WorldWideScience

Sample records for levofloxacin-induced achilles tendinitis

  1. Levofloxacin-Induced Achilles Tendinitis in a Young Adult in the Absence of Predisposing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durey, Areum; Baek, Yong Soo; Park, Jin Seok; Lee, Kwangsoo; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Cheong, Moon-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) represent a major class of antimicrobials that have a high potential as therapeutic agents. Although FQs are generally safe for the use as antimicrobials, they may induce tendinopathic complications such as tendinitis and tendon rupture. A number of factors have been suggested to further predispose a patient to such injuries. Hitherto, a few published cases on tendon disorders have implicated levofloxacin, a more recently introduced FQ. Here, we report a patient with levofloxacin-induced Achilles tendinitis, who exhibited no known predisposing factors. A 20-year-old man without any history of disease or medication presented with community-acquired pneumonia. Levofloxacin was administered and 3 days later, he complained of pain in the left Achilles tendon and revealed redness and swelling in the area. On suspecting Achilles tendinitis, levofloxacin treatment was discontinued, and the tendinitis subsequently improved. To our knowledge, this is the first case report on FQ-induced Achilles tendinitis in Korea. PMID:20376902

  2. Achilles tendinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendinitis of the heel ... foot. Rarely, it is caused by an injury. Tendinitis due to overuse is most common in younger ... occur in walkers, runners, or other athletes. Achilles tendinitis may be more likely to occur if: There ...

  3. Achilles Tendinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who play sports, such as tennis or basketball, only on the weekends. Most cases of Achilles ... soft tissues such as tendons, they may help rule out other conditions that can cause similar symptoms. ...

  4. Fluoroquinolone-induced Achilles tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, P K; Ho, Carmen T K

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of Achilles tendinitis after intake of ciprofloxacin for treatment of respiratory tract infection. Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy is an uncommon but increasingly recognised adverse effect of this antibiotic class. Most of the cases occur in the Achilles tendon and may lead to tendon rupture. Possible predisposing risk factors include use of steroid, patients with renal impairment or renal transplant, old age, and being an athlete. The drug should be stopped once this condition is suspected. Symptomatic treatment should be given and orthopaedic referral is desirable if tendon rupture occurs.

  5. [Laser therapy of Achilles tendinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darre, E M; Klokker, M; Lund, P; Rasmussen, J D; Hansen, K; Vedtofte, P E

    1994-11-07

    The effects of low level laser treatment in soldiers with achilles tendinitis were studied in a prospective, randomized and double blind trial. Eighty-nine soldiers were enrolled in the study. Forty-six were randomized to treatment with active laser and 43 to treatment with placebo laser. No statistically significant differences in the number of consultations, morning stiffness, tenderness, crepitation, swelling, redness, VAS-score of pain and degree of unfitness for duty were found between the two treatment groups.

  6. Insertional Achilles tendinitis and Haglund's deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Steve; Thordarson, David B; Charlton, Timothy P

    2012-06-01

    Haglund's deformity is an enlargement of the posterosuperior prominence of the calcaneus, which is frequently associated with insertional Achilles tendinitis. To our knowledge, no study has been done successfully correlating the characteristics of a Haglund's deformity with insertional Achilles tendinitis. The purpose of our study was to analyze the characteristics of a Haglund's deformity in patients with and without insertional Achilles tendinitis to see if there was a correlation. The study was a retrospective radiographic review of a single surgeon's patients with insertional Achilles tendinitis from 2005 to 2008. Our study population consisted of 44 patients, 48 heels (22 male, 22 female) with insertional Achilles tendinitis, with a mean age of 52 (range, 23 to 79) years. Our control population consisted of 50 patients (25 males, 25 females) and 50 heels without insertional Achilles tendinitis with a mean age of 55.6 (range, 18 to 89) years. We introduced two new measurements of the Haglund's deformity in this study: the Haglund's deformity height and peak angle. A standing lateral foot or ankle radiograph was analyzed for each patient and the following measurements were made: Haglund deformity height and peak angle; Bohler's angle; Fowler-Philip angle; and parallel pitch sign. We also looked for the presence of calcification in the study group and the length and width of the calcification. Unpaired t-test was used to analyze the measurements between the groups. Ten patients' radiographs were re-measured and correlation coefficients were obtained to assess the reliability of the measuring techniques. For the insertional Achilles tendinitis group, the mean Haglund's deformity height was 9.6 (range, 5.3 to 15.3) mm and the mean Haglund's deformity peak angle was 105 (range, 87 to 123) degrees. Calcification was present in 35 of 48 or (73%) of patients with a mean length of 13.3 (range, 3.2 to 41.9) mm and mean width of 4.5 (range, 1.0 to 10.4) mm. In the control

  7. Achilles tendinitis in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Palazzi, F; Rivas, S; Mujica, P

    1990-08-01

    Overuse injuries of tendons are known to occur in persons whose activities submit the tendon to excessive stress. Classical ballet dancers performing en pointe, demie point, or plié exert forces that, although normal in magnitude, are increased in frequency, thus overusing the Achilles tendon. In the present study all cases of Achilles tendinopathy seen in a period of three years in three ballet companies were reviewed by a special orthopedic clinic. The cause, whether by abnormal tension or incorrect use, development, and progression to chronic tendinopathy, as well as measures to prevent it, were analyzed in 19 cases. The methods of treatment, including conservative treatment with rest and refraining from dancing, local treatment such as ice and adhesive strapping, antiinflammatory drugs, local injections, thermotherapy, and laser therapy, were compared, and the time of recovery and ability to resume dancing were evaluated. Two cases required surgical treatment to subside, and the patients had to retire from professional dancing. The roentgenographic diagnosis of stage and progression of the tendinopathy is emphasized as a valuable accessory sign. The similarity in lesions between Achilles and patellar tendon problems was observed and confirmed.

  8. Achilles tendinitis as a rare extraintestinal manifestation of ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenda, Takahiro; Araki, Ichiro; Nakamiya, Otoyuki; Tokuumi, Yuji; Shimada, Yuka; Komai, Keigo; Taniuchi, Yukie

    2016-06-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease often have extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) involving almost all organ systems, but little has been reported on Achilles tendinitis. Herein, we present a unique case of Achilles tendinitis, which manifested shortly after initiation of mesalazine therapy for ulcerative colitis. A 26-year-old Japanese woman with bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps lasting for 7 days was referred to our hospital. The Lichtiger clinical activity index (CAI) score was 9 at the first visit. Based on the clinical symptoms and examination results, she was diagnosed with ulcerative pancolitis in the active phase, and treatment with mesalazine (2.4 g/day) and probiotics was initiated. Her symptoms resolved within 7 days of treatment (CAI 3). However, she then developed bilateral Achilles tendinitis without any apparent cause. The Achilles tendinitis subsided with conservative management within 2 weeks, despite continuation of mesalazine therapy. This case instructively suggests that Achilles tendinitis should be noted as an EIM of ulcerative colitis.

  9. WITHDRAWN: Interventions for treating acute and chronic Achilles tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLauchlan, George; Handoll, Helen Hg

    2011-08-10

    Achilles tendinitis is one of the most common of all sports injuries. There is no consensus on treatment. To assess the effectiveness of various treatment interventions for acute and chronic Achilles tendinitis in adults. The Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group specialised register (December 2000), Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2000), MEDLINE (1966 to December 2000), EMBASE (1980 to 2001 wk 04), CINAHL (1982 to December 2000), and reference lists of identified trials were searched. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials of treatment interventions for acute and chronic Achilles tendinitis in adults. Studies focusing on pathological tendinitis were excluded. Excluded were those trials that compared different dosages of the same drug or drugs within the same class of drugs, for example different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Three reviewers independently assessed trial quality, by use of a ten item check list, and extracted data. Requests were sent for separate data for Achilles tendinitis patients in studies within trials of mixed patient populations. Where possible, quantitative analysis and limited pooling of data were undertaken. Nine trials, involving 697 patients, met the inclusion criteria of the review. Methodological quality was adequate in most of the trials with regards to blinding but the assessment of outcome was incomplete and short-term.There was weak but not robust evidence from three trials of a modest benefit of NSAIDs for the alleviation of acute symptoms. There was some weak evidence of no difference compared with no treatment of low dose heparin, heel pads, topical laser therapy and peritendonous steroid injection, but this could not be fully evaluated from the reports of four trials. The results of an experimental preparation of a calf-derived deproteinized haemodialysate, Actovegin, were promising but the severity of patient symptoms was questionable in the single small trial testing

  10. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  11. Case Study of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy Therapy of the Achilles Tendinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Eun-ha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : In order to estimate clinical effects of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy therapy of Achilles Tendinitis Methods : From 4th August, 2008 to 14th August, 2008, 1 female patient diagnosed as Chronic Achilles Tendinitis (clinical diagnosed was treated with general oriental medicine therapy(acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy. Results : The patient's chief complaints- Lt. heel pain and stiffness, dorsi-flexion limitation, nodules in the achilles tendon- were notably improved. Conclusions : This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acuputomy therapy has significant effect in improving symptoms of achilles tendinitis. as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  12. Infectious Achilles Tendinitis After Local Injection of Human Placental Extracts: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon-Chung; Ahn, Jae Hoon; Kim, Man-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Local injections of corticosteroids or human placental extracts are sometimes used for the treatment of resistant tendinitis or fasciitis. We report a case of infectious Achilles tendinitis complicated by calcaneal osteomyelitis after injection of human placental extracts for the Achilles tendinitis. She was treated with excision of the infected bone and tendon, followed by V-Y lengthening of the proximal portion of the Achilles tendon in a single stage. At 2 years postoperative, she remained symptom free without any signs of recurrence, and the follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scan demonstrated a well-maintained Achilles tendon with normal signal intensity. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Photoacoustic microscopy of collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Li, Meng-Lin

    2010-02-01

    Assessments of vascularity are important when assessing inflammation changes in tendon injuries since Achilles tendinitis is often accompanied with neovascularization or hypervascularity. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging in noninvasive monitoring of morphological and vascular changes in Achilles tendon injuries. Collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis model of mice was adopted here. During collagenase-induced tendinitis, a 25-MHz photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was used to image micro-vascular changes in Achilles tendons longitudinally up to 23 days. The positions of vessels imaged by PAM were identified by co-registration of PAM Bmode images with 25-MHz ultrasound (USM) ones. Morphological changes in Achilles tendons due to inflammation and edema were revealed by the PAM and USM images. Proliferation of new blood vessels within the tendons was also observed. Observed micro-vascular changes during tendinitis were similar to the findings in the literatures. This study demonstrates that photoacoustic imaging, owning required sensitivity and penetration, has the potential for high sensitive diagnosis and assessment of treatment performance in tendinopathy.

  14. Biomechanical and biochemical protective effect of low-level laser therapy for Achilles tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Arnold, Gilles; Magnenet, Vincent; Rahouadj, Rachid; Magdalou, Jacques; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão

    2014-01-01

    For three decades, low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used for treatment of tendinitis as well as other musculoskeletal diseases. Nevertheless, the biological mechanisms involved remain not completely understood. In this work, the effects of LLLT and of the widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac, have been compared in the case of collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis. Wistar rats were treated with diclofenac or laser therapy. The tensile behavior of tendons was characterized through successive loading-unloading sequences. The method considered 11 characteristic parameters to describe the mechanical behavior. It was shown that during the acute inflammatory process of the tendon, the mechanical properties were significantly correlated to the high levels of MMP-3, MMP-9 and MMP-13 expression presented in a previous paper (Marcos, R.L., et al., 2012). The treatment by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as diclofenac sodium produces a low protective effect and can affect the short-term biochemical and biomechanical properties. On the contrary, it is shown that LLLT exhibits the best results in terms of MMPs reduction and mechanical properties recovery. Thus, LLLT looks to be a promising and consistent treatment for tendinopathies. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Achilles tendinitis in systemic lupus erythematosus: search for an associated inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrot, P A; Leone, J; Brochot, P; Pennaforte, J L

    2015-10-01

    Except for traumatic and iatrogenic causes, Achilles tendinitis (AT) is mostly encountered in the context of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. This study aimed to describe AT in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Among 158 SLE patients who fulfilled the SLE criteria of the ACR classification followed between 1980 and 2013, we selected those who experienced at least one episode of AT not caused by traumatic or toxicity factors. Eight patients (one male, seven females), median age 52 years (range: 35-68), presented with 11 episodes of AT within an average of 10.5 (0-21) years after SLE diagnosis. Clinical presentation of SLE was mainly cutaneous (eight of eight), and articular (seven of eight). Axial symptoms were reported in six patients, two of whom had HLA-B27-positive status, and fulfilled the Amor and European Spondylarthropathy Study Group criteria. Resolution of AT was good with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory topical or systemic drug therapies, which kept SLE quiescent and avoided any increase of specific treatment. Although the association is rare, when AT occurs in SLE patients, physicians should look for associated spondylarthritis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Low-level light-emitting diode therapy increases mRNA expressions of IL-10 and type I and III collagens on Achilles tendinitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Murilo; de Souza, Renato Aparecido; Pires, Viviane Araújo; Santos, Ana Paula; Aimbire, Flávio; Silva, José Antônio; Albertini, Regiane; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of low-level light-emitting diode (LED) therapy (880 ± 10 nm) on interleukin (IL)-10 and type I and III collagen in an experimental model of Achilles tendinitis. Thirty male Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 5), three groups in the experimental period of 7 days, control group, tendinitis-induced group, and LED therapy group, and three groups in the experimental period of 14 days, tendinitis group, LED therapy group, and LED group with the therapy starting at the 7th day after tendinitis induction (LEDT delay). Tendinitis was induced in the right Achilles tendon using an intratendinous injection of 100 μL of collagenase. The LED parameters were: optical power of 22 mW, spot area size of 0.5 cm(2), and irradiation time of 170 s, corresponding to 7.5 J/cm(2) of energy density. The therapy was initiated 12 h after the tendinitis induction, with a 48-h interval between irradiations. The IL-10 and type I and III collagen mRNA expression were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction at the 7th and 14th days after tendinitis induction. The results showed that LED irradiation increased IL-10 (p < 0.001) in treated group on 7-day experimental period and increased type I and III collagen mRNA expression in both treated groups of 7- and 14-day experimental periods (p < 0.05), except by type I collagen mRNA expression in LEDT delay group. LED (880 nm) was effective in increasing mRNA expression of IL-10 and type I and III collagen. Therefore, LED therapy may have potentially therapeutic effects on Achilles tendon injuries.

  17. Effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy on nanostructural and biomechanical responses in the collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Don; Choi, Samjin; Lee, Gi-Ja; Chon, Jinmann; Jeong, Yong Seol; Park, Hun-Kuk; Kim, Hee-Sang

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively investigate the effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on the nanostructure and adhesion force of collagen fibrils in a rat model of collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis (CIAT) using histology and atomic force microscopy. A total of 45 rats were divided into experimental groups of three rats each: a control group, 27 CIAT rats with nine time points, and 15 ESWT rats with five time points. Progressive changes in nanostructure including the fibrillary diameter and D-periodicity, and biomechanical properties including the fibrillary adhesion forces in each healing phase were investigated over a 5-week period after collagenase injection. On postoperative day 3, CIAT rats showed granulomatous tissue associated with subacute inflammation, and a deterioration in nanostructure and mechanical properties compared to controls. On postoperative day 12, the ESWT group showed increased vascularity, fibroblastic activity, lymphocyte and plasma cell infiltration, dense histocytes, and disorganization of the fibers compared to the CIAT group. The ESWT group showed and improvement in nanostructure and mechanical properties compared to controls, while the CIAT group showed a deterioration in nanostructure and mechanical properties compared to controls. On postoperative day 26, the ESWT group showed 30% inflamed tissue and 70% fibrotic tissue, while the CIAT group showed chronic inflammation. By the end of the experiments, in both groups the changes had reversed and the tissues were similar in appearance to those in the control group. Following ESWT the deformed and irregular collagen network returned to a well-aligned normal collagen network nanostructure. These results suggest that ESWT may promote the healing response in Achilles tendinitis.

  18. Green tea and glycine aid in the recovery of tendinitis of the Achilles tendon of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, C P; Guerra, F Da Ré; de Oliveira, L P; Almeida, M S; Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra; Pimentell, E R

    2015-02-01

    Green tea (GT) is widely used due to its anti-inflammatory properties. Previous studies have shown beneficial effects of a glycine diet on the remodeling process in inflamed tendons. Tendinitis is commonly observed in athletes and is of concern to surgeons due to the slowness of the recovery process. Our hypothesis is that GT + a glycine diet may improve tendinitis. To analyze the effect of GT and/or glycine in the diet on tendinitis. Wistar rats were divided into seven groups (G): control group (C); G1 and G4, tendinitis; G2 and G5, tendinitis supplied with GT; and G3 and G6, tendinitis supplied with GT and a glycine diet for 7 or 21 days, respectively. We performed zymography for metalloproteinase, biochemical, morphological and biomechanics tests. G2, G3 and G5 showed high levels of hydroxyproline in relation to G1, while G4 showed high levels of glycosaminoglycans. High activity of metalloproteinase-2 was detected in G3. The organization of collagen bundles was better in G2 and G3. G5 showed similar birefringence measurements compared with C. G5 withstood a larger load compared with G4. The presence of metalloproteinase-2 indicates that a tissue is undergoing a remodeling process. High birefringence suggests a better organization of collagen bundles. After 21 days, G5 sustained a high load before rupture, unlike G4. The results suggest that GT + a glycine diet has beneficial effects that aid in the recovery process of the tendon after tendinitis.

  19. Infrared (810 nm) low-level laser therapy in rat achilles tendinitis: a consistent alternative to drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Messias, Felipe de Moura; de Carvalho, Maria Helena Catelli; Pallotta, Rodney Capp; Frigo, Lúcio; dos Santos, Rosângela Aparecida; Ramos, Luciano; Teixeira, Simone; Bjordal, Jan Magnus; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão

    2011-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used and can reduce musculoskeletal pain in spite of the cost of adverse reactions like gastrointestinal ulcers or cardiovascular events. The current study investigates if a safer treatment such as low-level laser therapy (LLLT) could reduce tendinitis inflammation, and whether a possible pathway could be through inhibition of either of the two-cyclooxygenase (COX) isoforms in inflammation. Wistar rats (six animals per group) were injected with saline (control) or collagenase in their Achilles tendons. Then, we treated them with three different doses of IR LLLT (810 nm; 100 mW; 10 s, 30 s and 60 s; 3.57 W cm(-2); 1 J, 3 J, 6 J) at the sites of the injections, or intramuscular diclofenac, a nonselective COX inhibitor/NSAID. We found that LLLT dose of 3 J significantly reduced inflammation through less COX-2-derived gene expression and PGE(2) production, and less edema formation compared to nonirradiated controls. Diclofenac controls exhibited significantly lower PGE(2) cytokine levels at 6 h than collagenase control, but COX isoform 1-derived gene expression and cytokine PGE(2) levels were not affected by treatments. As LLLT seems to act on inflammation through a selective inhibition of the COX-2 isoform in collagenase-induced tendinitis, LLLT may have potential to become a new and safer nondrug alternative to coxibs.

  20. Green Tea and Glycine Modulate the Activity of Metalloproteinases and Collagen in the Tendinitis of the Myotendinous Junction of the Achilles Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Cristiano Pedrozo; De Oliveira, LetÍCia Prado; Da Ré Guerra, Flávia; Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra; Pimentel, Edson Rosa

    2016-07-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the weakest element in the muscle-tendon unit of the heel, and thus the most susceptible to injuries. The scarcity of adequate treatments means that tendinitis is a major concern to athletes and other groups who depend on their physical fitness, although green tea and glycine have both been shown to have beneficial effects on the inflammation. The present study investigated the remodeling effects of green tea and glycine in the MTJ of rats with tendinitis. For this, male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: animals without tendinitis and animals with tendinitis; animals with tendinitis supplied with green tea; animals with tendinitis supplied with a glycine diet; animals with tendinitis supplied with a green tea and glycine diet. Tendinitis was induced and the treatment with green tea (700 mg/kg/day) and a 5% glycine diet lasted 7 days. The treatments regulated the activity of metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, -8, and -9, and induced the synthesis of type I collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and non-collagenous proteins. Changes were also noted in the compaction of the collagen molecules and the amount of tenocytes. When combined, green tea and glycine modulated the inflammatory process and induced the synthesis of the elements involved in the post-lesion recovery of the tissue. The data from the MTJ were different when compared with results already published using the whole Achilles tendon. These data indicate that each region of the inflamed tendon can exhibit different responses during the treatment and therefore, modify its extracellular matrix components to facilitate recovery and repair. Anat Rec, 299:918-928, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Gold nanoparticles and diclofenac diethylammonium administered by iontophoresis reduce inflammatory cytokines expression in Achilles tendinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohnert MB

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo B Dohnert1,2, Mirelli Venâncio1, Jonathann C Possato1, Rodrigo C Zeferino1, Luciana H Dohnert2, Alexandra I Zugno1, Cláudio T De Souza1, Marcos MS Paula1, Thais F Luciano11Postgraduation Program in Health Sciences, Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências da Saúde PPGCS, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Criciúma, Santa Catarina, 2Department of Physiotherapy, Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Torres, Rio Grande do Sul, BrazilIntroduction: Tendinitis affects a substantial number of people in several occupations involving repetitive work or direct trauma. Iontophoresis is a therapeutic alternative used in the treatment of injury during the inflammatory phase. In recent years, gold nanoparticles (GNP have been studied due to their therapeutic anti-inflammatory capacity and as an alternative to the transport of several proteins. Purpose: This study evaluates the therapeutic effects of iontophoresis using GNPs and diclofenac diethylammonium on inflammatory parameters in rats challenged with traumatic tendinitis.Methods: Wistar rats were divided in three treatment groups (n = 15: (1 iontophoresis + diclofenac diethylammonium; (2 iontophoresis + GNP; and (3 iontophoresis + diclofenac diethylammonium + GNP. External control was formed by challenged tendons without treatment (n = 15. Iontophoresis was administered using 0.3 mA direct current on 1.5 cm² electrodes. Results: The levels of both inflammatory cytokines were significantly higher in untreated challenged rats, when compared with the control (5.398 ± 234 for interleukin 1 beta and 6.411 ± 432 for tumor necrosis factor alpha, which confirms the occurrence of an inflammatory stage in injury (P < 0.05. A significant decrease was observed in expression of cytokines interleukin 1 beta in the three treatment groups, in comparison with untreated challenged tendons, although, in the group treated with diclofenac and GNP, results were similar to the control (1.732 ± 239 (P < 0

  2. Levofloxacin-induced acute anxiety and insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kandasamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolones can cause adverse neuropsychiatric side effects, which are more common in older age. We present three cases of levofloxacin-induced acute anxiety and insomnia in young adults. In all the cases, discontinuation of levofloxacin immediately lead to remission.

  3. Ultrasound-guided retro-calcaneal bursa corticosteroid injection for refractory Achilles tendinitis in patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathy: efficacy and follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Puja; Aggarwal, Amita

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided corticosteroid injection has been shown to be safe and effective for varied causes of plantar fasciitis; however, its use for Achilles tendinitis is controversial. We studied the efficacy and changes in US findings at Achilles enthesitis after corticosteroid injection in patients with spondyloarthropathy (SpA). Patients with SpA with symptomatic Achilles enthesitis, refractory to 6 weeks of full-dose NSAIDs, were offered US-guided local corticosteroid injection. Injected entheses were examined by US (both B mode and power Doppler) at baseline and 6 weeks after injection. Standard OMERACT definitions were used to define enthesitis. Achilles tendon thickness >5.29 mm, 2 cm proximal to insertion in long axis, was considered thickened. Twenty-seven symptomatic Achilles tendons (in 18 patients) were injected with 20 mg methylprednisolone under US guidance baseline, and 6-week follow-up US features were compared. All patients reported improvement in pain (VAS) in the affected tendon after injection (p < 0.0001). Simultaneously, improvement in local inflammatory changes were noted, in the form of significant reduction in tendon thickness (p < 0.0001), vascularity (p < 0.0001), peritendinous oedema (p = 0.001), bursitis and bursal vascularity (p < 0.001 and < 0.0001, respectively). There was no change in bone erosions and enthesophyte. None of the patients had tendon rupture or other injection-related complications at 6 weeks of follow-up. US-guided local corticosteroid injection is an effective and safe modality for refractory Achilles enthesitis in patients with SpA and leads to reversion of acute changes at entheseal site.

  4. Arthroscopiclly assisted radiofrequency probe to treat achilles tendinitis%关节镜下等离子刀治疗慢性跟腱炎

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉杰; 王志刚; 李众利; 蔡谞; 周密; 魏民; 朱娟丽

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨关节镜下等离子刀(TOPAZ)微创治疗慢性跟腱炎的疗效.方法 采用局部浸润麻醉,关节镜辅助下等离子刀微创治疗慢性跟腱炎17例,其中男性11例,女性6例;年龄17~48岁.标记跟腱疼痛点,在跟腱两侧病灶以上5 mm处切开皮肤5 mm,插入肌腱剥离器,沿皮下组织与肌腱之间进行钝性分离,制作出20 mm×30 mm的工作腔隙,置入30°关节镜,观察其病理改变.采用微型刨削刀和等离子刀,清理跟腱表面增生杂乱的须状撕裂的腱性纤维组织和增厚的部分腱膜.再将TOPAZ电极置入病灶,启动等离子刀进行局部打孔,深达跟腱在跟骨附着处表面,孔间距离3~5 mm呈网眼状.结果 术后17例获得随访,随访时间9~35个月,平均13个月.术后疼痛症状完全解除15例,疼痛明显改善2例.VAS疼痛评分术前8.7分,术后1.6分.无术中和术后跟腱断裂、感染、血管神经损伤等并发症.结论 关节镜监视下等离子刀微创治疗跟腱炎创伤小,手术操作简便,有利于术后康复,疗效显著.%Objective To evaluate the effectivenss of microtenotomy using a radiofrequency(RF) probe to treat chronieity achilles tendinitis.Methods Seventeen cases of chronicity achilles tendinitis were treated by RF probe.Eleven cases were male,and 6 female.The average age of the patients was 25(17-48)years.Nine were athlete,4 sports activity and 4 students.Seven were in left side,and 10 righit side.Before receiving the RF therapia all patients had achilles tendinitis symptoms.The patients were treated with local anesthesia under arthroscopy by Arthrocare 2000 and TOPAZ.The operation were performed through a manmade lacouna under the subcutaneous tissue of achilles tend,insert arthroscope.The pathology test found the achilles tendon surface fibrous tissue hyperplasia and tear.The probe of RF to perforate just as meshwork,the space was 3-5 mm.Results Patients reported significantly reduced pain from 7 to 14 d

  5. Classification and arthroscopic surgery of chronic achilles tendinitis%慢性跟腱炎的分型与关节镜微创治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉杰; 朱娟利; 王晓; 王志刚; 陈旭; 李众利; 蔡谞; 齐玮; 李春宝; 魏民

    2010-01-01

    目的 观察慢性跟腱炎的分型与局部麻醉下关节镜微创治疗的效果.方法 2003年3月至2009年3月,采用局部麻醉下关节镜微创治疗慢性跟腱炎22例,男16例,女6例,年龄17~53岁,平均33.5岁.运动损伤16例,病因不明6例.术前根据X线片、MRI检查、CT扫描和临床特点,将其分为:增生肥大型(10例)、钙化结节型(5例)和纤维撕裂型(7例).分别采用局麻关节镜下等离子刀消融、刨削清理术治疗.结果 术后随访22例,平均随访14个月(9~54个月),采用制定的评定标准和VAS评分进行疗效评价,优:12例,良8例,可2例.无血管神经损伤、感染和跟腱断裂等并发症.结论 跟腱炎分型有助于临床诊断和治疗方案制定;局麻关节镜下微创治疗慢性跟腱炎方法可行,操作简便,疗效显著.%Objective To investigate the clinical classification of chronic achilles tendinitis and analyze the surgical technique and efficacy of arthroscopic surgery. Methods Twenty-two patients ( 16 males, 6 females) with chronic achilles tendinitis were recruited. The average age was 33.5 years old ( range: 17-53). Sixteen cases were caused by sport injury while 6 cases had no definite etiological factor.The Achilles tendinopathy was divided into three types according to clinical characteristics and the results of X ray, CT scan and MRI examination of ankle: Type 1, hypertrophy (n = 10); Type 2, calcified tubercle (n = 5 ); Type 3, fiber tear (n = 7 ). All cases were treated with endoscopic debridement of ventral neovascularized area, poritendineum and Achilles tendon by shaver and radiofrequency (RF) probe.Resuits The patients were followed-up for a mean of 14 months (range: 9-15). Evaluated by our criteria and visual analogue scale, the post-operative efficacy was excellent in 12 cases, good in 8 and fair in 2. No postoperative complications, such as neurovascular injury, infection and rupture of Achilles tendon, was recorded. Conclusion This scheme of

  6. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... walking or standing on your foot References Achilles Tendinitis. In: Safran MR, Zachazewski J, Stone DA, eds. ... Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heel Injuries and Disorders Tendinitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  7. Low-level laser therapy in collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis in rats: analyses of biochemical and biomechanical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Arnold, Gilles; Magnenet, Vincent; Rahouadj, Rachid; Wang, Xiong; Demeurie, Frank; Magdalou, Jacques; de Carvalho, Maria Helena Catelli; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão

    2012-12-01

    NSAIDs are widely prescribed and used over the years to treat tendon injuries despite its well-known long-term side effects. In the last years several animal and human trials have shown that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) presents modulatory effects on inflammatory markers, however the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term effects of LLLT or sodium diclofenac treatments on biochemical markers and biomechanical properties of inflamed Achilles tendons. Wistar rats Achilles tendons (n = 6/group) were injected with saline (control) or collagenase at peritendinous area of Achilles tendons. After 1 h animals were treated with two different doses of LLLT (810 nm, 1 and 3 J) at the sites of the injections, or with intramuscular sodium diclofenac. Regarding biochemical analyses, LLLT significantly decreased (p laser-treated groups when compared to collagenase and diclofenac groups. We conclude that LLLT was able to reduce tendon inflammation and to preserve tendon resistance and elasticity.

  8. Tendinitis and Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Tendinitis & Bursitis Tendinitis (Bursitis) Fast Facts Tendinitis and bursitis are inflammation or ... painful, even during rest. What causes tendinitis and bursitis? Tendinitis can occur from a sudden intense injury. ...

  9. Tendinitis and Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Am A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Tendinitis & Bursitis Tendinitis (Bursitis) Fast Facts Tendinitis and bursitis are inflammation ... becomes very painful, even during rest. What causes tendinitis and bursitis? Tendinitis can occur from a sudden ...

  10. Achilles tendon disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinfeld, Steven B

    2014-03-01

    Achilles tendon disorders include tendinosis, paratenonitis, insertional tendinitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, and frank rupture. Patients present with pain and swelling in the posterior aspect of the ankle. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are helpful in confirming the diagnosis and guiding treatment. Nonsurgical management of Achilles tendon disorders includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, bracing, and footwear modification. Surgical treatment includes debridement of the diseased area of the tendon with direct repair. Tendon transfer may be necessary to augment the strength of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Patellar Tendinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... handle the stresses that can cause patellar tendinitis. Eccentric exercises, which involve lowering your leg very slowly after extending your knee, are particularly helpful. Improve your technique. To be ...

  12. Achilles tendon: US diagnosis of pathologic conditions. Work in progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blei, C.L.; Nirschl, R.P.; Grant, E.G.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-three patients were prospectively examined with ultra-sound (US) for acute or recurrent Achilles tendon symptoms. Three types of pathologic conditions of the Achilles tendon were found: tendinitis/tenosynovitis, acute tendon trauma, and postoperative changes. US appears to enable differentiation of these conditions and to contribute to the diagnosis of a broad range of Achilles tendon disorders.

  13. Calcifying tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhthoff, H K

    1996-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis is not due to a dystrophic calcification of the degenerative tendinous tissue but due to a cell mediated reactive process. In fact, following formation of a deposit resorption usually ensues which in turn will be followed by a tendon reconstitution. If patent conservative measures fail, surgery should only be contemplated in the presence of radiologically dense, homogenous and well delineated deposits which indicate that the resorptive activity has not set in. If, on the other hand, there is evidence of ongoing resorption the decision for surgery should be postponed since only exceptionally natural resorption will not occur.

  14. A STUDY TO COMPARE THE EFFICACY OF ULTRASOUND WITH ECCENTRIC EXERCISES AND ULTRASOUND WITH CONCENTRIC EXERCISES ON TENDO ACHILLES TENDINITIS IN ATHELETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravish

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In a previous uncontrolled pilot study we demonstrated very good clinical results with eccentric calf muscle training on patients with painful chronic Achilles tendinosis located at the 2-6 cm level in the tendon. In the present prospective study patients with painful chronic Achilles tendinosis at the 2-6 cm level in the tendon were randomized to treatment with either an eccentric or a concentric training regimen for the calf muscles with therapeutic ultrasound. The study included 60 patients, with 30 in each group mean age 30 years in each treatment group. The amount of pain during activity (jogging or walking was recorded by the patients on a visual analogue scale, and patient satisfaction was assessed before and after treatment. The patients were instructed to perform their eccentric or concentric training regimen on a daily basis for 12 weeks. In both types of treatment regimen the patients were told to do their exercises despite experiencing pain or discomfort in the tendon during exercise. The results showed that after the eccentric training regimen 80% of the patients (24/30 were satisfied and had resumed their previous activity level (before injury, compared to 63% of the patients (19/30 who were treated with the concentric training regimen with therapeutic ultrasound as the common modality. The results of means of pain is (0.902 is significant, for range of motion is (0.042 which is not significant and foot ankle ability measure is (0.311 is significant after treatment with eccentric training was significantly better than after concentric training.

  15. Marked Multiple Tendinitis at the Onset of Rheumatoid Arthritis in a Patient with Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Ultrasonographic Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old woman who had been diagnosed with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia developed rheumatoid arthritis (RA. She presented with marked tendinitis of the Achilles tendons, patellar tendons, and finger extensor tendons at the onset of RA. Ultrasonographic examination revealed that tendon lesions were predominantly tendinitis rather than paratenonitis, and that the tendinitis was of the noninsertional variety, rather than the insertional variety. Preexisting tendon xanthomas might have contributed to the unusually dominant noninsertional tendinitis of multiple tendons.

  16. De Quervain tendinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendinopathy - De Quervain tendinitis; de Quervain tenosynovitis ... De Quervain tendinitis can be caused by playing sports such as tennis, golf, or rowing. Constantly lifting children can also strain ...

  17. Bursitis and Tendinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Bursitis and Tendinitis February 2017 Questions and Answers about Bursitis and Tendinitis This publication contains general information about bursitis and ...

  18. Achilles Tendinosis Stopping the Progression to Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessin, Meta

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to differentiate between acute Achilles tendinitis and chronic Achilles tendinosis and to highlight a specific treatment protocol for mid-portion Achilles tendinosis. Tendinosis (degeneration of the tendon) results from chronic tissue injury and has long-term implications for a dancer's career. An eccentric heavy-load exercise protocol has been used successfully to treat tendinosis in athletes. A modified eccentric exercise protocol is proposed as one component of an effective rehabilitation program for dancers. This protocol facilitates tissue remodeling to build strength, flexibility, and adaptability of the Achilles tendon tissue, so that dancers can continue to dance without further complications of the injury.

  19. Treatment of degenerative Achilles'tendon rupture using V-Y tendinous flap and transfer of flexor hallucis longus tendon%V-Y肌腱瓣结合屈(足母)长肌腱转移治疗退变的跟腱断裂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈宇辉; 刘津浩; 徐向阳

    2008-01-01

    目的 介绍V-Y肌腱瓣结合屈(足母)长肌腱转移治疗退变的跟腱断裂的术式、手术指征及疗效.方法 2003年10月至2006年5月对21例跟腱断裂采用V-Y肌腱瓣结合屈躅长肌腱转移治疗,其中采用铆钉17例,界面螺钉4例.介绍该手术方法,并根据文献和实践总结手术指征. 结果 本组所有患者获得12~18个月(平均14个月)随访.根据Arner-Lindholm疗效评价标准:优19例,良2例.术后伤口均一期愈合,随访期间跟腱无再次断裂,无伤口感染,无皮肤坏死,踝关节活动好,无僵直,无神经血管损伤.行走步态基本正常,对前足推进影响不大.该术式修复强度允许跟腱早期功能锻炼. 结论 采用V-Y肌腱瓣结合足屈(足母)长肌腱治疗跟腱断裂疗效好,该术式适用于跟腱组织退变、炎症和部分缺损(<3cm)患者,术中单纯V-Y肌腱瓣修补强度不够可采用屈(足母)长肌腱转移.%Objective To introduce the technique.indication and outcome of treatment of degenerative Achilles'rupture with transfer of flexor hallucis longus tendon and V-Y tendinous flap. Methods From October 2003 to May 2006,21 cases of degenerative Achilles'tendon rupture were treated in our department using transfer of flexor hallucis longus tendon and V-Y tendinous flap.Rivets were used in 17 cases and surface screws in 4.They were followed up for 12 to 18 months(average,14). Results According to the Arner-Lindholm criteria for curative results,19 of the 21 cases were excellent and 2 good.Follow-ups revealed no Achilles'tendon re-rupture,infection,skin necrosis,stiff ankle,or injury to nerves and vessels.Walking gaits nearly recovered to normal.The repair strength allowed early functional exercise of the Achilles'tendon. Conclusion Transfer of flexor hallucis longus tendon combined with V-Y tendinous flap can cure the degenerative Achilles'tendon ruptures and defects of Achilles'tendon within 3 cm.

  20. Local injection of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells versus triamcinolone acetonide for treatment of Achilles tendinitis in rabbits%局部注射骨髓间充质干细胞和曲安奈德治疗兔跟腱炎的效果对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裘超; 洪建军; 毛诚晃; 卢晓郎

    2012-01-01

    背景:应用长效糖皮质激素局部封闭治疗跟腱炎在学术界一直很有争议.目的:对跟腱炎模型兔跟腱局部分别注射兔骨髓间充质干细胞和长效糖皮质激素曲安奈德,动态观察相关指标,观察骨髓间充质干细胞和曲安奈德对跟腱炎的组织结构和力学性能的影响.方法:将60只单侧跟腱炎新西兰大白兔模型随机等分4组,取其中2组分别于患侧跟腱局部注射骨髓间充质干细胞和曲安奈德1次;剩余2组则分别注射2次,注射间隔2周.结果与结论:相比1次曲安奈德组,局部注射骨髓间充质干细胞1次和2次的跟腱炎模型兔跟腱腱束整齐、致密,断裂少,成纤维细胞增多,跟腱组织羟脯氨酸含量、跟腱最大负荷拉力均增加(P < 0.05),2次注射的治疗效果更明显(P < 0.05).说明局部重复注射骨髓间充质干细胞移植治疗跟腱炎的效果优于长效糖皮质激素曲安奈德.%BACKGROUND: It remains to be disputed to apply long-lasting glucocorticoid for partial closure theray of AchillesOBJECTIVE: Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and long-lasting triamcmolone acetonide were respectively injected into the achilles tendon of a rabbit model of Achilles tendonitis to dynamically observe related indices and investigate the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and long-lasting triamcinolone acetonide on tissue structure and mechanical performance of Achilles tendon with tendonitisMETHODS: Sixty rabbit models of unilateral Achilles tendinitis were randomly divided into four groups Two groups were locally administered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and tnamcmolone acetonide respectively once, and the remaining two groups were locally administered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and glucocortocoid respectively twice with a time interval of 2 weeksRESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Compared with tnamcmolone acetonide once group, rabbits in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells once or twice groups, rabbits

  1. Management of chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Tendons transmit force between muscles and bones and, when stretched, store elastic energy that contributes to movement.(1) The tendinous portion of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles merge to form the Achilles tendon, which is the largest and strongest in the body, but one of the most frequently injured.(2,3) Conservative management options for chronic Achilles tendinopathy include eccentric (lengthening) exercises, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT), topical nitroglycerin, low level laser therapy, orthoses, splints or injections (e.g. corticosteroids, hyperosmolar dextrose, polidocanol, platelet-rich plasma), while a minority of patients require surgery (using open, percutaneous or endoscopic methods).(4-8) Here we assess the management options for patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy (lasting over 6 weeks).

  2. Tendinitis aquiliana asociada al uso de levofloxacino: comunicación de cuatro casos

    OpenAIRE

    Aros E,Claudio; Flores W,Claudio; Mezzano A,Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone-associated tendinitis are well described in the literature, but these are not frequently observed and usually are related to the oldest fluoroquinolones. Levofloxacin is a recently introduced fluoroquinolone. In this paper we report four cases (three female, aged 39 to 70 years old) of Achilles tendinitis occurring in a period of few months. Two patients on chronic dialysis, one kidney transplant recipient, and one patient with chronic vasculitis, both with normal renal functi...

  3. Ossifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff after arthroscopic excision of calcium deposits: report of two cases and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Merolla, Giovanni; Dave, Arpit C.; Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Ossifying tendinitis (OT) is a type of heterotopic ossification, characterized by deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in a histologic pattern of mature lamellar bone. It is usually associated with surgical intervention or trauma and is more commonly seen in Achilles or distal biceps tendons, and also in the gluteus maximus tendon. To our knowledge, there is no description of OT as a complication of calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff. In this report, we describe two cases in which the...

  4. Achilles Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  5. Sports and other soft tissue injuries, tendinitis, bursitis, and occupation-related syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H H; Qureshi, A A; Biundo, J J

    2000-03-01

    This review highlights three areas: plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and carpal tunnel syndrome. The diagnosis and treatment of plantar fasciitis are reviewed; nonsurgical treatments remain the mainstay of management. Several recent articles support the use of night splints. Some novel treatments recently investigated, including low intensity laser irradiation and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, are reviewed, as well as the effectiveness of steroid injection. Novel treatments for Achilles tendinitis are also reviewed, including the use of injection therapy and the treatment approach of one author for the management of Achilles tendon rupture. Nonsurgical techniques in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome, such as yoga, ultrasound, noninvasive laser neurolysis, manipulation, nerve and tendon gliding exercises, and medications, are reviewed. Prednisolone was shown to be effective in the treatment of mild to moderate disease and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were found to be ineffective.

  6. Acute Prevertebral Calcific Tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Alexander; Jeffery, Caroline C; Ansari, Khalid; Naik, Sandeep

    2015-11-01

    We present a case of neck pain in a middle-aged woman, initially attributed to a retropharyngeal infection and treated with urgent intubation. With the help of computed tomography, the diagnosis was later revised to acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis, a self-limiting condition caused by abnormal calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscles. It is critical to differentiate between these two disease entities due to dramatic differences in management. A discussion of acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis and its imaging findings is provided below.

  7. Biceps tendinitis and subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, W C; McCluskey, G M

    2001-07-01

    Since the 17th century, the long head of the biceps tendon as a source of shoulder pain and its functional significance has been a source of debate. Although the term tendinitis is commonly used, overuse tendon injuries infrequently demonstrate inflammatory cells; instead, degenerative changes resulting from the failure of self-repair usually are found. Bicipital tendinitis or bicipital tenosynovitis is most often secondary to impingement beneath the coracoacromical arch. Primary bicipital tendinitis and tendinitis secondary to instability are possible, however. Through a careful history, physical examination, and appropriate imaging studies, the clinician can establish the diagnosis of disorders of the biceps tendon Arthroscopic evaluation greatly improves the diagnosis and treatment of biceps tendon and related shoulder pathology. Although the exact functional role of the biceps tendon remains incompletely defined, a growing body of evidence supports its role as a stabilizer of the glenohumeral joint. This stabilizing function should be incorporated into the treatment of biceps tendon disorders. Routine tenodesis has been replaced by a more individualized approach, taking into consideration physiologic age, activity level, expectations, and exact shoulder pathology present. New repair techniques are under development, and preservation of the biceps-labral complex is now preferred when possible.

  8. Evidence of accumulated stress in Achilles and anterior knee tendons in elite badminton players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Anders Ploug; Boesen, Morten Ilum; Koenig, Merete Juhl

    2011-01-01

    Tendon-related injuries are a major problem, but the aetiology of tendinopathies is unknown. In tendinopathies as well as during unaccustomed loading, intra-tendinous flow can be detected indicating that extensive loading can provoke intra-tendinous flow. The aim of present study is to evaluate......- and tuberositas region. Intra-tendinous flow was measured using both a semi-quantitative grading system (CD grading) and a quantitative scoring system (CF) on colour Doppler. Intra-tendinous flow in the Achilles and anterior knee tendons was examined in fourteen single players before tournament and after 1st...... and 2nd match, respectively on both the dominant and non-dominant side. All players had abnormal intra-tendinous flow (Colour Doppler = grade 2) in at least one tendon in at least one scan during the tournament. At baseline, only two of the 14 players had normal flow in all the tendons examined. After 1...

  9. Calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon (Gluteus maximus tendinitis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wepfer, J.F.; Reed, J.G.; Cullen, G.M.; McDevitt, W.P.

    1983-02-01

    Seven cases of calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon are presented. Awareness of the precise anatomic location of the calcific deposit is essential for the accurate diagnosis of this uncommon site of tendinitis. Clinically, the presenting complaint is that of pain. In some instances, however, the patients are asymptomatic and the calcification is an incidental finding.

  10. Achilles tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  11. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles tendon rupture Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Achilles (uh-KILL-eez) tendon rupture is an injury that affects the back ... but it can happen to anyone. The Achilles tendon is a strong fibrous cord that connects the ...

  12. Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetke, E; Johannsen, F; Langberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    In published efficacy studies on Achilles tendinopathy (AT) exercise alone results in improvement in 60-90% of the cases. However, this high success rate cannot be expected in usual clinical practice. We prospectively investigated the effectiveness of a treatment regimen consisting of home...

  13. What Are Bursitis and Tendinitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Two types of tendinitis can affect the shoulder. Biceps tendinitis causes pain in the front or side of the shoulder. Pain may also travel down to the elbow and forearm. Raising your arm over your head may also be painful. The biceps muscle in the front of the upper arm ...

  14. [Shoulder calcifying tendinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavert, P; Sirveaux, F

    2008-12-01

    Calcifying tendinitis is a frequent shoulder disease but the surgical treatment is still debatable. The authors of this symposium reviewed retrospectively 450 patients treated by arthroscopal excision for calcifying tendinitis. Imaging were used to assess the cuff status in every case. The minimum follow-up was five years except for subscapularis and infraspinatus calcification (minimum two years). At the same time, we led a prospective study evaluating the prevalence of the calcifications on 1276 asymptomatic shoulders. The prevalence of rotator cuff calcification was 7.3%, with a female predominance specially in the operated group. Calcifications have been found as well in patients more than 70 years old. The inter- and intraobserver agreement for the A-B-C classification was poor, specially to differentiate the type A and B calcifications. The long-term follow-up allows to prove that the calcifying tendinitis is temporary without any relation with rotator cuff rupture. Recurrence of the calcific deposit after complete disappearance was never observed and the rate of full thickness tears was 3.9% at an average of nine years follow-up (mean age 56 years). These findings allowed to conclude than cuff suture after removing the deposit is not mandatory. However, the preoperative cuff status had a significant influence on the functional results at follow-up. Preoperative associated partial tear of the cuff or a preoperative positive Jobe test affected significantly the results and increased the rate of full thickness tear at follow-up. The subscapularis calcifications were rare (6% of the calcifications) and were associated with further deposit on the cuff. Infraspinatus calcifications were more frequent (20%), mostly associated to over tendons calcifications. The arthroscopic treatment obtained good results independently from the calcification location but the surgical approach should be adapted. Functional results were lower after removing a type C calcification

  15. Achille Campanile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melani Malamut

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Achille Campanile (1899-1977 wrote plays, gags, sketches, novels and reviews in journals. A taste for the absurd, nonsense, misunderstanding and wordplay are all elements of his plays. After the most prolific period (1924-1935 came a creative pause, perhaps because of insufficient interest of the audience. Unfortunately the audience in the 1920s did not understand Campanile, so he remained on the sideline for therest of his life.

  16. Calcifications simulating peroneus longus tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, A. de; Illum, F.; Joergensen, J.

    1984-06-01

    In two patients with sprains of the ankle joint calcification adjacent to the posterior tibial margin was evident in the lateral projection of a standard radiographic examination. Calcifying peroneus longus tendinitis was suggested. Further tangential views and computed tomography (CT) scan disclosed, however, that the calcifications in both patients were located in the tibial insertion of the posterior and inferior tibio-fibular ligament. In such cases, a correct diagnosis will avoid unnecessary treatment for a non-existent tendinitis.

  17. The low level laser therapy (LLLT) operating in 660 nm reduce gene expression of inflammatory mediators in the experimental model of collagenase-induced rat tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Silva, Romildo; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Bjordal, Jan Magnus; Frigo, Lucio; Rahouadj, Rachid; Arnold, Gilles; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Magdalou, Jacques; Pallotta, Rodney; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat

    2015-09-01

    Tendinopathy is a common disease with a variety of treatments and therapies. Laser therapy appears as an alternative treatment. Here, we investigate the effects of laser irradiation in an experimental model of tendinitis induced by collagenase injection on rats' Achilles tendon, verifying its action in important inflammatory markers. Male Wistar rats were used and divided into five groups: control saline (C), non-treated tendinitis (NT) and tendinitis treated with sodium diclofenac (D) or laser (1 J) and (3 J). The tendinitis was induced by collagenase (100 μg/tendon) on the Achilles tendon, which was removed for further analyses. The gene expression for COX-2; TNF-α; IL-6; and IL-10 (RT-PCR) was measured. The laser irradiation (660 nm, 100 mW, 3 J) used in the treatment of the tendinitis induced by collagenase in Achilles tendon in rats was effective in the reduction of important pro-inflammatory markers such as IL-6 and TNF-α, becoming a promising tool for the treatment of tendon diseases.

  18. Ossifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff after arthroscopic excision of calcium deposits: report of two cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolla, Giovanni; Dave, Arpit C; Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    Ossifying tendinitis (OT) is a type of heterotopic ossification, characterized by deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in a histologic pattern of mature lamellar bone. It is usually associated with surgical intervention or trauma and is more commonly seen in Achilles or distal biceps tendons, and also in the gluteus maximus tendon. To our knowledge, there is no description of OT as a complication of calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff. In this report, we describe two cases in which the patients developed an OT of the supraspinatus after arthroscopic removal of calcium deposits. The related literature is reviewed.

  19. [Eight cases of calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis/retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yuichiro; Chazono, Hideaki; Suzuki, Homare; Ohkuma, Yusuke; Sakurai, Toshioki; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Okamoto, Yoshitaka

    2013-11-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis/retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is an inflammation of the longus colli muscle caused by calcium hydroxyapatite crystal depositon in the longus colli muscle tendon. The three major symptoms are neck pain, limitations of neck movement, and swallowing pain. We treated 8 cases of calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis/ retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis. Each patient complained of neck pain, limitations of neck movement, and swallowing pain. The only local finding was the smooth swelling of the posterior pharyngeal wall. CT imaging showed calcification of the tendon of the longus colli muscle and a low density area in the retropharyngeal space without ring enhancement, suggesting a retropharyngeal abscess. MR imaging showed the smooth swelling of the retropharyngeal space and an increased signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis heals spontaneously, and treatment is not usually required. However, the clinical outcomes are similar and can be confused with retropharyngeal abscess and pyogenic spondylitis, so antibiotics are administrated in many cases. In our report, 7 patients were hospitalized and were treated with the intravenous administration of antibiotics, while 1 patient who refused hospitalization was treated with an oral antibiotic. Steroids were administrated in 2 cases. The 7 patients who were hospitalized were cured within 6 to 10 days.

  20. Percutaneous Achilles Tendon Lengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Percutaneous Achilles Tendon Lengthening Page Content ​ Pre-operative incision markings along ... What is the goal of a percutaneous Achilles tendon lengthening? The goal of this procedure is to ...

  1. Rare locations of calcifying tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nidecker, A.; Hartweg, H.

    1983-12-01

    5 case-reports illustrate 2 rare locations of calcifying peritendinitis: The insertion of the deltoid tendon in the proximal humreus and the insertion of the gluteus maximus tendon in the femur. Knowledge of these insertion sites on one hand and the possibility of calcifying tendinitis at these sites on the other hand may allow proper diagnosis of certain shoulder- and hip joint pain syndromes and subsequent correct therapy.

  2. Ossification of the Achilles tendon: imaging abnormalities in 12 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Witte, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Resnick, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Pogue, W. [Dept. of Radiology, AMI Valley Medical Center, El Cajon, CA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Ossification of the Achilles tendon is a rare clinical entity that is characterized by the presence of an ossific mass contained within the fibrocartilaginous substance of the tendon. Because the radiographic features of this condition have not been documented entirely and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings have not been determined, a review of 16 affected tendons in 12 patients was performed in an attempt to characterize the imaging abnormalities associated with this process. MR imaging was performed in three Achilles tendons which demonstrated thickening of the tendons at the level of the ossifications and a lack of intratendinous signal abnormalities compatible with acute tendinitis. Signal intensity similar to that of bone marrow was present in the ossifications. (orig.)

  3. [Tendinitis of the hip region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, M; Lequesne, M

    1991-06-21

    Tendinitis and bursitis are less common around the hip than around the shoulder. Nevertheless, they must be recognized to avoid unnecessary and costly diagnostic errors. Their various clinical forms are studied in detail. Tendino-bursitis of the gluteus medius muscle is the most frequent in its subacute form, but it is rare in its acute, pseudo-gouty form. Calcification of the reflected tendon of the rectus femoris muscle often closely resembles arthritis of the hip. Synovial cysts of the psoas bursa and rupture of the gluteus medius tendon are rare but must be known. Local injections of corticosteroids play an important part in the treatment of these diseases.

  4. Electrical impedance spectroscopy and diagnosis of tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kisung; Lee, Kyeong Woo; Kim, Sang Beom; Han, Tai Ryoon; Jung, Dong Keun; Roh, Mee Sook; Lee, Jong Hwa

    2010-02-01

    There have been a number of studies that investigate the usefulness of bioelectric signals in diagnoses and treatment in the medical field. Tendinitis is a musculoskeletal disorder with a very high rate of occurrence. This study attempts to examine whether electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) can detect pathological changes in a tendon and find the exact location of the lesion. Experimental tendinitis was induced by injecting collagenase into one side of the patellar tendons in rabbits, while the other side was used as the control. After measuring the impedance in the tendinitis and intact tendon tissue, the dissipation factor was computed. The real component of impedance and the dissipation factor turned out to be lower in tendinitis than in intact tissues. Moreover, the tendinitis dissipation factor spectrum showed a clear difference from that of the intact tendon, indicating its usefulness as a tool for detecting the location of the lesion. Pathologic findings from the tissues that were obtained after measuring the impedance confirmed the presence of characteristics of tendinitis. In conclusion, EIS is a useful method for diagnosing tendinitis and detecting the lesion location in invasive treatment.

  5. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodne, D.; Quinn, S.F.; Murray, W.T.; Cochran, C.; Bolton, T.; Rudd, S.; Lewis, K.; Daines, P.; Bishop, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  6. Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heel cord tear; Calcaneal tendon rupture ... MRI scan to see what type of Achilles tendon tear you have. An MRI is a type ... partial tear means at least some of the tendon is still OK. A full tear means your ...

  7. Efficacy of intra-tendinous injection of platelet-rich plasma in treating tendinosis: comprehensive assessment of a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaudière, Benjamin; Lempicki, Marta; Pesquer, Lionel; Louedec, Liliane; Preux, Pierre Marie; Meyer, Philippe; Hummel, Vincent; Larbi, Ahmed; Deschamps, Lydia; Journe, Clement; Hess, Agathe; Silvestre, Alain; Sargos, Paul; Loriaut, Philippe; Boyer, Patrick; Schouman-Claeys, Elisabeth; Michel, Jean Baptiste; Serfaty, Jean Michel

    2013-10-01

    To assess the potential of intra-tendinous injection of platelet rich plasma (PRP) to treat tendinosis (T+) in a rat model of patellar and Achilles T+, and evaluate its local toxicity. Thirty rats (120 patellar and Achilles tendons) were used. We induced T+ into 80 tendons (patellar = 40, Achilles = 40) by injecting collagenase at day 0 under ultrasound (US) guidance. Clinical examination and US at day 3, followed by US-guided intra-tendinous injection of either PRP (PRPT+, n = 40) or physiological serum (ST+, n = 40, control). Follow-up was at days 6, 13, 18 and 25 using clinical, US and histological evaluation. To study PRP toxicity, we injected PRP into 40 normal tendons (PRPT-) and compared with 40 untreated normal tendons (T-). All PRPT+ showed better joint mobilisation compared with ST+ at day 6 (P = 0.005), day 13 (P = 0.02), day 18 (P = 0.003) and day 25 (P = 0.01). Similar results were found regarding US and histology, with smaller collagen fibre diameters (day 6, P = 0.003, day 25, P ≤ 0.004), less disorganisation and fewer neovessels (day 6, P = 0.003, day 25, P = 0.0003) in PRPT+ compared with ST+. Comparison between PRPT- and T- showed no PRP toxicity (P = 0.18). Our study suggests that mono-injection of PRP in T+ improves tendon healing, with no local toxicity. • We assessed the potential of platelet rich plasma (PRP) to treat tendinosis. • We treated patellar and Achilles tendinosis in a rat model. • We evaluated clinical, imaging and histological data. • Intra-tendinous PRP injection could be useful in the treatment of tendinosis.

  8. Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis. [Radiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S.

    1981-12-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis is an imflammation of the longus colli muscle tendon which is located on the anterior surface of the verterbral column extending from the atlas to the third thoracic vertebra. The acute inflammatory condition is selflimiting with symptoms consisting of a gradually increasing neck pain often associated with throat pain and difficulty swallowing. The pain is aggravated by head and neck movement. Clinically the condition can be confused with retropharyngeal absecess, meningitis, infectious spondylitis, and post-traumatic muscle spasm. The radiographic features of this condition consist of pre-vertebral soft tissue swelling from C1 to C4 and amorphous calcific density in the longus colli tendon anterior to the body of C2 and inferior to the anterior arch of C1.

  9. A mathematical model characterising Achilles tendon dynamics in flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzistefani, N; Chappell, M J; Hutchinson, C; Kletzenbauer, S; Evans, N D

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to acquire mechanistic knowledge of the gastrocnemius muscle-Achilles tendon complex behaviour during specific movements in humans through mathematical modelling. Analysis of this muscle-tendon complex was performed to see if already existing muscle-tendon models of other parts of the body could be applied to the leg muscles, especially the gastrocnemius muscle-Achilles tendon complex, and whether they could adequately characterise its behaviour. Five healthy volunteers were asked to take part in experiments where dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the foot were studied. A model of the Achilles tendon-gastrocnemius muscle was developed, incorporating assumptions regarding the mechanical properties of the muscle fibres and the tendinous tissue in series. Ultrasound images of the volunteers, direct measurements and additional mathematical calculations were used to parameterise the model. Ground reaction forces, forces on specific joints and moments and angles for the ankle were obtained from a Vicon 3D motion capture system. Model validation was performed from the experimental data captured for each volunteer and from reconstruction of the movements of specific trajectories of the joints, muscles and tendons involved in those movements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Incidence of retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis (longus colli tendinitis) in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Gilad; Ben-Ari, Oded; Brenner, Adi; Fliss, Dan M; Wasserzug, Oshri

    2013-06-01

    To determine the incidence of retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis (longus colli tendinitis) in a general urban adult population. Observational study in a municipal medical center. Single tertiary referral center. All symptomatic patients with a differential diagnosis of retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis underwent fiber-optic assessment, laboratory studies, and imaging studies. The main outcome measure was the incidence of retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis. Thirteen patients with symptoms suggestive of retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis were evaluated in our institution between January 2008 and December 2011. Final diagnosis was made by means of a computed tomographic scan: 8 patients had retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis, 1 had retropharyngeal abscess, and the remaining 4 had other deep neck infections. The mean annual crude retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis incidence was 0.50 cases per 100,000 person-years, and the standardized incidence was 1.31 for the age-matched population. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is not a rare disease and is probably underdiagnosed because symptoms are nonspecific, treating physicians are often unfamiliar with this entity, and it is a self-limiting pathology.

