacterial infections. Following chemical or heat denaturation, inactivated toxins can be administered to mount toxin-specific immune responses. However, retaining faithful antigenic presentation while removing toxin virulence remains a major challenge and presents a trade-off between efficacy and safety in toxoid development. Here, we show a nanoparticle-based toxin-detainment strategy that safely delivers non-disrupted pore-forming toxins for immune processing. Using erythrocyte membrane-coated nanoparticles and staphylococcal α-haemolysin, we demonstrate effective virulence neutralization via spontaneous particle entrapment. Compared with vaccination with heat-denatured toxin, mice vaccinated with the nanoparticle-detained toxin showed superior protective immunity against toxin-mediated adverse effects. We find that the non-disruptive detoxification approach benefited the immunogenicity and efficacy of toxoid vaccines. We anticipate that this study will open new possibilities in the preparation of antitoxin vaccines against the many virulence factors that threaten public health.

  1. Influence of silver nanoparticles on food components in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocka, A.; Cieśla, J.

    2013-01-01

    During storage, grain might be affected by bacterial and fungal infections. Pathogens diminish the grain quality through contamination with excrements and second metabolites. It is very important to prevent grain from infections. Due to their antimicrobial properties, silver nanoparticles can play the role of an effective protector. The influence of nanoparticles on wheat quality was studied. The gluten parameters and falling number did not change after covering the grain with silver nanoparticles stabilized by sodium citrate. Changes in the structure of starch and gluten were investigated using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Infrared spectra of the whole meal and starch have shown a slight shift (from 1 000 to 995cm-1) of the band connected with the C-O-H bending. This displacement is probably related to the changes in sample moisture. Significant differences, corresponding to changes in the protein secondary structure, have appeared in the gluten spectra after covering.A decrease of absorbance in the amide and CH and OH regions has been observed regardless of the covering time.

  2. Precipitation of metal oxide nanoparticles using a miniemulsion technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marion Winkelmann; Heike Petra Schuchmann

    2011-01-01

    A method to precipitate nanoparticles using a miniemulsion technique is described,in which miniemulsion droplets between 100 and 1000 nm in size serve as nanoreactors enabling both the control of particle formation and particle growth.The application ofminiemulsion droplets to synthesise nanoparticles comprises three advantages:first,the size of the precipitated particles is limited by the reactant concentration within the emulsion droplet; second,particle agglomeration is prevented as nanoparticle collision outside the nanoreactor is avoided; and third,easy technical scale up can be realized by increasing emulsion volume and thus the number of nanoreactors,while local conditions within the reactors are not changed.The miniemulsion technique is an easy scalable process which allows defined synthesis of particles by precipitation reactions.The miniemulsion technique involves first the preparation of a stable water-inoil miniemulsion by high pressure homogenisation.Whereas a water soluble reactant is provided within the aqueous droplets,another oil- as well as water-soluble reactant can be introduced to the emulsion after homogenisation.The precipitation reaction is induced by the diffusion of the second reactant into the emulsion droplet.Together with this contribution,a method is described and discussed which uses a high pressure homogenisation process to produce stable water-in-oil miniemulsions serving as a reaction medium to precipitate metal oxides.

  3. Exploring the retention properties of CaF2 nanoparticles as possible additives for dental care application with tapping-mode atomic force microscope in liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Wasem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM is used to determine the retention properties of CaF2 nanoparticles adsorbed on mica and on tooth enamel in liquid. From the phase-lag of the forced cantilever oscillation the local energy dissipation at the detachment point of the nanoparticle was determined. This enabled us to compare different as-synthesized CaF2 nanoparticles that vary in shape, size and surface structure. CaF2 nanoparticles are candidates for additives in dental care products as they could serve as fluorine-releasing containers preventing caries during a cariogenic acid attack on the teeth. We show that the adherence of the nanoparticles is increased on the enamel substrate compared to mica, independently of the substrate roughness, morphology and size of the particles.

  4. Pollution prevention through chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, J.J.; Anastas, P.T.; Hassur, S.M.; Tobin, P.S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics

    1995-09-01

    Prosperity without pollution, and the consideration of how to achieve this economic and environmental imperative, has become the fundamental environmental theme of the 1990s. The new strategy--pollution prevention--will serve s the keystone of federal, state, and local environmental policy. The challenge is to switch from two decades of environmental policy based on pollution controls and government-mandated regulations to a future environmental policy based on pollution prevention, source reduction, recycling, and waste minimization. To make this change will require a new social compact among environmental, industrial, and regulatory interests. This chapter focuses on the role of chemistry and the contributions of synthetic and process analytical chemists. It also describes the implementation of pollution prevention concepts into the premanufacturing notice review process mandated by Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and discusses the implications of pollution prevention for chemical safety. 55 refs.

