WorldWideScience

Sample records for levitated centrifugal blood

  1. Evaluation of a Spiral Groove Geometry for Improvement of Hemolysis Level in a Hydrodynamically Levitated Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a spiral groove geometry for a thrust bearing to improve the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. We compared three geometric models: (i) the groove width is the same as the ridge width at any given polar coordinate (conventional model); (ii) the groove width contracts inward from 9.7 to 0.5 mm (contraction model); and (iii) the groove width expands inward from 0.5 to 4.2 mm (expansion model). To evaluate the hemolysis level, an impeller levitation performance test and in vitro hemolysis test were conducted using a mock circulation loop. In these tests, the driving conditions were set at a pressure head of 200 mm Hg and a flow rate of 4.0 L/min. As a result of the impeller levitation performance test, the bottom bearing gaps of the contraction and conventional models were 88 and 25 μm, respectively. The impeller of the expansion model touched the bottom housing. In the hemolysis test, the relative normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) ratios of the contraction model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 0.6 and 0.9, respectively. In contrast, the relative NIH ratios of the conventional model in comparison with BPX-80 and HPM-15 were 9.6 and 13.7, respectively. We confirmed that the contraction model achieved a large bearing gap and improved the hemolysis level in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Estimation of the radial force using a disturbance force observer for a magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, C N; Shinshi, T; Shimokohbe, A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydraulic forces in a magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump is important from the point of view of the magnetic bearing design. Direct measurement is difficult due to the absence of a rotor shaft, and computational fluid dynamic analysis demands considerable computational resource and time. To solve this problem, disturbance force observers were developed, using the radial controlled magnetic bearing of a centrifugal blood pump, to estimate the radial forces on the maglev impeller. In order to design the disturbance observer, the radial dynamic characteristics of a maglev impeller were evaluated under different working conditions. It was observed that the working fluid affects the additional mass and damping, while the rotational speed affects the damping and stiffness of the maglev system. Based on these results, disturbance force observers were designed and implemented. The designed disturbance force observers present a bandwidth of 45 Hz. In non-pulsatile conditions, the magnitude of the estimated radial thrust increases in proportion to the flowrate, and the rotational speed has little effect on the force direction. At 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, the estimated radial thrust is 0.95 N. In pulsatile conditions, this method was capable of estimating the pulsatile radial thrust with good response.

  3. Development of a disposable magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump (MedTech Dispo) intended for bridge-to-bridge applications--two-week in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Eiki; Someya, Takeshi; Kitao, Takashi; Kimura, Taro; Ushiyama, Tomohiro; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2010-09-01

    Last year, we reported in vitro pump performance, low hemolytic characteristics, and initial in vivo evaluation of a disposable, magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump, MedTech Dispo. As the first phase of the two-stage in vivo studies, in this study we have carried out a 2-week in vivo evaluation in calves. Male Holstein calves with body weight of 62.4–92.2 kg were used. Under general anesthesia, a left heart bypass with a MedTech Dispo pump was instituted between the left atrium and the descending aorta via left thoracotomy. Blood-contacting surface of the pump was coated with a 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer. Post-operatively, with activated clotting time controlled at 180–220 s using heparin and bypass flow rate maintained at 50 mL/kg/min, plasma-free hemoglobin (Hb), coagulation, and major organ functions were analyzed for evaluation of biocompatibility. The animals were electively sacrificed at the completion of the 2-week study to evaluate presence of thrombus inside the pump,together with an examination of major organs. To date, we have done 13 MedTech Dispo implantations, of which three went successfully for a 2-week duration. In these three cases, the pump produced a fairly constant flow of 50 mL/Kg/min. Neurological disorders and any symptoms of thromboembolism were not seen. Levels of plasma-free Hb were maintained very low. Major organ functions remained within normal ranges. Autopsy results revealed no thrombus formation inside the pump. In the last six cases, calves suffered from severe pneumonia and they were excluded from the analysis. The MedTech Dispo pump demonstrated sufficient pump performance and biocompatibility to meet requirements for 1-week circulatory support. The second phase (2-month in vivo study) is under way to prove the safety and efficacy of MedTech Dispo for 1-month applications. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2010, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation

  4. Centrifugal blood pump 603

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Centrifugal blood pump 603 pressure obtained for real blood, as shown in figure 6, is a little higher than that for glycerin aqua Solution with the same viscosity as blood. This may indicate the effect of slight non-. Newtonian turbulent flow. The radial whirl motion of the impeller was observed by dual laser position sensors.

  5. Container for centrifuging blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narra, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    A container is described for use in drawing patient's blood, centrifuging the blood and then labelling the separated red cells with sup(99m)Tc. It consists of a tube with a central chamber and a lower portion provided with an aperture in which a weir is supported and extends into the central chamber. The weir has a central channel. A resilient plug seals the aperture. (author)

  6. New centrifugation blood culture device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, G L; Smith, K

    1978-01-01

    A single-tube blood culture device designed for centrifugation in a tabletop centrifuge is described. Reconstruction experiments using 21 different organisms and human donor blood indicate that excellent recovery can be obtained by centrifugation for 30 min at 3,000 X g. PMID:342539

  7. Numerical analysis of the internal flow field in screw centrifugal blood pump based on CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, W.; Han, B. X.; Y Wang, H.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    As to the impeller blood pump, the high speed of the impeller, the local high shear force of the flow field and the flow dead region are the main reasons for blood damage. The screw centrifugal pump can effectively alleviate the problems of the high speed and the high shear stress for the impeller. The softness and non-destructiveness during the transfer process can effectively reduce the extent of the damage. By using CFD software, the characteristics of internal flow are analyzed in the screw centrifugal pump by exploring the distribution rules of the velocity, pressure and shear deformation rate of the blood when it flows through the impeller and the destructive effects of spiral blades on blood. The results show that: the design of magnetic levitation solves the sealing problems; the design of regurgitation holes solves the problem of the flow dead zone; the magnetic levitated microcirculation screw centrifugal pump can effectively avoid the vortex, turbulence and high shear forces generated while the blood is flowing through the pump. Since the distribution rules in the velocity field, pressure field and shear deformation rate of the blood in the blood pump are comparatively uniform and the gradient change is comparatively small, the blood damage is effectively reduced.

  8. Improved Outcome of Cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Infants and Children Using Magnetic Levitation Centrifugal Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; Hoxha, Stiljan; Torre, Salvatore; Rungatscher, Alessio; Menon, Tiziano; Barozzi, Luca; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has traditionally been and, for the most part, still is being performed using roller pumps. Use of first-generation centrifugal pumps has yielded controversial outcomes, perhaps due to mechanical properties of the same and the ensuing risk of hemolysis and renal morbidity. Latest-generation centrifugal pumps, using magnetic levitation (ML), exhibit mechanical properties which may have overcome limitations of first-generation devices. This retrospective study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of veno-arterial (V-A) ECMO for cardiac indications in neonates, infants, and children, using standard (SP) and latest-generation ML centrifugal pumps. Between 2002 and 2014, 33 consecutive neonates, infants, and young children were supported using V-A ECMO for cardiac indications. There were 21 males and 12 females, with median age of 29 days (4 days-5 years) and a median body weight of 3.2 kg (1.9-18 kg). Indication for V-A ECMO were acute circulatory collapse in ICU or ward after cardiac repair in 16 (49%) patients, failure to wean after repair of complex congenital heart disease in 9 (27%), fulminant myocarditis in 4 (12%), preoperative sepsis in 2 (6%), and refractory tachy-arrhythmias in 2 (6%). Central cannulation was used in 27 (81%) patients and peripheral in 6. Seven (21%) patients were supported with SP and 26 (79%) with ML centrifugal pumps. Median duration of support was 82 h (range 24-672 h), with 26 (79%) patients weaned from support. Three patients required a second ECMO run but died on support. Seventeen (51%) patients required peritoneal dialysis for acute renal failure. Overall survival to discharge was 39% (13/33 patients). All patients with fulminant myocarditis and with refractory arrhythmias were weaned, and five (83%) survived, whereas no patient supported for sepsis survived. Risk factors for hospital mortality included lower (pumps in infants and children yields outcomes absolutely comparable to

  9. Inhibition of pneumococcal autolysis in lysis-centrifugation blood culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtonen, O P

    1986-01-01

    The recovery of Streptococcus pneumoniae from the Isolator lysis-centrifugation blood culture has been low in many studies. The poor survival of pneumococci was not due to toxicity of the Isolator medium but to autolysis before plating. This autolysis was completely inhibited by adding 10 mM phosphorylcholine to the Isolator medium.

  10. Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy of red blood cells and Plasmodium falciparum trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskar, Ljiljana; Tuckermann, Rudolf; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen; Ly, Vanalysa; McNaughton, Don; Wood, Bayden R

    2007-09-01

    Methods to probe the molecular structure of living cells are of paramount importance in understanding drug interactions and environmental influences in these complex dynamical systems. The coupling of an acoustic levitation device with a micro-Raman spectrometer provides a direct molecular probe of cellular chemistry in a containerless environment minimizing signal attenuation and eliminating the affects of adhesion to walls and interfaces. We show that the Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopic (RALS) approach can be used to monitor the heme dynamics of a levitated 5 microL suspension of red blood cells and to detect hemozoin in malaria infected cells. The spectra obtained have an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and demonstrate for the first time the utility of the technique as a diagnostic and monitoring tool for minute sample volumes of living animal cells.

  11. 21 CFR 864.9275 - Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. 864.9275 Section 864.9275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9275 Blood bank centrifuge for in vitro diagnostic use. (a...

  12. [Hemolysis Performance Analysis of the Centrifugal Maglev Blood Pump].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwen; Zhang, Fan; Fang, Yuan; Dong, Baichuan; Zhou, Liang

    2016-05-01

    In order to analyze and study the hemolysis performance of the centrifugal maglev blood pump, which was designed by ourselves, this paper built the mathematical model and computational fluid dynamics analyzed it using Fluent. Then we set up the in vitro hemolysis experiment platform, in case of the design condition, the content of free hemoglobin and hematocrit in plasma were measured in a certain time interval, and calculated the normalized index of hemolysis of the blood pump. The numerical simulation results show the internal static pressure distribution is smooth inside the pump, the wal shear stress inside the pump is less than 150 Pa. Therefore, the red blood cel damage and exposure time is independent. The normalized index of hemolysis is (0.002 9±0.000 7) mg/L, which is in accordance with human physiological requirement.

  13. Centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbaramajer.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of the processes taking place at centrifugal method of isotope separation taking into account the latest investigations, in particular, investigation of velocity field applying the theory of boundary layers in rotating gas is conducted. As a result of using power computers for the solution of hydrodynamics equations by numerical methods sufficiently exact solutions of main hydrodynamic equations, reflecting the real centrifuge construction are derived. The increase of calculation accuracy of the flow field reflected also on the accuracy of the diffusion equation solution. Three parameters of similarity (height of transfer unit, flow, mass transfer coefficient) and their connection with the flow field, elementary separation coefficient in a cetrifugal field and molecular diffusion coefficient is determined. Modified formulas for the separation coefficient and separation centrifuge power taking into account similarity parameter changes over the axis are derived. The possibility of determining the system of controlled parameters optimizing the separation centrifuge power is shown

  14. CENTRIFUGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping mechanism for damping vibration forces occurring during the operation of a centrifuge is described. The vibration damping mechanism comprises a plurality of nested spaced cylindrical elements surrounding the rotating shaft of the centrifuge. Some of the elements are held substantially stationary while the others are held with respect to a pair of hearings spaced along the rotating shaft. A fluid is retained about the cylindrical elements.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia detected by the Isolator lysis-centrifugation blood culture system.

    OpenAIRE

    Kiehn, T E; Gold, J W; Brannon, P; Timberger, R J; Armstrong, D

    1985-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected by the Isolator lysis-centrifugation blood culture system from the blood of a patient with tuberculosis of the breast. The organism also grew on conventional laboratory media inoculated with pleural fluid from the patient.

  16. An implantable centrifugal blood pump for long term circulatory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, K; Litwak, P; Kormos, R L; Mori, T; Tagusari, O; Antaki, J F; Kameneva, M; Watach, M; Gordon, L; Umezu, M; Tomioka, J; Koyanagi, H; Griffith, B P

    1997-01-01

    A compact centrifugal blood pump was developed as an implantable left ventricular assist system. The impeller diameter is 40 mm and the pump dimensions are 55 x 64 mm. This first prototype was fabricated from titanium alloy, resulting in a pump weight of 400 g including a brushless DC motor. Weight of the second prototype pump was reduced to 280 g. The entire blood contacting surface is coated with diamond like carbon to improve blood compatibility. Flow rates of over 7 L/min against 100 mmHg pressure at 2,500 rpm with 9 W total power consumption have been measured. A newly designed mechanical seal with a recirculating purge system ("Cool-Seal") is used as a shaft seal. In this seal system, seal temperature is kept under 40 degrees C to prevent heat denaturation of blood proteins. Purge fluid also cools the pump motor coil and journal bearing. The purge fluid is continuously purified and sterilized by an ultrafiltration filter incorporated into the paracorporeal drive console. In vitro experiments with bovine blood demonstrated an acceptably low hemolysis rate (normalized index of hemolysis = 0.005 +/- 0.002 g/100 L). In vivo experiments are currently ongoing using calves. Via left thoracotomy, left ventricular apex-descending aorta bypass was performed utilizing a PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) vascular graft, with the pump placed in the left thoracic cavity. In two in vivo experiments, pump flow rate was maintained at 5-8 L/min, and pump power consumption remained stable at 9-10 W. All plasma free hemoglobin levels were measured at < 15 mg/dl. The seal system has demonstrated good seal capability with negligible purge fluid consumption (< 0.5 ml/ day). Both animals remain under observation after 162 and 91 days of continuous pump function.

  17. Egg beater as centrifuge: isolating human blood plasma from whole blood in resource-poor settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Amy P; Gupta, Malancha; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Whitesides, George M

    2008-12-01

    This paper demonstrates that a hand-powered egg beater can be modified to serve as a centrifuge for separating plasma from human whole blood. Immunoassays used to diagnose infectious diseases often require plasma from whole blood, and obtaining plasma typically requires electrically-powered centrifuges, which are not widely available in resource-limited settings. Human whole blood was loaded into polyethylene (PE) tubing, and the tubing was attached to the paddle of an egg beater. Spinning the paddle pelleted the blood cells to the distal end of the PE tubing; the plasma remained as the supernatant. A cholesterol assay (run on patterned paper) demonstrated the suitability of this plasma for use in diagnostic assays. The physics of the system was also analyzed as a guide for the selection of other rotating systems for use in centrifugation. Egg beaters, polyethylene tubing, and paper are readily available devices and supplies that can facilitate the use of point-of-care diagnostics at sites far from centralized laboratory facilities.

  18. Isolation of Mycobacterium chelonei with the lysis-centrifugation blood culture technique.

    OpenAIRE

    Fojtasek, M F; Kelly, M T

    1982-01-01

    Mycobacterium chelonei was isolated from a patient by the lysis-centrifugation and the conventional two-bottle blood culture methods. The lysis-centrifugation method was significantly more sensitive and rapid than the conventional method in detecting and isolating this organism; quantitations done by this method were useful for monitoring response to therapy.

  19. Effect of hypergravity on catecholamine levels in telemetrically collected blood of rats during centrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetnansky, R.; Petrak, J.; Mravec, B.; Tillinger, A.; Jurani, M.; Baranovska, M.; Hapala, I.; Frollo, I.

    2005-08-01

    Hypergravity is known to activate the sympathoadrenal system (SAS). Rats subjected to various accelerations (+G) exhibited increased levels of plasma epinephrine (EPI) and partly also norepinephrine (NE). However, the collection of blood was performed after centrifugation finished and therefore plasma NE and EPI levels could have been affected by the process of deceleration. The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma EPI and NE levels in blood collected directly during the centrifugation after reaching different +G, using newly developed remote controlled equipment. Such telemetrically regulated equipment for multiple blood sampling allows us to investigate selective effects of hypergravity during centrifugation. All animals had a polyethylene tubing in the tail artery which was connected to a pre-programmed device for three blood withdrawals (0.6 ml each) into individual syringes, performed at any chosen time intervals. Plasma EPI and NE levels were measured at hypergravity between +1G - +5G. Plasma EPI levels showed a huge, hypergravity dependent increase at the interval of 10-20 min. After the blood collection was completed, the centrifuge was turned off and another blood sampling was performed immediately after the centrifuge stopped (10 min). In these samples plasma EPI levels showed a significant reduction compared to the 20 min interval of centrifugation but the EPI levels at 4G-6G were still significantly elevated compared to pre- centrifugation levels. Plasma NE levels showed less pronounced changes (increased after 6G only) with a slower return to control levels.Thus, our data has shown completely different responses of the adrenomedullary (epinephrine) and sympathoneural (norepinephrine) systems to hypergravitation. This data shows that the increased gravitation and not the stressful situations connected with centrifugation is the factor responsible for massive activation of the adrenomedullary system. The mechanism of small activation of the

  20. Numerical Calculation for Whirling Motion of a Centrifugal Blood Pump with Conical Spiral Groove Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemaru, Daichi; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    Whirling motion of a pump impeller was calculated for the centrifugal blood pump with Conical Spiral Groove Bearings to get a criterion for the instability of impeller whirling motion. The motion of the centrifugal blood pump impeller was calculated based on a spring damping model, and unsteady flow in the pump was computed using the commercial CFD package ANSYS CFX. Also the whirling motion of rotating impeller was measured using two displacement sensors fixed to the blood pump casing. The numerical calculations were done for the blood pump impeller with conical spiral groove bearings, and impeller whirling motion was evaluated.

  1. Evaluation of conventional castaneda and lysis centrifugation blood culture techniques for diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantur, Basappa G; Mangalgi, Smita S

    2004-09-01

    We investigated the role of the lysis centrifugation blood culture technique over the conventional Castaneda technique for the diagnosis of human brucellosis. The lysis centrifugation technique has been found to be more sensitive in both acute (20% higher sensitivity; P centrifugation was in the mean detection time, which was only 2.4 days in acute and 2.7 days in chronic cases, with 103 out of 110 (93.6%) and 17 out of 20 (85%) cultures from acute and chronic brucellosis, respectively, detected before the conventional culture was positive. Our results confirmed the potential usefulness of the lysis technique in diagnosis and institution of appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  2. The effect of increased centrifugation temperature on the quality of red-blood-cell concentrates of automated whole blood processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinigel, C; Rummler, S; Barz, D

    2013-10-01

    There are manual and automated methods to separate whole blood (WB) available. The Atreus whole blood processing system is an automated method, which combines centrifugation and expression of components into a single device. A major difference to conventional methods is that centrifugation temperature is not controlled at 22°C. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of increased centrifugation temperatures on the quality of red-blood-cell concentrates (RCC) after active cooling of WB prior to processing. A total of 28 WB were processed: 16 at centrifugation temperatures of up to 28°C (1st protocol) and 12 at 34°C (2nd protocol). RCC quality parameters were tested weekly for 42 days. Red-blood-cell concentrates (RCC) quality complied with the European and German guidelines. Haemolysis was not significantly different throughout storage. Significant statistical differences were detected between both protocols in potassium concentration at the end of storage and in ATP levels at the day of processing. Centrifugation temperatures of up to 34°C are well tolerated by the red blood cells with minimal interference with the RCC quality parameters. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  3. Rapid prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic modules for point of care blood testing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Madzivhandila, Phophi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present modular centrifugal microfluidic devices that enable a series of blood tests to be performed towards a full blood count. The modular approach allows for rapid prototyping of device components in a generic format to complete different...

  4. Optimization of a Hybrid Magnetic Bearing for a Magnetically Levitated Blood Pump via 3-D FEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W; Burger, Aaron F; Day, Steven W

    2011-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of a magnetically levitated (maglev) axial flow blood pump, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) was used to optimize the design of a hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB). Radial, axial, and current stiffness of multiple design variations of the HMB were calculated using a 3-D FEA package and verified by experimental results. As compared with the original design, the optimized HMB had twice the axial stiffness with the resulting increase of negative radial stiffness partially compensated for by increased current stiffness. Accordingly, the performance of the maglev axial flow blood pump with the optimized HMBs was improved: the maximum pump speed was increased from 6000 rpm to 9000 rpm (50%). The radial, axial and current stiffness of the HMB was found to be linear at nominal operational position from both 3-D FEA and empirical measurements. Stiffness values determined by FEA and empirical measurements agreed well with one another. The magnetic flux density distribution and flux loop of the HMB were also visualized via 3-D FEA which confirms the designers' initial assumption about the function of this HMB.

  5. Hypergravity-induced increase in plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels in telemetrically collected blood of rats during centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrak, Juraj; Mravec, Boris; Jurani, Marian; Baranovska, Magda; Tillinger, Andrej; Hapala, Ivan; Frollo, Ivan; Kvetnanský, Richard

    2008-12-01

    Rats subjected to various accelerations (+G) exhibited increased levels of plasma epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NE), and corticosterone. However, the collection of blood was performed after a centrifugation finished, and therefore the levels could be affected by the process of deceleration. The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma EPI, NE, and corticosterone levels in blood collected directly during centrifugation after reaching different G (2-6), using newly developed remote-controlled equipment. Animals placed into the centrifuge cabins had inserted polyethylene tubing in the tail artery, which was connected with a preprogrammed device for blood withdrawals. Plasma EPI, NE, and corticosterone levels were measured at different time intervals of hypergravity of 2-6G. Plasma EPI levels showed a huge, hypergravity-level-dependent increase. After the last blood collection was completed during hypergravity, the centrifuge was turned off and another blood sampling was performed immediately after the centrifuge stopped (10 min). In these samples, plasma EPI showed significantly lower levels compared to centrifugation intervals. Plasma NE levels were significantly increased after 6G only. The increase in plasma corticosterone was dependent on level of G, however after the centrifuge stopped, corticosterone levels remained elevated. Thus, our data show that hypergravity highly activates the adrenomedullary and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical systems, whereas the sympathoneural system is activated only at high hypergravity. Immediately after centrifugation is over, EPI levels quickly return to control values. Our technique of blood collection during centrifugation allows assessment of the real hormonal levels at the particular hypergravity value.

  6. Centrifugation after irradiation of red blood cells does not accelerate haemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dominik R; Goehring, Jasmin; Weisbach, Volker; Strasser, Erwin F; Ringwald, Juergen; Zimmermann, Robert; Eckstein, Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    For intrauterine transfusion and some other rare indications, irradiation and washing or adjustment to an elevated haematocrit is necessary. No data are currently available indicating whether irradiation of red blood cell concentrates (RBCs) might impair the mechanical stability of erythrocytes during centrifugation leading to elevated haemolysis. Consequently, if irradiation and centrifugation of RBCs is necessary, there is no definitive recommendation about the preferred sequence of steps. We divided 20 RBC units that were not older than 9 days into two subunits. These subunits were prepared to yield irradiated RBCs with an elevated haematocrit, as they are used for intrauterine transfusion. One subunit was centrifuged and then irradiated, the other subunit was irradiated and then centrifuged. The units were evaluated in vitro before preparation and on days 1 and 7. We could not find any difference in the haemolysis rate, extracellular LDH or alpha-HBDH between the two groups of RBCs. This observation indicates that centrifugation after irradiation of RBCs does not accelerate haemolysis. A similar ATP content in the two subunits demonstrated no difference in energy metabolism. The extracellular potassium concentration was significantly lower in the subunits washed after irradiation. There is no difference in the haemolysis caused by centrifugation between irradiated and non-irradiated RBCs. However, it is well known that washing RBCs after irradiation significantly lowers the potassium content. Summarising these two findings leads to the conclusion that it is optimal first to irradiate and then to wash RBCs.

  7. A portable system for processing donated whole blood into high quality components without centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Sean C; Strachan, Briony C; Xia, Hui; Vörös, Eszter; Torabian, Kian; Tomasino, Taylor A; Griffin, Gary D; Lichtiger, Benjamin; Aung, Fleur M; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S

    2018-01-01

    The use of centrifugation-based approaches for processing donated blood into components is routine in the industrialized world, as disparate storage conditions require the rapid separation of 'whole blood' into distinct red blood cell (RBC), platelet, and plasma products. However, the logistical complications and potential cellular damage associated with centrifugation/apheresis manufacturing of blood products are well documented. The objective of this study was to evaluate a proof-of-concept system for whole blood processing, which does not employ electromechanical parts, is easily portable, and can be operated immediately after donation with minimal human labor. In a split-unit study (n = 6), full (~500mL) units of freshly-donated whole blood were divided, with one half processed by conventional centrifugation techniques and the other with the new blood separation system. Each of these processes took 2-3 hours to complete and were performed in parallel. Blood products generated by the two approaches were compared using an extensive panel of cellular and plasma quality metrics. Comparison of nearly all RBC parameters showed no significant differences between the two approaches, although the portable system generated RBC units with a slight but statistically significant improvement in 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid concentration (p applications in remote or resource-limited settings, or for patients requiring highly functional platelet product.

  8. Centrifugation-free washing: A novel approach for removing immunoglobulin A from stored red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vörös, Eszter; Piety, Nathaniel Z; Strachan, Briony C; Lu, Madeleine; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S

    2018-08-01

    Washed red blood cells (RBCs) are indicated for immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficient recipients. Centrifugation-based cell processors commonly used by hospital blood banks cannot consistently reduce IgA below the recommended levels, hence double washing is frequently required. Here, we describe a prototype of a simple, portable, disposable system capable of washing stored RBCs without centrifugation, while reducing IgA below 0.05 mg/dL in a single run. Samples from RBC units (n = 8, leukoreduced, 4-6 weeks storage duration) were diluted with normal saline to a hematocrit of 10%, and then washed using either the prototype washing system, or via conventional centrifugation. The efficiency of the two washing methods was quantified and compared by measuring several key in vitro quality metrics. The prototype of the washing system was able to process stored RBCs at a rate of 300 mL/hour, producing a suspension of washed RBCs with 43 ± 3% hematocrit and 86 ± 7% cell recovery. Overall, the two washing methods performed similarly for most measured parameters, lowering the concentration of free hemoglobin by >4-fold and total free protein by >10-fold. Importantly, the new washing system reduced the IgA level to 0.02 ± 0.01 mg/mL, a concentration 5-fold lower than that produced by conventional centrifugation. This proof-of-concept study showed that centrifugation may be unnecessary for washing stored RBCs. A simple, disposable, centrifugation-free washing system could be particularly useful in smaller medical facilities and resource limited settings that may lack access to centrifugation-based cell processors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Disposable MagLev centrifugal blood pump utilizing a cone-shaped impeller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijikata, Wataru; Sobajima, Hideo; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Nagamine, Yasuyuki; Wada, Suguru; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2010-08-01

    To enhance the durability and reduce the blood trauma of a conventional blood pump with a cone-shaped impeller, a magnetically levitated (MagLev) technology has been applied to the BioPump BPX-80 (Medtronic Biomedicus, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), whose impeller is supported by a mechanical bearing. The MagLev BioPump (MagLev BP), which we have developed, has a cone-shaped impeller, the same as that used in the BPX-80. The suspension and driving system, which is comprised of two degrees of freedom, radial-controlled magnetic bearing, and a simply structured magnetic coupling, eliminates any physical contact between the impeller and the housing. To reduce both oscillation of the impeller and current in the coils, the magnetic bearing system utilizes repetitive and zero-power compensators. In this article, we present the design of the MagLev mechanism, measure the levitational accuracy of the impeller and pressure-flow curves (head-quantity [HQ] characteristics), and describe in vitro experiments designed to measure hemolysis. For the flow-induced hemolysis of the initial design to be reduced, the blood damage index was estimated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Stable rotation of the impeller in a prototype MagLev BP from 0 to 2750 rpm was obtained, yielding a flow rate of 5 L/min against a head pressure in excess of 250 mm Hg. Because the impeller of the prototype MagLev BP is levitated without contact, the normalized index of hemolysis was 10% less than the equivalent value with the BPX-80. The results of the CFD analysis showed that the shape of the outlet and the width of the fluid clearances have a large effect on blood damage. The prototype MagLev BP satisfied the required HQ characteristics (5 L/min, 250 mm Hg) for extracorporeal circulation support with stable levitation of the impeller and showed an acceptable level of hemolysis. The simulation results of the CFD analysis indicated the possibility of further reducing the blood damage of

  10. Estimation of changes in dynamic hydraulic force in a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with transient computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ohta, Akiko; Tanaka, Nobuatu; Qian, Yi; Tsukiya, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the hydraulic force on magnetically levitated (maglev) pumps should be studied carefully to improve the suspension performance and the reliability of the pumps. A maglev centrifugal pump, developed at Ibaraki University, was modeled with 926 376 hexahedral elements for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. The pump has a fully open six-vane impeller with a diameter of 72.5 mm. A self-bearing motor suspends the impeller in the radial direction. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 250 mmHg and 14 l/min, respectively. First, a steady-state analysis was performed using commercial code STAR-CD to confirm the model's suitability by comparing the results with the real pump performance. Second, transient analysis was performed to estimate the hydraulic force on the levitated impeller. The impeller was rotated in steps of 1 degrees using a sliding mesh. The force around the impeller was integrated at every step. The transient analysis revealed that the direction of the radial force changed dynamically as the vane's position changed relative to the outlet port during one circulation, and the magnitude of this force was about 1 N. The current maglev pump has sufficient performance to counteract this hydraulic force. Transient CFD analysis is not only useful for observing dynamic flow conditions in a centrifugal pump but is also effective for obtaining information about the levitation dynamics of a maglev pump.