  11. Achilles tendinosis: treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Roberto Gabriel L; Jung, Hong-Geun

    2015-03-01

    Athletes usually complain of an ongoing or chronic pain over the Achilles tendon, but recently even non-athletes are experiencing the same kind of pain which affects their daily activities. Achilles tendinosis refers to a degenerative process of the tendon without histologic or clinical signs of intratendinous inflammation. Treatment is based on whether to stimulate or prevent neovascularization. Thus, until now, there is no consensus as to the best treatment for this condition. This paper aims to review the common ways of treating this condition from the conservative to the surgical options.

  12. Imaging findings in acute calcific prevertebral tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Caio Giometti; Diniz, Fabio de Vilhena; Garcia, Marcio Ricardo Taveira; Gomes, Regina Lucia Elia; Daniel, Mauro Miguel; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Dept.

    2011-09-15

    Acute calcific prevertebral tendinitis is a benign and rare condition that presents calcification of the superior oblique fibers of longus colli muscle with local inflammatory reaction. Such condition is one of the less common presentations of calcium hydroxyapatite deposition disease. Clinical signs are usually acute neck pain and odynophagia, and it may be misdiagnosed as retropharyngeal abscess, spondylodiscitis or traumatic injury. The imaging findings in calcific prevertebral tendinitis are pathognomonic. The knowledge of such findings is extremely important to avoid unnecessary interventions in a patient presenting a condition with a good response to conservative treatment. (author)

  13. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, E.J. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); El-Khoury, G.Y. [Dept. of Radiology and Orthopaedics, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  14. Achilles tendon: US examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornage, B.D.

    1986-06-01

    Real-time ultrasonography (US) using linear-array probes and a stand-off pad as a ''waterpath'' was performed to evaluate the Achilles tendon in 67 patients (including 24 athletes) believed to have acute or chronic traumatic or inflammatory pathologic conditions. Tendons in 23 patients appeared normal on US scans. The 44 abnormal tendons comprised five complete and four partial ruptures, seven instances of postoperative change, and 28 cases of tendonitis. US depiction of the inner structure of the tendon resulted in the diagnosis of focal abnormalities, including partial ruptures, nodules, and calcifications. Tendonitis was characterized by enlargement and decreased echogenicity of the tendon. The normal US appearance of the Achilles tendon is described.

  15. In-vitro tensile testing machine for vibration study of fresh rabbit Achilles tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, Gian M.; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo; Pianosi, Antonella

    2001-10-01

    A lot of people, overall athletic one suffer from tendinitis or complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. This structure becomes inflamed and damaged mainly from a variety of mechanical forces and sometimes due to metabolic problems, such as diabetes or arthritis. Over the past three decades extensive studies have been performed on the structural and mechanical properties of Achilles tendon trying to explain the constitutive equations to describe and foresee tendon behavior. Among the various mechanical parameters, the vibrational behavior is also of interest. Several investigations are performed in order to study how the Achilles tendon vibrations influence the response of the muscle proprioception and human posture. The present article describes how in vitro tensile experiments can be performed, taking into account the need to simulate physiological condition of Achilles tendon and thus approaching some opened problems in the design of the experimental set-up. A new system for evaluating tendon vibrations by non contact techniques is proposed. Preliminary simple elongation tests are made extracting the main mechanical parameters: stress and strain at different fixed stretches, in order to characterize the tissue. Finally, a vibration study is made at each pretensioned tendon level evaluating the oscillating curves caused by a small hammer.

  16. The effect of foot overpronation on Achilles tendon blood supply in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karzis, K; Kalogeris, M; Mandalidis, D; Geladas, N; Karteroliotis, K; Athanasopoulos, S

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Achilles tendon blood flow in individuals with overpronated feet during non-weight- and weight-bearing positions. Achilles tendon blood flow was measured by means of the pulsatility index (PI) and the resistance index (RI) in 15 male individuals with overpronated feet and 15 counterparts with normal feet, using power Doppler ultrasonography (PDI). Achilles tendon ultrasonographic (US) assessment was performed at its musculo-tendinous junction (MTJ), mid-tendon (MT), and osseotendinous junction (OTJ) at a non-weight-bearing relaxed position (RP) and during two-leg stance (TLS) and one-leg upright stance (OLS). PI and RI indices were significantly greater in individuals with overpronated feet compared to individuals with normal feet at the OTJ in OLS position (P MTJ in all positions (P MTJ (P < 0.001). The findings of the present study suggest that foot overpronation may affect Achilles tendon blood flow, particularly at mid-tendon, thus enhancing the possibility for injury. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Pathways in the diagnosis of prevertebral tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmann, R; Hammer, G; Simbrunner, J

    2012-01-01

    The prevertebral tendinitis is an inflammatory process, which affects the cervicothoracic prevertebral muscles. This extremely rare entity was first described by Hartley and Fahlgren in 1964 and until now there are just some case reports dealing with this process. Unfortunately it is quite easy to misdiagnose or mistake the prevertebral tendinitis as an abscess, because of the imaging features. The aim of this case series is to offer guidelines in the diagnosis of this rare disease to prevent unnecessary surgery. Six patients with already by imaging or retrospectively after surgery by pathologic report diagnosed prevertebral tendinitis were included in this study. None of these patients suffered from a chronically inflammatory disease. Three patients just received contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) and another group of three patients received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In two out of three MRI examinations, we additionally performed diffusion weighted images and calculated the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map. The laboratory reports obtained on the day of the computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were reviewed for C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count (WBCC). All patients revealed a prevertebral cervical effusion. Five out of six patients showed amorphous calcifications in the tendon of the prevertebral muscles. In one case calcifications could not be identified at all because of very strong beam hardening artefacts caused by dental prothesis. The CRP values were increased in all patients (mean value 44.9 mg/l; SD ± 28.3). However, WBCC remained normal (mean value 8.4G/l; SD ± 2.7). Only for the two patients who received DWI it was possible to assess the quality of the prevertebral fluid accumulation and to detect the benign prevertebral effusion, which is typical for the retropharyngeal tendinitis. According to the experience with our patients the best imaging feature is MRI with DWI and ADC

  18. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with cortical bone erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Roxanne; Kim, David H; Millett, Peter J; Weissman, Barbara N

    2004-10-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. We present a pathologically proven case of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, CT, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed.

  19. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with cortical bone erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Roxanne; Kim, David H.; Millett, Peter J. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Weissman, Barbara N. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, Boston (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. We present a pathologically proven case of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, CT, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Calcifying tendinitis of the gluteus maximus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, H C; Bos, G D; Renner, J B

    2001-10-01

    A case of calcifying tendinitis of the insertion of the gluteus maximus tendon is presented. Plain-film roentgenograms showed amorphous calcific densities extending from the posterior border of the femur. Computed tomography showed cortical erosion associated with the calcified mass. The patient responded well to needle lavage and injection with local anesthesia and corticosteroids. Fifteen-month follow-up roentgenograms showed resolution of the calcification. Recognition of this entity may make a workup and a biopsy unnecessary.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in retropharyngeal tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekbon, K.; Annell, K.; Traeff, J.; Torhall, J. (Soeder Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1994-08-01

    Seven consecutive patients with acute retropharyngeal tendinitis underwent plain X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine. All seven had marked soft tissue swelling anterior to C1 and C2 on plain X-ray, and soft tissue calcification at this level was present in five of them. On MRI, there was markedly increased signal intensity on T[sub 2]-weighted images in the acute phase and intermediate signal intensity on T[sub 1]-weighted images, anterior to the level of CI and C2, often extending as far down as C6. These changes correlated well with the soft tissue swelling seen on conventional X-ray of the cervical spine. The maximum mid-sagittal thickness of the soft issues was significantly greater in the tendinitis patients than in 12 control subjects free of symptoms from the pharynx or the cervical spine. Treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs rapidly alleviated symptoms, and at follow-up MRI showed regression or complete restitution of the changes. In conclusion, MRI can visualize the edematous changes in the longus colli muscle and adds useful diagnostic information in suspected cases of acute retropharyngeal tendinitis. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Effects of repeated Achilles tendon vibration on triceps surae stiffness and reflex excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapole, Thomas; Pérot, Chantal

    2011-02-01

    Clinical studies frequently report an increase in stiffness and a loss of range of motion at joints placed in disuse or immobilization. This is notably the case for subjects maintained in bed for a long period, whilst their joints are not affected. Recently we documented on healthy subjects the benefit in terms of force and activation capacities of the triceps surae offered by vibrations applied to the Achilles tendon. Knowing that stiffness changes may contribute to force changes, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of tendon vibration on the triceps surae stiffness of healthy subjects. The vibration program consisted in 14 days of 1h daily Achilles tendon vibration applied at rest. Nineteen healthy students were involved in this study. Before and at the end of the vibration program, musculo-tendinous stiffness in active conditions was determined by use of a quick-release test. Passive stiffness was also analyzed by a flexibility test: passive torque-angle relationships were established from maximal plantar-flexion to maximal dorsiflexion. Passive stiffness indexes at 10°, 15° and 20° dorsiflexion were defined as the slope of the relationships at the corresponding angle. Tendinous reflex, influenced by stiffness values, was also investigated as well as the H reflex to obtain an index of the central reflex excitability. After the program, musculo-tendinous stiffness was significantly decreased (p=.01). At the same time, maximal passive dorsiflexion was increased (p=.005) and passive stiffness indexes at 10°, 15° and 20° dorsiflexion decreased (ptriceps surae parameters are diminished after the vibration program, it could be beneficial to immobilized persons as hypo-activity is known to increase muscular stiffness.

  3. Acute calcific tendinitis of the finger--a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, S N

    2004-07-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis of the hand is rare and often misdiagnosed as infection, fracture or periarthritis. It frequently occurs in peri-menopausal women and is caused by deposits of hydroxyapatite crystals. We describe acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor digitorum superficialis insertion in an elderly man taking oral anticoagulants. The differential diagnoses and recommended treatment are discussed.

  4. Isolated Gastrocnemius Recession for Treatment of Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallerico, Valerie K; Greenhagen, Robert M; Lowery, Clinton

    2015-08-01

    Many surgeries exist for treatment of insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Another surgical option to consider is an isolated gastrocnemius recession. Recent studies have demonstrated the success of a gastrocnemius recession for noninsertional Achilles tendinitis. We hypothesize that an isolated gastrocnemius recession can be a successful, effective, and less invasive surgery for patients with chronic insertional Achilles tendinopathy. This article presents a retrospective review of one surgeon's results of 11 patients (2010-2012), with an average age of 59 years who presented with chronic insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Gastrocnemius recessions, either endoscopic or open, were performed after an average of 6.2 months of conservative treatment. All patients' radiographs were reviewed preoperatively for any calcaneal spurs and divided into groups accordingly. Average follow-up time postoperatively was 13.8 months. Plantarflexion strength, equinus deformity, as well as the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot instrument was assessed. In all, 10/11 (91%) patients had high patient satisfaction, pain relief, no residual equinus deformity, loss in muscle strength and returned to regular activities successfully at 1-year follow up. All patients and groups had significant improvement in AOFAS scores. The median postoperative AOFAS score was 94.8. All patients and patient groups had significant improvement pre- to postoperatively. Patients without spurs appear to do better than patients with spurs. One patient developed recurrence of insertional heel pain and equinus deformity. Other complications included 2 sural nerve parasthesias, which resolved. An isolated gastrocnemius recession for chronic insertional Achilles tendinopathy can provide high satisfaction, pain relief, and a faster recovery period with few or no complications. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case series. © 2014 The Author(s).

  5. Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Christopher J.; Tan, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy is a degenerative condition characterised by pain on activity. Eccentric stretching is the most effective treatment. Surgical treatment is reserved for recalcitrant cases. Minimally-invasive and tendinoscopic treatments are showing promising results. Cite this article: Pearce CJ, Tan A. Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:383-390. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.160024. PMID:28461917

  6. Achilles tendon rupture; assessment of nonoperative treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2014-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent and potentially disabling injury. Over the past decade a change in treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture away from operative towards non-operative treatment has taken place...

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of biceps tendinitis and tendinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churgay, Catherine A

    2009-09-01

    Biceps tendinitis is inflammation of the tendon around the long head of the biceps muscle. Biceps tendinosis is caused by degeneration of the tendon from athletics requiring overhead motion or from the normal aging process. Inflammation of the biceps tendon in the bicipital groove, which is known as primary biceps tendinitis, occurs in 5 percent of patients with biceps tendinitis. Biceps tendinitis and tendinosis are commonly accompanied by rotator cuff tears or SLAP (superior labrum anterior to posterior) lesions. Patients with biceps tendinitis or tendinosis usually complain of a deep, throbbing ache in the anterior shoulder. Repetitive overhead motion of the arm initiates or exacerbates the symptoms. The most common isolated clinical finding in biceps tendinitis is bicipital groove point tenderness with the arm in 10 degrees of internal rotation. Local anesthetic injections into the biceps tendon sheath may be therapeutic and diagnostic. Ultrasonography is preferred for visualizing the overall tendon, whereas magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography arthrography is preferred for visualizing the intra-articular tendon and related pathology. Conservative management of biceps tendinitis consists of rest, ice, oral analgesics, physical therapy, or corticosteroid injections into the biceps tendon sheath. Surgery should be considered if conservative measures fail after three months, or if there is severe damage to the biceps tendon.

  8. The Achilles heel of adults and children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, J.I.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the imaging and treatment of the Achilles heel of adults and children. The figurative and literal Achilles heel consists of a number of pathologies: ankle impingement, Achilles tendinopathy, retrocalcaneal bursitis and calcaneal apophysitis. Research as well as diagnosis and t

  9. Reconstruction of Kuwada grade IV chronic achilles tendon rupture by minimally invasive technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xudong; Wu, Yongping; Tao, Huimin; Yang, Disheng; Huang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transfer of a flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon can not only reconstruct the Achilles tendon but also provide ischemic tendinous tissues with a rich blood supply to enhance wound healing. This retrospective study aims to investigate clinical outcomes in patients who underwent repair of Kuwada grade IV chronic Achilles tendon rupture with long hallucis longus tendons harvested using a minimally invasive technique. Materials and Methods: 35 patients who were treated for Kuwada grade IV Achilles tendon injuries from July 2006 to June 2011 were included in this retrospective study. The age ranged between 23 and 71 years. The duration from primary injury to surgery ranged from 29 days to 34 months (mean value, 137.6 days). All 35 patients had difficulties in lifting their calves. Thirty two were followed up for a mean 32.2 months (range 18–72 months), whereas three were lost to followup. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the tendon rupture gap ranged from 6.0 to 9.2 cm. During surgery, a 2.0 cm minor incision was made vertically in the medial plantar side of the midfoot, and a 1.5 cm minor transverse incision was made in the plantar side of the interphalangeal articulation of the great toe to harvest the FHL tendon, and the tendon was fixed to the calcaneus with suture anchors. Postoperative appearance and function were evaluated by physiotherapists based American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society-ankle and hindfoot score (AOFAS-AH), and Leppilahti Achilles tendon ratings. Results: Results were assessed in 32 patients. Except for one patient who suffered complications because of wound disruption 10 days after the operation, all other patients had primary wound healing, with 28 of 32 able to go up on their toes at last followup. The AOFAS-AH score was increased from preoperative (51.92 ± 7.08) points to (92.56 ± 6.71) points; Leppilahti Achilles tendon score was increased from preoperative (72.56 ± 7.43) to (92.58 ± 5.1). There were

  10. Calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hottat, N.; Fumiere, E.; Delcour, C. [C. H. U. de Charleroi (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    1999-08-01

    Two cases of calcific tendinitis of gluteus maximus muscle are presented. The CT findings, including amorphous calcification without soft tissue mass and possible cortical erosion at the femoral enthesis of the gluteus maximus muscle, are highly suggestive of calcific tendinitis at this unusual but classical location. Ossifying entheses with well-defined cortical defect are frequent at the femoral insertion of the gluteus maximus muscle in asymptomatic subjects and must be differentiated from a real cortical erosion sometimes associated with these calcific tendinitis. (orig.) With 3 figs., 7 refs.

  11. Demonstration of Achilles tendon on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M.; Rupp, N.; Lehner, K.; Paar, O.; Gradinger, R.; Karpf, P.M.

    1985-08-01

    Ligaments and tendons, including the Achilles tendon, show the highest density among normal soft tissue structures in the body. Traumatic and degenerative changes of the Achilles tendon are often associated with marked thickening and reduction in density associated with increased opacity of the space in front of the Achilles tendon. These changes are easily demonstrated by CT, whereas conventional radiological techniques only show non-specific changes. Twenty-five patients were examined, including nine with pain, seven following rupture of the Achilles tendon and nine post-operative controls; it was found that CT can add information important for the diagnosis and treatment planning of abnormalities of the Achilles tendon.

  12. MRI of the Achilles tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naegele, M.; Lienemann, A.; Hahn, D.; Lissner, J.; Boehm, P.

    1987-06-01

    The Achilles tendon and preachillar space of 30 patients was studied by MRI. A surface coil (Helmholtz' principle) was applied and all patients were examined with a superconducting magnet operating at 1.0 Tesla field strength. The purpose of the study was to illustrate pathological changes of the tendon and the surrounding soft tissue. In 3 cases MRI diagnosed a total rupture of the Achilles tendon. Furthermore, the strain of the tendon and side effects of an inflammatory process could be demonstrated. The use of a surface coil yields a high resolution of the normal anatomy of the region and of the pathological changes of the tendon and the surrounding soft tissue structures. The advantages of MRI for Achilles tendon diagnostics against competitive modalities are 1) excellent soft tissue contrast, 2) multiplanar imaging, 3) as well as exact delineation and visualisation of the lesion.

  13. Tendinitis Pain: Should I Apply Ice or Heat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Laskowski, M.D. References Questions and answers about bursitis and tendinitis. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal ... Diseases. http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bursitis. Accessed Aug. 1, 2017. Marx JA, et al., ...

  14. Homozygous Hypercholesterolaemia With Cutaneous And Tendinous Xanthoma In A Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahiri Bhabesh Chandra

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A seven year old male child, born of a consanguineous marriage is reported for the rare occurrence of severe hypercholesterolaemia with cutaneous and tendinous xanthoma, mental retardation and eosinophilia in his childhood.

  15. Prevertebral tendinitis: how to avoid unnecessary surgical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Georg Philipp; Vollmann, Robert; Tomazic, Peter Valentin; Simbrunner, Josef; Friedrich, Gerhard

    2012-07-01

    Prevertebral tendinitis is an inflammatory process that affects the cervicothoracic prevertebral muscles. Because of its clinical presentation and imaging features in computed tomography scans, prevertebral tendinitis can easily be mistaken for deep cervical abscess formation. Totally different therapy regimens require clinical and diagnostic pathways for sufficient differentiation between those two pathologic entities. Case series with comparison. In 10 patients with prevertebral tendinitis, we evaluated the symptoms, laboratory reports, and radiological imaging findings. We compared these data to 65 patients with a deep cervical abscess formation. The basic radiologic imaging procedure was contrast-enhanced computed tomography. For detection of prevertebral tendinitis, we performed magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion-weighted images and calculated the apparent diffusion coefficient map. Patients with prevertebral tendinitis complained of severe neck pain, globus sensation, and neck stiffness. Diffusion-weighted images showed a typical benign prevertebral effusion. Computed tomography scans showed amorphous calcifications in the tendon of the prevertebral muscles. The C-reactive protein values were slightly increased in patients with prevertebral tendinitis, and white blood cell count remained normal. In comparison to patients with deep cervical abscess formation, the C-reactive protein and white blood cell count was significantly lower (P tendinitis cases. Prevertebral tendinitis should be considered when patients suffer from neck pain, neck stiffness, and globus sensations despite low signs of inflammation in the laboratory report. To confirm the diagnosis, the best imaging feature is magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient map. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Achilles tendon lesions in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J G

    1993-09-01

    Achillodynia (Achilles tendon pain) is a significant source of disability to many people taking part in sports. Papers in the English language published since 1986 are reviewed here, grouped into specific subject areas including biomechanics, pathology, general clinical presentations, experimental treatments, steroids, podiatry and surgery. While there has been no dramatic breakthrough in the field, there have been various interesting advances with particular reference to imaging and conservative management, which will hopefully stimulate further studies. Many problems of Achilles tendon lesions in athletes remain unsolved, however, and much is yet to be done to provide adequate and generally effective methods of prevention and conservative treatment.

  17. Complete Achilles tendon ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landvater, S J; Renström, P A

    1992-10-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures can be treated nonsurgically in the nonathletic or low-end recreational athletic patient, particularly those more than 50 years of age, provided the treating physician does not delay in the diagnosis and treatment (preferably less than 48 hrs and possibly less than 1 week). The patient should be advised of the higher incidence of re-rupture of the tendon when treated nonsurgically. Surgical treatment is recommended for patients who are young and athletic. This is particularly true because the major criticism of surgical treatment has been the complication rate, which has decreased to a low level and to a mild degree, usually not significantly affecting the repair over time. Surgical treatment in these individuals seems to be superior not only in regard to re-rupture but also in assuring the correct apposition of the tendon ends and in placing the necessary tension on the tendon to secure appropriate orientation of the collagen fibers. This in turn allows them to regain full strength, power, endurance, and an early return to sports. Surgery is also recommended for late diagnosed ruptures where there is significant lengthening of the tendon. Surgical technique should involve a medial incision to avoid the sural nerve, absorbable suture, and augmentation with fascia or tendon where there is a gap or late rupture. Postoperatively, the immobilization should be 7 to 10 days in a splint. A walking boot with early motion in plantar flexion or a short leg cast with the tendon under slight tension should thereafter be used for 4 to 5 weeks. An early and well-supervised rehabilitation program should be initiated to restore the patient to the preinjury activity level.

  18. Achilles Impingement Tendinopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark J; Mourelatos, Jan; Mar, Alice

    2017-02-28

    Haglund's syndrome is impingement of the retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendon caused by a prominence of the posterosuperior calcaneus. Radiographic measurements are not sensitive or specific for diagnosing Haglund's deformity. Localization of a bone deformity and tendinopathy in the same sagittal section of a magnetic resonance imaging scan can assist with the diagnosis in equivocal cases. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of Haglund's syndrome in patients presenting with Achilles tendinopathy and note any associated findings to determine the criteria for a diagnosis of Haglund's syndrome. We reviewed 40 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles tendinopathy and 19 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles high-grade tears and/or ruptures. Achilles tendinopathy was often in close proximity to the superior aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity, consistent with impingement (67.5%). Patients with Achilles impingement tendinopathy were more often female (p < .04) and were significantly heavier than patients presenting with noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy (p = .014) or Achilles tendon rupture (p = .010). Impingement tendinopathy occurred medially (8 of 20) and centrally (10 of 20) more often than laterally (2 of 20) and was associated with a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with a loss of calcaneal recess more often than a superior projection (22 of 27 versus 8 of 27; p < .001). Haglund's deformity should be reserved for defining a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with loss of calcaneal recess because this corresponds with impingement. Achilles impingement tendinopathy might be more appropriate terminology for Haglund's syndrome, because the bone deformity is often subtle. Of the 27 images with Achilles impingement tendinopathy, 10 (37.0%) extended to a location prone to Achilles tendon rupture. Given these findings, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy are not mutually

  19. The roentgenographic findings of achilles tendon rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seouk, Kang Hyo; Keun, Rho Yong [Shilla General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of a lateral view of the ankles in Achilles tendon rupture. We performed a retrospective analysis of the roentgenographic findings of 15 patients with surgically proven Achilles tendon rupture. Four groups of 15 patients(normal, ankle sprain, medial lateral malleolar fracture, and calcaneal fracture) were analysed as reference groups. Plain radiographs were reviewed with regard to Kager's triangle, Arner's sign, Toygar's angle, ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon, sharpness of the anterior margin of Achilles tendon, and meniscoid smooth margin of the posterior skin surface of the ankle. Kager's triangle was deformed and disappeared after rupture of the Achilles tendon in nine patients(60%) with operative verification of the rupture, six patients(40%) had a positive Arner's sign, while none had a diminished Toygars angle. In 13 patients(87%) with a ruptured Achilles tendon, the thickness of this was nonuniform compared with the reference group. The anterior margin of the Achilles tendon became serrated and indistinct in 14 patients(93%) in whom this was ruptured. An abnormal ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon was noted in nine patient(60%), and nonparallelism between the anterior margin of the Achilles tendon and posterior skin surface of the ankle was detected in 11 patients(73%). The posterior skin surface of the ankle had a nodular surface margin in 13 patients(87%). A deformed Kager's triangle and Achilles tendon, and an abnormal ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon in a lateral view of the ankles are important findings for the diagnesis of in diagnosing achilles tendon rupture.

  20. Achilles tendon rupture; assessment of nonoperative treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent and potentially disabling injury. Over the past decade a change in treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture away from operative towards non-operative treatment has taken place. However, the optimal non-operative treatment protocol remains...... and Sweden. Immediate weight-bearing was found to be safe and recommendable in non-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. The novel ultrasound measurement showed excellent reliability and acceptable validity and agreement....

  1. Achilles tendon rupture; assessment of nonoperative treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Troelsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent and potentially disabling injury. Over the past decade a change in treatment ofacute Achilles tendon rupture away from operative towards non-operative treatment has taken place. However, the optimal non-operative treatment protocol remains...... and Sweden. Immediate weight-bearing was found to be safe and recommendable in non-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. The novel ultrasound measurement showed excellent reliability and acceptable validity and agreement....

  2. Acromial morphology in patients with calcific tendinitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balke, Maurice; Banerjee, Marc; Vogler, Tim; Akoto, Ralph; Bouillon, Bertil; Liem, Dennis

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the morphology of the acromion in calcific tendinitis differs from controls without subacromial pathology and matches subacromial impingement. Digital radiographs of 150 shoulders were evaluated with the open source DICOM-Viewer OsiriX. 50 patients had symptomatic calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, 50 had subacromial impingement without calcifications or rotator cuff tears, 50 with bruised shoulder that were previously asymptomatic served as controls. Acromial shape according to Bigliani et al. acromial tilt (AT) according to Kitay et al. and Aoki et al. acromion index (AI) according to Nyffeler et al. and lateral acromial angle (LAA) according to Banas et al. were measured. Both calcific (0.72; P = 0.001) and impingement groups (0.73; P = 0.008) were significantly different from controls (0.67) using AI measure, while only the calcific group (79.5°) was different from controls (84.1°) using LAA (P tendinitis. The hypothesis of this study was that the morphology of the acromion in calcific tendinitis differs from controls without subacromial pathology and matches subacromial impingement was only confirmed for the AI. The AI of shoulders with calcific tendinitis is comparable to that of shoulders with subacromial impingement.

  3. Management of acute calcific tendinitis around the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Min; Baek, Ji-Hoon; Ko, Young-Bong; Lee, Han-Jun; Park, Ki Jeong; Ha, Yong-Chan

    2014-11-01

    Although the natural history of calcific tendinitis within the rotator cuff of the shoulder is established, the natural history of calcific tendinitis around the hip joint remains unknown. To examine the duration of symptoms including pain, the location of calcific tendinitis around the hip joint, the radiologic course of calcium phosphate crystals, and the proportion of patients who required surgical treatment. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty hips (29 patients) with acute calcific tendinitis were treated between January 2010 and December 2012. Level of subjective hip pain using the visual analog scale pain score, radiologic type, and the location and size of calcium deposits were measured during a follow-up period of 12 to 32 months. The 29 patients included 7 men (24%) and 22 women (76%) with a mean age of 51.5 years (range, 28-78 years). All visual analog scale pain scores significantly improved from a mean of 7.1 to 0.8 at the latest follow-up (P 3 months) of severe pain, solid type, and large size (range, 96-416 mm(2)) were treated with arthroscopic excision. Nonoperative treatment in patients with acute calcific tendinitis of the hip joint might be successful in most patients. Surgical treatment is of value for patients experiencing prolonged severe pain, solid type, and large size. © 2014 The Author(s).

  4. Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis Mimicking a Retropharyngeal Phlegmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Gabra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute retropharyngeal tendinitis is a little known but not an uncommon condition. It was first described by Hartley in 1964 as an inflammation of the longus colli muscle secondary to calcium crystals deposition on its insertion. The calcifications are mostly located on the oblique portion of the muscle at the level of C1-C2. Methods. We will describe this disease through 4 cases that presented in our institution. Results. The most common symptoms are severe neck pain, odynophagia, and a painful restriction of neck movement. It is associated with mild fever and inflammatory lab findings such as a slight elevation of white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein. CT scan is recommended as the first-line imaging modality to establish a diagnosis. Treatments consist of NSAIDs and analgesics to accelerate the healing process. If symptoms are severe, a course of corticosteroids is required. Conclusion. Since the clinical and laboratory findings of this condition and those of a retropharyngeal abscess overlap, it is important to establish the right diagnosis in order to prevent more invasive procedures. A good knowledge of this clinical entity by otolaryngologists would prevent delays in hospital discharge and unnecessary anxiety.

  5. A STUDY OF ASSOCIATION OF FLUOROQUINOLONES IN TENDINITIS AND ASSOCIATED COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakash Jaiswal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Fluoroquinolones are the quinolone antimicrobials, which are known to have one or more fluorine substitutions. The first generation fluoroquinolones, which was introduced in 1980s have one fluoro substitution. This was very affective in cases of gram-negative bacterias. 1 In the 1990s, compounds with additional fluoro and other substitutions have been developed further extending antimicrobial activity to gram-positive cocci and also anaerobes, which also has higher metabolic stability. 2,3,4 It also has a higher half-life. These are referred to as second generation fluoroquinolones. The first generation fluoroquinolone includes norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and pefloxacin. Second generation fluoroquinolone includes levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, sparfloxacin, moxifloxacin, gemifloxacin and prulifloxacin. The present topic of controversy is tendinopathy and tendon rupture induced by fluoroquinolone. There is enough data, which suggest that fluoroquinolones should be used with utmost care in population of patients. That means, not all the patients with gram-negative infections can be given this antibiotic as it has its own side effects. The first one to publish report was that of a fifty-six-year-old patient who had urinary tract infection and was treated with norfloxacin. The patient developed Achilles tendinopathy and the associated rupture was reported in New Zealand in the year 1983. Subsequently, there were many other case reports and case-controlled studies reporting similar findings. Fluoroquinolone are commonly prescribed to treat community-acquired infections involving the respiratory, urogenital and gastrointestinal tracts. Fluoroquinolone concentration is seen on a higher scale in bones and joints when compared to the serum levels. So, it is ideal to treat the bones and joint infections. The cartilage infections is also treated with fluoroquinolone. Achilles tendinitis or rupture is among the most serious side effects

  6. Progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Masafumi; Higuchi, Fujio; Suzuki, Ritsu; Yamanaka, Kensuke

    2003-02-01

    This report documents the clinical, radiographic and histologic findings in a 46-year-old man with calcifying tendinitis in his left shoulder which progressed to rotator cuff tear. The patient had a 1-year history of repeated calcifying tendinitis before being referred to our hospital. On the initial visit, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed calcium deposition localized in the supraspinatus tendon without apparent tear. Three months after the first visit, MRI revealed a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear at the site of calcium deposition. Surgical and histologic findings demonstrated that calcium deposition was the cause of cuff rupture. To our knowledge, based on a review of the English literature, this is the first case report in which the progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear has been serially observed.

  7. Progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotoh, Masafumi; Higuchi, Fujio; Suzuki, Ritsu; Yamanaka, Kensuke [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical Center of Kurume University, 155-1 Kokubu-machi, Kurume City, Fukuoka 839-0862 (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    This report documents the clinical, radiographic and histologic findings in a 46-year-old man with calcifying tendinitis in his left shoulder which progressed to rotator cuff tear. The patient had a 1-year history of repeated calcifying tendinitis before being referred to our hospital. On the initial visit, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed calcium deposition localized in the supraspinatus tendon without apparent tear. Three months after the first visit, MRI revealed a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear at the site of calcium deposition. Surgical and histologic findings demonstrated that calcium deposition was the cause of cuff rupture. To our knowledge, based on a review of the English literature, this is the first case report in which the progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear has been serially observed. (orig.)

  8. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  9. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiasharete Jielile; Beicen Hunapia; Ayidaer Jialihasi; Jingping Bai; Murat Kizaibek; Minawa Aibai; Gulnur Sabirhazi; Nuerai Shawutali; Wulanbai Tangkejie; Aynaz Badelhan; Yeermike Nuerduola; Turde Satewalede; Darehan Buranbai

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy.

  10. Association of Achilles tendinopathy and plantar spurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulcano, Ettore; Mani, Sriniwasan B; Mani, Sriniwasan; Do, Huong; Bohne, Walter H; Ellis, Scott J

    2014-10-01

    Plantar spurs and Achilles tendinopathy are common causes of heel pain. In the authors' practice, it was anecdotally noted that patients with Achilles tendinopathy often presented with plantar spurs. Nonetheless, there is a shortage of studies investigating whether Achilles tendinopathy and plantar spurs exist concomitantly. A better understanding of the association between the 2 pathologies might help physicians recognize and treat both conditions, educate patients about Achilles tendinopathy and plantar spurs, and ultimately investigate possible underlying causes of both pathologies that could be addressed together. The authors examined the prevalence of plantar spurs in patients diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy as well as demographic differences within the unilateral and bilateral Achilles tendinopathy populations. A total of 785 patient records were retrospectively reviewed. Mean patient age was 56.2±15.5 years (46.9% men and 53.1% women). Seventy-two (9.2%) patients were affected bilaterally by Achilles tendinopathy. Lateral radiographs were reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon to identify the presence of plantar spurs. A total of 329 (41.9%) patients with Achilles tendinopathy were found to have a concomitant plantar spur. Patients with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy and a plantar spur were more likely to be women (58.7% vs 49.8%, P=.020) and older (62.7 vs 51.7 years, Ptendinopathy group, there were 46 (63.9%) patients with at least one foot presenting with a plantar spur. The study's findings suggest a significant association between Achilles tendinopathy and plantar spurs. Older women with Achilles tendinopathy are at greater risk of being affected by plantar spurs. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Midportion Achilles tendinosis and the plantaris tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredson, Håkan

    2011-10-01

    When re-operating patients with midportion Achilles tendinosis, having had a poor effect of ultrasound (US) and Doppler-guided scraping, the author found the involvement of the plantaris tendon to be a likely reason for the poor result. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of a plantaris tendon in close relation to the Achilles tendon in consecutive patients with midportion Achilles tendinosis undergoing treatment with US and Doppler-guided scraping. This study includes 73 consecutive tendons with chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinosis, where US+Doppler examination showed thickening, irregular tendon structure, hypo-echoic regions, and localised high blood flow outside and inside the ventral Achilles midportion. The tendons were treated with US+Doppler-guided scraping, via a medial incision. If there was a plantaris tendon located in close relation to the medial Achilles, it was extirpated. An invaginated, or 'close by located', enlarged plantaris tendon was found in 58 of 73 (80%) tendons. Preliminary clinical results of the combined procedure, US + Doppler-guided surgical scraping and extirpation of the plantaris tendon, are very promising. A thickened plantaris tendon located in close relation to the medial Achilles seems common in patients with chronic painful midportion tendinosis. The role of the plantaris tendon in midportion Achilles tendinosis needs to be further evaluated and should be kept in mind when treating this condition.

  12. Platelet-rich plasma injections for the treatment of refractory Achilles tendinopathy: results at 4 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Di Matteo, Berardo; Di Martino, Alessandro; Tesei, Giulia; Pelotti, Patrizia; Cenacchi, Annarita; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic Achilles tendinopathy is responsible for a severe reduction in physical performance and persistent pain. There is currently a number of therapeutic options and the local administration of growth factors is an emerging treatment strategy. In particular, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a widely used way to provide a local regenerative stimulus for tendon healing. The aim of this study was to document the mid-term results obtained after treating recalcitrant Achilles tendinopathy with injections of high concentrate, leucocyte-rich PRP. Materials and methods Twenty-seven patients (mean age: 44.6 years; 22 men and 5 women) affected by chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy (7 bilateral, for a total of 34 tendons), refractory to previous treatments, were enrolled. Patients were treated with three ultrasound-guided intra-tendinous injections of PRP at 2-week intervals. Patients were prospectively evaluated at baseline, and then at 2, 6, and up to a mean of 54.1 months of follow-up (minimum 30 months), using the following tools: Blanzina, VISA-A, EQ-VAS for general health, and Tegner scores. Results The VISA-A score showed a significant improvement: the baseline score of 49.9±18.1 increased to 62.9±19.8 at 2 months (p=0.002), with a further improvement at 6 months (84.3±17.1, ptendinopathy with a stable outcome up to a medium-term follow-up. Longer symptom duration was related with a more difficult return to sporting activity. PMID:24960641

  13. Retropharyngeal Tendinitis: Radiographic and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelineck, J.; Salomonsen, M.; Hviid, C. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in retropharyngeal tendinitis. Material and methods: Within 1 year, four patients presenting with symptoms of retropharyngeal tendinitis were examined by radiography and MRI. Results: On MRI and radiographs, all patients had characteristic soft-tissue swellings and calcifications related to the tendon of the longus colli muscle situated inferior to the anterior arc of C1. MRI showed well-defined edema, with high signal in the retropharyngeal tissue anterior to C1-C5 on short T1 inversion recovery (STIR) sequences, low signal on T1-weighted sequences, and low signal in the calcification on both sequences. In addition, three patients had high signal intensity changes on STIR sequences in the atlantoaxial joint situated posterior to the anterior arc of C1. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive and accurate method in the diagnosis of retropharyngeal tendinitis. A new finding in this condition is an effusion or synovitis in the anterior atlantoaxial joint. MRI is a valuable tool in differentiating retropharyngeal tendinitis from other diagnoses such as retropharyngeal abscess, pyogenic spondylitis, and spondyloarthropathy.

  14. Diagnostic failure of ciprofloxacin-induced spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon rupture: case-report and medical-legal considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantalone, A; Abate, M; D'Ovidio, C; Carnevale, A; Salini, V

    2011-01-01

    Rare side-effects of fluoroquinolone therapy are tendinitis and tendon rupture. Many reports have demonstrated that the concomitant use of corticosteroids, in patients aged 60 years or older, increase the risk substantially. We present a case of spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon rupture induced by ciprofloxacin and methylprednisolone. A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with Bronchiolitis Obliterans with Organizing Pneumonia (BOOP) and was started on oral ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily for 3 weeks and on oral methylprednisolone 16 mg twice daily for 2 weeks. The diagnosis was made after doctors, rather than stop drug therapy and advise complete rest, had mistakenly prescribed for the woman to undergo physiotherapy and local NSAIDs, thus favoring the onset of tendon ruptures and resulting in surgical and legal implications. Inspired by this case, we also submit a brief review on professional liability in Orthopaedics.

  15. Motor responses to experimental Achilles tendon pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    of the exercise are affected by Achilles tendon pain. Objective The authors aimed to determine the effects of experimental Achilles tendon pain on motor function during one-legged weight bearing ankle plantar and dorsal flexion exercises. Methods In a crossover study, with 16 healthy subjects tested on two...... before, during and after either experimental Achilles tendon pain or a non-painful control condition. Pain was induced by intratendinous injections of hypertonic saline with isotonic saline injections as control. Joint kinematics, ground reaction force frequency contents and average EMG amplitudes were...... calculated. Results Compared with the control condition experimental Achilles tendon pain reduced the EMG activity in agonistic, synergistic and antagonistic muscles, and increased the ground reaction force frequency content around 10 Hz, during both eccentric and concentric movement phases. Conclusions...

  16. Discriminant validity study of Achilles enthesis ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expósito Molinero, María Rosa; de Miguel Mendieta, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    We want to know if the ultrasound examination of the Achilles tendon in spondyloarthritis is different compared to other rheumatic diseases. We studied 97 patients divided into five groups: rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, gout, chondrocalcinosis and osteoarthritis, exploring six elementary lesions in 194 Achilles entheses examined. In our study the total index ultrasonographic Achilles is higher in spondyloarthritis with significant differences. The worst elementary spondyloarthritis lesions for discriminations against other pathologies were calcification. This study aims to demonstrate the discriminant validity of Achilles enthesitis observed by ultrasound in spondyloarthritis compared with other rheumatic diseases that may also have ultrasound abnormalities such enthesis level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with focal umeral osteolysis. Imaging features

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Mascarenhas; F. Morais; H. Marques; Guerra, A.; E. Carpinteiro; Gaspar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. The authors report two cases of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, and MR findings. The importance of considering this d...

  18. Acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis: a case report with unusual location of calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Young; Jin, Wook; Yang, Dal Mo [East-West Neo-Medical Center, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Sang Hun [East-West Neo Medical Center, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is an inflammatory process caused by calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition in the longus colli tendon of the prevertebral space, and it may mimic a retropharyngeal infection or abscess. The diagnosis of retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis will be made radiologically by the detection of calcifications anterior to C1-C3 and prevertebral soft tissue swelling. We present a case of acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis with an unusual location of calcification anterior to the C5-C6 disc. (orig.)

  19. Inflammation of vertebral bone associated with acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihmanli, I.; Kanberoglu, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Istanbul Univ. (Turkey); Karaarslan, E. [Intermed Medical Center, Nisantasi, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2001-12-01

    We present a case of acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis with characteristic findings on radiographic, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To our knowledge, this is the first acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis report having inflammation of both the vertebra itself and the longus colli muscle diagnosed on MRI. In patients with neck pain, acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis, even if these patients had vertebral pathological signals on MRI. (orig.)

  20. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with focal umeral osteolysis. Imaging features

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Mascarenhas; Morais,F.; H. Marques; Guerra, A.; E. Carpinteiro; Gaspar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. The authors report two cases of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, and MR findings. The importance of considering this d...

  1. Arthroscopic treatment of chronically painful calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Xu; Feng, Yong; Chen, Guangxing; Liu YANG

    2013-01-01

    Background Relatively large calcific tendinitis with persistent symptoms after extended periods of conservative treatment is an indication for operative therapy. Arthroscopy, as a treatment for calcific tendinitis of the hip abductors and calcinosis circumscripta, has been described previously; however, to our knowledge, the clinical and radiological response to arthroscopic removal of calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris tendon has not. Methods We present arthroscopic treatment of unusu...

  2. Quantitative Diagnostic Method for Biceps Long Head Tendinitis by Using Ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Shih-Wei Huang; Wei-Te Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the feasibility of grayscale quantitative diagnostic method for biceps tendinitis and determine the cut-off points of a quantitative biceps ultrasound (US) method to diagnose biceps tendinitis. Design. Prospective cross-sectional case controlled study. Setting. Outpatient rehabilitation service. Methods. A total of 336 shoulder pain patients with suspected biceps tendinitis were recruited in this prospective observational study. The grayscale pixel data of the range ...

  3. Biceps tendinitis as a cause of acute painful knee after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandher, Dilbans Singh; Boparai, Randhir Singh; Kapila, Rajesh

    2009-12-01

    The case report highlights an unusual case of posterolateral knee pain after total knee arthroplasty. Tendinitis of the patellar tendon or pes anserinus is a common complication after total knee arthroplasty; however, there is no report in the literature regarding the biceps femoris tendinitis causing acute pain in the early postoperative period. In this case, the biceps tendinitis was diagnosed and treated by ultrasound-guided injection into the tendon sheath.

  4. Eccentric exercise in treatment of Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Larsen, C C; Bieler, T

    2007-01-01

    Prognosis and treatment of Achilles tendon pain (achillodynia) has been insufficiently studied. The purpose of the present study was to examine the long-term effect of eccentric exercises compared with stretching exercises on patients with achillodynia.......Prognosis and treatment of Achilles tendon pain (achillodynia) has been insufficiently studied. The purpose of the present study was to examine the long-term effect of eccentric exercises compared with stretching exercises on patients with achillodynia....

  5. Complications of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder: a concise review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolla, Giovanni; Bhat, Mahendar G; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Calcific tendinitis (CT) of the rotator cuff (RC) muscles in the shoulder is a disorder which remains asymptomatic in a majority of patients. Once manifested, it can present in different ways which can have negative effects both socially and professionally for the patient. The treatment modalities can be either conservative or surgical. There is poor literature evidence on the complications of this condition with little consensus on the treatment of choice. In this review, the literature was extensively searched in order to study and compile together the complications of CT of the shoulder and present it in a clear form to ease the understanding for all the professionals involved in the management of this disorder. Essentially there are five major complications of CT: pain, adhesive capsulitis, RC tears, greater tuberosity osteolysis and ossifying tendinitis. All the above complications have been explained right from their origin to the control measures required for the relief of the patient. 5.

  6. Isolated popliteus rupture at the musculo-tendinous junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, John F; Webb, Sandra; McDonald, Karl; Meikle, Grant; McMahon, Simon F

    2011-06-01

    We report the case of a 23-year-old professional senior international rugby union player who sustained a lateral blow to his semiflexed knee during a competitive game. Initial clinical examination was unremarkable apart from some posterolateral tenderness. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed an isolated popliteus tendon rupture at the musculo-tendinous junction. After 5 weeks of focused rehabilitation and graduated training, he was able to resume his playing career and resumed his international playing career later that season. At the time of reporting, he has completed a full domestic and international season without any sequelae from the injury. This report highlights the rarity of such an injury, especially at the musculo-tendinous junction, and sets out a detailed rehabilitation program that has enabled the patient in question to resume his playing career.

  7. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with focal umeral osteolysis. Imaging features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Mascarenhas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. The authors report two cases of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed.

  8. Rocker shoes reduce Achilles tendon load in running and walking in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Postema, Klaas; Dekker, Rienk; Hijmans, Juha M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Relative rest and pain relief play an important role in the management of Achilles tendinopathy, and might be achieved by reducing the load on the Achilles tendon. Previous studies have provided evidence that rocker shoes are able to decrease the ankle internal plantar flexion moment in

  9. Significance of density and demarcation of calcifications in calcifying tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhthoff, H.K.; Sarkar, K.; Hammond, I.

    1982-04-01

    Calcification of tendons can be either degenerative and progressive in nature or reactive and selfhealing. Radiologic examinations permit to distinguish between both kinds. The reactive calcification, known also as calcifying tendinitis, passes through two main phases, the formative and the resorptive phase. Since treatment is different for each phase, their roentgenologic distinction is important. Dense, well demarcated and homogenous calcifications indicate the presence of a formative phase whereas less dense, ill defined and fluffy deposits point toward an ongoing resorption.

  10. MRI of normal achilles tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollandi, G.A. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Bertolotto, M. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Perrone, R. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Garlaschi, G. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Derchi, L.E. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    1995-12-01

    To investigate the normal internal structure of tendons 11 volunteers without clinical evidence of tendinopathy were examined using conventional spin-echo T1-, T2- and proton-density weighted sequences. The Achilles tendon was chosen because of its high frequency of injury in athletic activity, large size, superficial position and because it is oriented nearly parallel to the static magnetic field, therefore minimizing the ``magic angle phenomenon``. The tendons exhibited areas of slighly increased signal in four T1-weighted and in all but one proton-density-weighted scans. No intratendinous signal was detected in T2-weighted images. The possible origin of these findings is discussed. We conclude that the knowledge of these normal signals may be useful to avoid incorrectly diagnosing as pathological. (orig.). With 2 figs.

  11. Sonographic Findings of Calcific Tendinitis around the Hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Seok; Lee, Young Hwan; Sung, Nak Kwan; Jung, Kyung Jae; Park, Young Chan; Kim, Ho Kyun [Catholic University of Daegu, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Jeong; Lee, Sung Moon; Cho, Kil Ho [Keimyung University, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kyung Jin [Dankook University, College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    To evaluate the sonographic findings of calcific tendinitis around the hip. Ten patients (7 women and 3 men: mean age, 42 years: age range, 34-52 years) with a diagnosis of calcific tendinitis around the hip were evaluated. All the patients underwent radiography and sonography (color Doppler sonography in 6 patients). The sonographic findings were analyzed to determine the level of tendon thickening compared with the contralateral side as well as the shape and posterior acoustic shadowing of the calcification, and vascularity on color Doppler sonography. In all cases, sonography showed a thickening of the tendon compared with the contralateral normal tendon as well as hyperechoic calcific shadows within the thickened tendon. Intratendinous calcifications were mainly observed as a homogeneous ovoid hyperechoic shadow with or without acoustic shadowing. Color Doppler sonography showed increased vascularity within or around the thickened tendon in four of the six patients. Sonography is effective in detecting a thickening of the tendon as well as intratendinous calcification, and can be used to diagnose calcific tendinitis around the hip

  12. Clinical signs and anatomical correlation of patellar tendinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rath Ehud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellar tendinitis is one of the several differential diagnosis of anterior knee pain. The clinical diagnosis of patellar tendinitis is based on tenderness to palpation at the inferior pole of the patella. The tenderness has been noted to be maximal when the knee is extended and the quadriceps relaxed, but a definite clinical sign for diagnosis is lacking. The accuracy of two clinical signs was assesed by a two-stage study which included physical examination, MRI and a cadaveric study. Materials and Methods: Two clinical signs, the "passive flexion-extension sign" and the "standing active quadriceps sign" were assessed in 10 consecutive patients with presumed patellar tendinitis. Five patients had an MRI, showed focal abnormality in the tendon. The location of the MRI finding corresponded, to the region of maximal tenderness. A cadaveric dissection was undertaken to describe the anatomy of the patella and the patellar tendon during these tests. Results: Both tests showed a significant decrease in tenderness at the area of inflammation when the patellar tendon was under tension. The cadaveric dissection showed that when the knee is flexed to 90΀ or when the quadriceps is tensioned the deep fibers of the tendon do not deform to anteriorly applied pressure. Conclusion: We suggest using these studies routinely in the evaluation of patients with anterior knee pain.

  13. Upper limb tendinitis and entrapment neuropathy in coal miners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdolap, Senay; Emre, Ufuk; Karamercan, Ayşe; Sarikaya, Selda; Köktürk, Fürüzan

    2013-05-01

    It is well-known that work-related upper limb musculoskeletal disorders, particularly tendinitis and nerve entrapment, remain a difficult and costly problem in industrialized countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate tendinitis and entrapment neuropathy of the upper limb of Turkish coal miners. Eighty coal miners and 43 age-matched clerical workers were included in the study. The evaluation procedures included collection of personal and clinical data, physical examination and bilateral electrodiagnostic testing. Subjects were examined to diagnose tendinitis and nerve entrapment of the upper limb. Bilateral median and ulnar nerves conduction tests were performed on all subjects. Data were collected between August 2011 and December 2011. There were 33 subjects with lateral epicondylitis, 10 with medial epicondylitis, and 22 with De Quervain's disease among the coal miners. There were seven subjects with lateral epicondylitis, eight with medial epicondylitis, and four with De Quervain's disease in the control group. The two groups significantly differed in the prevalences of lateral epicondylitis and De Quervain's disease (P = 0.024 and P =0.029, respectively). Sixteen subjects in the coal miners and 12 subjects in the controls had carpal tunnel syndrome (P = 0.66). Thirty-seven subjects in the coal miners had ulnar neuropathy of the elbow (UNE), while four subjects in the controls had UNE; this difference was statistically significant (P Quervain disease, and ulnar neuropathy are common work-related upper limb disorders among coal miners. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Achilles tendinosis: Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mos, M. de; El, B. van; Groot, J. de; Jahr, H.; Schie, H.T.M. van; Arkel, E.R. van; Tol, H.; Heijboer, R.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Verhaar, J.A.N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design: Descript

  15. Achilles tendinosis - Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mos, Marieke; van El, Benno; DeGroot, Jeroen; Jahr, Holger; van Schie, Hans T. M.; van Arkel, Ewoud R.; Tol, Hans; Heijboer, Rien; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; Verhaar, Jan A. N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design: Descript

  16. Achilles tendinosis: Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mos, M. de; El, B. van; Groot, J. de; Jahr, H.; Schie, H.T.M. van; Arkel, E.R. van; Tol, H.; Heijboer, R.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Verhaar, J.A.N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design:

  17. Achilles tendinosis - Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mos, Marieke; van El, Benno; DeGroot, Jeroen; Jahr, Holger; van Schie, Hans T. M.; van Arkel, Ewoud R.; Tol, Hans; Heijboer, Rien; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; Verhaar, Jan A. N.

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design:

  18. Achilles tendinosis - Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mos, Marieke; van El, Benno; DeGroot, Jeroen; Jahr, Holger; van Schie, Hans T. M.; van Arkel, Ewoud R.; Tol, Hans; Heijboer, Rien; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; Verhaar, Jan A. N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design: Descript

  19. Achilles tendinosis: Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mos, M. de; El, B. van; Groot, J. de; Jahr, H.; Schie, H.T.M. van; Arkel, E.R. van; Tol, H.; Heijboer, R.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Verhaar, J.A.N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design: Descript

  20. Finite Element Analysis of the Achilles Tendon While Running

    OpenAIRE

    Anițaș Răzvan; Lucaciu Do

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The Achilles tendon is the most frequent recipient of traumatic injuries. The aim of this study is to identify and describe the varying load at ankle level and especially at the Achilles tendon’s insertion on the calcaneus.

  1. Retropharyngeal tendinitis may be more common than we think: a report on 45 cases seen in Danish chiropractic clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Carsten; Salomonsen, Mette; Gelineck, John;

    2009-01-01

    This study presents information from 45 cases of retropharyngeal tendinitis that were collected in Danish chiropractic clinics.......This study presents information from 45 cases of retropharyngeal tendinitis that were collected in Danish chiropractic clinics....

  2. TREATMENT OF OLD ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Koryshkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1998 to 2010 32 patients (14 men, 18 women, aged 15-65 years, underwent surgical treatment for old Achilles tendon rupture. In all cases correct diagnosis was made not earlier than 1 month after injury. The importance of clinical Thompson test and sonographic examination for diagnosis of Achilles tendon rupture is underlined. For the restoration of Achilles tendon V-Y plasty was used. Surgery was performed in a period of 1 to 13 months in patients with subcutaneous Achilles tendon ruptures. Follow-up results of patients in the postoperative period ranged from 6 months to 10 years (mean follow-up 1 year 7 months. Date of observation in the postoperative period ranged from 6 months to 19 years. Marginal necrosis wound occurred in 3 (10% patients, re-rupture of the Achilles tendon to tendon suture zone - in one patient, even in one patient on day 14 became infected. Violations of the foot innervation were no detected.

  3. Analysis of the effect of phototherapy in model with traumatic Achilles tendon injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalechi, Heliodora Leão; de Farias Marques, Anna Cristina; da Silva, Evela Aparecida Pereira; Aimbire, Flávio; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo A B; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camilo; Albertini, Regiane

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-intensity laser (LILT) infrared (830 nm) therapy in tendon inflammation, tendinitis induced by mechanical trauma in rat Achilles tendon. For this, we used 65 young male Wistar rats, weighing ± 300 g divided into different groups: C = control (n = 5) and experimental (n = 10/group), with two different times of sacrifice such as treated with L = laser, D = treated with diclofenac, and T = untreated injured. The tendon inflammation was induced by controlled contusion in the medial region of the Achilles tendon of the animals. The treated groups received some kind of intervention every 24 h, all groups were sacrificed on the 7th or 14th day after the trauma. The tendons were dissected, extracted, and sent for analysis. Histological analysis of the L group showed a decrease in the number of inflammatory cells in relation to other groups in both periods studied. The comparative results between the number of inflammatory cells in the control and treated groups at 7 and 14 days showed statistically significant differences. Qualitative analysis findings obtained by the picrosirius red technique under polarized light showed that in 7 days, the T group presented collagen types I and III in the same proportion; group D presented a predominance of type III fibers, while in group L, type I collagen predominated. The 14-day group D showed collagen types I and III in the same proportion, while in group L, there was a predominance of type I fibers. Biomechanical analysis showed that 7-day groups L and C showed similar stiffness and increased breaking strength. The 14-day groups L and C showed greater rupturing strength as well as increased stiffness angle. Group D showed a decrease of maximum traction strength and degree of rigidity. It was concluded that treatment with LIL in the parameters used and the times studied reduces migration of inflammatory cells and improves the quality of repair while reducing the functional

  4. Assessment of Postoperative Tendon Quality in Patients With Achilles Tendon Rupture Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Tendon Fiber Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarman, Hakan; Atmaca, Halil; Cakir, Ozgur; Muezzinoglu, Umit Sefa; Anik, Yonca; Memisoglu, Kaya; Baran, Tuncay; Isik, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Although pre- and postoperative imaging of Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) has been well documented, radiographic evaluations of postoperative intratendinous healing and microstructure are still lacking. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an innovative technique that offers a noninvasive method for describing the microstructure characteristics and organization of tissues. DTI was used in the present study for quantitative assessment of fiber continuity postoperatively in patients with acute ATR. The data from 16 patients with ATR from 2005 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The microstructure of ART was evaluated using tendon fiber tracking, tendon continuity, fractional anisotropy, and apparent diffusion coefficient values by way of DTI. The distal and proximal portions were measured separately in both the ruptured and the healthy extremities of each patient. The mean patient age was 41.56 ± 8.49 (range 26 to 56) years. The median duration of follow-up was 21 (range 6 to 80) months. The tendon fractional anisotropy values of the ruptured Achilles tendon were significantly lower statistically than those of the normal side (p = .001). However, none of the differences between the 2 groups with respect to the distal and proximal apparent diffusion coefficient were statistically significant (p = .358 and p = .899, respectively). In addition, the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient measurements were not significantly different in the proximal and distal regions of the ruptured tendons compared with the healthy tendons. The present study used DTI and fiber tracking to demonstrate the radiologic properties of postoperative Achilles tendons with respect to trajectory and tendinous fiber continuity. Quantifying DTI and fiber tractography offers an innovative and effective tool that might be able to detect microstructural abnormalities not appreciable using conventional radiologic techniques. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle

  5. Arthroscopic treatment of chronically painful calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xu; Feng, Yong; Chen, Guangxing; Yang, Liu

    2013-11-23

    Relatively large calcific tendinitis with persistent symptoms after extended periods of conservative treatment is an indication for operative therapy. Arthroscopy, as a treatment for calcific tendinitis of the hip abductors and calcinosis circumscripta, has been described previously; however, to our knowledge, the clinical and radiological response to arthroscopic removal of calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris tendon has not. We present arthroscopic treatment of unusual calcific tendonitis of the origin of the rectus femoris and associated intra-articular lesions in 3 patients with chronic coxa pain. Our cases show that hip arthroscopy is an effective therapeutic modality for calcific tendinitis of the hip joint with satisfactory short-term outcomes. Calcific tendinitis, although an uncommon clinical entity, should be a part of the differential diagnosis of acute or chronic hip pain.

  6. Achilles tendon rupture in atypical patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a significant injury, and the likelihood of a good recovery is directly associated with early diagnosis and appropriate referral. Such injuries are commonly assessed and identified by practitioners working in 'minors' areas of emergency departments or urgent care settings. The literature frequently describes rupture of the Achilles tendon as 'typically sport-related' affecting 'middle-aged weekend warriors', but this aetiology accounts for only about 70% of such injuries. Factors such as the natural ageing process, obesity and use of some commonly prescribed medications, can increase the risk of developing a tendinopathy and subsequent rupture, often from a seemingly insignificant incident. However, research suggests that injuries in this patient population are more likely be missed on first examination. This article describes risk factors that should alert clinicians to the possibility of Achilles tendon rupture in 'atypical' patient populations.

  7. Achilles and Patellar Tendinopathy Loading Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malliaras, Peter; Barton, Christian J; Reeves, Neil D;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Achilles and patellar tendinopathy are overuse injuries that are common among athletes. Isolated eccentric muscle training has become the dominant conservative management strategy for Achilles and patellar tendinopathy but, in some cases, up to 45 % of patients may not respond....... Eccentric-concentric progressing to eccentric (Silbernagel combined) and eccentric-concentric isotonic (heavy-slow resistance; HSR) loading have also been investigated. In order for clinicians to make informed decisions, they need to be aware of the loading options and comparative evidence. The mechanisms...... of loading also need to be elucidated in order to focus treatment to patient deficits and refine loading programmes in future studies. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this review are to evaluate the evidence in studies that compare two or more loading programmes in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy...