  5. Scabies: Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Error processing SSI file Prevention & Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir When a ... avoid outbreaks. Institutional outbreaks can be difficult to control and require a rapid, aggressive, and sustained response. ...

  6. Prevention of Listeriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Listeria (Listeriosis) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Listeria (Listeriosis) Questions & Answers Prevention People at Risk Pregnant Women ...

  7. Polio and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplementary Immunization Activity (SIA) Calendar Financing Financial Needs Investment Case Financial Resource Requirements GPEI Budget 2017 FRR ... tonsils (tonsillectomy) intramuscular injections, e.g. medications strenuous exercise injury Treatment and prevention There is no cure ...

  8. Prevent Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and prevent back pain: Do back-strengthening and stretching exercises at least 2 or 3 times a ... risk of back pain. Do back-strengthening and stretching exercises [PDF - 244 KB] at least 2 or ...

  9. Prevention in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Stephen; Bridgman, Colette; Brocklehurst, Paul

    2015-01-01

    for the conference, collected materials from scribes during the conference and additional resources collated in advance of the meeting, authors agreed on the summary document. RESULTS: The Prevention in Practice conference aimed to collate information about which diseases could be prevented in practice, how diseases...... and that the use of effective skill mix would be key to realizing efficiencies. The evidence base for prevention of caries and periodontal disease has been available for many years, as have the tools and techniques to detect, diagnose and stage the diseases appropriately. Dentistry finds itself in a enviable...... position with respect to its ability to prevent, arrest and reverse much of the burden of disease, however, it is clear that the infrastructure within primary care must be changed, and practitioners and their teams appropriately supported to deliver this paradigm shift from a surgical to a medical model....

  10. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MMWR RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  11. Prevention of Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Hwei; Chen, Ding-Shinn

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes life-threatening liver disease. It is transmitted through a horizontal route or a mother-to-infant route, and the latter is the major route in endemic areas. Prevention of HBV infection by immunization is the best way to eliminate HBV-related diseases. The HBV vaccine is the first human vaccine using a viral antigen from infected persons, which is safe and effective. Either passive immunization by hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) or active immunization by HBV vaccine is effective, and a combination of both yields the best efficacy in preventing HBV infection. The impact of universal HBV immunization is huge, with 90%–95% effectiveness in preventing chronic HBV infection. It is the first cancer preventive vaccine with a protective efficacy against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) of ∼70%. Nevertheless, further effort is still needed to avoid vaccine failure and to increase the global coverage rate. PMID:25732034

  12. Preventing pressure ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000147.htm Preventing pressure ulcers To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pressure ulcers are also called bedsores, or pressure sores. They ...

  13. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to prevent clots or, less commonly, thrombolytics to dissolve them. Glossary Cesarean Birth: Birth of a baby ... Opportunities Careers at ACOG Sitemap Website Feedback American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 409 12th Street SW, ...

  14. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or removed safely. How are children exposed to lead? Lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust are ... What can be done to prevent exposure to lead? It is important to determine the construction year ...

  15. Histoplasmosis Risk and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Histoplasmosis Risk & Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Who gets histoplasmosis? Anyone can get histoplasmosis if they’ve been ...

  16. A blowout preventer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigor' yev, N.I.; Khayrullin, B.Yu.; Nomin, V.I.; Ukdov, I.A.

    1983-01-01

    A blowout preventer is proposed which contains a body, blocks with rods, tops, hydraulic cylinders, spindles linked with the rods of the hydraulic cylinders and with the blocks which are installed in spindle stops and locking devices. To ensure the capability of backing up the hydraulic drive with a manual drive when using the preventer with traverse linked hydraulic cylinders installed on the body parallel to the axis of movement of the blocks, the spindles are linked with the rods of the blocks by a telescopic helical connection, are connected with the traverses with the capability of turning and are made with beads for interacting with the traverses when the preventer is closed. The stops are equal in length to the travel of the block for locking the spindles during opening of the preventer.

  17. Infection Prevention in Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergam, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients undergoing hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation are increasing every year, as are the number of centers both transplanting and caring for these patients. Improvements in transplant procedures, immunosuppressive regimens, and prevention of transplant-associated complications have led to marked improvements in survival in both populations. Infections remain one of the most important sources of excess morbidity and mortality in transplant, and therefore, infection prevention strategies are a critical element for avoiding these complications in centers caring for high-risk patients. This manuscript aims to provide an update of recent data on prevention of major healthcare-associated infections unique to transplantation, reviews the emergence of antimicrobial resistant infections, and discusses updated strategies to both identify and prevent transmission of these pathogens in transplant recipients.