  11. Leukoreduction by centrifugation does not eliminate Trypanosoma cruzi from infected blood units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzib, Doris; Hernández, Virginia Peña; Ake, Baldemar Canche; López, Ruth Alacantara; Monteón, Victor Manuel

    2009-06-01

    Current strategies to prevent transfusion-associated Chagas disease include the identification of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected blood donors through questionnaires and serologic tests. There are other procedures such as leukoreduction that prevent the transmission of infectious agents associated to white cells. The objective of the present work was to estimate the seroprevalence, evaluate the efficacy of leukoreduction by centrifugation to eliminate T. cruzi in infected blood units, and the correlation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses of seropositive blood donors with chronic chagasic cardiopathy. Over a period of 14 months, 33 out of 6600 blood donors (0.5%) at Centro Estatal de la Transfusión Sanguínea in Campeche State, México were seropositive for T. cruzi. Twenty seropositive blood units were submitted through leukoreduction by centrifugation, and in the fractions generated (red cell fraction, platelets, and the buffy-coat), we searched for the presence of T. cruzi using specific polymerase chain reaction. We detected parasite DNA in 50% to 60% of the fractions tested, suggesting that leukoreduction by centrifugation does not eliminate the microorganisms in the infected blood unit. We also observed that the level of IgG2 and IgG4 subclasses specific for T. cruzi in seropositive blood donors was lower than in chronic cardiopathic chagasic patients. In conclusion, leukoreduction by centrifugation has a limited role in eliminating T. cruzi in infected blood supply, and the low level of specific IgG2 and IgG4 could be a marker in the indeterminate phase of infection.

  12. Comparison of lysis-centrifugation with lysis-filtration and a conventional unvented bottle for blood cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, V J; Zierdt, C H; Wu, T C; Stock, F; Pizzo, P A; MacLowry, J D

    1984-01-01

    Evaluation of a commercially available lysis-centrifugation blood culture system (Isolator, DuPont Co., Wilmington, Del.) and a lysis-filtration blood culture system for 3,111 cultures showed that both methods had comparable recoveries (73 and 68%, respectively) of significant aerobic and facultatively anaerobic isolates. The unvented conventional blood culture bottle had a recovery rate of 59%. Although the lysis-centrifugation and lysis-filtration systems had comparable recoveries of pathog...

  13. Blood culture bottles are superior to lysis-centrifugation tubes for bacteriological diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Siersema, P D; de Marie, S; van Zeijl, J H; Bac, D J; Wilson, J H

    1992-01-01

    The conventional method of ascitic fluid culturing was compared with the bedside inoculation of ascites into blood culture bottles and into lysis-centrifugation tubes. The conventional culture method was compared with the blood culture bottle method in 31 episodes of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). Cultures were positive with the conventional culture method in 11 (35%) episodes and with the blood culture bottle method in 26 (84%) episodes (P less than 0.001). The lysis-centrifugation...

  14. Comparison of the lysis-centrifugation and agitated biphasic blood culture systems for detection of fungemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, P R

    1991-01-01

    Although the detection of fungemia has been improved by the use of vented or biphasic blood culture bottles, the best recovery and earliest detection have been reported in the Isolator lysis-centrifugation system. It was recently demonstrated that improved detection of both bacteria and fungi was accomplished by mechanically agitating blood culture bottles for the first 24 h of incubation. In this study the detection of fungemia by use of the Isolator system was compared with that of an agitated biphasic system. A total of 182 fungi were isolated from blood specimens inoculated into both culture systems. No difference in the overall recovery of fungi or individual species of yeasts was observed between the two systems. However, all seven isolates of Histoplasma capsulatum were recovered in the Isolator system only. The time required to detect fungemia with each of the two systems was also compared. No statistically significant difference was observed. From the data collected during this 18-month study, it can be concluded that the overall recovery and time of detection of yeasts are equivalent in the lysis-centrifugation system and the agitated biphasic blood culture system. The lysis-centrifugation system is still superior for the detection of filamentous fungi such as H. capsulatum. PMID:1993772

  15. Effect of centrifuge test on blood serum lipids index of cadet pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wochyński, Zbigniew; Kowalczuk, Krzysztof; Kłossowski, Marek; Sobiech, Krzysztof A

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the relationship between the lipid index (WS) in the examined cadets and duration of exposure to +Gz in the human centrifuge. The study involved 19 first-year cadets of the Polish Air Force Academy in Dęblin. Tests in the human centrifuge were repeated twice, i.e. prior to (test I) and 45 days after (test II). After exposure to +Gz, the examined cadets were divided into 2 groups. Group I (N=11) included cadets subjected to a shorter total duration of exposure to +Gz, while group II (N=8) included cadets with a longer total duration of exposure to +Gz. Total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG), and apolipoproteins A1 and B were assayed in blood serum prior to (assay A) and after (assay B) both exposures to +Gz. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) level was estimated from the Friedewald formula. WS is an own mathematical algorithm. WS was higher in group II, assay A - 10.0 and B - 10.08 of test I in the human centrifuge than in group I where the WS values were 6.91 and 6.96, respectively. WS was also higher in group II in assay A - 10.0 and B -10.1 of test II in the human centrifuge than in group I - 6.96 and 6.80, respectively. The higher value of WS in group II, both after the first and second exposure to +Gz in human centrifuge, in comparison with group I, indicated its usefulness for determination of the maximum capability of applying acceleration of the interval type during training in the human centrifuge.

  16. In vivo evaluation of centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass-Spiral Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cibele; da Silva, Bruno Utiyama; Leme, Juliana; Uebelhart, Beatriz; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas; Biscegli, José F; Andrade, Aron; Zavaglia, Cecília

    2013-11-01

    The Spiral Pump (SP), a centrifugal blood pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), has been developed at the Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology/Adib Jatene Foundation laboratories, with support from Sintegra Company (Pompeia, Brazil). The SP is a disposable pump with an internal rotor-a conically shaped fuse with double entrance threads. This rotor is supported by two ball bearings, attached to a stainless steel shaft fixed to the housing base. Worm gears provide axial motion to the blood column, and the rotational motion of the conically shaped impeller generates a centrifugal pumping effect, improving pump efficiency without increasing hemolysis. In vitro tests were performed to evaluate the SP's hydrodynamic performance, and in vivo experiments were performed to evaluate hemodynamic impact during usual CPB. A commercially available centrifugal blood pump was used as reference. In vivo experiments were conducted in six male pigs weighing between 60 and 90 kg, placed on CPB for 6 h each. Blood samples were collected just before CPB (T0) and after every hour of CPB (T1-T6) for hemolysis determination and laboratory tests (hematological and biochemical). Values of blood pressure, mean flow, pump rotational speed, and corporeal temperature were recorded. Also, ergonomic conditions were recorded: presence of noise, difficulty in removing air bubbles, trouble in installing the pump in the drive module (console), and difficulties in mounting the CPB circuit. Comparing the laboratory and hemolysis results for the SP with those of the reference pump, we can conclude that there is no significant difference between the two devices. In addition, reports made by medical staff and perfusionists described a close similarity between the two devices. During in vivo experiments, the SP maintained blood flow and pressure at physiological levels, consistent with those applied in cardiac surgery with CPB, without presenting any malfunction. Also, the SP needed lower rotational

  17. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, M; Ratho, R; Chawla, Y; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA) and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET) technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  18. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001, even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  19. Acute hydrodynamic damage induced by SPLITT fractionation and centrifugation in red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, Adriana; Godoy-Silva, Ruben; Hoyos, Mauricio; Camacho, Marcela

    2016-05-01

    Though blood bank processing traditionally employs centrifugation, new separation techniques may be appealing for large scale processes. Split-flow fractionation (SPLITT) is a family of techniques that separates in absence of labelling and uses very low flow rates and force fields, and is therefore expected to minimize cell damage. However, the hydrodynamic stress and possible consequent damaging effects of SPLITT fractionation have not been yet examined. The aim of this study was to investigate the hydrodynamic damage of SPLITT fractionation to human red blood cells, and to compare these effects with those induced by centrifugation. Peripheral whole blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers. Samples were diluted in a buffered saline solution, and were exposed to SPLITT fractionation (flow rates 1-10 ml/min) or centrifugation (100-1500 g) for 10 min. Cell viability, shape, diameter, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and membrane potential were measured. Under the operating conditions employed, both SPLITT and centrifugation maintained cell viability above 98%, but resulted in significant sublethal damage, including echinocyte formation, decreased cell diameter, decreased mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and membrane hyperpolarization which was inhibited by EGTA. Wall shear stress and maximum energy dissipation rate showed significant correlation with lethal and sublethal damage. Our data do not support the assumption that SPLITT fractionation induces very low shear stress and is innocuous to cell function. Some changes in SPLITT channel design are suggested to minimize cell damage. Measurement of membrane potential and cell diameter could provide a new, reliable and convenient basis for evaluation of hydrodynamic effects on different cell models, allowing identification of optimal operating conditions on different scales. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrating Cell Phone Imaging with Magnetic Levitation (i-LEV) for Label-Free Blood Analysis at the Point-of-Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baday, Murat; Calamak, Semih; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-03-02

    There is an emerging need for portable, robust, inexpensive, and easy-to-use disease diagnosis and prognosis monitoring platforms to share health information at the point-of-living, including clinical and home settings. Recent advances in digital health technologies have improved early diagnosis, drug treatment, and personalized medicine. Smartphones with high-resolution cameras and high data processing power enable intriguing biomedical applications when integrated with diagnostic devices. Further, these devices have immense potential to contribute to public health in resource-limited settings where there is a particular need for portable, rapid, label-free, easy-to-use, and affordable biomedical devices to diagnose and continuously monitor patients for precision medicine, especially those suffering from rare diseases, such as sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Here, a magnetic levitation-based diagnosis system is presented in which different cell types (i.e., white and red blood cells) are levitated in a magnetic gradient and separated due to their unique densities. Moreover, an easy-to-use, smartphone incorporated levitation system for cell analysis is introduced. Using our portable imaging magnetic levitation (i-LEV) system, it is shown that white and red blood cells can be identified and cell numbers can be quantified without using any labels. In addition, cells levitated in i-LEV can be distinguished at single-cell resolution, potentially enabling diagnosis and monitoring, as well as clinical and research applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Centrifuge apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartory, Walter K.; Eveleigh, John W.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for operating a continuous flow blood separation centrifuge are provided. The hematocrit of the entrant whole blood is continuously maintained at an optimum constant value by the addition of plasma to the entrant blood. The hematocrit of the separated red cells is monitored to indicate the degree of separation taking place, thereby providing a basis for regulating the flow through the centrifuge.

  2. [Pre-analytical stability before centrifugation of 7 biochemical analytes in whole blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier-Cornet, Andreas; Moineau, Marie-Pierre; Narbonne, Valérie; Plee-Gautier, Emmanuelle; Le Saos, Fabienne; Carre, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The pre-analytical stability of 7 biochemical parameters (parathyroid hormone -PTH-, vitamins A, C E and D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and insulin) at +4 °C, was studied on whole blood samples before centrifugation. The impact of freezing at -20°C was also analyzed/performed for PTH and vitamin D. The differences in the results of assays for whole blood samples, being kept for different times between sampling time and analysis, from 9 healthy adults, were compaired by using a Student t test. The 7 analytes investigated remained stable up to 4 hours at +4°C in whole blood. This study showed that it is possible to accept uncentrifuged whole blood specimens kept at +4°C before analysis. PTH is affected by freezing whereas vitamin D is not.

  3. Method and apparatus for automated processing and aliquoting of whole blood samples for analysis in a centrifugal fast analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtis, C.A.; Johnson, W.F.; Walker, W.A.

    1985-08-05

    A rotor and disc assembly for use in a centrifugal fast analyzer. The assembly is designed to process multiple samples of whole blood followed by aliquoting of the resultant serum into precisely measured samples for subsequent chemical analysis. The assembly requires minimal operator involvement with no mechanical pipetting. The system comprises: (1) a whole blood sample disc; (2) a serum sample disc; (3) a sample preparation rotor; and (4) an analytical rotor. The blood sample disc and serum sample disc are designed with a plurality of precision bore capillary tubes arranged in a spoked array. Samples of blood are loaded into the blood sample disc by capillary action and centrifugally discharged into cavities of the sample preparation rotor where separation of serum and solids is accomplished. The serum is loaded into the capillaries of the serum sample disc by capillary action and subsequently centrifugally expelled into cuvettes of the analyticaly rotor for conventional methods. 5 figs.

  4. Method and apparatus for automated processing and aliquoting of whole blood samples for analysis in a centrifugal fast analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtis, Carl A.; Johnson, Wayne F.; Walker, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A rotor and disc assembly for use in a centrifugal fast analyzer. The assembly is designed to process multiple samples of whole blood followed by aliquoting of the resultant serum into precisely measured samples for subsequent chemical analysis. The assembly requires minimal operator involvement with no mechanical pipetting. The system comprises (1) a whole blood sample disc, (2) a serum sample disc, (3) a sample preparation rotor, and (4) an analytical rotor. The blood sample disc and serum sample disc are designed with a plurality of precision bore capillary tubes arranged in a spoked array. Samples of blood are loaded into the blood sample disc in capillary tubes filled by capillary action and centrifugally discharged into cavities of the sample preparation rotor where separation of serum and solids is accomplished. The serum is loaded into the capillaries of the serum sample disc by capillary action and subsequently centrifugally expelled into cuvettes of the analytical rotor for analysis by conventional methods.

  5. Centrifugation: an important pre-analytic procedure that influences plasma microRNA quantification during blood processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Cui, Cui; Zhou, Xin-Xi; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Jia, Wei-Hua

    2013-12-01

    Circulating microRNAs are robustly present in plasma or serum and have become a research focus as biomarkers for tumor diagnosis and prognosis. Centrifugation is a necessary procedure for obtaining high-quality blood supernatant. Herein, we investigated one-step and two-step centrifugations, two centrifugal methods routinely used in microRNA study, to explore their effects on plasma microRNA quantification. The microRNAs obtained from one-step and two-step centrifugations were quantified by microarray and TaqMan-based real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Dynamic light scattering was performed to explore the difference underlying the two centrifugal methods. The results from the microarray containing 1,347 microRNAs showed that the signal detection rate was greatly decreased in the plasma sample prepared by two-step centrifugation. More importantly, the microRNAs missing in this plasma sample could be recovered and detected in the precipitate generated from the second centrifugation. Consistent with the results from microarray, a marked decrease of three representative microRNAs in two-step centrifugal plasma was validated by Q-PCR. According to the size distribution of all nanoparticles in plasma, there were fewer nanoparticles with size >1,000 nm in two-step centrifugal plasma. Our experiments directly demonstrated that different centrifugation methods produced distinct quantities of plasma microRNAs. Thus, exosomes or protein complexes containing microRNAs may be involved in large nanoparticle formation and may be precipitated after two-step centrifugation. Our results remind us that sample processing methods should be first considered in conducting research.

  6. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Generation from Blood Cells Using Sendai Virus and Centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Yeri Alice; Nam, Yoojun; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2016-12-21

    The recent development of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) proved that mature somatic cells can return to an undifferentiated, pluripotent state. Now, reprogramming is done with various types of adult somatic cells: keratinocytes, urine cells, fibroblasts, etc. Early experiments were usually done with dermal fibroblasts. However, this required an invasive surgical procedure to obtain fibroblasts from the patients. Therefore, suspension cells, such as blood and urine cells, were considered ideal for reprogramming because of the convenience of obtaining the primary cells. Here, we report an efficient protocol for iPSC generation from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). By plating the transduced PBMCs serially to a new, matrix-coated plate using centrifugation, this protocol can easily provide iPSC colonies. This method is also applicable to umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs). This study presents a simple and efficient protocol for the reprogramming of PBMCs and CBMCs.

  7. Two-Dimensional Computational Flow Analysis and Frictional Characteristics Model for Red Blood Cell under Inclined Centrifuge Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Shirai, Atsushi

    Simplified two-dimensional flow analysis is performed in order to simulate frictional characteristics measurement of red blood cells moving on a glass plate in a medium with an inclined centrifuge microscope. Computation under various conditions reveals the influences of parameters on lift, drag, and moment acting on a red blood cell. Among these forces, lift appears only when the cell is longitudinally asymmetric. By considering the balance of forces, the frictional characteristics of the red blood cell are modeled as the sum of Coulomb friction and viscous drag. The model describes the possibility that the red blood cell deforms to expand in the front side in response to the inclined centrifugal force. When velocity exceeds some critical value, the lift overcomes the normal centrifugal force component, and the thickness of the plasma layer between the cell and the glass plate increases from the initial value of the plasma protein thickness.

  8. EVAHEART: an implantable centrifugal blood pump for long-term circulatory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kenji; Kihara, Shinichiro; Akimoto, Takehide; Tagusari, Osamu; Kawai, Akihiko; Umezu, Mitsuo; Tomioka, Jun; Kormos, Robert L; Griffith, Bartley P; Kurosawa, Hiromi

    2002-11-01

    We developed "EVAHEART": a compact centrifugal blood pump system as an implantable left ventricular assist device for long-term circulatory support. The 55 x 64 mm pump is made from pure titanium, and weighs 370 g. The entire blood-contacting surface is covered with an anti-thrombogenic coating of diamond like carbon (DLC) or 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) to improve blood compatibility. Flows exceeding 12 L/min against 100 mmHg pressure at 2600 rpm was measured. A low-temperature mechanical seal with recirculating cooling system is used to seal the shaft. EVAHEART demonstrated an acceptably low hemolysis rate with normalized index of hemolysis of 0.005 +/- 0.002 g/100L. We evaluated the pump in long-term in-vivo experiments with seven calves. Via left thoracotomy, we conducted left ventricular apex-descending aorta bypass, placing the pump in the left thoracic cavity. Pump flow rates was maintained at 5-9 L/min, pump power consumption remained stable at 9-10 W in all cases, plasma free Hb levels were less than 15 mg/dl, and the seal system showed good seal capability throughout the experiments. The calves were sacrificed on schedule on postoperative day 200, 222, 142, 90, 151, 155, and 133. No thrombi formed on the blood contacting surface with either the DLC or MPC coating, and no major organ thromboembolisms occurred except for a few small renal infarcts. EVAHEART centrifugal blood pump demonstrated excellent performance in long-term in-vivo experiments.

  9. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Selahi, AmirAli; Madadelahi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ∼100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s −1 , recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells. (paper)

  10. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Selahi, AmirAli; Madadelahi, Masoud

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ~100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s-1, recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells.

  11. Design optimization of flow channel and performance analysis for a new-type centrifugal blood pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, J. J.; Luo, X. W.; Y Wu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a new-type centrifugal blood pump, whose impeller is suspended inside a pump chamber with hydraulic bearings, is presented. In order to improve the hydraulic performance of the pump, an internal flow simulation is conducted to compare the effects of different geometrical parameters of pump flow passage. Based on the numerical results, the pumps can satisfy the operation parameters and be free of hemolysis. It is noted that for the pump with a column-type supporter at its inlet, the pump head and hydraulic efficiency decreases compared to the pump with a step-type support structure. The performance drop is caused by the disturbed flow upstream impeller inlet. Further, the unfavorable flow features such as reverse flow and low velocity in the pump may increases the possibility of thrombus. It is also confirmed that the casing shape can little influence pump performance. Those results are helpful for design optimization in blood pump development.

  12. Outcomes and biochemical parameters following cardiac surgery: effects of transfusion of residual blood using centrifugation and multiple-pass hemoconcentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Erick; McKay, William; Qureshi, Abdul Mohamed; Rosin, Mark; Gamble, Jon; Dalshaug, Greg; Mycyk, Taras; Prasad, Kailash

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether or not there was a significant difference between the methods of centrifugation (CF) and multiple-pass hemoconcentration (MPH) of the residual cardiopulmonary-bypass volume in relation to biochemical measurements and patient outcomes. Prospective, randomized, and controlled. Conducted at a western Canadian tertiary care hospital. Consisted of 61 consecutive male and female patients from ages 40 to 80 who were scheduled for cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Either the centrifugation or multiple-pass hemoconcentration method was used to process the residual blood from the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. The 12-hour postoperative levels of serum hemoglobin were not significantly different in the centrifugation group as compared to the multiple-pass hemoconcentration group. However, the serum levels of total protein and albumin were significantly higher in the multiple-pass hemoconcentration group as compared to the centrifugation group. Additionally, after 12-hours postoperatively, the serum fibrinogen and platelet counts were significantly higher in the multiple-pass hemoconcentration group as compared to those of the centrifugation group. The allogeneic product transfusion index and the chest-tube blood drainage indices were lower in the multiple-pass hemoconcentration group as compared to the centrifugation group. Although the CF method provided a product in a shorter turnaround time, with consistent clearance of heparin, the MPH method trended towards enhanced biochemical and clinical patient outcomes over the 12-hour postoperative period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Directly observed reversible shape changes and hemoglobin stratification during centrifugation of human and Amphiuma red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Joseph F; Inoué, Shinya

    2006-02-21

    This paper describes changes that occur in human and Amphiuma red blood cells observed during centrifugation with a special microscope. Dilute suspensions of cells were layered, in a centrifuge chamber, above an osmotically matched dense solution, containing Nycodenz, Ficoll, or Percoll (Pharmacia) that formed a density gradient that allowed the cells to slowly settle to an equilibrium position. Biconcave human red blood cells moved downward at low forces with minimum wobble. The cells oriented vertically when the force field was increased and Hb sedimented as the lower part of each cell became bulged and assumed a "bag-like" shape. The upper centripetal portion of the cell became thinner and remained biconcave. These changes occurred rapidly and were completely reversible upon lowering the centrifugal force. Bag-shaped cells, upon touching red cells in rouleau, immediately reverted to biconcave disks as they flipped onto a stack. Amphiuma red cells displayed a different type of reversible stratification and deformation at high force fields. Here the cells became stretched, with the nucleus now moving centrifugally, the Hb moving centripetally, and the bottom of the cells becoming thinner and clear. Nevertheless, the distribution of the marginal bands at the cells' rim was unchanged. We conclude that centrifugation, per se, while changing a red cell's shape and the distribution of its intracellular constituents, does so in a completely reversible manner. Centrifugation of red cells harboring altered or missing structural elements could provide information on shape determinants that are still unexplained.

  14. Geometric Optimization for Non-Thrombogenicity of a Centrifugal Blood Pump through Flow Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Masahiro; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi; Tsutsui, Tatsuo; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    A monopivot centrifugal blood pump, whose impeller is supported with a pivot bearing and a passive magnetic bearing, is under development for implantable artificial heart. The hemolysis level is less than that of commercial centrifugal pumps and the pump size is as small as 160 mL in volume. To solve a problem of thrombus caused by fluid dynamics, flow visualization experiments and animal experiments have been undertaken. For flow visualization a three-fold scale-up model, high-speed video system, and particle tracking velocimetry software were used. To verify non-thrombogenicity one-week animal experiments were conducted with sheep. The initially observed thrombus around the pivot was removed through unifying the separate washout holes to a small centered hole to induce high shear around the pivot. It was found that the thrombus contours corresponded to the shear rate of 300s-1 for red thrombus and 1300-1700s-1 for white thrombus, respectively. Thus flow visualization technique was found to be a useful tool to predict thrombus location.

  15. Large-scale clinical comparison of the lysis-centrifugation and radiometric systems for blood culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brannon, P.; Kiehn, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Isolator 10 lysis-centrifugation blood culture system (E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del.) was compared with the BACTEC radiometric method (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) with 6B and 7D broth media for the recovery of bacteria and yeasts. From 11,000 blood cultures, 1,174 clinically significant organisms were isolated. The Isolator system recovered significantly more total organisms, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus spp., and yeasts. The BACTEC system recovered significantly more Pseudomonas spp., Streptococcus spp., and anaerobes. Of the Isolator colony counts, 87% measured less than 11 CFU/ml of blood. Organisms, on an average, were detected the same day from each of the two culture systems. Only 13 of the 975 BACTEC isolates (0.01%) were recovered by subculture of growth-index-negative bottles, and 12 of the 13 were detected in another broth blood culture taken within 24 h. Contaminants were recovered from 4.8% of the Isolator 10 and 2.3% of the BACTEC cultures

  16. An implantable centrifugal blood pump with a recirculating purge system (Cool-Seal system).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, K; Litwak, P; Tagusari, O; Mori, T; Kono, K; Kameneva, M; Watach, M; Gordon, L; Miyagishima, M; Tomioka, J; Umezu, M; Outa, E; Antaki, J F; Kormos, R L; Koyanagi, H; Griffith, B P

    1998-06-01

    A compact centrifugal blood pump has been developed as an implantable left ventricular assist system. The impeller diameter is 40 mm, and pump dimensions are 55 x 64 mm. This first prototype, fabricated from titanium alloy, resulted in a pump weight of 400 g including a brushless DC motor. The weight of a second prototype pump was reduced to 280 g. The entire blood contacting surface is coated with diamond like carbon (DLC) to improve blood compatibility. Flow rates of over 7 L/min against 100 mm Hg pressure at 2,500 rpm with 9 W total power consumption have been measured. A newly designed mechanical seal with a recirculating purge system (Cool-Seal) is used for the shaft seal. In this seal system, the seal temperature is kept under 40 degrees C to prevent heat denaturation of blood proteins. Purge fluid also cools the pump motor coil and journal bearing. Purge fluid is continuously purified and sterilized by an ultrafiltration unit which is incorporated in the paracorporeal drive console. In vitro experiments with bovine blood demonstrated an acceptably low hemolysis rate (normalized index of hemolysis = 0.005 +/- 0.002 g/100 L). In vivo experiments are currently ongoing using calves. Via left thoracotomy, left ventricular (LV) apex descending aorta bypass was performed utilizing an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) vascular graft with the pump placed in the left thoracic cavity. In 2 in vivo experiments, the pump flow rate was maintained at 5-9 L/min, and pump power consumption remained stable at 9-10 W. All plasma free Hb levels were measured at less than 15 mg/dl. The seal system has demonstrated good seal capability with negligible purge fluid consumption (<0.5 ml/day). In both calves, the pumps demonstrated trouble free continuous function over 6 month (200 days and 222 days).

  17. Optimized processing of growth factor mobilized peripheral blood CD34+ products by counterflow centrifugal elutriation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Chy-Anh; Torres-Coronado, Monica; Gardner, Agnes; Gu, Angel; Vu, Hieu; Rao, Anitha; Cao, Lan-Feng; Ahmed, Amira; Digiusto, David

    2012-05-01

    Cell separation by counterflow centrifugal elutriation has been described for the preparation of monocytes for vaccine applications, but its use in other current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) operations has been limited. In this study, growth factor-mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cell products were collected from healthy donors and processed by elutriation using a commercial cell washing device. Fractions were collected for each product as per the manufacturer's instructions or using a modified protocol developed in our laboratory. Each fraction was analyzed for cell count, viability, and blood cell differential. Our data demonstrate that, using standard elutriation procedures, >99% of red blood cells and platelets were removed from apheresis products with high recoveries of total white blood cells and enrichment of CD34+ cells in two of five fractions. With modification of the basic protocol, we were able to collect all of the CD34+ cells in a single fraction. The CD34-enriched fractions were formulated, labeled with a ferromagnetic antibody to CD34, washed using the Elutra device, and transferred directly to a magnetic bead selection device for further purification. CD34+ cell purities from the column were extremely high (98.7 ± 0.9%), and yields were typical for the device (55.7 ± 12.3%). The processes were highly automated and closed from receipt of the apheresis product through formulation of target-enriched cell fractions. Thus, elutriation is a feasible method for the initial manipulations associated with primary blood cell therapy products and supports cGMP and current good tissue practice-compliant cell processing.

  18. Impact of age and diagnosis on viability during centrifugation and cryopreservation of peripheral blood stem cell products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civriz Bozdag, S; Bay, M; Ayyıldız, E; Topcuoglu, P; Ilhan, O

    2012-08-01

    The viability of the hematopoietic stem cells infused to the patient is important for transplant outcome. We evaluated 31 peripheral blood stem cell product collected from 15 patients. We aimed to check the viabilities of the cells from patients with different age and diagnosis, in different stages of the cryopreservation procedure. We showed a markedly decreased viability rate after centrifugation and addition of DMSO. Percentages of viabilities were similar between young and old patients in each step. Type of hematological malignancy did not make a significant influence on the viability. High speed centrifugation has a negative impact on the viability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Shear Evaluation by Quantitative Flow Visualization Near the Casing Surface of a Centrifugal Blood Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Yuki; Ito, Kazuyuki; Konishi, Yoshiaki; Masuzawa, Toru; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Endo, Seiko; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    To clarify the correlation between high-shear flow and hemolysis in blood pumps, detail shear velocity distribution was quantified by an experimental method with a model centrifugal blood pump that has a series data of hemolysis tests and computational fluid dynamic analyses. Particular attention was paid to the shear velocity near the casing surface in the volute where the high shear causes in circumferentially wide region that is considerable to cause high hemolysis. Three pump models were compared concern with the radial gap width between the impeller and casing (the radial volute width) also with the outlet position whereas the impeller geometry was identical. These casing geometries were as follows: model 1-the gap width is standard 3mm and the outlet locates to make a smooth geometrical connection with the volute, model 2-the gap width is small 0.5mm and the outlet locates to make the smooth geometrical connection with the volute, and model 3-the gap width is small 0.5mm and the outlet locates to hardly make the smooth geometrical connection with the volute but be similar radial position with that of model 1. Velocity was quantified with a particle tracking velocimetry that is one of the quantitative flow visualization techniques, and the shear velocity was calculated. Results showed that all large shear velocity existed within the layers of about 0.1mm from the casing surface and that those layers were hardly affected by a vane passage even if the gap width is 0.5mm. They also showed that the maximum shear velocity appeared on the casing surface, and the shear velocities of models 2 and 3 were almost twice as large as that of model 1. This finding is in full corresponding with the results of hemolysis tests which showed that the hemolysis levels of both models 2 and 3 were 1.5 times higher than that of model 1. These results suggest that detailed high-shear evaluation near the casing surface in the volute is one of the most important keys in estimating the

  20. Comparison of the lysis centrifugation method with the conventional blood culture method in cases of sepsis in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Harshal R; De, Anuradha S; Baveja, Sujata M

    2012-07-01

    Physicians and microbiologists have long recognized that the presence of living microorganisms in the blood of a patient carries with it considerable morbidity and mortality. Hence, blood cultures have become critically important and frequently performed test in clinical microbiology laboratories for diagnosis of sepsis. To compare the conventional blood culture method with the lysis centrifugation method in cases of sepsis. Two hundred nonduplicate blood cultures from cases of sepsis were analyzed using two blood culture methods concurrently for recovery of bacteria from patients diagnosed clinically with sepsis - the conventional blood culture method using trypticase soy broth and the lysis centrifugation method using saponin by centrifuging at 3000 g for 30 minutes. Overall bacteria recovered from 200 blood cultures were 17.5%. The conventional blood culture method had a higher yield of organisms, especially Gram positive cocci. The lysis centrifugation method was comparable with the former method with respect to Gram negative bacilli. The sensitivity of lysis centrifugation method in comparison to conventional blood culture method was 49.75% in this study, specificity was 98.21% and diagnostic accuracy was 89.5%. In almost every instance, the time required for detection of the growth was earlier by lysis centrifugation method, which was statistically significant. Contamination by lysis centrifugation was minimal, while that by conventional method was high. Time to growth by the lysis centrifugation method was highly significant (P value 0.000) as compared to time to growth by the conventional blood culture method. For the diagnosis of sepsis, combination of the lysis centrifugation method and the conventional blood culture method with trypticase soy broth or biphasic media is advocable, in order to achieve faster recovery and a better yield of microorganisms.