  8. Achilles Vivacqua: vida e obra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina de Carvalho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo trata de um projeto de inventariação e organização de fundos de escritor, que resultou do recebimento da doação, no Acervo de Escritores Mineiros da UFMG, de documentos de Achilles Vivacqua. A partir da análise dos documentos, descobriu-se o escritor, sua escrita e a contribuição de sua arte para o cenário literário mineiro. O aparato teórico utilizado se baseou em obras teórico-críticas sobre o modernismo e a literatura produzida em Minas, fortuna crítica sobre o autor, e estudos sobre a arquivística de estudiosos como Haydée Coelho, Reinaldo Marques e outros que refletem sobre pesquisas em fontes primárias. Por meio das escavações, constatamos que Vivacqua teve, em sua época, relevância para o cenário cultural do Brasil, tendo participado do movimento modernista mineiro. Outra conclusão a que chegamos é que muito se pode apreender sobre um escritor e seu projeto literário, o que reforça o valor da pesquisa em arquivos.

  9. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Jutta [Bethanien Krankenhaus, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Luboldt, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Wolfram; Jacobi, Volkmar; Herzog, Christopher; Vogl, Thomas J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    To investigate clinical (pain, mobility) and radiological (resolution of calcium deposits) efficacy of different energy levels of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. There were 90 study subjects with radiographically verified calcific tendinitis of one shoulder, mean age 52{+-}6 years (range 29 - 65 years; females:males=55:35), all of whom had had symptoms for at least 6 months and substantial restriction of shoulder mobility and pain that required taking anti-inflammatory drugs. Calcium deposits were of type I or type II (clearly circumscribed and dense) and ranged from 1 cm to 3 cm in diameter. Subjects were divided into three groups to receive ESWT at one of two energy levels (E{sub 1}=0.15 mJ/mm{sup 2}, E{sub 2}=0.44 mJ/mm{sup 2}) or sham treatment. Treatment was given at 6 weekly intervals until symptoms resolved, five treatments had been given or the subject dropped out of the programme. All subjects in groups E{sub 1} and E{sub 2} completed the programme. Those in group E{sub 1} had significantly less pain during treatment but more treatments than those in group E{sub 2}, and at 6 month follow-up had residual calcification and recurrence of pain (87%). Subjects in group E{sub 2} had no residual calcification or recurrence of pain. Sham treatment had no effect. There were no side effects except a small number of haematomas (2 in E{sub 1}, 6 in E{sub 2}; maximum size 2 cm). ESWT in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder is very effective. It does not have significant side effects at an energy level of E=0.44 mJ/mm{sup 2}, which can therefore be recommended. (orig.)

  10. Achilles tendon rupture; assessment of nonoperative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2014-04-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent and potentially disabling injury. Over the past decade a change in treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture away from operative towards non-operative treatment has taken place. However, the optimal non-operative treatment protocol remains to be clarified, particularly the role of weight-bearing during early rehabilitation. Also, there is a need for a clinically applicable and accurate measurement to detect patients in risk of developing Achilles tendon elongation. The aim of this PhD thesis was to evaluate non-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. In study I, a cross-sectional survey was performed investigating the chosen treatment protocols across Scandinavia. In study II, the effect of immediate weight-bearing on patient reported and functional outcomes was investigated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). In study III, the effect of immediate weight-bearing on the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex was investigated in an RCT. In study IV, validity, reliability and agreement of a novel ultrasound measurement of Achilles tendon length and elongation was tested. Study I found surgery to be the preferred treatment in 83% of departments in Denmark, 92% in Norway, 65% in Sweden, and 30% in Finland (p tendon complex. Study IV showed excellent intra-rater reliability (ICC 0.96, SEM 3.7 mm and MDC 10.3 mm), inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.97, SEM 3.3 mm and MDC 9.3 mm) and validity (measurement error 2%). Treatment algorithms across Scandinavia showed considerable variation, though operative treatment and controlled early weight-bearing was the preferred treatment in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Immediate weight-bearing was found to be safe and recommendable in non-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. The novel ultrasound measurement showed excellent reliability and acceptable validity and agreement.

  11. Tendinitis postquirúrgicas alrededor de la rodilla

    OpenAIRE

    ROSATO, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Las tendinitis son inflamaciones agudas de las estructuras tendinosas, frecuentes en distintas prácticas deportivas pero que también pueden desencadenarse en los procesos de rehabilitación postquirúrgicos,enlenteciendo la correcta evolución del mismo tanto en el tiempo como en el confort del paciente. Alrededor de la rodilla existen estructuras musculotendinosas con funciones biomecánicas muy complejas, que en muchas ocasiones dependen de la posición y la funcionalidad de la cadera y que a la...

  12. The Risk of Achilles Tendon Rupture in the Patients with Achilles Tendinopathy: Healthcare Database Analysis in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Yasui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Disorders of the Achilles tendon can be broadly classified into acute and chronic entities. Few studies have established chronic Achilles tendinopathy as a precursor to acute Achilles ruptures. In this study, we assessed the relationship between Achilles tendinopathy and rupture, clarifying the incidence of rupture in the setting of underlying tendinopathy. Methods. The United Healthcare Orthopedic Dataset from the PearlDiver Patient Record Database was used to identify patients with ICD-9 codes for Achilles rupture and/or Achilles tendinopathy. The number of patients with acute rupture, chronic tendinopathy, and rupture following a prior diagnosis of tendinopathy was assessed. Results. Four percent of patients with an underlying diagnosis of Achilles tendinopathy went on to sustain a rupture (7,232 patients. Older patients with tendinopathy were most vulnerable to subsequent rupture. Conclusions. The current study demonstrates that 4.0% of patients who were previously diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy sustained an Achilles tendon rupture. Additionally, older patients with Achilles tendinopathy were most vulnerable. These findings are important as they can help clinicians more objectively council patients with Achilles tendinopathy.

  13. The Risk of Achilles Tendon Rupture in the Patients with Achilles Tendinopathy: Healthcare Database Analysis in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimozono, Yoshiharu; Kawano, Hirotaka

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Disorders of the Achilles tendon can be broadly classified into acute and chronic entities. Few studies have established chronic Achilles tendinopathy as a precursor to acute Achilles ruptures. In this study, we assessed the relationship between Achilles tendinopathy and rupture, clarifying the incidence of rupture in the setting of underlying tendinopathy. Methods. The United Healthcare Orthopedic Dataset from the PearlDiver Patient Record Database was used to identify patients with ICD-9 codes for Achilles rupture and/or Achilles tendinopathy. The number of patients with acute rupture, chronic tendinopathy, and rupture following a prior diagnosis of tendinopathy was assessed. Results. Four percent of patients with an underlying diagnosis of Achilles tendinopathy went on to sustain a rupture (7,232 patients). Older patients with tendinopathy were most vulnerable to subsequent rupture. Conclusions. The current study demonstrates that 4.0% of patients who were previously diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy sustained an Achilles tendon rupture. Additionally, older patients with Achilles tendinopathy were most vulnerable. These findings are important as they can help clinicians more objectively council patients with Achilles tendinopathy. PMID:28540301

  14. Analysis of experimental tendinitis in rats treated with laser and platelet-rich plasma therapies by Raman spectroscopy and histometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Paula Kariluce; Silveira, Landulfo; Barbosa, Danillo; Munin, Egberto; Salgado, Miguel Angel Castillo; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this controlled experimental study was to analyze the changes in the Achilles tendons of rats with experimentally induced tendinitis after treatment with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and/or laser therapies by histometry to quantify fibroblasts and by Raman spectroscopy to determine the biochemical concentration of collagen types I and III. Fifty-four male Wistar rats were divided into six treatment groups: control (G1); PRP only (G2); irradiation with 660 nm laser (G3); irradiation with 830 nm laser (G4); PRP plus 660 nm laser irradiation (G5); and PRP plus 830 nm laser irradiation (G6). Injuries (partial tenotomy) were inflicted in the middle third of the Achilles tendon, with PRP added prior to suture in the appropriate experimental groups. A diode laser (model Laser Flash® III, DMC Equipamentos Ltda, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) that can be operated in two wavelengths 660 and 830 nm was used for irradiation treatments. The irradiation protocol was energy density of 70 J/cm², 20 s irradiation time, and 0.028 cm² spot area, per point in three points in the injured. The histometry was made in micrographical images of the H&E stained sections and evaluated by ImageJ (version 1.46r)®. Raman spectra were collected using a dispersive spectrometer at 830 nm excitation, 200 mW power, and 10 s integration time (P-1 Raman system, Lambda Solutions, Inc. MA, USA). The relative amount of type I collagen was significantly greater in the PRP plus 830 nm laser irradiation group (468 ± 188) than in the control (147 ± 137), 630 nm laser only (191 ± 117), and 830 nm laser only (196 ± 106) groups (p < 0.01), while the quantity of type III collagen was significantly greater in the PRP-only group compared to both irradiated groups without PRP (p < 0.05). Treatment with PRP combined with irradiation at 830 nm resulted in a larger number of fibroblasts and increased concentration of type I collagen, thus accelerating the healing of the injured

  15. Effects of boric acid on the healing of Achilles tendons of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymaz, Burak; Gölge, Umut Hatay; Ozyalvaclı, Gulzade; Kömürcü, Erkam; Goksel, Ferdi; Mermerkaya, Musa Ugur; Doral, Mahmut Nedim

    2016-12-01

    Tendinous lesions are among the most frequent pathologies encountered in sportsmen. The objectives of new treatments are to improve the healing process and reduce the recovery time. Boron plays an important role in the wound repair process by increasing components of extracellular matrix and angiogenesis. This animal study aimed to investigate the effect of boric acid on healing of the Achilles tendon. The right Achilles tendons of 40 rats were completely sectioned, and the rats were randomly divided into five groups. Each group consisted of eight rats. Groups 1 and 2 were oral boric acid groups with the doses of 4 and 8 mg/kg/day boric acid, respectively. Group 3 was the local boric acid group (8 mg/kg boric acid intratendinous injection). Group 4 was administered both oral and local boric acid (8 mg/kg/day orally and 8 mg/kg boric acid intratendinous injection), and group 5 was the control group with no boric acid application. At the end of the fourth week, all the rats were killed and histopathological examination of the Achilles tendon repair site was made. Histopathological examination of the tissue sections revealed more properly oriented collagen fibres, more normal cellular distribution of tenocytes and more properly organized vascular bundles in group 1 and group 2, which were the groups administered oral boric acid. Pathological sum scores of groups 1 and 2 were less than those of the other groups, and the differences between the oral boric acid groups (group 1 and group 2) and the other three groups (groups 3, 4 and 5) were statistically significant (p = 0.001). As boric acid is safe and toxicity even after very high doses is unusual, oral boric acid may be used as an agent to improve the healing process of tendon injuries. However, biomechanical tests should also be performed to show the effect of boric acid on strength and endurance of the tendon before it can be used in clinical practice.

  16. Shoulder function after extracorporal shock wave therapy for calcific tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompe, J D; Bürger, R; Hopf, C; Eysel, P

    1998-01-01

    We report a controlled, prospective study that explored the effect of extracorporal shock waves of low- versus high-energy density in patients with chronic shoulder pain and calcific tendinitis. We assigned at random 100 patients who had had calcific tendinitis for more than 12 months to 2 groups to receive shock wave therapy either of a low- or high-energy density. Group 1 received 1500 impulses of 0.06 mJ/mm2, whereas group 2 received 1500 impulses of 0.28 mJ/mm2. Unlike group 1, in which the shock wave application could be performed without local anesthesia, all patients in group 2 required brachial plexus anesthesia. The patients were reviewed at 6 and 24 weeks. Partial or complete disintegration of the calcareous deposit was observed in 50% of the patients in group 1 and 64% of the patients in group 2 (P < .01). According to the Constant score, ratings increased from 48 to 71 points in group 1 (P < .001) and from 53 to 88 in group 2 (P < .001) (out of a total possible 100 points), the end values of both groups differing significantly (P < .01). After 24 weeks, 52% of the patients in group 1 rated the results of treatment as good or excellent, compared with 68% in group 2 (P < .01). No improvement was reported by 24% versus 10%, respectively, at the 24-week follow-up.

  17. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chin-Jung; Wang, Der-Yean; Tseng, Kuo-Fung; Fong, Yi-Chin; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Jim, Yick-Fung

    2008-01-01

    We prospectively studied extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for calcific tendinitis of the shoulder in 46 consecutive patients. All patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: treatment and control. The 33 patients in the treatment group received 2 courses of ESWT at the energy density of 0.55 mJ/mm(2) (1000 impulses). The control group underwent sham treatment with a dummy electrode (13 patients). Evaluation included the Constant score, pain scale, and radiographs. The ESWT results were good to excellent in 87.9% of shoulders (29/33) and fair in 12.1% (4/33), and the control results were fair in 69.2% (9/13) and poor in 30.1% (4/13). Among ESWT patients, calcium deposits were completely eliminated in 7 cases (21.2%), partially eliminated in 11 (36.3%), and unchanged in 15 (45.4%). In contrast, elimination was partial in 2 control patients (15.3%) and unchanged in 11 (84.7%). There was no significant difference between Gärtner type I and type II groups in the Constant score (P > .05). ESWT shows promise for pain relief and functional restoration of calcific tendinitis with negligible complications.

  18. ANATOMICAL VARIATION OF PALMARIS LONGUS: TENDINOUS ORIGIN AND FLESHY INSERTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhadeb Ghosh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A tendinous origin and fleshy insertion of palmaris longus muscle was observed in the left forearm during routine dissection which was performed on adult male cadaver in the department of Anatomy, Dr. Rajendra Prasad Government Medical College. It was having long tendinous origin from the medial epicondyle of the humerus and the surrounding deep fascia. It was fusiform at the lower middle of the forearm. The fleshy muscular insertion was noted to the flexor retinaculum and few muscular fibers interdigitate with flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and palmar aponeurosis. The length of tendon was 19 inches and fleshy muscular length was 11inches. The median nerve and ulnar nerve was covered by this fleshy insertion. This palmaris longus variation is helpful for the surgeon and the radiologist, orthopaedic, plastic surgeon during any diagnosis of the forearm because this fleshy part of muscle can compress the median nerve and ulnar nerve or it can be mistaken as a tumor or ganglion during radiological or clinical examination.

  19. Quantitative diagnostic method for biceps long head tendinitis by using ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of grayscale quantitative diagnostic method for biceps tendinitis and determine the cut-off points of a quantitative biceps ultrasound (US) method to diagnose biceps tendinitis. Design. Prospective cross-sectional case controlled study. Outpatient rehabilitation service. A total of 336 shoulder pain patients with suspected biceps tendinitis were recruited in this prospective observational study. The grayscale pixel data of the range of interest (ROI) were obtained for both the transverse and longitudinal views of the biceps US. A total of 136 patients were classified with biceps tendinitis, and 200 patients were classified as not having biceps tendinitis based on the diagnostic criteria. Based on the Youden index, the cut-off points were determined as 26.85 for the transverse view and 21.25 for the longitudinal view of the standard deviation (StdDev) of the ROI values, respectively. When the ROI evaluation of the US surpassed the cut-off point, the sensitivity was 68% and the specificity was 90% in the StdDev of the transverse view, and the sensitivity was 81% and the specificity was 73% in the StdDev of the longitudinal view to diagnose biceps tendinitis. For equivocal cases or inexperienced sonographers, our study provides a more objective method for diagnosing biceps tendinitis in shoulder pain patients.

  20. Rupture of Achilles Tendon : Usefulness of Ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Hyeon; Ki, Won Woo; Yoon, Kwon Ha; Kim, Song Mun; Shin, Myeong Jin [Ulsan Medical College, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon Tae [Chungnam University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-15

    To differentiate a complete rupture of Achilles tendon from an incomplete one which is important because its treatment is quite different. And it is necessary to know the exact site of the rupture preoperatively. Fifteen cases of fourteen patients which were diagnosed as Achilles tendon rupture by ultrasonography and surgery were reviewed. We compared sonographic rupture site with surgical findings. Ultrasonographic criteria for differentiation of complete and incomplete rupture was defined as follows : the discreteness, which means the proximal intervening hypoechogenicity to the interface echogenicity of distal margin of ruptured tendon : the slant sign, which represents the interface of ruptured distal margin which was seen over the 3/4 of the thickness of the tendon without intervening low echogeneicity : the invagination sign, which means the echogenic invagination from Kager triangle into posterior aspect of Achilles tendon over the half thickness of the tendon. The sites of complete tendon rupture were exactly corresponded to surgical finding in four cases of ten complete ruptures. And the discrepancy between sonographic and surgical findings in the site of complete rupture was 1.2 {+-} 0.4 cm in six cases. Three of ten complete ruptures showed the discreteness sign, all of ten showed the slant sign and two of ten showed the invagination sign. It is helpful to differentiate a complete from incomplete rupture of the Achilles tendon and to localize the site of the complete rupture with the ultrasonographic evaluation

  1. Acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor pollicis longus in an 8-year-old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheterpal, Arvin; Zoga, Adam; McClure, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a common source of musculoskeletal pain in adults; however, it is rarely encountered in children. Calcific tendinitis is the most commonly encountered manifestation of hydroxyapatite deposition disease, in which calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition occurs in tendons. It may cause acute or chronic pain, or may be entirely asymptomatic. We describe a case of acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor pollicis longus tendon in an 8-year-old boy, who initially presented to our department for workup of a mass felt along the volar aspect of the right wrist.

  2. Calcific tendinitis of the biceps-labral complex: a rare cause of acute shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Kim, Weon-Yoo

    2008-06-01

    Calcific tendinitis most commonly affects the rotator cuff and has not been previously reported affecting the biceps-labral complex. We report a case of calcific tendinitis of the biceps-labral complex attachment, a rare cause of acute, severe shoulder pain. Clinically, it can be misdiagnosed as supraspinatus tendinitis or septic arthritis of the shoulder joint. Non-operative treatment failed to resolve the symptoms. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcific deposit resulted in resolution of symptoms. Knowledge of this clinical condition and its imaging features is crucial for a correct diagnosis of this uncommon cause of shoulder pain.

  3. Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture Reconstructed With Achilles Tendon Allograft and Xenograft Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollawell, Shane; Baione, William

    2015-01-01

    More than 20% of acute Achilles tendon injuries are misdiagnosed, leading to chronic or neglected ruptures. Some controversy exists regarding how to best manage an acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, a general consensus has been reached that chronic rupture with ≥3 cm of separation is associated with functional morbidity and, therefore, should be managed operatively. It has been demonstrated that the functional outcomes of surgically treated Achilles ruptures are superior to the nonoperative outcomes in a chronic setting. In the present report, we reviewed 4 patients with chronic Achilles tendon ruptures that were successfully treated with an Achilles tendon interposition allograft and simultaneous augmentation with a xenograft. The median duration of rupture was 11 (range 8 to 16) weeks, the median gap between the proximal and distal segments of the tendon was 4.75 (range 3.5 to 6) cm, and the patients were able to return pain-free to all preinjury activities at a median of 14.5 (range 13.8 to 15.5) weeks, without the need for tendon transfer, lengthening, or additional intervention. The median duration of follow up was 37.25 (range 15.25 to 51.5) months, at which point the mean Foot and Ankle Outcomes Instrument core scale score was 97 ± 1 (mean normative score 53 ± 1), and the Foot and Ankle Outcomes Instrument shoe comfort core scale score was 100 ± 0 (mean normative score 59 ± 0). The combined Achilles allograft plus xenograft augmentation technique appears to be a reasonable option for the surgical treatment of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. V-Y肌腱瓣修补术治疗陈旧性跟腱断裂的应用解剖%Applied anatomy of treatment of old rupture of achillies tendon with V-Y tendinous flap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂团文; 彭耀金

    2011-01-01

    Objective To provide anatomical data for surgical treatment of old rupture of Achillies tendon with V-Ytendinous flap.Methods The relevant anatomical data were measured on 20 cases of adult lower leg anatomy layer by layer specimens. Seven cases specimens of gastrocnemius tendon close to the average level of calf were made models of the Achilles tendon defect respectively 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 cm, they were firstly made a stump direct repair, furtherly made V-Ytendinous flap for repair surgery, to explore the application of the V-Ytendinous flap repair of old rupture of Achillies tendon. Results The narrowest location of Normal adults, Achilles tendon at an average width (13.25±2.73) mm, average thickness (6.26±2.04) mm, average distance to the top of the heel (39.52±1.25) mm. The Achilles tendon defect within 2 cm, The stump direct suture surgery can proceed smoothly; The Achilles tendon defect is to 3cm, the stump direct suture surgery is difficult to complete,it needs V-Y tendonous flap to repair. The Achilles tendon defect is to 7 cm, the V-Y tendinous flap repair is more difficult to complete. Conclusion V-Y tendinous flap repair is suitable for 3-6 cm within the Achilles tendon defect.%目的:探讨V-Y肌腱瓣修补术治疗陈旧性跟腱断裂的解剖学依据.方法:对20例成人小腿标本进行逐层解剖,测量相关解剖学数据;选取其中7例腓肠肌肌腱接近平均水平的小腿标本,制作成跟腱缺损分别为1、2、3、4、5、6、7 cm的模型,先进行断端直接吻合术,再进行V-Y肌腱瓣修补模拟手术,探讨V-Y肌腱瓣修补术的适用症.结果:正常成人跟腱最窄处平均宽度(13.25±2.73)mm,平均厚度(6.26±2.04)mm,与跟骨上方平均距离(39.52±1.25)mm.跟腱缺损2 cm以内,断端直接吻合手术能顺利进行,跟腱缺损达到3cm,直接吻合较困难,须V-Y肌腱瓣修补术才能顺利进行,缺损达到7 cm,V-Y肌腱瓣修补术完成较困难.结论.:V-Y肌腱瓣修补术适于3~6cm以内的跟腱缺损.

  5. Early weightbearing using Achilles suture bridge technique for insertional Achilles tendinosis: a review of 43 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Ryan B; Cottom, James M; Vora, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Posterior heel pain caused by insertional Achilles tendinosis can necessitate surgical intervention when recalcitrant to conservative care. Surgical treatment can necessitate near complete detachment of the Achilles tendon to fully eradicate the offending pathologic features and, consequently, result in long periods of non-weightbearing. A suture bridge technique using bone anchors is available for reattachment of the Achilles tendon. This provides restoration of the Achilles footprint on the calcaneus, including not only contact, but also actual pressure between the tendon and bone. We performed a review of 43 patients who underwent surgical treatment of insertional Achilles tendinosis with reattachment of the Achilles tendon using the suture bridge technique. The mean age was 53 (range 29 to 87) years. The mean follow-up period was 24 (range 13 to 52) months. The mean postoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 90 (range 65 to 100). The mean preoperative visual analog scale pain score was 6.8 (range 2 to 10) and the mean postoperative visual analog scale pain score was 1.3 (range 0 to 6). The mean interval to weightbearing was 10 (range 0 to 28) days. No postoperative ruptures occurred. Of the 43 patients, 42 (97.6%) successfully performed the single heel rise test at the final postoperative visit. Concomitant procedures were performed in 35 patients, including 33 (77%) requiring open gastrocnemius recession and 2 (5%) requiring flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer. A total of 42 patients (97.6%) returned to regular shoe gear, and 42 (97.6%) returned to their activities of daily living, including running for 20 athletic patients (100%). Complications included postoperative wound dehiscense requiring surgical debridement in 2 patients (5%) and soft tissue infection requiring antibiotics and surgical debridement in 1 (2%) patient. Our findings support using the Achilles tendon suture bridge for reattachment of the Achilles tendon in the

  6. Risk of shoulder tendinitis in relation to shoulder loads in monotonous repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, P.; Bonde, J. P.; Mikkelsen, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies relate the occurrence of shoulder disorders to quantified ergonomic exposures. This study evaluates the hypothesis that shoulder loads in repetitive work might contribute to the occurrence of shoulder tendinitis. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 1961 workers...... in repetitive work and 782 referents. Shoulder loads were quantified at task level and measures of exposures were assigned based on task distribution. Symptoms in combination with clinical criteria defined shoulder tendinitis. RESULTS: The prevalence of shoulder tendinitis was higher among exposed workers...... risk slightly (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.0-2.6 per unit). CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that workers with repetitive tasks have increased risk of shoulder tendinitis, which partially can be attributed to force requirements...

  7. Efficacy of Achilles Suture Bridge Technique for Insertional Achilles Tendinosis in an Obese and Athletic Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineta, Kazuaki; Suzue, Naoto; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the efficacy of the suture bridge technique for treating insertional Achilles tendinosis in an obese and athletic patient. A 48-year-old man presented to our department with a 6-month history of left posterior heel pain. The patient was an athlete (triathlon) and appeared obese (height: 197 cm, body weight: 120 kg, body mass index: 30.9). A diagnosis of insertional Achilles tendinosis was made. Because 6 months of conservative treatments had failed, we performed open resection of the calcaneal exostosis and Haglund's deformity along with debridement of the degenerative tissue of the tendon. Wide detachment of the insertion of the Achilles tendon was necessary, and reattachment of the tendon was performed using the Arthrex SpeedBridge(TM) system (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL). Six weeks postoperatively, this patient was allowed to walk with full weight bearing. Twelve weeks after surgery, this patient started jogging with neither pain nor evidence of Achilles tendon rupture. The suture bridge technique was effective for the reconstruction of the Achilles tendon in an obese and athletic patient. J. Med. Invest. 63: 310-314, August, 2016.

  8. Biceps tendinitis in chronic rotator cuff tears: a histologic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaraju, Vamsi M; Kang, Richard W; Yanke, Adam B; McNickle, Allison G; Lewis, Paul B; Wang, Vincent M; Williams, James M; Chubinskaya, Susan; Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic rotator cuff tears frequently have anterior shoulder pain attributed to the long head of the biceps brachii (LHBB) tendon. In this study, tenodesis or tenotomy samples and cadaveric controls were assessed by use of immunohistochemical and histologic methods to quantify inflammation, vascularity, and neuronal plasticity. Patients had moderate pain and positive results on at least 1 clinical test of shoulder function. The number of axons in the distal LHBB was significantly less in patients with biceps tendinitis. Calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P immunostaining was predominantly within nerve roots and blood vessels. A moderate correlation (R = 0.5) was identified between LHBB vascularity and pain scores. On the basis of these results, we conclude that, in the context of rotator cuff disease, the etiology of anterior shoulder pain with macroscopic changes in the biceps tendon is related to the complex interaction of the tendon and surrounding soft tissues, rather than a single entity.

  9. Misconceived Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis during Management of Myofascial Neck Pain Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of posterior neck pain is very challenging based on symptoms and physical examination only. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is a rare and frequently misdiagnosed entity in various causes of neck pain. It results from calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscle which is characterized by severe neck pain, painful restriction of neck movement, dysphagia, and odynophagia. We herein report a case of a patient with acute retropharyngeal calcific tendiniti...

  10. Calcific Tendinitis of the Gluteus Maximus in a Golfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ariel A; Stang, Thomas S; Fritz, Jan; Papp, Derek F

    2016-09-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a relatively rare condition in which calcium is inappropriately deposited in tendons, resulting in a local inflammatory reaction that can cause severe symptoms in certain cases. The cause of this disease process is not completely understood, although repetitive microtrauma likely plays a role in its development. Although the disorder most often involves the rotator cuff, it can affect other structures throughout the body, such as the tendons about the ankle and hip-including the rectus femoris and gluteus maximus. Nonoperative management typically involves using an anti-inflammatory medication and activity modification and can be augmented with formal physical therapy and modalities. Although nonoperative management provides adequate relief for many patients, sometimes operative debridement of the calcific deposit with or without repair of the involved tendon is required. The authors report an unusual case of calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus insertion in a golfer. The patient had tried nonoperative treatment for approximately 2 years with no real relief, and a recent exacerbation of the pain was significantly delaying his return to sport. Although plain radiographs did not show abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging showed a calcific deposit in the insertion of the gluteus maximus tendon. After discussing further treatment options with the patient, the decision was made to remove the deposit and repair the insertion. He recovered completely and was able to return to play. The frequency, pathogenesis, and treatment of this condition are discussed in this case report, as well as the possible link to golf in this patient. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e997-e1000.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Tendinitis of the Temporalis muscle: Differential diagnosis and treatment. A Case Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Iturriaga.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The temporalis muscle plays an essential role in mastication and is actively involved in the mandibular closing movement. It is covered by a fibroelastic fascia that forms its tendon. Tendinitis is a degenerative and inflammatory process, which originates in the tendon-bone junction. Signs and symptoms such as swelling, pain, tenderness on palpation, limitation of movement and mouth opening are frequently associated with other temporomandibular disorders and not with tendinitis as a causal factor. Objective: To describe a clinical case identifying the diagnostic process and management of tendinitis of the temporalis muscle. Case report: A 30-year old male patient who sought treatment after continuous squeezing pain in the zygomatic and bilateral temporal regions with increased pain during mouth opening and mandibular function. The patient referred pain in the insertion region of the tendon of the temporalis muscle. Pain was removed after using anesthesia, consequently confirming the diagnosis of tendinitis of the temporalis muscle. Primary management measures were performed and then peritendinous corticosteroids were administered. The patient did not refer spontaneous or functional pain during check-up. Conclusion: Tendinitis of the temporalis muscle is a common condition, although frequently underdiagnosed. A good differential diagnosis must be performed to avoid confusion with other common conditions such as odontogenic pain, sinusitis, arthralgia, myofascial pain and migraine. Management depends on the type of tendinitis. It usually occurs in conjunction with other types of TMD or facial pain, so it is important to know the different clinical characteristics of pathologies with similar manifestations.

  12. Biceps tendinitis caused by an osteochondroma in the bicipital groove: a rare cause of shoulder pain in a baseball player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onga, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Akisue, Toshihiro; Marui, Takashi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2005-02-01

    Tendinitis of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is commonly seen in athletes who do repetitive overhead motions. Common causes of biceps tendinitis include impingement syndrome, subluxation of the biceps tendon, and attrition tendinitis, whereas biceps tendinitis secondary to a bone neoplasm is rare. A case of biceps tendinitis caused by an osteochondroma arising in the left humeral bicipital groove in a 25-year-old male baseball player is reported. The tumor was hook-shaped, originated from the inferomedial portion of the humeral lesser tubercle, and surrounded the biceps tendon. Symptoms of increasing pain and inability to throw resulted from direct irritation of the biceps tendon by the tumor. Total excision of the tumor relieved the symptoms within 3 weeks. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases in the English-language literature of biceps tendinitis caused by an osteochondroma.

  13. Percutaneous & Mini Invasive Achilles tendon repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmont Michael R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a considerable cause of morbidity with reduced function following injury. Recent studies have shown little difference in outcome between the techniques of open and non-operative treatment using an early active rehabilitation programme. Meta-analyses have shown that non-operative management has increased risk of re-rupture whereas surgical intervention has risks of complications related to the wound and iatrogenic nerve injury. Minimally invasive surgery has been adopted as a way of reducing infections rates and wound breakdown however avoiding iatrogenic nerve injury must be considered. We discuss the techniques and outcomes of percutaneous and minimally invasive repairs of the Achilles tendon.

  14. Motor responses to experimental Achilles tendon pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    calculated. Results Compared with the control condition experimental Achilles tendon pain reduced the EMG activity in agonistic, synergistic and antagonistic muscles, and increased the ground reaction force frequency content around 10 Hz, during both eccentric and concentric movement phases. Conclusions...... different days separated by 1 week, three-dimensional ground reaction forces, ankle joint kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) of the lower leg muscles were recorded during one-legged full weight-bearing ankle plantar (concentric) and dorsal (eccentric) flexion exercises. Measurements were done...... before, during and after either experimental Achilles tendon pain or a non-painful control condition. Pain was induced by intratendinous injections of hypertonic saline with isotonic saline injections as control. Joint kinematics, ground reaction force frequency contents and average EMG amplitudes were...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalabi, A. [Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden). Center for Surgical Sciences Divisions of Radiology and Orthopedics

    2004-09-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to evaluate and monitor the morphological response following treatment interventions in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy by using different MRI techniques. For this purpose, we investigated different types of sequences, including gadolinium contrast medium-enhanced T1-WI images (CME T1-WI), and developed a precise method to measure tendon volume and mean intratendinous signal of the Achilles tendon. Study I aimed at evaluating 15 patients with chronic, painful Achilles tendinosis, before and 2 years after surgical treatment. There was marked regression of the intratendinous signal postoperatively. The most sensitive sequence for depicting an intratendinous lesion in this study was CME T1-WI images. They showed a regression of the intratendinous signal abnormality from 13/15 patients preoperatively to 4/15 postoperatively. The clinical outcome was excellent in eight, good in five, fair in one and poor in one patient. In study II, the early contrast agent enhancement in the dynamically enhanced MRI signal (DEMRI) was correlated with the histopathologic findings in 15 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Early contrast enhancement (within the first 72 s) was seen in DEMRI in the symptomatic Achilles tendons, with a significant difference compared to the asymptomatic contralateral tendons. Increased severity of tendon changes, including fiber structure abnormality, increased vascularity, rounding of nuclei, and increased amount of glycosaminoglycans, correlated to CME. In study III, we developed a computerized 3-D seed-growing MRI technique to measure tendon volume and mean intratendinous signal. This technique showed an excellent inter- and intra-observer reliability. The technique was also used to follow up prospectively the tendon adaptation and healing described in studies IV-VI. In study IV, using serial MRI during a period of 1 year, we evaluated the biological effect of tendon repair following iatrogenic

  16. Nonsurgical Management of Midsubstance Achilles Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClinton, Shane; Luedke, Lace; Clewley, Derek

    2017-04-01

    Midsubstance Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most common lower leg conditions. Most patients can recover with nonsurgical treatment that focuses on tendon loading exercises and, when necessary, symptom modulating treatments such as topical, oral, or injected medication, ice, shoe inserts, manual therapy, stretching, taping, or low-level laser. If unresponsive to initial management, a small percentage of patients may consider shockwave or sclerosing treatment and possibly surgery.

  17. Achilles Tendon Repair, A Modified Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Keyhani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Wound complications following open repair for acute Achilles tendon ruptures (AATR remain the subject of significant debate. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of covering repaired AATR using well-nourished connective tissues (paratenon and deep fascia to avoid complications after open repair.   Methods: In this case series study, open repair was performed for 32 active young patients with AATR. After the tendon was repaired, the deep fascia and paratenon was used to cover the Achilles tendon. Patients were followed for two years and any wound complication was recorded. During the last visit, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle-hind foot score was completed for all patients. Calf circumference and ankle range of motion were measured and compared with the contralateral side. Patients were asked about returning to previous sports activities and limitations with footwear. Results: Only, one patient developed deep wound infection (3%. None of the patients had any discomfort around the operation area, limitation with footwear, sural nerve injury, re-rupture, and skin adhesion. The AOFAS score averaged 92.5±6. Two patients (7% were unable to return to previous sports activities because of moderate pain in heavy physical exercises. The calf circumference and ankle ROM were similar between healthy and operated sides. Conclusion: The present study showed that fascial envelope for full covering of the repaired Achilles tendon may help to prevent the occurrence of wound complications.

  18. Achilles Tendon Repair, A Modified Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Keyhani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wound complications following open repair for acute Achilles tendon ruptures (AATR remain the subject of significant debate. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of covering repaired AATR using well-nourished connective tissues (paratenon and deep fascia to avoid complications after open repair.   Methods: In this case series study, open repair was performed for 32 active young patients with AATR. After the tendon was repaired, the deep fascia and paratenon was used to cover the Achilles tendon. Patients were followed for two years and any wound complication was recorded. During the last visit, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle-hind foot score was completed for all patients. Calf circumference and ankle range of motion were measured and compared with the contralateral side. Patients were asked about returning to previous sports activities and limitations with footwear. Results: Only, one patient developed deep wound infection (3%. None of the patients had any discomfort around the operation area, limitation with footwear, sural nerve injury, re-rupture, and skin adhesion. The AOFAS score averaged 92.5±6. Two patients (7% were unable to return to previous sports activities because of moderate pain in heavy physical exercises. The calf circumference and ankle ROM were similar between healthy and operated sides. Conclusion: The present study showed that fascial envelope for full covering of the repaired Achilles tendon may help to prevent the occurrence of wound complications.

  19. Micromechanical properties and collagen composition of ruptured human achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Philip; Kovanen, Vuokko; Hölmich, Per

    2013-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is one of the strongest tendons in the human body, and yet it frequently ruptures, which is a substantial clinical problem. However, the cause of ruptures remains elusive.......The Achilles tendon is one of the strongest tendons in the human body, and yet it frequently ruptures, which is a substantial clinical problem. However, the cause of ruptures remains elusive....

  20. Local biochemical and morphological differences in human Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J, Pingel; Fredberg, Ulrich; K, Qvortrup

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is high and underlying etiology as well as biochemical and morphological pathology associated with the disease is largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to describe biochemical and morphological differences in chronic Achilles tendinopathy....... The expressions of growth factors, inflammatory mediators and tendon morphology were determined in both chronically diseased and healthy tendon parts....

  1. Finite Element Analysis of the Achilles Tendon While Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anițaș Răzvan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Achilles tendon is the most frequent recipient of traumatic injuries. The aim of this study is to identify and describe the varying load at ankle level and especially at the Achilles tendon’s insertion on the calcaneus.

  2. Validation of a novel ultrasound measurement of achilles tendon length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Riecke, Anja Falk; Boesen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: A clinically applicable and accurate method for measuring Achilles tendon length is needed to investigate the influence of elongation of the Achilles tendon after acute rupture. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an ultrasonographic (US) length measurement...... of the Achilles tendon-aponeurosis complex. METHODS: Both legs of 19 non-injured subjects were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and US. The length from calcaneus to the medial head of m. Gastrocnemius was measured by three independent US examiners. Repeated US measurements were performed and compared...... to be further assessed in the setting of acute Achilles tendon rupture. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This new ultrasound measurement might allow for length measurement of ruptured Achilles tendons in the acute and chronic state after rupture. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II....

  3. Use of fluroquinolone and risk of Achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Obel, Niels; Hallas, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several case-control studies have reported that the use of fluoroquinolone increases the risk of rupture of the Achilles tendon. Our aim was to estimate this risk by means of a population-based cohort approach. SETTING: Data on Achilles tendon ruptures and fluoroquinolone use were...... retrieved from three population-based databases that include information on residents of Funen County (population: 470,000) in primary and secondary care during the period 1991-1999. A study cohort of all 28,262 first-time users of fluoroquinolone and all incident cases of Achilles tendon ruptures were...... identified. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The incidence rate of Achilles tendon ruptures among users and non-users of fluoroquinolones and the standardised incidence rate ratio associating fluoroquinolon use with Achilles tendon rupture were the main outcome measures. RESULTS: Between 1991 and 2002 the incidence...

  4. The Achilles tendon: fundamental properties and mechanisms governing healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Gordon, Joshua A.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights recent research on Achilles tendon healing, and comments on the current clinical controversy surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of injury. The processes of Achilles tendon healing, as demonstrated through changes in its structure, composition, and biomechanics, are reviewed. Finally, a review of tendon developmental biology and mechano transductive pathways is completed to recognize recent efforts to augment injured Achilles tendons, and to suggest potential future strategies for therapeutic intervention and functional tissue engineering. Despite an abundance of clinical evidence suggesting that current treatments and rehabilitation strategies for Achilles tendon ruptures are equivocal, significant questions remain to fully elucidate the basic science mechanisms governing Achilles tendon injury, healing, treatment, and rehabilitation. PMID:25332943

  5. Increased Expression of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors in Achilles Tendinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Emmelie; Forsgren, Sture; Alfredson, Håkan; Fowler, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in the control of pain. However, little is known as to the integrity of the cannabinoid system in human pain syndromes. Here we investigate the expression of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in human Achilles tendons from healthy volunteers and from patients with Achilles tendinosis. Methodology Cannabinoid CB1 receptor immunoreactivity (CB1IR) was evaluated in formalin-fixed biopsies from individuals suffering from painful Achilles tendinosis in comparison with healthy human Achilles tendons. Principal Findings CB1IR was seen as a granular pattern in the tenocytes. CB1IR was also observed in the blood vessel wall and in the perineurium of the nerve. Quantification of the immunoreactivity in tenocytes showed an increase of CB1 receptor expression in tendinosis tissue compared to control tissue. Conclusion Expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 is increased in human Achilles tendinosis suggesting that the cannabinoid system may be dysregulated in this disorder. PMID:21931835

  6. Increased expression of cannabinoid CB₁ receptors in Achilles tendinosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmelie Björklund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in the control of pain. However, little is known as to the integrity of the cannabinoid system in human pain syndromes. Here we investigate the expression of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB₁ in human Achilles tendons from healthy volunteers and from patients with Achilles tendinosis. METHODOLOGY: Cannabinoid CB₁ receptor immunoreactivity (CB₁IR was evaluated in formalin-fixed biopsies from individuals suffering from painful Achilles tendinosis in comparison with healthy human Achilles tendons. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CB₁IR was seen as a granular pattern in the tenocytes. CB₁IR was also observed in the blood vessel wall and in the perineurium of the nerve. Quantification of the immunoreactivity in tenocytes showed an increase of CB₁ receptor expression in tendinosis tissue compared to control tissue. CONCLUSION: Expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 is increased in human Achilles tendinosis suggesting that the cannabinoid system may be dysregulated in this disorder.

  7. Are the Symptoms of Calcific Tendinitis Due to Neoinnervation and/or Neovascularization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Lisa; Millar, Neal L; Lam, Patrick; Murrell, George A C

    2016-02-03

    Calcific tendinitis can be a substantial cause of pain and dysfunction in the shoulder, and the pathophysiology is unclear. Recent studies have shown a link among nerve ingrowth, neovascularization, and pain in tendinopathy. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence of neoinnervation and/or neovascularization in calcific tendinitis lesions of the shoulder. At arthroscopy, ultrasound was used to identify calcium within the tendon. Samples were taken from the supraspinatus tendon adjacent to the calcific lesion (in the calcific tendinitis group, with ten patients), the torn supraspinatus tendon of patients undergoing rotator cuff repair (the rotator cuff tear group, with ten patients), and the subscapularis tendon of patients undergoing a stabilization surgical procedure (the control group, with ten patients). Biopsied tendon samples were evaluated immunohistochemically by quantifying the presence of macrophages (using CD68 and CD206), T cells (CD3), mast cells (mast cell tryptase), vascular endothelium (CD34), and peripheral nerve markers (PGP 9.5). There was a twofold to eightfold increase of nerve markers, neovascularization, macrophages, M2 macrophages, and mast cells in the calcific tendinitis group compared with the rotator cuff tear group (p tendinitis lesions of the shoulder along with an eightfold increase in mast cells and macrophages. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that, in calcific tendinitis, the calcific material is inducing a vigorous inflammatory response within the tendon with formation of new blood vessels and nerves. This study helps to explain why calcific tendinitis is related to substantial pain in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  8. The victorian institute of sports assessment - achilles questionnaire (visa-a) - a reliable tool for measuring achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jonas Vestergård; Bartels, Else Marie; Langberg, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is a common pathology and the aetiology is unknown. For valid and reliable assessment The Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment has designed a self-administered Achilles questionnaire, the VISA-A. The aim of the present study was to evaluate VISA-A as an outcome...

  9. The victorian institute of sports assessment - achilles questionnaire (visa-a) - a reliable tool for measuring achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jonas Vestergård; Bartels, Else Marie; Langberg, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is a common pathology and the aetiology is unknown. For valid and reliable assessment The Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment has designed a self-administered Achilles questionnaire, the VISA-A. The aim of the present study was to evaluate VISA-A as an outcome meas...

  10. The victorian institute of sports assessment - achilles questionnaire (visa-a) - a reliable tool for measuring achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jonas Vestergård; Bartels, Else Marie; Langberg, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is a common pathology and the aetiology is unknown. For valid and reliable assessment The Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment has designed a self-administered Achilles questionnaire, the VISA-A. The aim of the present study was to evaluate VISA-A as an outcome...

  11. Lubricin in human achilles tendon: The evidence of intratendinous sliding motion and shear force in achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Long; Wei, Zhuang; Zhao, Chunfeng; Jay, Gregory D; Schmid, Thomas M; Amadio, Peter C; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-06-01

    Achilles tendon is one of the most commonly injured tendons. Mechanical force is regarded as a major causative factor. However, the biomechanics of Achilles tendon and mechanical mechanism of the injuries are unclear. Lubricin expresses at regions exposed to sliding motion and shear force in a number of tissues. This study investigated the distribution and concentration of lubricin in human Achilles tendons for better understanding the biomechanics of Achilles tendon. Achilles tendons were harvested from nine cadavers. Lubricin was extracted from various locations proximal to the calcaneal insertion and quantified with ELISA. The distribution of lubricin was investigated with immunohistochemistry. Lubricin was mainly identified at the interfaces of tendon fascicles, especially in the mid-portion of the tendon. The concentration of lubricin in Achilles tendons varied by individual and the distance from its calcaneal insertion. The distal portion of the tendon had a higher concentration of lubricin than the proximal regions of the tendon. This study suggests the presence of intratendinous sliding motion of fascicles and shear force at interfaces of fascicles in human Achilles tendon. Shear force could be an important mechanical factor for the development of Achilles tendinopathy and rupture.

  12. Structural integrity is decreased in both Achilles tendons in people with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docking, Sean I; Rosengarten, Samuel D; Daffy, John; Cook, Jill

    2015-07-01

    A high proportion of Achilles tendinopathy patients develop bilateral symptoms with human and animal studies showing bilateral histological changes associated with overuse/pathology in one tendon. The current study examined changes in tendon structure, assessed semi-quantitatively using ultrasound tissue characterisation, in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic tendon in unilateral Achilles tendinopathy patients in comparison to individuals with no history of tendinopathy. Cross-sectional case-control study. Participants with Achilles tendinopathy (n=21), with varying severity and length of clinical symptoms, and six participants with no history of tendinopathy were recruited. Tendons were scanned using ultrasound tissue characterisation, which captures contiguous transverse ultrasound images every 0.2mm and renders a 3-dimensional image. Ultrasound tissue characterisation quantifies tendon structure by measuring the stability of echopattern over contiguous transverse images. Four echo-types were discriminated and expressed as a percentage. Antero-posterior diameter of all tendons was measured. Significant differences were observed in the proportion of normal tendon structure between all three groups (ptendon containing the least amount of normal tendon structure (symptomatic - 79.5%, asymptomatic - 81.8%, control - 86.4%). The asymptomatic tendon contained significantly less normal tendon in comparison to the control tendon (p=0.008), suggesting the asymptomatic tendon is structurally compromised despite the absence of symptoms. Both Achilles tendons are structurally compromised in patients with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Future studies need to investigate whether these changes increase the risk of developing symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis: a source of non-surgical acute cervical pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Claudio F; Soffia, Pablo S; Pruzzo, Edda

    2014-02-01

    Prevertebral calcific tendinitis results from calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposits in the longus colli muscles, which induce symptoms similar to some surgically-treated conditions, such as retropharyngeal abscesses. Imaging techniques are critical for accurate diagnosis. To describe the computed tomography (CT) findings associated with prevertebral calcific tendinitis. Retrospective analysis performed in an 18-month period, searching for patients with neck CT and reports with diagnosis of "calcific longus collis tendinitis" or "prevertebral calcific tendinitis". CT images and clinical data available in the medical records were analyzed. One hundred and thirty-four examinations were performed in the period studied. Nine patients who fulfilled inclusion criteria were identified and their CT imaging characteristics are presented. Six presented with calcific deposits in the right longus colli muscle. CT matched the clinical pain lateralization in all cases. Eight patients had no significant enhancement post injection of contrast media. Prevertebral calcific tendinitis is a cause of acute cervical pain that clinically mimics a retropharyngeal abscess, however on neck CT has a characteristic appearance. Correct identification of this pathologic condition will help avoiding unnecessary invasive procedures.

  14. The effect of glenoid cavity depth on rotator cuff tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkoc, Melih; Korkmaz, Ozgur; Ormeci, Tugrul; Sever, Cem; Kara, Adna; Mahirogulları, Mahir

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most important causes of shoulder pain are inflammation and degenerative changes in the rotator cuff (RC). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive and safe imaging modality. MRI can be used for the evaluation of cuff tendinopathy. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between glenoid cavity depth and cuff tendinopathy and we investigated glenoid cavity depth on the pathogenesis of cuff tendinopathy. We retrospectively evaluated 215 patients who underwent MRI. Of these, 60 patients showed cuff tendinopathy (group A) and 54 patients showed no pathology (group B). Glenoid cavity depth was calculated in the coronal and transverse planes. The mean axial depth was 1.7 ± 0.9 and the mean coronal depth 3.8 ± 0.9, for group A. The mean axial depth was 3.5 ± 0.7 and the mean coronal depth 1.5 ± 0.8, for group B. There were significant differences in the axial and coronal depths between the two groups. High coronal and low axial depth of the glenoid cavity can be used to diagnose RC tendinitis.

  15. MR imaging in chronic Achilles tendon disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Movin, T.; Rolf, C. [Section for Sports Medicine, Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Huddinge Univ. Hospital (Sweden); Kristoffersen-Wiberg, M.; Aspelin, P. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska Inst., Huddinge Univ. Hospital (Sweden)

    1998-03-01

    Objectives: The primary objective was to compare 4 imaging sequences (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, proton density, and T1-weighted with gadolinium contrast agent enhancement) with regard to intratendinous signal abnormality in patients with achillodynia. The secondary objective was to relate the images to the clinical symptoms and histopathological findings. Material and Methods: Twenty patients (16 men, 4 women, median age 40 years) with chronic achillodynia participated in the study. The symptoms prohibited activity and clinical examination revealed swelling and tenderness 1.5-6 cm proximal to the Achilles tendon insertion. Of the 20 patients: 5 had bilateral achillodynia, 4 had had previous contralateral Achilles tendon disorder, and 11 had never had symptoms in the contralateral tendon region. These 11 tendons served as controls for comparison. MR imaging was performed on a superconductive 1.5 T unit. Both Achilles tendons were examined (n=40) at the same time, and multiple sagittal and transversal images were obtained. The corresponding sections on these images were visually graded according to both extension and level of MR signal intensity. Tissue was obtained for microscopic examination from the most symptomatic side in all patients (n=20). Results: T1-weighted images following gadolinium contrast medium enhancement proved to be the best method by which to visualize intratendinous signal abnormality. This sequence revealed signal abnormality in 24/25 symptomatic tendons and in 1/11 control tendons. Histopathological examination showed an increased noncollagenous extracellular matrix and altered fiber structure in the lesions corresponding to the contrast-enhanced areas. (orig./MG).

  16. [Fluoroquinolone-induced Achilles tendon rupture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, N

    2008-02-01

    A 72-year-old female dialysis patient with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus who was under long-term medication with oral prednisolone due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was given levofloxacin for one week to treat an acute bronchitis (one 500 mg dose on the first day, 125 mg/day orally from second day onwards). One day after the end of levofloxacin treatment, the patient complained about a constant dragging pain above the right heel that receded under local application of diclofenac ointment and inactivity of the right foot. Twelve days after ending administration of levofloxacin, strong pains in the right calf were suddenly felt during normal walking, and active plantar flexion was lost. Palpation showed the right calf to be soft; a distinct gap was found in the middle third of the Achilles tendon. The Thompson test was positive, and the patient was unable to stand on her right toes. Ultrasonography showed a discontinuity of the right Achilles tendon. A spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture after taking fluoroquinolone was diagnosed. Conservative treatment was applied due to the reduced general condition. Initial treatment involved a below-knee plaster cast in equinus position; the cast was replaced on the fourth day by a pneumatic walker, which was also worn during mobilisation by physiotherapy. A typical feature of fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy (FIT) is a considerable latency period in some cases between the commencement of treatment with a fluoroquinolone and the onset of FIT symptoms. In addition to fluoroquinolone intake, there are three other predisposing risk factors for tendinopathy: age over 60 years, long-term treatment with systemic glucocorticoids, and chronic kidney disease. The patient showed a combination of all the aforementioned risk factors. In patients with these risk factors, especially among people with a combination of said risk factors - which is frequently the case with nephrologic and dialysis patients, especially

  17. A SLAP lesion associated with calcific tendinitis of the long head of the biceps brachii at its origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Cheon; Rhee, Kwang Jin; Shin, Hyun Dae; Kim, Young Mo

    2007-12-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a common condition with characteristic clinical and radiological findings. Although we do not know which condition initiated the pathologic cascade, we present a rare case of calcific tendinitis of the long head of the biceps brachii at its origin, associated with a SLAP lesion. The calcium deposit was removed and the SLAP lesion was repaired with a suture anchor arthroscopically.

  18. ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURE AND PLATELET RICH PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Zedde

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendon rupture is currently one of the most frequent injuries in athletes. Such rupture may be caused by a sudden dorsiflexion of the ankle, pushing off with the weight bearing forefoot while extending the knee or violent dorsiflexion of a plantar flexed foot. The treatment goal consists of restoring the normal tendon length and tension, as well as the function and strength of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex. The biological repair process can be enhanced in all stages of recovery with the use of PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma without any side effects.

  19. The neuromechanical adaptations to Achilles tendinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Jen; Kulig, Kornelia

    2015-08-01

    Achilles tendinosis is a localized degenerative musculoskeletal disorder that develops over a long period of time and leads to a compliant human Achilles tendon. We demonstrate that the compliant Achilles tendon elicited a series of adaptations from different levels of the human movement control system, such as the muscle-tendon interaction, CNS control and other muscles in the lower leg. These results illustrate the human body's capacity to adapt to tendon pathology and provide the physiological basis for intervention or prevention strategies. Human movement is initiated, controlled and executed in a hierarchical system including the nervous system, muscle and tendon. If a component in the loop loses its integrity, the entire system has to adapt to that deficiency. Achilles tendon, when degenerated, exhibits lower stiffness. This local mechanical deficit may be compensated for by an alteration of motor commands from the CNS. These modulations in motor commands from the CNS may lead to altered activation of the agonist, synergist and antagonist muscles. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of tendon degeneration on its mechanical properties, the neuromechanical behaviour of the surrounding musculature and the existence of the CNS modulation accompanying tendinosis. We hypothesize that the degenerated tendon will lead to diminished tissue mechanical properties and protective muscle activation patterns, as well as an up-regulated descending drive from the CNS. Strong evidence, as reported in the present study, indicates that tendinotic tendons are more compliant compared to healthy tendons. This unilateral involvement affected the neuromuscular control on the involved side but not the non-involved side. The muscle-tendon unit on the tendinotic side exhibits a lowered temporal efficiency, which leads to altered CNS control. The altered CNS control is then expressed as an adapted muscle activation pattern in the lower leg. Taken together, the findings of

  20. An Achilles tendinosis masking an intramedullary astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappers, Jeroen; Herregods, Piet; Chappel, Rudi; Surgeloose, Didier De; Stassijns, Gaëtane

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old male with a right Achilles tendinosis, who complains about a mild gait disorder starting after walking several kilometers. In the following months he develops neurological symptoms. MRI lumbar spine shows an intramedullary tumor at level Th12. A biopsy confirms the diagnosis of an intramedullary astrocytoma. Primary intramedullary tumors are relatively rare. Clinical presentation is often insidious. The authors want to make a point to reconsider a diagnosis in case it does not explain completely the anamnestic or clinical findings. According to the literature there is no optimal approach to the management of these tumors.

  1. Treatment of Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures With Large Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jamal; Jones, Kennis; Raikin, Steven M

    2016-10-01

    Background When Achilles tendon ruptures become chronic, a defect often forms at the rupture site. There is scant literature regarding the treatment of chronic Achilles ruptures with defects of 6 cm or larger. We examined outcomes from combining a turndown of the proximal, central Achilles with a flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon transfer to treat this condition. Materials Between September 2002 and December 2013, 32 patients presented with a chronic Achilles rupture and a defect of 6 cm or more. Twenty patients were male and 12 were female. Patient age was between 20 and 74 years, with a mean of 53.3 years. Eighteen and 14 patients had their right and left Achilles tendon affected, respectively. The number of days between injury and surgery ranged from 30 to 315 days, with a mean of 102 days. Reconstruction of the Achilles involved a turndown of the proximal, central tendon and FHL augmentation. Final patient follow-up ranged from 18 to 150 months, with a mean of 62.3 months. At surgery, the gap between the ruptured ends of the Achilles ranged from 6 to 12 cm, with a mean gap of 7.5 cm. Full healing was achieved in all 32 patients (100%) by 5 months postoperatively. Mean Foot and Ankle Ability Measures scores increased from 36.3% to 90.2% between initial and latest follow-up (P Achilles ruptures with large defects are scant within the orthopaedic literature. Our method of Achilles reconstruction results in a high rate of improved function and pain relief. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case series. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Relationship between calcifying tendinitis and subacromial impingement: a prospective radiography and magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, M; Sabo, D; Wehrle, M; Mau, H

    1996-01-01

    In a prospective study radiographs and magnetic resonance images of 75 patients with calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff were analyzed. The aim was to evaluate any relation between calcifying tendinitis and subacromial impingement. A total of 83% of the calcifications were located in the supraspinatus or the adjoining part of the subscapularis tendon. On T1-weighted images they could be demonstrated with high accuracy as areas of decreased signal intensity. A magnetic resonance imaging categorization of the calcium deposits was carried out by means of a differentiation of form, outline, and density. A partial rotator cuff tear was found in one shoulder; in 11% variable aspects of degenerative alteration of the affected tendon were seen. By analysis of the radiographic outlet view 16% of the cases had a type III acromion. In conclusion, little correlation exists between calcifying tendinitis and additional findings associated with subacromial impingement.

  3. Treatment for Frozen Shoulder Combined with Calcific Tendinitis of the Supraspinatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Kai Chen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder is a process that involves calcium deposition in the rotator cuff tendons. It is usually a self-limiting process and is often chronic in nature. However, it can lead to acute pain resulting in frozen shoulder syndrome. We report 32 cases in which frozen shoulder was associated with calcific tendinitis of the supraspinatus. The aim of this study was to use arthroscopic brisement of the glenohumeral joint and make multiple punctures in the calcific spot to treat the frozen shoulder associated with calcific tendinitis of the supraspinatus. In our study, 30 patients had satisfactory results after a 2-year follow-up. Five patients experienced some postoperative calcium shadows, but there was also greater improvement in the range of motion and pain relief in this study compared with other reports in the literature of frozen shoulder cases.

  4. Adipose tissue as mesenchymal stem cells source in equine tendinitis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando de Mattos Carvalho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tendinitis is an important high-relapse-rate disease, which compromises equine performance and may result in early athletic life end to affected animals. Many therapies have been set to treat equine tendinitis; however, just few result in improved relapse rates, quality of extracellular matrix (ECM and increased biomechanical resistance of the treated tissue. Due to advances in the regenerative medicine, promising results were initially obtained through the implantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC derived from the bone marrow in the equine tendon injury. Since then, many studies have been using MSCs from different sources for therapeutic means in equine. The adipose tissue has appeared as feasible MSC source. There are promising results involving equine tendinitis therapy using mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue (AdMSCs.

  5. Validity and Reliability of the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganestam, Ann; Barfod, Kristoffer; Klit, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The best treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture remains debated. Patient-reported outcome measures have become cornerstones in treatment evaluations. The Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) has been developed for this purpose but requires additional validation. The purpose of the present...... study was to validate a Danish translation of the ATRS. The ATRS was translated into Danish according to internationally adopted standards. Of 142 patients, 90 with previous rupture of the Achilles tendon participated in the validity study and 52 in the reliability study. The ATRS showed moderately...

  6. Misconceived Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis during Management of Myofascial Neck Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Youn; Lim, Jin Hun; Kim, Yong Seok; Kwon, Young Eun; Yu, Jae Yong; Lee, Jun Hak

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of posterior neck pain is very challenging based on symptoms and physical examination only. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is a rare and frequently misdiagnosed entity in various causes of neck pain. It results from calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscle which is characterized by severe neck pain, painful restriction of neck movement, dysphagia, and odynophagia. We herein report a case of a patient with acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis, who complained of posterior neck pain, initially diagnosed and treated as a myofascial neck pain syndrome.