  18. Prevent Child Abuse America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... call the police . Crisis and support contacts For Child Abuse Reporting Numbers in your State please visit: Child ... suspected child abuse and neglect. Parent Resources Prevent Child Abuse America (800) CHILDREN A resource for tips, referrals, ...

  19. Settings for Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more about suicide prevention in particular settings. American Indian/Alaska Native Settings Behavioral Health Care Inpatient Mental Health Outpatient Mental Health Substance Abuse Treatment Colleges and Universities Communities Crisis Centers/ ...

  20. Chemical Accident Prevention Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    These include chemical safety alerts, emergency preparedness and prevention advisories, and topical backgrounders. Excess flow valves, protecting workers in ethylene oxide sterilization facilities, reactivity hazards, and delayed coker units are covered.

  1. Polyp Prevention Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary objective of the Polyp Prevention Trial (PPT) is to determine whether a low fat, high fiber, high vegetable and fruit eating plan will decrease the recurrence of adenomatous polyps of the large bowel.

  2. Preventing eye injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daksha Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main challenge in developing a strategy to prevent eye injuries is that there are so many different causes and situations that can lead to eye injuries, each requiring a different approach.

  3. Prevention of cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayati Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin has a well-established role in the treatment of broad spectrum of malignancies; however its use is limited because of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity (CIN which can be progressive in more than 50% of cases. The most important risk factors for CIN include higher doses of cisplatin, previous cisplatin chemotherapy, underlying kidney damage and concurrent treatment with other potential nephrotoxin agents, such as aminoglycosides, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or iodinated contrast media. Different strategies have been offered to diminish or prevent nephrotoxicity of cisplatin. The standard approach for prevention of CIN is the administration of lower doses of cisplatin in combination with full intravenous hydration prior and after cisplatin administration. Cisplatin-induced oxidative stress in the kidney may be prevented by natural antioxidant compounds. The results of this review show that many strategies for prevention of CIN exist, however, attention to the administration of these agent for CIN is necessary.

  4. Preventing Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Newsletter Donate Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Knee Injuries Knee injuries in children and adolescent athletes ... this PDF Share this page: WHAT ARE COMMON KNEE INJURIES? Pain Syndromes One of the most common ...

  5. Magnetic nanoparticles in medical nanorobotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Sylvain

    2015-02-01

    Medical nanorobotics is a field of robotics that exploits the physics at the nanoscale to implement new functionalities in untethered robotic agents aimed for ultimate operations in constrained physiological environments of the human body. The implementation of such new functionalities is achieved by embedding specific nano-components in such robotic agents. Because magnetism has been and still widely used in medical nanorobotics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) in particular have shown to be well suited for this purpose. To date, although such magnetic nanoparticles play a critical role in medical nanorobotics, no literature has addressed specifically the use of MNP in medical nanorobotic agents. As such, this paper presents a short introductory tutorial and review of the use of magnetic nanoparticles in the field of medical nanorobotics with some of the related main functionalities that can be embedded in nanorobotic agents.

  6. Magnetic nanoparticles in medical nanorobotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.martel@polymtl.ca [Polytechnique Montréal, NanoRobotics Laboratory, Department of Computer and Software Engineering, Institute of Biomedical Engineering (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Medical nanorobotics is a field of robotics that exploits the physics at the nanoscale to implement new functionalities in untethered robotic agents aimed for ultimate operations in constrained physiological environments of the human body. The implementation of such new functionalities is achieved by embedding specific nano-components in such robotic agents. Because magnetism has been and still widely used in medical nanorobotics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) in particular have shown to be well suited for this purpose. To date, although such magnetic nanoparticles play a critical role in medical nanorobotics, no literature has addressed specifically the use of MNP in medical nanorobotic agents. As such, this paper presents a short introductory tutorial and review of the use of magnetic nanoparticles in the field of medical nanorobotics with some of the related main functionalities that can be embedded in nanorobotic agents.

  7. Synthesis of nanoparticles using ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia Xu

    2017-01-24

    The present disclosure relates to methods for producing nanoparticles. The nanoparticles may be made using ethanol as the solvent and the reductant to fabricate noble-metal nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distributions, and to coat a thin metal shell on other metal cores. With or without carbon supports, particle size is controlled by fine-tuning the reduction power of ethanol, by adjusting the temperature, and by adding an alkaline solution during syntheses. The thickness of the added or coated metal shell can be varied easily from sub-monolayer to multiple layers in a seed-mediated growth process. The entire synthesis of designed core-shell catalysts can be completed using metal salts as the precursors with more than 98% yield; and, substantially no cleaning processes are necessary apart from simple rinsing. Accordingly, this method is considered to be a "green" chemistry method.