  1. Development of a Compact Maglev Centrifugal Blood Pump Enclosed in a Titanium Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Chi Nan; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Asama, Junichi; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    A compact centrifugal blood pump consisting of a controlled two-degrees-of-freedom radial magnetic bearing and a brushless DC motor enclosed in a titanium housing has been developed for use as an implantable ventricular assist device. The magnetic bearing also supports axial and angular motions of the impeller via a magnetic coupling. The top housing is made of pure titanium, while the impeller and the stator are coated with pure titanium and Ti-6Al-7Nb, respectively, to improve the biocompatibility of the pump. The combination of pure titanium and titanium alloy was chosen because of the sensitivity of eddy current type displacement sensors through the intervening conducting wall. The dimensions of the pump are 69.0 mm in diameter and 28.5 mm in height. During a pump performance test, axial shifting of the impeller due to hydraulic forces led to variations in the rotational positioning signal, causing loss of control of the rotational speed. This problem was solved by conditioning the rotational positioning signal. With a flow rate of 5 l/min against a head pressure of 100 mmHg, the power consumption and efficiency of the pump were 5.5 W and 20%, respectively. Furthermore, the hemolysis of the blood pump was 43.6% lower when compared to that of a commercially available pump.

  2. Impact of Ficoll density gradient centrifugation on major and trace element concentrations in erythrocytes and blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Ahmed, Sultan; Harari, Florencia; Vahter, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Ficoll density gradient centrifugation is widely used to separate cellular components of human blood. We evaluated the suitability to use erythrocytes and blood plasma obtained from Ficoll centrifugation for assessment of elemental concentrations. We determined 22 elements (from Li to U) in erythrocytes and blood plasma separated by direct or Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Compared with erythrocytes and blood plasma separated by direct centrifugation, those separated by Ficoll had highly elevated iodine and Ba concentration, due to the contamination from the Ficoll-Paque medium, and about twice as high concentrations of Sr and Mo in erythrocytes. On the other hand, the concentrations of Ca in erythrocytes and plasma were markedly reduced by the Ficoll separation, to some extent also Li, Co, Cu, and U. The reduced concentrations were probably due to EDTA, a chelator present in the Ficoll medium. Arsenic concentrations seemed to be lowered by Ficoll, probably in a species-specific manner. The concentrations of Mg, P, S, K, Fe, Zn, Se, Rb, and Cs were not affected in the erythrocytes, but decreased in plasma. Concentrations of Mn, Cd, and Pb were not affected in erythrocytes, but in plasma affected by EDTA and/or pre-analytical contamination. Ficoll separation changed the concentrations of Li, Ca, Co, Cu, As, Mo, I, Ba, and U in erythrocytes and blood plasma, Sr in erythrocytes, and Mg, P, S, K, Fe, Zn, Se, Rb and Cs in blood plasma, to an extent that will invalidate evaluation of deficiencies or excess intakes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Removal of cellular-type hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (hemoglobin-vesicles) from blood using centrifugation and ultrafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiromi; Sou, Keitaro; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Tsuchida, Eishun; Kobayashi, Koichi

    2012-02-01

    The hemoglobin-vesicle (HbV) is an artificial oxygen carrier encapsulating a concentrated hemoglobin solution in a phospholipid vesicle (liposome). During or after transporting oxygen, macrophages capture HbVs in the reticuloendothelial system (RES) with an approximate circulation half-life of 3 days. Animal studies show transient splenohepatomegaly after large doses, but HbVs were completely degraded, and the components were excreted in a few weeks. If a blood substitute is used for emergency use until red blood cell transfusion becomes available or for temporary use such as a priming fluid for an extracorporeal circuit, then one option would be to remove HbVs from the circulating blood without waiting a few weeks for removal by the RES. Using a mixture of beagle dog whole blood and HbV, we tested the separation of HbV using a centrifugal Fresenius cell separator and an ultrafiltration system. The cell separator system separated the layers of blood cell components from the HbV-containing plasma layer by centrifugal force, and then the HbV was removed from plasma phase by the ultrafiltration system. The HbVs (250-280 nm) are larger than plasma proteins (blood cell components (> 3 µm). The size of HbVs is advantageous to be separated from the original blood components, and the separated blood components can be returned to circulation. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Shaft/shaft-seal interface characteristics of a multiple disk centrifugal blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, K B; Miller, G E

    1999-06-01

    A multiple disk centrifugal pump (MDCP) is under investigation as a potential left ventricular assist device. As is the case with most shaft driven pumps, leakage problems around the shaft/shaft seal interface are of major interest. If leakage were to occur during or after implantation, potential events such as blood loss, clotting, blood damage, and/or infections might result in adverse effects for the patient. Because these effects could be quite disastrous, potential shaft and shaft seal materials have been investigated to determine the most appropriate course to limit these effects. Teflon and nylon shaft seals were analyzed as potential candidates along with a stainless steel shaft and a Melonite coated shaft. The materials and shafts were evaluated under various time durations (15, 30, 45, and 60 min), motor speeds (800, 1,000, 1,200, and 1,400 rpm), and outer diameters (1/2 and 3/4 inches). The motor speed and geometrical configurations were typical for the MDCP under normal physiologic conditions. An air and water study was conducted to analyze the inner diameter wear, the inner temperature values, and the outer temperature values. Statistical comparisons were computed for the shaft seal materials, the shafts, and the outer diameters along with the inner and outer temperatures. The conclusions made from the results indicate that both the tested shaft seal materials and shaft materials are not ideal candidates to be used for the MDCP. Teflon experienced a significant amount of wear in air and water studies. Nylon did experience little wear, but heat generation was an evident problem. A water study on nylon was not conducted because of its molecular structure.

  5. The effect of centrifugation at various g force levels on rheological properties of rat, dog, pig and human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ferenc; Toth, Eniko; Miszti-Blasius, Kornel; Nemeth, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory investigations often require centrifugation of blood samples for various erythrocyte tests. Although there is a lack of data about the effect of centrifugation at various g force levels on erythrocyte rheological properties. We aimed to investigate the effect of a 10-minute centrifugation at 500, 1000 or 1500 g at 15°C of rat, dog, pig and human venous (K3-EDTA, 1.5 mg/ml) blood samples. Hematological parameters, erythrocyte deformability, cell membrane stability, osmotic gradient ektacytometry (osmoscan) and erythrocyte aggregation were determined. Hematological and erythrocyte deformability parameters showed interspecies differences, centrifugation caused no significant alterations. Cell membrane stability for human erythrocytes centrifuged at higher g level showed less decrease in deformability. Osmoscan O min parameter showed slight elevation in dog centrifuged aliquots. Erythrocyte aggregation parameters changed unexpectedly. Rat and dog erythrocyte aggregation indices significantly dropped in centrifuged aliquots. Pig erythrocyte aggregation indices increased significantly after centrifugation. Human erythrocyte aggregation was the most stable one among the investigated species. The used centrifugation protocols caused the largest alterations in erythrocyte aggregation in a controversial way among the investigated species. On the other hand, erythrocyte deformability parameters were stable, cell membrane stability and osmoscan data show minor shifts.

  6. Assessment of centrifugation using for accelerated immunological microarray analysis for blood cells investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Shishkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase of incubation microarray with cell suspension is prolonged when cells are investigated. It takes from 20 to 60 min if cell sedimentation on the surface of microarray is the result of gravity . Decrease of this stage duration is possible due to centrifugation. In th is article influence of centrifugation on results of analysis is considered. Changes of morphological description of cells are estimated when they a re precipitatedwith different acceleration. Also availability of centrifugation using when it is necessary to obtain the high density of cell binding in test regions of microarray if cells concentration in sample is small is demonstrated.

  7. Magnetic levitation

    OpenAIRE

    Štěpánek,B.; Paleček,M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with magnetism and its influence on superconducting materials. We describe the discovery and development of superconductivity, superconducting levitation and its use in future technology - called. MAGLEV speed trains. We show the interaction of the magnetic field of a strong neodymium magnet and high-temperature superconductor, cooled with liquid nitrogen at about -200 ° C. Of superconductors at this temperature becomes perfect diamagnetic material. That is ejected from the ma...

  8. Biochemical assessment of growth factors and circulation of blood components contained in the different fractions obtained by centrifugation of venous blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corigiano, M; Ciobanu, G; Baldoni, E; Pompa, G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a biochemical marker with different elements of a normal blood serum and centrifuged blood serum after a different rotation system. For this technique, we used five fractions of a blood Concentrated Growth Factors system (bCGF) and a particular device for the different rotation program. Blood samples were collected from 10 volunteers aged between 35 and 55 in the Operative Unit of the “Sapienza” University of Rome with only a fraction of different biochemical elements. Through an individual blood phase separator tube of venous blood, active factions of serum and 4 fractions of red buffy coat were taken. The biochemical markers with 14 elements were examined at times: P1-11 minutes, P2-12minutes, P3-15 minutes. Exclusively biological materials which are normally applied in the regeneration techniques for different defects and lesions were used with this technique. After specific rotation programs, a different result was obtained for each cycle: P1, P2, P3. In test tubes obtained by separated blood, we observed a higher concentration of proteins, ions, and other antigens compared to normal blood plasma. Examining the biochemical results of different elements, we observed an increase (P≤0,01). Since each person’s DNA is different, we could not have the same results in 5 fractions of blood concentration, we did, however, find a good increase in only a fraction of proteins, immunoglobulin and different ions. We obtained five fractions after centrifugation, and we had an increase in different biochemical elements compared to normal blood (P≤0,01) which is significant at different times. These biochemical elements were stimulated by different growth factors, which are used by the immune system, and they induced the formation of hard and soft tissues and good regeneration.

  9. [A comparative study of blood culture conventional method vs. a modified lysis/centrifugation technique for the diagnosis of fungemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Axel Rodolfo; Hernández, Betsy; Rodríguez, Marina; Romero, Hilda

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the efficacy of blood culture conventional method vs. a modified lysis/centrifugation technique. Out of 450 blood specimens received in one year, 100 where chosen for this comparative study: 60 from patients with AIDS, 15 from leukemic patients, ten from febrile neutropenic patients, five from patients with respiratory infections, five from diabetics and five from septicemic patients. The specimens were processed, simultaneously, according to the above mentioned methodologies with daily inspections searching for fungal growth in order to obtain the final identification of the causative agent. The number (40) of isolates recovered was the same using both methods, which included; 18 Candida albicans (45%), ten Candida spp. (25%), ten Histoplasma capsulatum (25%), and two Cryptococcus neoformans (5%). When the fungal growth time was compared by both methods, growth was more rapid when using the modified lysis/centrifugation technique than when using the conventional method. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference (pcentrifugation technique showed to be more efficacious than the conventional one, and therefore the implementation of this methodology is highly recommended for the isolation of fungi from blood.

  10. Evaluation of the impact of density gradient centrifugation on fetal cell loss during enrichment from maternal peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emad, Ahmed; Drouin, Régen

    2014-09-01

    Physical separation by density gradient centrifugation (DGC) is usually used as an initial step of multistep enrichment protocols for purification of fetal cells (FCs) from maternal blood. Many protocols were designed but no single approach was efficient enough to provide noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Procedures and methods were difficult to compare because of the nonuniformity of protocols among different groups. Recovery of FCs is jeopardized by their loss during the process of enrichment. Any loss of FCs must be minimized because of the multiplicative effect of each step of the enrichment process. The main objective of this study was to evaluate FC loss caused by DGC. Fetal cells were quantified in peripheral blood samples obtained from both euploid and aneuploid pregnancies before and after enrichment by buoyant DGC using Histopaque 1.119 g/mL. Density gradient centrifugation results in major loss of 60% to 80% of rare FCs, which may further complicate subsequent enrichment procedures. Eliminating aggressive manipulations can significantly minimize FC loss. Data obtained raise questions about the appropriateness of the DGC step for the enrichment of rare FCs and argues for the use of the alternative nonaggressive version of the procedure presented here or prioritizing other methods of enrichments. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Detection of fungal DNA in lysis-centrifugation blood culture for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis in neonatal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, L; Betta, P; Romeo, M G; Oliveri, S

    2012-03-01

    We report data concerning the detection of fungal DNA directly from lysis-centrifugation blood culture to assess its value in the detection of fungaemia in 86 of the 347 patients admitted to the neonatal intensive-care unit between January 2009 and December 2010. The sensitivity and specificity of the PCR were 87.5% and 98.5%, respectively, with a positive predictive value of 93.3% and a negative predictive value of 97.1%. Detection of fungal DNA directly from blood culture Isolator 1.5 microbial tubes, without prior cultivation, is a promising approach for the rapid detection of Candida spp. in neonates with suspected candidaemia. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  12. Blood glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, 3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate measurements in man using a centrifugal analyser with a fluorimetric attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J; Hodson, A W; Skillen, A W; Stappenbeck, R; Agius, L; Alberti, K G

    1988-03-01

    Methods are described for the analysis of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glycerol, 3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate in perchloric acid extracts of human blood, using the Cobas Bio centrifugal analyser fitted with a fluorimetric attachment. Intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation ranged from 1.9 to 7.9% and from 1.0 to 7.2% respectively. Correlation coefficients ranged from 0.96 to 0.99 against established continuous-flow and manual spectrophotometric methods. All seven metabolites can be measured using a single perchloric acid extract of 20 microliter of blood. The versatility of the assays is such that as little as 100 pmol pyruvate, 3-hydroxybutyrate or as much as 15 nmol glucose can be measured in the same 20 microliter extract.

  13. Centrifugal Separation Device Based on Two-Layer Laminar Flow in Microchannels for High-Throughput and Continuous Blood Cell/Plasma Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taizo Kobayashi,; Taisuke Funamoto,; Makoto Hosaka,; Satoshi Konishi,

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a novel type of centrifugation device that is based on the two-layer laminar flow in micro flow channels for continuous blood cell/plasma separation. We propose to rotate the flow channels which are arranged along the circumference around the rotational axis. Downsizing the channel width reduced both the cell sedimentation time and the required centrifugal force, because the channel width corresponds to the centrifugal sedimentation length. First, plasma and cells were continuously extracted from pig blood in each of the branch channels using a milled acrylic prototype device (channel width = 800 μm, volume = 150 μl). Next, the relationship between the channel width (125, 250, and 500 μm) and the sedimentation time taken for various centrifugal forces (2.3, 9, 36, and 145 G) was evaluated using the downsized microchannels fabricated by hot-embossing and thermal bonding technologies. Using downsized microchannels with a width of 125 μm successfully reduced the sedimentation time to 85 s as compared to the sedimentation time of 270 s for a channel of a width of 500 μm, when a centrifugal force of 2.3 G was applied. The use of the proposed device did not result in obvious hemolysis at the centrifugal forces lower than 335 G.

  14. Comparison of the Lysis Centrifugation Method with the Conventional Blood Culture Method in Cases of Sepsis in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Parikh, Harshal R; De, Anuradha S; Baveja, Sujata M

    2012-01-01

    Introduction : Physicians and microbiologists have long recognized that the presence of living microorganisms in the blood of a patient carries with it considerable morbidity and mortality. Hence, blood cultures have become critically important and frequently performed test in clinical microbiology laboratories for diagnosis of sepsis. Objectives: To compare the conventional blood culture method with the lysis centrifugation method in cases of sepsis. Materials and Methods: Two hundred ...

  15. CENTRIFUGE APPARATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.; Urey, H.C.; Cohen, K.

    1960-08-01

    A high-speed centrifuge for the separation of gaseous isotopes is designed comprising a centrifugal pump mounted on the outlet of a centrifuge bowl and arranged to pump the heavy and light fractions out of the centrifuge bowl in two separate streams.

  16. Residual blood processing by centrifugation, cell salvage or ultrafiltration in cardiac surgery: effects on clinical hemostatic and ex-vivo rheological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Alexander B; Muntajit, Warayouth; Bhagirath, Pranav; van Barneveld, Laurentius J; Romijn, Johannes W; de Vroege, Roel; Boer, Christa

    2012-10-01

    The study compared the effects of three blood concentration techniques after cardiopulmonary bypass on clinical hemostatic and ex-vivo rheological parameters. Residual blood of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery was processed by centrifugation, cell salvage or ultrafiltration, and retransfused (n = 17 per group). Study parameters included blood loss, (free) hemoglobin, hematocrit, fibrinogen and erythrocyte aggregation, deformability and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate content. Patient characteristics were similar between groups. Ultrafiltration was associated with the highest weight of the transfusion bag [649 ± 261 vs. 320 ± 134 g (centrifugation) and 391 ± 158 g (cell salvage); P levels in the transfusion bag. Retransfusion of cell saver blood induced the largest gain in postoperative patient hemoglobin levels when compared to centrifugation and ultrafiltration, and was associated with the largest increase in 2,3-diphosphoglycerate when compared to ultrafiltration (Δ2,3-diphosphoglycerate 1.34 ± 1.92 vs. -0.77 ± 1.56 mmol/l; P = 0.03). Cell salvage is superior with respect to postoperative hemoglobin gain and washout of free hemoglobin when compared to centrifugation or ultrafiltration.

  17. Influence of centrifugation conditions on the results of 77 routine clinical chemistry analytes using standard vacuum blood collection tubes and the new BD-Barricor tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadamuro, Janne; Mrazek, Cornelia; Leichtle, Alexander B; Kipman, Ulrike; Felder, Thomas K; Wiedemann, Helmut; Oberkofler, Hannes; Fiedler, Georg M; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth

    2018-02-15

    Although centrifugation is performed in almost every blood sample, recommendations on duration and g-force are heterogeneous and mostly based on expert opinions. In order to unify this step in a fully automated laboratory, we aimed to evaluate different centrifugation settings and their influence on the results of routine clinical chemistry analytes. We collected blood from 41 healthy volunteers into BD Vacutainer PST II-heparin-gel- (LiHepGel), BD Vacutainer SST II-serum-, and BD Vacutainer Barricor heparin-tubes with a mechanical separator (LiHepBar). Tubes were centrifuged at 2000xg for 10 minutes and 3000xg for 7 and 5 minutes, respectively. Subsequently 60 and 21 clinical chemistry analytes were measured in plasma and serum samples, respectively, using a Roche COBAS instrument. High sensitive Troponin T, pregnancy-associated plasma protein A, ß human chorionic gonadotropin and rheumatoid factor had to be excluded from statistical evaluation as many of the respective results were below the measuring range. Except of free haemoglobin (fHb) measurements, no analyte result was altered by the use of shorter centrifugation times at higher g-forces. Comparing LiHepBar to LiHepGel tubes at different centrifugation setting, we found higher lactate-dehydrogenase (LD) (P = 0.003 to centrifuged at higher speed (3000xg) for a shorter amount of time (5 minutes) without alteration of the analytes tested in this study. When using LiHepBar tubes for blood collection, a separate LD reference value might be needed.

  18. Comparison of PCR-Based Diagnosis with Centrifuged-Based Enrichment Method for Detection of Borrelia persica in Animal Blood Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, S R; Kishdehi, M; Siavashi, Mr

    2011-01-01

    The mainstay of diagnosis of relapsing fever (RF) is demonstration of the spirochetes in Giemsa-stained thick blood smears, but during non fever periods the bacteria are very scanty and rarely detected in blood smears by microscopy. This study is aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of different methods developed for detection of low-grade spirochetemia. Animal blood samples with low degrees of spirochetemia were tested with two PCRs and a nested PCR targeting flaB, GlpQ, and rrs genes. Also, a centrifuged-based enrichment method and Giemsa staining were performed on blood samples with various degrees of spirochetemia. The flaB-PCR and nested rrs-PCR turned positive with various degrees of spirochetemia including the blood samples that turned negative with dark-field microscopy. The GlpQ-PCR was positive as far as at least one spirochete was seen in 5-10 microscopic fields. The sensitivity of GlpQ-PCR increased when DNA from Buffy Coat Layer (BCL) was used as template. The centrifuged-based enrichment method turned positive with as low concentration as 50 bacteria/ml blood, while Giemsa thick staining detected bacteria with concentrations ≥ 25000 bacteria/ml. Centrifuged-based enrichment method appeared as much as 500-fold more sensitive than thick smears, which makes it even superior to some PCR assays. Due to simplicity and minimal laboratory requirements, this method can be considered a valuable tool for diagnosis of RF in rural health centers.

  19. A Novel Centrifugation Method Using a Cell Salvage Device Offers an Alternative to the Use of Leukocyte-Depleting Filters for Autologous Blood Transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchilon, Michael; Gaspar, Cristina; Mexas, Angela; Nieter, Don

    2016-12-01

    Autotransfusion protocols often use the use of costly filters, such as leukocyte-depleting filters (LDFs), to minimize reinfusion of activated leukocytes and inflammatory mediators associated with reperfusion injury (RI). LDFs are used extensively in hospital settings; however, they represent an additional capital expenditure for hospitals, as well as a constraint on the reinfusion rate of blood products for health-care providers. We compared a commonly used LDF to a novel centrifugation method employing a widely used cell salvage device. Complete blood counts and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) measuring tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) were performed to compare the efficacy of these methodologies. The LDF removed, on average, 94% of all leukocytes, including 96% of neutrophils. The centrifugation method removed, on average, 89% of all leukocytes, including 91% of neutrophils and resulted in a highly concentrated red blood cell product. Our results suggest both methods offer equivalent leukocyte reduction. TNF-α was also comparably reduced following our novel centrifugation method and the LDF method and IL-2 levels were undetectable in all samples. These results indicate our novel centrifugation method may preclude the need for a LDF during select autotransfusion applications.

  20. Reproducibility of Serum Potassium Values in Serum From Blood Samples Stored for Increasing Times Prior to Centrifugation and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Aaron; Lu, Chuanyong; Sun, Yi; Garcia, Rafael; Rets, Anton; Alexis, Herol; Saad, Heba; Eid, Ikram; Harris, Loretta; Marshall, Barbara; Tafani, Edlira; Pincus, Matthew R

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this work was to determine if immediate versus postponed centrifugation of samples affects the levels of serum potassium. Twenty participants donated normal venous blood that was collected in four serum separator tubes per donor, each of which was analyzed at 0, 1, 2, or 4 hr on the Siemens Advia 1800 autoanalyzer. Coefficients of variation (CVs) for potassium levels ranged from 0% to 7.6% with a mean of 3 ± 2%. ANOVA testing of the means for all 20 samples showed a P-value of 0.72 (>0.05) indicating that there was no statistically significant difference between the means of the samples at the four time points. Sixteen samples were found to have CVs that were ≤5%. Two samples showed increases of potassium from the reference range to levels higher than the upper reference limit, one of which had a 4-hr value that was within the reference or normal range (3.5-5 mEq/l). Overall, most samples were found to have reproducible levels of serum potassium. Serum potassium levels from stored whole blood collected in serum separator tubes are, for the most part, stable at room temperature for at least 4 hr prior to analysis. However, some samples can exhibit significant fluctuations of values. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Systematic Design of a Magnetically Levitated Brushless DC Motor for a Reversible Rotary Intra-Aortic Blood Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaxin; Logan, Thomas G; Smith, P Alex; Hsu, Po-Lin; Cohn, William E; Xu, Liping; McMahon, Richard A

    2017-10-01

    The IntraVAD is a miniature intra-aortic ventricular assist device (VAD) designed to work in series with the compromised left ventricle. A reverse-rotation control (RRc) mode has been developed to increase myocardial perfusion and reduce ventricular volume. The RRc mode includes forward rotation in systole and reverse rotation in diastole, which requires the IntraVAD to periodically reverse its rotational direction in synchrony with the cardiac cycle. This periodic reversal leads to changes in pressure force over the impeller, which makes the entire system less stable. To eliminate the mechanical wear of a contact bearing and provide active control over the axial position of the rotor, a miniature magnetically levitated bearing (i.e., the PM-Coil module) composed of two concentric permanent magnetic (PM) rings and a pair of coils-one on each side-was proposed to provide passive radial and active axial rotor stabilization. In the early design stage, the numerical finite element method (FEM) was used to optimize the geometry of the brushless DC (BLDC) motor and the maglev module, but constructing a new model each time certain design parameters were adjusted required substantial computation time. Because the design criteria for the module had to be modified to account for the magnetic force produced by the motor and for the hemodynamic changes associated with pump operation, a simplified analytic expression was derived for the expected magnetic forces. Suitable bearings could then be designed capable of overcoming these forces without repeating the complicated FEM simulation for the motor. Using this method at the initial design stage can inform the design of the miniature maglev BLDC motor for the proposed pulsatile axial-flow VAD. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Hemocompatibility of Axial Versus Centrifugal Pump Technology in Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibilsky, David; Lenglinger, Matthias; Avci-Adali, Meltem; Haller, Christoph; Walker, Tobias; Wendel, Hans Peter; Schlensak, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The hemocompatible properties of rotary blood pumps commonly used in mechanical circulatory support (MCS) are widely unknown regarding specific biocompatibility profiles of different pump technologies. Therefore, we analyzed the hemocompatibility indicating markers of an axial flow and a magnetically levitated centrifugal device within an in vitro mock loop. The HeartMate II (HM II; n = 3) device and a CentriMag (CM; n = 3) adult pump were investigated in a human whole blood mock loop for 360 min using the MCS devices as a driving component. Blood samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for markers of coagulation, complement system, and inflammatory response. There was a time-dependent activation of the coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin complexes [TAT]), complement (SC5b-9), and inflammation system (polymorphonuclear [PMN] elastase) in both groups. The mean value of TAT (CM: 4.0 μg/L vs. 29.4 μg/L, P technologies and a magnetically levitated centrifugal pump design might be superior. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  3. Plasma centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehata, Takashi; Mase, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    The plasma centrifuge is one of statistical isotope separation processes which uses the centrifugal force of a J x B driven rotating plasma in a magnetic field to give rise to the mass-dependent radial transport of isotopic ions. The system has been developed as an alternative to the gas centrifuge because a much higher rotational velocity and separation factor have been achieved. In this review, the physical aspects of the plasma centrifuge followed by the recent experimental achievements are described, especially in comparison with the gas centrifuge. (author)

  4. A Centrifugal Microfluidic Platform That Separates Whole Blood Samples into Multiple Removable Fractions Due to Several Discrete but Continuous Density Gradient Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Scott T.; Hatcher, Christopher L.; Singh, Anup K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a miniaturized centrifugal platform that uses density centrifugation for separation and analysis of biological components in small volume samples (~5 μL). We demonstrate the ability to enrich leukocytes for on-disk visualization via microscopy, as well as recovery of viable cells from each of the gradient partitions. In addition, we simplified the traditional Modified Wright-Giemsa staining by decreasing the time, volume, and expertise involved in the procedure. From a whole blood sample, we were able to extract 95.15% of leukocytes while excluding 99.8% of red blood cells. This platform has great potential in both medical diagnostics and research applications as it offers a simpler, automated, and inexpensive method for biological sample separation, analysis, and downstream culturing. PMID:27054764

  5. Optimized methods to measure acetoacetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, glycerol, alanine, pyruvate, lactate and glucose in human blood using a centrifugal analyser with a fluorimetric attachment

    OpenAIRE

    Stappenbeck, R.; Hodson, A. W.; Skillen, A. W.; Agius, L.; Alberti, K. G. M. M.

    1990-01-01

    Optimized methods are described for the analysis of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glycerol, D-3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate in perchloric acid extracts of human blood using the Cobas Bio centrifugal analyser. Glucose and lactate are measured using the photometric mode and other metabolites using the fluorimetric mode. The intra-assay coefficients of variation ranged from 0.7 to 4.1%, except with very low levels of pyruvate and acetoacetate where the coefficients of variation were ...

  6. Geometric Optimization for Non-Thrombogenicity of a Centrifugal Blood Pump through Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi

    A monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump has been developed in our laboratory. The flow patterns within the pump should be carefully examined in order to prevent thrombogenesis, especially around the pivot bearing. Therefore, the effects of the pump geometry on the local flow were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics together with the experimental flow visualization. The engineering goal was to reduce the area of stagnation around the pivot in order to prevent thrombus formation. As a result, the stagnation area and the flow rate through the washout holes were found to be highly affected by the size and geometry of the washout holes. Secondary flow was revealed to form a jet-like wash against the pivot, thus preventing thrombus formation. The flow rate through the washout holes was estimated to be up to one fifth of the pump flow rate, depending on the cross-sectional areas of the washout holes. Furthermore, an anti-thrombogenic effect was attained by removing a small gap between the male and female pivots.