  7. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff: state of the art in diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolla, Giovanni; Singh, Sanjay; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a painful shoulder disorder characterised by either single or multiple deposits in the rotator cuff tendon. Although the disease subsides spontaneously in most cases, a subpopulation of patients continue to complain of pain and shoulder dysfunction and the deposits do not show any signs of resolution. Although several treatment options have been proposed, clinical results are controversial and often the indication for a given therapy remains a matter of clinician choice. Herein, we report on the current state of the art in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

  8. Calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius tendon with bone marrow edema mimicking metastatic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ik [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health Systems, Ann Arbor (United States); Hayes, Curtis W. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health Systems, Ann Arbor (United States); Taubman Clinic, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Biermann, Sybil J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Michigan Health Systems, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2002-06-01

    A case of calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius is presented. This report describes a patient with a history of breast cancer who had the combination of amorphous calcifications in the gluteus medius tendon and the MR finding of conspicuous bone marrow edema in the adjacent greater trochanter, prompting concern for metastatic disease. We present images from radiography, bone scanning, CT, and MR imaging. The unusual combination of findings in these studies should be considered conclusive for calcific tendinitis, and should not be confused with malignancy. (orig.)

  9. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle treatment of calcific tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignesh, K Nithin; McDowall, Adam; Simunovic, Nicole; Bhandari, Mohit; Choudur, Hema N

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the efficacy of ultrasound-guided needle lavage in treating calcific tendinitis. Two independent assessors searched medical databases and screened studies for eligibility. Eleven articles were included. Heterogeneity among included studies precluded meta-analysis. Results of randomized controlled trials suggested no difference in pain relief between needle lavage and other interventions, but the studies were of low quality. Additional high-quality evidence is required to determine the relative efficacy of ultrasound-guided needle lavage in the management of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

  10. Attrition tendinitis of long head of biceps brachii in relation to humeral head osteonecrosis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesler, Ethan R; Sarlikiotis, Thomas; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kokkalis, Zinon T

    2013-01-01

    This case report identifies a 41-year-old male patient who developed anterior shoulder pain in the setting of humeral head osteonecrosis. As a consequence of the cartilage degeneration, multiple loose bodies formed and migrated into the bicipital tendon sheath, causing attrition tendinitis, which was a feature of the clinical presentation. The patient was treated by a combination of arthroscopic glenohumeral joint debridement and open tenodesis of the biceps using a suture anchor. Follow-up revealed asymptomatic shoulder function by 18 months. This is the first report in the literature of bicipital tendinitis in the context of avascular necrosis of the shoulder.

  11. [Bilateral calcifying tendinitis of the long tendon of the biceps associated with a SLAP lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayayo Sinués, Esteban; Soriano Guillén, Antonia Pilar; Vela Marín, Ana Carmen; Martínez Pérez, Belén

    2010-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis is a common disorder related to deposition of hidroxyapatite crystals, which is most common around the shoulder joint, involving the supraespinosus tendon. It can however, affect almost any tendon at its insertion. Clinical features are variable and include pain and inflammation that often resolves spontaneously. We present a case of bilateral calcifying tendinitis of the long head of the biceps tendon at its insertion on the superior glenoid rim associated with superior labrum antero-posterior tears (SLAP) confirmed by arthroscopy. Calcium deposits were surgically removed and the SLAP lesions were repaired.

  12. Longus colli tendinitis. A review of literature and case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawky Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To increase the awareness of longus colli tendinitis (LCT among spine specialists and to present a practical overview of diagnostic and treatment options, so that unnecessary interventions are avoided. Five sample cases from a German spine center will also be presented. Methods: Literature review and case series. A PubMed search was performed in May 2015, and the articles found were reviewed for clinical presentation, investigations, and treatment. The frequency of publication of LCT cases and the specialty of journals were also noted. Recent cases treated in our institution were also reviewed. The clinical findings, investigations, and therapeutic interventions were summarized. Results: The PubMed search from May 2015 found 104 articles, published over 51 years, on the topic of LCT. Only four were published in spine journals. A review of this literature yielded a total of 242 cases. The classic clinical triad included neck pain, limitation of movements, and swallowing complaints. C-reactive Protein (CRP values were available in 21 cases (mean 23.66 mg/dL. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT scan was the best diagnostic modality. LCT is usually a self-limiting condition, but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs may help alleviate discomfort. Five cases of LCT were diagnosed and treated in our center over the past three years. Conclusions: LCT, which is uncommon and has non-specific symptoms, is often referred to spine centers. Spine specialists should be aware of its clinical presentation and radiographic findings in order to avoid unnecessary interventions. The condition is self-limiting and can be treated conservatively.

  13. Realtime Achilles Ultrasound Thompson (RAUT) Test for the Evaluation and Diagnosis of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Matthew J; Olson, Kirstina; Heckmann, Nathanael; Charlton, Timothy P

    2017-01-01

    Acute complete Achilles tendon ruptures are commonly missed injuries. We propose the Realtime Achilles Ultrasound Thompson (RAUT) test, a Thompson test under ultrasound visualization, to aid in the diagnosis of these injuries. We hypothesized that RAUT testing would provide improved diagnostic characteristics compared with static ultrasound. Twenty-two consecutive patients with operatively confirmed acute Achilles tendon ruptures were prospectively evaluated with RAUT testing and static ultrasonography. RAUT video recordings and static ultrasound images from both ruptured and uninjured sides were randomized and graded by a group of novice reviewers and a group of expert attendings. From these observations, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for RAUT and static ultrasound were calculated. In addition, κ interobserver coefficients were computed. Forty-seven novice reviewers and 11 foot and ankle attendings made a total of 4136 and 528 observations, respectively. For static ultrasound, sensitivity and specificity were 76.8% and 74.8% for the novice reviewers and 79.6% and 86.4% for the attendings, respectively. For RAUT testing, sensitivity and specificity were 87.2% and 81.1% for the novice group and 86.4% and 91.7% for the attending group, respectively. The κ coefficient was 0.62 and 0.27 for novice and attending RAUT reviewers, indicating substantial and fair agreement, respectively, but only 0.46 and 0.12 for static ultrasonography, representing moderate and slight agreement, respectively. RAUT testing was a sensitive and specific test, providing a cost-effective adjunct to the clinical examination when diagnosing acute Achilles tendon ruptures. This test can be used by surgeons with minimal training in ultrasonography. Level II, diagnostic study.

  14. Central pain processing is altered in people with Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompra, Nefeli; van Dieën, Jaap H; Coppieters, Michel W

    2016-08-01

    Tendinopathy is often a chronic condition. The mechanisms behind persistent tendon pain are not yet fully understood. It is unknown whether, similar to other persistent pain states, central pain mechanisms contribute to ongoing tendon pain. We investigated the presence of altered central pain processing in Achilles tendinopathy by assessing the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) effect in people with and without Achilles tendinopathy. 20 people with Achilles tendinopathy and 23 healthy volunteers participated in this cross-sectional study. CPM was assessed by the cold pressor test. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was recorded over the Achilles tendon before and during immersion of the participant's hand into cold water. The CPM effect was quantified as the absolute difference in PPT before and during the cold pressor test. An increase in PPT was observed in the Achilles tendinopathy and control group during the cold pressor test (ptendinopathy group (mean difference=36.4 kPa, SD=68.1 kPa; ptendinopathy compared to people without Achilles tendinopathy. A reduced conditioned pain modulation effect reflects altered central pain processing which is believed to contribute to the persistence of pain in other conditions. Altered central pain processing may also be an important factor in persistent tendon pain that has traditionally been regarded to be dominated by peripheral mechanisms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. High association between accessory soleus muscle and achilles tendonopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, Michael D.; Gordon, Andrew G.; Blebea, Judy S.; Dalinka, Murray K. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-12-15

    This study investigated the association between accessory soleus muscle and abnormalities of the Achilles tendon. The authors reviewed 15 consecutive cases with a diagnosis of accessory soleus muscle from a computerized database of ankle magnetic resonance (MR) examinations reported between January 1998 and January 2007. On review, two cases were eliminated because of an incorrect initial diagnosis: One patient had a low lying soleus attachment to the Achilles tendon, while the other had a prominent flexor hallucis longus tendon partially obliterating Kager's fat. The remaining 13 cases with accessory soleus muscles were evaluated for Achilles tendon abnormalities. There were 13 cases of accessory soleus muscles in 11 patients; two patients had bilateral accessory soleus muscles (the only study patients with bilateral MR examinations in our sample). There were five male and six female patients ranging from 15 to 81 years of age (mean 48). There were nine cases (69.2%) in which Achilles tendonopathy was associated with accessory soleus muscle, including tendonopathy of each Achilles tendon in the two patients with bilateral accessory muscles. In our small patient population, there was a high association between accessory soleus muscle and Achilles tendonopathy. (orig.)

  16. Platelet rich plasma treatment for chronic Achilles tendinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monto, Raymond Rocco

    2012-05-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinosis is a relatively common but difficult orthopedic condition to treat. In this study, autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP), a concentrated bioactive blood component rich in cytokines and growth factors, was evaluated to determine its potential long-term efficacy in treating chronic cases of Achilles tendinosis resistant to traditional nonoperative management. Thirty patients with chronic Achilles tendinosis who did not respond to a minimum of 6 months of traditional nonoperative treatment modalities were treated with a single ultrasound guided injection of PRP. AOFAS scoring was completed for all patients pretreatment and at 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months post-treatment. MRI and/or ultrasound studies were completed for all patients pre-treatment and at 6 months post-treatment. Prior to the PRP treatment all of the patients in this study were considering surgical Achilles repair for their severe symptoms. The average AOFAS score increased from 34 (range, 20 to 60) to 92 (range, 87 to 100) by 3 months after PRP treatment and remained elevated at 88 (range, 76 to 100) at 24 months post-treatment. Pretreatment imaging abnormalities present in the Achilles tendon on MRI and ultrasound studies resolved in 27 of 29 patients at 6 months post-treatment. Clinical success was achieved in 28 of 30 patients. Platelet-rich plasma was used effectively to treat chronic recalcitrant cases of Achilles tendinosis.

  17. Intraarticular lesions in calcifying tendinitis: incidence and association with the acromion index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappe, Thomas; Cakir, Balkan; Lippacher, Sabine; Reichel, Heiko; Elsharkawi, Mohammed

    2011-03-01

    Intraarticular pathologies are a common finding during arthroscopy for rotator cuff lesions. Both rotator cuff tears as well as cartilage lesions have been described as correlating with the acromion index. In the current study, we aimed to determine the incidence of intraarticular lesions in calcifying tendinitis, to compare the incidence in patients with partial- and full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff, and to determine the acromion index in these groups. The incidence and type of accompanying intraarticular lesions were compared between three consecutive, age-matched groups of 64 patients each: those with calcifying tendinitis (group A), and those with partial- (group B) and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (group C). Also, the acromion index was measured from plain radiographs and compared between the groups. The incidence of intraarticular pathology was 43% in group A, 41% in group B and 84% in group C. The differences between groups A and C as well as B and C were significant (p tendinitis are comparable to age-matched shoulders with partial- rather than full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The acromion index is not different between shoulders with calcifying tendinitis, and partial- or full-thickness rotator cuff tears.

  18. Acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibis, A H; Giannis, D; Malizos, K N; Kitsioulis, P; Arvanitis, D L

    2013-05-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle (or retropharyngeal tendinitis) is an aseptic inflammatory process characterized by acute posterior neck pain, neck stiffness and dysphagia or odynophagia. Awareness of its existence is crucial in the differential diagnosis, because many other conditions, such as retropharyngeal abscess, meningitis or disc herniation, show similar clinical features. We present a case exhibiting an uncommon symptom (torticollis) and a brief literature review to emphasize the risk of misdiagnosis. A 36-year-old woman presented with neck stiffness and torticollis accompanied by dysphagia and prevertebral space sensitivity on the second day. The diagnosis was established by computed tomography (CT), the gold standard for identifying the presence of prevertebral oedema and calcific deposition associated with retropharyngeal tendinitis. Treatment with NSAIDs and low doses of corticosteroids relieved the symptoms within 48 h. Retropharyngeal tendinitis is an underreported entity in the literature and orthopaedists should become aware of its existence. Misdiagnosis of this important mimicker may lead to unnecessary antibiotics administration and interventions in the retropharyngeal space.

  19. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff as a cause of drooping shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato, N.; Banderali, A. [Department of Radiology, San Carlo Hospital, Piazzale Gianasso, 16158 Genoa (Italy); Neumaier, C.E. [Department of Radiology, National Cancer Institute, Viale Benedetto XV 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Dahmane, M.; Martinoli, C.; Derchi, L.E. [Department of Radiology, University of Genoa, Viale Benedetto XV 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy)

    2003-02-01

    We describe a case of inferior glenohumeral subluxation or drooping shoulder secondary to acute calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. The various etiologies of drooping shoulder and the specific causes determining glenohumeral widening in our report are discussed. The importance in recognizing this uncommon complication of a common abnormal finding and correction by aspiration is stressed. (orig.)

  20. A case of calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis: the significance of an early diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Kyoichi; Kusunoki, Takeshi; Mori, Kazunori; Murata, Kiyotaka; Doi, Katsumi

    2013-02-01

    The clinical presentation of calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis, a rare entity, can mimic more serious disorders. We describe the case of a 35-year-old man who was referred to us for evaluation of a suspected retropharyngeal abscess. At presentation, the patient reported severe cervical pain and stiffness. He exhibited mild fever, torticollis, and a moderately elevated white blood count; no swelling of the retropharyngeal wall was observed. Based on the results of plain radiography and computed tomography (CT), we diagnosed the patient with calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis. He was treated with a 7-day course of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and a 3-day course of a steroid, and he recovered well. We suggest that the true incidence of calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis is actually higher than what is generally believed because this diagnosis is frequently missed. Contrast-enhanced CT can aid in diagnosing calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis. CT should be performed in patients who present with nonspecific symptoms such as severe neck pain, sore throat, odynophagia, and mild fever.

  1. Successful Treatment of Gluteal Pain from Obturator Internus Tendinitis and Bursitis with Ultrasound-Guided Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Boqing; Rispoli, Leia; Stitik, Todd; Leong, Michelle

    2017-10-01

    This case report describes what the authors believe is the first case of a patient with obturator internus tendinitis and bursitis successfully treated with a corticosteroid injection using a trans-tendinous lateral to medial approach. The patient presented with right gluteal pain not relieved by physical therapy or right hip and ischial bursa corticosteroid injections. Pelvic and lumbar spine MRIs and EMG/NCS findings were unremarkable. Physical examination demonstrated tenderness to palpation at the right middle lower gluteal region. Ultrasound imaging with sonopalpation identified the maximal local tender point as the right obturator internus muscle and/or its underlying bursa. A 22-gauge 3.5-inch needle was inserted in-plane to the transducer and longitudinal to the obturator internus from a lateral to medial direction, an approach previously described in cadavers. The obturator internus tendon sheath and bursa were injected with 2.5 ml of 0.5% lidocaine combined with 10 mg of triamcinolone. The patient reported immediate complete relief of pain with continued relief at 2 and 6 months post-injection. This case report demonstrates an injection of the obturator internus tendon sheath and bursa using a trans-tendinous approach, which may be successful for treatment of patients presenting with persistent gluteal pain from obturator internus tendinitis and bursitis.

  2. Intra-tendinous ganglion in the long head of the biceps humeri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Kenta; Akisue, Toshihiro; Fujimoto, Takuya; Kawamoto, Teruya; Hara, Hitomi; Kurosaka, Masahiro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kobe (Japan); Hitora, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Tetuji [Kagawa University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kita-gun, Kagawa (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    We present details of a case of intra-tendinous ganglion arising from the long head of the biceps at an unusual location. MRI scans have important implications for surgical planning and treatment. After excision of the ganglion, the tendon remaining could be repaired. Five months after surgery, there was no sign of recurrence. (orig.)

  3. MR arthrography in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder: diagnostic performance and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubler, Christoph; Mengiardi, Bernard; Schmid, Marius R.; Hodler, Juerg; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Jost, Bernhard [University Hospital Balgrist, Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    The purpose was to assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography to diagnose calcific tendinitis of the shoulder and to assess the reasons for diagnostic errors. Standard MR arthrograms of 22 patients with calcific tendinitis and 61 controls were retrospectively analyzed by two independent and blinded radiologists. All cases were consecutively collected from a database. Conventional radiographs were available in all cases serving as gold standard. The supraspinatus was involved in 16, the infraspinatus in four and the subscapularis in two patients. All diagnostic errors were analyzed by two additional readers. Reader 1 correctly detected 12 of the 22 shoulders with and 42 of the 61 shoulders without calcific tendinitis (sensitivity 0.55, specificity 0.66). The corresponding values for reader 2 were 13 of 22 and 40 of 61 cases (sensitivity 0.59, specificity 0.69). Inter-rater agreement (kappa-value) was 0.42. Small size of the calcific deposits and isointensity compared to the surrounding tissue were the most important reasons for false negative results. Normal hypointense areas within the supraspinatus tendon substance and attachment were the main reason for false positive results. In conclusion, MR arthrography is insufficient in the diagnosis of calcific tendinitis. Normal hypointense parts of the rotator cuff may mimic calcific deposits and calcifications may not be detected when they are isointense compared to the rotator cuff. Therefore, MR imaging should not be interpreted without corresponding radiographs. (orig.)

  4. Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm caused by calcific tendinitis of the distal biceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garayoa, Santiago Amillo; Romero-Muñoz, Luis M; Pons-Villanueva, Juan

    2010-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm requires immediate treatment to avoid damage of the soft tissues and a poor functional outcome for the forearm. Muscular and bone lesions are the main causes of acute compartment syndromes. We report a case of acute compartment syndrome of the forearm caused by a calcific tendinitis of the distal biceps.

  5. [Conservative functional treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüfner, T; Gaulke, R; Imrecke, J; Krettek, C; Stübig, T

    2010-09-01

    The conservative functional treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures has developed further over the last 20 years and is basically possible for 60-80% of patients. The treatment leads to success if the indications obtained by dynamic sonography are correctly interpreted (adaptation of the tendon ends up to 20 degrees plantar flexion), if the patient presents sufficient compliance and the physiotherapy is increasingly intensified depending on tendon healing. Modern ortheses allow an increased equinus position and therefore improved protection of the healing tendon. If these factors are present a relatively low re-rupture rate of only 7% can be achieved. The decisive advantage of conservative functional therapy is the avoidance of specific operative risks, such as infection and injury to the sural nerve. After removal of the orthesis the tendon should continue to be modeled using shoe insoles and raised heels.

  6. Paired changes in electromechanical delay and musculo-tendinous stiffness after endurance or plyometric training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosset, Jean-Francois; Piscione, Julien; Lambertz, Daniel; Pérot, Chantal

    2009-01-01

    When measured in vivo electromechanical delay (EMD) depends mainly on the elastic properties of the muscle-tendon unit. Recent studies have shown changes in stiffness of the triceps surae (TS) following a period of training. To confirm the influence of musculo-tendinous stiffness on EMD, this study investigates paired changes in these two parameters after a training period. Two types of training known to induce opposite changes in stiffness were analysed. EMD and musculo-tendinous stiffness were measured on adult subjects before and after 10 weeks of endurance (n = 21) or plyometric (n = 9) trainings. EMD was defined as the time lag between the TS M-wave latency and the onset of muscle twitch evoked at rest by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the posterior tibial nerve. Quick release tests were used to evaluate the musculo-tendinous stiffness of the ankle plantar flexors. The stiffness index was defined as the slope of the relationship between angular stiffness and external torque values. Endurance training, known to preferentially activate the slow, stiffer muscle fibers, leads to a decrease in EMD and to an increase in stiffness index. Following plyometric training, which specifically recruits fast, more compliant fibers, EMD and the stiffness index exhibited adaptations directionally opposite to those seen with endurance training. When pooling the data for the two subject groups, a correlation was found between changes in EMD and changes in musculo-tendinous stiffness indexes. Thus, changes in EMD values are proposed to indirectly link to changes in musculo-tendinous stiffness for subjects involved in muscle training.

  7. Achilles tendon rupture following surgical management for tendinopathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maffulli Nicola

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achilles tendinopathy is understood to be a failed healing response. Operative management is utilised following the failure of non-operative methods. Case Presentation We present a case of Achilles tendon rupture, sustained whilst isometrically loading the Achilles tendon during an eccentric loading exercise programme. Conclusion: Bilateral surgical exploration and debridement had previously been performed after conservative management of bilateral Achilles tendinopathy had been unsuccessful.

  8. Clinical Outcomes and Complications of Percutaneous Achilles Repair System Versus Open Technique for Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew R; Jones, Carroll P; Cohen, Bruce E; Davis, W Hodges; Ellington, J Kent; Anderson, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    Limited incision techniques for acute Achilles tendon ruptures have been developed in recent years to improve recovery and reduce postoperative complications compared with traditional open repair. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the clinical outcomes and postoperative complications between acute Achilles tendon ruptures treated using a percutaneous Achilles repair system (PARS [Arthrex, Inc, Naples, FL]) versus open repair and evaluate the overall outcomes for operatively treated Achilles ruptures. Between 2005 and 2014, 270 consecutive cases of operatively treated acute Achilles tendon ruptures were reviewed (101 PARS, 169 open). Patients with Achilles tendinopathy, insertional ruptures, chronic tears, or less than 3-month follow-up were excluded. Operative treatment consisted of a percutaneous technique (PARS) using a 2-cm transverse incision with FiberWire (Arthrex, Inc, Naples, FL) sutures or open repair using a 5- to 8-cm posteromedial incision with FiberWire in a Krackow fashion reinforced with absorbable sutures. Patient demographics were recorded along with medical comorbidities, activity at injury, time from injury to surgery, length of follow-up, return to baseline activities by 5 months, and postoperative complications. The most common activity during injury for both groups was basketball (PARS: 39%, open: 47%). A greater number of patients treated with PARS were able to return to baseline physical activities by 5 months compared with the open group (PARS: 98%, open: 82%; P = .0001). There were no significant differences (P > .05) between groups in rates of rerupture (P = 1.0), sural neuritis (P = .16), wound dehiscence (P = .74), superficial (P = .29) and/or deep infection (P = .29), or reoperation (P = .13). There were no deep vein thromboses (DVTs) or reruptures in either group. In the PARS group, there were no cases of sural neuritis, 3 cases (3%) of superficial wound dehiscence, and 2 reoperations (2%) for superficial

  9. Functional reconstruction of complex tendo Achilles defect by free latissimus dorsi muscle flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya N Upadhyaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing the complex tendo Achilles defect involves reconstructing the Achilles tendon as well as providing soft tissue cover to the heel area. The advent of microsurgery has revolutionised the reconstruction of this difficult defect providing a number of options to the reconstructive surgeon. We present a case of complex tendo Achilles defect reconstructed by the latissimus dorsi free flap.

  10. Acute calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris associated with intraosseous involvement: a case report with serial CT and MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Kim, Jong Pil

    2013-11-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis of the shoulder is a well-known condition, but it is rare in the rectus femoris origin. Mostly reported cases were occurred in the reflected head of the rectus femoris, and only few cases were in the direct head of the rectus femoris. Intraosseous marrow involvement of calcific tendinitis is a more rare condition; it often goes misdiagnosed as an infection or a neoplasm. We report a rare, unusual case of acute calcific tendinitis of the direct head of the rectus femoris associated with intraosseous marrow involvement of calcification in anterior inferior iliac spine with serial CT and MRI findings. Aggressive osseous change may occur in acute calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris as in this case which should be made an appropriate diagnosis to avoid unnecessary investigation and overtreatment like a surgery.

  11. The role of ultrasound guided peri-tendinous injection in the treatment of non-calcific tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Niazi

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasound is a non invasive imaging technique that allows real time guidance for interventional therapy of non-calcific tendinopathy improving the result of peri-tendinous corticosteroid injection.

  12. Arthroscopic Removal and Rotator Cuff Repair Without Acromioplasty for the Treatment of Symptomatic Calcifying Tendinitis of the Supraspinatus Tendon

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcified rotator cuff tendinitis is a common cause of chronic shoulder pain that leads to significant pain and functional limitations. Although most patients respond well to conservative treatment, some eventually require surgical treatment. Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome with arthroscopic removal of calcific deposit and rotator cuff repair without acromioplasty for the treatment of calcific tendinitis of the supraspinatus tendon. Study Design: Case series; Level of ev...

  13. Effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the shoulder joint functional status of patients with calcific tendinitis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to analyze the effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the shoulder function of patients with calcific tendinitis through a 12-week follow-up. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 34 patients with calcific tendinitis participated in this study. In the extracorporeal shock wave therapy group, 18 patients received 6-week extracorporeal shock wave therapy and 12-week follow-up. The Constant-Murley scale was used to evaluate shoulder joint function. [Results] Analys...

  14. Pattern of Fascicular Involvement in Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy at Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counsel, Peter; Comin, Jules; Davenport, Marcus; Connell, David

    2015-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is composed of fascicles from the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, which are identifiable as discrete components at anatomical dissection. The pattern of fascicular involvement in Achilles tendinopathy may be characterized at ultrasound, and this characterization is reliable between different observers. Cross-sectional diagnostic study. Level 3. One hundred cases of Achilles tendinopathy were retrospectively evaluated by 2 blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Using a short-axis anatomical map, each case was categorized as involving the fascicular territories of the medial head of gastrocnemius, lateral head of gastrocnemius, soleus, or combinations of these, or as indeterminate. Both radiologists agreed on the fascicular involvement pattern in 93 of 100 cases; 20 involved only medial gastrocnemius territories, 8 lateral gastrocnemius, 15 soleus, 3 medial and lateral gastrocnemius, 21 medial gastrocnemius and soleus, 9 soleus and lateral gastrocnemius, and 16 the entire tendon, and 1 case was classified as indeterminate. In 7 cases, the interpretations were discordant. The kappa value was calculated as 0.92 (95% CI, 0.86-0.98) in keeping with a high level of interobserver agreement. As assessed at ultrasound, most cases of Achilles tendinopathy involve the medial head of gastrocnemius and/or soleus fascicles. The provided observational data will increase understanding of patterns of Achilles tendinopathy. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Surgical Strategy for the Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yangjing; Yang, Liu; Yin, Li; Duan, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture is usually misdiagnosed and treated improperly. This study aims to better understand the treatment of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Methods. Patients who were not able to perform a single-limb heel rise were chosen. Pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were conducted. By evaluating the presence or absence of Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length of rupture, V-Y advancement, gastrocnemius fascial turndown flap, or flexor halluces longus tendon transfer were selected for tendon repair. The function of ankle and foot was assessed by American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scores and Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS). Results. Twenty-nine patients were followed up. One patient had superficial incision infection, which was healed after debridement and oral antibiotics. Three months postoperatively, MRI showed some signs of inflammation, which disappeared at one or two years postoperatively. All patients were able to perform a single-limb heel rise. Mean AOFAS scores and ATRS scores were increased at the latest follow-up. Conclusion. Surgical options can be determined by evaluating the presence of the Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length, which can avoid using the nearby tendon and yield satisfactory functional results.

  16. Repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures using Lynn method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Tolunay

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Efficiency assessment of Lynn method onopen primary repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.Methods: Data were evaluated from 19 patients whotreated with the Lynne method due to acute Achilles tendonrupture. Average follow-up length was 12.3 months(range 8-15 months. Dominant side was the right sideby all patients and all patients were males. Plantaris tendonaugmentation was applied after end-to-end repair bymodified Kessler suture technique.Results: The mean postoperative AOFAS score (TheAmerican Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfootclinical outcome scores was 93.5 (range 82-100. Theaverage of Achilles tendon postoperative assessmentscore, as developed by Thermann and colleagues, was93.3. Both assessment scores were between 90-100 andwere evaluated as very good. None of the patients developedpost-operative wound infection. The Thompson testwas negative on all patients and bilateral motor strengthwas 5/5.Conclusion: Lynn method, especially in young and activepatients with acute Achilles tendon rupture is a methodthat should be considered in treatment protocols.Key words: Achilles tendon, Lynn method, AOFAS score

  17. Surgical Strategy for the Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangjing Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture is usually misdiagnosed and treated improperly. This study aims to better understand the treatment of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Methods. Patients who were not able to perform a single-limb heel rise were chosen. Pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were conducted. By evaluating the presence or absence of Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length of rupture, V-Y advancement, gastrocnemius fascial turndown flap, or flexor halluces longus tendon transfer were selected for tendon repair. The function of ankle and foot was assessed by American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scores and Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS. Results. Twenty-nine patients were followed up. One patient had superficial incision infection, which was healed after debridement and oral antibiotics. Three months postoperatively, MRI showed some signs of inflammation, which disappeared at one or two years postoperatively. All patients were able to perform a single-limb heel rise. Mean AOFAS scores and ATRS scores were increased at the latest follow-up. Conclusion. Surgical options can be determined by evaluating the presence of the Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length, which can avoid using the nearby tendon and yield satisfactory functional results.

  18. High-energy extracorporeal shock-wave therapy for treating chronic calcific tendinitis of the shoulder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannuru, Raveendhara R; Flavin, Nina E; Vaysbrot, Elizaveta; Harvey, William; McAlindon, Timothy

    2014-04-15

    Calcific and noncalcific tendinitis of the shoulder can be unresponsive to conventional therapies. Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT) has been suggested as an alternative treatment. To assess the efficacy of ESWT in patients with calcific and noncalcific tendinitis. MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched up to 1 November 2013. Randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) comparing high-energy versus low-energy ESWT or placebo for treatment of calcific or noncalcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Outcome measures included pain (visual analogue scale score), functional assessment (Constant-Murley score), and resolution of calcifications. Three independent reviewers abstracted data and determined eligibility and quality by consensus. Twenty-eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Studies were heterogeneous. Twenty RCTs compared ESWT energy levels and placebo and consistently showed that high-energy ESWT was significantly better than placebo in decreasing pain and improving function and resorption of calcifications in calcific tendinitis. No significant difference was found between ESWT and placebo in treatment of noncalcific tendinitis. The number of RCTs was small, and the studies were heterogeneous. High-energy ESWT is effective for improving pain and shoulder function in chronic calcific shoulder tendinitis and can result in complete resolution of calcifications. This therapy may be underutilized for a condition that can be difficult to manage. None.

  19. Missed Medial Malleolar Fracture Associated With Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Koji; Taketomi, Shuji; Inui, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kensuke; Sanada, Takaki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old man sustained an Achilles tendon rupture while playing futsal. A concomitant medial malleolar fracture was not diagnosed until the patient underwent an operation for Achilles tendon repair. A routine postoperative radiograph showed a minimally displaced medial malleolar fracture. Conservative treatment was chosen for the fracture. The function of the Achilles tendon recovered well, and the fracture was united. A medial malleolar fracture can be missed when an Achilles tendon rupture occurs simultaneously. Thus, surgeons should consider the possibility of medial malleolar fracture associated with an Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Deep transverse friction massage for treating lateral elbow or lateral knee tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, Laurianne M; Brosseau, Lucie; Tugwell, Peter; Wells, George A; Welch, Vivian; Shea, Beverley; Poitras, Stephane; De Angelis, Gino; Rahman, Prinon

    2014-11-08

    Background Deep transverse friction massage, one of several physical therapy interventions suggested for the management of tendinitis pain, was first demonstrated in the 1930s by Dr James Cyriax, a renowned orthopedic surgeon in England. Its goal is to prevent abnormal fibrous adhesions and abnormal scarring. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001.Objectives To assess the benefits and harms of deep transverse friction massage for treating lateral elbow or lateral knee tendinitis.Search methods We searched the following electronic databases: the specialized central registry of the Cochrane Field of Physical and Related Therapies,the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL),MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Clinicaltrials.gov, and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), up until July 2014. The reference lists of these trials were consulted for additional studies.Selection criteria All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing deep transverse friction massage with control or other active interventions for study participants with two eligible types of tendinitis (ie, extensor carpi radialis tendinitis (lateral elbow tendinitis, tennis elbow or lateral epicondylitis or lateralis epicondylitis humeri) and iliotibial band friction syndrome (lateral knee tendinitis)) were selected. Only studies published in English and French languages were included.Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed the studies on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results of individual trials were extracted from the included study using extraction forms prepared by two independent review authors before the review was begun.Data were cross-checked by a third review author. Risk of bias of the included studies was assessed using the "Risk of bias"tool of The Cochrane Collaboration. A pooled analysis was performed using

  1. Effectiveness comparison of channel-assisted mini-incision and open Achilles shortening for treatment of healed Achilles tendon rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-zhe QI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the clinical effectiveness between the channel-assisted mini-invasion and open Achilles shortening for treatment of the elongated Achilles tendon following previous rupture. Methods The clinical data of 19 patients admitted from Dec. 2013 to Dec. 2015 and met the inclusion criteria were analyzed retrospectively. Eight patients were treated with shortening operation by channel-assisted minimally invasive repair system, while 11 patients received dissection of Krackow Achilles tendon shortening. There was no significant difference between the two groups in gender, age, injury to operation time, preoperative calf circumference and preoperative AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society score (P>0.05. Results The operation time, incision length and postoperative hospital days were significantly less in min-invasion group than in incision group (P0.05. Conclusion Channel-assisted minimally invasive Achilles tendon shortening operation has not only similar effectiveness to the incision shorting operation for the treatment of elongated Achilles tendon following previous rupture, but also has the advantages of shortening operation time and stay in hospital and avoidance of sural nerve injury. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.07.12

  2. Functional rehabilitation of patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark-Christensen, Troels; Troelsen, Anders; Kallemose, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The optimal treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is continuously debated. Recent studies have proposed that the choice of either operative or non-operative treatment may not be as important as rehabilitation, suggesting that functional rehabilitation should be preferred over......, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and PEDro using the search terms: "Achilles tendon," "rupture," "mobilization" and "immobilization". Seven RCTs involving 427 participants were eligible for inclusion, with a total of 211 participants treated with functional rehabilitation and 216 treated with immobilization....... CONCLUSION: Functional rehabilitation after acute Achilles tendon rupture does not increase the rate of re-rupture or other complications. A trend toward earlier return to work and sport, and increased patient satisfaction was found when functional rehabilitation was used. The present literature is of low...

  3. Nonoperative dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Bloch Lauridsen, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dynamic rehabilitation has been suggested to be an important part of nonoperative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture that results in functional outcome and rerupture rates comparable with those of operative treatment. However, the optimal role of weight-bearing during early...... rehabilitation remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare immediate weight-bearing with non-weight-bearing in a nonoperative dynamic treatment protocol for Achilles tendon rupture. METHODS: The study was conducted as a blinded, randomized, controlled, parallel superiority trial. Patients eighteen...... to sixty years of age were eligible for inclusion. Both groups were treated nonoperatively with controlled early motion. The intervention group was allowed full weight-bearing from day one, and the control group was non-weight-bearing for six weeks. The primary outcome was the Achilles tendon Total Rupture...

  4. Botulinum toxin improves reduced dorsiflexion after Achilles tendon surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Iris; Lorbach, Olaf; Mehnert, Sabine; Kaps, Manfred; Engelhardt, Martin

    2010-02-01

    Generally, outcome after surgical repair of complete Achilles tendon rupture is good. However, some patients have ongoing problems with dorsiflexion of the ankle joint. We report on eight patients, who did not achieve heel contact because of reduced ankle dorsiflexion 5 months after surgical repair of complete Achilles tendon rupture. All patients received at least three cycles of injections with 200-300 units of Botulinum toxin A (BOTOX) into the gastrocnemius and soleus muscle. Weakening of the triceps surae by Botulinum toxin allowed patients to perform the required exercises and to tolerate casting at night. Thus, all patients were able to tolerate plantigrade foot position 9 months after beginning of Botulinum toxin treatment. At final follow-up after 2 years, pain had significantly improved, and a mean dorsiflexion of 21 degrees was reached. In conclusion, treatment of the calf muscles with BOTOX is a safe and effective method to improve restricted dorsiflexion in patients after Achilles tendon repair.

  5. Achilles tendinopathy: A review of the current concepts of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, A J; Calder, J D F

    2013-10-01

    The two main categories of Achilles tendon disorder are broadly classified by anatomical location to include non-insertional and insertional conditions. Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy is often managed conservatively, and many rehabilitation protocols have been adapted and modified, with excellent clinical results. Emerging and popular alternative therapies, including a variety of injections and extracorporeal shockwave therapy, are often combined with rehabilitation protocols. Surgical approaches have developed, with minimally invasive procedures proving popular. The management of insertional Achilles tendinopathy is improved by recognising coexisting pathologies around the insertion. Conservative rehabilitation protocols as used in non-insertional disorders are thought to prove less successful, but such methods are being modified, with improving results. Treatment such as shockwave therapy is also proving successful. Surgical approaches specific to the diagnosis are constantly evolving, and good results have been achieved.

  6. Could Ossification of the Achilles Tendon Have a Hereditary Component?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chawki Cortbaoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ossification of the Achilles tendon (OTA is an unusual clinical condition. It is characterized by the presence of an ossified mass within the fibrocartilaginous substance of the Achilles tendon. The etiology of the ossification of the Achilles tendon is unknown. Review of the literature suggests that its etiology is multifactorial. The major contributing factors are trauma and surgery with other minor causes such as systemic diseases, metabolic conditions, and infections. To our knowledge, no previous reports suggest any genetic/hereditary predisposition in OAT. We report 3 siblings who have OAT with no history of any of the aforementioned predisposing factors. Could OAT have a hereditary component as one of its etiologies?

  7. Evaluation of the Achilles Ankle Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Wietse; Meijneke, Cory; van der Kooij, Herman

    2016-02-11

    This paper evaluates the Achilles exoskeleton. The exoskeleton is intended to provide push-off assistance for healthy subjects during walking. The assistance is provided by a series elastic actuator that has been optimized to provide maximal push-off power. The paper presents the control method of the exoskeleton and the evaluation of the exoskeleton. Benchtop tests evaluated the performance of the actuator and human experiments evaluated the working of the complete system. The actuator can track force reference signals with amplitudes of 1 N to 100 N with a bandwidth between 8.1 Hz and 20.6 Hz, and outputs a maximum mechanical power of 80.2 W. Based on these results the augmentation factor predicted that the exoskeleton can generate a 33 W decrease in metabolic cost. In contrast with this prediction, in the human experiments we found an increase in metabolic rate for assistance (21.2 W) and no assistance (22.7 W) compared to baseline.

  8. Minimally invasive surgery for Achilles tendon pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Maffulli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Maffulli1, Umile Giuseppe Longo2, Filippo Spiezia2, Vincenzo Denaro21Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, England; 2Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Minimally invasive trauma and orthopedic surgery is increasingly common, though technically demanding. Its use for pathologies of the Achilles tendon (AT hold the promise to allow faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, and improved functional outcomes when compared to traditional open procedures, which can lead to difficulty with wound healing because of the tenuous blood supply and increased chance of wound breakdown and infection. We present the recent advances in the field of minimally invasive AT surgery for tendinopathy, acute ruptures, chronic tears, and chronic avulsions of the AT. In our hands, minimally invasive surgery has provided similar results to those obtained with open surgery, with decreased perioperative morbidity, decreased duration of hospital stay, and reduced costs. So far, the studies on minimally invasive orthopedic techniques are of moderate scientific quality with short follow-up periods. Multicenter studies with longer follow-up are needed to justify the long-term advantages of these techniques over traditional ones.Keywords: tendinopathy, rupture, percutanous repair, less invasive

  9. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in chronic Achilles tendinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärdin, Anna; Brismar, Torkel B; Movin, Tomas; Shalabi, Adel

    2013-11-22

    Chronic Achilles tendinosis is a common problem. When evaluating and comparing different therapies there is a need for reliable imaging methods. Our aim was to evaluate if chronic Achilles tendinosis affects the dynamic contrast-enhancement in the tendon and its surroundings and if short-term eccentric calf-muscle training normalizes the dynamic contrast-enhancement. 20 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were included. Median duration of symptoms was 31 months (range 6 to 120 months). Both Achilles tendons were examined with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI before and after a 12- week exercise programme of eccentric calf-muscle training. The dynamic MRI was evaluated in tendon, vessel and in fat ventrally of tendon. Area under the curve (AUC), time to peak of signal, signal increase per second (SI/s) and increase in signal between start and peak as a percentage (SI%) was calculated. Pain and performance were evaluated using a questionnaire. In the fat ventrally of the tendon, dynamic contrast enhancement was significantly higher in the symptomatic leg compared to the contralateral non-symptomatic leg before but not after treatment. Despite decreased pain and improved performance there was no significant change of dynamic contrast enhancement in symptomatic tendons after treatment. In Achilles tendinosis there is an increased contrast enhancement in the fat ventrally of the tendon. The lack of correlation with symptoms and the lack of significant changes in tendon contrast enhancement parameters do however indicate that dynamic enhanced MRI is currently not a useful method to evaluate chronic Achilles tendinosis.

  10. Injectable treatments for noninsertional achilles tendinosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Christopher E; Hsu, Andrew R; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Holmes, George B

    2013-05-01

    Although there has been a recent increase in interest regarding injectable therapy for noninsertional Achilles tendinosis, there are currently no clear treatment guidelines for managing patients with this condition. The objective of this study was (1) to conduct a systematic review of clinical outcomes following injectable therapy of noninsertional Achilles tendinosis, (2) to identify patient-specific factors that are prognostic of treatment outcomes, (3) to provide treatment recommendations based on the best available literature, and (4) to identify knowledge deficits that require further investigation. We searched MEDLINE (1948 to March week 1 2012) and EMBASE (1980 to 2012 week 9) for clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of injectable therapies for noninsertional Achilles tendinosis. Specifically, we included randomized controlled trials and cohort studies with a comparative control group. Data abstraction was performed by 2 independent reviewers. The Oxford Level of Evidence Guidelines and GRADE recommendations were used to rate the quality of evidence and to make treatment recommendations. Nine studies fit the inclusion criteria for our review, constituting 312 Achilles tendons at final follow-up. The interventions of interest included platelet-rich plasma (n = 54), autologous blood injection (n = 40), sclerosing agents (n = 72), protease inhibitors (n = 26), hemodialysate (n = 60), corticosteroids (n = 52), and prolotherapy (n = 20). Only 1 study met the criteria for a high-quality randomized controlled trial. All of the studies were designated as having a low quality of evidence. While some studies showed statistically significant effects of the treatment modalities, often studies revealed that certain injectables were no better than a placebo. The literature surrounding injectable treatments for noninsertional Achilles tendinosis has variable results with conflicting methodologies and inconclusive evidence concerning indications for treatment and the

  11. Calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris: an unusual site and cause for lateral knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Warwick; Chase, Helen Emily; Cahir, John G; Walton, Neil Patrick

    2016-07-29

    A 37-year-old man presented to the acute knee and sports medicine clinic with atraumatic lateral knee pain. He had point tenderness over the lateral aspect of his knee which had not settled with anti-inflammatory medications. Imaging revealed a large opaque lesion lateral to the knee and although there was no clear mechanism, injury to the posterolateral corner was considered. An MRI subsequently revealed a rare case of calcific tendinitis to the biceps femoris tendon insertion. This condition was self-limiting and did not require interventions such as steroid injections. This is the first reported case of calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris as a cause of acute knee pain. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. The clinical observations of 3 cases of metatarsal tendinitis treated with anti-inflammatory herbal acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-lae,Kim

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The objective of this study is to observe the effect of anti-inflammatory herbal acupuncture on the metatarsal tendinitis. Methods : After the application of herbal acupuncture, the VAS and Baumgaertner's nine point scale were assessed. If there were any restraints on the ROM, ROM was also assessed alongside the previous scales. Results : 1. The pain was reduced significantly according to the VAS scale. 2. As to the assessment of satisfaction in treatment, by the Baumgaertner's nine point scale, 2 out of 3 cases scored Excellent, and one case scored Good. Conclusions : The anti-inflammatory herbal acupuncture is effective to the metatarsal tendinitis, and can be used more frequently in the clinical practices.

  13. Platelet-rich plasma for calcific tendinitis of the shoulder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seijas, Roberto; Ares, Oscar; Alvarez, Pedro; Cusco, Xavier; Garcia-Balletbo, Montserrat; Cugat, Ramon

    2012-04-01

    We report a 44-year-old woman with calcific tendinitis of the shoulder treated with platelet-rich plasma injection. Prior to this, she had no improvement of the symptoms after 6 weeks of ultrasound treatment, Codman exercises, and anti-inflammatory treatment. Platelet-rich plasma was injected into the subacromial area 3 times at 2-week intervals. She had progressive improvement of pain after 2 weeks, and was asymptomatic at week 6. The patient then underwent the previous protocol of rehabilitation. At the one-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and had complete resolution of calcific tendinitis. The patient had regained full range of movement and had resumed all her activities.

  14. Ultrasound-guided injection for the biceps brachii tendinitis: results and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingwei; Ebraheim, Nabil; Lause, Gregory E

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the results of ultrasound-guided injection of corticosteroid for biceps brachii tendinitis. In this randomized and prospective study, we evaluated 45 patients who were treated by free-hand injection without ultrasound guidance (group A) and 53 patients who were treated by ultrasound-guided injection (group B). The mean age was 47 y (range, 28 to 72). The average follow-up was 33 weeks (range, 24 to 56). The visual analog scale score decreased from 7.1 ± 2.3 before injection to 4.2 ± 3.1 at follow-up in group A and from 6.9 ± 2.6 to 2.1 ± 1.9 in group B (p biceps brachii tendinitis.

  15. A comparison of physical examinations with musculoskeletal ultrasound in the diagnosis of biceps long head tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lin, Shu-Hsien; Hsu, Yen-Hsia; Chen, Shih-Ching; Kang, Jiunn-Horng

    2011-09-01

    Provocative tests are useful in diagnosing biceps tendon tendinitis. This is the first study to establish the reliability of these tests by comparing the resuts with musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) findings. This study examined 125 patients (69 women and 56 men) and 143 shoulders with shoulder pain. Yergason's test, Speed's test and a bicipital groove tenderness test were performed and musculoskeletal US findings were used as standard reference. Biceps tendon tendinitis was diagnosed with US in 39.1% of the patients and, of those, 55.3% had coexisting rotator cuff injury. The sensitivity and specificity of Yergason's test were 32% and 78%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of Speed's test were 63% and 58%, respectively. In conclusion, all three tests are limited by poor sensitivity. US can be an image modality choice in diagnosing biceps pathology.

  16. Human Achilles tendon glycation and function in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, Rene Brüggebusch; Madsen, Mads Kongsgaard

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients have an increased risk of foot ulcers, and glycation of collagen may increase tissue stiffness. We hypothesized that the level of glycemic control (glycation) may affect Achilles tendon stiffness, which can influence gait pattern. We therefore investigated the relationship between...... collagen glycation, Achilles tendon stiffness parameters and plantar pressure in poorly (n = 22) and well (n = 22) controlled diabetic patients, including healthy age matched (45-70 yrs) controls (n = 11). There were no differences in any of outcome parameters (collagen cross-linking or tendon stiffness...... concentrations (55%, P pressure (PPP)-ratio (33%, P

  17. Achilles tendinopathy following Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir) use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, F V; Tomlins, J; Churchill, D R; Walker-Bone, K; Richardson, D

    2014-10-01

    A multitude of rheumatologic manifestations have been associated with HIV infection and protease inhibitors use. We describe two cases that display a temporal relationship between initiating Kaletra and developing Achilles tendinopathy. Immediate and dramatic resolution of symptoms occurred on switching from Kaletra to an alternative agent. Clinicians may want to consider a trial of an alternative agent in individuals on Kaletra who experience Achilles tendinopathy. Adverse events must be formally reported so that our understanding of antiretrovirals may continually evolve and aid decisions about antiretroviral prescribing. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. [Damage to large tendons: Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2006-07-01

    The etiology and mechanisms of Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures are very similar. Age dependent changes in tendon structure and disorders such gout, diabetes, rheumatic diseases and chronic renal failure are associated causes. The main mechanism of rupture is indirect trauma. Although clinical diagnosis is easy, ruptures are still frequently missed. Sonography is the main standard diagnostic tool. MRI is indicated only in special cases. Open operative repair is the most common treatment for quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures. Treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures is moving towards an individualized choice of therapy. Percutaneous and other "minimally invasive" techniques will play an increasingly important role.

  19. Infarto del miocardio y tendinitis aquiliana como manifestaciones de hipercolesterolemia familiar

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Uribe; Alvaro Moreno; Javier Molina; Amado Karduss

    1988-01-01

    La hipercolesterolemia familiar (HF) es un trastorno genético caracterizado por disminución de los receptores para LDL colesterol, que se manifiesta por aumento de los niveles plasmáticos de LDL, enfermedad coronarla (EC) prematura y manifestaciones osteoarticulares como xantomas tendinosos y artritis. Se Informa el caso de un hombre de 30 anos, sin antecedentes reumatológicos ni cardiovasculares, quien concomitantemente presentó Infarto agudo del miocardlo (IM) y tendinitis aguda del Aqulles...

  20. Acute neck pain in the ED: Consider longus colli calcific tendinitis vs meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tyag K; Weis, James C

    2017-06-01

    Presented here is a rare cause of severe neck pain - acute longus colli calcific tendinitis - in a 54year old man who presented to the emergency department. The neck pain is due to inflammation caused by calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition in the tendons on the longus colli muscles. This is non-infectious. The gold standard for diagnosis is a CT neck which best shows the calcifications in the anterior vertebral column of C1-C4, where the tendons of these muscles insert bilaterally. Longus colli calcific tendinitis is not life-threatening and patients will make a full recovery after treatment with NSAIDs. However, this condition is often confused with life-threatening conditions such as infection (meningitis or retropharyngeal abscess), intracranial hemorrhage, trauma, herniation of cervical discs, or malignancy (Estimable et al. (2015) [1]). Symptoms associated with calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle are non-specific and include mild fever, moderate-severe headache, neck pain, and drastically reduced range of motion of the neck. More specific symptoms are the presence of dysphagia and odynophagia. Lab findings usually are significant for mild leukocytosis, and elevated ESR and CRP. Awareness of this condition by E.D. physicians can avoid unnecessary invasive interventions, increased costs, and delays that result from incorrect diagnosis and treatment. This is a unique case in which a patient who was afebrile with a normal ESR was worked up for meningitis and an intracranial process, and also empirically treated for meningitis before finally being diagnosed with acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle in the E.D. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tendon-derived progenitor cells improve healing of collagenase-induced flexor tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgam, Sushmitha S; Stewart, Allison A; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Wagoner Johnson, Amy J; Stewart, Matthew C

    2016-12-01

    Tendinitis is a common and a performance-limiting injury in athletes. This study describes the value of intralesional tendon-derived progenitor cell (TDPC) injections in equine flexor tendinitis. Collagenase-induced tendinitis was created in both front superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendons. Four weeks later, the forelimb tendon lesions were treated with 1 × 10(7) autogenous TDPCs or saline. Tendinitis was also induced by collagenase in one hind SDF tendon, to study the survival and distribution of DiI-labeled TDPCs 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after injection. The remaining normal tendon was used as a "control." Twelve weeks after forelimb TDPC injections, tendons were harvested for assessment of matrix gene expression, biochemical, biomechanical, and histological characteristics. DiI-labeled TDPCs were abundant 1 week after injection but gradually declined over time and were undetectable after 6 weeks. Twelve weeks after TDPC injection, collagens I and III, COMP and tenomodulin mRNA levels were similar (p = 0.3) in both TDPC and saline groups and higher (p < 0.05) than normal tendon. Yield and maximal stresses of the TDPC group were significantly greater (p = 0.005) than the saline group's and similar (p = 0.6) to normal tendon. However, the elastic modulus of the TDPC and saline groups were not significantly different (p = 0.32). Histological assessment of the repair tissues with Fourier transform-second harmonic generation imaging demonstrated that collagen alignment was significantly better (p = 0.02) in TDPC group than in the saline controls. In summary, treating collagenase-induced flexor tendon lesions with TDPCs improved the tensile strength and collagen fiber alignment of the repair tissue. Study Design © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2162-2171, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Glycosaminoglycans of human rotator cuff tendons: changes with age and in chronic rotator cuff tendinitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, G P; Harrall, R. L.; Constant, C R; Chard, M D; Cawston, T E; Hazleman, B L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To analyse the glycosaminoglycans of the adult human rotator cuff tendon matrix, to characterise changes in the glycosaminoglycan composition with age and in chronic rotator cuff tendinitis. METHODS--Rotator cuff (supraspinatus) tendons (n = 84) and common biceps tendons (n = 26) were obtained from cadavers with no history of tendon pathology (age range 11-95 years). Biopsies of rotator cuff tendons (supraspinatus and subscapularis tendons, n = 53) were obtained during open should...

  3. Infarto del miocardio y tendinitis aquiliana como manifestaciones de hipercolesterolemia familiar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Uribe

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available La hipercolesterolemia familiar (HF es un trastorno genético caracterizado por disminución de los receptores para LDL colesterol, que se manifiesta por aumento de los niveles plasmáticos de LDL, enfermedad coronarla (EC prematura y manifestaciones osteoarticulares como xantomas tendinosos y artritis. Se Informa el caso de un hombre de 30 anos, sin antecedentes reumatológicos ni cardiovasculares, quien concomitantemente presentó Infarto agudo del miocardlo (IM y tendinitis aguda del Aqulles. Las características clínicas y el patrón Iipídico fueron compatibles con HF (hiperlipoproteinemia lIa. Se discuten las características clínicas del paciente y las manifestaciones reumatológicas de las hipercolesterolemias. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH Js a genetic disorder characterized by a decrease Jn LDL cholesterol receptors; patents exhibit Increased plasmatic LDL levels, early coronary artery disease and osteoarticular manifestations such as tendinous xanthomata and arthritis. We report the case of a thirty year-old man wlth no cardiovascular or rheumatologic history who presented with concomitant acute myocardial Jnfarctlon and acute Achilles’' tendinitis. Clinical features and lipid work-up were consistent wlth FH (Hyperllpoprotelnemla Ila.

  4. A rare case of neck pain: acute longus colli calcific tendinitis in a possibly immunocompromised individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estimable, Kerlie; Rizk, Cynthia; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of severe neck pain in a 45-year-old man with severe hidradenitis suppurativa who was participating in a study involving adalimumab. The neck pain was associated with acute longus colli calcific tendinitis, which is a noninfectious inflammatory response in the longus colli tendons secondary to deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystal. The diagnosis was made by computed tomography, which showed calcifications and deposits, and magnetic resonance imaging, which showed a retropharyngeal effusion. Ears, Nose, and Throat Services performed a fiberoptic scope examination, which revealed a patent airway and no drainable abscess. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs resulted in a dramatic improvement in the patient's clinical symptoms. In acute longus colli tendinitis, differentiating retropharyngeal aseptic effusion from infection is important. Of note, the confounding factor in this case was that the patient was blinded to whether he was receiving the placebo or adalimumab, so whether the patient was immunosuppressed and at risk for infection was unknown. Clinician familiarity and education concerning acute calcific longus colli tendinitis may lead to decreased costs stemming from incorrect diagnosis and unnecessary treatment. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  5. Ultrasound Guidance in Performing a Tendoscopic Surgery to Treat Posterior Tibial Tendinitis: A Useful Tool?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinobu Nishimura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old man with a pronation-external rotation type of fracture was surgically treated using a fibular plate. Five years later, he underwent resection of bone hyperplasia because of the ankle pain and limitation of range of motion. Thereafter, the left ankle became intermittently painful, which persisted for about one year. He presented at the age of 43 with persistent ankle pain. Physical and image analysis findings indicated a diagnosis of posttraumatic posterior tibial tendinitis, which we surgically treated using tendoscopy. Endoscopic findings showed tenosynovitis and fibrillation on the tendon surface. We cleaned and removed the synovium surrounding the tendon and deepened the posterior tibial tendon groove to allow sufficient space for the posterior tibial tendon. Full weight-bearing ambulation was permitted one day after surgery and he returned to his occupation in the construction industry six weeks after surgery. The medial aspect of the ankle was free of pain and symptoms at a review two years after surgery. Although tendoscopic surgery for stage 1 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction has been reported, tendoscopic surgery to treat posttraumatic posterior tibial tendinitis has not. Our experience with this patient showed that tendoscopic surgery is useful not only for stage 1 posterior tibial dysfunction, but also for posttraumatic posterior tibial tendinitis.

  6. Sensory dysfunction associated with repetitive strain injuries of tendinitis and focal hand dystonia: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byl, N; Wilson, F; Merzenich, M; Melnick, M; Scott, P; Oakes, A; McKenzie, A

    1996-04-01

    Repetitive strain injuries are reaching epidemic levels among workers who perform heavy schedules of rapid alternating movements (eg., computer programmers, data entry workers) or repetitive, sustained, coordinated movements (eg., editors, writers, salespeople). The purpose of this study was to determine if patients with repetitive strain injury demonstrated degraded sensory motor performance with their hands. Sixty age-matched adults were recruited, with 15 each assigned to a healthy adult control group, a healthy musician control group, a tendinitis group, or a focal dystonia group. Four sensory motor subtests from the Sensory Integration and Praxis Test were given to the subjects according to a standardized protocol. Using multiple one-factor analyses of variance in the parametric or nonparametric mode followed by post hoc pairwise testing, no significant differences were found between the healthy controls and the musician controls. On the test of kinesthesia, using the left hand, subjects with tendinitis performed significantly worse than controls and subjects with focal dystonia. Compared with controls, subjects with focal dystonia did significantly worse on graphesthesia and manual form perception (part 1 and part 2). Subjects with focal dystonia also did significantly worse than subjects with tendinitis when using the left hand on graphesthesia and manual form perception (part 2). When treating patients with repetitive strain injury, discriminative sensory motor skills must be carefully assessed and may need to be addressed as part of an effective treatment program.

  7. Ultrasonic evaluations of Achilles tendon mechanical properties poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Liu, Shu Q; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2009-03-01

    Spasticity, contracture, and muscle weakness are commonly observed poststroke in muscles crossing the ankle. However, it is not clear how biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon change poststroke, which may affect functions of the impaired muscles directly. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon, including the length and cross-sectional area, in the impaired and unimpaired sides of 10 hemiparetic stroke survivors were evaluated using ultrasonography. Elongation of the Achilles tendon during controlled isometric ramp-and-hold and ramping up then down contractions was determined using a block-matching method. Biomechanical changes in stiffness, Young's modulus, and hysteresis of the Achilles tendon poststroke were investigated by comparing the impaired and unimpaired sides of the 10 patients. The impaired side showed increased tendon length (6%; P = 0.04), decreased stiffness (43%; P Young's modulus (38%; P = 0.005), and increased mechanical hysteresis (1.9 times higher; P muscle spasticity, contracture, and/or disuse poststroke. In vivo quantitative characterizations of the tendon biomechanical properties may help us better understand changes of the calf muscle-tendon unit as a whole and facilitate development of more effective treatments.

  8. New finding in the radiographic diagnosis of Achilles tendon rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newmark, H.; Mellon, W.S. Jr.; Malhotra, A.K.; Olken, S.M.; Halls, J.

    1982-06-01

    The authors describe a new radiographic sign of rupture of the Achilles tendon system. It is a fracture, with separation through an osteophyte at the insertion of this tendon. Previously reported signs are also discussed as well as the present case report.

  9. Surgical treatment of the neglected achilles tendon rupture with Hyalonect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esenyel, Cem Zeki; Tekin, Cagri; Cakar, Murat; Bayraktar, Kursat; Saygili, Selcuk; Esenyel, Meltem; Tekin, Zeynep N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the management and outcomes of ten patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture treated with a turndown gastrocnemius-soleus fascial flap wrapped with a surgical mesh (Hyalonect). Ten men with neglected Achilles tendon rupture were treated with a centrally based turndown gastrocnemius fascial flap wrapped with Hyalonect. Hyalonect is a knitted mesh composed of HYAFF, a benzyl ester of hyaluronic acid. The Achilles tendon ruptures were diagnosed more than 1 month after injury. The mean patient age was 41 years. All of the patients had weakness of active plantarflexion. The mean preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 64.8. The functional outcome was excellent. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 97.8 at the latest follow-up. There were significant differences between the preoperative and postoperative scores. Ankle range of motion was similar in both ankles. Neither rerupture nor major complication, particularly of wound healing, was observed. For patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture with a rupture gap of at least 5 cm, surgical repair using a single turndown fascial flap covered with Hyalonect achieved excellent outcomes.