  8. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  9. Inductive heating of conductive nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Nordebo, Sven

    2016-01-01

    We consider the heating of biological tissue by injecting gold nanoparticles and subjecting the system to an electromagnetic field in the radio frequency spectrum. There are results that indicate that small conducting particles can substantially increase the heating locally and thus provide a method to treat cancer. However, recently there are also other publications that question whether metal nanoparticles can be heated in radiofrequency at all. This paper presents a simplified analysis and some interesting observations regarding the classical electromagnetic background to this effect. Here, it is assumed that the related dipole effects are based solely on conducting nanospheres that are embedded in a surrounding medium. From this point of view it is concluded that the effect of using a capactive coupling i.e., a strong electric field to induce electric dipoles can be disregarded unless the volume fraction of the gold nanoparticles is unrealistically high or if there are some other external electric dipole ...

  10. Synthesis of nanoparticles using ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jia Xu

    2017-01-24

    The present disclosure relates to methods for producing nanoparticles. The nanoparticles may be made using ethanol as the solvent and the reductant to fabricate noble-metal nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distributions, and to coat a thin metal shell on other metal cores. With or without carbon supports, particle size is controlled by fine-tuning the reduction power of ethanol, by adjusting the temperature, and by adding an alkaline solution during syntheses. The thickness of the added or coated metal shell can be varied easily from sub-monolayer to multiple layers in a seed-mediated growth process. The entire synthesis of designed core-shell catalysts can be completed using metal salts as the precursors with more than 98% yield; and, substantially no cleaning processes are necessary apart from simple rinsing. Accordingly, this method is considered to be a "green" chemistry method.

  11. Green chemistry for nanoparticle synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Haohong; Wang, Dingsheng; Li, Yadong

    2015-08-21

    The application of the twelve principles of green chemistry in nanoparticle synthesis is a relatively new emerging issue concerning the sustainability. This field has received great attention in recent years due to its capability to design alternative, safer, energy efficient, and less toxic routes towards synthesis. These routes have been associated with the rational utilization of various substances in the nanoparticle preparations and synthetic methods, which have been broadly discussed in this tutorial review. This article is not meant to provide an exhaustive overview of green synthesis of nanoparticles, but to present several pivotal aspects of synthesis with environmental concerns, involving the selection and evaluation of nontoxic capping and reducing agents, the choice of innocuous solvents and the development of energy-efficient synthetic methods.

  12. Lymphatic Biodistribution of Polylactide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Eric J.; Tang, Li; Tong, Rong; Cheng, Jianjun; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor metastases occur through both the cardiovascular and lymphatic circulations. However, the majority of nanoparticle biodistribution studies have been focused on the cardiovascular circulation. In this study, we report the formulation of Cy5-labeled polylactide (Cy5-PLA) nanoparticles with controlled size and surface features and the subsequent evaluation of their lymphatic biodistribution. Cy5-PLA nanoparticles were formulated through Cy5/(BDI)ZnN(TMS)2-mediated [(BDI) = 2-((2,6-diisopropylphenyl) amido)-4-((2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-imino)-2-pentene] ring-opening polymerization of lactide followed by nanoprecipitation. Their lymphatic biodistribution was evaluated by using whole-body fluorescence imaging of nude mice and ex vivo fluorescence imaging of the resected organs. This technique has the potential for providing optical contrast and drug delivery through the lymphatic circulation for the treatment of metastatic cancer. PMID:20487681

  13. Lymphatic Biodistribution of Polylactide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Chaney

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumor metastases occur through both the cardiovascular and lymphatic circulations. However, the majority of nanoparticle biodistribution studies have been focused on the cardiovascular circulation. In this study, we report the formulation of Cy5-labeled polylactide (Cy5-PLA nanoparticles with controlled size and surface features and the subsequent evaluation of their lymphatic biodistribution. Cy5-PLA nanoparticles were formulated through Cy5/(BDIZnN(TMS2-mediated [(BDI = 2-((2,6-diisopropylphenyl amido-4-((2,6-diisopropylphenyl-imino-2-pentene] ring-opening polymerization of lactide followed by nanoprecipitation. Their lymphatic biodistribution was evaluated by using whole-body fluorescence imaging of nude mice and ex vivo fluorescence imaging of the resected organs. This technique has the potential for providing optical contrast and drug delivery through the lymphatic circulation for the treatment of metastatic cancer.