  7. Comparison of PCR-Based Diagnosis with Centrifuged-Based Enrichment Method for Detection of Borrelia Persica in Animal Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR Naddaf

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mainstay of diagnosis of relapsing fever (RF is demonstration of the spirochetes in Giemsa-stained thick blood smears, but during non fever periods the bacteria are very scanty and rarely detected in blood smears by mi­cros­copy. This study is aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of different methods developed for detection of low-grade spi­ro­chetemia. Methods: Animal blood samples with low degrees of spirochetemia were tested with two PCRs and a nested PCR tar­get­ing flaB, GlpQ, and rrs genes. Also, a centrifuged-based enrichment method and Giemsa staining were per­formed on blood samples with various degrees of spirochetemia. Results: The flaB-PCR and nested rrs-PCR turned positive with various degrees of spirochetemia including the blood samples that turned negative with dark-field microscopy. The GlpQ-PCR was positive as far as at least one spi­ro­chete was seen in 5-10 microscopic fields. The sensitivity of GlpQ-PCR increased when DNA from Buffy Coat Layer (BCL was used as template. The centrifuged-based enrichment method turned positive with as low concentra­tion as 50 bacteria/ml blood, while Giemsa thick staining detected bacteria with concentrations ≥ 25000 bacteria/ml. Conclusion: Centrifuged-based enrichment method appeared as much as 500-fold more sensitive than thick smears, which makes it even superior to some PCR assays. Due to simplicity and minimal laboratory requirements, this method can be considered a valuable tool for diagnosis of RF in rural health centers.

  8. Comparison of PCR-Based Diagnosis with Centrifuged-Based Enrichment Method for Detection of Borrelia persica in Animal Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR Naddaf

    2011-06-01

    Background: The mainstay of diagnosis of relapsing fever (RF is demonstration of the spirochetes in Giemsa-stained thick blood smears, but during non fever periods the bacteria are very scanty and rarely detected in blood smears by mi­cros­copy. This study is aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of different methods developed for detection of low-grade spi­ro­chetemia. Methods: Animal blood samples with low degrees of spirochetemia were tested with two PCRs and a nested PCR tar­get­ing flaB, GlpQ, and rrs genes. Also, a centrifuged-based enrichment method and Giemsa staining were per­formed on blood samples with various degrees of spirochetemia. Results: The flaB-PCR and nested rrs-PCR turned positive with various degrees of spirochetemia including the blood samples that turned negative with dark-field microscopy. The GlpQ-PCR was positive as far as at least one spi­ro­chete was seen in 5-10 microscopic fields. The sensitivity of GlpQ-PCR increased when DNA from Buffy Coat Layer (BCL was used as template. The centrifuged-based enrichment method turned positive with as low concentra­tion as 50 bacteria/ml blood, while Giemsa thick staining detected bacteria with concentrations ≥ 25000 bacteria/ml.  Conclusion: Centrifuged-based enrichment method appeared as much as 500-fold more sensitive than thick smears, which makes it even superior to some PCR assays. Due to simplicity and minimal laboratory requirements, this method can be considered a valuable tool for diagnosis of RF in rural health centers.  

  9. Development of real-time and quantitative monitoring of thrombus formation in an extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakota, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu

    2018-02-01

    We developed an optical detector of thrombus formed on the pivot bearing of an extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump (MERA HCF-MP23; Senko Medical Instrument Mfg. Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) which is frequently used for long-term extracorporeal circulation support to bridge to an implantable artificial heart, which in turn is used for bridge to heart transplantation in Japan. In this study, we investigated the quantitative performance of the thrombus formation in acute animal experiments. A total of three experiments of extracorporeal left ventricular assist using Japanese specific pathogen-free pigs were conducted. The optical fibers were set in the pump driver unit. The incident light at nearinfrared wavelength aiming at the pivot bearing and the resulting scattered light were guided to respective fibers. The detected signal was analyzed to obtain thrombus formation level (TFL) calculated by a specially developed software. When the increase in TFL was confirmed, the pump was exchanged and the extracorporeal circulation was restarted. The number of pump exchanges were four times at each experiment so a total of twelve pumps were evaluated. 3-dimentional data surrounding the pivot bearing and the adhered thrombus was captured by a 3-dimantional surface measurement system to calculate the thrombus surface area (TSA) formed on the pivot bearing. As a result, the correlation coefficient between TFL and TSA was 0.878. The accuracy of TSA estimated by the optical detector was 3.6+/-2.3 mm2. This was small enough to not have the pump exchanged in clinical judgement. The developed detector would be useful for optimal anti-coagulation management.

  10. Improved acoustic levitation apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, L. H.; Johnson, J. L.; Oran, W. A.; Reiss, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Concave driver and reflector enhance and shape levitation forces in acoustic resonance system. Single-mode standing-wave pattern is focused by ring element situated between driver and reflector. Concave surfaces increase levitating forces up to factor of 6 as opposed to conventional flat surfaces, making it possible to suspend heavier objects.

  11. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  12. Centrifugal pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, HH

    1981-01-01

    Centrifugal Pumps describes the whole range of the centrifugal pump (mixed flow and axial flow pumps are dealt with more briefly), with emphasis on the development of the boiler feed pump. Organized into 46 chapters, this book discusses the general hydrodynamic principles, performance, dimensions, type number, flow, and efficiency of centrifugal pumps. This text also explains the pumps performance; entry conditions and cavitation; speed and dimensions for a given duty; and losses. Some chapters further describe centrifugal pump mechanical design, installation, monitoring, and maintenance. The

  13. Acoustic Levitation With One Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.

    1987-01-01

    Higher resonator modes enables simplification of equipment. Experimental acoustic levitator for high-temperature containerless processing has round cylindrical levitation chamber and only one acoustic transducer. Stable levitation of solid particle or liquid drop achieved by exciting sound in chamber to higher-order resonant mode that makes potential well for levitated particle or drop at some point within chamber.

  14. The Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Blood Cells: An Efficient Protocol Using Serial Plating of Reprogrammed Cells by Centrifugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngkyun Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs have demonstrated great potential for differentiation into diverse tissues. We report a straightforward and highly efficient method for the generation of iPSCs from PBMCs. By plating the cells serially to a newly coated plate by centrifugation, this protocol provides multiple healthy iPSC colonies even from a small number of PBMCs. The generated iPSCs expressed pluripotent markers and differentiated into all three germ layer lineages. The protocol can also be used with umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs. In this study, we present a simple and efficient protocol that improved the yield of iPSCs from floating cells such as PBMCs and CBMCs by serial plating and centrifugation.

  15. Density-Gradient Mediated Band Extraction of Leukocytes from Whole Blood Using Centrifugo-Pneumatic Siphon Valving on Centrifugal Microfluidic Discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Sinéad M.; Kilcawley, Niamh A.; Early, Philip L.; Glynn, Macdara T.; Ducrée, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Here we present retrieval of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by density-gradient medium based centrifugation for subsequent analysis of the leukocytes on an integrated microfluidic “Lab-on-a-Disc” cartridge. Isolation of white blood cells constitutes a critical sample preparation step for many bioassays. Centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are particularly suited for blood processing as they function without need of surface treatment and are ‘low-pass’, i.e., holding at high centrifugation speeds and opening upon reduction of the spin rate. Both ‘hydrostatically’ and ‘hydrodynamically’ triggered centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valving schemes are presented. Firstly, the geometry of the pneumatic chamber of hydrostatically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves is optimised to enable smooth and uniform layering of blood on top of the density-gradient medium; this feature proves to be key for efficient Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction. A theoretical analysis of hydrostatically primed valves is also presented which determines the optimum priming pressure for the individual valves. Next, ‘dual siphon’ configurations for both hydrostatically and hydrodynamically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are introduced; here plasma and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells are extracted through a distinct siphon valve. This work represents a first step towards enabling on disc multi-parameter analysis. Finally, the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells extraction in these structures is characterised using a simplified design. A microfluidic mechanism, which we termed phase switching, is identified which affects the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction. PMID:27167376

  16. Levitation in paramagnetic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunne, P.A. [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity Collge, Dublin 2 (Ireland)]. E-mail: pdunne2@tcd.ie; Hilton, J. [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity Collge, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Coey, J.M.D. [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity Collge, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2007-09-15

    Magnetic levitation of diamagnetic and paramagnetic substances in a paramagnetic liquid is explored. Materials ranging from graphite to tin and copper can be made to float at ambient temperature in concentrated solutions of dysprosium nitrate, when an electromagnet or four-block permanent magnet array is used to produce a gradient field. Simulations illustrate the stable regions for levitation above the permanent magnets; and a novel eight-block configuration is proposed, which allows denser materials such as gold or lead to be levitated.

  17. Levitation in paramagnetic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, P.A.; Hilton, J.; Coey, J.M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic levitation of diamagnetic and paramagnetic substances in a paramagnetic liquid is explored. Materials ranging from graphite to tin and copper can be made to float at ambient temperature in concentrated solutions of dysprosium nitrate, when an electromagnet or four-block permanent magnet array is used to produce a gradient field. Simulations illustrate the stable regions for levitation above the permanent magnets; and a novel eight-block configuration is proposed, which allows denser materials such as gold or lead to be levitated

  18. A centrifuge-less plasma separation method from whole blood anticoagulated with EDTA-2K for the use of clinical laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, N; Tsuda, I; Fukumori, T; Hino, M; Takubo, T; Kondo, H

    2001-12-01

    In the modern medical laboratory system, simple and rapid processing of specimens are required. In the current system with the transportation line, its centrifugation part would disturb smooth flow of the testing because it needs much time for the centrifugation. To solve the problems, a serum separation method was tried for the whole blood specimen using poly-L-lysine, concanavalin A and phyto-hemoagglutinin. Ploy-L-lysine with molecular weight 130,000 to 210,000 in a final concentration of 0.1% could accelerate blood sedimentation, although its supernatant contaminated platelets. Concanavalin and phytohemoagulutinin could accelerate the sedimentation and obtained plasma, but the method could yield enough amount of supernatant by 1 hour standing. As the purpose of this study is to develop a centrifugeless method, a sieve method using a steel mesh and a magnet was applied to the mixture of EDTA blood, red-cell adhesives and thrombin. The method was unique to separate plasma, but the yield was not so high and chemistry data were not fitted with serum data in some of tests. Thus, the trial would be a new technology, but it was judged that some further improvement will be needed technically.

  19. Plasma centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karchevskij, A.I.; Potanin, E.P.

    2000-01-01

    The review of the most important studies on the isotope separation processes in the rotating plasma is presented. The device is described and the characteristics of operation of the pulse plasma centrifuges with weakly and strongly ionized plasma as well as the stationary plasma centrifuges with the medium weak ionization and devices, applying the stationary vacuum arc with the high ionization rate and the stationary beam-plasma discharge with complete ionization, are presented. The possible mechanisms of the isotope separation in plasma centrifuges are considered. The specific energy consumption for isotope separation in these devices is discussed [ru

  20. Acoustic-Levitation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Uncontaminated environments for highly-pure material processing provided within completely sealed levitation chamber that suspends particles by acoustic excitation. Technique ideally suited for material processing in low gravity environment of space.

  1. Acoustic Levitation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammell, P. M.; Wang, T. G.; Croonquist, A.; Lee, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Dense materials, such as steel balls, continuously levitated with energy provided by efficient high-powered siren in combination with shaped reflector. Reflector system, consisting of curved top reflector and flat lower reflector, eliminates instability in spatial positioning of sample.

  2. Electrostatic Levitator Electrode Layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Schematic of Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) electrodes and controls system. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  3. Electrostatic Levitator Layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) general layout with captions. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  4. Hematocrit analysis through the use of an inexpensive centrifugal polyester-toner device with finger-to-chip blood loading capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Brandon L.; Gilbert, Rachel J. [Department of Chemistry, McCormick Road, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Mejia, Maximo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineer' s Way, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Shukla, Nishant [Department of Computer Science, Engineer' s Way, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Haverstick, Doris M. [Department of Pathology, University of Virginia Health Science Center, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); Garner, Gavin T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineer' s Way, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Landers, James P., E-mail: landers@virginia.edu [Department of Chemistry, McCormick Road, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineer' s Way, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Virginia Health Science Center, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Hematocrit (HCT) measurements are important clinical diagnostic variables that help physicians diagnose and treat various medical conditions, ailments, and diseases. In this work, we present the HCT Disc, a centrifugal microdevice fabricated by a Print, Cut and Laminate (PCL) method to generate a 12-sample HCT device from materials costing <0.5 USD (polyester and toner or PeT). Following introduction from a drop of blood (finger stick), whole blood metering and cell sedimentation are controlled by centrifugal force, only requiring a CD player motor as external hardware and, ultimately, a cell phone for detection. The sedimented volume from patient blood in the HCT Disc was analyzed using a conventional scanner/custom algorithm for analysis of the image to determine a hematocrit value, and these were compared to values generated in a clinical laboratory, which correlated well. To enhance portability and assure simplicity of the HCT measurement, values from image analysis by a cell phone using a custom application was compared to the scanner. Fifteen samples were analyzed with cell phone image analysis system and were found to be within 4% of the HCT values determined in the clinical lab. We demonstrate the feasibility of the PeT device for HCT measurement, and highlight its uniquely low cost (<0.5 USD), speed (sample-to-answer <8 min), multiplexability (12 samples), low volume whole blood requirement (<3 μL), rotation speeds (<4000 rpm) needed for effective measurement as well as the direct finger-to-chip sample loading capability. - Highlights: • A 12-sample hematocrit device was developed from polyester-toner materials. • The device can analyze a patient's hematocrit within 8 min from 3 μL of blood. • Cell phone image analysis is used to correctly determine clinical hematocrits.

  5. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fibrinogen concentration of whole blood influences the cellular composition of platelet-rich plasma obtained from centrifugation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Zhengliang; Sheng, Jiagen; Xie, Xuetao; Zhang, Changqing

    2017-09-01

    Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), which reflects the sedimentation rate of platelets, leukocytes and erythrocytes in response to centrifugal force, may influence the cellular composition of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) obtained via centrifugation methods. However, no relevant studies have substantiated this. In the present study, blood was collected from 40 healthy volunteers and used to prepare PRP with two plasma-based preparation systems [YinPRP and Plasma Rich in Growth Factor (PRGF) systems] and two buffy coat-based systems (RegenPRP and WEGOPRP systems) in a single-donor model. Volumes of PRP and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) that were removed in the preparation process were recorded. Analyses of ESR, haematocrit, C-reaction protein, coagulation, serum glucose and serum lipid of the whole blood used for PRP preparation were performed to evaluate the levels of ESR and the factors known to influence it. Whole blood analysis was performed to evaluate the cellular composition of PRP. Results demonstrated that there were marked positive correlations between the ESR of the whole blood used for PRP preparation and PPP removal efficiencies, platelet concentrations, platelet capture efficiencies and platelet enrichment factors of PRP formulations obtained from plasma-based systems, and PRP yield efficiency of RegenPRP and PPP removal efficiency of WEGOPRP. Furthermore, there were marked negative correlations between ESR and concentrations and enrichment factors of platelets, leukocytes and erythrocytes of RegenPRP. Fibrinogen concentration of the whole blood, which had a marked positive correlation with ESR, also influenced the cellular composition of PRP. These findings may increase the understanding of PRP preparation and provide substantial evidence for the individualised optimisation of PRP preparation systems used in clinical practice.

  6. Hematocrit analysis through the use of an inexpensive centrifugal polyester-toner device with finger-to-chip blood loading capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Brandon L.; Gilbert, Rachel J.; Mejia, Maximo; Shukla, Nishant; Haverstick, Doris M.; Garner, Gavin T.; Landers, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Hematocrit (HCT) measurements are important clinical diagnostic variables that help physicians diagnose and treat various medical conditions, ailments, and diseases. In this work, we present the HCT Disc, a centrifugal microdevice fabricated by a Print, Cut and Laminate (PCL) method to generate a 12-sample HCT device from materials costing <0.5 USD (polyester and toner or PeT). Following introduction from a drop of blood (finger stick), whole blood metering and cell sedimentation are controlled by centrifugal force, only requiring a CD player motor as external hardware and, ultimately, a cell phone for detection. The sedimented volume from patient blood in the HCT Disc was analyzed using a conventional scanner/custom algorithm for analysis of the image to determine a hematocrit value, and these were compared to values generated in a clinical laboratory, which correlated well. To enhance portability and assure simplicity of the HCT measurement, values from image analysis by a cell phone using a custom application was compared to the scanner. Fifteen samples were analyzed with cell phone image analysis system and were found to be within 4% of the HCT values determined in the clinical lab. We demonstrate the feasibility of the PeT device for HCT measurement, and highlight its uniquely low cost (<0.5 USD), speed (sample-to-answer <8 min), multiplexability (12 samples), low volume whole blood requirement (<3 μL), rotation speeds (<4000 rpm) needed for effective measurement as well as the direct finger-to-chip sample loading capability. - Highlights: • A 12-sample hematocrit device was developed from polyester-toner materials. • The device can analyze a patient's hematocrit within 8 min from 3 μL of blood. • Cell phone image analysis is used to correctly determine clinical hematocrits.

  7. CFD simulation of centrifugal cells washers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellet, Beth E; Binbing, Han; Dandy, David S; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics to guide the design of better centrifuges for processing shed blood is explored here. The velocity field and the rate of protein removal from the shed blood have been studied. The results indicate that computational fluid dynamics could help screen preliminary centrifuge bowl designs thus reducing the number of initial experimental tests required when developing new centrifuge bowls. Though the focus of this work is on washing shed blood the methods developed here are applicable to the design of centrifuge bowls for other blood processing applications.

  8. Optimized methods to measure acetoacetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, glycerol, alanine, pyruvate, lactate and glucose in human blood using a centrifugal analyser with a fluorimetric attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappenbeck, R; Hodson, A W; Skillen, A W; Agius, L; Alberti, K G

    1990-01-01

    Optimized methods are described for the analysis of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glycerol, D-3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate in perchloric acid extracts of human blood using the Cobas Bio centrifugal analyser. Glucose and lactate are measured using the photometric mode and other metabolites using the fluorimetric mode. The intra-assay coefficients of variation ranged from 0.7 to 4.1%, except with very low levels of pyruvate and acetoacetate where the coefficients of variation were 7.1 and 12% respectively. All seven metabolites can be measured in a perchloric acid extract of 20 mul of blood. The methods have been optimized with regard to variation in the perchloric acid content of the samples. These variations arise from the method of sample preparation used to minimize changes occurring in metabolite concentration after venepuncture.

  9. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  10. Variable-Position Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Method of acoustic levitation supports objects at positions other than acoustic nodes. Acoustic force is varied so it balances gravitational (or other) force, thereby maintaining object at any position within equilibrium range. Levitation method applicable to containerless processing. Such objects as table-tennis balls, hollow plastic spheres, and balsa-wood spheres levitated in laboratory by new method.

  11. A differential centrifugation protocol and validation criterion for enhancing mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) results in microbial identification using blood culture growth bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March-Rosselló, G A; Muñoz-Moreno, M F; García-Loygorri-Jordán de Urriés, M C; Bratos-Pérez, M A

    2013-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) is a widely used tool in clinical microbiology for rapidly identifying microorganisms. This technique can be applied directly on positive blood cultures without the need for its culturing, thereby, reducing the time required for microbiological diagnosis. The present study proposes an innovative identification protocol applied to positive blood culture bottles using MALDI-TOF. We have processed 100 positive blood culture bottles, of which 36 of 37 Gram-negative bacteria (97.3 %) were correctly identified directly with 100 % of Enterobacteriaceae and other Gram-negative rods and 87.5 % of non-fermenting Gram-negative rods. We also correctly identified directly 62 of 63 of Gram-positive bacteria (98.4 %) with 100 % of Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and Gram-positive bacilli and 98 % of Staphylococcus. Applying the differential centrifugation protocol at the moment the automatic blood culture incubation system gives a positive reading together with the proposed validation criterion offers 98 % sensitivity (95 % confidence interval: 95.2-100 %). The MALDI-TOF system, thus, provides a rapid and reliable system for identifying microorganisms from blood culture growth bottles.

  12. Research on levitation coupled with standing wave levitation and electromagnetic levitation:

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, Xiao Yang; Li, Xinbo; Liu, GuoJun; Liu, JianFang; Liu, XiaoLun; Lu, Song

    2013-01-01

    In order to solve the problem caused by metal materials' inability to be cooled without contact with other materials after being heated by electromagnetic levitation, a new method is proposed: using a standing wave levitator to levitate the melted metal. The standing wave levitator adopts a concave spherical surface on the emitter and the reflector. Using ANSYS software, the transducer and the standing wave fields were simulated. Based on the simulation, the distribution and the maximum acous...

  13. MALDI-TOF identification of Gram-negative bacteria directly from blood culture bottles containing charcoal: Sepsityper® kits versus centrifugation-filtration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, Kathleen; Cruz, Kristian; Shemes, Stephen; Szpunar, Susan; Fishbain, Joel T

    2015-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry has dramatically altered the way microbiology laboratories identify clinical isolates. Direct blood culture (BC) detection may be hampered, however, by the presence of charcoal in BC bottles currently in clinical use. This study evaluates an in-house process for extraction and MALDI-TOF identification of Gram-negative bacteria directly from BC bottles containing charcoal. Three hundred BC aliquots were extracted by a centrifugation-filtration method developed in our research laboratory with the first 96 samples processed in parallel using Sepsityper® kits. Controls were colonies from solid media with standard phenotypic and MALDI-TOF identification. The identification of Gram-negative bacteria was successful more often via the in-house method compared to Sepsityper® kits (94.7% versus 78.1%, P≤0.0001). Our in-house centrifugation-filtration method was further validated for isolation and identification of Gram-negative bacteria (95%; n=300) directly from BC bottles containing charcoal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Friction in levitated superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, E.H.

    1988-01-01

    A type I superconductor levitated above a magnet of low symmetry has a unique equilibrium position about which it may oscillate freely. In contrast, a type II superconductor has a continuous range of stable equilibrium positions and orientations where it floats rigidly without swinging or orbiting as if it were stuck in sand. A strong internal friction conspicuously indicates the existence and unpinning of flux lines in oxide superconductors levitated above liquid nitrogen. It is shown how these effects follow from the hysteretic magnetization curves and how the energy is dissipated

  15. Pendair and magnetic levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, D S

    1979-11-01

    World-wide developments in air cushioned and magnetic levitation, (MAGLEV) vehicles, mainly trains and urban area people movers, are reviewed and the merits of the two systems are reviewed. It is concluded that air cushion systems are simpler, cheaper, and more efficient than MAGLEV systems. (LCL)

  16. Force measurements for levitated bulk superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachi, Y.; Sawa, K.; Iwasa, Y.; Nagashima, K.; Otani, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Tomita, M.; Murakami, M.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a force measurement system which enables us to directly measure the levitation force of levitated bulk superconductors. Experimental data of the levitation forces were compared with the results of numerical simulation based on the levitation model that we deduced in our previous paper. They were in fairly good agreement, which confirms that our levitation model can be applied to the force analyses for levitated bulk superconductors. (author)

  17. Force measurements for levitated bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachi, Y. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan); ISTEC, Superconductivity Research Laboratory, 1-16-25 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan). E-mail: tachi at istec.or.jp; Uemura, N. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan); ISTEC, Superconductivity Research Laboratory, 1-16-25 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sawa, K. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Iwasa, Y. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Nagashima, K. [Railway Technical Research Institute, Hikari-cho, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Otani, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Tomita, M.; Murakami, M. [ISTEC, Superconductivity Research Laboratory, 1-16-25 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    We have developed a force measurement system which enables us to directly measure the levitation force of levitated bulk superconductors. Experimental data of the levitation forces were compared with the results of numerical simulation based on the levitation model that we deduced in our previous paper. They were in fairly good agreement, which confirms that our levitation model can be applied to the force analyses for levitated bulk superconductors. (author)

  18. Simplified Rotation In Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.; Trinh, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    New technique based on old discovery used to control orientation of object levitated acoustically in axisymmetric chamber. Method does not require expensive equipment like additional acoustic drivers of precisely adjustable amplitude, phase, and frequency. Reflecting object acts as second source of sound. If reflecting object large enough, close enough to levitated object, or focuses reflected sound sufficiently, Rayleigh torque exerted on levitated object by reflected sound controls orientation of object.

  19. Development of a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump intended for one-month support in bridge-to-bridge applications: in vitro and initial in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Mariko; Waguri, Satoshi; Ushiyama, Tomohiro; Nagaoka, Eiki; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2009-09-01

    MedTech Dispo, a disposable maglev centrifugal blood pump with two degrees of freedom magnetic suspension and radial magnetic coupling rotation, has been developed for 1-month extracorporeal circulatory support. As the first stage of a two-stage in vivo evaluation, 2-week evaluation of a prototype MedTech Dispo was conducted. In in vitro study, the pump could produce 5 L/min against 800 mm Hg and the normalized index of hemolysis was 0.0054 +/- 0.0008 g/100 L. In in vivo study, the pump, with its blood-contacting surface coated with biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer, was implanted in seven calves in left heart bypass. Pump performance was stable with a mean flow of 4.49 +/- 0.38 L/min at a mean speed of 2072.1 +/- 64.5 rpm. The maglev control revealed its stability in rotor position during normal activity by the calves. During 2 weeks of operation in two calves which survived the intended study period, no thrombus formation was seen inside the pump and levels of plasma free hemoglobin were maintained below 4 mg/dL. Although further experiments are required, the pump demonstrated the potential for sufficient and reliable performance and biocompatibility in meeting the requirements for cardiopulmonary bypass and 1-week circulatory support.

  20. Acoustic Levitation Containerless Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whymark, R. R.; Rey, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    This research program consists of the development of acoustic containerless processing systems with applications in the areas of research in material sciences, as well as the production of new materials, solid forms with novel and unusual microstructures, fusion target spheres, and improved optical fibers. Efforts have been focused on the containerless processing at high temperatures for producing new kinds of glasses. Also, some development has occurred in the areas of containerlessly supporting liquids at room temperature, with applications in studies of fluid dynamics, potential undercooling of liquids, etc. The high temperature area holds the greatest promise for producing new kinds of glasses and ceramics, new alloys, and possibly unusual structural shapes, such as very uniform hollow glass shells for fusion target applications. High temperature acoustic levitation required for containerless processing has been demonstrated in low-g environments as well as in ground-based experiments. Future activities include continued development of the signals axis acoustic levitator.

  1. Generalized Superconductivity. Generalized Levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciobanu, B.; Agop, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the recent papers, the gravitational superconductivity is described. We introduce the concept of generalized superconductivity observing that any nongeodesic motion and, in particular, the motion in an electromagnetic field, can be transformed in a geodesic motion by a suitable choice of the connection. In the present paper, the gravitoelectromagnetic London equations have been obtained from the generalized Helmholtz vortex theorem using the generalized local equivalence principle. In this context, the gravitoelectromagnetic Meissner effect and, implicitly, the gravitoelectromagnetic levitation are given. (authors)

  2. The Levitation Control System for the Levitated Dipole Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, D. T.; Hansen, A. K.; Mauel, M. E.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Dagen, S.; Kesner, J.; Liptac, J.

    2001-10-01

    The confining field in the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is provided by a 1/2 ton levitated superconducting dipole magnet. This floating coil is charged with 1.5 MA current and will be levitated continuously for the eight hour experimental run day. Earnshaw's theorem states that there exists no statically stable configuration for levitation of magnets. In LDX, the floating coil is levitated by a smaller dipole levitation coil 1.5 meters above. This configuration is unstable vertically, but stable in tilt or horizontal motion. The position of the coil will be monitored with a set of eight laser position detectors giving redundant measurements of the five degrees of freedom of the floating coil. The levitation will then be stabilized by feedback control of the current in the levitation coil. The feedback system is a digital system running on a real time operating system platform. This system is programmed, monitored, and controlled by a second computer using Matlab Simulink. The system is currently being tested on a small model and a larger test is planned before LDX operation. Results from these tests and optimizations will be presented.

  3. Electric vehicles, magnetic levitation and superconductive levitation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyczalek, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This is a technological assessment of electric automotive vehicles, high speed magnetic levitation trains and hyperspeed superconductive magnetic levitation trains in Japan. It includes conventional battery electric vehicles for the automotive application, conventional magnetic levitation trains with peak speeds of 300 km/h and superconductive levitation trains capable of speeds over 500 km/h in transcontinental service. These electric vehicles have been under development since 1971 and are now considered ready for introduction into intercity commercial service. Conventional magnetic levitation trains are targeted to connect New Chitose International Airport with Sapporo and shorter connections in LasVegas, Philadelphia and Miami. The first superconductive train is planned for the Osaka to Tokyo link by the year 2000, a distance of 515 km. The initial step has been taken with approval of funding for the first five year phase of construction beginning with the Kansai project near Osaka

  4. The Heartmate III: design and in vivo studies of a maglev centrifugal left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loree, H M; Bourque, K; Gernes, D B; Richardson, J S; Poirier, V L; Barletta, N; Fleischli, A; Foiera, G; Gempp, T M; Schoeb, R; Litwak, K N; Akimoto, T; Kameneva, M; Watach, M J; Litwak, P

    2001-05-01

    A compact implantable centrifugal left ventricular assist device (LVAD) (HeartMate III) featuring a magnetically levitated impeller is under development. The goal of our ongoing work is to demonstrate feasibility, low hemolysis, and low thrombogenicity of the titanium pump in chronic bovine in vivo studies. The LVAD is based on so-called bearingless motor technology and combines pump rotor, drive, and magnetic bearing functions in a single unit. The impeller is rotated (theta z) and levitated with both active (X, Y) and passive (Z, theta x, theta y) suspension. Six prototype systems have been built featuring an implantable titanium pump (69 mm diameter, 30 mm height) with textured blood contacting surfaces and extracorporeal electronics. The pumps were implanted in 9 calves (< or = 100 kg at implant) that were anticoagulated with Coumadin (2.5 < or = INR < or = 4.0) throughout the studies. Six studies were electively terminated (at 27-61 days), 1 study was terminated after the development of severe pneumonia and lung atelectasis (at 27 days) another study was terminated after cardiac arrest (at 2 days) while a final study is ongoing (at approximately 100 days). Mean pump flows ranged from 2 to 7 L/min, except for brief periods of exercise at 6 to 9 L/min. Plasma free hemoglobin ranged from 4 to 10 mg/dl. All measured biochemical indicators of end organ function remained within normal range. The pumps have met performance requirements in all 9 implants with acceptable hemolysis and no mechanical failures.