  10. [Surgical treatment for chronic achilles tendon rupture and severe scarring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chuan-Xiu; He, Sheng-Wei; Fang, Xu; Mi, Li-Dong; Du, Guang-Yu; Sun, Xue-Gang

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of autologous semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafting with anchor repair for the treatment of chronic achilles tendon rupture and severe scarring. From April 2010 to October 2012,26 patients with chronic achilles tendon rupture(with Myerson type III ) and severe scarring were treated with autologous semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafting with anchor repair. There were 19 males and 7 females,with an average age of 32 years old (ranged, 22 to 47 years). The time from injury to surgery was from 3 to 12 months (7 months on average). The plantar flexion strength of all injuried feet attenuated and single heel rise test were positive in 26 cases before operation. Plaster immobilization and routine rehabilitation therapy were performed after operation. Clinical effects were evaluated by Arner-lindholm criterion and complications were observed after operation. All the patients were followed up from 12 to 24 months with a mean of 16 months. No complications such as achilles tendon re-rupture, wound infection, etc were found during follow-up period. According to the Arner-Lindholm standard, 15 cases got excellent results and 11 good. Using autologous semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafts with anchor repair to treat chronic achilles tendon rupture and severe scarring is a perfect surgical procedure.

  11. Imaging and Treatment of Chronic Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. de Vos (Robert-Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: It is estimated that 30-50% of sports injuries are caused by tendon disorders. Chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy is a frequent problem, particularly occurring in athletes but also affecting inactive people. Diagnosis is made based on clinical findings and currently t

  12. Enforced bipedal downhill running induces Achilles tendinosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Gabriel Yin-Fat; Chung, Polly Yee-Man; Wang, Jenny Shijie; Cheung, Roy Tsz-Hei

    2011-01-01

    Enforced downhill running has been reported to induce tendinosis in the rat supraspinatus tendon but similar exercise failed to induce Achilles tendinosis in this animal. Due to the presence of acromial arch in the shoulder, accessing the supraspinatus tendon with physical modalities is difficult; thus this model may not be suitable for studying the treatment for tendinosis. To develop a rat model for Achilles tendinosis, we tested 14 mature Sprague-Dawley rats by dividing them into 2 groups of 7 each. The experimental group was subjected to a daily enforced downhill bipedal running program by suspending their upper bodies so that they ran with their hind limbs on a treadmill for 1 hr/day for 8 weeks. The downward inclination was 20 degrees and the speed was 17 m/min. The animals in the control group did not undergo any exercise. After 8 weeks, the Achilles tendons were harvested and subjected to histological and biomechanical analysis. Histological examination revealed tenocyte proliferation, change in tenocytes appearance, and collagen bundle disintegration in the running group. The biomechanical testing revealed significant decrease in stiffness (p = 0.002) and ultimate tensile strength (p = 0.016) in the running group than in the control group. Both the histological and biomechanical findings are suggestive of changes in the tendon of the running group that resembled the pathological changes of tendinosis in human. This new model of Achilles tendinosis in rat will be useful for studying the etiology and subsequent management strategies of this condition.

  13. Physiological Achilles' heels of Enteropathogenic bacteria in livestock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    An elaborate feeding regimen of animals, which takes advantage of the Achilles' heels of enteropathogenic bacteria, can possibly enable prophylaxis in the intestinal tract, attenuate actual disease symptoms, accelerate recovery from a bacterial gastroenteritis or ensure food safety. There is a wide

  14. Physiological Achilles' heels of Enteropathogenic bacteria in livestock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    An elaborate feeding regimen of animals, which takes advantage of the Achilles' heels of enteropathogenic bacteria, can possibly enable prophylaxis in the intestinal tract, attenuate actual disease symptoms, accelerate recovery from a bacterial gastroenteritis or ensure food safety. There is a wide

  15. Characterization and Surgical Management of Achilles Tendon Sleeve Avulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jeannie; Easley, Mark E; Nunley, James A

    2016-06-01

    An Achilles sleeve avulsion occurs when the tendon ruptures distally from its calcaneal insertion as a continuous "sleeve." This relatively rare injury pattern may not be appreciated until the time of surgery and can be challenging to treat because, unlike a midsubstance rupture, insufficient tendon remains on the calcaneus to allow for end-to-end repair, and unlike a tuberosity avulsion fracture, any bony element avulsed with the tendon is inadequate for internal fixation. This study aimed to highlight the characteristics of Achilles sleeve avulsions and present the outcomes of operative repair using suture anchor fixation. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 11 consecutive Achilles tendon sleeve avulsions (10 males, 1 female; mean age 44 years) that underwent operative repair between 2008 and 2014. Patient demographics, injury presentation, and operative details were reviewed. Postoperative outcomes were collected at a mean follow-up of 38.4 (range, 12-83.5) months, including the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot score, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, plantarflexion strength, patient satisfaction, and complications. Eight patients (72.7%) had preexisting symptoms of insertional Achilles disease. Ten of 11 (90.9%) injuries were sustained during recreational athletic activity. An Achilles sleeve avulsion was recognized preoperatively in 7 of 11 (64%) cases, where lateral ankle radiographs demonstrated a small radiodensity several centimeters proximal to the calcaneal insertion. Intraoperatively, 90.9% of sleeve avulsions had a concomitant Haglund deformity and macroscopic evidence of insertional tendinopathy. All patients healed after suture anchor repair. The average AOFAS score was 92.8 and VAS score was 0.9. Ten patients (90.9%) were completely satisfied. One complication occurred, consisting of delayed wound healing. Achilles tendon sleeve avulsions predominantly occurred in middle-aged men with preexisting insertional

  16. Influence of Cervical Muscle Fatigue on Musculo-Tendinous Stiffness of the Head-Neck Segment during Cervical Flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portero, Raphaël; Quaine, Franck; Cahouet, Violaine; Léouffre, Marc; Servière, Christine; Portero, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if the fatigue of cervical muscles has a significant influence on the head-neck segment musculo-tendinous stiffness. Ten men (aged 21.2 ± 1.9 years) performed four quick-release trials of flexion at 30 and 50% MVC before and after the induction of muscular fatigue on cervical flexors. Electromyographic activity was recorded on the sternocleidomastoids (SCM) and spinal erectors (SE), bilaterally. Musculo-tendinous stiffness was calculated through the quick-release method adapted to the head-neck segment. We noticed a significant linear increase of the head-neck segment musculo-tendinous stiffness with the increase of exertion level both before (P musculo-tendinous stiffness with fatigue of cervical muscles. We found a significant increase in EMG activity in the SCM and the SE after the induction of fatigue of the SCM. Our findings suggest that with fatigue of cervical flexors, neck muscle activity is modulated in order to maintain the musculo-tendinous stiffness at a steady state.

  17. Achilles tendinopathy modulates force frequency characteristics of eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Nicole L; Wearing, Scott C; O'Toole, John M; Smeathers, James E

    2013-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that ground reaction force (GRF) recorded during eccentric ankle exercise is characterized by greater power in the 8- to 12-Hz bandwidth when compared with that recorded during concentric ankle exercise. Subsequently, it was suggested that vibrations in this bandwidth may underpin the beneficial effect of eccentric loading in tendon repair. However, this observation has been made only in individuals without Achilles tendinopathy. This research compared the force frequency characteristics of eccentric and concentric exercises in individuals with and without Achilles tendinopathy. Eleven male adults with unilateral midportion Achilles tendinopathy and nine control male adults without tendinopathy participated in the research. Kinematics and GRF were recorded while the participants performed a common eccentric rehabilitation exercise protocol and a concentric equivalent. Ankle joint kinematics and the frequency power spectrum of the resultant GRF were calculated. Eccentric exercise was characterized by a significantly greater proportion of spectral power between 4.5 and 11.5 Hz when compared with concentric exercise. There were no significant differences between limbs in the force frequency characteristics of concentric exercise. Eccentric exercise, in contrast, was defined by a shift in the power spectrum of the symptomatic limb, resulting in a second spectral peak at 9 Hz, rather than 10 Hz in the control limb. Compared with healthy tendon, Achilles tendinopathy was characterized by lower frequency vibrations during eccentric rehabilitation exercises. This finding may be associated with changes in neuromuscular activation and tendon stiffness that have been shown to occur with tendinopathy and provides a possible rationale for the previous observation of a different biochemical response to eccentric exercise in healthy and injured Achilles tendons.

  18. The role of tendon microcirculation in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2008-04-30

    Tendinopathy is of distinct interest as it describes a painful tendon disease with local tenderness, swelling and pain associated with sonographic features such as hypoechogenic texture and diameter enlargement. Recent research elucidated microcirculatory changes in tendinopathy using laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry such as at the Achilles tendon, the patellar tendon as well as at the elbow and the wrist level. Tendon capillary blood flow is increased at the point of pain. Tendon oxygen saturation as well as tendon postcapillary venous filling pressures, determined non-invasively using combined Laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry, can quantify, in real-time, how tendon microcirculation changes over with pathology or in response to a given therapy. Tendon oxygen saturation can be increased by repetitive, intermittent short-term ice applications in Achilles tendons; this corresponds to 'ischemic preconditioning', a method used to train tissue to sustain ischemic damage. On the other hand, decreasing tendon oxygenation may reflect local acidosis and deteriorating tendon metabolism. Painful eccentric training, a common therapy for Achilles, patellar, supraspinatus and wrist tendinopathy decreases abnormal capillary tendon flow without compromising local tendon oxygenation. Combining an Achilles pneumatic wrap with eccentric training changes tendon microcirculation in a different way than does eccentric training alone; both approaches reduce pain in Achilles tendinopathy. The microcirculatory effects of measures such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy as well as topical nitroglycerine application are to be studied in tendinopathy as well as the critical question of dosage and maintenance. Interestingly it seems that injection therapy using color Doppler for targeting the area of neovascularisation yields to good clinical results with polidocanol sclerosing therapy, but also with a combination of epinephrine and lidocaine.

  19. Metabolic syndrome associated to non-inflammatory Achilles enthesopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Di Carlo, Luigi; Salini, Vincenzo; Schiavone, Cosima

    2014-01-01

    Enthesopathies are frequently found in rheumatic inflammatory diseases, but can be observed also in absence of systemic inflammation. Aging, overuse, and microtraumas can be responsible for enthesis-degenerative phenomena. Despite that Achilles enthesis is the more frequently affected, no systematic study on the risk factors associated to this enthesopathy has been yet performed. The aim of this paper was to assess whether the metabolic syndrome could be associated to entheseal lesions. Forty-five subjects with symptomatic non-inflammatory Achilles enthesopathy were compared to 45 asymptomatic controls. An ultrasound study of the Achilles enthesis was carried out, and the presence/absence of lesions (morphologic abnormalities, calcific deposits, enthesophytes, cortical abnormalities, and adjacent bursitis) was assessed. On the basis of history, comorbidities (osteoarthritis, diabetes, and hypertension) were recorded. In each subject, body mass index (BMI), glucose, total, and HDL cholesterol were also evaluated. All symptomatic subjects showed at ultrasound evaluation at least one structural entheseal alteration; pathologic features in asymptomatic subjects were found in 6/45 (13.3 %) of cases. Higher values of BMI and glucose were found in subjects with symptomatic enthesopathy. At multiple logistic regression analysis, the presence of high values of BMI and glucose was related to a higher probability to detect entheseal lesions. Metabolic syndrome and overweight may have a role in the pathogenesis of Achilles enthesopathy due to their synergistic worsening effect on other pathogenetic factors of tendon degeneration, such age and overuse. Therefore, subjects with metabolic syndrome practicing sports and other activities stressing the Achilles tendon should receive advice for more frequent controls.

  20. The Achilles tendon resting angle as an indirect measure of Achilles tendon length following rupture, repair, and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Carmont

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: The ATRA increases following injury, is reduced by surgery, and then increases again during initial rehabilitation. The angle also correlates with patient-reported symptoms early in the rehabilitation phase and with heel-rise height after 1 year. The ATRA might be considered a simple and effective means to evaluate Achilles tendon function 1 year after the rupture.

  1. Using of Tendinous Plasty in Treatment of Patients with Flexor Tendons of 2–5 Fingers Injury in “Critical” Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Kireev

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Injury of both superficial and deep tendons of fingers flexors needs to carry out tendinous plasty with excision of distal part of superficial flexor muscle tendon. Use of length measuring method for tendinous transplant allows us to avoid the flexion contracture in future and appearance of functional insufficiency of flexion during postoperative period and rehabilitation of patient.

  2. Radial extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinitis: a prospective randomised double-blind placebo-controlled multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A. van der; Yang, K.G.; Tamminga, R.; Hoeven, H. van der

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of radial extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (rESWT) on patients with chronic tendinitis of the rotator cuff. This was a randomised controlled trial in which 82 patients (mean age 47 years (24 to 67)) with chronic tendinitis diagnosed clinically were

  3. Radial extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinitis: a prospective randomised double-blind placebo-controlled multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A. van der; Yang, K.G.; Tamminga, R.; Hoeven, H. van der

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of radial extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (rESWT) on patients with chronic tendinitis of the rotator cuff. This was a randomised controlled trial in which 82 patients (mean age 47 years (24 to 67)) with chronic tendinitis diagnosed clinically were

  4. Arthroscopic suture bridge technique for intratendinous tear of rotator cuff in chronically painful calcific tendinitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Moon, Chang-Yun; Park, Sang-Eun; Kim, Yeon-Jun; Kim, Sung-Eun

    2013-11-01

    Arthroscopic removal, now the main treatment option, has almost replaced open surgery for treatment of resistant calcific tendinitis. In some cases of chronic calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, the calcific materials are hard and adherent to the tendon. Removal of these materials can cause significant intratendinous tears between the superficial and deep layers of the degenerated rotator cuff. Thus far, there are no established surgical techniques for removing the calcific materials while ensuring cuff integrity. Good clinical results for rotator cuff repair were achieved by using an arthroscopic suture bridge technique in patients with long-standing calcific tendinitis. Intact rotator cuff integrity and recovery of signal change on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were confirmed. This is a technical note about a surgical technique and its clinical results with a review of relevant published reports. © 2013 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Repair of Chronic Achilles Ruptures Has a High Incidence of Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark J; DeCarbo, William T; Hofbauer, Mark H; Thun, Joshua D

    2016-11-23

    Background Despite the low incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in foot and ankle surgery, some authors report a high incidence of symptomatic DVT following Achilles tendon rupture. The purpose of this study was to identify DVT risk factors inherent to Achilles tendon repair to determine which patients may benefit from prophylaxis. Methods One hundred and thirteen patient charts were reviewed following elective and nonelective Achilles tendon repair. For elective repair of insertional or noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy, parameters examined included lateral versus prone positioning and the presence versus absence of a flexor hallucis longus transfer. For nonelective repair, acute Achilles tendon ruptures were compared to chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. Results Of 113 Achilles tendon repairs, 3 venous thromboembolism (VTE) events (2.65%) occurred including 2 pulmonary emboli (1.77%). Seventeen of these repairs were chronic Achilles tendon ruptures, and all 3 VTE events (17.6%) occurred within this subgroup. Elevated body mass index was associated with VTE in patients with chronic Achilles ruptures although this did not reach significance (P = .064). No VTE events were reported after repair of 28 acute tendon ruptures or after 68 elective repairs of tendinopathy. Two patients with misdiagnosed partial Achilles tendon tears were excluded because they experienced a VTE event 3 weeks and 5 weeks after injury, prior to surgery. Conclusion In our retrospective review, chronic Achilles ruptures had a statistically significant higher incidence of VTE compared with acute Achilles ruptures (P = .048) or elective repair (P = .0069). Pharmaceutical anticoagulation may be considered for repair of chronic ruptures. Repair of acute ruptures and elective repair may not warrant routine prophylaxis due to a lower incidence of VTE.

  6. Long-term functional outcome of bilateral spontaneous and simultaneous Achilles tendon ruptures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, Prasad

    2012-10-01

    Bilateral simultaneous ruptures are rare comprising less than 1% of all Achilles tendon ruptures. Risk factors for bilateral ruptures include chronic diseases and medications such as corticosteroids and fluoroquinolones. There is little in the literature on the long-term functional outcome of bilateral Achilles tendon ruptures. This article present a series of 3 cases of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon ruptures with a minimum of 5-year follow up suggesting a good functional outcome.

  7. The effect of dry needling and treadmill running on inducing pathological changes in rat Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bom Soo; Joo, Young Chae; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Kil Hwan; Kang, Joon Soon; Park, So Ra

    2015-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common degenerative condition without a definitive treatment. An adequate chronic animal model of Achilles tendinopathy has not yet been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual and combined effects of dry needling and treadmill running on the Achilles tendon of rats. Percutaneous dry needling, designed to physically replicate microrupture of collagen fibers in overloaded tendons, was performed on the right Achilles tendon of 80 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: a treadmill group, which included rats that underwent daily uphill treadmill running (n = 40), and a cage group, which included rats that could move freely within their cages (n = 40). At the end of weeks 1 and 4, 20 rats from each group were sacrificed, and bilateral Achilles tendons were collected. The harvested tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and histological analysis. Dry needling induced histological and mechanical changes in the Achilles tendons at week 1, and the changes persisted at week 4. The needled Achilles tendons of the treadmill group tended to show more severe histological and mechanical changes than those of the cage group, although these differences were not statistically significant. Dry needling combined with free cage activity or treadmill running produced tendinopathy-like changes in rat Achilles tendons up to 4 weeks after injury. Dry needling is an easy procedure with a short induction period and a high success rate, suggesting it may have relevance in the design of an Achilles tendinopathy model.

  8. Inflammatory and Metabolic Alterations of Kager's Fat Pad in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingel, Jessica; Petersen, M Christine H; Fredberg, Ulrich; Kjær, Søren G; Quistorff, Bjørn; Langberg, Henning; Hansen, Jacob B

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a painful inflammatory condition characterized by swelling, stiffness and reduced function of the Achilles tendon. Kager's fat pad is an adipose tissue located in the area anterior to the Achilles tendon. Observations reveal a close physical interplay between Kager's fat pad and its surrounding structures during movement of the ankle, suggesting that Kager's fat pad may stabilize and protect the mechanical function of the ankle joint. The aim of this study was to characterize whether Achilles tendinopathy was accompanied by changes in expression of inflammatory markers and metabolic enzymes in Kager's fat pad. A biopsy was taken from Kager's fat pad from 31 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and from 13 healthy individuals. Gene expression was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Focus was on genes related to inflammation and lipid metabolism. Expression of the majority of analyzed inflammatory marker genes was increased in patients with Achilles tendinopathy compared to that in healthy controls. Expression patterns of the patient group were consistent with reduced lipolysis and increased fatty acid β-oxidation. In the fat pad, the pain-signaling neuropeptide substance P was found to be present in one third of the subjects in the Achilles tendinopathy group but in none of the healthy controls. Gene expression changes in Achilles tendinopathy patient samples were consistent with Kager's fat pad being more inflamed than in the healthy control group. Additionally, the results indicate an altered lipid metabolism in Kager's fat pad of Achilles tendinopathy patients.

  9. Open re-rupture of the Achilles tendon after surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Hanada

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate of re-rupture of Achilles tendon after surgical treatment were reported to 1.7-5.6% previously. Re-rupture of Achilles tendon generally occurs subcutaneously. We experienced two rare cases of the open re-ruptures of Achilles tendon with a transverse wound perpendicular to the primary surgical incision. Re-rupture occurred 4 and 13 weeks after surgical treatment. We suggest that open re-rupture correlates more closely with skin scaring and shortening. Another factor may be adhesion between the subcutaneous scar and the suture of the paratenon and Achilles tendon with post-operative immobilization.

  10. Inflammatory and metabolic alterations of Kager's fat pad in chronic achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Petersen, Marie Christine Helby; Fredberg, Ulrich;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achilles tendinopathy is a painful inflammatory condition characterized by swelling, stiffness and reduced function of the Achilles tendon. Kager's fat pad is an adipose tissue located in the area anterior to the Achilles tendon. Observations reveal a close physical interplay between...... Kager's fat pad and its surrounding structures during movement of the ankle, suggesting that Kager's fat pad may stabilize and protect the mechanical function of the ankle joint. AIM: The aim of this study was to characterize whether Achilles tendinopathy was accompanied by changes in expression...

  11. Observations on the Efficacy of Acupuncture plus Tuina Therapy in Treating Supraspinatus Tendinitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高扬; 杨玲

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical efficacy ofacupuncture plus Tuina therapy in treating supraspinatus tendinitis.Methods:One hundred patients with supraspinatus tendinitis were randomly allocated to two groups.The treatment group of 50 cases was treated with acupuncture plus Tuina therapy and the control group of 50 cases,with simple acupuncture.Treatment was given once daily,10 times as a course.The therapeutic effects were evaluated after two courses oftreatment.Results:The total efficacy rate was 96.0%in the treatment group and 74.0%in the control group.x2 test showed that there was a statistically significant difference in the total efficacy rate between the two groups(P<0.01).Conclusion:Acupuncture plus Tuina therapy is superior to simple acupuncture in treating supraspinatus tendinitis.%目的:观察针刺、推拿治疗冈上肌肌腱炎的临床疗效.方法:将100例冈上肌肌腱炎患者随机分为两组,治疗组50例采用针刺推拿疗法,对照组50例采用单纯针刺疗法;每日1次,10次为1个疗程,2个疗程后进行疗效评定.结果:治疗组总有效率96.0%,对照组总有效率74.0%,两组总有效率经x2检验(P<0.01),差异有统计学意义.结论:针刺配合推拿治疗冈上肌肌腱炎疗效优于单纯针刺治疗.

  12. A Rare Cause of Dysphagia to Remember: Calcific Tendinitis of the Longus Colli Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic M. Colella

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Longus colli tendinitis (LCT is an acute inflammatory condition with symptoms typically consisting of acute neck pain and stiffness with or without dysphagia. Once more severe etiologies for these symptoms are ruled out, this self-limiting condition usually resolves spontaneously with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids. We present a case of LCT that presented as acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia that rapidly resolved once diagnosed and treated with anti-inflammatory agents. Though exceedingly rare, LCT must be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia when more common etiologies do not correlate with the clinical presentation.

  13. Bone scan findings in calcific tendinitis at the gluteus maximus insertion: some illustrative cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Damme

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the bone scan and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography findings in calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus and discuss its pathophysiology. Although this tendinopathy is mostly self-limiting, awareness of this disease is important for 2 reasons. First, it may explain acute hip symptoms in patients in the resorptive phase of the calcifications. Second, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis for bone scan hot spots in the vicinity of the gluteus maximus tendon and for cortical erosion seen in that region on X-rays or CT.

  14. Tratamiento de las tendinitis calcificantes con iontoforesis de ácido acético

    OpenAIRE

    Olmo Fernández-Delgado, Juan Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Las tendinitis calcificantes del hombro son una patología frecuente, con manifestaciones clínicas y radiológicas variadas y que van desde el hombro hiperálgico a fases asintomáticas. No existe un tratamiento concluyente, utilizándose infiltraciones, aspiraciones, ondas de choque y cirugía. En medicina física se han utilizado los ultrasonidos (US) como principal técnica, aunque también ha sido utilizada la iontoforesis con distintas substancias. Objetivos. Conocer la utilidad de...

  15. [Carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger wrist" revealing a tendinous sheath fibroma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhima, M A; Ait Essi, F; Abkari, I; Najeb, Y; Fikry, T

    2014-02-01

    The tendinous sheath fibroma (TSF) is a rare benign tumor, exceptionally responsible for carpal tunnel syndrome and "trigger" wrist: we found this association less than ten times in the English and French literature. We report the case of a 63-year-old right-handed carpenter who featured a triggering phenomenon of the right wrist during the flexion-extension movements and compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel, secondary to a TSF of the flexor digitorum superficialis. The diagnosis was suspected at the sonography and MRI, the tumor was excised and proven histologically to be a TSF. One year later, the patient remained free of symptoms.

  16. A Rare Cause of Dysphagia to Remember: Calcific Tendinitis of the Longus Colli Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, Dominic M.; Calderón Sandoval, Fiorela; Powers, David W.; Patel, Nimal; Sobrado, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Longus colli tendinitis (LCT) is an acute inflammatory condition with symptoms typically consisting of acute neck pain and stiffness with or without dysphagia. Once more severe etiologies for these symptoms are ruled out, this self-limiting condition usually resolves spontaneously with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids. We present a case of LCT that presented as acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia that rapidly resolved once diagnosed and treated with anti-inflammatory agents. Though exceedingly rare, LCT must be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute neck pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia when more common etiologies do not correlate with the clinical presentation. PMID:28100997

  17. Acute Achilles tendon rupture - Minimally invasive surgery versus nonoperative treatment with immediate full weightbearing - Randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, Roderick; Verleisdonk, Egbert-Jan M. M.; van der Heijden, Geert J. -M. -G.; Clevers, Geert-Jan; Hammacher, Erik R.; Verhofstad, Michiel H. J.; van der Werken, Christiaan

    2008-01-01

    Background: Surgical repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures is considered superior to nonoperative treatment, but complications other than rerupture range up to 34%. Nonoperative treatment by functional bracing seems a promising alternative. Hypothesis: Nonoperative treatment of acute Achilles ten

  18. [Treatment of traumatic sections of the Achilles tendon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanu, N

    1977-01-01

    The author maintains that the atrophy of the sural triceps muscle, the retraction of the Achille tendon and the osteoporosis of the calcaneum and of the tarsian bones, occurring after the traumatic sectioning of the Achille tendon, are the results of an inadequate treatment. The cause of these sequellae is the immobilization of the foot in an equinus position, which relaxes the sural triceps and as a result of the lack of mechanical traction factor, leads to local circulatory disturbances followed by a modification in the structure of the bone and of the muscle. On the basis of this pathophysiological concept the author has excluded post-operative immobilization in the equinus position, and in fact any type of immobilization, recommending in contrast a mobilization of the foot from the very first days after the suture of the tendon. The clinical results obtained confirm the value of the hypothesis.

  19. Nonoperative, dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Lauridsen, Hanne Bloch

    2015-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture alters the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex that can affect functional performance and the risk of repeat injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon...... complex in patients randomized to early weightbearing or non-weightbearing in the nonoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 60 patients were randomized to full weightbearing from day 1 of treatment or non-weightbearing for 6 weeks. After 6 and 12 months, the peak passive torque at 20......° dorsiflexion, the stiffness during slow stretching, and the maximal strength were measured in both limbs. The stiffness of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in the terminal part of dorsiflexion was significantly increased (p = .024) in the non-weightbearing group at 12 months. The peak passive torque...

  20. Quantification of cell density in rat Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, René B; Heinemeier, Katja M

    2017-01-01

    Increased tendon cell nuclei density (TCND) has been proposed to induce tendon mechanical adaptations. However, it is unknown whether TCND is increased in tendon tissue after mechanical loading and whether such an increase can be quantified in a reliable manner. The aim of this study was to develop...... a reliable method for quantification of TCND and to investigate potential changes in TCND in rat Achilles tendons in response to 12 weeks of running. Eight adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ran (RUN) on a treadmill with 10° incline, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk (17-20 m/min) for 12 weeks (which improved tendon mechanical...... properties) and were compared with 11 control rats (SED). Tissue-Tek-embedded cryosections (10 µm) from the mid region of the Achilles tendon were cut longitudinally on a cryostat. Sections were stained with alcian blue and picrosirius red. One blinded investigator counted the number of tendon cell nuclei 2...

  1. Chronic Achilles Tendon Disorders: Tendinopathy and Chronic Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffulli, Nicola; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon involves clinical conditions in and around the tendon and it is the result of a failure of a chronic healing response. Although several conservative therapeutic options have been proposed, few of them are supported by randomized controlled trials. The management is primarily conservative and many patients respond well to conservative measures. If clinical conditions do not improve after 6 months of conservative management, surgery is recommended. The management of chronic ruptures is different from that of acute ruptures. The optimal surgical procedure is still debated. In this article chronic Achilles tendon disorders are debated and evidence-based medicine treatment strategies are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of Achilles tendon rupture using different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubor Predrag

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Today there are controversies about searching for the ideal surgical method (conservatively with plaster cast, with open and percutaneous tenorrhaphy for repairing a ruptured Achilles tendon. The aim of this study study was to examine the results of treating Achilles tendon ruptures in patients by using the following methods: percutaneous suturing, open surgery technique and non-surgical treatment by plaster cast immobilisation. Methods. Forty two patients treated at our facility in the period August 2003 - September 2010 for Achilles tendon ruptures were included in the study. They were operated on by using different orthopedic procedures (percutaneous reconstruction of the Achilles tendon, open surgery, plaster cast only and two anaesthesia technique (spinal aneasthesia and local infiltrational anaesthesia. The following parameters were monitored after interventions performed and compared: duration of hospital stay, postsurgical complications, incidence of the reruptures of the Achilles tendon and time for full leg functionality. Results. The patients sustained their respective injuries in the following manner: 8 of them while pursuing sports activities, 24 while pursuing recreational activities, 4 at workplace, 4 while performing everyday activities, and 2 of the patients did not know how they had sustained their injuries. The average age of the patients was 40.5, with 37 (88% men and 5 (12% women. Surgeries were performed under spinal anaesthesia in 29 (69% patients, and in 5 (12% patients tenorrhaphy was performed under local anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was not used in 8 (19% patients treated with plaster cast. We performed percutaneous reconstruction of the Achilles tendon in 19 (45% patients. A total of 14 (33% patients were treated under spinal anaesthesia, and 5 (11.9% under local infiltrational anaesthesia with 2% xylocain. We treated 15 (36% patients with open surgery. The patients treated conservatively stayed in

  3. Biomechanical characteristics of the eccentric Achilles tendon exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Bliddal, Henning

    2009-01-01

    muscles were recorded. Joint kinematics, GRF frequency contents, average EMG amplitudes, and Achilles tendon loads were calculated. FINDINGS: The eccentric movement phase was characterized by a higher GRF frequency content in the 8-12 Hz range, and reduced EMG activity in the lower leg muscles...... into the biomechanics of the exercise may improve our understanding. METHODS: Sixteen healthy subjects performed one-legged full weight bearing ankle plantar and dorsiflexion exercises during which three-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF), ankle joint kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) of the lower leg....... No differences in Achilles tendon loads were found. INTERPRETATION: This descriptive study demonstrates differences in the movement biomechanics between the eccentric and concentric phases of one-legged full weight bearing ankle dorsal and plantar flexion exercises. In particular, the findings imply...

  4. Development of the human Achilles tendon enthesis organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, H M; Vázquez, Osorio T; McGonagle, D; Bydder, G; Santer, R M; Benjamin, M

    2008-12-01

    The attachment of the Achilles tendon is part of an 'enthesis organ' that reduces stress concentration at the hard-soft tissue interface. The organ also includes opposing sesamoid and periosteal fibrocartilages, a bursa and Kager's fat pad. In addition, the deep crural and plantar fasciae contribute to Achilles stress dissipation and could also be regarded as components. Here we describe the sequence in which these various tissues differentiate. Serial sections of feet from spontaneously aborted foetuses (crown rump lengths 22-322 mm) were examined. All slides formed part of an existing collection of histologically sectioned embryological material, obtained under Spanish law and housed in the Universidad Complutense, Madrid. From the earliest stages, it was evident that the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia had a mutual attachment to the calcaneal perichondrium. The first components of the enthesis organ to appear (in the 45-mm foetus) were the retrocalcaneal bursa and the crural fascia. The former developed by cavitation within the mesenchyme that later gave rise to Kager's fat pad. The tip of the putative fat pad protruded into the developing bursa in the 110-mm foetus and fully differentiated adipocytes were apparent in the 17-mm foetus. All three fibrocartilages were first recognisable in the 332-mm foetus--at which time adipogenesis had commenced in the heel fat pad. The sequence in which the various elements became apparent suggests that bursal formation and the appearance of the crural fascia may be necessary to facilitate the foot movements that subsequently lead to fibrocartilage differentiation. The later commencement of adipogenesis in the heel than in Kager's pad probably reflects the non-weight environment in utero. The direct continuity between plantar fascia and Achilles tendon that is characteristic of the adult reflects the initial attachment of both structures to the calcaneal perichondrium rather than to the skeletal anlagen itself.

  5. [Achilles tendon rupture--early functional and surgical options with special emphasis on rehabilitation issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, K; Thermann, H; Hüfner, T

    2007-03-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are one end of a continuum starting with the healthy Achilles tendon via the thickened and painful tendinopathic Achilles tendon with neovascularisation to the complete tendon rupture. Often times chinolone antibiotics, cortisone therapy and valgus foot axis are associated risk factors. Incidence of Achilles tendon ruptures is estimated to be 10/100 000 per year with a mean age of 35-40 years. Physical activity is encountered in 75 % cases of Achilles tendon ruptures. Running is associated with Achilles tendinopathy as the predominant overuse injury in an analysis among 291 athletes with 10 million kilometers exposure. The Achilles tendinopathic rate was 0.016/1000 km differentiated in 0.008/1000 km mid-portion tendinopathy and 0.005/1000 km insertional tendinopathy. Achilles tendinopathy in running overuse injuries is followed by runner's knee (0.013/1000 km), shin splint (0.0104/1000 km) and plantar fasciitis (0.0054/1000 km). Dynamic ultrasound in 20 degrees plantar flexion is of utmost importance for therapeutic decision making. With an adaptation rate of 75 % or more of the ruptured tendon in 20 degrees plantar flexion and a high patient's compliance we perform an early functional conservative treatment regimen in Achilles tendon ruptures. In almost all other cases the percutaneous Achilles tendon repair is indicated, where nervus suralis lesions have to be appreciated. The vulnerable zone is 10-12 cm proximal to the calcaneus at the lateral border of the Achilles tendon with the sural nerve in close proximity with the tendon. Early functional rehabilitation is not associated with a higher risk of rerupture but with improved subjective assessments and should therefore be advocated.

  6. The pathogenesis of Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, Bruno; Bondi, Manuel; Pierantoni, Silvia; Samaila, Elena

    2014-09-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a degenerative, not an inflammatory, condition. It is prevalent in athletes involved in running sports. A systematic literature review on Achilles tendon tendinopathy has been performed according to the intrinsic (age, sex, body weight, tendon temperature, systemic diseases, muscle strength, flexibility, previous injuries and anatomical variants, genetic predisposition and blood supply) and extrinsic risk factors (drugs and overuse), which can cause tendon suffering and degeneration. Different theories have been found: Neurogenic, Angiogenic, Impingement and "Iceberg" Hypotheses. Multiple databases were utilized for articles published between 1964 and 2013. The different hypothesis were analyzed, differently considering those concerning the pathogenesis of tendinopathy and those concerning the etiology of complaints in patients. This review of the literature demonstrates the heterogeneity of Achilles tendinopathy pathogenesis. Various risk factors have been identified and have shown an interaction between them such as genes, age, circulating and local cytokine production, sex, biomechanics and body composition. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture reconstructed using hamstring tendon autograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Philip; Mason, Lyndon William; Molloy, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon (delayed diagnosis of more than 4 weeks) can result in retraction of the tendon and inadequate healing. Direct repair may not be possible and augmentation methods are challenging when the defect exceeds 5-6 cm, especially if the distal stump is grossly tendinopathic. We describe our method of Achilles tendon reconstruction with ipsilateral semitendinosis autograft and interference screw fixation in a patient with chronic rupture, a 9 cm defect and gross distal tendinopathy. Patient reported outcome measures consistently demonstrated improved health status at 12 months post surgery: MOXFQ-Index 38-25, EQ5D-5L 18-9, EQ VAS 70-90 and VISA-A 1-64. The patient was back to full daily function, could single leg heel raise and was gradually returning to sport. No complications or adverse events were recorded. Reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon with large defects and gross tendinopathy using an ipsilateral semitendinosis autograft and interference screw fixation can achieve satisfactory improvements in patient reported outcomes up to 1 year post-surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Achilles tendinosis: a morphometrical study in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rafael Duarte; Glazebrook, Mark Anthony; Campos, Vinicius Castro; Vasconcelos, Anilton Cesar

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the morphopathogenesis of Achilles tendinosis, using a rat model and presenting quantitative analysis of time-dependent histological changes. Thirty Wistar rats were used, randomly split in experimental and control groups. Animals of the experimental group were submitted to a treadmill running scheme. Five animals of each group were euthanized at four, eight and sixteen weeks. Achilles tendons were collected and processed routinely for histopath sections. Slides were stained by Hematoxylin-Eosin, Picrosirius Red, Alcian Blue, AgNOR, TUNEL and evaluated morphometrically. Cellular density decreased slightly along the time and was higher in the experimental group than in controls at fourth, eighth and sixteenth weeks. Fiber microtearing, percentual of reticular fibers and glycosaminoglycans content increased along the time and were higher in experimental group than in controls at all-time intervals. AgNOR labeling here interpreted as a marker of transcription activity was higher in the experimental groups than in controls at all-time intervals. Apoptotic cells were more frequent and diffusely distributed in tendinosis samples than in control groups. These results suggest that as mechanical overload is becoming chronic, cellular turnover and matrix deposition increases leading to tendinosis. The combination of staining techniques and morphometry used here to describe the evolution of lesions occurring in a rat model system has proved to be suited for the study of induced Achilles tendinosis.

  9. Acute calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius: an uncommon source for back, buttock, and thigh pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Nam Chull

    2014-06-01

    This study was conducted to describe the imaging features and clinical manifestations in acute calcific tendinitis (CaT) of the gluteus medius muscle (GMe). A retrospective analysis was conducted, aimed at six patients with acute calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius muscle (CaT-GMe), who were seen between January 2011 and December 2012. Clinical presentations, radiologic data (radiography, CT, and MRI), and laboratory reports were all subject to review. All patients presented with pain and decreased range of motion (ROM) at the hip. Two of the six patients experienced pain in the anterolateral thigh and groin, with antalgic gait (anterior group). The other four complained of low back, buttock, and posterolateral thigh pain, accompanied by difficulty in standing and antalgic gait (posterior group). Edema within the GMe or effusion surrounding the muscle was regularly identified on MRIs. Calcific deposits were conspicuous in the gluteus medius tendon attachments to the lateral (anterior group) and superoposterior (posterior group) facets of the greater trochanter on radiography, CT, or MRI. Complete resolution of symptoms was uniformly achieved in 5-10 days with conservative management. Acute CaT-GMe should be considered in any patient suffering lateral hip pain (with either groin or low back pain) and ROM limitation. Images of the hip characteristically show edema of the gluteus medius and calcifications lateral or superior to the greater trochanter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Arthroscopic therapy of tendinitis calcarea--acromioplasty or removal of calcium?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch, J; Strauss, J M; Schmiel, S

    1996-12-01

    In a retrospective analysis we evaluated 48 patients who had been arthroscopically treated for tendinitis calcarea. The calcific deposit was removed whenever possible and all patients were treated by arthroscopic subacromial decompression. In subjects who showed subacromial stenosis by X-ray or by intraoperative findings, an arthroscopic acromioplasty was performed. At follow-up all patients were evaluated according to the Constant score. Additionally all pre- and postoperative X-rays were reviewed. After surgery the Constant score significantly improved. In all cases where acromioplasty was performed, a flattening of the bony configuration was achieved. The X-ray analysis showed that no calcific deposit with blurred borders converted to sharp borders. There was also no deposit that converted from a transparent appearance to a dense structure. Patients with disappearance of the calcific deposit post-operatively had significantly better outcome than patients with no change in the X-ray. An additional acromioplasty did not improve the results. The aim of arthroscopic treatment of calcific tendinitis has to be the removal of the calcific deposit. Acromioplasty does not lead to further improvement to the result.

  11. Structural characteristics of the tendinous cord-papillary muscle junction in healthy and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia-Farje, Luis Alberto Domingo; Almeida-Francia, Camila Contin Diniz; Matheus, Selma Maria Michelin; Torrejais, Marcia Miranda; Soares, Jair de Campos

    2009-10-01

    Although the myotendinous junction (MTJ) of skeletal striated muscle is well known, more detailed studies regarding the structure of the cardiac MTJ are scarce. The objective of the present study was to investigate the morphological characteristics of the MTJ in hearts of healthy and hypertensive (SHR) female rats using histological, ultrastructural and three-dimensional (SEM) methods, as well as to evaluate the expression of vinculin by immunofluorescence. In the two groups, light microscopy showed branching tendinous cords and collagen bundles penetrating the apex of the finger-like projections of the papillary muscle. SEM analysis revealed an enlarged apex of the papillary muscle in SHR which was not observed in healthy animals. The loss of force transmission appears to be compensated by the amplified connection between the papillary muscle and valvular collagen. A large number of intercalated disks close to the fiber apex, small amounts of an amorphous intercellular substance and numerous vesicles were observed in SHR. In these animals, the expression of vinculin was more marked showing a regular distribution and a pattern of transverse striations along the sarcolemma. The presence of this protein in transverse bands suggests that vinculin surrounds myofibrils in the region of the Z band. Vinculin staining was also more marked in the region of the tendinous cord-papillary muscle junctions of SHR compared to control animals. Vinculin was quantified by electrophoresis and higher amounts of this protein were observed in SHR compared to control animals.

  12. US Findings of Biceps Tendinitis: Cross Sectional Area Measurements of Long Head of Biceps Brachii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jong Soo; Seo, Kyung Mook; Lee, Hwa Yeon; Song, In Sup [ChungAng University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Seung Min [Bundang Cha Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe typical sonographic findings in patients with biceps tendinitis. Seventy five patients who had been clinically diagnosed with biceps tendinitis were included. Of the 75, 37 were male, 38 were female, and their mean age was 56 {+-} 9.74. The patients complained of shoulder pain and ultrasonography was performed for bilateral shoulders in all patients. The cross sectional area of the biceps tendon was measured. The status of fluid collection around the biceps tendon and accompanying rotator cuff disease were also investigated. The cross sectional areas of the diseased biceps tendon were 0.18 {+-} 0.09 cm2 (range: 0.07-0.42), and the areas of the normal side was 0.11 {+-} 0.05 cm2 (0.03-0.24). The cross sectional area of the diseased biceps tendon was 0.075 {+-} 0.062 cm2 greater, on average, than the uninvolved site (p < 0.01). Thirty six patients(48%) had fluid collection around the inflamed biceps tendon, and 30 patients had accompanied rotator cuff disease. During US examination of the shoulder in patients complaining of shoulder pain, if the cross sectional area of the biceps tendon in the painful shoulder is asymmetrically and larger than the contralateral tendon, biceps tendonitis is suggested

  13. Nerve distributions in insertional Achilles tendinopathy - a comparison of bone, bursae and tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Gustav; Backman, Ludvig J; Christensen, Jens; Alfredson, Håkan

    2017-03-01

    In a condition of pain in the Achilles tendon insertion there are multiple structures involved, such as the Achilles tendon itself, the retrocalcaneal bursa and a bony protrusion at the calcaneal tuberosity called Haglund's deformity. The innervation patterns of these structures are scarcely described, and the subcutaneous calcaneal bursa is traditionally not considered to be involved in the pathology. This study aimed at describing the innervation patterns of the four structures described above to provide a better understanding of possible origins of pain at the Achilles tendon insertion. Biopsies were taken from 10 patients with insertional Achilles tendinopathy, which had pathological changes in the subcutaneous and retrocalcaneal bursae, a Haglund deformity and Achilles tendon tendinopathy as verified by ultrasound. The biopsies were stained using immunohistochemistry in order to delineate the innervation patterns in the structures involved in insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Immunohistochemical examinations found that the subcutaneous bursa scored the highest using a semi-quantitative evaluation of the degree of innervation when compared to the retrocalcaneal bursa, the Achilles tendon, and the calcaneal bone. These findings suggest that the subcutaneous bursa, which is traditionally not included in surgical treatment, may be a clinically important factor in insertional Achilles tendinopathy.

  14. Z-APPROACH USAGE IN SURGICAL TREATMENT OF ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gritsyuk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors worked out and checked out rational Z-approach to the Achilles tendon with taking into consideration anatomical, physiological and biomechanical features of this region. Entrance allowed trustworthy reduce frequency and area of postoperative wound rim necrosis, and allowed statistic trustworthy reduce number of complications after surgical treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures.

  15. Elastographic Findings of Achilles Tendons in Asymptomatic Professional Male Volleyball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Mehtap; Idilman, Ilkay S; Ipek, Ali; Ikiz, Sinem Sigit; Bektaser, Bulent; Gumus, Mehmet

    2016-12-01

    Elastography is a new sonographic technique that evaluates the elasticity of different tissues such as the Achilles tendon. In this study, we aimed to investigate the elastographic findings of Achilles tendons in professional athletes in comparison with healthy volunteers. Twenty-one professional male volleyball players with no history of Achilles trauma were included in this study. Twenty-one healthy male volunteers with similar ages and body mass indices were selected as control participants. All participants underwent sonographic and elastographic evaluations of the Achilles tendons to evaluate Achilles tendon thickness and stiffness. We observed thickening in many of the thirds of the Achilles tendons (right proximal, right middle, left middle, and left distal thirds) of athletes in comparison with healthy volunteers. We did not detect any abnormalities according to the sonographic evaluations in both athletes and healthy volunteers. In the elastographic evaluations, we observed softening in the middle thirds of the Achilles tendons of athletes according to the main types (P < .001) and subtypes (P < .001 for right; and P = .002 for left middle third). There was no difference observed in the elastographic evaluations of the proximal and distal thirds. On sonography and elastography, we observed thickening and softening in Achilles tendons of athletes in comparison with healthy volunteers who had similar ages and body mass indices. These changes could be associated with early tendon degeneration. Further longitudinal studies may support this consideration. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  16. Treatment of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture in Scandinavia Does Not Adhere to Evidence-based Guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer W; Nielsen, Fredrik; Helander, Katarina N;

    2013-01-01

    and that adherence to evidence-based recommendations would not be as good as desired. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how acute Achilles tendon rupture is treated in Scandinavia. A questionnaire was distributed to all orthopedic departments treating acute Achilles tendon ruptures in Denmark...

  17. Shear wave elastographic characterization of normal and torn achilles tendons: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang-Mei; Cui, Li-Gang; He, Ping; Shen, Wei-Wei; Qian, Ya-Jun; Wang, Jin-Rui

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using quantitative shear wave elastography for assessing the functional integrity of the Achilles tendon and to summarize the changes in elasticity of ruptured Achilles tendons in comparison with normal controls. Thirty-six normal and 14 ruptured Achilles tendons were examined with shear wave elastography coupled with a linear array transducer (4-15 MHz). The elasticity value of each Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view was measured. The mean elasticity value ± SD for the normal Achilles tendons was 291.91 ± 4.38 kPa (note that there are saturated measurement phenomena for the normal Achilles tendon, so the actual value will be >300 kPa), whereas the ruptured Achilles tendons had an elasticity value of 56.48 ± 68.59 kPa. A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the findings in healthy volunteers (P = .006). Our results suggest that shear wave elastography is a valuable tool that can provide complementary biomechanical information for evaluating the function of the Achilles tendon.

  18. [Impingement lesion of the distal anterior Achilles tendon in sub-Achilles bursitis and Haglund-pseudoexostosis-a therapeutic challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, H; Arentz, S

    2003-12-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis in athletes is frequently misdiagnosed. Results of conservative treatment are not very promising. This investigation evaluates the results of 39 consecutive cases in 38 patients surgically treated due to chronic retrokalkaneal bursitis in a sport specific population. Preoperative MRI and ultrasound investigation showed corresponding lesions (focal degeneration, partial rupture) of the anterior Achilles tendon. This is possibly the result of a previously undescribed impingement lesion produced by the Haglund's bone and the chronically inflamed retrocalcaneal bursa. During operation this lesion was additionally addressed in 85% of the cases. Follow up was done after 32 months. Success rate was 54%. VISA-A Score at follow up was 80.6 points. Training and competition activities were started at 16 weeks and 9 months respectively. Unsatisfying results were analysed. In two cases Haglund's bone resection was incomplete and had to be removed in a reoperation. Additionally one deep wound infection had to be revised. Due to the distal Achilles tendon fiber extensions around the medial and lateral calcaneal bone, an unintended Achilles tendon lesion, induced by the edge of the osteotome seems to be possible. Two calcanear stress fractures complicated the postoperative rehabilitation.

  19. Inflammatory and Metabolic Alterations of Kager's Fat Pad in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Petersen, M Christine H; Fredberg, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achilles tendinopathy is a painful inflammatory condition characterized by swelling, stiffness and reduced function of the Achilles tendon. Kager's fat pad is an adipose tissue located in the area anterior to the Achilles tendon. Observations reveal a close physical interplay between...... Kager's fat pad and its surrounding structures during movement of the ankle, suggesting that Kager's fat pad may stabilize and protect the mechanical function of the ankle joint. AIM: The aim of this study was to characterize whether Achilles tendinopathy was accompanied by changes in expression...... of inflammatory markers and metabolic enzymes in Kager's fat pad. METHODS: A biopsy was taken from Kager's fat pad from 31 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and from 13 healthy individuals. Gene expression was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Focus was on genes related to inflammation...

  20. Blood flow in the peritendinous space of the human Achilles tendon during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Bülow, J; Kjaer, M

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated blood flow in the peritendinous space of the human Achilles tendon during rest and 40-min dynamical contraction of m. triceps surae. In 10 healthy volunteers 133Xe was injected in to the peritendinous space just ventrally to the Achilles tendon 2 and 5 cm proximal...... to the calcaneal insertion of the tendon, respectively. Blood flow 5 cm proximal to the Achilles tendon insertion was found to increase 4-fold from rest to exercise whereas the exercise induced increase in blood flow was less pronounced, only 2.5-fold, when measured 2 cm proximal to the Achilles tendon insertion....... Lymph drainage from the area was found to be negligible both during rest and exercise. We conclude that dynamical calf muscle contractions result in increased peritendinous blood flow at the Achilles tendon in humans....

  1. Bone Reduction Clamp to Gain Length in Repairing Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Patrick S; Pedowitz, David I

    2016-11-01

    Chronic Achilles tendon ruptures occur after an unrecognized, untreated, or misdiagnosed acute Achilles tendon rupture and present a potentially debilitating injury for the patient. Various techniques have been described to reconstruct the Achilles tendon after chronic ruptures. The technique chosen depends on the length of tendon defect that is present after debridement. If the tendon gap is greater than 3 cm, additional techniques are generally used, as direct repair is often not possible. The authors present a novel intraoperative technique using pointed reduction clamps to gain and maintain length of the Achilles tendon to decrease the gap between ends of the Achilles tendon and allow for end-to-end repair when it may have otherwise not been possible. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1223-e1225.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Percutaneous Repair Technique for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture with Assistance of Kirschner Wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ze-yang; Chai, Ming-xiang; Liu, Yue-ju; Zhang, Xiao-ran; Zhang, Tao; Song, Lian-xin; Ren, Zhi-xin; Wu, Xi-rui

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce a self-designed, minimally invasive technique for repairing an acute Achilles tendon rupture percutaneously. Comparing with the traditional open repair, the new technique provides obvious advantages of minimized operation-related lesions, fewer wound complications as well as a higher healing rate. However, a percutaneous technique without direct vision may be criticized by its insufficient anastomosis of Achilles tendon and may also lead to the lengthening of the Achilles tendon and a reduction in the strength of the gastrocnemius. To address the potential problems, we have improved our technique using a percutaneous Kirschner wire leverage process before suturing, which can effectively recover the length of the Achilles tendon and ensure the broken ends are in tight contact. With this improvement in technique, we have great confidence that it will become the treatment of choice for acute Achilles tendon ruptures. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Influence of Cervical Muscle Fatigue on Musculo-Tendinous Stiffness of the Head-Neck Segment during Cervical Flexion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Portero

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine if the fatigue of cervical muscles has a significant influence on the head-neck segment musculo-tendinous stiffness.Ten men (aged 21.2 ± 1.9 years performed four quick-release trials of flexion at 30 and 50% MVC before and after the induction of muscular fatigue on cervical flexors. Electromyographic activity was recorded on the sternocleidomastoids (SCM and spinal erectors (SE, bilaterally. Musculo-tendinous stiffness was calculated through the quick-release method adapted to the head-neck segment.We noticed a significant linear increase of the head-neck segment musculo-tendinous stiffness with the increase of exertion level both before (P < 0.0001 and after the fatigue procedure (P < 0.0001. However, this linear relationship was not different before and after the fatigue procedure. EMG analysis revealed a significant increase of the root mean square for the right SCM (P = 0.0002, the left SCM (P < 0.0001, the right SE (P < 0.0001, and the left SE (P < 0.0001 and a significant decrease of the median power frequency only for the right (P = 0.0006 and the left (P = 0.0003 SCM with muscular fatigue.We did not find significant changes in the head-neck segment musculo-tendinous stiffness with fatigue of cervical muscles. We found a significant increase in EMG activity in the SCM and the SE after the induction of fatigue of the SCM. Our findings suggest that with fatigue of cervical flexors, neck muscle activity is modulated in order to maintain the musculo-tendinous stiffness at a steady state.

  4. Influence of musculo-tendinous stiffness of the plantar ankle flexor muscles upon maximal power output on a cycle ergometre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driss, Tarak; Lambertz, Daniel; Rouis, Majdi; Vandewalle, Henry

    2012-11-01

    The importance of maximal voluntary torque (T (MVC)), maximal rate of torque development (MRTD) and musculo-tendinous stiffness of the triceps surae for maximal power output on a cycle ergometre (Pmax) was studied in 21 healthy subjects by studying the relationships between maximal cycling power related to body mass (Pmax BM(-1)) with T (MVC), MRTD and different indices of musculo-tendinous stiffness of the ankle flexor. Pmax BM(-1) was calculated from the data of an all-out force-velocity test on a Monark cycle ergometre. T (MVC) and MRTD were measured on a specific ankle ergometre. Musculo-tendinous stiffness was estimated by means of quick releases at 20, 40, 60 and 80% T (MVC) on the same ankle ergometre. Pmax BM(-1) was significantly and positively correlated with MRTD related to body mass but the positive correlation between Pmax BM(-1) and T (MVC) did not reach the significance level (0.05). Pmax BM(-1) was significantly and positively correlated with the estimation of stiffness at 40% T (MVC) (S(0.4)), but not with stiffness at 20, 60 and 80% T (MVC). The results of the present study suggest that maximal power output during cycling is significantly correlated with the level of musculo-tendinous stiffness which corresponds to torque range around peak torque at optimal pedal rate. However, the low coefficient of determination (r2 = 0.203) between Pmax BM(-1) and S (0.4) BM(-1) suggested that Pmax BM(-1) largely depended on other factors than the musculo-tendinous stiffness of the only plantar flexors.

  5. Subcutaneous Achilles tendon rupture in an eighty-year-old female with an absence of risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoki Sonohata

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendon ruptures rarely occur in patients over 80 years of age. However, it is unclear what treatment, surgical or conservative, is suitable for such an Achilles tendon rupture in the elderly. In addition, the clinical results of an Achilles tendon rupture in the elderly are disappointing. We report here the case of a subcutaneous Achilles tendon rupture in an eighty-year-old, healthy female, who returned to her previous level of activity following surgical treatment. Additional case reports of other instances of successful treatment are needed to help establish the optimal treatment protocol for an Achilles tendon rupture in the elderly.

  6. Ipsilateral free semitendinosus tendon graft transfer for reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gougoulias Nikolaos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many techniques have been developed for the reconstruction of the Achilles tendon in chronic tears. In presence of a large gap (greater than 6 centimetres, tendon augmentation is required. Methods We present our method of minimally invasive semitendinosus reconstruction for the Achilles tendon using one para-midline and one midline incision. Results The first incision is a 5 cm longitudinal incision, made 2 cm proximal and just medial to the palpable end of the residual tendon. The second incision is 3 cm long and is also longitudinal but is 2 cm distal and in the midline to the distal end of the tendon rupture. The distal and proximal Achilles tendon stumps are mobilised. After trying to reduce the gap of the ruptured Achilles tendon, if the gap produced is greater than 6 cm despite maximal plantar flexion of the ankle and traction on the Achilles tendon stumps, the ipsilateral semitendinosus tendon is harvested. The semitendinosus tendon is passed through small incisions in the substance of the proximal stump of the Achilles tendon, and it is sutured to the Achilles tendon. It is then passed beneath the intact skin bridge into the distal incision, and passed from medial to lateral through a transverse tenotomy in the distal stump. With the ankle in maximal plantar flexion, the semitendinosus tendon is sutured to the Achilles tendon at each entry and exit point Conclusion This minimally invasive technique allows reconstruction of the Achilles tendon using the tendon of semitendinosus preserving skin integrity over the site most prone to wound breakdown, and can be especially used to reconstruct the Achilles tendon in the presence of large gap (greater than 6 centimetres.

  7. The structural and mechanical properties of the Achilles tendon 2 years after surgical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremia, Jeam Marcel; Bobbert, Maarten Frank; Casa Nova, Mayra; Ott, Rafael Duvelius; Lemos, Fernando de Aguiar; Lupion, Raquel de Oliveira; Frasson, Viviane Bortoluzzi; Vaz, Marco Aurélio

    2015-06-01

    Acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon affect the tendon's structural and mechanical properties. The long-term effects of surgical repair on these properties remain unclear. To evaluate effects of early mobilization versus traditional immobilization rehabilitation programs 2 years after surgical Achilles tendon repair, by comparing force-elongation and stress-strain relationships of the injured tendon to those of the uninjured tendon. A group of males with previous Achilles tendon rupture (n=18) and a group of healthy male controls (n=9) participated. Achilles tendon rupture group consisted of patients that had received early mobilization (n=9) and patients that had received traditional immobilization with a plaster cast (n=9). Comparisons of tendon structural and mechanical properties were made between Achilles tendon rupture and healthy control groups, and between the uninjured and injured sides of the two rehabilitation groups in Achilles tendon rupture group. Ultrasound was used to determine bilaterally tendon cross-sectional area, tendon resting length, and tendon elongation as a function of torque during maximal voluntary plantar flexion. From these data, Achilles tendon force-elongation and stress-strain relationships were determined. The Achilles tendon rupture group uninjured side was not different from healthy control group. Structural and mechanical parameters of the injured side were not different between the Achilles tendon rupture early mobilization and the immobilization groups. Compared to the uninjured side, the injured side showed a reduction in stress at maximal voluntary force, in Young's modulus and in stiffness. Two years post-surgical repair, the Achilles tendon mechanical properties had not returned to the uninjured contralateral tendon values. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Longitudinal microvascularity in achilles tendinopathy (power doppler ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging time-intensity curves and the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles questionnaire): a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Paula J. [University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust (UHNS), Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); North Staffs. Royal Infirmary, X-ray Department, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); McCall, Iain W. [Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Day, Christopher [University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust (UHNS), Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Belcher, John [Cardiff University, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, North Wales Clinical School, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Maffulli, Nicola [Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    To evaluate the imaging of the natural history of Achilles tendinopathy microvascularisation in comparison with symptoms, using a validated disease-specific questionnaire [the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A)]. A longitudinal prospective pilot study of nine patients with post-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), time-intensity curve (TIC) enhancement, ultrasound (US) and power Doppler (PD) evaluation of tendinopathy of the mid-Achilles tendon undergoing conservative management (eccentric exercise) over 1 year. There were five men and four women [mean age 47 (range 30-62) years]. Six asymptomatic tendons with normal US and MRI appearance showed less enhancement than the tibial metaphysis did and showed a flat, constant, but very low rate of enhancement in the bone and Achilles tendon (9-73 arbitrary TIC units). These normal Achilles tendons on imaging showed a constant size throughout the year (mean 4.9 mm). At baseline the TIC enhancement in those with tendinopathy ranged from 90 arbitrary units to 509 arbitrary units. Over time, 11 abnormal Achilles tendons, whose symptoms settled, were associated with a reduction in MRI enhancement mirrored by a reduction in the number of vessels on power Doppler (8.0 to 2.7), with an improvement in morphology and a reduction in tendon size (mean 15-10.6 mm). One tendon did not change its abnormal imaging features, despite improving symptoms. Two patients developed contralateral symptoms and tendinopathy, and one had more abnormal vascularity on power Doppler and higher MRI TIC peaks in the asymptomatic side. In patient with conservatively managed tendinopathy of the mid-Achilles tendon over 1 year there was a reduction of MRI enhancement and number of vessels on power Doppler, followed by morphological improvements and a reduction in size. Vessels per se related to the abnormal morphology and size of the tendon rather than symptoms. Symptoms improve before the Achilles size reduces and the

  9. MRI of the Achilles tendon: A comprehensive review of the anatomy, biomechanics, and imaging of overuse tendinopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Moncayo, Valeria; Terk, Michael R. (Dept. of Radiology, Emory Univ. Orthopedics and Spine Center, Atlanta, GA (United States)), e-mail: cpierr3@emory.edu

    2010-05-15

    The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body; it plays an important role in the biomechanics of the lower extremity. It can withstand great forces, especially during sporting exercises and pivoting. The pathologies related to the Achilles tendon are diverse and many carry undesirable consequences. We retrospectively analyzed the images of patients who underwent examinations of the ankle/foot region to review the anatomy of the Achilles tendon and its surroundings and to search for pathologies consistent with overuse injuries. The anatomy of the tendon is described from origin to insertion. The imaging characteristics of the Achilles tendon including pitfalls are reviewed. We also describe the Achilles overuse injuries: paratenonitis, tendinosis, tendon tear, atypical tear, tendon re-tear, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retro-Achilles bursitis, Haglund's deformity, and tendon calcification. We present other entities like tendon ossification and failed transplanted Achilles tendon, with emphasis on MRI

  10. "Bursal reactions" in rotator cuff tearing, the impingement syndrome, and calcifying tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, H; Brunet, J A; Welsh, R P; Uhthoff, H K

    1997-01-01

    Subacromial bursal specimens from 63 patients undergoing surgery for rotator cuff tearing (n = 43), the impingement syndrome (n = 14), and calcifying tendinitis n = 6) were studied to characterize the reactions that develop at the tendinopathy "lesional" sites. Intensity of the bursal reactions and production of type III collagen vary considerably, with the highest incidence of both seen in patients with rotator cuff tears. The intensity of bursal reactions correlated with the degree of formation of perivascular new collagen and type III collagen expression. In 22 of the 63 patients the bursal reaction distant to the tendon lesion was also studied. It was minimal and did not correlate to the lesional bursal findings. A strong correlation, however, existed between surgical appearance and histologic grading. The term "localized bursal reaction" as opposed to bursitis more correctly describes bursal involvement. Resection of bursal tissues should be limited to the lesional tissue that interferes with subacromial motion.