  14. Fabrication of Metallic Hollow Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Choi, Sr., Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Metal and semiconductor nanoshells, particularly transition metal nanoshells, are fabricated using dendrimer molecules. Metallic colloids, metallic ions or semiconductors are attached to amine groups on the dendrimer surface in stabilized solution for the surface seeding method and the surface seedless method, respectively. Subsequently, the process is repeated with additional metallic ions or semiconductor, a stabilizer, and NaBH.sub.4 to increase the wall thickness of the metallic or semiconductor lining on the dendrimer surface. Metallic or semiconductor ions are automatically reduced on the metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles causing the formation of hollow metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. The void size of the formed hollow nanoparticles depends on the dendrimer generation. The thickness of the metallic or semiconductor thin film around the dendrimer depends on the repetition times and the size of initial metallic or semiconductor seeds.

  15. Applications of Thermoresponsive Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Yildiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, magnetic nanoparticles carrying thermoresponsive polymeric coatings have gained increasing attention in material sciences due to the fact that resultant platforms offer controllable modalities such as imaging, drug delivery, and magnetic separation. As a result, novel materials including biosensors, therapeutic platforms, imaging agents, and magnetic separators have been realized. Since the number of publications reporting the applications of thermoresponsive magnetic nanoparticle has increased steadily over the years, a comprehensive review will be beneficial. In this paper, we aim to review publications studying applications of thermoresponsive nanoparticles in biomedical sciences as well as in environmental and chemical sciences. The paper also briefly discusses chemical formulations, characterizations, and properties of the thermoresponsive magnetic particles and then provides future outlooks.

  16. Nanoparticle composites for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männl, U.; van den Berg, C.; Magunje, B.; Härting, M.; Britton, D. T.; Jones, S.; van Staden, M. J.; Scriba, M. R.

    2014-03-01

    Printed Electronics is a rapidly developing sector in the electronics industry, in which nanostructured materials are playing an increasingly important role. In particular, inks containing dispersions of semiconducting nanoparticles, can form nanocomposite materials with unique electronic properties when cured. In this study we have extended on our previous studies of functional nanoparticle electronic inks, with the development of a solvent-based silicon ink for printed electronics which is compatible with existing silver inks, and with the investigation of other metal nanoparticle based inks. It is shown that both solvent-based and water-based inks can be used for both silver conductors and semiconducting silicon, and that qualitatively there is no difference in the electronic properties of the materials printed with a soluble polymer binder to when an acrylic binder is used.

  17. Polymer Functionalized Nanoparticles in Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Arthi

    2013-03-01

    Significant interest has grown around the ability to control spatial arrangement of nanoparticles in a polymer nanocomposite to engineer materials with target properties. Past work has shown that one could achieve controlled assembly of nanoparticles in the polymer matrix by functionalizing nanoparticle surfaces with homopolymers. This talk will focus on our recent work using Polymer Reference Interaction Site Model (PRISM) theory and Monte Carlo simulations and GPU-based molecular dynamics simulations to specifically understand how heterogeneity in the polymer functionalization in the form of a) copolymers with varying monomer chemistry and monomer sequence, and b) polydispersity in homopolymer grafts can tune effective interactions between functionalized nanoparticles, and the assembly of functionalized nanoparticles.

  18. Cytotoxic Effects of Fucoidan Nanoparticles against Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuichiro Kimura

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyzed the size-dependent bioactivities of fucoidan by comparing the cytotoxic effects of native fucoidan and fucoidan lipid nanoparticles on osteosarcoma in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments indicated that nanoparticle fucoidan induced apoptosis of an osteosarcoma cell line more efficiently than native fucoidan. The more potent effects of nanoparticle fucoidan, relative to native fucoidan, were confirmed in vivo using a xenograft osteosarcoma model. Caco-2 cell transport studies showed that permeation of nanoparticle fucoidan was higher than native fucoidan. The higher bioactivity and superior bioavailability of nanoparticle fucoidan could potentially be utilized to develop novel therapies for osteosarcoma.

  19. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  20. Biological synthesis of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anal K. Jha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost green and reproducible yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae mediated biosynthesis of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at close to room temperature in the laboratory. X-ray, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles, as well as a very few aggregate having the size of 3-15 nm, were found. The vibrating sample magnetometer measurement showed superparamagnetic behavior in cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. The mechanism involved in the biosynthesis of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles has also been discussed.