  5. Quantification of platelets obtained by different centrifugation protocols in SHR rats

    OpenAIRE

    João Alberto Yazigi Junior; João Baptista Gomes dos Santos; Bruno Rodrigues Xavier; Marcela Fernandes; Sandra Gomes Valente; Vilnei Mattiolli Leite

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To quantify the platelet concentration in the blood of SHR rats, by means of different centrifugation protocols, and to evaluate what the most effective method for obtaining platelets is. METHODS: We used 40 male rats of the isogenic SHR lineage. The animals were divided into three groups: control, using whole blood without centrifugation; single centrifugation, using whole blood subjected to a single centrifugation at 200 × gand 400 × g; and double centrifugation, usin...

  6. Direct identification and susceptibility testing of positive blood cultures using high speed cold centrifugation and Vitek II system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Ali M; Rabaan, Ali A; Fawarah, Mahmoud M; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A

    Compared to routine isolated colony-based methods, direct testing of bacterial pellets from positive blood cultures reduces turnaround time for reporting of antibiotic susceptibility. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy, and precision, of a rapid method for direct identification and susceptibility testing of blood cultures with the routine method used in our laboratory, using Vitek 2. A total of 60 isolates were evaluated using the candidate and the routine method. The candidate method had 100% accuracy for the identification of Gram negative bacteria, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus, 50% for Streptococcus and 33.3% for Corynebacterium species. Susceptibility testing of Gram negative isolates yielded 98-100% essential agreement. For Staphylococcus and Enterococcus isolates, essential agreement was 100% for 17 antibiotics except for moxifloxacin. Direct testing of blood culture samples with Vitek 2 produced reliable identification and susceptibility results 18-24h sooner for aerobic/anaerobic facultative Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive Staphylococcus and Enterococcus strains. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acoustic Levitation With One Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Rudnick, I.; Elleman, D. D.; Stoneburner, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Report discusses acoustic levitation in rectangular chamber using one driver mounted at corner. Placement of driver at corner enables it to couple effectively to acoustic modes along all three axes. Use of single driver reduces cost, complexity and weight of levitation system below those of three driver system.

  8. Centrifugal pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Gülich, Johann Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    This book gives an unparalleled, up-to-date, in-depth treatment of all kinds of flow phenomena encountered in centrifugal pumps including the complex interactions of fluid flow with vibrations and wear of materials. The scope includes all aspects of hydraulic design, 3D-flow phenomena and partload operation, cavitation, numerical flow calculations, hydraulic forces, pressure pulsations, noise, pump vibrations (notably bearing housing vibration diagnostics and remedies), pipe vibrations, pump characteristics and pump operation, design of intake structures, the effects of highly viscous flows, pumping of gas-liquid mixtures, hydraulic transport of solids, fatigue damage to impellers or diffusers, material selection under the aspects of fatigue, corrosion, erosion-corrosion or hydro-abrasive wear, pump selection, and hydraulic quality criteria. As a novelty, the 3rd ed. brings a fully analytical design method for radial impellers, which eliminates the arbitrary choices inherent to former design procedures. The d...

  9. Development of a real-time and quantitative thrombus sensor for an extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump by near-infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakota, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Mizuno, Tomohiro; Arai, Hirokuni; Maruyama, Osamu

    2018-01-01

    We developed an optical thrombus sensor for a monopivot extracorporeal centrifugal blood pump. In this study, we investigated its quantitative performance for thrombus detection in acute animal experiments of left ventricular assist using the pump on pathogen-free pigs. Optical fibers were set in the driver unit of the pump. The incident light at the near-infrared wavelength of 810 nm was aimed at the pivot bearing, and the resulting scattered light was guided to the optical fibers. The detected signal was analyzed to obtain the thrombus formation level. As a result, real-time and quantitative monitoring of the thrombus surface area on the pivot bearing was achieved with an accuracy of 3.6 ± 2.3 mm 2 . In addition, the sensing method using the near-infrared light was not influenced by changes in the oxygen saturation and the hematocrit. It is expected that the developed sensor will be useful for optimal anticoagulation management for long-term extracorporeal circulation therapies.

  10. Detection of circulating trophoblast particles in maternal blood using density gradient centrifugation in preeclampsia and in normotensive pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuessel, Lorenz; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Zeillinger, Robert; Pateisky, Petra; Ott, Johannes; Zeisler, Harald; Birdir, Cahit

    2016-08-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a frequent pregnancy-related disease and a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Despite that, exact mechanisms of its pathophysiology remain largely unknown. In pregnancies complicated by PE, changes in the regulation of apoptosis seem to result in increased apoptotic shedding of trophoblast particles (TPs) into maternal circulation. Since the number of TP in peripheral blood is low, their detection necessitates pre-analytical enrichment. In this prospective multicenter pilot study we aimed to analyze TP in peripheral blood of 29 women with PE and of 13 unaffected controls using the OncoQuick®plus system for cell enrichment. Using immunocytochemistry, slides were evaluated microscopically for TP. Statistical analyses were performed using Welch's t-test or Fisher's exact test. TP were detected in 10 (34.5%) women with PE and in two (15.4%) of unaffected controls. More than one TP were only found in PE. Comparing the mean counts of TP between groups, we detected significantly more TP in PE (p = 0.046). The OncoQuick®plus system can be applied to detect TP in both women with PE and in normotensive pregnancies. Longitudinal studies investigating the role of TP as a screening method for patients at risk for PE are warranted.

  11. Review of Progress in Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2018-04-01

    Acoustic levitation uses acoustic radiation forces to counteract gravity and suspend objects in mid-air. Although acoustic levitation was first demonstrated almost a century ago, for a long time, it was limited to objects much smaller than the acoustic wavelength levitating at fixed positions in space. Recent advances in acoustic levitation now allow not only suspending but also rotating and translating objects in three dimensions. Acoustic levitation is also no longer restricted to small objects and can now be employed to levitate objects larger than the acoustic wavelength. This article reviews the progress of acoustic levitation, focusing on the working mechanism of different types of acoustic levitation devices developed to date. We start with a brief review of the theory. Then, we review the acoustic levitation methods to suspend objects at fixed positions, followed by the techniques that allow the manipulation of objects. Finally, we present a brief summary and offer some future perspectives for acoustic levitation.

  12. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  13. Modeling centrifugal cell washers using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellet, Beth E; Han, Binbing; Dandy, David S; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil

    2004-11-01

    Reinfusion of shed blood during surgery could avoid the need for blood transfusions. Prior to reinfusion of the red blood cells, the shed blood must be washed in order to remove leukocytes, platelets, and other contaminants. Further, the hematocrit of the washed blood must be increased. The feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to guide the design of better centrifuges for processing shed blood is explored here. The velocity field within a centrifuge bowl and the rate of protein removal from the shed blood has been studied. The results obtained indicate that CFD could help screen preliminary centrifuge bowl designs, thus reducing the number of initial experimental tests required when developing new centrifuge bowls. Although the focus of this work is on washing shed blood, the methods developed here are applicable to the design of centrifuge bowls for other blood-processing applications.

  14. Campaign for Levitation in LDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, D. T.; Hansen, A. K.; Mauel, M. E.; Ortiz, E. E.; Boxer, A. C.; Ellsworth, J. L.; Karim, I.; Kesner, J.; Michael, P. C.; Zhukovsky, A.

    2006-10-01

    In the past year, preparations have been made for the first flight of the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). LDX, which consists of a 560 kg superconducting coil floating within a 5 m diameter vacuum chamber, is designed to study fusion relevant plasmas confined in a dipole magnetic field. During the spring, a high temperature superconducting levitation coil was integrated into the LDX facility. Testing was undertaken to verify the thermal performance of the coil under expected levitation conditions. In addition, a real-time operating system digital control system was developed that will be used for the levitation control. In July, plasma experiments were conducted with all superconducting magnets in operation. While still supported, roughly 75% of the weight of the floating coil was magnetically lifted by the levitation coil above. A series of plasma experiments were conducted with the same magnetic geometry as will be the case during levitation. During August, the second generation launcher system will be installed. The launcher, which retracts beyond the plasma's last closed field lines during operation, is designed to safely catch the floating coil following an unexpected loss of control. After this installation, levitation experiments will commence.

  15. Magnetically Levitated and Guided Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Puci

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the fundamentals of magnetic levitation technology. A general background of the magnetic levitation is given in this article, including applications of this technology, several comparisons with other types of technologies, the real stage of its development, etc. Further in the paper, the two main types of magnetically levitated systems are compared within their subgroups, on characteristics and specifications basis. A comparison between the AC and DC power supplies for these systems, including the pros and cons of each type, is also provided in the paper.

  16. Proliferative and phenotypical characteristics of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells: comparison of Ficoll gradient centrifugation and red blood cell lysis buffer treatment purification methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najar, Mehdi; Rodrigues, Robim M; Buyl, Karolien; Branson, Steven; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Lagneaux, Laurence; Rogiers, Vera; De Kock, Joery

    2014-09-01

    Adult human subcutaneous adipose tissue harbors a multipotent stem cell population, the so-called human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSCs). These cells are able to differentiate in vitro into various cell types and possess immunomodulatory features. Yet procedures to obtain AT-MSCs can vary significantly. The two most extensively used AT-MSC purification techniques are (i) density gradient centrifugation using Ficoll and (ii) red blood cell (RBC) lysis buffer treatment of the stromal vascular fraction. In the context of potential clinical cell therapy, the stem cell yield after purification and upon consecutive passages, as well as the purity of the obtained cell population, are of utmost importance. We investigated the expansion capacity and purity of AT-MSCs purified by both procedures immediately after isolation and upon consecutive passages. We also investigated possible purification-dependent differences in their expression of immune-inhibitory factors and cell adhesion molecules. We found that RBC lysis buffer treatment is a more robust and easier method to purify AT-MSCs than density gradient fractionation. However, the resulting AT-MSC-RBC population contains a significantly higher number of CD34(+) cells, particularly during the first passages after plating. From passage 4 onward, no significant differences could be observed between both populations with respect to the immunophenotype, expansion capacity and expression of immune inhibitory factors and cell adhesion molecules. Our data show that RBC lysis buffer treatment may be a good alternative to density fractionation, providing a faster, more robust and easier method to purify AT-MSCs with biologically preserved characteristics. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Influences of centrifugation on cells and tissues in liposuction aspirates: optimized centrifugation for lipotransfer and cell isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Masakazu; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Shigeura, Tomokuni; Sato, Katsujiro; Gonda, Koichi; Harii, Kiyonori; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2008-03-01

    Although injective autologous fat transplantation is one of the most attractive options for soft-tissue augmentation, problems such as unpredictability and fibrosis resulting from fat necrosis limit its universal acceptance. Centrifugation is one of most common methods for overcoming these difficulties. This study was performed to investigate quantitatively the effects of centrifugation on liposuction aspirates to optimize centrifugal conditions for fat transplantation and isolation of adipose-derived stem cells. Liposuction aspirates, obtained from eight healthy female donors, were either not centrifuged or centrifuged at 400, 700, 1200, 3000, or 4200 g for 3 minutes. The volumes of the oil, adipose, and fluid portions and numbers of blood cells and adipose-derived cells in each portion were examined. The processed adipose tissues (1 ml) were injected into athymic mice, and grafts were harvested and weighed at 4 weeks. Morphologic alterations were observed using light and scanning electron microscopy. Centrifugation concentrated adipose tissues and adipose-derived stem cells in the adipose portion and partly removed red blood cells from the adipose portion. Centrifugation at more than 3000 g significantly damaged adipose-derived stem cells. Centrifugation enhanced graft take per 1 ml centrifuged adipose but reduced calculated graft take per 1 ml adipose before centrifugation. Excessive centrifugation can destroy adipocytes and adipose-derived stem cells, but appropriate centrifugation concentrates them, resulting in enhanced graft take. The authors tentatively recommend 1200 g as an optimized centrifugal force for obtaining good short- and long-term results in adipose transplantation.

  18. Acoustic Levitation With Less Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Certain chamber shapes require fewer than three acoustic drivers. Levitation at center of spherical chamber attained using only one acoustic driver. Exitation of lowest spherical mode produces asymmetric acoustic potential well.

  19. High-temperature levitated materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, David L

    2010-01-01

    .... This can be avoided by suspending the sample through levitation. This technique also makes metastable states of matter accessible, opening up new avenues of scientific enquiry, as well as possible new materials for technological applications...

  20. Separations by centrifugal phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The technical information presented herein emphasizes the uniqueness of the centrifugal separations methodology and pertinent theory for various kinds of centrifugation. The topics are arranged according to gas, liquid, and solid phases, in the order of increasing densities. Much space is devoted to liquid centrifugation because of the importance of this technique in chemical and biological laboratories. Many separational and characterizational examples are illustrated in detail. The material has been divided into 7 chapters entitled: 1) Introduction, 2) Basic Theory of Centrifugation, 3) Gas Centrifuges, 4) Preparative Liquid Centrifuges, 5) Analytical Liquid Centrifuges, 6) Liquid Centrifuges in Practice, and 7) Mechanical Separations by Centrifuges. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each chapter except the introduction

  1. Enrichment: centrifuge process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soubbaramayer.

    1989-01-01

    This short course is divided into three sections devoted respectively to the physics of the process, some practical problems raised by the design of a centrifuge and the present situation of centrifugation in the World. 31 figs., 18 refs

  2. Matching Impedances and Modes in Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature differences accommodated with tunable coupler. Report discusses schemes for coupling sound efficiently from cool outside atmosphere into hot acoustic-levitation chamber. Theoretical studies have practical implications for material-processing systems that employ acoustic levitation.

  3. Magnetic propulsion for magnetically levitated trains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melville, P H

    1973-12-01

    One of the main problems associated with magnetically levitated trains is the means of propulsion. A system is described whereby the repulsion from the superconducting magnets, in addition to levitating the train, can also be used to propel it.

  4. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  5. Observations on centrifugation: application to centrifuge development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T; Smith, M; Roberts, B

    1999-11-01

    This report outlines the background to the development of an automated, serial, discrete centrifuge, reporting on the criteria considered essential in such an instrument. We established the criteria by examining the detailed logistics of centrifuge operation in a hospital laboratory. The mean sample load per run, using six centrifuges, was 13.6 samples, and the user-selectable cycle time ranged from 00:01:10 to 00:12:33 (hours:minutes:seconds) with a fixed g value of 1050. During the laboratory working window, (0900-1700), only 50% of the centrifuge capacity was utilized and more than one-third of the sample workload was delayed for >5 min because the centrifuges were not emptied promptly. In addition, 35% of the sample workload was centrifuged for less than the time prescribed in the operational specifications. Based on these findings, we designed a new continuous, serial centrifuge to overcome some of the deficiencies noted in the logistics study. The centrifuge operates continuously, nominally treating 150 samples/h, with a cycle time of 5 min at 1,000 g. The cycle time and g value are variable between limits, and their selection governs the throughput rate. Each sample is centrifuged separately in individual rotors mounted in a sturdy carousel with a periphery that traverses a load/unload station. There is no sample delay because of operator absence, and the capacity is fully utilized. The centrifuge can operate in a stand-alone capacity or has the capability of being integrated into a sample preparation system or as a direct front end for high-throughput analyzers.

  6. Centrifugation speed affects light transmission aggregometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolla, M; Nardi, M A; Berger, J S

    2012-02-01

    Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) is considered the gold standard for investigating platelet activity ex vivo. However, LTA protocols are not standardized, and differences in LTA procedure are a potential source of variance in results. Centrifugation speed is an essential component of platelet preparation in LTA, has yet to be standardized, and may affect platelet aggregation results. We sought to investigate the effect of relative centrifugal force (RCF) intensity on LTA results. Ten healthy controls had venous blood drawn and centrifuged at 150, 200, 300, and 500 g for 10 min. Cell counts in whole blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were measured using a hematology analyzer. LTA was performed using 1.0 μm adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and 0.4 μm epinephrine as an agonist. Aggregation (%) was compared at 60, 120, 180, and 300 s and at maximum aggregation. Centrifugation speed was associated with decreasing platelet count (P centrifuge RCF at 60, 120, 180, 300 s and at maximum aggregation (P centrifugation speed in the interpretation of LTA results, supporting the need for standardization of centrifugation RCF in LTA protocols. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Levitation With a Single Acoustic Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Pair of reports describes acoustic-levitation systems in which only one acoustic resonance mode excited, and only one driver needed. Systems employ levitation chambers of rectangular and cylindrical geometries. Reports first describe single mode concept and indicate which modes used to levitate sample without rotation. Reports then describe systems in which controlled rotation of sample introduced.

  8. Controlling charge on levitating drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, Ryan T; Westphall, Michael S; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Levitation technologies are used in containerless processing of materials, as microscale manipulators and reactors, and in the study of single drops and particles. Presented here is a method for controlling the amount and polarity of charge on a levitating drop. The method uses single-axis acoustic levitation to trap and levitate a single, initially neutral drop with a diameter between 400 microm and 2 mm. This drop is then charged in a controllable manner using discrete packets of charge in the form of charged drops produced by a piezoelectric drop-on-demand dispenser equipped with a charging electrode. The magnitude of the charge on the dispensed drops can be adjusted by varying the voltage applied to the charging electrode. The polarity of the charge on the added drops can be changed allowing removal of charge from the trapped drop (by neutralization) and polarity reversal. The maximum amount of added charge is limited by repulsion of like charges between the drops in the trap. This charging scheme can aid in micromanipulation and the study of charged drops and particles using levitation.

  9. Magnetic levitation configuration incorporating levitation, guidance and linear synchronous motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, H.T.

    1993-10-19

    A propulsion and suspension system for an inductive repulsion type magnetically levitated vehicle which is propelled and suspended by a system which includes propulsion windings which form a linear synchronous motor and conductive guideways, adjacent to the propulsion windings, where both combine to partially encircling the vehicle-borne superconducting magnets. A three phase power source is used with the linear synchronous motor to produce a traveling magnetic wave which in conjunction with the magnets propel the vehicle. The conductive guideway combines with the superconducting magnets to provide for vehicle levitation. 3 figures.

  10. Rapid Detection and Identification of Candidemia by Direct Blood Culturing on Solid Medium by Use of Lysis-Centrifugation Method Combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelevich, Evgeny A.; Grünastel, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida sepsis is a life-threatening condition with increasing prevalence. In this study, direct blood culturing on solid medium using a lysis-centrifugation procedure enabled successful Candida species identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization time of flight mass spectrometry on average 3.8 h (Sabouraud agar) or 7.4 h (chocolate agar) before the positivity signal for control samples in Bactec mycosis-IC/F or Bactec Plus aerobic/F bottles, respectively. Direct culturing on solid medium accelerated candidemia diagnostics compared to that with automated broth-based systems. PMID:27795344

  11. Rapid Detection and Identification of Candidemia by Direct Blood Culturing on Solid Medium by Use of Lysis-Centrifugation Method Combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelevich, Evgeny A; Grünastel, Barbara; Becker, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Candida sepsis is a life-threatening condition with increasing prevalence. In this study, direct blood culturing on solid medium using a lysis-centrifugation procedure enabled successful Candida species identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry on average 3.8 h (Sabouraud agar) or 7.4 h (chocolate agar) before the positivity signal for control samples in Bactec mycosis-IC/F or Bactec Plus aerobic/F bottles, respectively. Direct culturing on solid medium accelerated candidemia diagnostics compared to that with automated broth-based systems. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Centrifuge modeling of monopiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkvort, Rasmus Tofte

    2010-01-01

    To gain a larger knowledge of the monopile foundation concept, centrifuge modeling is used by the geotechnical group at DTU. The centrifuge operated at DTU is a beam centrifuge and was built in 1976. In the recent years it has been upgraded with onboard data acquisition and control systems....... The capabilities of the centrifuge at DTU makes it possible to obtain a scale factor of 85 in experiments which equals a soil volume in prototype scale of a diameter of 40 meters and a depth of 40 meters. This paper describes centrifuge modeling theory, the centrifuge setup at DTU and as an example show results...... from centrifuge tests performed on large diameter piles installed in dry sand....

  13. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  14. Hemolytic performance of a MagLev disposable rotary blood pump (MedTech Dispo): effects of MagLev gap clearance and surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Hideo; Asama, Junichi; Hijikata, Wataru; Hara, Chikara; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Yasuda, Toshitaka; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-12-01

    Mechanical shaft seal bearing incorporated in the centrifugal blood pumps contributes to hemolysis and thrombus formation. In addition, the problem of durability and corrosion of mechanical shaft seal bearing has been recently reported from the safety point of view. To amend the shortcomings of the blood-immersed mechanical bearings, a magnetic levitated centrifugal rotary blood pump (MedTech Dispo Model 1; Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan) has been developed for extracorporeal disposable application. In this study, the hemolytic performance of the MedTech Dispo Model 1 centrifugal blood pump system was evaluated, with special focus on the narrow blood path clearance at the magnetic bearing between rotor and stator, and on the pump housing surface roughness. A pump flow of 5 L/min against the head pressure of 100 mm Hg for 4 h was included in the hemolytic test conditions. Anticoagulated fresh porcine blood was used as a working fluid. The clearance of blood path at the magnetic bearing was in the range of 100-250 micro m. Pump housing surface roughness was controlled to be around Ra = 0.1-1.5 micro m. The lowest hemolytic results were obtained at the clearance of 250 micro m and with the polished surface (Ra = 0.1 micro m) yielding the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) of less than 0.001 g/100 L, which was 1/5 of the Biopump BP-80 (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA, and 1/4 of the BPX-80. In spite of rough surface and narrow blood path, NIH levels were less than clinically acceptable level of 0.005 g/100 L. The noncontact, levitated impeller system is useful to improve pump performance in blood environment.

  15. 21 CFR 864.9285 - Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9285 Automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology. (a) Identification. An automated cell-washing centrifuge for immuno-hematology is a device used...

  16. Airborne chemistry: acoustic levitation in chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesson, Sabina; Nilsson, Staffan

    2004-04-01

    This review with 60 references describes a unique path to miniaturisation, that is, the use of acoustic levitation in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry applications. Levitation of small volumes of sample by means of a levitation technique can be used as a way to avoid solid walls around the sample, thus circumventing the main problem of miniaturisation, the unfavourable surface-to-volume ratio. Different techniques for sample levitation have been developed and improved. Of the levitation techniques described, acoustic or ultrasonic levitation fulfils all requirements for analytical chemistry applications. This technique has previously been used to study properties of molten materials and the equilibrium shape()and stability of liquid drops. Temperature and mass transfer in levitated drops have also been described, as have crystallisation and microgravity applications. The airborne analytical system described here is equipped with different and exchangeable remote detection systems. The levitated drops are normally in the 100 nL-2 microL volume range and additions to the levitated drop can be made in the pL-volume range. The use of levitated drops in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry offers several benefits. Several remote detection systems are compatible with acoustic levitation, including fluorescence imaging detection, right angle light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Applications include liquid/liquid extractions, solvent exchange, analyte enrichment, single-cell analysis, cell-cell communication studies, precipitation screening of proteins to establish nucleation conditions, and crystallisation of proteins and pharmaceuticals.

  17. The Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Blood Cells: An Efficient Protocol Using Serial Plating of Reprogrammed Cells by Centrifugation

    OpenAIRE

    Youngkyun Kim; Yeri Alice Rim; Hyoju Yi; Narae Park; Sung-Hwan Park; Ji Hyeon Ju

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have demonstrated great potential for differentiation into diverse tissues. We report a straightforward and highly efficient method for the generation of iPSCs from PBMCs. By plating the cells serially to a newly coated plate by centrifugation, this protocol provides multiple healthy iPSC colonies even from a small number of PBMCs. The generated iPSCs expressed pluripotent markers and differentiated into all three germ layer lineages. The protocol...

  18. A Rapid Centrifugation-Assisted Solid-Phase Extraction and Liquid Chromatography Method for Determination of Loureirin A and Loureirin B of Dragon's Blood Capsules in Rat Plasma and Urine After Oral Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoshuang; Li, Gaofeng; Ma, Shangfang; Hu, Xujia

    2015-07-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid centrifugation-assisted solid-phase extraction (SPE) with high-performance liquid chromatography (SPE-HPLC) method was developed for simultaneous determination of the metabolites loureirin A and loureirin B from Dragon's blood in rat plasma and urine. The development of the extraction procedure included optimization of some important extraction phases. After evaluation, the metabolites of Dragon's blood were extracted by centrifugation-assisted SPE and separated by using HPLC. This method showed good linearity (r(2) > 0.99), and in the rat plasma and urine, the recoveries were 93.1 and 95.7% for loureirin A and were 90.1 and 94.2% for loureirin B. The relative standard deviation (RSD) values of intraday and interday precision in rat plasma and urine for loureirin A were <3.84 and 2.01%, respectively. The RSD values of the intraday and interday precision in rat plasma and urine for loureirin B were below 4.25 and 5.83%, respectively. Thus, the established method is suitable for metabolism studies of loureirin A and loureirin B in rat plasma and urine. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Digital Controller For Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, D. Kent

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic driver digitally controls sound fields along three axes. Allows computerized acoustic levitation and manipulation of small objects for such purposes as containerless processing and nuclear-fusion power experiments. Also used for controlling motion of vibration-testing tables in three dimensions.

  20. The optical levitation of spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roosen, G.

    1979-01-01

    In this article we are dealing with optical levitation, that is the possibility of maintaining particles in a stable equilibrium position in air or vacuum by means of laser beams. In the first part, we review the methods used to calculate the force exerted on a sphere by a laser beam. The axial and transverse force components could be obtained either by applying Debye theory to laser beams which have a non-uniform energy distribution or by using, in the case of large spheres, a geometrical optics approach. From the results achieved with the geometrical optics approach, we derive, in a second part, the required stable equilibrium conditions for a sphere placed either in a vertical beam or in two horizontal ones having the same axis but opposite direction. In the last part, we describe in detail the levitation experiments carried out using either a vertical or two horizontal beams. In conclusion, we point out some applications of optical levitation, emphasizing especially the suspension by optical levitation of the targets used in laser fusion experiments. (author) [fr

  1. Centrifuge design and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.T.; Holmes, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    BNFL has been enriching uranium on an industrial scale using the centrifuge process for over a decade. Together with its Urenco partners, a joint development programme has been and is being vigorously pursued to reduce specific costs, increase output and maintain competitiveness throughout the 1990s. The paper summarises the development of the centrifuge from its earliest concepts through to the centrifuges of today which are jointly designed by the Urenco partners. The potential for further development is also examined. (author)

  2. Development of a 3D circular microfluidic centrifuge for the separation of mixed particles by using their different centrifuge times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, H J; Kim, D I; Kim, M J; Nguyen, X D; Park, D H; Go, J S

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a circular microfluidic centrifuge with two inlets and two outlets to separate mixed microparticles with a specially designed sample injection hole. To separate the mixed particles, it uses a rotational flow, generated in a chamber by counter primary flows in the microchannels. The shape and sizes of the circular microfluidic centrifuge have been designed through numerical evaluation to have a large relative centrifugal force. The difference of centrifuge times of the mixed particles of 1 μm and 6 μm was determined to be 8.2 s at an inlet Reynolds number of 500 and a sample Reynolds number of 20. In the experiment, this was measured to be about 10 s. From the separation of the two polymer particles analogous to the representative sizes of platelets and red blood cells, the circular microfluidic centrifuge shows a potential to separate human blood cells size-selectively by using the difference of centrifuge times. (paper)

  3. On the horizontal wobbling of an object levitated by near-field acoustic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2007-11-01

    A circular planar object can be levitated with several hundreds of microns by ultrasonic near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL). However, when both the sound source and the levitated object are circularly shaped and the center of the levitated object does not coincide with the source center, instability problem often occurs. When this happens, it becomes difficult to pick up or transport the object for the next process. In this study, when the center of the levitated object was offset from the source center, the moving direction of the levitated object was predicted by using the time averaged potential around the levitated object. The wobbling frequency of the levitated object was calculated by analyzing the nonlinear wobbling motion of the object. It was shown that the predicted wobbling frequencies agreed with measured ones well. Finally, a safe zone was suggested to avoid the unstable movement of an object.

  4. A simple and efficient levitation technique for noncontact coating of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple and very efficient gas jet levitation technique for levitating inertial ... Inertial confinement fusion targets; low Reynolds number levitation; fluid dynamics. ... any mechanical handling of these specified targets can cause damage beyond ...

  5. RESEARCH CENTRIFUGE- ADVANCED TOOL SEPERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan Ashwini; Prof. B.V. Jain; Dr Surajj Sarode

    2015-01-01

    A centrifuge is a critical piece of equipment for the laboratory. Purpose of this study was to study research centrifuge in detail, its applications, uses in different branches and silent features. Their are two types of research centrifuge study here revolutionary research centrifuge and microprocessor research centrifuge. A centrifuge is a device that separates particles from a solution through use of a rotor. In biology, the particles are usually cells, sub cellular organelles, or large mo...

  6. Controlling Sample Rotation in Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Rotation of acoustically levitated object stopped or controlled according to phase-shift monitoring and control concept. Principle applies to square-cross-section levitation chamber with two perpendicular acoustic drivers operating at same frequency. Phase difference between X and Y acoustic excitation measured at one corner by measuring variation of acoustic amplitude sensed by microphone. Phase of driver adjusted to value that produces no rotation or controlled rotation of levitated object.

  7. Velocity damper for electromagnetically levitated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R.J.

    1994-06-07

    A system for damping oscillatory and spinning motions induced in an electromagnetically levitated material is disclosed. Two opposed field magnets are located orthogonally to the existing levitation coils for providing a DC quadrupole field (cusp field) around the material. The material used for generating the DC quadrupole field must be nonconducting to avoid eddy-current heating and of low magnetic permeability to avoid distorting the induction fields providing the levitation. 1 fig.