  11. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff: functional outcome after arthroscopic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ruben; Debeer, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    In this study, we assessed the functional results after arthroscopic excision of rotator cuff calcifications. Sixty-one shoulders in 57 patients with chronic calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff were treated with arthroscopic excision, subacromial bursa debridement and shaving. In patients with fraying or roughness of the coracoacromial ligament, an acromioplasty was also performed. Patients were evaluated after a mean follow-up of 15 months. The modified Constant score and DASH score significantly improved from 33.4 to 66.8 and from 49.7 to 17.3 respectively. Performing an acromioplasty did not influence the final outcome. Frozen shoulder was a frequent complication (18%) without significant effect on the final DASH or Constant score. The presence of residual calcifications after arthroscopic needling did not influence the final outcome. We therefore believe that the presence of residual calcifications can be accepted if this is deemed necessary to preserve the integrity of the tendon.

  12. Complete Resolution of a Case of Calcific Tendinitis of the Longus Colli with Conservative Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Toshinori; Miyagi, Ryo; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Katoh, Shinsuke; Sairyo, Koichi; Yasui, Natsuo

    2014-01-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis of the longuscolli is a self-limiting inflammatory condition caused by calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longuscolli tendon. Although several case reports have described its radiological presentation, few reports provide detailed chronological accounts through symptomatic and radiologic resolution. A 59-year-old woman presented with severe neck pain and stiffness of a few days duration as well as moderate discomfort when swallowing. Lateral radiographs revealed a large calcium deposit anterior to the C1.C2 joint and swelling of the prevertebral soft tissue from C1 to C5. CT and magnetic resonance imaging showed fluid in the retropharyngeal gap.A soft collar and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug were prescribed, without antibiotics. At 4 months after presentation, the calcium deposit and all symptoms had resolved completely. Although this disease is comparatively rare, physicians should keep it in mind when a patient presents with acute severe neck pain. PMID:25346822

  13. Unusual case of acute neck pain: acute calcific longus colli tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gunjan S; Fomin, Daren A; Joshi, Gargi S; Serano, Richard D

    2016-06-02

    Acute calcific longus colli tendinitis (ACLCT), a very rare cause of severe neck pain, dysphagia and odynophagia, is often mistaken for other common causes of neck pain. However, prompt recognition of this uncommon presentation is important to prevent unnecessary medical and surgical intervention. A 46-year-old Caucasian man presented with a 1-day history of severe neck pain, headache and odynophagia. The patient was afebrile with stable vital signs, however, the laboratory data showed mildly elevated C reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The physical examination was remarkable for markedly reduced cervical range of motion. MRI revealed the pathognomonic findings of paravertebral oedema and calcification. The definitive diagnosis of ACLCT was made and the patient was successfully managed with a short course of oral steroid, benzodiazepine and aural acupuncture, with complete resolution of the condition within a week. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Arthroscopic debridement for bilateral calcific tendinitis of the subscapularis tendons: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Kam-Lung; Woo, Siu-Bon

    2015-04-01

    We report on a 36-year-old man who underwent arthroscopic debridement for bilateral calcific tendinitis of the subscapularis tendons. The patient had a positive coracoid impingement test for both shoulders. Radiology showed calcific deposits at the insertion of both subscapularis tendons, close to the lesser tuberosities and just posterior to the coracoid tips. The patient underwent sequential arthroscopic coracoplasty and removal of calcific deposits in the subscapularis tendons. The patient returned to work 6 weeks after each surgery. At 2 years, the patient had no shoulder pain, with full range of motion and full power of the subscapularis muscles. The coracoid impingement test was negative for both shoulders. There was no evidence of recurrence.

  15. Efectividad de las ondas de choque en la tendinitis calcificante del manguito rotador

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Jiménez, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: la tendinitis calcificante del manguito rotador es una patología que se caracteriza por la formación de depósitos cálcicos en el tendón, afectando en la mayoría de los casos al músculo supraespinoso. Su etiología es desconocida aunque se puede asociar a la morfología anatómica características de esta región, al constante uso que se le da a la articulación o a la diabetes mellitus entre otras. Dado que este trastorno tiene una alta prevalencia, hace que sea nece...

  16. [Percutaneus Suture of Achilles Tendon Rupture--Operation for Beginners?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, A; Dolezych, R; Chmielnicki, M

    2016-02-01

    Acute rupture of the Achilles tendon is the most common tendon injury, with an incidence of 30/100,000 population. With the Dresden instruments, operative tendon suture can be standardised and is safe, quick and minimally invasive. With post-operative functional therapy in a walking boot, very good clinical results can be achieved. Is this operation suitable as an educational procedure and is its performance still economic? Between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2013, 212 patients with acute rupture of the Achilles tendon were operated using the Dresden instruments. There were 167 males and 45 females, with an average age of 46 years. 99 operations were performed by trainees, 46 by attending surgical staff, and 57 by a senior surgeon. With the trainees, the mean duration of the operation was 29:53 minutes, and with the attending staff 29:10 minutes (n. s., p > 0.1). The rate of complications (re-rupture, infection, and sural nerve damage) was 5/99 (5 %) for the trainees, 4/46 (8.7 %) for the attending staff, and 3/57 (5.3 %) for the senior surgeon. A total cost analysis yielded a total operative cost of 445.76 € for outpatient surgery. With a billed sum of 490.11 €, net income of 44.35 € per case is generated. In patients with reasonable indications for 2-day short inpatient treatment, total treatment cost was 3232.70 €. Percutaneous suture of the Achilles tendon with the Dresden instruments is a standardised and cost-effective surgical procedure. It is suitable as a "beginner's" procedure that can be performed quickly, safely, and cost-effectively. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Percutaneous suturing of the ruptured Achilles tendon with endoscopic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Bozkurt, Murat; Turhan, Egemen; Ayvaz, Mehmet; Atay, Ozgür Ahmet; Uzümcügil, Akin; Leblebicioğlu, Gürsel; Kaya, Defne; Aydoğ, Tolga

    2009-08-01

    A prospective study of modified percutaneous Achilles tendon repair performed between 1999 and 2005 under local infiltration anesthesia is presented; the study evaluated the results of percutaneous repair technique by visualization of the synovia under endoscopic control, followed by early functional postoperative treatment for surgical intervention of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Sixty-two patients (58 males, 4 females, mean age 32) were treated by percutaneous suturing with modified Bunnel technique under endoscopic control within 10 days after acute total rupture. Physiotherapy was initiated immediately after the operation and patients were encouraged to weight-bearing ambulation with a walking brace-moon boot as tolerated. Full weight-bearing was allowed minimum after 3 weeks postoperatively without brace. The procedure was tolerated in all patients. There were no significant ROM limitation was observed. Two patients experienced transient hypoesthesia in the region of sural nerve that spontaneously resolved in 6 months. Fifty-nine patients (95%) including professional athletes returned to their previous sportive activities, while 18 of them (29%) had some minor complaints. The interval from injury to return to regular work and rehabilitation training was 11.7 weeks (10-13 weeks). At the latest follow-up (mean: 46 months; range: 12-78 months), all the patients had satisfactory results with a mean American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society's ankle-hindfoot score of 94.6. No re-ruptures, deep venous thrombosis or wound problems occurred. The proposed method offers a reasonable treatment option for acute total Achilles tendon rupture with a low number of complications. The rerupture rate and return to preinjury activities are comparable to open and percutaneous without endoscopic control procedures.

  18. Variation in the human Achilles tendon moment arm during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasske, Kristen; Thelen, Darryl G; Franz, Jason R

    2017-02-01

    The Achilles tendon (AT) moment arm is an important determinant of ankle moment and power generation during locomotion. Load and depth-dependent variations in the AT moment arm are generally not considered, but may be relevant given the complex triceps surae architecture. We coupled motion analysis and ultrasound imaging to characterize AT moment arms during walking in 10 subjects. Muscle loading during push-off amplified the AT moment arm by 10% relative to heel strike. AT moment arms also varied by 14% over the tendon thickness. In walking, AT moment arms are not strictly dependent on kinematics, but exhibit important load and spatial dependencies.

  19. Kosmos and Polis in the Shield of Achilles

    OpenAIRE

    Flórez Flórez, Alfonso; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2011-01-01

    Stirred by the death of his friend and comrade Patroclus, Achilles returns to the battlefield in order to confront Hector, leader of the Trojan army. His armor, however, has been plundered from Patroclus’ corpse by Hector himself, his companion’s slayer. Given this situation, his immortal mother, Thetis, rushes to the workshop of Hephaestus, the famous god of craftsmanship, to ask him to fabricate a new armor for her son. In a night’s work, Hephaestus makes a complete armor, in which the shie...

  20. Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfer for Calcific Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Michael A; Catanzariti, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Calcific insertional Achilles tendinopathy can result in significant pain and disability. Although some patients respond to nonoperative therapy, many patients are at risk for long-term morbidity and unpredictable clinical outcomes. There is no evidence-based data to support the timing of operative invention, choice of procedures, or whether equinus requires treatment. This article suggests the need for a classification system based on physical examination and imaging to help guide treatment. There is an obvious need for evidence-based studies evaluating outcomes and for properly conducted scientific research to establish appropriate treatment protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Recurrence of Diabetic Pedal Ulcerations Following Tendo-Achilles Lengthening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D. Weiner

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Foot and ankle surgeons are frequently challenged by the devastating systemic consequences of diabetes mellitus manifested through neuropathy, integumentary and joint breakdown, delayed healing, decreased ability to fight infection, and fragile tendon/ligaments. Diabetic neuropathic pedal ulcerations lead to amputations at an alarming rate and also carry a high mortality rate. This article will discuss causes of diabetic pedal ulcerations that persist or recur after tendo-Achilles lengthening and will highlight areas that need to be addressed by the practitioner such as infection, vascular and nutritional status, glucose control, off-loading, biomechanics, and patient compliance.

  2. Stretching for prevention of Achilles tendon injuries: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Don Young; Chou, Loretta

    2006-12-01

    Professional and recreational athletes commonly perform pre-exercise stretching to prevent musculoskeletal injuries. Little definitive evidence exists that clearly demonstrates the efficacy of stretching in reducing injury. Achilles tendon injuries are among the most common injuries affecting active individuals in the United States today. Clinicians commonly recommend stretching the Achilles tendon without concrete scientific evidence to support such a claim. Few studies have addressed the effect of stretching in Achilles tendon injuries, and it is unclear if the conclusions made for musculoskeletal injuries can be applied to the Achilles tendon. Biomechanical studies of the Achilles tendon and measurements of the tendon's reflex activity have demonstrated possible mechanisms for the potential benefit of stretching, including load-induced hypertrophy and increased tendon tensile strength. Recent prospective studies have contended that reductions in plantarflexor strength and increases in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion from stretching the Achilles tendon may increase the risk of injury. Studies examining stretching in injury prevention, the biomechanical properties of injuries to the Achilles tendon were compiled and reviewed. Although many theories have been published regarding the potential benefits and limitations of stretching, few studies have been able to definitively demonstrate its utility in injury prevention.

  3. Compensatory muscle activation caused by tendon lengthening post-Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suydam, Stephen M; Buchanan, Thomas S; Manal, Kurt; Silbernagel, Karin Gravare

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a relationship between the lengthening of the Achilles tendon post-rupture and surgical repair to muscle activation patterns during walking in order to serve as a reference for post-surgical assessment. The Achilles tendon lengths were collected from 4 patients with an Achilles tendon rupture 6 and 12 months post-surgery along with 5 healthy controls via ultrasound. EMG was collected from the triceps surae muscles and tibialis anterior during overground walking. Achilles lengths at 6 and 12 months post-surgery were significantly longer (p Achilles tendon rupture; no side-to-side difference was found in the healthy controls. The triceps surae muscles' activations were fair to moderately correlated to the Achilles lengths (0.38 Achilles tendon length and iEMG from the triceps surae muscles indicate that loss of function is primarily caused by anatomical changes in the tendon and the appearance of muscle weakness is due to a lack of force transmission capability. This study indicates that when aiming for full return of function and strength, an important treatment goal appears to be to minimize tendon elongation.

  4. Compensatory muscle activation caused by tendon lengthening post Achilles tendon rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suydam, Stephen M.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Manal, Kurt; Silbernagel, Karin Gravare

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish a relationship between the lengthening of the Achilles tendon post rupture and surgical repair to muscle activation patterns during walking in order to serve as a reference for post-surgical assessment. Method The Achilles tendon lengths were collected from 4 patients with an Achilles tendon rupture 6 and 12 month post-surgery along with 5 healthy controls via ultrasound. EMG was collected from the triceps surae muscles and tibialis anterior during over-ground walking. Results Achilles lengths at 6 and 12 months post-surgery were significantly longer (p Achilles tendon rupture; no side to side difference was found in the healthy controls. The triceps surae muscles’ activations were fair to moderately correlated to the Achilles lengths (0.38 Achilles tendon length and iEMG from the triceps surae muscles indicate that loss of function is primarily caused by anatomical changes in the tendon and the appearance of muscle weakness is due to a lack of force transmission capability. This study indicates that when aiming for full return of function and strength an important treatment goal appears to be to minimize tendon elongation. Level of evidence Prognostic prospective case series. Level IV. PMID:23609529

  5. Type 1 Achilles tendon rupture caused by grooming trauma in a young dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Isaka

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendon rupture is uncommon in small animal practice. A 9-month-old, female, mixed breed dog (weighing 2.2kg was referred to our hospital with a primary complaint of right hind limb lameness. Complete right Achilles tendon rupture was diagnosed by physical examination and radiography. The tendon was surgically repaired the next day by using a three-loop and single near-far-far-near suture methods. Complete healing was achieved by 97 days post-surgery. This report describes the surgical technique used for complete Achilles tendon rupture repair in a young dog.

  6. An Alternative Bundle-to-Bundle Suturing Technique for Repairing Fresh Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Bin; Xie, Ming; Huang, Ruokun; Xiao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The main concern about conventional Achilles tendon repair surgical techniques is how to maintain the initial strength of the ruptured Achilles tendon through complicated suturing methods. The primary surgical problem lies in the properties of the soft tissue; the deterioration of the Achilles tendon, especially in its elasticity; and the surface lubricity of the local tissues. In the present study, we describe an innovative bundle-to-bundle suturing method that addresses these potential problems. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon and ipsilateral fracture of the medial malleolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Paula J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although ankle fractures and an Achilles tendon rupture are relatively frequent in isolation, their association in the same injury is uncommon. Case presentation A 38 year old male tree surgeon fell six meters from a tree, sustaining a subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon and an ipsilateral closed fracture of the medial malleolus. The injuries were diagnosed following clinical examination and imaging. Conclusion This injury combination is infrequent, and management of the Achilles tendon rupture should take into account the necessity not to secondarily displace the fracture of the medial malleollus.

  8. Achilles tendon reattachment after surgical treatment of insertional tendinosis using the suture bridge technique: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Bryan L; Hyer, Christopher F

    2012-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a clinical diagnosis characterized as a triad of symptoms including pain, swelling, and impaired performance of the diseased tendon. Achilles tendinopathy is divided into Achilles tendonitis and tendinosis based on histopathological examination. Achilles tendinosis is viewed microscopically as disorganized collagen, abnormal neovascularization, necrosis, and mucoid degeneration. Insertional Achilles tendinosis is a degenerative process of the tendon at the junction of the tendon and calcaneus. This disease is initially treated conservatively with activity modification, custom orthotic devices, heel lifts, and immobilization. After 3 to 6 months of conservative therapy has failed to alleviate symptoms, surgical management is indicated. Surgical management of insertional Achilles tendinosis includes Achilles tendon debridement, calcaneal exostosis ostectomy, and retrocalcaneal bursa excision. In this case series, we present 4 patients who underwent surgical management of insertional Achilles tendinosis with complete tendon detachment. All patients underwent reattachment of the Achilles tendon with the suture bridge technique. The Arthrex SutureBridge(®) (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL) device uses a series of 4 suture anchors and FiberWire(®) (Arthrex Inc.) to reattach the Achilles tendon to its calcaneal insertion. This hourglass pattern of FiberWire(®) provides a greater area of tendon compression, consequently allowing greater stability and possible earlier return to weightbearing activities. The patients were followed up for approximately 2 years' duration. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. At final follow-up there was no evidence of Achilles tendon ruptures or device failures. All patients were able to return to their activities of daily living without the use of assistive devices. The patients' average visual analog pain scale was 1 (range 0 to 4), and their average foot functional index score was 3.41 (range 0

  9. Serum Levels of Oxylipins in Achilles Tendinopathy: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Nording, Malin L.; Gaida, Jamie E.; Forsgren, Sture; Alfredson, Håkan; Fowler, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Linoleic acid-derived oxidation products are found in experimental pain models. However, little is known about the levels of such oxylipins in human pain. In consequence, in the present study, we have undertaken a lipidomic profiling of oxylipins in blood serum from patients with Achilles tendinopathy and controls. Methodology/Principal findings A total of 34 oxylipins were analysed in the serum samples. At a significance level of Ptendinopathy samples. This difference remained significant when the dataset was controlled for age, gender and body-mass index. In contrast, 0/21 of the arachidonic acid- and 0/4 of the dihomo-γ-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid or docosahenaenoic acid-derived oxylipins were higher in the patient samples at this level of significance. The area under the Receiver-Operator Characteristic (ROC) curve for 12,13-DiHOME was 0.91 (Ptendinopathy. Given the ability of two of these, 9- and 13-HODE to activate transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, it is possible that these changes may contribute to the symptoms seen in Achilles tendinopathy. PMID:25875933

  10. Treatment of A Case of Spontaneous Rupture of Achille's Tendon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张世筠

    2003-01-01

    @@ Mr. Guo, 51 years old, paid his first visit on November 7, 2001. The patient felt sudden pain in the right Achille's tendon in June 1999 with no apparent predisposing factors. Several months later he palpated a small pitting in the middle of the right Achille's tendon, which expanded gradually in size. In June 2000, two thirds of the tendon was diagnosed to be ruptured in a local hospital. Ten days later the tendon was ruptured completely when he felt sudden severe pain, numbness and distention, and he was unable to raise the heel. The lesion was healed three months later after being treated with a plaster model, but it was partially ruptured again 6 months later. Though the ruptured tendon was healed again with the help of a plaster model, he still suffered from local swelling and pain, which was aggravated during movement and made him difficult in walking, squatting down and standing up. During the examination, the right heel was found hyperemic and swollen with ecchymosis and tenderness. The tongue proper was dark red and the pulse thready and rapid. The condition was due to depletion and deficiency of liver-qi, stagnant blood with dampheat obstructing the collaterals. The principle of nourishing the liver and soothing the tendon was adopted, assisted by invigorating blood circulation and removing blood stasis, clearing heat and transforming dampness.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed radiography in Achilles tendon rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenaga, Tateo; Hachiya, Junichi; Miyasaka, Yasuo and others

    1988-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Radiography (CR) were performed in 15 patients with complete Achilles tendon rupture who were treated conservatively without surgery. MRI was obtained using Toshiba MRT 50 A superconductive machine, operaing at 0.5 Tesla. CR was performed by CR-101, Fuji Medical System. In fresh cases, ruptured tendons showed intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high intensity on T2-weighted images. Thickening of the tendon was observed in all cases except in very acute stage. Configuration of thickend tendons tends to be dumbbell shape in subacute stage and fusiform in chronic stage of more than six months after the initial trauma. In cases which showed high signal intensity at the ruptured area both on T1 and T2 weighted images, migration of fat into the sapces between the ruptured tendons was considered to be the major source of increased signal intensity. Computed radiography showed thickening of the tendon, blurring of anterior margin of the tendon, and decreased translucency of pre-Achilles fat pad. However, MRI better demonstrated the details of ruptured tendons when compared to CR, and thought to be an usefull way of following up the healing process of the ruptured tendon to facilitate more reasonable judgement of the time of removing plaster casts and stating exercise.

  12. Acute Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis in an Unusual Location: a Case Report in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Atlantoaxial Subluxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Kyu Hoon; Uhm, Wan Sik [Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is defined as inflammation of the longus colli muscle and is caused by the deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals, which usually involves the superior oblique fibers of the longus colli muscle from C1-3. Diagnosis is usually made by detecting amorphous calcification and prevertebral soft tissue swelling on radiograph, CT or MRI. In this report, we introduce a case of this disease which was misdiagnosed as a retropharyngeal tuberculous abscess, or a muscle strain of the ongus colli muscle. No calcifications were visible along the vertical fibers of the longus colli muscle. The lesion was located anterior to the C4-5 disc, in a rheumatoid arthritis patient with atlantoaxial subluxation. Calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle at this location in a rheumatoid arthritis patient has not been reported in the English literature.

  13. Acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor carpi ulnaris causing acute compressive neuropathy of the ulnar nerve: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasen, Sam

    2012-12-01

    This study reports a case of acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor carpi ulnaris in a 64-year-old woman. She presented with symptoms of acute ulnar nerve compression mimicking a volar compartment syndrome. Owing to rapidly progressive symptoms, emergency surgical exploration was carried out. Intra-operatively a large mass of calcium phosphate carbonate was noted in association with the flexor carpi ulnaris near its insertion at the wrist compressing the ulnar nerve and artery in Guyon's canal. Postoperatively the patient had complete resolution of symptoms. Conservative management with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, rest, splinting, and steroid therapy is recommended for acute calcific tendinitis, but this case suggests a role for surgical treatment when there is acute neural compression and severe pain.

  14. Lifestyle and metabolic factors in relation to shoulder pain and rotator cuff tendinitis: A population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jula Antti

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder pain is a common health problem. The purpose of this study was to assess the associations of lifestyle factors, metabolic factors and carotid intima-media thickness with shoulder pain and chronic (> 3 months rotator cuff tendinitis. Methods In this cross-sectional study, the target population consisted of subjects aged 30 years or older participating in a national Finnish Health Survey during 2000-2001. Of the 7,977 eligible subjects, 6,237 (78.2% participated in a structured interview and clinical examination. Chronic rotator cuff tendinitis was diagnosed clinically. Weight-related factors, C-reactive protein and carotid intima-media thickness were measured. Results The prevalence of shoulder joint pain during the preceding 30 days was 16% and that of chronic rotator cuff tendinitis 2.8%. Smoking, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were related to an increased prevalence of shoulder pain in both genders. Metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus and carotid intima-media thickness were associated with shoulder pain in men, whereas high level of C-reactive protein was associated with shoulder pain in women. Increased waist circumference and type 1 diabetes mellitus were associated with chronic rotator cuff tendinitis in men. Conclusions Our findings showed associations of abdominal obesity, some other metabolic factors and carotid intima-media thickness with shoulder pain. Disturbed glucose metabolism and atherosclerosis may be underlying mechanisms, although not fully supported by the findings of this study. Prospective studies are needed to further investigate the role of lifestyle and metabolic factors in shoulder disorders.

  15. Role of TGF-beta1 in relation to exercise-induced type I collagen synthesis in human tendinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja; Langberg, Henning; Olesen, Jens L

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical loading of tissue is known to influence local collagen synthesis, and microdialysis studies indicate that mechanical loading of human tendon during exercise elevates tendinous type I collagen production. Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), a potent stimulator of type I collag...... to exercise, suggest a role for TGF-beta1 in mechanical regulation of local collagen type I synthesis in tendon-related connective tissue in vivo....

  16. High incidence and treatment of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis after trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty for basal joint arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, T H; Hales, P F

    2014-10-01

    We reviewed the incidence and treatment of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis in 77 patients (81 thumbs) who had trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty for thumb carpometacarpal joint arthritis. Eighteen patients, 20 wrists (25%) had flexor carpi radialis tendinitis. The onset was 2-10 months (mean 4.7) after surgery. Two cases had preceding trauma. Eight cases (40%) responded to splinting and steroid injection. Ten patients, 12 wrists (60%) underwent surgery after failing non-operative treatment. Eleven wrists had frayed or partially torn flexor carpi radialis tendon and one had a complete tendon rupture with pseudotendon formation. Flexor carpi radialis tenotomy and pseudotendon excision were performed. All operated patients obtained good pain relief initially post-operatively. However, the pain recurred in two patients after 8 months. One required a local steroid injection for localized tenderness at the site of the proximal tendon stump. The other patient required a revision operation for scaphotrapezoid impingement. Both obtained complete pain relief. Our study has shown a high incidence of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis following trapeziectomy and abductor pollicis longus suspensionplasty. Patients should be warned about this potential complication. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Marked innervation but also signs of nerve degeneration in between the Achilles and plantaris tendons and presence of innervation within the plantaris tendon in midportion Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, C; Harandi, V M; Alfredson, H; Forsgren, S

    2015-06-01

    The plantaris tendon is increasingly recognised as an important factor in midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Its innervation pattern is completely unknown. Plantaris tendons (n=56) and associated peritendinous tissue from 46 patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy and where the plantaris tendon was closely related to the Achilles tendon were evaluated. Morphological evaluations and stainings for nerve markers [general (PGP9.5), sensory (CGRP), sympathetic (TH)], glutamate NMDA receptor and Schwann cells (S-100β) were made. A marked innervation, as evidenced by evaluation for PGP9.5 reactions, occurred in the peritendinous tissue located between the plantaris and Achilles tendons. It contained sensory and to some extent sympathetic and NMDAR1-positive axons. There was also an innervation in the zones of connective tissue within the plantaris tendons. Interestingly, some of the nerve fascicles showed a partial lack of axonal reactions. New information on the innervation patterns for the plantaris tendon in situations with midportion Achilles tendinopathy has here been obtained. The peritendinous tissue was found to be markedly innervated and there was also innervation within the plantaris tendon. Furthermore, axonal degeneration is likely to occur. Both features should be further taken into account when considering the relationship between the nervous system and tendinopathy.

  18. Imaging of plantar fascia and Achilles injuries undertaken at the London 2012 Olympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, David A; Carne, Andrew; Bethapudi, Sarath; Engebretsen, Lars; Budgett, Richard; O'Connor, Philip

    2013-12-01

    Plantar fascia and distal Achilles injuries are common in elite athletes. Acute athletic injuries of the plantar fascia include acute plantar fasciopathy and partial or complete tears. Underlying most acute injuries is a background of underlying chronic plantar fasciopathy. Injuries may affect the central or less commonly lateral portions of the fascia and acute tears are generally proximal. Athletic Achilles injuries may occur at the mid tendon or the distal insertion, and there may be an underlying chronic tendinopathy. Acute or chronic paratendinopathy may occur as a separate entity or combined with Achilles injury. In this article, the spectrum of athletic injuries of the plantar fascia and Achilles is described, illustrated by imaging findings from the London 2012 Olympic games.

  19. Less promising results with sclerosing ethoxysclerol injections for midportion achilles tendinopathy: a retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. van Sterkenburg; M.C. de Jonge; I.N. Sierevelt; C.N. van Dijk

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Local injections of the sclerosing substance polidocanol (Ethoxysclerol) have shown good clinical results in patients with chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. After training by the inventors of the technique, sclerosing Ethoxysclerol injections were applied on a group of patients i

  20. Ruptured human Achilles tendon has elevated metabolic activity up to 1 year after repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Couppé, Christian; Lonsdale, Markus

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Following Achilles tendon rupture, running is often allowed after 6 months. However, tendon healing is slow and the metabolic status of the tendon at this point is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate tendon metabolism (glucose uptake) and vascularization at 3, 6 and 12...... months after Achilles tendon rupture as measured using PET and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS). METHODS: The study group comprised 23 patients with surgically repaired Achilles tendon rupture who were investigated at 3 months (n = 7), 6 months (n = 7) and 12 months (n = 9) after surgery. The triceps...... surae complex was loaded over 20 min of slow treadmill walking while a radioactive tracer ((18)F-FDG) was administered prior to PET. Vascularization was measured in terms of PDUS flow activity, and patient-reported outcomes were scored using the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS) and sports assessment...

  1. Fatal Pulmonary Embolism following Achilles Tendon Repair: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim M. Makhdom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep venous thrombosis (DVT is a significant source of morbidity in orthopaedic surgery. It can progress to a pulmonary embolism, a significant source of mortality. Up to date, patients with Achilles tendon rupture routinely do not receive DVT chemical prophylaxis. We are presenting a case of fatal pulmonary embolism after a surgically treated Achilles tendon rupture in a forty-two-year-old male healthy patient. In the current body of the literature, the reported incidence of DVT after Achilles tendon rupture is highly variable ranging from less than 1% to 34%, and there is a disagreement in the international guidelines regarding the need of chemical DVT prophylaxis with this type of injury. Further research needs to be conducted to investigate the risks and benefits of chemical DVT prophylaxis following Achilles tendon rupture. For low-risk patients, the use of milder forms of prophylaxis such as aspirin should also be explored.

  2. Augmented repair of acute tendo Achilles ruptures with gastrosoleus turn down flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Demirel

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Primary repair of acute tendo Achilles rupture augment with gastrosoleus turn down flip technique in combination of immediate weightbearing ambulation provides a good outcome, but is associated with similar complication rates to the previous literature.

  3. Dual Fixation of Calcaneal Tuberosity Avulsion with Concomitant Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Novel Hybrid Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautham Prabhakar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture of the calcaneal tuberosity with a concomitant Achilles tendon rupture presents a difficult challenge for the treating surgeon. The ultimate goal of treatment is to restore function of both the gastrocnemius-soleus complex and the Achilles tendon. This particular subset of fractures occurs often in diabetics and elderly patients with osteoporosis making fixation of the displaced fragment rather complex. If the Achilles tendon disruption is only discovered later once the fracture is healed, subsequent management is difficult with surgical treatment being more morbid. While this is a rare injury, the consequences of a missed chronic Achilles tendon disruption are severe with significant dysfunction. It is therefore important to have a high index of suspicion for concomitant injury and to be prepared for dual fixation. We present a novel hybrid surgical fixation technique, which may be used in this instance.

  4. Comparison of Achilles Tendon Loading Between Male and Female Recreational Runners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenhalgh Andrew; Sinclair Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    ... information to better understand why this is the case. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether gender differences in the Achilles tendon load exist in recreational runners. Fifteen male (age 26.74...

  5. Disrupted Tactile Acuity in People With Achilles Tendinopathy: A Preliminary Case-Control Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debenham, James; Butler, Prue; Mallows, Adrian; Wand, Benedict M

    2016-12-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, preliminary case-control design. Background The mechanisms that contribute to Achilles tendinopathy remain poorly understood. The disparity between pain experience and peripheral pathology demonstrated in patients with Achilles tendinopathy suggests that changes in central nervous system function may be involved. Objectives To investigate whether lower-limb tactile acuity is impaired in people with nonacute Achilles tendinopathy. Methods Thirteen consecutive participants with nonacute midportion Achilles tendinopathy and 13 healthy controls were enrolled. Two-point discrimination thresholds over the affected Achilles tendon, unaffected tendon, and tendon of healthy controls were evaluated. Independent and dependent t tests were used to compare group means. Results Two-point discrimination distance over the affected limb in participants with Achilles tendinopathy was significantly increased when compared to the unaffected limb (mean difference, 11.7 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9, 21.5; P = .02) and to healthy controls (mean difference, 13.1 mm; 95% CI: 1.6, 24.6; P = .03). There was no significant difference between the healthy controls and the unaffected side in people with Achilles tendinopathy (mean difference, 1.4 mm; 95% CI: -7.9, 5.1; P = .66). Conclusion These data provide the first evidence of reduced 2-point discrimination over the affected tendon in patients with Achilles tendinopathy. Further research is needed to determine the cause for the change in tactile acuity. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(12):1061-1064. Epub 30 Oct 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6514.

  6. Ultrasound guided electrocoagulation in patients with chronic non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M Ilum; Torp-Pedersen, S; Koenig, M Juhl

    2006-01-01

    High resolution colour Doppler ultrasound shows intratendinous Doppler activity in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Treatment of this neovascularisation with sclerosing therapy seems to relieve the pain. However, the procedure often has to be repeated.......High resolution colour Doppler ultrasound shows intratendinous Doppler activity in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Treatment of this neovascularisation with sclerosing therapy seems to relieve the pain. However, the procedure often has to be repeated....

  7. Comparison of Achilles Tendon Loading Between Male and Female Recreational Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Greenhalgh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recreational running is an activity with multiple reported health benefits for both sexes, however, chronic injuries caused by excessive and/or repetitive loading of the Achilles tendon are common. Males have been identified as being at an increased risk of suffering an injury to the Achilles tendon and as such, knowledge of differences in loading between the sexes may provide further information to better understand why this is the case. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether gender differences in the Achilles tendon load exist in recreational runners. Fifteen male (age 26.74 ± 5.52 years, body height 1.80 ± 0.11 m and body mass 74.22 ± 7.27 kg and fifteen female (age 25.13 ± 6.39 years, body height 1.68 ± 0.12 m and body mass 67.12 ± 9.11 kg recreational runners volunteered to take part in the current investigation. Participants completed 10 trials running at 4.0 m·s-1 ±5% striking a force platform (1000 Hz with their right foot. Ankle joint kinematics were synchronously recorded (250 Hz using an optoelectric motion capture system. Ankle joint kinetics were computed using Newton-Euler inverse-dynamics. Net external ankle joint moments were then calculated. To estimate Achilles tendon kinetics the plantarflexion moment calculated was divided by an estimated Achilles tendon moment arm of 0.05 m. Differences in Achilles tendon kinetics were examined using independent sample t-tests (p<0.05. The results indicate that males were associated with significantly (p<0.05 greater Achilles tendon loads than females. The findings from this study support the notion that male recreational runners may be at greater risk of Achilles tendon pathology.

  8. Skin-derived fibroblasts for the treatment of refractory Achilles tendinosis: preliminary short-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Haron; Clarke, Andrew; Rosenfeld, Peter; Leach, Christopher; Connell, David

    2012-02-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinosis is a common musculoskeletal disorder often refractory to conservative management. Our study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of the use of autologous skin-derived collagen-producing cells in the treatment of refractory Achilles tendinosis. We conducted a randomized, double-blind study on forty Achilles tendons in thirty-two patients (eight with bilateral involvement) who had a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of Achilles tendinosis. The patients ranged from twenty-two to sixty-seven years old and had a mean age of 45.2 years. The patients with unilateral involvement were randomized into the treatment group (twelve patients) and control group (twelve patients). The eight patients with bilateral involvement were individually randomized into treatment and control groups, with eight Achilles tendons in each group. Achilles tendons in the treatment group were injected under ultrasound guidance with laboratory-expanded, skin-derived fibroblasts suspended in autologous plasma. The control group received ultrasound-guided injection of a local anesthetic and physiotherapy. The Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment (VISA) questionnaire and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were used as the main outcome measures for both groups. Significant differences in the mean VISA and VAS scores were detected between the treatment and the control groups for the patients with unilateral involvement at six months (p tendinosis is safe. However, larger studies with a longer duration of follow-up are required to determine the long-term effectiveness before wider clinical application is considered.

  9. Macroscopic Anomalies and Pathological Findings in and Around the Achilles Tendon: Observations From 1661 Operations During a 40-Year Period

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johansson, Kristian; Lempainen, Lasse; Sarimo, Janne; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Orava, Sakari

    2014-01-01

    ...; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The main macroscopic pathologies of 1661 chronic Achilles tendon overuse injuries, which were diagnosed and surgically treated by a single surgeon, were reviewed...

  10. Plantarflexor muscle function in healthy and chronic Achilles tendon pain subjects evaluated by the use of EMG and PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achilles tendon pathologies may alter the coordinative strategies of synergistic calf muscles. We hypothesized that both surface electromyography and positron emission tomography would reveal differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic legs in Achilles tendinopathy patients...... and between healthy controls. METHODS: Eleven subjects with unilateral chronic Achilles tendon pain (28 years) and eleven matched controls (28 years) were studied for triceps surae and flexor hallucis longus muscle activity in response to repetitive isometric plantarflexion tasks performed at 30% of maximal...... voluntary contraction using surface electromyography and glucose uptake using positron emission tomography. Additionally, Achilles tendon glucose uptake was quantified. FINDINGS: Normalized myoelectric activity of soleus was higher (P

  11. Effect of taurine on rat Achilles tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Ovunc; Lineaweaver, William C; Cavusoglu, Turker; Binboga, Erdal; Uyanikgil, Yigit; Zhang, Feng; Pekedis, Mahmut; Yagci, Tugay

    2015-01-01

    Taurine has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant characteristics. We have introduced taurine into a tendon-healing model to evaluate its effects on tendon healing and adhesion formation. Two groups of 16 rats underwent diversion and repair of the Achilles tendon. One group received a taurine injection (200 mg/ml) at the repair site, while the other group received 1 ml of saline. Specimens were harvested at 6 weeks and underwent biomechanical and histological evaluation. No tendon ruptured. Average maximum load was significantly greater in the taurine-applied group compared with the control group (p taurine-applied group compared with the control group (p  0.05). After histological assessment, we found that fibroblast proliferation, edema, and inflammation statistically decreased in the treatment group (p taurine may have an effect on adhesion formation.

  12. Diagnosing Achilles tendon injuries in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, Lynda

    2013-09-01

    Achilles tendon (AT) injury is an overuse injury often seen in professional and recreational athletes. It tends to affect men, particularly those in their thirties and forties, more than women, and is typically seen in people who are intermittently active. To ensure AT ruptures are identified and treated effectively, early intervention in emergency departments (EDs) is crucial. This article discusses how advanced nurse practitioners can use their comprehensive problem-solving, clinical decision-making and clinical judgement skills to manage patients who present with suspected AT injury. It also describes the anatomy of tendon rupture, the aetiology and mechanism of injuries, and the importance of assessment and diagnostic tools, therapeutic techniques and management strategies. Finally, it considers the psychological effect this injury can have on patients, while in the ED and after discharge. A case study is included as an example of ED management.

  13. A Case of Heel Cord Pain After Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: Treated by Endoscopic Adhesiolysis of the Achilles Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    The causes of heel cord pain after repair of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon are unclear. The proposed etiologies include nonabsorbable suture granuloma formation, alteration of the pain receptors threshold in the tendon, and distension of the paratenon by the hypertrophied tendon, underlying tendinopathy, postrepair neovascularization, and peritendinous fibrous adhesion. We present an endoscopic technique of adhesiolysis of the Achilles tendon to deal with the various possible causes of postrepair heel cord pain. Therapeutic, Level 4: Case report. © 2015 The Author(s).

  14. Pressure and tendon strain in the sixth extensor compartment of the wrist during simulated provocative maneuvers for diagnosing extensor carpi ulnaris tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Moritomo, Hisao; Omori, Shinsuke; Iida, Akio; Omokawa, Shohei; Suzuki, Daisuke; Fujimiya, Mineko; Wada, Takuro; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-11-01

    Various provocative maneuvers for diagnosing extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendinitis have been reported; however, it remains unclear which maneuver is the most sensitive to detect ECU tendinitis. To clarify this, we investigated and compared the extratendinous pressure and ECU tendon strain in the sixth extensor compartment of the wrist during various provocative maneuvers for diagnosing ECU tendinitis. Nine upper extremities from nine fresh-frozen cadavers were examined. We investigated extratendinous pressure in the ECU fibro-osseous tunnel of the distal ulna and ECU tendon strain during eight forearm positions-neutral rotation, pronation, supination, pronation with wrist flexion, supination with wrist flexion, supination with wrist extension, both hand and forearm supination, and supination with ECU full loading-to simulate provocative maneuvers reported to detect ECU tendinitis. Pressure was significantly higher during both hand and forearm supination (carpal supination test) and during supination with wrist extension (prayer's hand supination test) than during neutral rotation. The pressure during the carpal supination test was 3 times higher than that during the prayer's hand supination test and 27 times higher than that during the neutral position. Strain was significantly higher during the carpal supination test and during supination with ECU full loading (the ECU synergy test) than during other maneuvers. Both pressure and tendon strain increased most notably during the carpal supination test compared to the other maneuvers, which suggests that the carpal supination test is the most sensitive for the detection of ECU tendinitis.

  15. Localization and expression of osteopontin in the rotator cuff tendons in patients with calcifying tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, E; Sugamoto, K; Nakase, T; Miyamoto, T; Kaneko, M; Tomita, T; Myoui, A; Ochi, T; Yoshikawa, H

    2001-06-01

    Calcifying tendinitis of rotator cuff tendons is a common and painful condition caused by ectopic calcification in humans. To examine the involvement of osteopontin (OPN), a potent regulator of calcium deposition on connective tissues, localization and expression of OPN protein and messenger (m)RNA were investigated in human tissue samples of calcified rotator cuff tendons. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that OPN was localized in cells surrounding the calcified area. OPN was localized in two distinct cell types, i.e., fibroblast-like cells negative for CD68 and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and multinucleated macrophages positive for CD68 and TRAP. In situ hybridization revealed that the mRNA expression of OPN in these cells coincided with the immunohistochemistry results, and these results were supported by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis using human OPN-specific oligonucleotides. Cells located away from the calcified area did not express OPN. The present findings indicate the involvement of OPN in the process of calcification of rotator cuff tendons and suggest that OPN plays a role in such painful disorders through the actions of at least two cell types.

  16. Intraosseous migration of tendinous calcifications: cortical erosions, subcortical migration and extensive intramedullary diffusion, a SIMS series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malghem, Jacques; Omoumi, Patrick; Lecouvet, Frederic; Berg, Bruno vande [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Departement de radiologie et d' imagerie medicale, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2015-10-15

    Calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition is a common disorder, which sometimes causes acute pain as calcifications dissolve and migrate into adjacent soft tissue. Intraosseous calcium penetration has also been described. We illustrate the appearance of these lesions using a series of 35 cases compiled by members of the French Society of Musculoskeletal Imaging (Societe d'Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, SIMS). The first group in our series (7 cases) involved calcification-related cortical erosions of the humeral and femoral diaphyses, in particular at the pectoralis major and gluteus maximus insertions. A second group (28 cases) involved the presence of calcium material in subcortical areas. The most common site was the greater tubercle of the humerus, accompanying a calcifying tendinopathy of the supraspinatus. In addition, an extensive intramedullary diffusion of calcium deposits was observed in four of these cases, associated with cortical erosion in one case and subcortical lesions in three cases. Cortical erosions and intraosseous migration of calcifications associated with calcific tendinitis may be confused with neoplasm or infection. It is important to recognize atypical presentations of hydroxyapatite deposition to avoid unnecessary investigation or surgery. (orig.)

  17. Radiological and anatomical investigation of calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakida, Osamu; Aoki, Jun; Fujioka, Fumio; Watanabe, Tomofumi; Seo, Gwy-Suk; Sone, Shusuke; Nagata, Tetsuji [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    The radiological findings in four cases of gluteus maximus tendinitis were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients underwent radiographic, CT and MRI examinations. Amorphous or round calcifications were detected on lateral radiographs in three cases, and on CT in all cases. A small cortical erosion was observed in three cases on both radiographs and CT. MRI showed a thickened gluteus maximus tendon, but no other specific features. In the supine position, which is common in routine CT and MRI studies, the calcific deposits appeared to be distributed along the vastus lateralis muscle tendon. To correlate these radiographic observations with the topographic anatomy of the tendon`s insertion, we investigated 14 thighs of seven cadavers, and clarified that the tendon`s insertion was the main component of the lateral femoral intermuscular septum. Consequently we performed MRI on a volunteer in a prone position who was asked to maintain contraction of the gluteus maximus and quadratus femoris muscles. The images obtained showed clearly that the gluteus maximus tendon was directed dorsally. In conclusion, radiography and CT are the modalities of choice for diagnosis of this entity. Additionally, radiologists should be aware that the gluteus maximus tendons are directed laterally as a main part of the lateral femoral intermuscular septum on routine CT and MRI. (author).

  18. Tendinous muscle insertions (scleromuscular junctions of the recti muscles) in patients with ocular alignment problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorova, M G; Palmowski-Wolfe, A M; Meyer, P

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the hypothesis whether the scleromuscular junction of extraocular recti muscle is tendinous. Muscle samples of the 41 extraocular recti muscles of 33 patients and 4 muscle-/eye-matched samples from 2 postmortem eyes, were processed for light/electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry with antibodies against desmin, smooth-muscle actin and muscle regulating proteins like myf3 and myf4 (myogenin), tenascin C and for 8 samples against collagens I to IV. Histological examination of the muscle samples confirmed a thick collagen-structured tissue, specific for muscle tendon; without appearance of muscle tissue. This was confirmed by immunohistochemistry with antibodies against desmin, smooth-muscle actin, myf3 and myf4 (myogenin) and for eight samples with collagens I to IV. Anti-tenascin C marker was only strongly positive in the connective tissue of the blood vessel walls. Electron microscopy demonstrated collagen bundles composed of parallel oriented fibrils with a moderate amount of ground substance. The absence of contractile fibers at the sclerotendinous junction is an entirely normal finding in humans and cannot be related to ocular alignment pathogenesis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R.

  20. Application of internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop in early Achilles tendon rupture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Chen; Jia-Sen Wei; Zhao-Yang Hou; Jiong Hu; Yan-Guang Cao; Qi-Xin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical effect and safety of internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop in earlyAchilles tendon rupture.Methods:Seventy-six patients respectively with early transected and avulsed types ofAchilles tendon rupture were selected and treated with internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop.The patients began to take exercise for their lower limbs through continous passive motion as early as possible after surgical repair, and the loops were removed after3-5 months.Six months later, the condition of complications includingAchilles tendon re-rupture, wound fistula, wound infection and skin necrosis, cutaneous sensation in sural nerve dominance region, time back to preinjury work or learning as well as time to physical activities were observed.One year later, the therapeutic effect was evaluated, and the maximum circumferences of bilateral legs and ruptured plane circumferences ofAchilles tendon were measured.Results:The wound of all patients healed well, no complications likeAchilles tendon re-rupture, wound fistula, wound infection and skin necrosis occured, and the cutaneous sensation in sural nerve dominance region was normal.The mean time back to preinjury workor learning as well as to pysical activities of all patients were respectively10 and22 weeks.Seventy out of76 patients(92.1%) achieved an excellent effect, and6(7.9%) good effect.The excellent and good rate came up to100%.The maximum circumference in the affected leg decreased to 2 mm averagely compared with the offside, while the ruptured plane circumferences ofAchilles tendon in the affected side increased to2.2 mm compared with the offside.Conclusions:For earlyAchilles tendon rupture, internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop can recover the ankle function better, return to the preinjury state in the shortest time, and has few complications.

  1. Cross cultural adaptation of the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score with reliability, validity and responsiveness evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmont, Michael R; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina; Mei-Dan, Omer; Karlsson, Jon; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-06-01

    The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) was developed because of the need for a reliable, valid and sensitive instrument to evaluate symptoms and their effects on physical activity in patients following either conservative or surgical management of an Achilles tendon rupture. Prior to using the score in larger randomized trial in an English-speaking population, we decided to perform reliability, validity and responsiveness evaluations of the English version of the ATRS. Even though the score was published in English, the actual English version has not be validated and compared to the results of the Swedish version. From 2009 to 2010, all patients who received treatment for Achilles tendon rupture were followed up using the English version of the ATRS. Patients were asked to complete the score at 3, 6 and 12 months following treatment for Achilles tendon rupture. The ATRS was completed on arrival in the outpatient clinic and again following consultation. The outcomes of 49 (13 female and 36 male) patients were assessed. The mean (SD) age was 49 (12) years, and 27 patients had treatment for a left-sided rupture, 22 the right. All patients received treatment for ruptured Achilles tendons: 38 acute percutaneous repair, 1 open repair, 5 an Achilles tendon reconstruction using a Peroneus Brevis tendon transfer for delayed presentation, 1 gracilis augmented repair for re-rupture and 4 non-operative treatment for mid-portion rupture. The English version of ATRS was shown to have overall excellent reliability (ICC = 0.986). There was no significant difference between the results with the English version and the Swedish version when compared at the 6-month- or 12-month (n.s.) follow-up appointments. The effect size was 0.93. The minimal detectable change was 6.75 points. The ATRS was culturally adapted to English and shown to be a reliable, valid and responsive method of testing functional outcome following an Achilles tendon rupture.

  2. Prospective randomized clinical trial of aggressive rehabilitation after acute Achilles tendon ruptures repaired with Dresden technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Carlos; Peña y Lillo, Roberto; Carreño, Gabriel; Marambio, Hugo

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a common injury during working years. Aggressive rehabilitation may provide better outcomes, but also a greater chance of re-rupture. To determine if aggressive rehabilitation has better clinical outcomes for Achilles tendon function, Triceps surae function, one-leg heel rise capacity and lower complication rate during twelve weeks after percutaneous Achilles tendon repair compared to conventional rehabilitation. Randomized controlled trial. Thirty-nine patients were prospectively randomized. The aggressive group (n=20, 41.4 ± 8.3 years) received rehabilitation from the first day after surgery. The conventional group (n=19, 41.7 ± 10.7 years) rested for 28 days, before rehabilitation started. The statistical parameters were the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS), verbal pain scale, time to return to work, pain medication consumption, Achilles tendon strength, dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM), injured-leg calf circumference, calf circumference difference, one-leg heel rise repetition and difference, re-rupture rate, strength deficit rate, and other complication rates. Mixed-ANOVA and Bonferroni's post hoc test were performed for multiple comparisons. Student's t-test was performed for parameters measured on the 12th week. The aggressive group with respect to the conventional group had a higher ATRS; lower verbal pain score; lower pain medication consumption; early return to work; higher Achilles tendon strength; higher one-leg heel rise repetitions; and lower one-leg heel rise difference. The re-rupture rate was 5% and 5%, the strength deficit rate was 42% and 5%, and other complications rate was 11% and 15% in the conventional and aggressive group, respectively. Patients with Dresden repair and aggressive rehabilitation have better clinical outcomes, Achilles tendon function and one-leg heel rise capacity without increasing the postoperative complications rate after 12 weeks compared to rehabilitation with immobilization and

  3. Application of internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop in early Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Wei, Jia-Sen; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Hu, Jiong; Cao, Yan-Guang; Chen, Qi-Xin

    2013-11-01

    To explore the clinical effect and safety of internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop in early Achilles tendon rupture. Seventy-six patients respectively with early transected and avulsed types of Achilles tendon rupture were selected and treated with internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop. The patients began to take exercise for their lower limbs through continous passive motion as early as possible after surgical repair, and the loops were removed after 3-5 months. Six months later, the condition of complications including Achilles tendon re-rupture, wound fistula, wound infection and skin necrosis, cutaneous sensation in sural nerve dominance region, time back to preinjury work or learning as well as time to physical activities were observed. One year later, the therapeutic effect was evaluated, and the maximum circumferences of bilateral legs and ruptured plane circumferences of Achilles tendon were measured. The wound of all patients healed well, no complications like Achilles tendon re-rupture, wound fistula, wound infection and skin necrosis occured, and the cutaneous sensation in sural nerve dominance region was normal. The mean time back to preinjury work or learning as well as to pysical activities of all patients were respectively 10 and 22 weeks. Seventy out of 76 patients (92.1%) achieved an excellent effect, and 6 (7.9%) good effect. The excellent and good rate came up to 100%. The maximum circumference in the affected leg decreased to 2 mm averagely compared with the offside, while the ruptured plane circumferences of Achilles tendon in the affected side increased to 2.2 mm compared with the offside. For early Achilles tendon rupture, internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop can recover the ankle function better, return to the preinjury state in the shortest time, and has few complications. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Patellofemoral Joint and Achilles Tendon Loads During Overground and Treadmill Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Richard W; Halsey, Lisa; Hayek, Andrew; Johnson, Holly; Willson, John D

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Level 4, controlled laboratory study. Background Little is known regarding how the potential differences between treadmill and overground running may affect patellofemoral joint and Achilles tendon loading characteristics. Objectives To compare measures of loading of the patellofemoral joint and Achilles tendon across treadmill and overground running in healthy, uninjured runners. Methods Eighteen healthy runners ran at their self-selected speed on an instrumented treadmill and overground, while 3-D running mechanics were sampled. A musculoskeletal model derived peak load, rate of loading, and estimated cumulative load per 1 km of continuous running for the patellofemoral joint and Achilles tendon for each condition. Data were analyzed via paired t tests and Pearson correlations to detect differences and assess relationships, respectively, between the 2 running mediums. Results No differences (P>.05) were found between treadmill and overground running for peak load, rate of loading, or estimated cumulative patellofemoral joint stress per 1 km of continuous running. However, treadmill running resulted in 12.5% greater peak Achilles tendon force (P0.70) and moderate agreements (r>0.50) for most patellofemoral joint and Achilles measures, respectively, between treadmill and overground running. Conclusion No differences were observed in loading characteristics to the patellofemoral joint between running mediums; however, treadmill running resulted in greater Achilles tendon loading compared with overground running. Future investigations should examine whether sudden bouts of treadmill running may increase the risk of mechanical overload of the Achilles tendon in runners who habitually train overground. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):664-672. Epub 12 May 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6494.

  5. Unilateral surgical treatment for patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy may result in bilateral recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredson, Håkan; Spang, Christoph; Forsgren, Sture

    2014-10-01

    Bilateral midportion Achilles tendinopathy/tendinosis is not unusual, and treatment of both sides is often carried out. Experiments in animals suggest of the potential involvement of central neuronal mechanisms in Achilles tendinosis. To evaluate the outcome of surgery for Achilles tendinopathy. This observational study included 13 patients (7 men and 6 women, mean age 53 years) with a long duration (6-120 months) of chronic painful bilateral midportion Achilles tendinopathy. The most painful side at the time for investigation was selected to be operated on first. Treatment was ultrasound-guided and Doppler-guided scraping procedure outside the ventral part of the tendon under local anaesthetic. The patients started walking on the first day after surgery. Follow-ups were conducted and the primary outcome was pain by visual analogue scale. In an additional part of the study, specimens from Achilles and plantaris tendons in three patients with bilateral Achilles tendinosis were examined. Short-term follow-ups showed postoperative improvement on the non-operated side as well as the operated side in 11 of 13 patients. Final follow-up after 37 (mean) months showed significant pain relief and patient satisfaction on both sides for these 11 patients. In 2 of 13 patients operation on the other, initially non-operated side, was instituted due to persisting pain. Morphologically, it was found that there were similar morphological effects, and immunohistochemical patterns of enzyme involved in signal substance production, bilaterally. Unilateral treatment with a scraping operation can have benefits contralaterally; the clinical implication is that unilateral surgery may be a logical first treatment in cases of bilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Teknik Rekonstruksi Turndown Flap Tendon Achilles dan Flap Fasiokutan Sural pada Ruptur Tendon Achilles yang Disertai Kerusakan Masif Jaringan Lunak: Laporan Kasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermawan Nagar Rasyid

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendon rupture is the most common ruptur of tendon in the lower limb despite being one of the toughest tendons. This rupture presents a complex problem to the treating surgeon especially if it is associated with tendon and soft tissue loss. The case in this study is one patient (male, age 30-year old with a spectrum of acute and infected open tendon-achilles rupture that includes loss of tendon of up to 5 cm, tendon defect with no distal attachment, and partial loss of the calcaneum. The skin defect measured after debridement ranged from 8 x 5 cm to 15 x 10 cm. The ruptured tendon was sutured using gastrocnemius-soleus turn down flap technic to calcaneus bone. A reverse sural artery was used to provide soft tissue cover. The flap survived. The patient had normal gait, were able to stand on tip toes, had active plantar flexion, and had returned to his original occupation 2 months after reconstruction. He had full range of movement at the ankle. Augmented repair of Achilles tendon rupture with large soft tissue defect using gastrocnemius- soleus turn down flap and sural artery flap are stable enough to allow early weight-bearing with favorable clinical result for this patient. Conclusions is single stage tendon reconstruction and reverse flow sural artery flap give good functional outcome in complex Achilles tendon rupture with tendon and soft tissue loss.

  7. The Achilles tendon total rupture score: a study of responsiveness, internal consistency and convergent validity on patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kearney Rebecca S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score was developed by a research group in 2007 in response to the need for a patient reported outcome measure for this patient population. Beyond this original development paper, no further validation studies have been published. Consequently the purpose of this study was to evaluate internal consistency, convergent validity and responsiveness of this newly developed patient reported outcome measure within patients who have sustained an isolated acute Achilles tendon rupture. Methods Sixty-four eligible patients with an acute rupture of their Achilles tendon completed the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score alongside two further patient reported outcome measures (Disability Rating Index and EQ 5D. These were completed at baseline, six weeks, three months, six months and nine months post injury. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score was evaluated for internal consistency, using Cronbach's alpha, convergent validity, through correlation analysis and responsiveness, by analysing floor and ceiling effects and calculating its relative efficiency in comparison to the Disability Rating Index and EQ 5D scores. Results The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha > 0.8 and correlated significantly (p Conclusions A universally accepted outcome measure is imperative to allow comparisons to be made across practice. This is the first study to evaluate aspects of validity of this newly developed outcome measure, outside of the developing centre. The ATRS demonstrated high internal consistency and responsiveness, with limited convergent validity. This research provides further support for the use of this outcome measure, however further research is required to advocate its universal use in patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Such areas include inter-rater reliability and research to determine the minimally clinically important difference

  8. The Achilles tendon total rupture score: a study of responsiveness, internal consistency and convergent validity on patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Rebecca S; Achten, Juul; Lamb, Sarah E; Parsons, Nicholas; Costa, Matthew L

    2012-02-29

    The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score was developed by a research group in 2007 in response to the need for a patient reported outcome measure for this patient population. Beyond this original development paper, no further validation studies have been published.Consequently the purpose of this study was to evaluate internal consistency, convergent validity and responsiveness of this newly developed patient reported outcome measure within patients who have sustained an isolated acute Achilles tendon rupture. Sixty-four eligible patients with an acute rupture of their Achilles tendon completed the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score alongside two further patient reported outcome measures (Disability Rating Index and EQ 5D). These were completed at baseline, six weeks, three months, six months and nine months post injury. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score was evaluated for internal consistency, using Cronbach's alpha, convergent validity, through correlation analysis and responsiveness, by analysing floor and ceiling effects and calculating its relative efficiency in comparison to the Disability Rating Index and EQ 5D scores. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha > 0.8) and correlated significantly (p measure is imperative to allow comparisons to be made across practice. This is the first study to evaluate aspects of validity of this newly developed outcome measure, outside of the developing centre. The ATRS demonstrated high internal consistency and responsiveness, with limited convergent validity. This research provides further support for the use of this outcome measure, however further research is required to advocate its universal use in patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Such areas include inter-rater reliability and research to determine the minimally clinically important difference between scores.All authors have read and concur with the content of this manuscript. The material

  9. Effect of Complications After Minimally Invasive Surgical Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures Report on 211 Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, Roderik; van der Heijden, Geert J. M. G.; Verleisdonk, Egbert-Jan M. M.; Kolfschoten, Nicky; Verhofstad, Michiel H. J.; van der Werken, Christiaan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Complications of acute Achilles tendon rupture treatment are considered to negatively influence outcome, but the relevance of these effects is largely unknown. Purpose: The Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) was used to determine level of disability in patients with minimally inv

  10. Biomechanical properties of isolated fascicles of the Iliopsoas and Achilles tendons in African American and Caucasian men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, P; Aagaard, P; Magnusson, S P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate biomechanical properties of the Iliopsoas and Achilles tendons in young African American (AA) and Caucasian (CC) men, and attempt to clarify whether the difference in Achilles tendon ruptures between AA and CC can be explained by differences in material properties....