  8. Acoustic Levitator With Furnace And Laser Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Stoneburner, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus incorporates electrical-resistance furnace for uniform heating up to temperature of about 1,000 degrees C. Additional local heating by pair of laser beams raise temperature of sample to more than 1,500 degrees C. High temperature single-mode acoustic levitator generates cylindrical-mode accoustic resonance levitating sample. Levitation chamber enclosed in electrical-resistance furnace. Infrared beams from Nd:YAG laser provide additional local heating of sample. Designed for use in containerless processing of materials in microgravity or in normal Earth gravity.

  9. A novel HTS magnetic levitation dining table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yiyun; Huang, Huiying

    2018-05-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk can levitate above or suspend below a permanent magnet stably. Many magnificent potential applications of HTS bulk are proposed by researchers. Until now, few reports have been found for real applications of HTS bulk. A complete set of small-scale HTS magnetic levitation table is proposed in the paper. The HTS magnetic levitation table includes an annular HTS magnetic levitation system which is composed of an annular HTS bulk array and an annular permanent magnet guideway (PMG). The annular PMG and the annular cryogenics vessel which used to maintain low temperature environment of the HTS bulk array are designed. 62 YBCO bulks are used to locate at the bottom of the annular vessel. A 3D-model finite element numerical method is used to design the HTS bulk magnetic levitation system. Equivalent magnetic levitation and guidance forces calculation rules are proposed aimed at the annular HTS magnetic levitation system stability. Based on the proposed method, levitation and guidance forces curves of the one YBCO bulk magnetic above PMG could be obtained. This method also can use to assist PMG design to check whether the designed PMG could reach the basic demand of the HTS magnetic levitation table.

  10. Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tixador, P [CNRS/CRTBT-LEG, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1994-04-01

    Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion are now attracting attention in several countries. Different superconducting MagLev and MHD systems will be described concentrating on, above all, the electromagnetic aspect. Some programmes occurring throughout the world will be described. Magnetic levitated trains could be the new high speed transportation system for the 21st century. Intensive studies involving MagLev trains using superconductivity have been carried our in Japan since 1970. The construction of a 43 km long track is to be the next step. In 1991 a six year programme was launched in the United States to evaluate the performances of MagLev systems for transportation. The MHD (MagnetoHydroDynamic) offers some interesting advantages (efficiency, stealth characteristics, ..) for naval propulsion and increasing attention is being paid towards it nowadays. Japan is also up at the top with the tests of Yamato I, a 260 ton MHD propulsed ship. (orig.).

  11. Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tixador, P.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion are now attracting attention in several countries. Different superconducting MagLev and MHD systems will be described concentrating on, above all, the electromagnetic aspect. Some programmes occurring throughout the world will be described. Magnetic levitated trains could be the new high speed transportation system for the 21st century. Intensive studies involving MagLev trains using superconductivity have been carried our in Japan since 1970. The construction of a 43 km long track is to be the next step. In 1991 a six year programme was launched in the United States to evaluate the performances of MagLev systems for transportation. The MHD (MagnetoHydroDynamic) offers some interesting advantages (efficiency, stealth characteristics, ..) for naval propulsion and increasing attention is being paid towards it nowadays. Japan is also up at the top with the tests of Yamato I, a 260 ton MHD propulsed ship. (orig.)

  12. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2002-01-01

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

  13. Centrifuge enrichment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astley, E.R.

    1976-01-01

    Exxon Nuclear has been active in privately funded research and development of centrifuge enrichment technology since 1972. In October of 1975, Exxon Nuclear submitted a proposal to design, construct, and operate a 3000-MT SWU/yr centrifuge enrichment plant, under the provisions of the proposed Nuclear Fuel Assurance Act of 1975. The U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) accepted the proposal as a basis for negotiation. It was proposed to build a 1000-MT SWU/yr demonstration increment to be operational in 1982; and after successful operation for about one year, expand the facilities into a 3000-MT SWU/yr plant. As part of the overall centrifuge enrichment plant, a dedicated centrifuge manufacturing plant would be constructed; sized to support the full 3000-MT SWU/yr plant. The selection of the centrifuge process by Exxon Nuclear was based on an extremely thorough evaluation of current and projected enrichment technology; results show that the technology is mature and the process will be cost effective. The substantial savings in energy (about 93%) from utilization of the centrifuge option rather than gaseous diffusion is a compelling argument. As part of this program, Exxon Nuclear has a large hardware R and D program, plus a prototype centrifuge manufacturing capability in Malta, New York. To provide a full-scale machine and limited cascade test capability, Exxon Nuclear is constructing a $4,000,000 Centrifuge Test Facility in Richland, Washington. This facility was to initiate operations in the Fall of 1976. Exxon Nuclear is convinced that the centrifuge enrichment process is the rational selection for emergence of a commercial enrichment industry

  14. Eddy current damping for magnetic levitation: downscaling from macro- to micro-levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbuken, C; Khamesee, M B; Yavuz, M

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic levitation of miniaturized objects is investigated in this paper. A magnetic levitation setup is built to implement one-dimensional magnetic levitation motion. It was observed that as the levitated object becomes smaller, magnetic levitation suffers more from undesired vibrations. As a solution, eddy current damping is offered and implemented successfully by placing conductive plates close to the levitated object. An analytical expression for damping coefficient is derived. Experimentally, it is shown that eddy current damping can reduce the RMS positioning error to the level of more than one third of its original value for a 0.386 g object levitated in an air-gap region of 290 mm. The proposed system has the potential to be used for micro-manipulation purposes in a high motion range of 39.8 mm

  15. Eddy current damping for magnetic levitation: downscaling from macro- to micro-levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elbuken, C; Khamesee, M B; Yavuz, M [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-09-21

    Magnetic levitation of miniaturized objects is investigated in this paper. A magnetic levitation setup is built to implement one-dimensional magnetic levitation motion. It was observed that as the levitated object becomes smaller, magnetic levitation suffers more from undesired vibrations. As a solution, eddy current damping is offered and implemented successfully by placing conductive plates close to the levitated object. An analytical expression for damping coefficient is derived. Experimentally, it is shown that eddy current damping can reduce the RMS positioning error to the level of more than one third of its original value for a 0.386 g object levitated in an air-gap region of 290 mm. The proposed system has the potential to be used for micro-manipulation purposes in a high motion range of 39.8 mm.

  16. Centrifugal pump handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pumps, Sulzer

    2010-01-01

    This long-awaited new edition is the complete reference for engineers and designers working on pump design and development or using centrifugal pumps in the field. This authoritative guide has been developed with access to the technical expertise of the leading centrifugal pump developer, Sulzer Pumps. In addition to providing the most comprehensive centrifugal pump theory and design reference with detailed material on cavitation, erosion, selection of materials, rotor vibration behavior and forces acting on pumps, the handbook also covers key pumping applications topics and operational

  17. A Simple, Inexpensive Acoustic Levitation Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schappe, R. Scott; Barbosa, Cinthya

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic levitation uses a resonant ultrasonic standing wave to suspend small objects; it is used in a variety of research disciplines, particularly in the study of phase transitions and materials susceptible to contamination, or as a stabilization mechanism in microgravity environments. The levitation equipment used for such research is quite…

  18. Off-Resonance Acoustic Levitation Without Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Orthogonal acoustic-levitation modes excited at slightly different frequencies to control rotation. Rotation of object in square cross-section acoustic-levitation chamber stopped by detuning two orthogonal (x and y) excitation drivers in plane of square cross section. Detuning done using fundamental degenerate modes or odd harmonic modes.

  19. An ionization chamber with magnetic levitated electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kawaguchi, T

    1999-01-01

    A new type of ionization chamber which has magnetically levitated electrodes has been developed. The electrodes are supplied voltages for the repelling of ions by a battery which is also levitated with the electrodes. The characteristics of this ionization chamber are investigated in this paper.

  20. Acoustical-Levitation Chamber for Metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Trinh, E.; Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sample moved to different positions for heating and quenching. Acoustical levitation chamber selectively excited in fundamental and second-harmonic longitudinal modes to hold sample at one of three stable postions: A, B, or C. Levitated object quickly moved from one of these positions to another by changing modes. Object rapidly quenched at A or C after heating in furnace region at B.

  1. Gyro-effect stabilizes unstable permanent maglev centrifugal pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun-Xi

    2007-03-01

    According to Earnshaw's Theorem (1839), the passive maglev cannot achieve stable equilibrium and thus an extra coil is needed to make the rotor electrically levitated in a heart pump. The author had developed a permanent maglev centrifugal pump utilizing only passive magnetic bearings, to keep the advantages but to avoid the disadvantages of the electric maglev pumps. The equilibrium stability was achieved by use of so-called "gyro-effect": a rotating body with certain high speed can maintain its rotation stably. This pump consisted of a rotor (driven magnets and an impeller), and a stator with motor coil and pump housing. Two passive magnetic bearings between rotor and stator were devised to counteract the attractive force between the motor coil iron core and the rotor driven magnets. Bench testing with saline demonstrated a levitated rotor under preconditions of higher than 3,250 rpm rotation and more than 1 l/min pumping flow. Rotor levitation was demonstrated by 4 Hall sensors on the stator, with evidence of reduced maximal eccentric distance from 0.15 mm to 0.07 mm. The maximal rotor vibration amplitude was 0.06 mm in a gap of 0.15 mm between rotor and stator. It concluded that Gyro-effect can help passive maglev bearings to achieve stabilization of permanent maglev pump; and that high flow rate indicates good hydraulic property of the pump, which helps also the stability of passive maglev pump.

  2. Magnetic levitation configuration incorporating levitation, guidance and linear synchronous motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Howard T.

    1993-01-01

    A propulsion and suspension system for an inductive repulsion type magnetically levitated vehicle which is propelled and suspended by a system which includes propulsion windings which form a linear synchronous motor and conductive guideways, adjacent to the propulsion windings, where both combine to partially encircling the vehicle-borne superconducting magnets. A three phase power source is used with the linear synchronous motor to produce a traveling magnetic wave which in conjunction with the magnets propel the vehicle. The conductive guideway combines with the superconducting magnets to provide for vehicle leviation.

  3. Valve for gas centrifuges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahs, Charles A.; Burbage, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  4. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  5. Gravity enhanced acoustic levitation method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.; Granett, D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is provided for acoustically levitating an object by applying a single frequency from a transducer into a resonant chamber surrounding the object. The chamber includes a stabilizer location along its height, where the side walls of the chamber are angled so they converge in an upward direction. When an acoustic standing wave pattern is applied between the top and bottom of the chamber, a levitation surface within the stabilizer does not lie on a horizontal plane, but instead is curved with a lowermost portion near the vertical axis of the chamber. As a result, an acoustically levitated object is urged by gravity towards the lowermost location on the levitation surface, so the object is kept away from the side walls of the chamber.

  6. Polarized particle levitation in hexapole field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.B.; Kallio, G.A.; Robinson, K.S.

    1976-06-01

    Proposed here is a novel electrostatic levitation scheme which uses the force exerted by a non-uniform electric field on a polarized particle. The scheme differs from conventional quadrupole levitation devices principally in that the levitated particle is uncharged. In order to provide the proper force required to achieve dynamic stabilization, a very intense non-uniform time-varying electric field produced by a three-dimensional hexapole electrode structure is utilized. The primary advantage of this levitation scheme might accrue in target fabrication operations where particle charge is undesirable or where reproducible charging of the particles themselves is difficult, due to high resistivity. The disadvantages of this scheme, as compared to charged particle levitation, are (i) a more complex electrode structure and (ii) significantly higher voltages. The scheme has possible application to molecular mass spectrometry, in situations where un-ionized but strongly polar or polarizable molecules are to be trapped or confined for analysis

  7. Vortex flow in acoustically levitated drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Z.L.; Xie, W.J. [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2011-08-29

    The internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops is investigated experimentally. This study reveals a kind of vortex flow which rotates in the meridional plane of the levitated drop. The magnitude of fluid velocity is nearly vanishing at the drop center, whereas it increases toward the free surface of a levitated drop until the maximum value of about 80 mm/s. A transition of streamline shapes from concentric circles to ellipses takes place at the distance of about 1.2 mm from the drop center. The fluid velocity distribution is plotted as a function of polar angle for seven characteristic streamlines. -- Highlights: → We experimentally observe the internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops. → We present a fascinating structure of vortex flow inside the levitated water drop. → This vortex flow rotates around the drop center in the meridional plane. → Velocity distribution information of this vortex flow is quantitatively analyzed.

  8. Vortex flow in acoustically levitated drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Z.L.; Xie, W.J.; Wei, B.

    2011-01-01

    The internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops is investigated experimentally. This study reveals a kind of vortex flow which rotates in the meridional plane of the levitated drop. The magnitude of fluid velocity is nearly vanishing at the drop center, whereas it increases toward the free surface of a levitated drop until the maximum value of about 80 mm/s. A transition of streamline shapes from concentric circles to ellipses takes place at the distance of about 1.2 mm from the drop center. The fluid velocity distribution is plotted as a function of polar angle for seven characteristic streamlines. -- Highlights: → We experimentally observe the internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops. → We present a fascinating structure of vortex flow inside the levitated water drop. → This vortex flow rotates around the drop center in the meridional plane. → Velocity distribution information of this vortex flow is quantitatively analyzed.

  9. Propulsion of magnetically levitated trains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wipf, S L

    1976-05-01

    A propulsion system for magnetically levitated trains is proposed. A method of periodically energizing magnetic loops on a train moving over a periodically undulating track allows the net repulsive magnetic force to tilt forward or backward for either propulsion or braking. The principle is explained and a specific example discussed. Approximate calculations show feasibility. Problems requiring technical solutions which cannot be considered present state-of-the-art are AC losses at frequencies up to 20 Hz and mechanical fatigue properties at low temperatures. Suitable primary power could be derived from hydrogen-fueled turbines yet to be developed.

  10. The theory of quantum levitators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impens, Francois; Pereira Dos Santos, Franck; Borde, Christian J

    2011-01-01

    We develop a unified theory for clocks and gravimeters using the interferences of multiple atomic waves put in levitation by traveling light pulses. Inspired by optical methods, we identify a propagation invariant, which enables us to analytically derive the wave function of the sample scattering on the light pulse sequence. A complete characterization of the device sensitivity with respect to frequency or acceleration measurements is obtained. These results agree with previous numerical simulations and confirm the conjecture of sensitivity improvement through multiple atomic wave interferences. A realistic experimental implementation for such a clock architecture is discussed.

  11. The theory of quantum levitators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Impens, Francois [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira Dos Santos, Franck; Borde, Christian J, E-mail: francois.impens@obspm.fr [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, LNE, CNRS, UPMC, 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

    2011-06-15

    We develop a unified theory for clocks and gravimeters using the interferences of multiple atomic waves put in levitation by traveling light pulses. Inspired by optical methods, we identify a propagation invariant, which enables us to analytically derive the wave function of the sample scattering on the light pulse sequence. A complete characterization of the device sensitivity with respect to frequency or acceleration measurements is obtained. These results agree with previous numerical simulations and confirm the conjecture of sensitivity improvement through multiple atomic wave interferences. A realistic experimental implementation for such a clock architecture is discussed.

  12. Quantum Spin Stabilized Magnetic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, C. C.; Pöchhacker, V.; Kustura, K.; Cirac, J. I.; Romero-Isart, O.

    2017-10-01

    We theoretically show that, despite Earnshaw's theorem, a nonrotating single magnetic domain nanoparticle can be stably levitated in an external static magnetic field. The stabilization relies on the quantum spin origin of magnetization, namely, the gyromagnetic effect. We predict the existence of two stable phases related to the Einstein-de Haas effect and the Larmor precession. At a stable point, we derive a quadratic Hamiltonian that describes the quantum fluctuations of the degrees of freedom of the system. We show that, in the absence of thermal fluctuations, the quantum state of the nanomagnet at the equilibrium point contains entanglement and squeezing.

  13. Use of near field acoustic levitation sliding contact

    OpenAIRE

    Stolarski, TA; Woolliscroft, CI

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into producing self-levitation effect using piezo-electric actuators (PZT). Self-levitation has been demonstrated and results are presented and discussed. A relationship between the levitation distance and weight of the levitating sample has been found. In addition the orientation and position of the PZTs has been found to affect the levitation distance. Modal shapes of the vibration plates used have been produced through modelling annd found to accurately...

  14. Pipeline system for gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumoto, Tsutomu; Umezawa, Sadao.

    1977-01-01

    Purpose: To enable effective operation for the gas centrifuge cascade system upon failures in the system not by interrupting the operation of all of the centrifuges in the system but by excluding only the failed centrifuges. Constitution: A plurality of gas centrifuges are connected by way of a pipeline and an abnormal detector for the automatic detection of abnormality such as destruction in a vacuum barrel and loss of vacuum is provided to each of the centrifuges. Bypass lines for short-circuitting adjacent centrifuges are provided in the pipelines connecting the centrifuges. Upon generation of abnormality in a centrifuge, a valve disposed in the corresponding bypass is automatically closed or opened by a signal from the abnormal detector to change the gas flow to thereby exclude the centrifuge in abnormality out of the system. This enables to effectively operate the system without interrupting the operation for the entire system. (Moriyama, K.)

  15. Spin doctors: new innovations for centrifugal apheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambic, H E; Nosé, Y

    1997-08-01

    The preparation of plasma from blood has a long history dating back to the early 1900s when the concept of blood washing replaced the traditional blood letting. Over the next 57 years landmark discoveries such as centrifugal and membrane filtration systems led to different and rapid plasma, solute, and cell separation. These were not singular events but rather events influenced by the converging chemical, physiological, and engineering advances that have characterized the latter half of the 20th century. These events have led to entire new fields of biomedical research. The biotechnology for on-line plasma separation and plasma treatment has opened a new era, expanding the application of extracorporeal technology to modern therapeutic medicine. The association of biochemical or cellular abnormalities with various disease states provides the rationale for therapeutic plasma exchange (the removal of large amounts of patient's plasma, alone or with replacement with crystalloid) and therapeutic cytopheresis (removal of cellular elements). The purpose of this review is to provide a historical picture of the innovative ideas of the spin doctors and their devices, which predate the centrifugal blood and cell separators commonplace to any hospital or blood bank worldwide. The emphasis is to define the historical events and their impacts on the development of centrifugal devices and apheresis technologies.

  16. Kinetically limited differential centrifugation as an inexpensive and readily available alternative to centrifugal elutriation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jinwang; Lee, Byung-Doo; Polo-Parada, Luis; Sengupta, Shramik

    2012-08-01

    When separating two species with similar densities but differing sedimentation velocities (because of differences in size), centrifugal elutriation is generally the method of choice. However, a major drawback to this approach is the requirement for specialized equipment. Here, we present a new method that achieves similar separations using standard benchtop centrifuges by loading the seperands as a layer on top of a dense buffer of a specified length, and running the benchtop centrifugation process for a calculated amount of time, thereby ensuring that all faster moving species are collected at the bottom, while all slower moving species remain in the buffer. We demonstrate the use of our procedure to isolate bacteria from blood culture broth (a mixture of bacterial growth media, blood, and bacteria).

  17. Particle levitation and laboratory scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of light scattering from aerosol particles can provide a non-intrusive in situ method for characterising particle size distributions, composition, refractive index, phase and morphology. When coupled with techniques for isolating single particles, considerable information on the evolution of the properties of a single particle can be gained during changes in environmental conditions or chemical processing. Electrostatic, acoustic and optical techniques have been developed over many decades for capturing and levitating single particles. In this review, we will focus on studies of particles in the Mie size regime and consider the complimentarity of electrostatic and optical techniques for levitating particles and elastic and inelastic light scattering methods for characterising particles. In particular, we will review the specific advantages of establishing a single-beam gradient force optical trap (optical tweezers) for manipulating single particles or arrays of particles. Recent developments in characterising the nature of the optical trap, in applying elastic and inelastic light scattering measurements for characterising trapped particles, and in manipulating particles will be considered.

  18. Levitated Optomechanics for Fundamental Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muddassar; Bateman, James; Vovrosh, Jamie; Hempston, David; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-05-01

    Optomechanics with levitated nano- and microparticles is believed to form a platform for testing fundamental principles of quantum physics, as well as find applications in sensing. We will report on a new scheme to trap nanoparticles, which is based on a parabolic mirror with a numerical aperture of 1. Combined with achromatic focussing, the setup is a cheap and readily straightforward solution to trapping nanoparticles for further study. Here, we report on the latest progress made in experimentation with levitated nanoparticles; these include the trapping of 100 nm nanodiamonds (with NV-centres) down to 1 mbar as well as the trapping of 50 nm Silica spheres down to 10?4 mbar without any form of feedback cooling. We will also report on the progress to implement feedback stabilisation of the centre of mass motion of the trapped particle using digital electronics. Finally, we argue that such a stabilised particle trap can be the particle source for a nanoparticle matterwave interferometer. We will present our Talbot interferometer scheme, which holds promise to test the quantum superposition principle in the new mass range of 106 amu. EPSRC, John Templeton Foundation.

  19. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  20. The Development Prospects of Magnetically Levitated Trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Nikšić

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the up-to-date research in developingmagnetically levitated (MAGLEV motorcars. It presents thehistorical overview of the development of the most famousmagnetic levitation systems of today.Apart from describing the operation method and the technicalfeatures of each system, the paper ana(vses the advantagesand drawbacks of certain systems, as well as the advantagesand drawbacks of magnetically levitated motorcars comparedto conventional railway.The paper presents the plans for the future as well as the systemswhich have the highest prospects of being also commerciallyand not just experimentally used.

  1. Parametric resonance in acoustically levitated water drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J.; Wei, B.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid drops can be suspended in air with acoustic levitation method. When the sound pressure is periodically modulated, the levitated drop is usually forced into an axisymmetric oscillation. However, a transition from axisymmetric oscillation into sectorial oscillation occurs when the modulation frequency approaches some specific values. The frequency of the sectorial oscillation is almost exactly half of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that this transition is induced by the parametric resonance of levitated drop. The natural frequency of sectorial oscillation is found to decrease with the increase of drop distortion extent.

  2. Parametric resonance in acoustically levitated water drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J. [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.c [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2010-05-10

    Liquid drops can be suspended in air with acoustic levitation method. When the sound pressure is periodically modulated, the levitated drop is usually forced into an axisymmetric oscillation. However, a transition from axisymmetric oscillation into sectorial oscillation occurs when the modulation frequency approaches some specific values. The frequency of the sectorial oscillation is almost exactly half of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that this transition is induced by the parametric resonance of levitated drop. The natural frequency of sectorial oscillation is found to decrease with the increase of drop distortion extent.

  3. Quantification of platelets obtained by different centrifugation protocols in SHR rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Alberto Yazigi Junior

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To quantify the platelet concentration in the blood of SHR rats, by means of different centrifugation protocols, and to evaluate what the most effective method for obtaining platelets is. METHODS: We used 40 male rats of the isogenic SHR lineage. The animals were divided into three groups: control, using whole blood without centrifugation; single centrifugation, using whole blood subjected to a single centrifugation at 200 × gand 400 × g; and double centrifugation, using whole blood subjected one centrifugation at different rotations, followed by collection of whole plasma subjected to another centrifugation at different rotations: 200 × g+ 200 ×g; 200 × g+ 400 × g; 200 × g+ 800 × g; 400 ×g+ 400 × g; 400 × g+ 800 × g. Samples of 3 ml of blood were drawn from each animal by means of cardiac puncture. The blood was stored in Vacutainer collection tubes containing 3.2% sodium citrate. The blood from the control group animals was analyzed without being subjected to centrifugation. After the blood from the other groups of animals had been subjected to centrifugation, the whole plasma was collected and subjected to platelet counting in the lower third of the sample. RESULTS: We obtained greatest platelet enrichment in the subgroup with two centrifugations comprising 400 × gfor 10 min + 400 ×gfor 10 min, in which the mean platelet concentration was 11.30 times higher than that of the control group. CONCLUSION: It was possible to obtain a high platelet concentration using viable simple techniques, by means of centrifugation of whole blood and use of commonly used materials. The most effective method for obtaining platelet concentrate was found in samples subjected to two centrifugations.

  4. Perceived radial translation during centrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Correia Grácio, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Linear acceleration generally gives rise to translation perception. Centripetal acceleration during centrifugation, however, has never been reported giving rise to a radial, inward translation perception. OBJECTIVE: To study whether centrifugation can induce a radial translation

  5. Acoustic levitation in the presence of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collas, P.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1989-01-01

    The method of Gor'kov (1961) has been applied to derive general expressions for the total potential and force on a small spherical object in a resonant chamber in the presence of both acoustic and gravitational force fields. The levitation position is also determined in rectangular resonators for the simultaneous excitation of up to three acoustic modes, and the results are applied to the triple-axis acoustic levitator. The analysis is applied to rectangular, spherical, and cylindrical single-mode levitators that are arbitrarily oriented relative to the gravitational force field. Criteria are determined for isotropic force fields in rectangular and cylindrical resonators. It is demonstrated that an object will be situated within a volume of possible levitation positions at a point determined by the relative strength of the acoustic and gravitational fields and the orientation of the chamber relative to gravity.

  6. Eutectic growth under acoustic levitation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W J; Cao, C D; Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2002-12-01

    Samples of Pb-Sn eutectic alloy with a high density of 8.5 x 10(3) kg/m(3) are levitated with a single-axis acoustic levitator, and containerlessly melted and then solidified in argon atmosphere. High undercoolings up to 38 K are obtained, which results in a microstructural transition of "lamellas-broken lamellas-dendrites." This transition is further investigated in the light of the coupled zone for eutectic growth and the effects of ultrasound. The breaking of regular eutectic lamellas and suppression of gravity-induced macrosegregation of (Pb) and (Sn) dendrites are explained by the complicated internal flow inside the levitated drop, which is jointly induced by the shape oscillation, bulk vibration and rotation of the levitated drop. The ultrasonic field is also found to drive forced surface vibration, which subsequently excites capillary ripples and catalyzes nucleation on the sample surface.

  7. Manipulation of biomimetic objects in acoustic levitation

    OpenAIRE

    Castro , Angelica

    2013-01-01

    This thesis contains 9 chapters making a total of 205 pages including articles. The articles are menctioned throughout the work and are listed as annexes. These articles were produced during the PhD.; Levitation is a promising tool for contactless guiding and non-toxic manipulation. Acoustic levitation by ultrasonic standing waves (USW) allows micron-scale particle manipulation in acoustic resonators. The main goal of this thesis is to explore the possibilities given by the acoustic levitatio...

  8. Feedforward Control of Magnetically Levitated Planar Actuators

    OpenAIRE

    Bloemers, T.; Proimadis, I.; Kasemsinsup, Y.; Tóth, R.

    2018-01-01

    The present report summarizes the work conducted during the internship on Feedforward Control of the Magnetic Levitation Setup. Different feedforward strategies, specifically tailored for this setup, are developed and reviewed. These feedforward methods explicitly take the intrinsic position-dependent behavior of the magnetic levitation setup into account. Additionally, closed-loop stability of the given setup is assessed. All investigations are carried out under the rigid-body assumption of ...

  9. Control of Levitating Particle in Ultrasound Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhanov Dmitry

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental setup for ultrasonic controlled levitation in the air has been developed. Two phased arrays made of 91 ultrasonic radiators placed in front of each other are used. Arrays are focused in the region of particle levitation. The length of the focus area allows us to move the particles along it, controlling the standing waves through the phase difference of the two arrays.

  10. [Acoustic Levitation Methods and Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Jacobi, N. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Methods are described for acoustically levitating objects within chambers of spherical and cylindrical shape. The wavelengths for chambers of particular dimensions are given, for generating standing wave patterns of any of a variety of modes within the chambers. For a spherical chamber the lowest resonant mode is excited by applying a wavelength of 3.02R, where R is the chamber radius. The two lowest pure radial modes for that chamber, are excited by applying wavelengths of 1.40R and 0.814R. For a cylindrical chamber of radius R, the lowest mode is at a wavelength of 3.41R, and the lowest pure radial modes are at wavelengths of 1.64R and 0.896R.

  11. Vibration converter with magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladilin, A. V.; Pirogov, V. A.; Golyamina, I. P.; Kulaev, U. V.; Kurbatov, P. A.; Kurbatova, E. P.

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model, the results of computational and theoretical research, and the feasibility of creating a vibration converter with full magnetic levitation in the suspension of a high-temperature superconductor (HTSC). The axial and radial stability of the active part of the converter is provided by the interaction of the magnetic field of ring-shaped permanent magnets and a hollow cylinder made of the ceramic HTSC material. The force is created by a system of current-carrying coils whose magnetic field is polarized by permanent magnets and interacts with induced currents in the superconducting cylinder. The case of transition to the superconducting state of HTSC material in the field of the permanent magnets (FC mode) is considered. The data confirm the outlook for the proposed technical solutions.

  12. Human Powered Centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  13. Lightweight Shield for Centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luper, C.

    1982-01-01

    Centrifuge bowl composed of laminated aluminum offers required combination of high strength at reduced weight. Around outside wall of bowl core of 1/16 inch thick spun aluminum are wrapped two layers of aluminum, each also one-sixteenth inch thick. Layered structure prevents cracks from propagating through wall.