  11. Effect of Complications After Minimally Invasive Surgical Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures Report on 211 Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, Roderik; van der Heijden, Geert J. M. G.; Verleisdonk, Egbert-Jan M. M.; Kolfschoten, Nicky; Verhofstad, Michiel H. J.; van der Werken, Christiaan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Complications of acute Achilles tendon rupture treatment are considered to negatively influence outcome, but the relevance of these effects is largely unknown. Purpose: The Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) was used to determine level of disability in patients with minimally inv

  12. Efectividad del tratamiento mediante ultrasonido y ejercicios terapéuticos en la tendinitis del supraespinoso sin calcificar

    OpenAIRE

    Vírseda García, Ángela

    2011-01-01

    Introducción: La tendinitis del músculo supraespinoso en una de las causas más frecuentes de consulta en Atención Primaria. En el caso del Centro de Salud Daroca supone un 43,80 % del total de patologías de hombro. Debido a la frecuencia de dicha patología y a la repercusión de la misma es necesario presentar un método de tratamiento lo más efectivo posible. Objetivo: Comprobar la efectividad del tratamiento fisioterapéutico combinado de ultrasonido y ejercicios terapéuticos en pacientes ...

  13. Computed tomography of the soft tissues of the shoulder. Pt. 3. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dihlmann, W.; Bandick, J.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography of the soft tissue of the shoulder in cases of calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff provides the following information: 1. Localisation of the calcium deposits within the rotator cuff. 2. Contours and density of the calcium deposits correlated with the clinical findings as described by Uhthoff et al. Ill-defined contours and non-homogeneous deposits are associated with more severe clinical features. 3. Computed tomography shows that apatite particles, which are not visible radiologically, may penetrate into the shoulder joint and produce synovitis with an effusion. This is of importance in local therapy.

  14. Biomedical Risk Factors of Achilles Tendinopathy in Physically Active People: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovskaia, Maria; Vlahovich, Nicole; Ashton, Kevin J; Hughes, David C

    2017-12-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is the most prevalent tendon disorder in people engaged in running and jumping sports. Aetiology of Achilles tendinopathy is complex and requires comprehensive research of contributing risk factors. There is relatively little research focussing on potential biomedical risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy. The purpose of this systematic review is to identify studies and summarise current knowledge of biomedical risk factors of Achilles tendinopathy in physically active people. Research databases were searched for relevant articles followed by assessment in accordance with PRISMA statement and standards of Cochrane collaboration. Levels of evidence and quality assessment designation were implemented in accordance with OCEBM levels of evidence and Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale, respectively. A systematic review of the literature identified 22 suitable articles. All included studies had moderate level of evidence (2b) with the Newcastle-Ottawa score varying between 6 and 9. The majority (17) investigated genetic polymorphisms involved in tendon structure and homeostasis and apoptosis and inflammation pathways. Overweight as a risk factor of Achilles tendinopathy was described in five included studies that investigated non-genetic factors. COL5A1 genetic variants were the most extensively studied, particularly in association with genetic variants in the genes involved in regulation of cell-matrix interaction in tendon and matrix homeostasis. It is important to investigate connections and pathways whose interactions might be disrupted and therefore alter collagen structure and lead to the development of pathology. Polymorphisms in genes involved in apoptosis and inflammation, and Achilles tendinopathy did not show strong association and, however, should be considered for further investigation. This systematic review suggests that biomedical risk factors are an important consideration in the future study of propensity to the development

  15. Shock wave therapy versus conventional surgery in the treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompe, J D; Zoellner, J; Nafe, B

    2001-06-01

    A prospective quasirandomized study was performed to compare the effects of surgical extirpation (Group I, 29 patients) with the outcome after high-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy (Group II, 50 patients; 3,000 impulses of an energy flux density of 0.6 mJ/mm2) in patients with a chronic calcifying tendinitis in the supraspinatus tendon. Symptoms and demographic data of the two groups were comparable. According to the University of California Los Angeles Rating System, the mean score in Group I was 30 points with 75% good or excellent results after 12 months, and 32 points with 90% good or excellent results after 24 months. Radiologically, there was no calcific deposit in 85% of the patients after 1 year. In Group II, the mean score was 28 points with 60% good or excellent results after 12 months, and 29 points with 64% good or excellent results after 2 years. Radiologically, complete elimination of the deposit was observed in 47% of the patients after 1 year. Clinically, according to the University of California Los Angeles score, there was no significant difference between both groups at 1 year. At 2 years, there was a significantly better result in Group II. Both groups then were subdivided into patients who had a homogenous deposit as seen on radiographs and patients who had an inhomogenous deposit before treatment. Surgery was superior compared with high-energy shock wave therapy for patients with homogenous deposits. For patients with inhomogenous deposits, high-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy was equivalent to surgery and should be given priority because of its noninvasiveness.

  16. Endoscopic-assisted achilles tendon reconstruction with free hamstring tendon autograft for chronic rupture of achilles tendon: clinical and isokinetic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shazly, Ossama; Abou El Soud, Maged M; El Mikkawy, Dalia M E; El Ganzoury, Ibrahim; Ibrahim, Ayman Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical and functional outcome of endoscopic-assisted reconstruction of chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon using free hamstring tendon autograft. We present a case series of 15 patients who had chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon (>6 weeks earlier) and underwent endoscopic-assisted reconstruction with a free hamstring autograft. The graft loop was passed through and fixed to the proximal stump of the tendon. The graft was then passed through suture to the distal stump and finally inserted into a tunnel in the anterior calcaneus to the Achilles tendon insertion and fixed with an bioabsorbable interference screw. The mean follow-up period was 27 months (SD, 3 months; range, 24 to 33 months). All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at follow-up 2 years postoperatively. All patients were functionally evaluated with the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score for the hindfoot preoperatively and postoperatively. Calf muscle power was evaluated by isokinetic strength testing at 2 years' follow-up. The mean size of the gap on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging was 49 mm (SD, 9 mm). The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 32.6 (SD, 7.5). There was a statistically significant improvement in the postoperative AOFAS score after 2 years to 90.8 (SD, 3.54) (P Achilles tendon reconstruction with free hamstring tendon autograft for chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon showed good to excellent results in all patients. Isokinetic testing showed a nonsignificant deficit between the involved and uninvolved sides at 2 years' follow-up. Level IV, therapeutic cases series. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of normal and pathological Achilles tendon by real-time shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Pompiliu HoraŢiu; Izvernariu, Dragoş Andrei; Iancu, Cătălina; Dinu, Gabriel Ovidiu; Crişan, Dan; Popescu, Simona Alina; Şirli, Roxana Lucia Denisa; Nistor, Bogdan Mihai; RăuŢia, Ion Călin; Lăzureanu, Dorela CodruŢa; Dema, Sorin; Prejbeanu, Ion Radu; Sporea, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy covers a range of several tendon conditions, mostly caused by overuse but at least in Achilles tendon pathology, favored by obesity, diabetes, inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. Subclinical tendon pathology is difficult to diagnose, as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations are sometimes inconclusive and not cost-effective. Elastography is an ultrasound examination method that uses mechanical impulses to produce shear waves in the tissue of interest, then measures the tissue displacement and calculates the shear wave speed or the elastic modulus of the examined tissue. We have used B-mode ultrasonography and shear wave elastography on 80 Achilles tendons from healthy volunteers with or without tendon pathology history, and correlated the data obtained with the clinical parameters of the volunteers, such as age, body mass index (BMI) and sports practice. We have shown that there is no significant correlation between the elastic modulus of the Achilles tendon and age, sports practice and body mass index with the exception of the correlation between the elastic modulus of the right Achilles tendon in men and age. Shear wave elastography has proved to be cost-effective for the evaluation of the Achilles tendon in healthy volunteers and was able to monitor the evolution of one patient with old tendon rupture treated by surgery. It can complete MRI investigation and it can replace B-mode ultrasonography particularly in monitoring the post-surgery evolution.

  18. Achilles tendon and plantar fascia in recently diagnosed type II diabetes: role of body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Schiavone, Cosima; Di Carlo, Luigi; Salini, Vincenzo

    2012-07-01

    Previous research has shown that plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness is increased in diabetes. The aims of present study were to assess whether tendon changes can occur in the early stages of the disease and to evaluate the extent of the influence of body mass index (BMI). The study population included 51 recent-onset type II diabetic subjects, who were free from diabetic complications, divided according to BMI into three groups (normal weight, overweight, and obese). Eighteen non-diabetic, normal-weight subjects served as controls. Plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness was measured by means of sonography. The groups were well balanced for age and sex. In all the diabetic subjects, plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness was increased compared to the controls (p fascia thickness and BMI values (r = 0.749, p fascia and Achilles tendon thickness is increased in the early stages of type II diabetes and that BMI is related more to plantar fascia than Achilles tendon thickness. Further longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate whether these early changes can overload the metatarsal heads and increase the stress transmitted to plantar soft tissues, thus representing an additional risk factor for foot ulcer development.

  19. Concurrent deficits of soleus and gastrocnemius muscle fascicles and Achilles tendon post stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Roth, Elliot J; Harvey, Richard L; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2015-04-01

    Calf muscles and Achilles tendon play important roles in functional activities. However, it is not clear how biomechanical properties of the uniarticular soleus (SOL) and biarticular gastrocnemius muscle and Achilles tendon, including the fascicle length, pennation angle, and stiffness, change concurrently post stroke. Biomechanical properties of the medial gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus muscles were evaluated bilaterally in 10 hemiparetic stroke survivors using combined ultrasonography-biomechanical measurements. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon including the length, cross-sectional area (CSA), stiffness, and Young's modulus were evaluated, together with calf muscle biomechanical properties. Gastrocnemius and SOL contributions were separated using flexed and extended knee positions. The impaired side showed decreased fascicle length (GM: 6%, P = 0.002 and SOL: 9%, P = 0.03, at full knee extension and 0° ankle dorsiflexion) and increased fascicular stiffness (GM: 64%, P = 0.005 and SOL: 19%, P = 0.012, at a common 50 N force level). In contrast, Achilles tendon on the impaired side showed changes in the opposite direction as the muscle fascicles with increased tendon length (5%, P Young's modulus (30%, P muscle fascicles and Achilles tendon biomechanical properties help us better understand concurrent changes of fascicles and tendon as part of the calf muscle-tendon unit and facilitate development of more effective treatments. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Utility of Ultrasonography in Assessing the Effectiveness of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy in Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of ultrasonography (US for predicting and assessing the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT in insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT. Methods. A total of 42 patients with an established diagnosis of chronic IAT were examined by US before ESWT and at 4 weeks and 12 weeks after ESWT. The thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA of the Achilles tendon, size of calcific plaques, tendon structure score, and neovascularization score were measured at each time point. Results. After therapy, Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A scores increased significantly, and the size of calcific plaques decreased (P<0.05. Neovascularization scores increased at the 4th week and then decreased at the 12th week (P<0.05. The thickness, CSA, and structure of the Achilles tendon did not change. Variables observed by US at baseline were not associated with changes in VISA-A scores at follow-up. However, the changes in calcific plaque size and neovascularization scores were related to the improvement of VISA-A scores between pre- and posttherapy (P<0.01. Conclusion. Ultrasonography can reveal some changes in the insertion of the Achilles tendon after ESWT, but the outcome of ESWT in IAT cannot be predicted by the variables observed by US.

  1. Utility of Ultrasonography in Assessing the Effectiveness of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy in Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of ultrasonography (US) for predicting and assessing the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT). Methods. A total of 42 patients with an established diagnosis of chronic IAT were examined by US before ESWT and at 4 weeks and 12 weeks after ESWT. The thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the Achilles tendon, size of calcific plaques, tendon structure score, and neovascularization score were measured at each time point. Results. After therapy, Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) scores increased significantly, and the size of calcific plaques decreased (P < 0.05). Neovascularization scores increased at the 4th week and then decreased at the 12th week (P < 0.05). The thickness, CSA, and structure of the Achilles tendon did not change. Variables observed by US at baseline were not associated with changes in VISA-A scores at follow-up. However, the changes in calcific plaque size and neovascularization scores were related to the improvement of VISA-A scores between pre- and posttherapy (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Ultrasonography can reveal some changes in the insertion of the Achilles tendon after ESWT, but the outcome of ESWT in IAT cannot be predicted by the variables observed by US. PMID:28004000

  2. Percutaneous repair followed by accelerated rehabilitation for acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mouazzen, Louay; Rajakulendran, Karthig; Najefi, Ali; Ahad, Nurul

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome after percutaneous repair followed by accelerated rehabilitation for acute Achilles tendon ruptures. 21 men and 9 women (mean age, 41 years) underwent percutaneous repair by a single senior surgeon for acute Achilles tendon ruptures, followed by early weight bearing and accelerated rehabilitation. Outcome measures included the Achilles tendon re-rupture rate, the Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) at 3 and 6 months, the incidence of sural nerve injury, wound infection, wound dehiscence, patient satisfaction, and the time to return to pre-rupture activity. The mean follow-up period was 12.5 months. The mean ATRS score improved from 57.65 at 3 months to 86.95 at 6 months (ptendon re-rupture, sural nerve injury, wound dehiscence, or deep infection. Two patients developed a superficial wound infection, which was resolved with oral flucloxacillin. Two patients had a mass at the transverse incision, but neither had any symptoms or functional restriction. All patients were able to bear full weight comfortably without the walker boot at 8 weeks, and return to their work by 3 months. The mean time to return to pre-rupture activity, including sports, was 10.4 months. The mean satisfaction rate was 87% at 6 months. Percutaneous repair of the Achilles tendon followed by early weight bearing and accelerated rehabilitation achieves good functional outcome.

  3. Retrocalcaneal bursitis but not Achilles tendinopathy is characterized by increased pressure in the retrocalcaneal bursa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja

    2014-03-01

    We questioned whether different forms of Achilles tendon overuse injuries can be differentiated by retrocalcaneal bursa pressure measurement. Retrocalcaneal bursa pressure was determined by using invasive pressure measurement in patients suffering from retrocalcaneal bursitis (n=13) or Achilles tendinopathy (n=15), respectively. Standardized measurements were taken with the subject lying prone. Initially, the foot and ankle was in a spontaneous, unsupported position. Then passive dorsiflexion was induced by an increasing pressure which was applied in five defined steps against the plantar forefoot. Mean pressures found in unloaded position were 30.5 (SD 28.9) mmHg in retrocalcaneal bursitis and -9.9 (SD 17.2) mmHg in Achilles tendinopathy (pbursitis and 32.5 (SD 48.9) mmHg for Achilles tendinopathy (p=0,051). Higher retrocalcaneal bursa pressure values were found in patients suffering from chronic retrocalcaneal bursitis. This result supports the hypothesis that retrocalcaneal bursa hypertension leads to an impingement lesion of the corresponding anterior Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Results of operative treatment for recalcitrant retrocalcaneal bursitis and midportion Achilles tendinopathy in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja

    2014-08-01

    The results of operative treatment for recalcitrant midportion Achilles tendinopathy and recalcitrant retrocalcaneal bursitis were evaluated using the patient administered, disease specific, and validated VISA-A-G questionnaire. A cohort of 89 patients was prospectively followed. These patients underwent operations for sport induced midportion Achilles tendinopathy (39 procedures) or retrocalcaneal bursitis (55 procedures). Depending on the individual intraoperative findings the patients of either disease were treated with two respective operative modifications (tendon repair or no tendon repair). Preoperative and follow-up status (3, 6, and 12 months) were investigated using the VISA-A-G questionnaire. Preoperatively, the four groups scored from 37.0 ± 17.6 to 45.9 ± 15.2 (p = 0.376-0.993) on the VISA-A-G questionnaire. Six and 12 months postoperatively, the VISA-A-G scores improved significantly (p bursitis and midportion Achilles tendinopathy responded equally well to operative treatment. When repaired, additional tendon lesions did not influence this result. We demand to differentiate not only between midportion Achilles tendinopathy and retrocalcaneal bursitis but also to identify additional Achilles tendon lesions to specifically address these lesions during operative procedures.

  5. Plantaris Excision Reduces Pain in Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy Even in the Absence of Plantaris Tendinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, James D F; Stephen, Joanna M; van Dijk, C Niek

    2016-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that the plantaris can contribute to symptoms in at least a subset of patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy. However, the nature of its involvement remains unclear. To determine whether excised plantaris tendons from patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy display tendinopathic changes and whether the presence of such changes affect clinical outcomes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Sixteen plantaris tendons in patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy recalcitrant to conservative management underwent histological examination for the presence of tendinopathic changes. All patients had imaging to confirm the presence of the plantaris tendon adherent to or invaginated into the focal area of Achilles tendinosis. Visual analog scale (VAS) and Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) results were recorded pre- and postoperatively. Sixteen patients (mean age, 26.2 years; range, 18-47 years) underwent surgery, with a mean follow-up of 14 months (range, 6-20 months). The plantaris tendon was histologically normal in 13 of 16 cases (81%). Inflammatory changes in the loose peritendinous connective tissue surrounding the plantaris tendon were evident in all cases. There was significant improvement in mean VAS scores (P < .05) and all domains of the FAOS postoperatively (P < .05). The absence of any tendinopathic changes in the excised plantaris of 13 patients who clinically improved suggests plantaris involvement with Achilles tendinopathy may not yet be fully understood and supports the concept that this may be a compressive or a frictional phenomenon rather than purely tendinopathic.

  6. Enhancement of Achilles tendon repair mediated by matrix metalloproteinase inhibition via systemic administration of doxycycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Michael W; Barr, Jerome; Greenwald, Robert; Lane, Lewis B; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Drakos, Mark C; Grande, Daniel A; Chahine, Nadeen O

    2014-04-01

    Collagenases or matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been shown to play an important role in the matrix degradation cascade associated with Achilles tendon rupture and disease. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of daily administration of doxycycline (Doxy) through oral gavage on MMP activity and on the repair quality of Achilles tendons in vivo. Our findings indicate that Achilles tendon transection resulted in increasing MMP-8 activity from 2 to 6 weeks post-injury, with peak increases in activity occurring at 4 weeks post-injury. Doxy adiministration at clinically relevant serum concentrations was found to significantly inhibit MMP activity after continuous treatment for 4 weeks, but not for continuous administration for shorter durations (96 h or 2 weeks). Extended doxy administration was also associated with improved collagen fibril organization, and enhanced biomechanical properties (stiffness, ultimate tensile strength, maximum load to failure, and elastic toughness). Our findings indicate that a temporal delay exists between Achilles tendon transection and associated increases in MMP-8 activity in situ. Our findings suggest that inhibition of MMP-8 at its peak activity levels ameliorates fibrosis development and improves biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Catastrophic Failure of an Infected Achilles Tendon Rupture Repair Managed with Combined Flexor Hallucis Longus and Peroneus Brevis Tendon Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Devin C; Elliott, Andrew D; Roukis, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Deep infection is one of the most devastating complications following repair of an Achilles tendon rupture. Treatment requires not only culture-driven antibiotic therapy, but more importantly, appropriate débridement of some or even all of the Achilles tendon. This may necessitate delayed reconstruction of the Achilles tendon. The authors present a successful case of reconstruction of a chronically infected Achilles tendon in an otherwise healthy 43-year-old man via a multistaged approach using the flexor hallucis longus and peroneus brevis tendons. We also provide a brief review of the literature regarding local tendon transfer used in the reconstruction of Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of absorbable and nonabsorbable sutures for repair of achilles tendon rupture with a suture-guiding device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaoglu, Baris; Ulku, Tekin Kerem; Gereli, Arel; Karahan, Mustafa; Turkmen, Metin

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the functional and clinical results of Achilles tendon repairs with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding device using nonabsorbable versus absorbable sutures. We hypothesized that the absorbable suture would have clinical results comparable to those of the nonabsorbable suture for Achilles tendon repair with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding system. From January 2010 to September 2013, 48 consecutive patients who had sustained a spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon underwent operative repair with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding device using 2 different suture types. All ruptures were acute. The patients were divided equally into 2 groups according to suture type. In the nonabsorbable suture group, No. 2 braided nonabsorbable polyethylene terephthalate sutures were used, and in the absorbable suture group, braided absorbable polyglactin sutures were used. The average age of the patients was 38 years (range, 28-50 years). Functional outcome scores and complications were evaluated. All patients had an intact Achilles repair after surgery. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot clinical outcome scores were 98 (range, 90-100) in the nonabsorbable suture group and 96.8 (range, 87-100) in the absorbable suture group. All patients returned to their previous work. The absorbable suture group had fewer postoperative complications (0%) than the nonabsorbable suture group (12.5%) (P Achilles tendon repair by an Achilles tendon suture-guiding system was associated with a lower incidence of suture reaction; however, functionally the results were not notably different from those using a traditional nonabsorbable suture. We conclude that repair with absorbable sutures is appropriate for Achilles tendon ruptures. Level II, prospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Current evidence of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Mittermayr, Rainer; Fuerst, Martin; Al Muderis, Munjed; Thiele, Richard; Saxena, Amol; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinopathy has been described as the most common overuse injury in sports medicine. Several treatment modalities such as activity modification, heel lifts, arch supports, stretching exercises, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, and eccentric loading are known as standard treatment mostly without proven evidence. After failed conservative therapy, invasive treatment may be considered. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been successfully used in soft-tissue pathologies like lateral epicondylitis, plantar fasciitis, tendinopathy of the shoulder and also in bone and skin disorders. Conclusive evidence recommending ESWT as a treatment for Achilles tendinopathy is still lacking. In plantar fasciitis as well as in calcific shoulder tendinopathy shock wave therapy is recently the best evaluated treatment option. This article analysis the evidence based literature of ESWT in chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Recently published data have shown the efficacy of focused and radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical results of percutaneous repair of ruptured Achilles tendon with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Noritaka; Hamanishi, Hirotsugu (Fujiwara Hospital, Kyoto (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed to evaluate the usefulness of percutaneous repair according to the modified method of Bunnell for Achilles tendon rupture. The subjects were four men and 4 women, whose ages ranged from 22 to 62 years with a mean of 38.6. No surgical complications, including recurrent rupture, neurological damage and infections, were encountered. Three months after surgery, dorsiflexion of foot was recovered to the degree of the healthy foot. Jogging became possible 5 or 6 months later. The healthy Achilles tendon was seen as low signal intensity, and the ruptured site was seen as high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Postoperative MR images showed tightness of the Achilles tendon. Signals in the repair site were shifted from isointensity to hypointensity with recovery. The tendon, mainly surrounding the reptured site, was thickened. In conclusion, MR imaging was useful in confirming the ruptured site and evaluating the condition of repair. (N.K.).

  11. Bilateral spontaneous non-traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widdowson David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present an interesting case of spontaneous non-traumatic bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendons, which is a rare condition. Delayed or missed diagnosis of Achilles tendon ruptures by primary treating physicians is relatively common. Case report A 78-year-old Caucasian woman presented with spontaneous non-traumatic bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendons. Her symptoms started two days after she took ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily for a urinary tract infection and prednisolone 30 mg once daily for chronic obstructive airway disease. Conclusion This case report aims to increase the awareness of this rare condition, which should be borne in mind with regard to patients who are on steroid therapy and are concurrently started on fluoroquinolones.

  12. METHOD OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Rodomanova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to justify a new method of surgical treatment of patients with recurrent and chronic Achilles tendon ruptures conducted applied topographic-anatomic study of 12 fixed and 8 fixed preparations of the lower extremities was performed. In the developed technique were carried out operations in 18 patients aged from 30 to 72 years with repeated ruptures Achilles tendon. The results of treatment were followed-up in all 18 patients in the period from 6 months to 3 years. Repeated tears of Achilles tendon were not observed. The range of motions in ankle joint reconstructed almost in its entirety. Performed topographic and anatomical studies and accumulated clinical experience allow us to recommend the proposed method for a wider clinical use.

  13. Physical rehabilitation after achilles tendon ruptures: a review of modern approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ra’ad Abdul Hadi Mohammad Alalwan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to conduct review methodological approaches to physical rehabilitation after Achilles tendon ruptures. Material & Methods: analysis and synthesis of the foreign and domestic special scientific and methodical literature on physical rehabilitation after surgical treatment of Achilles tendon rupture. Results: restore function lower limb and gait parameters is a long, complex and difficult process. Qualitative rehabilitation process should be accompanied by adequate motor mode and its extension, axial load and special exercise. The most significant differences are observed in the approach concerning types of immobilization, its term and necessity at all, timing axial load. Among the options of immobilization allocated gypsuming, a variety of cast, orthosis, splints and braces. In the later stages of rehabilitation recommendations are somewhat different of terms of basic loads such as the rise of the fingers, walking without assistive devices. Conclusion: problem of design protocol of physical rehabilitation after achilles tendon ruptures is not completely solved.

  14. Comparison between tenocutaneous suture and Kessler suture techniques in treating acute closed Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wen-Ge; Li, Huan; Zhu, Ya-Ping; Liu, Zhi-wei

    2014-06-01

    To compare the effectiveness of tenocutaneous suture and conventional Kessler suture techniques in treating acute closed Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 33 patients with acute closed Achilles tendon rupture who were admitted to our hospital from February 1998 to December 2008 underwent repair with either a tenocutaneous suture or Kessler suture technique. All patients were followed up for 1-5 years (mean, 3 years). According to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale, the excellence rate was 91% in the Kessler suture group and 98% in the tenocutaneous suture group, with a significant difference between groups. Our tenocutaneous suture technique is an effective method for treating Achilles tendon rupture. It has certain advantages compared with the conventional incision method and is worthy of wide clinical application. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. COX-2 in Cancer: Gordian knot or Achilles heel?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis eStasinopoulos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The networks of blood and lymphatic vessels and of the extracellular matrix and their cellular and structural components, that are collectively termed the tumor microenvironment, are frequently co-opted and shaped by cancer cells to survive, invade and form distant metastasis. With an enviable capacity to adapt to continually changing environments, cancer represents the epitome of functional chaos, a stark contrast to the hierarchical and organized differentiation processes that dictate the development and life of biological organisms. The consequences of changing landscapes such as hypoxia and acidic extracellular pH in and around tumors create a cascade of, or themselves are results of, changes in multiple pathways and networks that become apparent only several years later as recurrence and metastasis. These molecular and phenotypic changes approach the complexities of a ‘Gordian Knot’. We review evidence from our studies and from literature suggesting that COX-2 biology presents a nodal point in cancer biology and an ‘Achilles heel’ of COX-2-dependent tumors.

  16. Degenerative Achilles tendon disease; Assessment by magnetic resonance and ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhold, A.; Stiskal, M. (Rudolfinerhaus, Vienna (Austria). Department of Diagnostic Imaging); Kainberger, F.; Schwaighofer, B. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). 2. Medizinische Klinik)

    As Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and Ultrasound (US) allow the evaluation of soft-tissue structures not previously possible with other imaging techniques, a clinical study has been undertaken to determine the value of these 2 modalities in the detection of lesions in the Achilles tendon (AT), other than acute total rupture. Seven healthy subjects and 28 symptomatic patients with Achillodynia and/or signs of thickening of the AT were investigated with MR and US; all results were compared with the clinical features. Surgical findings were available in 14 patients. Patients were divided into 3 groups; those with tendon thickening, incomplete and complete ruptures. Thickening of the AT was easily detected with both methods. MR was superior in the detection of incomplete tendon rupture and in the evaluation of various stages of chronic degenerative changes. It is concluded that only if US remains unclear, an additional MR study should be performed and together with the clinical diagnosis indication for surgery can be made more efficient. (author). 24 refs.; 4 figs.

  17. Effect of Calendula officinalis cream on achilles tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, A A; Perez, M O; Vieira, C P; Esquisatto, M A M; Rodrigues, R A F; Gomes, L; Pimentel, E R

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, the scientific community has undertaken research on plant extracts, searching for compounds with pharmacological activities that can be used in diverse fields of medicine. Calendula officinalis L. is known to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and wound healing properties when used to treat skin burns. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of C. officinalis on the initial phase of Achilles tendon healing. Wistar rats were separated in three groups: Calendula (Cal)-rats with a transected tendon were treated with topical applications of C. officinalis cream and then euthanized 7 days after injury; Control (C)-rats were treated with only vehicle after transection; and Normal (N)-rats without tenotomy. Higher concentrations of hydroxyproline (an indicator of total collagen) and non-collagenous proteins were observed in the Cal group in relation to the C group. Zymography showed no difference in the amount of the isoforms of metalloproteinase-2 and of metalloproteinase-9, between C and Cal groups. Polarization microscopy images analysis showed that the Cal group presented a slightly higher birefringence compared with the C group. In sections of tendons stained with toluidine blue, the transected groups presented higher metachromasy as compared with the N group. Immunocytochemistry analysis for chondroitin-6-sulfate showed no difference between the C and Cal groups. In conclusion, the topical application of C. officinalis after tendon transection increases the concentrations of collagen and non-collagenous proteins, as well as the collagen organization in the initial phase of healing.

  18. Avoiding the Achilles heel of network-centric enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Michelle; Dryer, Jay E.; Randall, Lance

    2003-08-01

    Corporate, government and military bodies focus significant resources to develop sophisticated and capable information-based systems. The concept of people and resources connected by a robust network capable of extremely high rates of information exchange is very attractive because it allows smaller groups to coordinate together and focus effects from geographically diverse locations. However, there is also a hidden danger that comes with such advanced technology. For example, in the case of the U.S. Military, clearly United States holds a technological advantage over our adversaries and that this advantage is still expanding. This technology gap has resulted in the emergence of potent asymmetrical warfare. All too often in science fiction movies, we see a small group of humans defeat a technologically superior alien race by striking at a hidden weakness that renders all of their advanced weapons as useless, as a result of pervasive connectivity and interdependence. The analogy holds for any large network-centric enterprise, corporate or governmental. This paper focuses on specific technologies and methods that preempt this Achilles Heal scenario.

  19. Intraosseous calcium migration in calcifying tendinitis: a rare cause of single sclerotic injury in the humeral head (2010: 2b).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S; Rapariz, J M

    2010-05-01

    Intratendinous deposits of hydroxyapatite crystals are very common, particularly in the rotator cuff. In rare cases, the calcium located in the thickness of the supraspinatus tendon can suffer intraosseous migration into the greater tuberosity. We present a case of this rare entity: a 28-year-old patient who attended with pain and functional weakness in the left shoulder. The plain radiograph showed a sclerotic lesion in the greater tuberosity of the humeral head with a radiolucent halo. The MRI showed a lytic lesion containing the calcium inside and associated with an extensive pattern of oedema of the accompanying bone marrow. A plain radiograph taken 6 months before showed a calcifying tendinitis in the thickness of the supraspinatus tendon. A large number of entities can present as single sclerotic lesions of the humeral head. The diagnostic key lies in the existence of the calcifying tendinitis in the earlier study. The treatment of this disease consists of surgical removal of the calcium. The recognition of this entity is important to avoid unnecessary complementary tests and aggressive surgery, given that the surgical treatment is curative and leads to disappearance of the symptoms.

  20. Are the osseous and tendinous-cartilaginous tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distances the same on CT and MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer Hinckel, Betina; Gomes Gobbi, Riccardo; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura [Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of the Clinical Hospital of the Medical School of the University of Sao Paulo, Department of Orthopaedics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Noda Kihara Filho, Eduardo; Bordalo Rodrigues, Marcelo [Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of the Clinical Hospital of the Medical School of the University of Sao Paulo, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    To verify whether the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG) and the tendinous-cartilaginous TT-TG (the distance between the patellar tendon and trochlear groove: PT-TG) are identical using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. The TT-TG and PT-TG distances were measured on the same knee samples by three observers (two measurements per observer) using CT and MRI scans collected retrospectively. The reproducibility of the measurements was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The means and standard deviations of four measurements were calculated for each patient. A paired t-test was used to assess differences between measurements. Fifty knee samples (32 with patellar instability and 18 with other conditions) were evaluated. The inter- and intraobserver reliability was excellent for all four measurements (>0.8). On average, the TT-TG distance on MRI was 3.1-3.6 mm smaller than that on CT, and the PT-TG distance on MRI was 1.0-3.4 mm larger than the TT-TG distance on MRI. The osseous TT-TG and tendinous-cartilaginous PT-TG distances determined by CT and MRI were not identical. (orig.)

  1. Monitoring Achilles enthesitis in ankylosing spondylitis during TNF-alpha antagonist therapy: an ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Karadag, Omer; Filippucci, Emilio; Atagunduz, Pamir; Akdogan, Ali; Kalyoncu, Umut; Grassi, Walter; Direskeneli, Haner

    2010-03-01

    Enthesitis is considered as the primary anatomical lesion in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Therapeutic effects of TNF-alpha antagonist treatments for enthesitis on imaging changes are still limited to case reports or small sample-sized trials. We aimed to investigate the potential of ultrasonography (US) to detect early changes after TNF-alpha antagonist therapy of Achilles enthesis of AS patients. Forty-three AS patients with active disease, requiring TNF-alpha antagonist therapy, were included. Physical examination was performed to detect Achilles enthesitis and/or retrocalcaneal bursitis. US of the Achilles tendon was performed bilaterally. Grey-scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) scores on a 0-2 semi-quantitative scale and total additive scores (TS) were calculated. Follow-up US examinations were performed 2 months after the initiation of therapy. At baseline, 11 patients (26.2%) were symptomatic in physical examination for either Achilles enthesitis or retrocalcaneal bursitis, whereas 36 (83%) had GS US pathological findings and 10 (23.3%) had PD signal. GS score and TS decreased significantly [3.6 (3.0) vs 2.3 (2.2), P Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), ESR and CRP levels also showed significant improvements. Subclinical Achilles enthesitis, detected only with GS US, is present in a subset of AS patients and a significant improvement can be demonstrated after 2 months of TNF-alpha antagonist therapy. In addition to standard outcome measures, US might be an additional useful tool to monitor therapy in SpA patients with Achilles enthesitis.

  2. Early Ankle Mobilization Promotes Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Asilehan, Batiza; Wupuer, Aikeremu; Qianman, Bayixiati; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Maimaitiaili, Abudouheilil; Shawutali, Nuerai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Niyazebieke, Hadelebieke; Aizezi, Adili; Aisaiding, Amuding; Bakyt, Yerzat; Aibek, Rakimbaiev; Wuerliebieke, Jianati

    2016-01-01

    The use of early mobilization of the ankle joint without orthosis in the treatment of Achilles tendon rupture has been advocated as the optimal management. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes in a postoperative rabbit model of Achilles tendon rupture between early mobilization and immobilized animals using a differential proteomics approach. In total, 135 rabbits were randomized into the control group (n=15), the postoperative cast immobilization (PCI) group (n=60), and the early mobilization (EM) group (n=60). A rupture of the Achilles tendon was created in each animal model and repaired microsurgically, and tendon samples were removed at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days postoperatively. Proteins were separated using 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified using peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry, NCBI database searches, and bioinformatics analyses. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified between groups, some of which may play an important role in Achilles tendon healing. Notable candidate proteins that were upregulated in the EM group were identified, such as CRMP-2, galactokinase 1, tropomyosin-4, and transthyretin. The healing of ruptured Achilles tendons appears to be affected at the level of protein expression with the use of early mobilization. The classic postoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture with an orthosis ignored the self-protecting instinct of humans. With a novel operative technique, the repaired tendon can persist the load that comes from traction in knee and ankle joint functional movement. In addition, kinesitherapy provided an excellent experimental outcome via a mechanobiological mechanism. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Management of acute Achilles tendon rupture with tendon-bundle technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Guang; Li, Bing; Yang, Yun-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Objective * These authors contributed equally to this work. To explore tendon-bundle technique for treating Achilles tendon rupture with no defects. Methods Patients with full unilateral Achilles tendon rupture with no defects were included. The Achilles tendon medial edge surgical repair approach was used, revealing horsetail-like rupture bundles. Tendon bundles were anatomically realigned and repaired end-to-end using 5-0 sutures. Patients were followed-up for 1 year, and assessed for differences between the repaired versus healthy limb. Results Out of 24 patients (18 male, 6 female; aged 19-56 years) at 1 year following surgery, mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 92.4 ± 5.9; mean differences between the surgically repaired versus contralateral side in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion angle were 3.5 ± 2.3° and 5.6 ± 3.2°, respectively; mean difference in calf circumference between the two sides was 0.9 ± 0.5 cm; and mean increase in Achilles tendon width versus the healthy side was 0.8 ± 0.2 cm. By 1 year post-surgery, there were no significant between-side differences in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion angle, or calf circumference. Conclusions Tendon-bundle surgery resulted in good ankle function restoration and low complication rates. Tendon-bundle surgery may reduce blood supply destruction and maximally preserve Achilles tendon length, and may be effective for treating Achilles tendon rupture with no defects.

  4. Outcomes of acute Achilles tendon rupture repair with bone marrow aspirate concentrate augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Benjamin E; Stroh, David Alex; Schon, Lew C

    2015-05-01

    Optimal treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures remains controversial. Positive results using stem-cell-bearing concentrates have been reported with other soft-tissue repairs, but no studies exist on outcomes of bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) augmentation in primary Achilles tendon repair. We reviewed patients with sport-related Achilles tendon ruptures treated via open repair augmented with BMAC injection from 2009 to 2011. Data on operative complications, strength, range of motion, rerupture, calf circumference and functional improvement through progressive return to sport and the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) were analysed. A total of 27 patients (28 tendons) treated with open repair and BMAC injection were identified (mean age 38.3 ± 9.6 years). At mean follow-up of 29.7 ± 6.1 months, there were no reruptures. Walking without a boot was at 1.8 ± 0.7 months, participation in light activity was at 3.4 ± 1.8 months and 92% (25 of 27) of patients returned to their sport at 5.9 ± 1.8 months. Mean ATRS at final follow-up was 91 (range 72-100) points. One case of superficial wound dehiscence healed with local wound care. No soft-tissue masses, bone formation or tumors were observed in the operative extremity. Excellent results, including no re-ruptures and early mobilisation, were observed in this small cohort with open Achilles tendon repair augmented by BMAC. No adverse outcomes of biologic treatment were observed with this protocol. The efficacy of BMAC in the operative repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures warrants further study. IV - Therapeutic.

  5. Does achilles tendon cross sectional area differ after downhill, level and uphill running in trained runners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Katy Andrews; Johnson, A Wayne; Hunter, Iain; Myrer, J William

    2014-12-01

    In this study we examined how hill running affects the Achilles tendon, a common location for injuries in runners. Twenty females ran for 10 min on each of three randomly ordered grades (-6%, 0 and +6%) at speeds selected to match the metabolic rates. Achilles tendon (AT) cross-sectional area (CSA) was imaged using Doppler ultrasound and peak vertical forces were analyzed using an instrumented treadmill. A metabolic cart and gas analyzer ensured a similar metabolic cost across grades. Data were analyzed using a forward selection regression. Results showed similar decreases in AT CSA from pre- to post-run for all three conditions of ~5 to 7% (p = 0.0001). Active peak vertical forces were different across grades (p = 0.0001) with the largest occurring during downhill running and smallest during uphill running. Since changes in AT CSA were not different between grades, each form of running appears equal and acceptable in regards to how the Achilles tendon reacts. That is, the results suggest that the Achilles tendon is affected by downhill, level, and uphill running and a decrease in CSA appears to be a normal response. Key PointsDownhill (- 6%), level and uphill (+ 6%) running at different speeds each caused a statistically significant decrease in the Achilles tendon cross-sectional area in healthy, trained runners.The magnitude of change in Achilles tendon cross-sectional area did not differ between grades when metabolic cost of running was matched.Downhill running resulted in the largest peak vertical force, while uphill running resulted in the smallest.

  6. Surgical Correction of the Achilles Tendon for Diabetic Foot Ulcerations and Charcot Neuroarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Achilles tendon pathologic conditions are implicated in contributing to the development of many diabetic foot complications including diabetic foot ulceration and Charcot neuroarthropathy. Surgical correction of the diabetic equinus deformity has been studied as an isolated or adjunctive treatment when dealing with difficult-to-close diabetic foot ulcerations or when surgically addressing the diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy foot or ankle. This article reviews the most common indications, complications, and surgical procedures for equinus correction by either a tendo-Achilles lengthening or gastrocnemius recession for the management of diabetic foot conditions.

  7. Management of acute open tendo-achilles injuries in Indian lavatory pans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Sasanka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to the Tendo-achilles are common but rarely do they present directly to plastic surgeons. Eighteen patients with acute tendo-achilles injury due to fall in the lndian type of lavatory pan came directly to the emergency department of Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata and subsequently were treated in the Department of Plastic Surgery. Direct repair with prolene or stainless steel (SS wires with or without flap cover were performed for management. Exercises were started 1 month later with gradual increase in activity. Complications were minor and temporary in nature. Long term results in the form of performing previous activities were excellent.

  8. Tratamento cirúrgico da tendinite distal da patela Surgical treatment of the distal patellar tendinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Martins Amatuzzi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A tendinite distal da patela é uma doença que acomete principalmente jovens esportistas e caracteriza-se por dor referida na extremidade distal da patela junto à inserção do ligamento patelar. O tratamento inicial preconizado é sempre conservador com fisioterapia. A grande maioria tem boa resposta a este tipo de conduta, mas em alguns raros casos os sintomas não regridem exigindo uma mudança de conduta. Para este grupo usamos o tratamento cirúrgico com técnica derivada de Trillat que se baseia na utilização de um enxerto de parte do tendão do músculo Grácil implantado dentro do ligamento patelar, inserido intra-ósseo na patela e fixado na tuberosidade anterior da tíbia. Foram operados seis pacientes, sendo que em dois casos a operação foi bilateral, totalizando oito joelhos. O seguimento mínimo foi de três anos, com avaliação final dentro do índice considerado como EXCELENTE, conforme a cotação ARPÉGE, para todos os joelhos.Distal patellar tendinitis is a young athlete's disease characterized by pain at the distal patellar pole, near the patellar ligament insertion. Early treatment recommended is generally conservative, with physical therapy. The great majority of patients present favorable responses to this approach, but, in some cases, the remission of symptoms does not occur, requiring a different approach. For this group, surgical treatment with a technique derived from that of Trillat was used, which is based on the use of a graft removed from a portion of gracillis muscle tendon into patellar ligament, intraosseously inserted in the patella and fixed at the tibial anterior tuberosity. Six patients were operated, bilaterally in two cases, totaling eight knees. The minimum follow-up time was three years, with all knees presenting an EXCELLENT score, according to ARPÉGE evaluation.

  9. Radiological and clinical predictors of long-term outcome in rotator cuff calcific tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witte, Pieter Bas; van Adrichem, Raymond A; Selten, Jasmijn W; Nagels, Jochem; Reijnierse, M; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge on the epidemiology and long-term course of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis (RCCT) is scarce. We assessed demographics, radiological characteristics, and their association with long-term outcomes in a large patient group. Baseline demographics, radiological characteristics and treatment were recorded in 342 patients. Interobserver agreement of radiological measures was analyzed. Long-term outcome was evaluated with questionnaires (WORC, DASH). The association of baseline characteristics with outcome was assessed. Mean age was 49.0 (SD = 10.0), and 59.5 % were female. The dominant arm was affected in 66.0 %, and 21.3 % had bilateral disease. Calcifications were on average 18.7 mm (SD = 10.1, ICC = 0.84 (p < 0.001)) and located 10.1 mm (SD = 11.8) medially to the acromion (ICC = 0.77 (p < 0.001)). Gärtner type I calcifications were found in 32.1 % (Kappa = 0.47 (p < 0.001)). After 14 years (SD = 7.1) of follow-up, median WORC was 72.5 (range, 3.0-100.0; WORC < 60 in 42 %) and median DASH 17.0 (range, 0.0-82.0). Female gender, dominant arm involvement, bilateral disease, longer duration of symptoms, and multiple calcifications were associated with inferior WORC. DASH results were similar. Many subjects have persisting shoulder complaints years after diagnosis, regardless of treatment. Female gender, dominant arm involvement, bilateral disease, longer duration of symptoms, and multiple calcifications were associated with inferior outcome. Radiological measures had moderate-to-good reliability and no prognostic value. • Most RCCT studies report on short-term outcome and/or small patients groups. • In this large, long-term observational study, RCCT appeared to not be self-limiting in many subjects. • Negative prognostic factors included female gender, more calcifications, dominant arm affected, and longer duration of symptoms. • Interobserver agreement of general radiological RCCT measures is

  10. Muscle-tendon glucose uptake in Achilles tendon rupture and tendinopathy before and after eccentric rehabilitation: Comparative case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Finni, Taija

    2016-09-01

    Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is the most common tendon rupture injury. The consequences of ATR on metabolic activity of the Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors are unknown. Furthermore, the effects of eccentric rehabilitation on metabolic activity patterns of Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors in ATR patients have not been reported thus far. We present a case study demonstrating glucose uptake (GU) in the Achilles tendon, the triceps surae, and the flexor hallucis longus of a post-surgical ATR patient before and after a 5-month eccentric rehabilitation. At baseline, three months post-surgery, all muscles and Achilles tendon displayed much higher GU in the ATR patient compared to a healthy individual despite lower plantarflexion force. After the rehabilitation, plantarflexion force increased in the operated leg while muscle GU was considerably reduced. The triceps surae muscles showed similar values to the healthy control. When compared to the healthy or a matched patient with Achilles tendon pain after 12 weeks of rehabilitation, Achilles tendon GU levels of ATR patient remained greater after the rehabilitation. Past studies have shown a shift in the metabolic fuel utilization towards glycolysis due to immobilization. Further research, combined with immuno-histological investigation, is needed to fully understand the mechanism behind excessive glucose uptake in ATR cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of low-power LED and therapeutic ultrasound in the tissue healing and inflammation in a tendinitis experimental model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura Júnior, Manoel de Jesus; Arisawa, Emilia Ângela Loschiavo; Martin, Airton Abrahão; de Carvalho, Janderson Pereira; da Silva, José Mário Nunes; Silva, José Figueiredo; Silveira, Landulfo

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the anti-inflammatory response of low-power light-emitting diode (LED) and ultrasound (US) therapies and the quality and rapidness of tendon repair in an experimental model of tendinitis, employing histomorphometry and Raman spectroscopy. Tendinitis was induced by collagenase into the right tendon of 35 male Wistar rats with an average weight of 230 g. The animals were randomly separated into seven groups of five animals each: tendinitis without treatment-control (TD7 and TD14, where 1 and 2 indicated sacrifice on the 7th and 14th day, respectively), tendinitis submitted to US therapy (US7 and US14) and tendinitis submitted to LED therapy (LED7 and LED14). Contralateral tendons of the TD group at the 14th day were used as the healthy group (H). US treatment was applied in pulsed mode at 10 %, 1 MHz frequency, 0.5 W/cm(2), 120 s. LED therapy parameters were 4 J/cm(2), 120 s, daily dose at the same time and same point. Sacrifice was performed on the 7th or 14th day. Histomorphometric analysis showed lower number of fibroblasts on the 14th day of therapy for the US-treated group, compared to the TD and LED, indicating lower tissue inflammation. Raman showed that the LED group had an increase in the amount of collagen I and III from the 7th to the 14th day, which would indicate more organized fibers and a better quality of the healing, and US showed lower collagen I synthesis in the 14th day compared to H, indicating a lower tissue reorganization.

  12. Modeling the tensile behavior of human Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G; Shaw, K M

    1997-01-01

    Uniaxial quasi-static tensile stress, sigma versus strain, epsilon, data were obtained from 29 cadaveric Achilles tendons (donor ages: 36 to 100 years), at a strain rate of either 10 or 100%/s. These results were then used in modeling the elastic component of the tensile deformational behavior of this tissue. Two approaches were taken. In the first, it was shown that the following constitutive relation provided an excellent fit to the elastic section of the sigma-epsilon curve, sigma = C epsilon exp[D epsilon + F epsilon 2], with C, D and F being material constants, whose values for the present dataset were found to be C = 2.00 +/- 0.99, D = 0.089 +/- 0.087 and F = -0.0047 +/- 0.0095. The values of these coefficients were not statistically significantly affected by either donor age or test strain rate. In the second approach, the value of the modulus of elasticity of a filamentary polymer matrix composite material was computed as a function of various combinations of values of the modulus of elasticity of the fiber, the modulus of elasticity of the matrix, and angle of orientation of the principal material axes with respect to the reference coordinate axes (theta) for a fiber volume fraction of 0.6 and a material Poisson's ratio of 0.4. By comparing these results with the experimentally-obtained values of the tangent modulus of elasticity of the tendons (defined as the slope of the linear section of the post-toe zone in the sigma-epsilon plot), and assuming that the tendon may be idealized as a filamentary polymer matrix composite material, the suggestion is made that the winding angle of the fibers (collagen fibrils) in the tendon (taken to be equal to theta) is about 6 degrees.

  13. Achilles tendon and sports; Die Achillessehne im Sport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulreich, N.; Kainberger, F. [Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik Wien (Austria); Huber, W.; Nehrer, S. [Univ.-Klinik fuer Orthopaedie Wien (Austria)

    2002-10-01

    Because of the rising popularity of recreational sports activities achillodynia is an often associated symptom with running, soccer and athletics. Therefore radiologist are frequently asked to image this tendon. The origin of the damage of the Achilles tendon is explained by numerous hypothesis, mainly a decreased perfusion and a mechanical irritation that lead to degeneration of the tendon. High-resolution technics such as sonography and magnetic resonance imaging show alterations in the structure of the tendon which can be graduated and classified. Manifestations like tendinosis, achillobursitis, rupture and Haglunds disease can summarized as the tendon overuse syndrom. A rupture of a tendon is mostly the result of a degeneration of the collagenfibres. The task of the radiologist is to acquire the intrinsic factors for a potential rupture. (orig.) [German] Aufgrund des starken Anstiegs des Freizeitsportes sind Achillodynien ein besonders mit Laufsport, Fussball und Leichtathletik assoziiertes Symptom und die Indikation zur radiologischen Abklaerung wird oft gestellt. Die Entstehung von Sehnenschaeden wird durch eine Reihe von Hypothesen erklaert, wobei eine gestoerte Gewebeperfusion und eine mechanische Irritation als Hauptursachen angesehen werden, die zur Degeneration des Sehnengewebes und des umgebenden Gleitlagers fuehren. Sie koennen aufgrund sonographischer und MR-tomographischer Zeichen meist klar klassifiziert und graduiert werden, wobei hochaufloesende Techniken eine wesentliche Voraussetzung fuer die subtile Analyse der Sehnenstruktur darstellen. Die einzelnen klinischen Erscheinungsformen wie Tendinose, Achillobursitis, Haglund-Ferse und Sehnenruptur koennen unter dem Begriff des ''Sehnenueberlastungssyndroms'' (Tendon overuse syndrome) subsummiert werden. Rupturen der Achillessehne treten so gut wie immer bei bereits vorgeschaedigtem Kollagenfasergewebe auf, und der radiologischen Diagnostik kommt wesentliche Bedeutung dabei zu

  14. Uphill running improves rat Achilles tendon tissue mechanical properties and alters gene expression without inducing pathological changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, K M; Skovgaard, D; Bayer, M L

    2012-01-01

    Overuse Achilles tendinopathy is a common and challenging problem in sports medicine. Little is known about the etiology of this disorder, and the development of a good animal model for overuse tendinopathy is essential for advancing insight into the disease mechanisms. Our aim was to test...... a previously proposed rat model for Achilles tendon overuse. Ten adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ran on a treadmill with 10° incline, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk (17-20 m/min) for 12 wk and were compared with 12 control rats. Histological, mechanical, and gene-expression changes were measured on the Achilles tendons...

  15. Eccentric overload training in patients with a chronic Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Knikker; T. Takken; J.J. Kingma; Dr. H.M. Wittink

    2007-01-01

    Background: Eccentric overload training seems to be a promising conservative intervention in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. The efficacy of eccentric overload training on the outcome measures of pain and physical functioning are not exactly clear. Study design: Systematic review of the

  16. The influence of physical activity during youth on structural and functional properties of the Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenskjold, A; Kongsgaard, M; Larsen, J O

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a highly prevalent sports injury. Animal studies show a growth response in tendons in response to loading in the immature phase but not after puberty maturation. The aim of this investigation was to examine the structural and material properties in long distance runners w...

  17. Eccentric overload training in patients with a chronic Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, J.J.; Knikker, R. de; Wittink, H.M.; Takken, T.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Eccentric overload training seems to be a promising conservative intervention in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. The efficacy of eccentric overload training on the outcome measures of pain and physical functioning are not exactly clear. Study design: Systematic review of the

  18. Achilles Tendinopathy: Current Concepts about the Basic Science and Clinical Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Yun; Hua, Ying-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most frequently ankle and foot overuse injuries, which is a clinical syndrome characterized by the combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance. The two main categories of Achilles tendinopathy are classified according to anatomical location and broadly include insertional and noninsertional tendinopathy. The etiology of Achilles tendinopathy is multifactorial including both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Failed healing response and degenerative changes were found in the tendon. The failed healing response includes three different and continuous stages (reactive tendinopathy, tendon disrepair, and degenerative tendinopathy). The histological studies have demonstrated an increased number of tenocytes and concentration of glycosaminoglycans in the ground substance, disorganization and fragmentation of the collagen, and neovascularization. There are variable conservative and surgical treatment options for Achilles tendinopathy. However, there has not been a gold standard of these treatments because of the controversial clinical results between various studies. In the future, new level I researches will be needed to prove the effect of these treatment options.

  19. Heavy Slow Resistance Versus Eccentric Training as Treatment for Achilles Tendinopathy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Rikke; Kongsgaard, Mads; Hougs Kjær, Birgitte; Øhlenschlæger, Tommy; Kjær, Michael; Magnusson, S Peter

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that eccentric training has a positive effect on Achilles tendinopathy, but few randomized controlled trials have compared it with other loading-based treatment regimens. To evaluate the effectiveness of eccentric training (ECC) and heavy slow resistance training (HSR) among patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. A total of 58 patients with chronic (>3 months) midportion Achilles tendinopathy were randomized to ECC or HSR for 12 weeks. Function and symptoms (Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles), tendon pain during activity (visual analog scale), tendon swelling, tendon neovascularization, and treatment satisfaction were assessed at 0 and 12 weeks and at the 52-week follow-up. Analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis. Both groups showed significant (P tendon thickness and neovascularization. None of these robust clinical and structural improvements differed between the ECC and HSR groups. However, patient satisfaction tended to be greater after 12 weeks with HSR (100%) than with ECC (80%; P = .052) but not after 52 weeks (HSR, 96%; ECC, 76%; P = .10), and the mean training session compliance rate was 78% in the ECC group and 92% in the HSR group, with a significant difference between groups (P tendinopathy and that the latter tends to be associated with greater patient satisfaction after 12 weeks but not after 52 weeks. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. Achilles Tendinopathy: Current Concepts about the Basic Science and Clinical Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most frequently ankle and foot overuse injuries, which is a clinical syndrome characterized by the combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance. The two main categories of Achilles tendinopathy are classified according to anatomical location and broadly include insertional and noninsertional tendinopathy. The etiology of Achilles tendinopathy is multifactorial including both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Failed healing response and degenerative changes were found in the tendon. The failed healing response includes three different and continuous stages (reactive tendinopathy, tendon disrepair, and degenerative tendinopathy. The histological studies have demonstrated an increased number of tenocytes and concentration of glycosaminoglycans in the ground substance, disorganization and fragmentation of the collagen, and neovascularization. There are variable conservative and surgical treatment options for Achilles tendinopathy. However, there has not been a gold standard of these treatments because of the controversial clinical results between various studies. In the future, new level I researches will be needed to prove the effect of these treatment options.

  1. Heavy Slow Resistance Versus Eccentric Training as Treatment for Achilles Tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, Rikke; Kongsgaard, Mads; Hougs Kjær, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that eccentric training has a positive effect on Achilles tendinopathy, but few randomized controlled trials have compared it with other loading-based treatment regimens. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness of eccentric training (ECC) and heavy slow...

  2. Endoscopic adhesiolysis for extensive tibialis posterior tendon and Achilles tendon adhesions following compound tendon rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery. A case of extensive peritendinous adhesions of the Achilles tendon and tibialis posterior tendon after compound rupture of the tendons was reported. This was managed by endoscopic adhesiolysis of both tendons. The endoscopic approach allows early postoperative mobilisation which can relieve the tendon adhesion.

  3. Effects of Cigarette Smoking on Elastographic Strain Ratio Measurements of Patellar and Achilles Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ağladıoğlu, Kadir; Akkaya, Nuray; Güngör, Harun R; Akkaya, Semih; Ök, Nusret; Özçakar, Levent

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the sonographic and elastographic properties of patellar and Achilles tendons in smoking and nonsmoking otherwise healthy adults. We conducted a level 3 case-control analytical study. Smoking and nonsmoking volunteers (>18 years) without musculoskeletal system disorders were included in the study. Demographic characteristics and smoking habits (pack-years) were recorded. Proximal, middle, and distal third thicknesses of the patellar and Achilles tendons were measured by B-mode sonography. Strain ratio measurements of the same regions were measured by real-time ultrasound elastography. A total of 69 participants (57 male and 12 female; mean age ± SD, 35.5 ± 7.8 years) were evaluated in the study. Smoking (n = 35) and nonsmoking (n = 34) groups had no significant differences in terms of age, body mass index, sex, and activity level (all P > .05). Proximal, middle, and distal thirds of the patellar and Achilles tendons were significantly thinner in the smoking group (all P smoking group (all Psmoking amount (all P < .05). Thickness and strain ratio measurements of patellar and Achilles tendons were reduced (thinner and harder tendons) in smokers. Clinical implications of these morphologic and elastographic changes should be investigated in future studies. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  4. Endoscopic adhesiolysis for extensive tibialis posterior tendon and Achilles tendon adhesions following compound tendon rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery. A case of extensive peritendinous adhesions of the Achilles tendon and tibialis posterior tendon after compound rupture of the tendons was reported. This was managed by endoscopic adhesiolysis of both tendons. The endoscopic approach allows early postoperative mobilisation which can relieve the tendon adhesion.