  14. Multifunctional centrifugal grinding unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevostyanov, V. S.; Uralskij, V. I.; Uralskij, A. V.; Sinitsa, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents scientific and engineering developments of multifunctional centrifugal grinding unit in which the selective effect of grinding bodies on the crushing material is realized, depending on its physical and mechanical characteristics and various schemes for organizing the technological process

  15. Centrifugal analyzer development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtis, C.A.; Bauer, M.L.; Bostick, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    The development of the centrifuge fast analyzer (CFA) is reviewed. The development of a miniature CFA with computer data analysis is reported and applications for automated diagnostic chemical and hematological assays are discussed. A portable CFA system with microprocessor was adapted for field assays of air and water samples for environmental pollutants, including ammonia, nitrates, nitrites, phosphates, sulfates, and silica. 83 references

  16. Flow control arrangements for centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderton, G.W.; Davidge, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    In a centrifuge plant for the separation of uranium isotopes, when a centrifuge machine breaks down, light gas is produced. This gas can cause adjacent machines to break down, so propagating the fault. The present invention provides flow control arrangements in gas pipes to the centrifuge, whereby sudden egress of gas from a failed machine is inhibited. (author)

  17. Matrix method for acoustic levitation simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A B; Perez, Nicolas; Buiochi, Flavio; Adamowski, Julio C

    2011-08-01

    A matrix method is presented for simulating acoustic levitators. A typical acoustic levitator consists of an ultrasonic transducer and a reflector. The matrix method is used to determine the potential for acoustic radiation force that acts on a small sphere in the standing wave field produced by the levitator. The method is based on the Rayleigh integral and it takes into account the multiple reflections that occur between the transducer and the reflector. The potential for acoustic radiation force obtained by the matrix method is validated by comparing the matrix method results with those obtained by the finite element method when using an axisymmetric model of a single-axis acoustic levitator. After validation, the method is applied in the simulation of a noncontact manipulation system consisting of two 37.9-kHz Langevin-type transducers and a plane reflector. The manipulation system allows control of the horizontal position of a small levitated sphere from -6 mm to 6 mm, which is done by changing the phase difference between the two transducers. The horizontal position of the sphere predicted by the matrix method agrees with the horizontal positions measured experimentally with a charge-coupled device camera. The main advantage of the matrix method is that it allows simulation of non-symmetric acoustic levitators without requiring much computational effort.

  18. Levitation characteristics of HTS tape stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovskiy, S. V.; Ermolaev, Y. S.; Rudnev, I. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Due to the considerable development of the technology of second generation high-temperature superconductors and a significant improvement in their mechanical and transport properties in the last few years it is possible to use HTS tapes in the magnetic levitation systems. The advantages of tapes on a metal substrate as compared with bulk YBCO material primarily in the strength, and the possibility of optimizing the convenience of manufacturing elements of levitation systems. In the present report presents the results of the magnetic levitation force measurements between the stack of HTS tapes containing of tapes and NdFeB permanent magnet in the FC and ZFC regimes. It was found a non- linear dependence of the levitation force from the height of the array of stack in both modes: linear growth at small thickness gives way to flattening and constant at large number of tapes in the stack. Established that the levitation force of stacks comparable to that of bulk samples. The numerical calculations using finite element method showed that without the screening of the applied field the levitation force of the bulk superconductor and the layered superconductor stack with a critical current of tapes increased by the filling factor is exactly the same, and taking into account the screening force slightly different.

  19. Effective method to control the levitation force and levitation height in a superconducting maglev system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Peng-Tao; Yang Wan-Min; Wang Miao; Li Jia-Wei; Guo Yu-Xia

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the width of the middle magnet in the permanent magnet guideways (PMGs) on the levitation force and the levitation height of single-domain yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) bulks has been investigated at 77 K under the zero field cooled (ZFC) state. It is found that the largest levitation force can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG equal to the size of the YBCO bulk when the gap between the YBCO bulk and PMG is small. Both larger levitation force and higher levitation height can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG larger than the size of the YBCO bulk. The stiffness of the levitation force between the PMG and the YBCO bulk is higher in the system with a smaller width of the middle magnet in the PMG. These results provide an effective way to control the levitation force and the levitation height for the superconducting maglev design and applications. (paper)

  20. Temperature dependence of levitation force and its relaxation in a HTS levitation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Jun; Zhang Xingyi [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Zhou Youhe, E-mail: zhouyh@lzu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China)

    2010-03-01

    Using a modified Gifford-McMahon refrigerator to cool the cylindrical bulk YBaCuO superconductor within the region of 100-10 K, and using an updated high-temperature superconductor (HTS) maglev measurement system, the levitation force and its time relaxation at different temperatures between a YBaCuO bulk superconductor and a permanent magnet (PM) have been measured under zero-field cooling. It is found that decrease the cooling temperature of HTS can decrease the hysteresis of magnetization and increase the maximum levitation force of each hysteresis loop. For the relaxation of levitation force, if the temperature is continually lowered to 10 K after the relaxation measurement at given cooling temperature is performed for 600 s, the levitation force will continue to decrease sharply with the lowering of temperature even though it will get stable if the temperature is not lowered. Our results shown in this work are a benefit to the understanding of levitation systems.

  1. Separation parameters of gas centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, W.G.

    1977-01-01

    Early work on development of the gas centrifuge for separation of uranium isotopes has recently been reviewed. Several configurations were investigated. The preferred configuration eventually turned out to be a countercurrent centrifuge. In this form, an internal circulation is set up, and as a consequence, light isotope concentrates at one end of the centrifuge, heavy isotope at the other. In many ways the effect resembles the separation obtained in packed columns in the chemical and petroleum industries. It is the purpose of this paper to develop this analogy between countercurrent gas centrifuges and packed towers and to illustrate its usefulness in understanding the separation process in the centrifuge. 8 figures

  2. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Abhishek [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Basu, Saptarshi [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Kumar, Ranganathan, E-mail: ranganathan.kumar@ucf.edu [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters. -- Highlights: ► Demonstrates the importance of rotation in a levitated droplet that leads to controlled morphology. ► Provides detailed measurements of Particle Image Velocimetry inside levitated droplets. ► Shows variation of vortex strength with the droplet diameter and viscosity of the liquid.

  3. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-01-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters. -- Highlights: ► Demonstrates the importance of rotation in a levitated droplet that leads to controlled morphology. ► Provides detailed measurements of Particle Image Velocimetry inside levitated droplets. ► Shows variation of vortex strength with the droplet diameter and viscosity of the liquid.

  4. How to Simply Demonstrate Diamagnetic Levitation with Pencil Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelkova, Vera

    2016-01-01

    A new simple arrangement how to demonstrate diamagnetic levitation is presented. It uses pencil lead levitating in a track built from neodymium magnets. This arrangement can also be used as a classroom experiment.

  5. Determination of red blood cell deformability using centrifugal force in a three-dimensional-printed mini-disk (3D-PMD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjung Lim

    Full Text Available Measuring red blood cell (RBC deformability has become important for clinical disease diagnostics. Various methods for measuring RBC deformability have been developed; however, they require costly and large instruments, long measuring time, and skilled personnel. In this study, we present a three-dimensional-printed mini-disk (3D-PMD for measuring RBC deformability to overcome the previous limitations. For a miniaturized and low-cost setup, the 3D-PMD was fabricated by a 3D printing technique, which had not yet been used for fabricating a lab-on-a-compact disk (LOCD. Using a 3D printing technique, a multi-layered fluidic channel on the mini CD could be fabricated easily. During rotation by a spinning motor, the difference of the length of compressed RBCs in the fluidic channel was measured and analysed as compressibility indices (CIs of normal and glutaraldehyde-treated hardened RBCs. The rotation speed and time were decided as 3000 rpm and 30 min, respectively, at which the difference of CI values between normal and hardened RBCs was largest (CInormal-CIhardened = 0.195.

  6. Centrifugal compressor case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, B.

    2010-10-15

    Three centrifugal compressors at a pipeline station were retrofitted with higher head impellers in 2008. The owners of the station experienced vibration problems over the following 2 years that caused transmitter and position failures that were assumed to be flow-induced pulsations. A vibration and pulsation analysis indicated that the shell mode piping vibration excited by the blade pass pulsation was responsible for the failures. This study outlined factors that contributed to the vibration problem. Interferences between the compressor and shell mode piping natural frequencies were predicted, and potential excitation sources were examined. The study demonstrated how centrifugal vibration analyses can be used during the design phase to avoid costly adjustments. Recommendations included the addition of stiffeners to alter the shell modes, and the addition of constrained layer damping material to reduce resonant responses. 2 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs.

  7. Cavity Opto-Mechanics using an Optically Levitated Nanosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    center-of-mass motion of a levitated nanosphere. entanglement ∣ optical levitation ∣ quantum information One of the most intriguing questions associated...developed. Outlook An optically levitated opto-mechanical system can have remark- ably long coherence times, which potentially enables quantum phenomena...47) or facilitate novel quantum hybrid architectures (6). Note added: We have become aware of a recent, similar proposal to optically levitate and

  8. Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixador, P.

    1994-04-01

    Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion are now attracting attention in several countries. Different superconducting MagLev and MHD systems will be described concentrating on, above all, the electromagnetic aspect. Some programmes occurring throughout the world will be described. Magnetic levitated trains could be the new high speed transportation system for the 21st century. Intensive studies involving MagLev trains using superconductivity have been carried out in Japan since 1970. The construction of a 43 km long track is to be the next step. In 1991 a six year programme was launched in the United States to evaluate the performances of MagLev systems for transportation. The MHD (MagnetoHydroDynamic) offers some interesting advantages (efficiency, stealth characteristics, ...) for naval propulsion and increasing attention is being paid towards it nowadays. Japan is also up at the top with the tests of Yamato I, a 260 ton MHD propulsed ship. Depuis quelques années nous assistons à un redémarrage de programmes concernant la lévitation et la propulsion supraconductrices. Différents systèmes supraconducteurs de lévitation et de propulsion seront décrits en examinant plus particulièrement l'aspect électromagnétique. Quelques programmes à travers le monde seront abordés. Les trains à sustentation magnétique pourraient constituer un nouveau mode de transport terrestre à vitesse élevée (500 km/h) pour le 21^e siècle. Les japonais n'ont cessé de s'intéresser à ce système avec bobine supraconductrice. Ils envisagent un stade préindustriel avec la construction d'une ligne de 43 km. En 1991 un programme américain pour une durée de six ans a été lancé pour évaluer les performances des systèmes à lévitation pour le transport aux Etats Unis. La MHD (Magnéto- Hydro-Dynamique) présente des avantages intéressants pour la propulsion navale et un regain d'intérêt apparaît à l'heure actuelle. Le japon se situe là encore à la pointe des d

  9. Closed continuous-flow centrifuge rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breillatt, Jr., Julian P.; Remenyik, Carl J.; Sartory, Walter K.; Thacker, Louis H.; Penland, William Z.

    1976-01-01

    A blood separation centrifuge rotor having a generally parabolic core disposed concentrically and spaced apart within a housing having a similarly shaped cavity. Blood is introduced through a central inlet and into a central passageway enlarged downwardly to decrease the velocity of the entrant blood. Septa are disposed inside the central passageway to induce rotation of the entrant blood. A separation chamber is defined between the core and the housing wherein the whole blood is separated into red cell, white cell, and plasma zones. The zones are separated by annular splitter blades disposed within the separation chamber. The separated components are continuously removed through conduits communicating through a face seal to the outside of the rotor.

  10. Acoustic Measurement Of Periodic Motion Of Levitated Object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, John L.; Barmatz, Martin B.

    1992-01-01

    Some internal vibrations, oscillations in position, and rotations of acoustically levitated object measured by use of microphone already installed in typical levitation chamber for tuning chamber to resonance and monitoring operation. Levitating acoustic signal modulated by object motion of lower frequency. Amplitude modulation detected and analyzed spectrally to determine amplitudes and frequencies of motions.

  11. Gas Centrifuges and Nuclear Proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, David

    2004-09-15

    Gas centrifuges have been an ideal enrichment method for a wide variety of countries. Many countries have built gas centrifuges to make enriched uranium for peaceful nuclear purposes. Other countries have secretly sought centrifuges to make highly enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. In more recent times, several countries have secretly sought or built gas centrifuges in regions of tension. The main countries that have been of interest in the last two decades have been Pakistan, Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. Currently, most attention is focused on Iran, Pakistan, and North Korea. These states did not have the indigenous abilities to make gas centrifuges, focusing instead on illicit and questionable foreign procurement. The presentation covered the following main sections: Spread of centrifuges through illicit procurement; Role of export controls in stopping proliferation; Increasing the transparency of gas centrifuge programs in non-nuclear weapon states; and, Verified dismantlement of gas centrifuge programs. Gas centrifuges are important providers of low enriched uranium for civil nuclear power reactors. They also pose special nuclear proliferation risks. We all have special responsibilities to prevent the spread of gas centrifuges into regions of tension and to mitigate the consequences of their spread into the Middle East, South Asia, and North Asia.

  12. Dual levitated coils for antihydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, J. D.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2013-04-01

    Two coaxial superconducting magnetic coils that carry currents in the same direction and that are simultaneously levitated may serve for antihydrogen plasma confinement. The configuration may be suitable for use by a collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator facility to test fundamental symmetries between the properties of hydrogen and antihydrogen. Nested Penning traps are currently used to confine recombining antihydrogen plasma. Symmetry studies require the production of sufficiently cold antihydrogen. However, plasma drifts within nested Penning traps can increase the kinetic energy of antiprotons that form antihydrogen atoms. Dual levitated coils may serve to confine relatively large, cold, dense non-drifting recombining antihydrogen plasmas. A minimum-B magnetic field that is produced by the coils could provide for atom trapping. A toroidal plasma is confined between the coils. High density plasmas may be possible, by allowing plasma pressure to balance mechanical pressure to keep the coils apart. Progress is reported on theoretical and experimental efforts. The theoretical effort includes the development of a classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation of confinement. The experimental effort includes levitation of a NdFeB permanent ring magnet, which produces a magnetic field that is qualitatively similar to the field that would be produced by the two coaxial superconducting magnetic coils. Liquid-nitrogen-cooled Bi-2223 high-temperature-superconducting components, with a critical temperature of 108 K, were used to levitate the ring magnet. An issue concerning keeping the plane of the levitated ring horizontal is discussed.

  13. Dynamics of acoustically levitated disk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2004-10-01

    The acoustic levitation force on disk samples and the dynamics of large water drops in a planar standing wave are studied by solving the acoustic scattering problem through incorporating the boundary element method. The dependence of levitation force amplitude on the equivalent radius R of disks deviates seriously from the R3 law predicted by King's theory, and a larger force can be obtained for thin disks. When the disk aspect ratio gamma is larger than a critical value gamma(*) ( approximately 1.9 ) and the disk radius a is smaller than the critical value a(*) (gamma) , the levitation force per unit volume of the sample will increase with the enlargement of the disk. The acoustic levitation force on thin-disk samples ( gammaacoustic field for stable levitation of a large water drop is to adjust the reflector-emitter interval H slightly above the resonant interval H(n) . The simulation shows that the drop is flattened and the central parts of its top and bottom surface become concave with the increase of sound pressure level, which agrees with the experimental observation. The main frequencies of the shape oscillation under different sound pressures are slightly larger than the Rayleigh frequency because of the large shape deformation. The simulated translational frequencies of the vertical vibration under normal gravity condition agree with the theoretical analysis.

  14. Study on Transient Properties of Levitated Object in Near-Field Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bing; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Chun-Sheng

    2011-12-01

    A new approach to the study on the transient properties of the levitated object in near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) is presented. In this article, the transient response characteristics, including the levitated height of an object with radius of 24 mm and thickness of 5 mm, the radial velocity and pressure difference of gas at the boundary of clearance between the levitated object and radiating surface (squeeze film), is calculated according to several velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. First, the basic equations in fluid areas on Arbitrary Lagrange—Euler (ALE) form are numerically solved by using streamline upwind petrov galerkin (SUPG) finite elements method. Second, the formed algebraic equations and solid control equations are solved by using synchronous alternating method to gain the transient messages of the levitated object and gas in the squeeze film. Through theoretical and numerical analyses, it is found that there is a oscillation time in the transient process and that the response time does not simply increase with the increasing of velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. More investigations in this paper are helpful for the understanding of the transient properties of levitated object in NFAL, which are in favor of enhancing stabilities and responsiveness of levitated object.

  15. Study on Transient Properties of Levitated Object in Near-Field Acoustic Levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Bing; Chen Chao; Zhao Chunsheng

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to the study on the transient properties of the levitated object in near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) is presented. In this article, the transient response characteristics, including the levitated height of an object with radius of 24 mm and thickness of 5 mm, the radial velocity and pressure difference of gas at the boundary of clearance between the levitated object and radiating surface (squeeze film), is calculated according to several velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. First, the basic equations in fluid areas on Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) form are numerically solved by using streamline upwind petrov galerkin (SUPG) finite elements method. Second, the formed algebraic equations and solid control equations are solved by using synchronous alternating method to gain the transient messages of the levitated object and gas in the squeeze film. Through theoretical and numerical analyses, it is found that there is a oscillation time in the transient process and that the response time does not simply increase with the increasing of velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. More investigations in this paper are helpful for the understanding of the transient properties of levitated object in NFAL, which are in favor of enhancing stabilities and responsiveness of levitated object. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  16. Superconducting pipes and levitating magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Yan; Rizzato, Felipe B

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by a beautiful demonstration of the Faraday and the Lenz laws in which a small neodymium magnet falls slowly through a conducting nonferromagnetic tube, we consider the dynamics of a magnet falling coaxially through a superconducting pipe. Unlike the case of normal conducting pipes, in which the magnet quickly reaches the terminal velocity, inside a superconducting tube the magnet falls freely. On the other hand, to enter the pipe the magnet must overcome a large electromagnetic energy barrier. For sufficiently strong magnets, the barrier is so large that the magnet will not be able to penetrate it and will be levitated over the mouth of the pipe. We calculate the work that must done to force the magnet to enter a superconducting tube. The calculations show that superconducting pipes are very efficient at screening magnetic fields. For example, the magnetic field of a dipole at the center of a short pipe of radius a and length L approximately > a decays, in the axial direction, with a characteristic length xi approximately 0.26a. The efficient screening of the magnetic field might be useful for shielding highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices. Finally, the motion of the magnet through a superconducting pipe is compared and contrasted to the flow of ions through a trans-membrane channel.

  17. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  18. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Marco A. B., E-mail: marcobrizzotti@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-090 (Brazil); Bernassau, Anne L. [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-030 (Brazil)

    2016-07-25

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  19. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  20. The magnetic centrifugal mass filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Mass filters using rotating plasmas have been considered for separating nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel. We propose a new mass filter that utilizes centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions in a way similar to the asymmetric centrifugal trap. This magnetic centrifugal mass filter is shown to be more proliferation resistant than present technology. This filter is collisional and produces well confined output streams, among other advantages.

  1. The magnetic centrifugal mass filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Mass filters using rotating plasmas have been considered for separating nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel. We propose a new mass filter that utilizes centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions in a way similar to the asymmetric centrifugal trap. This magnetic centrifugal mass filter is shown to be more proliferation resistant than present technology. This filter is collisional and produces well confined output streams, among other advantages.

  2. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position.

  3. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Marco A. B., E-mail: marcobrizzotti@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, CP 66318, 05314-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Pérez, Nicolás [Centro Universitario de Paysandú, Universidad de la República, Ruta 3 km 363, 60000 Paysandú (Uruguay); Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, Av. Mello Moraes, 2231, 05508-030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-01-05

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position.

  4. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position

  5. Centrifuge impact cratering experiment 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Transient crates motions, cratering flow fields, crates dynamics, determining impact conditions from total crater welt, centrifuge quarter-space cratering, and impact cratering mechanics research is documented.

  6. Levitation, coating, and transport of particulate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    Several processes in various fields require uniformly thick coatings and layers on small particles. The particles may be used as carriers of catalytic materials (platinum or other coatings), as laser fusion targets (various polymer or metallic coatings), or for biological or other tracer or interactive processes. We have devised both molecular beam and electro-dynamic techniques for levitation of the particles during coating and electrodynamic methods of controlling and transporting the particles between coating steps and to final use locations. Both molecular beam and electrodynamic techniques are described and several advantages and limitations of each will be discussed. A short movie of an operating electrodynamic levitation and transport apparatus will be shown

  7. Levitated Duct Fan (LDF) Aircraft Auxiliary Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Emerson, Dawn C.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2011-01-01

    This generator concept includes a novel stator and rotor architecture made from composite material with blades attached to the outer rotating shell of a ducted fan drum rotor, a non-contact support system between the stator and rotor using magnetic fields to provide levitation, and an integrated electromagnetic generation system. The magnetic suspension between the rotor and the stator suspends and supports the rotor within the stator housing using permanent magnets attached to the outer circumference of the drum rotor and passive levitation coils in the stator shell. The magnets are arranged in a Halbach array configuration.

  8. Influence of the centrifuge time of primary plasma tubes on routine coagulation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Manzato, Franco; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2007-07-01

    Preparation of blood specimens is a major bottleneck in the laboratory throughput. Reliable strategies for reducing the time required for specimen processing without affecting quality should be acknowledged, especially for laboratories performing stat analyses. The present investigation was planned to establish a minimal suitable centrifuge time for primary samples collected for routine coagulation testing. Five sequential primary vacuum tubes containing 0.109 mol/l buffered trisodium citrate were collected from 10 volunteers and were immediately centrifuged on a conventional centrifuge at 1500 x g, at room temperature for 1, 2, 5, 10 and 15 min, respectively. Hematological and routine coagulation testing, including prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen, were performed. The centrifugation time was inversely associated with residual blood cell elements in plasma, especially platelets. Statistically significant variations from the reference 15-min centrifuge specimens were observed for fibrinogen in samples centrifuged for 5 min at most and for the activated partial thromboplastin time in samples centrifuged for 2 min at most. Meaningful biases related to the desirable bias were observed for fibrinogen in samples centrifuged for 2 min at most, and for the activated partial thromboplastin time in samples centrifuged for 1 min at most. According to our experimental conditions, a 5-10 min centrifuge time at 1500 x g may be suitable for primary tubes collected for routine coagulation testing.

  9. National geotechnical centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, J. A.; Kunz, N.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    A high G-ton centrifuge, able to take a 2700 kg (6000 lb) payload up to 300 G, is described. The stability of dams and embankments, the bearing capacity of soil foundations, and the dynamic behavior of foundations due to vibration of machinery are examples of applications. A power rating of 6,000 kW (9,000 hp) was established for the motor. An acceptable maximum speed of 70 rpm was determined. A speed increase with a ratio of 1:3 is discussed. The isolated tension straps, the anti-spreader bar and the flexwall bucket, and safety precautions are also discussed.

  10. Centrifugal-reciprocating compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, W. H. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A centrifugal compressor is described which includes at least one pair of cylinders arranged in coaxial alignment and supported for angular displacement about a common axis of rotation normally disecting a common longitudinal axis of symmetry for the cylinders. The cylinders are characterized by ported closures located at the mutually remote ends thereof through which the cylinders are charged and discharged, and a pair of piston heads seated within the cylinders and supported for floating displacement in compressive strokes in response to unidirectional angular displacement imparted to the cylinders.

  11. Assessment of hydraulic performance and biocompatibility of a MagLev centrifugal pump system designed for pediatric cardiac or cardiopulmonary support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasse, Kurt A; Gellman, Barry; Kameneva, Marina V; Woolley, Joshua R; Johnson, Carl A; Gempp, Thomas; Marks, John D; Kent, Stella; Koert, Andrew; Richardson, J Scott; Franklin, Steve; Snyder, Trevor A; Wearden, Peter; Wagner, William R; Gilbert, Richard J; Borovetz, Harvey S

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of children with life-threatening cardiac and cardiopulmonary failure is a large and underappreciated public health concern. We have previously shown that the CentriMag is a magnetically levitated centrifugal pump system, having the utility for treating adults and large children (1,500 utilized worldwide). We present here the PediVAS, a pump system whose design was modified from the CentriMag to meet the physiological requirements of young pediatric and neonatal patients. The PediVAS is comprised of a single-use centrifugal blood pump, reusable motor, and console, and is suitable for right ventricular assist device (RVAD), left ventricular assist device (LVAD), biventricular assist device (BVAD), or extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO) applications. It is designed to operate without bearings, seals and valves, and without regions of blood stasis, friction, or wear. The PediVAS pump is compatible with the CentriMag hardware, although the priming volume was reduced from 31 to 14 ml, and the port size reduced from 3/8 to (1/4) in. For the expected range of pediatric flow (0.3-3.0 L/min), the PediVAS exhibited superior hydraulic efficiency compared with the CentriMag. The PediVAS was evaluated in 14 pediatric animals for up to 30 days, demonstrating acceptable hydraulic function and hemocompatibility. The current results substantiate the performance and biocompatibility of the PediVAS cardiac assist system and are likely to support initiation of a US clinical trial in the future.

  12. Improved Position Sensor for Feedback Control of Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyers, Robert; Savage, Larry; Rogers, Jan

    2004-01-01

    An improved optoelectronic apparatus has been developed to provide the position feedback needed for controlling the levitation subsystem of a containerless-processing system. As explained, the advantage of this apparatus over prior optoelectronic apparatuses that have served this purpose stems from the use of an incandescent lamp, instead of a laser, to illuminate the levitated object. In containerless processing, a small object to be processed is levitated (e.g., by use of a microwave, low-frequency electromagnetic, electrostatic, or acoustic field) so that it is not in contact with the wall of the processing chamber or with any other solid object during processing. In the case of electrostatic or low-frequency electromagnetic levitation, real-time measurement of the displacement of the levitated object from its nominal levitation position along the vertical axis (and, in some cases, along one or two horizontal axes) is needed for feedback control of the levitating field.

  13. Levitation force relaxation under reloading in a HTS Maglev system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Qingyong; Wang Jiasu; Wang Suyu; Wang Jiansi; Dong Hao; Wang Yuxin; Shao Senhao

    2009-01-01

    The loading capacity of the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) Maglev vehicle is an important parameter in the practical application. It is closely related to the levitation force of the HTS bulk. Many papers reported that the levitation force showed the relaxation characteristic. Because different loads cause different levitation gaps and different applied magnetic fields, the levitation force relaxations under the different loads are not the same. In terms of cylindrical YBCO bulk levitated over the permanent magnetic guideway, the relationship between the levitation force relaxation and the reloading is investigated experimentally in this paper. The decrement, the decrement rate and the relaxation rate of the levitation force are calculated, respectively. This work might be helpful for studying the loading capacity of the HTS Maglev vehicle

  14. Levitation force relaxation under reloading in a HTS Maglev system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Qingyong [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, M/S 152, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)], E-mail: hedoubling@gmail.com; Wang Jiasu; Wang Suyu; Wang Jiansi; Dong Hao; Wang Yuxin; Shao Senhao [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, M/S 152, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)

    2009-02-01

    The loading capacity of the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) Maglev vehicle is an important parameter in the practical application. It is closely related to the levitation force of the HTS bulk. Many papers reported that the levitation force showed the relaxation characteristic. Because different loads cause different levitation gaps and different applied magnetic fields, the levitation force relaxations under the different loads are not the same. In terms of cylindrical YBCO bulk levitated over the permanent magnetic guideway, the relationship between the levitation force relaxation and the reloading is investigated experimentally in this paper. The decrement, the decrement rate and the relaxation rate of the levitation force are calculated, respectively. This work might be helpful for studying the loading capacity of the HTS Maglev vehicle.

  15. Effective method to control the levitation force and levitation height in a superconducting maglev system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng-Tao; Yang, Wan-Min; Wang, Miao; Li, Jia-Wei; Guo, Yu-Xia

    2015-11-01

    The influence of the width of the middle magnet in the permanent magnet guideways (PMGs) on the levitation force and the levitation height of single-domain yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) bulks has been investigated at 77 K under the zero field cooled (ZFC) state. It is found that the largest levitation force can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG equal to the size of the YBCO bulk when the gap between the YBCO bulk and PMG is small. Both larger levitation force and higher levitation height can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG larger than the size of the YBCO bulk. The stiffness of the levitation force between the PMG and the YBCO bulk is higher in the system with a smaller width of the middle magnet in the PMG. These results provide an effective way to control the levitation force and the levitation height for the superconducting maglev design and applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51342001 and 50872079), the Key-grant Project of Chinese Ministry of Education (Grant No. 311033), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120202110003), the Innovation Team in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014KTC-18), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. GK201101001 and GK201305014), and the Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Foundation Project of Shaanxi Normal University, China (Grant Nos. X2011YB08 and X2012YB05).

  16. Centrifugal precipitation chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoichiro; Lin, Qi

    2009-01-01

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography separates analytes according their solubility in ammonium sulfate (AS) solution and other precipitants. The separation column is made from a pair of long spiral channels partitioned with a semipermeable membrane. In a typical separation, concentrated ammonium sulfate is eluted through one channel while water is eluted through the other channel in the opposite direction. The countercurrent process forms an exponential AS concentration gradient through the water channel. Consequently, protein samples injected into the water channel is subjected to a steadily increasing AS concentration and at the critical AS concentration they are precipitated and deposited in the channel bed by the centrifugal force. Then the chromatographic separation is started by gradually reducing the AS concentration in the AS channel which lowers the AS gradient concentration in the water channel. This results in dissolution of deposited proteins which are again precipitated at an advanced critical point as they move through the channel. Consequently, proteins repeat precipitation and dissolution through a long channel and finally eluted out from the column in the order of their solubility in the AS solution. The present method has been successfully applied to a number of analytes including human serum proteins, recombinant ketosteroid isomerase, carotenoid cleavage enzymes, plasmid DNA, polysaccharide, polymerized pigments, PEG-protein conjugates, etc. The method is capable to single out the target species of proteins by affinity ligand or immunoaffinity separation. PMID:19541553

  17. Relativistic centrifugal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2018-03-01

    Near the central engine, many astrophysical jets are expected to rotate about their axis. Further out they are expected to go through the processes of reconfinement and recollimation. In both these cases, the flow streams along a concave surface and hence, it is subject to the centrifugal force. It is well known that such flows may experience the centrifugal instability (CFI), to which there are many laboratory examples. The recent computer simulations of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei undergoing the process of reconfinement show that in such jets CFI may dominate over the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability associated with velocity shear (Gourgouliatos & Komissarov). In this letter, we generalize the Rayleigh criterion for CFI in rotating fluids to relativistic flows using a heuristic analysis. We also present the results of computer simulations which support our analytic criterion for the case of an interface separating two uniformly rotating cylindrical flows. We discuss the difference between CFI and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in flows with curved streamlines.