  5. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Thomas R.; Roos, Andrew K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Fredericson, Michael; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (pAchilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries. PMID:28358823

  6. Management of Neglected Achilles Tendon Division: Assessment of Two Novel and Innovative Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Repair of injured Achilles tendon in neglected cases is one of the difficult and challenging procedures for surgeon. Here, we share our experience with the use of two innovative techniques for repair of chronic rupture of Achilles tendon. Design. Prospective Study. Setting. Tertiary care hospital. Patients. Twelve patients with chronic Tendo Achilles rupture were followed up over a period of three to five years. Intervention. Patients were divided in two groups, A and B. In Group A, the repair was done with Gastroc-soleus turndown flap and weaving with Plantaris tendon graft and in Group B, with modified Kessler’s technique strengthened with the free plantaris tendon graft. Outcome Assessment. Clinically and by Modified Rupp Scoring system. Results. At an average follow-up of 4 years (Group A, 3.7 and Group B, 4.4 years, the majority of the patients had excellent to good results as assessed with Modified Rupp Scoring with few minor complications in both the groups. There was no significant difference in the baseline variables such as age and gender and also in the Rupp’s score between the two groups. Conclusion. The two techniques are novel and simple and have been found to be useful for repair of chronically ruptured Achilles tendon.

  7. The Effectiveness of Open Repair Versus Percutaneous Repair for an Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Heidi; David, Shannon

    2016-12-01

    Clinical Scenario: There are 2 approaches available for surgical repair of the Achilles tendon: open or percutaneous. However, there is controversy over which repair is superior. Focused Clinical Question: Which type of surgery is better in providing the best overall patient outcome, open or percutaneous repair, in physically active men and women with acute Achilles tendon ruptures? Summary of Search, "Best Evidence" Appraised, and Key Findings: The literature was searched for studies of level 3 evidence or higher that investigated the effectiveness of open repair versus percutaneous repair on acute Achilles tendon ruptures in physically active men and women. The literature search resulted in 3 studies for possible inclusion. All 3 good-quality studies were included. Clinical Bottom Line: There is supporting evidence to indicate that percutaneous repair is the best option for Achilles tendon surgery when it comes to the physically active population. Percutaneous repair has faster surgery times, less risk of complications, and faster recovery times over having an open repair, although it is acknowledged that every patient has a different situation and best individual option may vary patient to patient.

  8. Endoscopic adhesiolysis for extensive tibialis posterior tendon and Achilles tendon adhesions following compound tendon rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery. A case of extensive peritendinous adhesions of the Achilles tendon and tibialis posterior tendon after compound rupture of the tendons was reported. This was managed by endoscopic adhesiolysis of both tendons. The endoscopic approach allows early postoperative mobilisation which can relieve the tendon adhesion. PMID:24045762

  9. Unrecognised Acute Rupture of the Achilles Tendon in Severe Ankle Sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Wai Lam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Inversion ankle sprain is a common sport injury. It commonly refers to the injury of lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle. Failure to detect the concomitant injuries would lead to inappropriate treatment and suboptimal result. A case of unrecognised rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with severe inversion ankle sprain is reported.

  10. Functional outcomes of conservatively managed acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J E; Nasr, P; Fountain, D M; Berman, L; Robinson, A H N

    2017-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to determine if the size of the tendon gap following acute rupture of the Achilles tendon shows an association with the functional outcome following non-operative treatment. All patients presenting within two weeks of an acute unilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon between July 2012 and July 2015 were considered for the study. In total, 38 patients (nine female, 29 male, mean age 52 years; 29 to 78) completed the study. Dynamic ultrasound examination was performed to confirm the diagnosis and measure the gap between ruptured tendon ends. Outcome was assessed using dynamometric testing of plantarflexion and the Achilles tendon Total Rupture score (ATRS) six months after the completion of a rehabilitation programme. Patients with a gap ≥ 10 mm with the ankle in the neutral position had significantly greater peak torque deficit than those with gaps tendon gap and functional outcome in acute rupture of the Achilles tendon. We have identified 10 mm as a gap size at which deficits in plantarflexion strength become significantly greater, however, the precise relationship between gap size and plantarflexion strength remains unclear. Large, multicentre studies will be needed to clarify this relationship and identify population subgroups in whom deficits in peak torque are reflected in patient-reported outcome measures. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:87-93. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  11. [No influence of physiotherapy on outcome after open repair of achilles tendon ruptures?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateschrang, A; Gratzer, C; Rolauffs, B; Glatzle, J; Weise, K; Braun, A

    2008-12-01

    Many studies have been performed to analyse the influence of surgical techniques and the postoperative aftercare after Achilles tendon ruptures on the outcome. However, there is no study investigating the influence of physiotherapy on outcome after surgical repair and standardised early functional rehabilitation of Achilles tendon rupture, so that this was the objective of the present study. In this retrospective study, 104 patients with Achilles tendon ruptures, all treated by open repair followed by a standardised early rehabilitation, were evaluated by the Thermann score. The average age was 42 years. We could identify 3 patient groups. Group I (n=23) did not receive any physiotherapy. Group II (n=41) received physiotherapy for 3-6 weeks, and group III (n=40) received more than 6 weeks of physiotherapy. Physiotherapy consisted of 3 units per week. Each unit lasted for 30 min. All groups were compared statistically via variance analysis. Group I scored on average 88.8 points, group II 88.6 and group III 87.0 points. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups (p=0.50). The age of patients had also no relevant influence on the outcome (p=0.48). Physiotherapy and age of the patients involved were not found to influence the outcome after open augmented repair of Achilles tendon ruptures followed by a standardised early rehabilitation. These results should be confirmed by a prospective randomised trial. Also elderly patients participating in demanding sport activities should receive a surgical repair.

  12. Extra-corporeal pulsed-activated therapy ("EPAT" sound wave) for Achilles tendinopathy: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amol; Ramdath, Sona; O'Halloran, Patrick; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is common and extracorporeal shockwaves have become a popular treatment for this condition, even though previous research has not provided conclusive results regarding its efficacy in cases of Achilles tendinopathy. Our aim was to evaluate 3 weekly shockwave treatments in patients with Achilles tendinopathy, as quantified by the Roles and Maudsley score. A total of 74 tendons in 60 patients were assessed at baseline and at least 1 year posttreatment, including 32 (43.24%) paratendinoses, 23 (31.08%) proximal tendinoses, and 19 (25.68%) insertional tendinoses. The mean age of the participants was 48.6 ± 12.94 years, and patients with paratendinosis (41.44 ± 14.01 years) were statistically significantly younger than those with proximal (53 ± 8.9 years) and insertional (54.26 ± 9.74 years) tendinopathy, and these differences were statistically significant (P = .0012 and P = .0063, respectively). Overall, 58 (78.38%) tendons improved by at least 1 year posttreatment, including 75% in the paratendinosis, 78.26% in the proximal tendinosis, and 84.21% in the insertional tendinosis groups, and no adverse effects were observed. The Roles and Maudsley score improved from 3.22 ± 0.55 to 1.84 ± 1.05 (P shockwave therapy serves as a safe, viable, and effective option for the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy.

  13. Does Achilles Tendon Cross Sectional Area Differ after Downhill, Level and Uphill Running in Trained Runners?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Andrews Neves, A. Wayne Johnson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined how hill running affects the Achilles tendon, a common location for injuries in runners. Twenty females ran for 10 min on each of three randomly ordered grades (-6%, 0 and +6% at speeds selected to match the metabolic rates. Achilles tendon (AT cross-sectional area (CSA was imaged using Doppler ultrasound and peak vertical forces were analyzed using an instrumented treadmill. A metabolic cart and gas analyzer ensured a similar metabolic cost across grades. Data were analyzed using a forward selection regression. Results showed similar decreases in AT CSA from pre- to post-run for all three conditions of ~5 to 7% (p = 0.0001. Active peak vertical forces were different across grades (p = 0.0001 with the largest occurring during downhill running and smallest during uphill running. Since changes in AT CSA were not different between grades, each form of running appears equal and acceptable in regards to how the Achilles tendon reacts. That is, the results suggest that the Achilles tendon is affected by downhill, level, and uphill running and a decrease in CSA appears to be a normal response.

  14. The amplitude of the Achilles tendon reflex in infants is related to body position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Janneke L. M.; Bos, Arend F.; vd Hoeven, Johannes H.; Brouwer, Oebele F.; Sollie, Krystyna M.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the Achilles tendon reflex (ATR) in healthy infants is modulated by changes in body position (prone vs. supine). The amplitude of the ATR was compared at postnatal day 1, months 2, 3 and 6, while infants were placed in prone and supine position. The ATR was con

  15. Histopathological and biomechanical evaluation of tenocyte seeded allografts on rat Achilles tendon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngörmüş, Cansın; Kolankaya, Dürdane; Aydin, Erkin

    2015-05-01

    Tendon injuries in humans as well as in animals' veterinary medicine are problematic because tendon has poor regenerative capacity and complete regeneration of the ruptured tendon is never achieved. In the last decade there has been an increasing need of treatment methods with different approaches. The aim of the current study was to improve the regeneration process of rat Achilles tendon with tenocyte seeded decellularized tendon matrices. For this purpose, Achilles tendons were harvested, decellularized and seeded as a mixture of three consecutive passages of tenocytes at a density of 1 × 10(6) cells/ml. Specifically, cells with different passage numbers were compared with respect to growth characteristics, cellular senescence and collagen/tenocyte marker production before seeding process. The viability of reseeded tendon constructs was followed postoperatively up to 6 months in rat Achilles tendon by histopathological and biomechanical analysis. Our results suggests that tenocyte seeded decellularized tendon matrix can significantly improve the histological and biomechanical properties of tendon repair tissue without causing adverse immune reactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first long-term study in the literature which was accomplished to prove the use of decellularized matrix in a clinically relevant model of rat Achilles tendon and the method suggested herein might have important implications for translation into the clinic.

  16. An in-vivo experimental evaluation of He-Ne laser photostimulation in healing Achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwakil, Tarek F

    2007-03-01

    There is no method of treatment that has been proven to accelerate the rate of tendon healing or to improve the quality of the regenerating tendon. Low level laser photostimulation has gained a considerable attention for enhancing tissue repair in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is controversy regarding the effectiveness of laser photostimulation for improvement of the healing process of surgically repaired tendons. Accordingly, the present study was conducted to evaluate the role of helium-neon (He-Ne) laser photostimulation on the process of healing of surgically repaired Achilles tendons. Thirty unilateral Achilles tendons of 30 Raex rabbits were transected and immediately repaired. Operated Achilles tendons were randomly divided into two equal groups. Tendons at group A were subjected to He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) photostimulation, while tendons at group B served as a control group. Two weeks later, the repaired Achilles tendons were histopathologically and biomechanically evaluated. The histopathological findings suggest the favorable qualitative pattern of the newly synthesized collagen of the regenerating tendons after He-Ne laser photostimulation. The biomechanical results support the same favorable findings from the functional point of view as denoted by the better biomechanical properties of the regenerating tendons after He-Ne laser photostimulation with statistical significance (p repair of ruptured and injured tendons for a better functional outcome. It could be applied safely and effectively in humans, especially with respect to the proposed long-term clinical outcome.

  17. Spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with gout.

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    A 49-year-old man with long-standing gout suffered a spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon. Surgical repair was performed, and gouty tophi were found in the severed end of the tendon. The possible causes of this spontaneous rupture are discussed.

  18. Technical Innovation Case Report: Ultrasound-Guided Prolotherapy Injection for Insertional Achilles Calcific Tendinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Benjamin K.; DeLuca, Jesse P.; Kyle P. Lammlein

    2016-01-01

    We describe the use of ultrasound guidance for hyperosmolar dextrose (prolotherapy) injection of the distal calcaneal tendon specifically just anterior to identified enthesophytes in patients with insertional Achilles calcific tendinosis refractory to conservative treatment. This specific technique has not to our knowledge been described or used in literature previously.

  19. Amniotic Tissues for the Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciosis and Achilles Tendinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Werber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Allogeneic amniotic tissue and fluid may be used to treat chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. This innovative approach involves delivering a unique allograft of live human cells in a nonimmunogenic structural tissue matrix to treat chronic tendon injury. These tissues convey very positive regenerative attributes; procurement is performed with maternal consent during elective caesarian birth. Materials and Methods. In the present investigation all patients were unresponsive to multiple standard therapies for a minimum of 6 months and were treated with one implantation of PalinGen SportFLOW around the plantar fascia and/or around the Achilles paratenon. The patients were given a standard protocol for postimplant active rehabilitation. Results. The analogue pretreatment pain score (VAS of 8. By the fourth week after treatment, all patients had significantly reduced self-reported pain. Twelve weeks following the procedure the average pain level had reduced to only 2. No adverse reactions were reported in any of the patients. Conclusion. All patients in this study experienced heel or Achilles pain, unresponsive to standard therapy protocols. After treatment all patients noted significant pain reduction, indicating that granulized amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid can be successfully used to treat both chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis.

  20. A Proposed Return-to-Sport Program for Patients With Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy: Rationale and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Crossley, Kay M

    2015-11-01

    Synopsis Achilles tendinopathy is a common overuse injury in athletes involved in running and jumping activities and sports. The intervention with the highest level of evidence is exercise therapy, and it is recommended that all patients initially be treated with exercise for at least 3 months prior to considering other treatment options. Recovery from Achilles tendinopathy can take up to a year, and there is a high propensity for recurrence, especially during the return-to-sport phase. The extent of the tendon injury, the age and sex of the athlete, the magnitude of pain/symptoms, the extent of impairments, and the demands of the sport all need to be considered when planning for return to sport. This clinical commentary describes an approach to return to sport for patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy. The aim of the return-to-sport program is to facilitate the decision-making process in returning an athlete with midportion Achilles tendinopathy back to full sport participation and to minimize the chances for recurrence of the injury. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):876-886. Epub 21 Sep 2015. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.5885.

  1. Technical Innovation Case Report: Ultrasound-Guided Prolotherapy Injection for Insertional Achilles Calcific Tendinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin K. Buchanan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the use of ultrasound guidance for hyperosmolar dextrose (prolotherapy injection of the distal calcaneal tendon specifically just anterior to identified enthesophytes in patients with insertional Achilles calcific tendinosis refractory to conservative treatment. This specific technique has not to our knowledge been described or used in literature previously.

  2. A single platelet-rich plasma injection for chronic midsubstance achilles tendinopathy: a retrospective preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, Christopher D; Smyth, Niall A; Newman, Hunter; Kennedy, John G

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a series of patients undergoing a single platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection for the treatment of chronic midsubstance Achilles tendinopathy, in whom conservative treatment had failed. Thirty-two patients underwent a single PRP injection for the treatment of chronic midsubstance Achilles tendinopathy and were evaluated at a 6-month final follow-up using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score and Short Form 12 general health questionnaire. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all patients prior to and 6 months after injection. Twenty-five of 32 patients (78%) reported that they were asymptomatic at the 6-month follow-up visit and were able to participate in their respective sports and daily activities. The remaining 7 patients (22%) who reported symptoms that did not improve after 6 months ultimately required surgery. Four patients went on to have an Achilles tendoscopy, while the other 3 had an open debridement via a tendon splitting approach. A retrospective evaluation of patients receiving a single PRP injection for chronic midsubstance Achilles tendinopathy revealed that 78% had experienced clinical improvement and had avoided surgical intervention at 6-month follow-up. Therapeutic, Level IV: Retrospective case series. © 2014 The Author(s).

  3. Sonographic measurements of the achilles tendon, plantar fascia, and heel fat pad are reliable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Finn E; Jensen, Signe; Stallknecht, Sandra E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine intra- and interobserver reliability and precision of sonographic (US) scanning in measuring thickness of the Achilles tendon, plantar fascia, and heel fat pad in patients with heel pain. METHODS: Seventeen consecutive patients referred with heel pain were included. Two...

  4. A Fibre-Reinforced Poroviscoelastic Model Accurately Describes the Biomechanical Behaviour of the Rat Achilles Tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuijerjans, Ashley; Matikainen, Marko K.; Julkunen, Petro; Eliasson, Pernilla; Aspenberg, Per; Isaksson, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational models of Achilles tendons can help understanding how healthy tendons are affected by repetitive loading and how the different tissue constituents contribute to the tendon’s biomechanical response. However, available models of Achilles tendon are limited in their description of the hierarchical multi-structural composition of the tissue. This study hypothesised that a poroviscoelastic fibre-reinforced model, previously successful in capturing cartilage biomechanical behaviour, can depict the biomechanical behaviour of the rat Achilles tendon found experimentally. Materials and Methods We developed a new material model of the Achilles tendon, which considers the tendon’s main constituents namely: water, proteoglycan matrix and collagen fibres. A hyperelastic formulation of the proteoglycan matrix enabled computations of large deformations of the tendon, and collagen fibres were modelled as viscoelastic. Specimen-specific finite element models were created of 9 rat Achilles tendons from an animal experiment and simulations were carried out following a repetitive tensile loading protocol. The material model parameters were calibrated against data from the rats by minimising the root mean squared error (RMS) between experimental force data and model output. Results and Conclusions All specimen models were successfully fitted to experimental data with high accuracy (RMS 0.42-1.02). Additional simulations predicted more compliant and soft tendon behaviour at reduced strain-rates compared to higher strain-rates that produce a stiff and brittle tendon response. Stress-relaxation simulations exhibited strain-dependent stress-relaxation behaviour where larger strains produced slower relaxation rates compared to smaller strain levels. Our simulations showed that the collagen fibres in the Achilles tendon are the main load-bearing component during tensile loading, where the orientation of the collagen fibres plays an important role for the tendon

  5. Rehabilitation of Achilles tendon ruptures: is early functional rehabilitation daily routine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankewycz, B; Krutsch, W; Weber, J; Ernstberger, A; Nerlich, M; Pfeifer, Christian G

    2017-03-01

    Ruptures of the Achilles tendon are the most common tendon injuries of the lower extremities. Besides the initial operative or non-operative treatment, rehabilitation of patients plays a crucial role for tendon healing and long-term outcome. As only limited evidence is available for optimized rehabilitation regimen and guidelines for the initial (e.g., first 6 weeks) rehabilitation are limited, this study investigated the current rehabilitation concepts after Achilles tendon rupture. We analyzed 213 written rehabilitation protocols that are provided by orthopedic and trauma surgery institutions throughout Germany in terms of recommendations for weight-bearing, range of motion (ROM), physiotherapy, and choice of orthosis. All protocols for operatively and non-operatively treated Achilles tendon ruptures were included. Descriptive analysis was carried out and statistical analysis applied where appropriate. Of 213 institutions, 204 offered rehabilitation protocols for Achilles tendon rupture and, therefore, 243 protocols for operative and non-operative treatment could be analyzed. While the majority of protocols allowed increased weight-bearing over time, significant differences were found for durations of fixed plantar flexion between operative (o) and non-operative (n) treatments [fixed 30° (or 20)° to 15° (or 10)°: 3.6 weeks (±0.1; o) vs 4.7 weeks (±0.3; n) (p ≤ 0.0001) and fixed 15° (or 10)° to 0°: 5.8 weeks (±0.1; o) vs 6.6 weeks (±0.2; n) (p ≤ 0.001)]. The mean time of the recommended start of physiotherapy is at 2.9 weeks (±0.2; o) vs 3.3 weeks (±0.4; n), respectively. Our study shows that a huge variability in rehabilitation after Achilles tendon rupture exists. This study shows different strategies in rehabilitation of Achilles tendon ruptures using a convertible vacuum brace system. To improve patient care, further clinical as well as biomechanical studies need to be conducted. This study might serve as basis for prospective

  6. Augmented Versus Nonaugmented Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Quan; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2017-04-01

    Although simple end-to-end repair of the Achilles tendon is common, many augmented repair protocols have been implemented for acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, whether augmented repair is better than nonaugmented repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture is still unknown. To conduct a meta-analysis to determine whether augmented surgical repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture improved subjective patient satisfaction without an increase in rerupture rates. Secondary outcomes assessed included infections, ankle range of motion, calf muscle strength, and minor complications. Meta-analysis. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed articles was conducted to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing augmented repair and nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture from January 1980 to August 2016 in the electronic databases of PubMed, Web of Science (SCI-E/SSCI/A&HCI), and EMBASE. The keywords (Achilles tendon rupture) AND (surg* OR operat* OR repair* OR augment* OR non-augment* OR end-to-end OR sutur*) were combined, and results were limited to human RCTs and controlled clinical trials published in the English language. Four RCTs involving 169 participants were eligible for inclusion; 83 participants were treated with augmented repair and 86 were treated with nonaugmented repair. Augmented repair led to similar responses when compared with nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture (93% vs 90%, respectively; P = .53). The rerupture rates showed no significant difference for augmented versus nonaugmented repair (7.2% vs 9.3%, respectively; P = .69). No differences in superficial and deep infections occurred in augmented (7 infections) and nonaugmented (8 infections) repair groups during postoperative follow-up ( P = .89). The average incisional infection rate was 8.4% with augmented repair and 9.3% with nonaugmented repair. No significant differences in other complications were found between augmented (7.2%) and

  7. Fluoroquinolone-induced bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon: clinical and sonographic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Busilacchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The fluoroquinolones are antibiotics widely used in the clinical practice. The concomitant use of corticosteroids and fluoroquinolones in elderly patients is recognised as a risk factor for developing clinically relevant tendon lesions. Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy is underreported in the literature. Clinical case. A 67-year-old man, came to our observation complaining of 5 days history of bilateral heel pain. The patient had a medical history of sarcoidosis and was treated with a daily dose of 5 mg of prednisone. He was initially given oral levofloxacin (500 mg/die for 10 days, because of an acute respiratory infection. Two days before the end of the antibiotic therapy, he developed bilateral heel pain. He denied any history of trauma. Physical examination revealed swelling and marked tenderness with mild palpation of the Achilles tendons at the calcaneal insertion. The ultrasound evaluation of the Achilles tendons revealed the following main abnormalities: diffuse thickening, loss of the “fibrillar” echotexture, blurred margins, and bilateral partial tendon tears. Discussion. Bilateral Achilles tendon pain and rupture has been described as a rare adverse effect of fluoroquinolone treatment. Most of the fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathies of the Achilles tendon are due to ciprofloxacin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of bilateral Achilles tendon rupture due to levofloxacin. The risk/benefit ratio of the fluoroquinolones should be carefully considered and these drugs should be prescribed cautiously in elderly patients treated with corticosteroids. This case can be regarded as a representative example of the potential clinical efficacy of sonography in daily rheumatological practise.

  8. Achilles tendinopathy in elderly subjects with type II diabetes: the role of sport activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Schiavone, Cosima

    2016-04-01

    Exercise is an important therapeutic tool in the management of diabetes in older people. Aim of this study was to assess the relationship among type II diabetes, sport, overweight, and symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy in elderly subjects. Thirty-eight patients suffering from Achilles tendinopathy and thirty-eight controls were enrolled. The prevalence of diabetes and sport practice as well as BMI and Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) values were registered. An ultrasound evaluation of Achilles tendon was performed. Patients showed an increased prevalence of diabetes (42 vs. 13.1 %, p = 0.004), and practice of sport (60.5 vs. 28.9 %, p = 0.0001), and higher BMI values (26.8 ± 3 vs. 24.8 ± 2.3, p = 0.001). Sonographic abnormalities, being diagnostic criteria, were present in all the patients with Achilles tendinopathy, but signs of degeneration were also found in 36.8 % of asymptomatic controls. Symptomatic subjects with diabetes, compared to those without, showed a higher prevalence of severe degeneration (75 vs. 36.3 %, p = 0.01). HbA1c values were significantly lower in sport practitioners, both diabetics and non-diabetics. Moreover, patients practicing sport showed a trend towards lower BMI values, compared to the sedentary counterpart. Sport practice in elderly diabetics provides relevant metabolic advantages, reducing HbA1c and BMI. However, some sport activities (e.g., speed walking, jogging or tennis) can expose to the risk of Achilles tendinopathy. So, sport practice should be encouraged, but practitioners should follow individual training programs and be submitted to periodic sonographic controls.

  9. Healing of Achilles tendon partial tear following focused shockwave: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu YC

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Chun Hsu,1,* Wei-Ting Wu,2,* Ke-Vin Chang,2–4 Der-Sheng Han,2–4 Li-Wei Chou5–7 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Community and Geriatric Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Bei-Hu Branch, 3National Taiwan University College of Medicine, 4Community and Geriatric Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Bei-Hu Branch, Taipei, 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital, 6Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, 7Department of Rehabilitation, Asia University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Achilles tendinopathy is a common cause of posterior heel pain and can progress to partial tendon tear without adequate treatment. Effects of traditional treatments vary, and many recent reports focus on the use of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT for Achilles tendinopathy but not for Achilles tendon partial tear. Here, we report the case of a 64-year-old female suffering from severe left heel pain for half a year. All treatment and rehabilitation were less effective until ESWT was applied. Each course of focused shockwave therapy included 2500 shots with energy flux density from 0.142 mJ/mm2 to 0.341 mJ/mm2. The visual analog scale decreased from nine to one degree. High-resolution musculoskeletal ultrasonography was performed before and 1 month after the treatment, which revealed healing of the torn region and decrease in inflammation. ESWT had shown to be an alternative treatment for Achilles tendon partial tear under safety procedure and ultrasound observation. Keywords: focused shockwave, Achilles tendon, partial tear, ultrasonography

  10. The treatment of a rupture of the Achilles tendon using a dedicated management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, A M; Topliss, C; Beard, D; Evans, R M; Williams, P

    2015-04-01

    The Swansea Morriston Achilles Rupture Treatment (SMART) programme was introduced in 2008. This paper summarises the outcome of this programme. Patients with a rupture of the Achilles tendon treated in our unit follow a comprehensive management protocol that includes a dedicated Achilles clinic, ultrasound examination, the use of functional orthoses, early weight-bearing, an accelerated exercise regime and guidelines for return to work and sport. The choice of conservative or surgical treatment was based on ultrasound findings. The rate of re-rupture, the outcome using the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) and the Achilles Tendon Repair Score, (AS), and the complications were recorded. An elementary cost analysis was also performed. Between 2008 and 2014 a total of 273 patients presented with an acute rupture 211 of whom were managed conservatively and 62 had surgical repair. There were three re-ruptures (1.1%). There were 215 men and 58 women with a mean age of 46.5 years (20 to 86). Functional outcome was satisfactory. Mean ATRS and AS at four months was 53.0 (sd 14), 64.9 (sd 15) (n = 135), six months 67.8 (sd 16), 73.8 (sd 15) (n = 103) and nine months (72.4; sd 14) 72.3 (sd 13) (n = 43). The programme realised estimated cost savings exceeding £91,000 per annum. The SMART programme resulted in a low rate of re-rupture, a satisfactory outcome, a reduced rate of surgical intervention and a reduction in healthcare costs. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  11. Ultrasonographic Classification of Achilles Tendon Ruptures as a Rationale for Individual Treatment Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlang, Michael H.; Zwipp, Hans; Friedrich, Adina; Peaden, Adam; Bunk, Alfred; Rammelt, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. This work introduces a distinct sonographic classification of Achilles tendon ruptures which has proven itself to be a reliable instrument for an individualized and differentiated therapy selection for patients who have suffered an Achilles tendon rupture. Materials and Methods. From January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2005, 273 patients who suffered from a complete subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon (ASR) were clinically and sonographically evaluated. The sonographic classification was organized according to the location of the rupture, the contact of the tendon ends, and the structure of the interposition between the tendon ends. Results. In 266 of 273 (97.4%) patients the sonographic classification of the rupture of the Achilles tendon was recorded. Type 1 was detected in 54 patients (19.8%), type 2a in 68 (24.9%), type 2b in 33 (12.1%), type 3a in 20 (7.3%), type 3b in 61 (22.3%), type 4 in 20 (7.3%), and type 5 in 10 (3.7%). Of the patients with type 1 and fresh ASR, 96% (n = 47) were treated nonoperative-functionally, and 4% (n = 2) were treated by percutaneous suture with the Dresden instrument (pDI suture). Of the patients classified as type 2a with fresh ASR, 31 patients (48%) were treated nonoperatively-functionally and 33 patients (52%) with percutaneous suture with the Dresden instrument (pDI suture). Of the patients with type 3b and fresh ASR, 94% (n = 34) were treated by pDI suture and 6% (n = 2) by open suture according to Kirchmayr and Kessler. Conclusion. Unlike the clinical classification of the Achilles tendon rupture, the sonographic classification is a guide for deriving a graded and differentiated therapy from a broad spectrum of treatments. PMID:24977069

  12. Treatment of ruptured Achilles tendon: Operative or non-operative procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukelj, Fabijan; Bandalovic, Ante; Knezevic, Josip; Pavic, Arsen; Pivalica, Bozen; Bakota, Bore

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of non-operative and surgical procedures in the treatment of ruptured Achilles tendon in athletes (professional and amateur). Ninety professional or amateur athletes with rupture of the Achilles tendon were included in the study between 1998 and 2013. The athletes were aged between 25 and 40 years (mean 34.83±4.65). A total of 30 athletes underwent an open procedure, 30 were treated with a percutaneous method and 30 were treated non-operatively. All operated patients were tested one year after the surgical procedure. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to compare the open and percutaneous methods. The results for the patients who were treated using the percutaneous method were 15% better than those for the patients who underwent the open procedure; the results for the group treated conservatively were 20% better than those for the group treated percutaneously. The percutaneous method was easier technically than the open method. Time spent in hospital was 14.5 times shorter with the percutaneous procedure compared with the open procedure (percutaneous procedure: range 0.5-2 days, mean 0.79±0.36; open procedure: range 10-24 days, mean 11.46±2.70; pAchilles tendon in the group treated with the percutaneous procedure. One patient in the group treated with the open procedure had postoperative infection (4.2%). In the non-surgical (conservatively treated) group, there were three reruptures of the Achilles tendon within one year, and one patient developed adhesions that resulted in loss of function and had to undergo an operation. The percutaneous method is the best method of surgical treatment for Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Percutaneous, Minimally Invasive Repair of Traumatic and Simultaneous Rupture of Both Achilles Tendons: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietek, Pawel; Karaczun, Maciej; Kruk, Bartosz; Szczypior, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Achilles injury is a common musculoskeletal disorder. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon, however, is much less common and usually occurs spontaneously. Complete, traumatic, and bilateral ruptures are rare and typically require long periods of immobilization before the patient can return to full weightbearing. A 52-year-old male was hospitalized for bilateral traumatic rupture to both Achilles tendons. No risk factors for tendon rupture were found. Blood samples revealed no peripheral blood pathologic features. Both tendons were repaired with percutaneous, minimally invasive surgery using the Achillon(®) tendon suture system. Rehabilitation was begun 4 weeks later. An ankle-foot orthosis was prescribed to provide ankle support with an adjustable range of movement, and active plantar flexion was set at 0° to 30°. The patient remained non-weightbearing with the ankle-foot orthosis device and performed active range-of-motion exercises. At 8 weeks after surgery, we recommended that he begin walking with partial weightbearing using a foot-tibial orthosis with the range of motion set to 45° plantar flexion and 15° dorsiflexion. At 10 weeks postoperatively, he was encouraged to return to full weightbearing on both feet. Beginning rehabilitation as soon as possible after minimally invasive surgery, compared with 6 weeks of immobilization after surgery, provided a rapid resumption to full weightbearing. We emphasize the clinical importance of a safe, simple treatment program that can be followed for a patient with damage to the Achilles tendons. To our knowledge, ours is the first report of minimally invasive repair of bilateral simultaneous traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The chinese version of achilles tendon total rupture score: cross-cultural adaptation, reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jin; Jia, Zhenyu; Zhi, Xin; Li, Xiaoqun; Zhai, Xiao; Cao, Liehu; Weng, Weizong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Lin; Chen, Xiao; Su, Jiacan

    2017-01-05

    The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), which is originally developed in 2007 in Swedish, is the only patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) for specific outcome assessment of an Achilles tendon rupture.Purpose of this study is to translate and cross-culturally adapt Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) into simplified Chinese, and primarily evaluate the responsiveness, reliability and validity. International recognized guideline which was designed by Beaton was followed to make the translation of ATRS from English into simplified Chinese version (CH-ATRS). A prospective cohort study was carried out for the cross-cultural adaptation. There were 112 participants included into the study. Psychometric properties including floor and ceiling effects, Cronbach's alpha, intraclass correlation coefficient, effect size, standard response mean, and construct validity were tested. The mean scores of CH-ATRS are 57.42 ± 13.70. No sign of floor or ceiling effect was found of CH-ATRS. High level of internal consistency was supported by the value of Cronbach's alpha (0.893). ICC (0.979, 95%CI: 0.984-0.993) was high to indicate the high test-retest reliability. Great responsive ness was proved with the high absolute value of ES and SRM (0.84 and 8.98, respectively). The total CH-ATRS score had very good correlation with physical function and body pain subscales of SF-36 (r = -0.758 and r = -0.694, respectively, p Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (CH-ATRS) can be used as a reliable and valid instrument for Achilles tendon rupture assessing in Chinese-speaking population. Level of evidence II.

  15. ggstThe role of tendon microcirculation in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knobloch Karsten

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tendinopathy is of distinct interest as it describes a painful tendon disease with local tenderness, swelling and pain associated with sonographic features such as hypoechogenic texture and diameter enlargement. Recent research elucidated microcirculatory changes in tendinopathy using laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry such as at the Achilles tendon, the patellar tendon as well as at the elbow and the wrist level. Tendon capillary blood flow is increased at the point of pain. Tendon oxygen saturation as well as tendon postcapillary venous filling pressures, determined non-invasively using combined Laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry, can quantify, in real-time, how tendon microcirculation changes over with pathology or in response to a given therapy. Tendon oxygen saturation can be increased by repetitive, intermittent short-term ice applications in Achilles tendons; this corresponds to 'ischemic preconditioning', a method used to train tissue to sustain ischemic damage. On the other hand, decreasing tendon oxygenation may reflect local acidosis and deteriorating tendon metabolism. Painful eccentric training, a common therapy for Achilles, patellar, supraspinatus and wrist tendinopathy decreases abnormal capillary tendon flow without compromising local tendon oxygenation. Combining an Achilles pneumatic wrap with eccentric training changes tendon microcirculation in a different way than does eccentric training alone; both approaches reduce pain in Achilles tendinopathy. The microcirculatory effects of measures such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy as well as topical nitroglycerine application are to be studied in tendinopathy as well as the critical question of dosage and maintenance. Interestingly it seems that injection therapy using color Doppler for targeting the area of neovascularisation yields to good clinical results with polidocanol sclerosing therapy, but also with a combination of epinephrine and

  16. Professional Athletes' Return to Play and Performance After Operative Repair of an Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofa, David P; Miller, J Chance; Jang, Eugene S; Woode, Denzel R; Greisberg, Justin K; Vosseller, J Turner

    2017-06-01

    Most Achilles tendon ruptures are sports related. However, few studies have examined and compared the effect of surgical repair for complete ruptures on return to play (RTP), play time, and performance across multiple sports. To examine RTP and performance among professional athletes after Achilles tendon repair and compare pre- versus postoperative functional outcomes of professional athletes from different major leagues in the United States. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), and National Hockey League (NHL) athletes who sustained a primary complete Achilles tendon rupture treated surgically between 1989 and 2013 were identified via public injury reports and press releases. Demographic information and performance-related statistics were recorded for 2 seasons before and after surgery and compared with matched controls. Statistical analyses were used to assess differences in recorded metrics. Of 86 athletes screened, 62 met inclusion criteria including 25 NBA, 32 NFL, and 5 MLB players. Nineteen (30.6%) professional athletes with an isolated Achilles tendon rupture treated surgically were unable to return to play. Among athletes who successfully returned to play, game participation averaged 75.4% ( P .05). When individual sports were compared, NBA players were most significantly affected, experiencing significant decreases in games played, play time, and performance. An Achilles tendon rupture is a devastating injury that prevents RTP for 30.6% of professional players. Athletes who do return play in fewer games, have less play time, and perform at a lower level than their preinjury status. However, these functional deficits are seen only at 1 year after surgery compared with matched controls, such that players who return to play can expect to perform at a level commensurate with uninjured controls 2 years postoperatively.

  17. Early changes in Achilles tendon behaviour in vivo following downhill backwards walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, C W; Bradshaw, E J; Furness, T P; Kemp, J; Clark, R A

    2016-01-01

    Downhill backwards walking causes repeated, cyclical loading of the muscle-tendon unit. The effect this type of repeated loading has on the mechanical behaviour of the Achilles tendon is presently unknown. This study aimed to investigate the biomechanical response of the Achilles tendon aponeurosis complex following a downhill backwards walking protocol. Twenty active males (age: 22.3 ± 3.0 years; mass: 74.7 ± 5.6 kg; height: 1.8 ± 0.7 m) performed 60 min of downhill (8.5°), backwards walking on a treadmill at -0.67 m · s(-1). Data were collected before, immediately post, and 24-, 48- and 168-h post-downhill backwards walking. Achilles tendon aponeurosis elongation, strain and stiffness were measured using ultrasonography. Muscle force decreased immediately post-downhill backward walking (P = 0.019). There were increases in Achilles tendon aponeurosis stiffness at 24-h post-downhill backward walking (307 ± 179.6 N · mm(-1), P = 0.004), and decreases in Achilles tendon aponeurosis strain during maximum voluntary contraction at 24 (3.8 ± 1.7%, P = 0.008) and 48 h (3.9 ± 1.8%, P = 0.002) post. Repeated cyclical loading of downhill backwards walking affects the behaviour of the muscle-tendon unit, most likely by altering muscle compliance, and these changes result in tendon stiffness increases.

  18. Plantaris excision in the treatment of non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, James D F; Freeman, Richard; Pollock, Noel

    2015-12-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a serious and frequently occurring problem, especially in elite athletes. Recent research has suggested a role for the plantaris tendon in non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy. To assess whether excising the plantaris tendon improved the symptoms of Achilles tendinopathy in elite athletes. This prospective consecutive case series study investigated 32 elite athletes who underwent plantaris tendon excision using a mini-incision technique to treat medially located pain associated with non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Preoperative and postoperative visual analogue scores (VAS) for pain and the foot and ankle outcome score (FAOS) as well as time to return to sport and satisfaction scores were assessed. At a mean follow-up of 22.4 months (12-48), 29/32 (90%) of athletes were satisfied with the results. Thirty of the 32 athletes (94%) returned to sport at a mean of 10.3 weeks (5-27). The mean VAS score improved from 5.8 to 0.8 (p<0.01) and the mean FAOS improved in all domains (p<0.01). Few complications were seen, four athletes experienced short-term stiffness and one had a superficial wound infection. The plantaris tendon may be responsible for symptoms in some athletes with non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Excision carries a low risk of complications and may provide significant improvement in symptoms enabling an early return to elite-level sports. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder: clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up findings at two to five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcellini, Giuseppe; Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Paganelli, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    From 1996 to 1999, 95 shoulders with calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff were treated arthroscopically by the same surgeon and assigned to the same rehabilitation program. The 63 patients matching the inclusion criteria were reviewed after a mean follow-up of 36 months. Preoperative and postoperative clinical functional assessment was performed separately by the same three surgeons using the Constant method. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to verify interobserver variability and to correlate the presence of residual calcifications with follow-up Constant scores and preoperative ultrasound findings. At 24 months, improved Constant scores were inversely related to the number and size of residual calcifications in all patients. Ultrasound examination showed no cuff tears. As outcome seemed to relate strongly only to the presence of residual calcium deposits in the tendon, their complete removal is recommended.

  20. V-Y肌腱瓣修补术治疗陈旧性跟腱断裂%Repair of an old rupture of Achilles tendon with V-Y tendinous flap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘德全; 刘亚波; 王满宜

    2003-01-01

    目的研究 V- Y肌腱瓣修补术治疗陈旧性跟腱断裂的手术方法及结果.方法对 9例平均 112d的陈旧性跟腱断裂患者,采用小腿三头肌 V- Y肌腱瓣修补术治疗修补缺损为 3.2~ 6cm,平均 4.6cm.结果平均随访 2年 8个月,按 Arner- Lindholm疗效评定标准评估,优 7例( 77.8%),良 2例( 22.2%),优良率为 100%.结论对于陈旧性跟腱断裂,小腿三头肌 V- Y肌腱瓣修补术是一种方法简单、疗效满意的手术方法.

  1. Impact of autologous blood injections in treatment of mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy: double blind randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Kevin J; Fulcher, Mark L; Rowlands, David S.; Kerse, Ngaire

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of two peritendinous autologous blood injections in addition to a standardised eccentric calf strengthening programme in improving pain and function in patients with mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy. Design Single centre, participant and single assessor blinded, parallel group, randomised, controlled trial. Setting Single sports medicine clinic in New Zealand. Participants 53 adults (mean age 49, 53% men) with symptoms of unilateral mid-portion Achilles ...

  2. Minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer in management of acute achilles tendon rupture associated with tendinosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2012-04-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is characterized by pain in the tendon, generally at the start and completion of exercise. However, tendinosis may lead to decreased blood flow, increased stiffness of the tendon and reduced tensile strength, and predispose to rupture. Operative treatment is indicated to restore the function of the Achilles tendon and alleviate the prerupture heel cord pain. A case of acute Achilles tendon rupture with extensive tendinosis that was successfully treated with minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer is reported.

  3. Effect of cyclic training model on terminal structure of rabbit Achilles tendon: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-lin HUANG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the effect of cyclic training on histomorphology of the terminal structure of rabbit Achilles tendon, and explore its preventive effect on training-based enthesiopathy. Methods  Seventy-two Japanese white rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups: control group, jumping group, running group and cyclic training group, 18 for each. Three rabbits of each group were sacrificed at the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th week. The terminal insertion tissues of bilateral Achilles tendons were harvested from these rabbits for observing the pathomorphological changes under light microscope, and pathological scoring and statistical analysis were carried out. Results  Light microscopy showed that the tendon fibers and fibrocartilage in the Achilles tendon insertion region were severely damaged in the jumping group, and though the tendon fibers were damaged severely, the injury to the fibrocartilage was comparatively less serious in the running group. The injuries to the tendon fibers and fibrocartilage were milder in the cyclic training group than in the jumping group and running group. In the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th and 8th week, the histopathology score of insertion of Achilles tendon was 1.17±0.12, 2.19±0.15, 3.23±0.20, 4.66±0.16, 4.71±0.18, 4.63±0.13 respectively in the jumping group, and 1.16±0.13, 1.15±0.14, 2.18±0.12, 2.99±0.15, 3.98±0.16, 4.01±0.12 respectively in the running group. Increase in pathological score appeared earlier in the jumping group than in the running group, and a significant increase began at the 3rd week. The difference in pathological score between the two groups originated mainly from the changes in the tidemark. In the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th week, the pathological score of Achilles tendon insertion was 1.13±0.14, 1.16±0.17, 1.15±0.13, 2.18±0.13, 2.17±0.12, 2.92±0.11 respectively in the cyclic training group, and they showed no significant changes as compared with control

  4. [MR imaging of the Achilles tendon: evaluation of criteria for the differentiation of asymptomatic and symptomatic tendons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C; Wedegärtner, U; Maas, L C; Buchert, R; Adam, G; Maas, R

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop quantitative and qualitative MRI criteria to differentiate between healthy and pathological Achilles tendons. 364 Achilles tendons were examined on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. 264 patients had Achilles tendon complaints, 100 asymptomatic Achilles tendons served as a control. T 1-weighted, T 2-weighted and a STIR sequence were performed in sagittal and axial orientation. Images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists. Quantitative and qualitative criteria were assessed. A Mann-Whitney-U-Test and a regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. There were statistically significant differences between the patients with disorders and the control group concerning the depth (12.0 mm and 6.3 mm, p tendon, the area of the tendon cross section (1.60 mm (2) and 061 mm (2), p tendon depth (A4), length of bursa (A5) and area of tendon (F). The measurement of the Achilles tendon and the binary-logistic regression analysis allow differentiation between normal and pathological Achilles tendons. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Direct Repair of Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures Using Scar Tissue Located Between the Tendon Stumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Toshito; Shima, Hiroaki; Mori, Katsunori; Kizawa, Momoko; Neo, Masashi

    2016-07-20

    Several surgical procedures for chronically ruptured Achilles tendons have been reported. Resection of the interposed scar tissue located between the tendon stumps and reconstruction using normal autologous tissue have been well described. We developed a direct repair procedure that uses scar tissue, which obviates the need to use normal autologous tissue. Thirty consecutive patients with Achilles tendon ruptures with a delay in diagnosis of >4 weeks underwent removal of a section of scar and healing tissue with direct primary suture of the ends of the tendon without the use of allograft or autograft. Patients were followed for a mean time of 33 months. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were measured with the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) and the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score. In addition, the patients underwent preoperative and postoperative functional measurements and magnetic resonance imaging. Lastly, we evaluated the histology of the interposed healing tissue. The mean AOFAS scores were 82.8 points preoperatively and 98.1 points postoperatively. The mean postoperative ATRS was 92.0 points. At the time of the latest follow-up, none of the patients had experienced tendon reruptures or difficulties in walking or climbing stairs, and all except 2 patients could perform a single-limb heel rise. All athletes had returned to their pre-injury level of sports participation. Preoperative T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed that 22 Achilles tendons were thickened with diffuse intratendinous high-signal alterations, and 8 Achilles tendons were thinned. Postoperative T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings included fusiform-shaped tendon thickening and homogeneous low-signal alterations of the tendons in all patients. Histologically, the interposed scar tissue consisted of dense collagen fibers. Shortening of the tissue between the 2 tendon ends that included healing scar and direct

  6. [PART-KESSLER TECHNIQUE WITH SUTURE ANCHOR IN REPAIR OF SPONTANEOUS Achilles TENDON RUPTURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jie; Duan, Liang; Li, Weiwei; Wei, Wenbo

    2016-02-01

    To summarize the application and experience of repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor. Between January 2011 and December 2013, 31 patients with spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture were treated by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor. Of 31 cases, 23 were male and 8 were female, aged 16-53 years (mean, 38 years). The left side was involved in 15 cases and the right side in 16 cases. The causes of injury included sudden heel pain and walking weakness during sports in 22 cases; no surefooted down-stairs, slip, and carrying heavy loads in 9 cases. The distance from broken site to the calcaneus adhension of Achilles tendon was 3-6 cm (mean, 4.2 cm). The time from injury to operation was 7 hours to 4 days (mean, 36.8 hours). All incisions healed by first intention without nerve injury or adhering with skin. The patients were followed up 6-24 months (mean, 15 months). All patients could complete 25 times heel raising without difficulty at 6 months after operation. No Achilles tendon rupture occurred again during follow-up. At 6 months after operation, the range of motion of the ankle joint in dorsiflexion and plantar flexion showed no significant difference between normal and affected sides (t=0.648, P=0.525; t=0.524, P=0.605). The circumference of the affected leg was significantly smaller than that of normal leg at 6 months after operation (t=2.074, P=0.041), but no significant difference was found between affected and normal sides at 12 months after operation (t=0.905, P=0.426). The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after operation were significantly higher than preoperative score (P0.05). Repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor can supply strong strain and decrease the shear forces of suture. So part-Kessler technique with suture anchor is successful in repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture.

  7. Characteristics of Intratendinous Microcirculation Shortly After an Achilles Rupture and Subsequent Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Ping; Shih, Kao-Shang; Chiang, Hongsen; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Lin, Leou-Chyr; Peng, Wei-Chen; Wen, Che-Sheng; Wang, Hsing-Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Early microcirculatory responses after experimental tenotomy are critical to the healing of tendons and their ultimate tensile strength. The effects of changes in microcirculation on the outcomes of tendon healing, however, have not been determined. To assess microcirculation values in injured Achilles tendons in the first 3 months after surgical repair and to correlate the inter-limb microcirculatory changes with functional outcomes at 3 and 6 months after surgery. Case-control study. A university sports physiotherapy laboratory. Thirteen subjects (median age: 45 years; range: 34.8-51.9 years) with a repaired Achilles tendon were recruited. Surgical repair. Measurements were obtained at 1, 2, 3, and 6 months after surgery. Bilateral measurements of tendon microcirculation (total hemoglobin [THb] and oxygen saturation [StO2]) were recorded at the first 3 time points, whereas outcome measures of a Taiwan Chinese version of the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment Scale-Achilles questionnaire, one-leg hopping distance, the star excursion balance test, and the heel raise index were conducted at the third and fourth time points. Correlations between the inter-limb microcirculatory changes, eg, between the measurements at 2 months and 1 month (2-1) after surgery, at 3 months and 2 months (3-2) after surgery, and at 3 months and 1 month (3-1) after surgery, and the outcome measures were investigated. Compared with the noninjured tendons, the repaired Achilles demonstrated greater THb (at 1, 2, and 3 months; P = .017, .008, and .012 respectively) and StO2 (at 3 months; P = .017). Furthermore, the THb2-1 and THb3-2, StO2 2-1, and StO2 3-2 showed correlations with the heel raise index, differences in the star excursion balance test and one-leg hopping distance between the noninjured leg and injured leg, and Taiwan Chinese version of the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment Scale-Achilles questionnaire scores (rho -0.921 to 0.855). Changes in the inter

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells from a hypoxic culture improve and engraft Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tung-Fu; Yew, Tu-Lai; Chiang, En-Rung; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Hsu, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Hsu, Yuan-Tong; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2013-05-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from humans cultured under hypoxic conditions increase bone healing capacity. Rat MSCs cultured under hypoxic conditions increase the tendon healing potential after transplantation into injured Achilles tendons. Controlled laboratory study. Biomechanical testing, histological analysis, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling/collagen immunohistochemistry were performed to demonstrate that augmentation of an Achilles tendon rupture site with hypoxic MSCs increases healing capacity compared with normoxic MSCs and controls. Fifty Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the experiments, with 2 rats as the source of bone marrow MSCs. The cut Achilles tendons in the rats were equally divided into 3 groups: hypoxic MSC, normoxic MSC, and nontreated (vehicle control). The uncut tendons served as normal uncut controls. Outcome measures included mechanical testing in 24 rats, histological analysis, and BrdU labeling/collagen immunohistochemistry in another 24 rats. The ultimate failure load in the hypoxic MSC group was significantly greater than that in the nontreated or normoxic MSC group at 2 weeks after incision (2.1 N/mm(2) vs 1.1 N/mm(2) or 1.9 N/mm(2), respectively) and at 4 weeks after incision (5.5 N/mm(2) vs 1.7 N/mm(2) or 2.7 N/mm(2), respectively). The ultimate failure load in the hypoxic MSC group at 4 weeks after incision (5.5 N/mm(2)) was close to but still significantly less than that of the uncut tendon (7.2 N/mm(2)). Histological analysis as determined by the semiquantitative Bonar histopathological grading scale revealed that the hypoxic MSC group underwent a significant improvement in Achilles tendon healing both at 2 and 4 weeks when compared with the nontreated or normoxic MSC group via statistical analysis. Immunohistochemistry further demonstrated that the hypoxic and normoxic MSC groups had stronger immunostaining for type I and type III collagen than did the nontreated group both at 2 and 4 weeks after

  9. Tendon degeneration and chronic shoulder pain: changes in the collagen composition of the human rotator cuff tendons in rotator cuff tendinitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, G P; Harrall, R. L.; Constant, C R; Chard, M D; Cawston, T E; Hazleman, B L

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To analyse the collagen composition of normal adult human supraspinatus tendon and to compare with: (1) a flexor tendon (the common biceps tendon) which is rarely involved in any degenerative pathology; (2) degenerate tendons from patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinitis. METHODS--Total collagen content, collagen solubility and collagen type were investigated by hydroxyproline analysis, acetic acid and pepsin digestion, cyanogen bromide peptide analysis, SDS-PAGE and Western ...

  10. Radial extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinitis: a prospective randomised double-blind placebo-controlled multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolk, A; Yang, K G Auw; Tamminga, R; van der Hoeven, H

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of radial extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (rESWT) on patients with chronic tendinitis of the rotator cuff. This was a randomised controlled trial in which 82 patients (mean age 47 years (24 to 67)) with chronic tendinitis diagnosed clinically were randomly allocated to a treatment group who received low-dose rESWT (three sessions at an interval 10 to 14 days, 2000 pulses, 0.11 mJ/mm(2), 8 Hz) or to a placebo group, with a follow-up of six months. The patients and the treating orthopaedic surgeon, who were both blinded to the treatment, evaluated the results. A total of 44 patients were allocated to the rESWT group and 38 patients to the placebo group. A visual analogue scale (VAS) score for pain, a Constant-Murley (CMS) score and a simple shoulder test (SST) score significantly improved in both groups at three and six months compared with baseline (all p ≤ 0.012). The mean VAS was similar in both groups at three (p = 0.43) and six months (p = 0.262). Also, the mean CMS and SST scores were similar in both groups at six months (p = 0.815 and p = 0.834, respectively). It would thus seem that low-dose rESWT does not reduce pain or improve function in patients chronic rotator cuff tendinitis compared with placebo treatment.

  11. [Acute hip pseudoparalysis with calcific tendinitis at the insertion of the psoas muscle. Case report and first description of an atypical location].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajonz, D; Moche, M; Tiepold, S; von Salis-Soglio, G; Pretzsch, M

    2013-03-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a common and widespread disease. It is most common in the rotator cuff especially in the supraspinatus tendon. In some cases it may also involve other locations such as the hips, particularly at the trochanter minor. In particular calcific tendinitis of the iliopsoas muscle tendon has not yet been described. Because of uncharacteristic symptoms and ambiguous diagnostic imaging the differentiation between traumatic, infectious and neoplastic genesis is often difficult. Because of artefacts the typical calcareous spots near the insertions are often underdiagnosed in conventional diagnostic x-ray images. In this case report the differentiation from an infection of the hip was only possible with positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging and negative microbiological testing of an aspirate. There are various therapy options, such as systemic and local medication, extracorporeal shock wave therapy up to surgery. However, calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting tendinopathy that can be treated with conservative therapy to complete remission in most cases.

  12. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used...... turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue.-Heinemeier, K. M., Schjerling, P., Heinemeier, J., Magnusson, S. P., Kjaer, M. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon...... (donor birth years 1945-1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of 14C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited...

  13. Eccentric rehabilitation exercise increases peritendinous type I collagen synthesis in humans with Achilles tendinosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Ellingsgaard, H; Madsen, T

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that 12 weeks of eccentric heavy resistance training can reduce pain in runners suffering from chronic Achilles tendinosis, but the mechanism behind the effectiveness of this treatment is unknown. The present study investigates the local effect of an eccentric training regime...... of heavy-resistance eccentric training apart from their regular training and soccer activity. Before and after the training period the tissue concentration of indicators of collagen turnover was measured by the use of the microdialysis technique. After training, collagen synthesis was increased...... in the healthy tendons. The clinical effect of the 12 weeks of eccentric training was determined by using a standardized loading procedure of the Achilles tendons showing a decrease in pain in all the chronic injured tendons (VAS before 44+/-9, after 13+/-9; P...

  14. A minimally invasive "overwrapping" technique for repairing neglected ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    About 10% to 25% of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon go undiagnosed for some time beyond what would be optimal for repair and a return to optimal function. Managing these chronic or neglected ruptures is a surgical challenge, because the tendon ends retract and atrophy and could develop a short, fibrous distal stump. In the present report, a patient with a ruptured right Achilles tendon, neglected for approximately 10 years, is described. The chronically injured tendon was successfully treated by overwrapping the interposed scar at the rupture site. This minimally invasive technique restored tension to the tendon, a prerequisite for which was the presence of functional triceps surae, confirmed by identification of gross contraction of the muscle during tiptoeing. The procedure is contraindicated when the scar tissue is not intact and does not have sufficient laxity to allow adequate dorsiflexion of the ankle after overwrapping the tendon or when the triceps surae are nonfunctional.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the Achilles tendon using ultrashort TE (UTE) pulse sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, M.D.; Benjamin, M.; Gishen, P.; Bydder, G.M. E-mail: gbydder@ucsd.edu

    2004-08-01

    AIM: To assess the potential value of imaging the Achilles tendon with ultrashort echo time (UTE) pulse sequences. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four normal controls and four patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were examined in the sagittal and transverse planes. Three of the patients were examined before and after intravenous gadodiamide. RESULTS: The fascicular pattern was clearly demonstrated within the tendon and detail of the three distinct fibrocartilaginous components of an 'enthesis organ' was well seen. T2* measurements showed two short T2* components. Increase in long T2 components with reduction in short T2 components was seen in tendinopathy. Contrast enhancement was much more extensive than with conventional sequences in two cases of tendinopathy but in a third case, there was a region of reduced enhancement. CONCLUSION: UTE pulse sequences provide anatomical detail not apparent with conventional sequences, demonstrate differences in T2* and show patterns of both increased and decreased enhancement in tendinopathy.

  16. Achilles tendon rupture: physiotherapy and endoscopy-assisted surgical treatment of a common sports injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Bozkurt, Murat; Turhan, Egemen; Dönmez, Gürhan; Demirel, Murat; Kaya, Defne; Ateşok, Kıvanç; Atay, Ozgür Ahmet; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-12-13

    Although the Achilles tendon (AT) is the strongest tendon in the human body, rupture of this tendon is one of the most common sports injuries in the athletic population. Despite numerous nonoperative and operative methods that have been described, there is no universal agreement about the optimal management strategy of acute total AT ruptures. The management of AT ruptures should aim to minimize the morbidity of the injury, optimize rapid return to full function, and prevent complications. Since endoscopy-assisted percutaneous AT repair allows direct visualization of the synovia and protects the paratenon that is important in biological healing of the AT, this technique becomes a reasonable treatment option in AT ruptures. Furthermore, Achilles tendoscopy technique may decrease the complications about the sural nerve. Also, early functional postoperative physiotherapy following surgery may improve the surgical outcomes.

  17. [Atypical Achilles tendon rupture in Haglund exostosis--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsch, M; Hackenbroch, M H; König, D P

    1998-01-01

    We report about an unusual case of a rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with Haglund's exostosis and long term achillodynia. Intraoperatively, we found a fresh superficial typically located tendon-rupture and an old deep round shaped rupture which was located directly over the cranial edge of the calcaneous bone spur. We presume that the sharp edge of Haglund's deformity was the cause of the deep tendon rupture, because the location of the round shaped rupture was near the exostosis. The additional superficial rupture, caused by an inadequate trauma, induced operative revision consisting of double layer transosseous suturing. In conclusion early operative resection of Haglund's deformity in cases of repeated irritations of the Achilles tendon should be performed to avoid mechanical damage, including the risk of rupture by the hypomochlion-like effect of the exostosis.

  18. Achilles in the age of steel: Greek Myth in modern popular music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Cavallini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available From the Sixties until today, the presence of Greek Mythology in so-called “popular music” appears to be far more frequent and significant than one could imagine. Nevertheless, at the beginning such references are rather generic, loose and even ironical; on the other side, in the Eighties and afterwards, particularly in the framework of certain music genres, entire concept albums are inspired to the deeds of Achilles and Odysseus, or by the tragic vicissitudes of the house of Atreus. Special attention is dedicated to the character of Achilles, who, as a prototype of the modern “super hero”, is somehow close to the sensibility and the expectations of contemporary youth cultures and their associated media.

  19. Clinical commentary of the evolution of the treatment for chronic painful mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Alfredson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe chronic painful Achilles tendon mid-portion was for many years, and still is in many countries, treated with intratendinous revision surgery. However, by coincidence, painful eccentric calf muscle training was tried, and it showed very good clinical results. This finding was unexpected and led to research into the pain mechanisms involved in this condition. Today we know that there are very few nerves inside, but multiple nerves outside, the ventral side of the chronic painful Achilles tendon mid-portion. These research findings have resulted in new treatment methods targeting the regions with nerves outside the tendon, methods that allow for a rapid rehabilitation and fast return to sports.

  20. [Guideline 'Chronic Achilles tendinopathy, in particular tendinosis, in sportsmen/sportswomen'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Linschoten, R; den Hoed, P T; de Jongh, A C

    2007-10-20

    --Chronic Achilles tendinopathy in sports often leads to various therapeutic strategies, medical shopping and frequently to inability to perform at the desired level. --Although it is clear that this chronic tendinopathy is not an inflammatory disease of the tendon, the cause of the degeneration of the tendon fibres is not understood. --The main therapeutic measure--based on scientific evidence--is eccentric calf-muscle training for at least 3 months. --Recent therapies such as sclerotherapy ofneovascularizations in and around the Achilles tendon appear to be promising, but more studies are required. --About 20% of the patients tend to be refractive to conservative measures. --In selected cases surgery can be undertaken, with percutaneous longitudinal tenotomy proving effective in 75-80% of the cases.