  18. Centrifugal gas separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanagawa, A; Fujii, O; Nakamoto, H

    1970-03-09

    Counter currents in the rotary drum of a centrifugal gas separator are produced by providing, at either end of the drum in the vicinity of the circumferential and central positions, respectively, outflow and inflow holes with a communicating passage external to the drum there between whereby gaseous counter currents are caused to flow within the drum and travel through the passage which is provided with gas flow adjustment means. Furthermore, the space defined by the stationary portion of the passage and the rotor drum is additionally provided with a screw pump or throttling device at either its stationary side or drum side or both in order to produce a radially directed gas flow therewithin. A gas mixture is axially admitted into the drum while centrifugal force and a cooling element provided therebelow cause an increase in gas pressure along and a gaseous flow toward the wall member, whereupon the comparatively high pressured circumferentially distributed gas is extracted from the outlet holes, flows through the external gas passage and back into the lower pressured drum core through the inlet holes, thus producing the desired counter currents. The gases thus separated are withdrawn along axially provided discharge pipes. Accordingly, this invention permits heating elements which were formerly used to produce thermal convection currents to be disposed of and allows the length of the rotor drum to be more efficiently utilized to enhance separation efficiency.

  19. Centrifugal shot blast system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a demonstration of Concrete cleaning, Inc., modified centrifugal shot blast technology to remove the paint coating from concrete flooring. This demonstration is part of the Chicago Pile-5 (CP-5) Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) CP-5 Research Reactor. The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that using innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources can result in significant benefits, such as decreased cost and increased health and safety, as compared with baseline D and D technologies. Potential markets exist for the innovative centrifugal shot blast system at the following sites: Fernald Environmental Management Project, Los Alamos, Nevada, Oak Ridge Y-12 and K-25, Paducah, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion site, and the Savannah River Site. This information is based on a revision to the OST Linkage Tables dated August 4, 1997

  20. Levitation properties of a ring-shaped flywheel supported by high Tc superconducting levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Hidekazu; Tawara, Taichi; Shimada, Ryuichi.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new combination of high T c superconducting levitation and ring-shaped flywheel energy storage systems. Superconducting levitation is appropriate for rotating a ring-shaped flywheel which has neither shaft nor hub, because it is a non-contact and automatically stable levitation without any control systems. The levitation properties such as static and dynamic lateral stiffnesses, lateral damping, and lateral vibration during rotation have been investigated using a small-scaled experimental machine consisting of 16 bulk superconductors 46 mm in diameter and a ring-shaped flywheel about 300 mm in diameter. The spring constant increased as the levitation gap height decreased, and the dynamic spring constant was slightly higher than the static constant. The damping coefficient increased as the gap height decreased and the vibration amplitude increased. The experimental critical speed was in good agreement with the calculated one using a one-degree of freedom model. Finally, the possibility of large-scaled practical systems is discussed from the viewpoint of superconducting levitation. (author)

  1. Centrifuges and inertial shear forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van J.J.W.A.; Folgering, H.T.E.; Bouten, C.V.C.; Smit, T.H.

    2004-01-01

    Centrifuges are often used in biological studies for 1xg control samples in space flight microgravity experiments as well as in ground based research. Using centrifugation as a tool to generate an Earth like acceleration introduces unwanted inertial shear forces to the sample. Depending on the

  2. Centrifuge treatment of coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.A. Kazak; V.Z. Kaidalov; L.F. Syrova; O.S. Miroshnichenko; A.S. Minakov [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    New technology is required for the removal of water and heavy fractions from regular coal tar. Centrifuges offer the best option. Purification of coal tar by means of centrifuges at OAO NLMK permits the production of pitch coke or electrode pitch that complies with current standards.

  3. NASA low speed centrifugal compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a low speed centrifugal compressor were examined at NASA Lewis Research Center to improve understanding of the flow in centrifugal compressors, to provide models of various flow phenomena, and to acquire benchmark data for three dimensional viscous flow code validation. The paper describes the objectives, test facilities' instrumentation, and experiment preliminary comparisons.

  4. Levitating a Magnet Using a Superconductive Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergens, Frederick H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the materials and a procedure for demonstrating the levitation of a magnet above a superconducting material. The demonstration can be projected with an overhead projector for a large group of students. Kits to simplify the demonstration can be purchased from the Institute for Chemical Education of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.…

  5. Hiding levitating objects above a ground plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    An approach to hiding objects levitating above a conducting sheet is suggested in this paper. The proposed device makes use of isotropic negative-refractive-index materials without extreme material parameters, and creates an illusion of a remote conducting sheet. Numerical simulations are perform...

  6. Magnetic levitation -The future transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rairan, Danilo

    2000-01-01

    The paper made a recount of the main advantages and disadvantages of the traditional systems of transport with base in electric power and it shows as the systems that use the magnetic levitation they are the future of the transport. Additionally it presents the physical principle of operation of the two main systems developed at the present time

  7. Levitated crystals and quasicrystals of metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goree, John A [Dept Phys and Astron., University of Iowa

    2012-07-25

    New scientific and technological opportunities exist by marrying dusty plasma research with metamaterials. Specifically, by balancing control and self-assembly, certain laboratory plasmas can become a generic levitation platform for novel structure formation and nanomaterial synthesis. We propose to experimentally investigate two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) levitated structures of metamaterials and their properties. Such structures can self assemble in laboratory plasmas, similar to levitated dust crystals which were discovered in the mid 1990's. Laboratory plasma platform for metamaterial formation eliminates substrates upon which most metamaterials have to be supported. Three types of experiments, with similar setups, are discussed here. Levitated crystal structures of metamaterials using anisotropic microparticles are the most basic of the three. The second experiment examines whether quasicrystals of metamaterials are possible. Quasicrystals, discovered in the 1980's, possess so-called forbidden symmetries according to the conventional crystallography. The proposed experiment could answer many fundamental questions about structural, thermal and dynamical properties of quasicrystals. And finally, how to use nanoparticle coated microparticles to synthesize very long carbon nanotubes is also described. All of the experiments can fit inside a standard International Space Station locker with dimensions of 8-inch x 17-inch X 18-inch. Microgravity environment is deemed essential in particular for large 3D structures and very long carbon nanotube synthesis.

  8. Gas-centrifuge unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, T.M.

    1977-01-01

    An isotope-enrichment unit is described for separating a gaseous mixture feedstock including a compound of a light nuclear isotope at a predetermined concentration and a compound of a heavy nuclear isotope at a predetermined concentration into at least two unit-output fractions including a waste fraction depleted in the light isotope to a predetermined concentration and a product fraction enriched in the light isotope to a predetermined concentration. The unit comprises a first group of cascades of gas centrifuges, each cascade having an enriching stage, a stripping stage, an input, a light-fraction output, and a heavy-fraction output for separating the gaseous-mixture feed stock into light and heavy gaseous-mixture fractions; and an auxillary cascade

  9. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century.

  10. Effect of Centrifuge Temperature on Routine Coagulation Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazar, Hayrullah; Özdemir, Fatma; Köse, Elif

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of cooled and standard centrifuges on the results of coagulation tests to examine the effects of centrifugation temperature. Equal-volume blood samples from each patient were collected at the same time intervals and subjected to standard (25°C) and cooled centrifugation (2-4°C). Subsequently, the prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, and D-dimer values were determined in runs with the same lot numbers in the same coagulation device using the Dia-PT R (PT and INR), Dia-PTT-liquid (aPTT), Dia-FIB (fibrinogen), and Dia-D-dimer kits, respectively. The study enrolled 771 participants. The PT was significantly (p centrifuges were as follows: PT 10.30 versus 10.50 s; PT (INR) 1.04 versus 1.09 s; APTT 28.90 versus 29.40 s; fibrinogen 321.5 versus 322.1 mg/dL; and D-dimer 179.5 versus 168.7 µg FEU/mL. There were significant differences (p centrifuges. Centrifuge temperature can have a significant effect on the results of coagulation tests. However, broad and specific disease-based studies are needed. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Gas centrifuge purge method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurich, Gordon R.

    1976-01-01

    1. In a method of separating isotopes in a high speed gas centrifuge wherein a vertically oriented cylindrical rotor bowl is adapted to rotate about its axis within an evacuated chamber, and wherein an annular molecular pump having an intake end and a discharge end encircles the uppermost portion of said rotor bowl, said molecular pump being attached along its periphery in a leak-tight manner to said evacuated chamber, and wherein end cap closure means are affixed to the upper end of said rotor bowl, and a process gas withdrawal and insertion system enters said bowl through said end cap closure means, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and end cap defining an upper zone at the discharge end of said molecular pump, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and rotor bowl defining a lower annular zone at the intake end of said molecular pump, a method for removing gases from said upper and lower zones during centrifuge operation with a minimum loss of process gas from said rotor bowl, comprising, in combination: continuously measuring the pressure in said upper zone, pumping gas from said lower zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a first preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a second preselected value, said first preselected value being greater than said second preselected value, and continuously pumping gas from said upper zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a third preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a fourth preselected value, said third preselected value being greater than said first, second and fourth preselected values.

  12. Optimization of Power Consumption for Centrifugation Process Based on Attenuation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, M. S.; Abd Malek, M. F.; Sabri, Naseer; Omar, M. Iqbal bin; Mohamed, Latifah; Juni, K. M.

    2013-04-01

    The main objective of this research is to produce a mathematical model that allows decreasing the electrical power consumption of centrifugation process based on attenuation measurements. The centrifugation time for desired separation efficiency may be measured to determine the power consumed of laboratory centrifuge device. The power consumption is one of several parameters that affect the system reliability and productivity. Attenuation measurements of wave propagated through blood sample during centrifugation process were used indirectly to measure the power consumption of device. A mathematical model for power consumption was derived and used to modify the speed profile of centrifuge controller. The power consumption model derived based on attenuation measurements has successfully save the power consumption of centrifugation process keeping high separation efficiency. 18kW.h monthly for 100 daily time device operation had been saved using the proposed model.

  13. Optimization of Power Consumption for Centrifugation Process Based on Attenuation Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salim, M S; Iqbal bin Omar, M; Malek, M F Abd; Mohamed, Latifah; Sabri, Naseer; Juni, K M

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to produce a mathematical model that allows decreasing the electrical power consumption of centrifugation process based on attenuation measurements. The centrifugation time for desired separation efficiency may be measured to determine the power consumed of laboratory centrifuge device. The power consumption is one of several parameters that affect the system reliability and productivity. Attenuation measurements of wave propagated through blood sample during centrifugation process were used indirectly to measure the power consumption of device. A mathematical model for power consumption was derived and used to modify the speed profile of centrifuge controller. The power consumption model derived based on attenuation measurements has successfully save the power consumption of centrifugation process keeping high separation efficiency. 18kW.h monthly for 100 daily time device operation had been saved using the proposed model.

  14. Development of the Floating Centrifugal Pump by Use of Non Contact Magnetic Drive and Its Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuo Uno

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the impeller construction, non contact driving method and performance of a newly developed shaftless floating pump with centrifugal impeller. The drive principle of the floating impeller pump used the magnet induction method similar to the levitation theory of the linear motor. In order to reduce the axial thrust by the pressure different between shroud and disk side, the balance hole and the aileron blade were installed in the floating impeller. Considering the above effect, floating of an impeller in a pump was realized. Moreover, the performance curves of a developed pump are in agreement with a general centrifugal pump, and the dimensionless characteristic curve also agrees under the different rotational speed due to no mechanical friction of the rotational part. Therefore, utility of a non contacting magnetic-drive style pump with the floating impeller was made clear.

  15. Parametric study of single-axis acoustic levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, W. J.; Wei, B.

    2001-08-06

    Remarkable enhancement of the single-axis acoustic levitation force is achieved by properly curving the surface and enlarging the section of the reflector so as to levitate high density material like tungsten ({rho}{sub s}=18.92g/cm{sup 3}). A two-cylinder model incorporating the boundary element method simulations is presented for systematic study of the relationship between levitation capabilities and geometric parameters. The model proves to be successful in predicting resonant modes and explaining deviation of the levitated samples near the reflector and driver. The dependence of levitation force on resonant mode, reflector section radius R{sub b} and curvature radius R is revealed and summarized, which agrees with the experiment in principle and suggests that a reflector with large R{sub b} and small R (when R{sub b}/{lambda}{>=}0.982) working under mode 1 assures better levitation capabilities. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Analysis of a Non-resonant Ultrasonic Levitation Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    In this study, a non-resonant configuration of ultrasonic levitation device is presented, which is formed by a small diameter ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. The influence of different levitator parameters on the levitation performance is investigated by using a numerical model that combines the Gor'kov theory with a matrix method based on the Rayleigh integral. In contrast with traditional acoustic levitators, the non-resonant ultrasonic levitation device allows the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be adjusted continually, without requiring the separation distance to be set to a multiple of half-wavelength. It is also demonstrated, both numerically and experimentally, that the levitating particle can be manipulated by maintaining the transducer in a fixed position in space and moving the reflector in respect to the transducer.

  17. Parametric study of single-axis acoustic levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, W. J.; Wei, B.

    2001-01-01

    Remarkable enhancement of the single-axis acoustic levitation force is achieved by properly curving the surface and enlarging the section of the reflector so as to levitate high density material like tungsten (ρ s =18.92g/cm 3 ). A two-cylinder model incorporating the boundary element method simulations is presented for systematic study of the relationship between levitation capabilities and geometric parameters. The model proves to be successful in predicting resonant modes and explaining deviation of the levitated samples near the reflector and driver. The dependence of levitation force on resonant mode, reflector section radius R b and curvature radius R is revealed and summarized, which agrees with the experiment in principle and suggests that a reflector with large R b and small R (when R b /λ≥0.982) working under mode 1 assures better levitation capabilities. Copyright 2001 American Institute of Physics

  18. Theoretical and experimental examination of near-field acoustic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Hideyuki; Kamakura, Tomoo; Matsuda, Kazuhisa

    2002-04-01

    A planar object can be levitated stably close to a piston sound source by making use of acoustic radiation pressure. This phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation [Y. Hashimoto et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2057-2061 (1996)]. In the present article, the levitation distance is predicted theoretically by numerically solving basic equations in a compressible viscous fluid subject to the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Additionally, experiments are carried out using a 19.5-kHz piston source with a 40-mm aperture and various aluminum disks of different sizes. The measured levitation distance agrees well with the theory, which is different from a conventional theory, and the levitation distance is not inversely proportional to the square root of the surface density of the levitated disk in a strict sense.

  19. Dynamics of levitated objects in acoustic vortex fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Z Y; Yin, J F; Zhai, W; Yan, N; Wang, W L; Zhang, J; Drinkwater, Bruce W

    2017-08-02

    Acoustic levitation in gaseous media provides a tool to process solid and liquid materials without the presence of surfaces such as container walls and hence has been used widely in chemical analysis, high-temperature processing, drop dynamics and bioreactors. To date high-density objects can only be acoustically levitated in simple standing-wave fields. Here we demonstrate the ability of a small number of peripherally placed sources to generate acoustic vortex fields and stably levitate a wide range of liquid and solid objects. The forces exerted by these acoustic vortex fields on a levitated water droplet are observed to cause a controllable deformation of the droplet and/or oscillation along the vortex axis. Orbital angular momentum transfer is also shown to rotate a levitated object rapidly and the rate of rotation can be controlled by the source amplitude. We expect this research can increase the diversity of acoustic levitation and expand the application of acoustic vortices.

  20. Waves in Strong Centrifugal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarization and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modeling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  1. Platelet concentration of plateletrich plasma from dogs, obtained through three centrifugation speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Couto de Magalhães Ferraz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The platelets release at least 4 growth factors (Platelet Derived Growth Factor. ²1 and ²2 Transforming Growth Factors and Insulin-like Growth Factor which are responsible for the migration and activation of cells that will start the reparation of soft tissues and bones. The Platelet Rich Plasma is an autogenous source for Growth Factors, obtained by platelet concentration by centrifuging total blood. This study aimed the comparison of platelet concentrations in plasma centrifuged in three different centrifugation speeds (1300, 1600 e 3200rpm, for the production of platelet rich plasma. Blood was drowned from 15 dogs, 40ml of each, and these were divided into four groups and centrifuged at 800rpm. Then the first group was centrifuged at 1300rpm, the second at 1600rpm, the third at 3200rpm and the last was used as control, named plasma. The mean percentage increase in the platelet concentration for each technique was: 1300 - 183%, 1600 - 210% and 3200 - 222%. But in centrifugation at 3200 rpm, platelets presented altered morphology and different sizes in every sample studied, which was understood as severe cell damage. It was concluded that the best technique for the preparation of the platelet rich plasma in dogs consisted of the previous centrifugation of the blood at 800rpm for ten minutes, and then the plasma should be separated. This plasma is then submitted to a second centrifugation of 1600rpm for 10 minutes, and the platelet poor plasma is separated and discharged.

  2. Electrostatic levitation and transport of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    Several levitation concepts have been evaluated resulting in the electrostatic quadrupole being chosen as the most universal. A levitator has been constructed to handle laser fusion targets during and between the processing steps. The levitator is based on a quadrupole rail which is segmented to provide electrically controlled transport and confinement along the rail. This device has demonstrated transport both vertical and horizontal of targets with appropriate mass to size ratios and exhibits remarkably stable confinement at atmospheric pressure

  3. Optical levitation of microdroplet containing a single quantum dot

    OpenAIRE

    Minowa, Yosuke; Kawai, Ryoichi; Ashida, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the optical levitation or trapping in helium gas of a single quantum dot (QD) within a liquid droplet. Bright single photon emission from the levitated QD in the droplet was observed for more than 200 s. The observed photon count rates are consistent with the value theoretically estimated from the two-photon-action cross section. This paper presents the realization of an optically levitated solid-state quantum emitter. This paper was published in Optics Letters and is made avai...

  4. Non-contact transportation using near-field acoustic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueha; Hashimoto; Koike

    2000-03-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation, where planar objects 10 kg in weight can levitate stably near the vibrating plate, is successfully applied both to non-contact transportation of objects and to a non-contact ultrasonic motor. Transporting apparatuses and an ultrasonic motor have been fabricated and their characteristics measured. The theory of near-field acoustic levitation both for a piston-like sound source and a flexural vibration source is also briefly described.

  5. Development of superconducting magnets for magnetically levitated trains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, E.; Iwamoto, M.; Ogino, O.; Kawamura, T.

    1974-01-01

    Superconducting magnets will play a vital role in magnetically levitated trains, producing lift, guidance and propulsion forces. The main problems in the design are the current density of coils and the cryogenic thermal insulation. This paper describes the development of full-scale levitation magnets with length of 1.55m and width of 0.3 or 0.5m. Dynamic levitation tests using small model magnets are also presented. (author)

  6. Effect of centrifugation and washing on adipose graft viability: a new method to improve graft efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoareau, Laurence; Bencharif, Karima; Girard, Anne-Claire; Gence, Lydie; Delarue, Pierre; Hulard, Olivier; Festy, Franck; Roche, Regis

    2013-05-01

    Adipose tissue grafting is a promising method in the field of surgical filling. We studied the effect of centrifugation on fat grafts, and we propose an optimised protocol for the improvement of adipose tissue viability. Adipose tissue was subjected to different centrifugations, and the volumes of interstitial liquid and oil released were measured to choose the optimal condition. Tissue from this condition was then compared to tissue obtained from two traditional techniques: strong centrifugation (commonly 3 min at 3000 rpm/900 g), and decantation, by injecting into immunodeficient mice. The cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) were assayed 24 h post-injection, and after 1 month of grafting the state of the lipografts was evaluated through macroscopic and histological analysis, with oil gap area measurement. Strong centrifugation (900 g, 1800 g) is deleterious for adipose tissue because it leads to until threefold more adipocyte death compared to low centrifugation (100 g, 400 g). In addition, mice injected with strong centrifuged and non-centrifuged adipose tissue have higher rates of blood IL-6 and MCP-1, compared to those grafted with soft centrifuged fat. Moreover, extensive lipid vacuoles were detectable on histological sections of the non-centrifuged lipografts, whereas lipografts from soft centrifugation contain a higher amount of connective tissue containing collagen fibres. It is necessary to wash and centrifuge adipose tissue before reinjection in order to remove infiltration liquid and associated toxic molecules, which in the long term are deleterious for the graft. However, strong centrifugation is not recommended since it leads very quickly to greater adipocyte death. Thus, soft centrifugation (400 g/1 min), preceded by washings, seems to be the most appropriate protocol for the reinjection of adipose tissue. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published

  7. Particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography in a levitated droplet with nanosilica suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan [University of Central Florida, Department of Mechanical Materials and Aerospace Engineering, Orlando, FL (United States); Basu, Saptarshi [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangalore (India)

    2012-03-15

    Preferential accumulation and agglomeration kinetics of nanoparticles suspended in an acoustically levitated water droplet under radiative heating has been studied. Particle image velocimetry performed to map the internal flow field shows a single cell recirculation with increasing strength for decreasing viscosities. Infrared thermography and high speed imaging show details of the heating process for various concentrations of nanosilica droplets. Initial stage of heating is marked by fast vaporization of liquid and sharp temperature rise. Following this stage, aggregation of nanoparticles is seen resulting in various structure formations. At low concentrations, a bowl structure of the droplet is dominant, maintained at a constant temperature. At high concentrations, viscosity of the solution increases, leading to rotation about the levitator axis due to the dominance of centrifugal motion. Such complex fluid motion inside the droplet due to acoustic streaming eventually results in the formation of a ring structure. This horizontal ring eventually reorients itself due to an imbalance of acoustic forces on the ring, exposing larger area for laser absorption and subsequent sharp temperature rise. (orig.)

  8. Microwave assisted centrifuge and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikrantz, David H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    Centrifuge samples may be exposed to microwave energy to heat the samples during centrifugation and to promote separation of the different components or constituents of the samples using a centrifuge device configured for generating microwave energy and directing the microwave energy at a sample located in the centrifuge.

  9. Levitation properties of maglev systems using soft ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Guang; Zhou, You-He

    2015-03-01

    Soft ferromagnets are widely used as flux-concentration materials in the design of guideways for superconducting magnetic levitation transport systems. In order to fully understand the influence of soft ferromagnets on the levitation performance, in this work we apply a numerical model based on the functional minimization method and the Bean’s critical state model to study the levitation properties of an infinitely long superconductor immersed in the magnetic field created by a guideway of different sets of infinitely long parallel permanent magnets with soft ferromagnets between them. The levitation force, guidance force, magnetic stiffness and magnetic pole density are calculated considering the coupling between the superconductor and soft ferromagnets. The results show that the levitation performance is closely associated with the permanent magnet configuration and with the location and dimension of the soft ferromagnets. Introducing the soft ferromagnet with a certain width in a few configurations always decreases the levitation force. However, for most configurations, the soft ferromagnets contribute to improve the levitation performance only when they have particular locations and dimensions in which the optimized location and thickness exist to increase the levitation force the most. Moreover, if the superconductor is laterally disturbed, the presence of soft ferromagnets can effectively improve the lateral stability for small lateral displacement and reduce the degradation of levitation force.

  10. Levitation of a magnet by an alternating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, W; Hunt, M O; Summerskill, W S H

    2013-01-01

    An experiment is described in which a small strong cylindrical magnet is levitated by a vertical non-uniform alternating magnetic field. Surprisingly, no superimposed constant field is necessary, but the levitation can be explained when the vertical motion of the magnet is taken into account. The theoretical mean levitation force is (0.26 ± 0.06) N, which is in good agreement with the levitated weight of (0.239 ± 0.001) N. This experiment is suitable for an undergraduate laboratory, particularly as a final year project. Students have found it interesting, and it sharpens up knowledge of basic magnetism. (paper)

  11. Dependence of acoustic levitation capabilities on geometric parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2002-08-01

    A two-cylinder model incorporating boundary element method simulations is developed, which builds up the relationship between the levitation capabilities and the geometric parameters of a single-axis acoustic levitator with reference to wavelength. This model proves to be successful in predicting resonant modes of the acoustic field and explaining axial symmetry deviation of the levitated samples near the reflector and emitter. Concave reflecting surfaces of a spherical cap, a paraboloid, and a hyperboloid of revolution are investigated systematically with regard to the dependence of the levitation force on the section radius R(b) and curvature radius R (or depth D) of the reflector. It is found that the levitation force can be remarkably enhanced by choosing an optimum value of R or D, and the possible degree of this enhancement for spherically curved reflectors is the largest. The degree of levitation force enhancement by this means can also be facilitated by enlarging R(b) and employing a lower resonant mode. The deviation of the sample near the reflector is found likely to occur in case of smaller R(b), larger D, and a higher resonant mode. The calculated dependence of levitation force on R, R(b), and the resonant mode is also verified by experiment and finally demonstrated to be in good agreement with experimental results, in which considerably a strong levitation force is achieved to levitate an iridium sphere which has the largest density of 22.6 g/cm(3).

  12. Energy-Based Controller Design of Stochastic Magnetic Levitation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the control problem of magnetic levitation system, in which velocity feedback signal is influenced by stochastic disturbance. Firstly, single-degree-freedom magnetic levitation is regarded as an energy-transform action device. From the view of energy-balance relation, the magnetic levitation system is transformed into port-controlled Hamiltonian system model. Next, based on the Hamiltonian structure, the control law of magnetic levitation system is designed by applying Lyapunov theory. Finally, the simulation verifies the correctness of the proposed results.

  13. Quantification of platelets obtained by different centrifugation protocols in SHR rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazigi Junior, João Alberto; Dos Santos, João Baptista Gomes; Xavier, Bruno Rodrigues; Fernandes, Marcela; Valente, Sandra Gomes; Leite, Vilnei Mattiolli

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the platelet concentration in the blood of SHR rats, by means of different centrifugation protocols, and to evaluate what the most effective method for obtaining platelets is. We used 40 male rats of the isogenic SHR lineage. The animals were divided into three groups: control, using whole blood without centrifugation; single centrifugation, using whole blood subjected to a single centrifugation at 200 × g and 400 × g; and double centrifugation, using whole blood subjected one centrifugation at different rotations, followed by collection of whole plasma subjected to another centrifugation at different rotations: 200 × g + 200 × g; 200 × g + 400 × g; 200 × g + 800 × g; 400 × g + 400 × g; 400 × g + 800 × g. Samples of 3 ml of blood were drawn from each animal by means of cardiac puncture. The blood was stored in Vacutainer collection tubes containing 3.2% sodium citrate. The blood from the control group animals was analyzed without being subjected to centrifugation. After the blood from the other groups of animals had been subjected to centrifugation, the whole plasma was collected and subjected to platelet counting in the lower third of the sample. We obtained greatest platelet enrichment in the subgroup with two centrifugations comprising 400 × g for 10 min + 400 × g for 10 min, in which the mean platelet concentration was 11.30 times higher than that of the control group. It was possible to obtain a high platelet concentration using viable simple techniques, by means of centrifugation of whole blood and use of commonly used materials. The most effective method for obtaining platelet concentrate was found in samples subjected to two centrifugations.

  14. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Use of density gradient centrifugation, magnetically activated cell sorting and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagnoli, C; Multhaupt, H A; Ludomirski, A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a noninvasive method suitable for clinical prenatal diagnosis. STUDY DESIGN: Fetal nucleated erythrocytes were separated from peripheral blood of 17 healthy pregnant women using small magnetically activated cell sorting columns (MiniMACS) following density gradient centrifug...

  15. Uranium enrichment by gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heriot, I.D.

    1988-01-01

    After recalling the physical principles and the techniques of centrifuge enrichment the report describes the centrifuge enrichment programmes of the various countries concerned and compares this technology with other enrichment technologies like gaseous diffusion, laser, aerodynamic devices and chemical processes. The centrifuge enrichment process is said to be able to replace with advantage the existing enrichment facilities in the short and medium term. Future prospects of the process are also described, like recycled uranium enrichment and economic improvements; research and development needs to achieve the economic prospects are also indicated. Finally the report takes note of the positive aspect of centrifuge enrichment as far as safeguards and nuclear safety are concerned. 27 figs, 113 refs

  16. Centar's gas centrifuge enrichment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abajian, V.V.; Fishman, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Plans for the building and operating of Centar Associates gas centrifuge uranium enrichment plant are described. Operating costs and machine manufacture are considered. Commitments with the utilities are summarised. (U.K.)

  17. Acoustic levitation and manipulation for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.

    1979-01-01

    A wide spectrum of experiments to be performed in space in a microgravity environment require levitation and manipulation of liquid or molten samples. A novel acoustic method has been developed at JPL for controlling liquid samples without physical contacts. This method utilizes the static pressure generated by three orthogonal acoustic standing waves excited within an enclosure. Furthermore, this method will allow the sample to be rotated and/or oscillated by modifying the phase angles and/or the amplitude of the acoustic field. This technique has been proven both in our laboratory and in a microgravity environment provided by KC-135 flights. Samples placed within our chamber driven at (1,0,0), (0,1,0), and (0,0,1), modes were indeed levitated, rotated, and oscillated.

  18. Aerodynamics of magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetz, Joseph A.; Marchman, James F., III

    1996-01-01

    High-speed (500 kph) trains using magnetic forces for levitation, propulsion and control offer many advantages for the nation and a good opportunity for the aerospace community to apply 'high tech' methods to the domestic sector. One area of many that will need advanced research is the aerodynamics of such MAGLEV (Magnetic Levitation) vehicles. There are important issues with regard to wind tunnel testing and the application of CFD to these devices. This talk will deal with the aerodynamic design of MAGLEV vehicles with emphasis on wind tunnel testing. The moving track facility designed and constructed in the 6 ft. Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech will be described. Test results for a variety of MAGLEV vehicle configurations will be presented. The last topic to be discussed is a Multi-disciplinary Design approach that is being applied to MAGLEV vehicle configuration design including aerodynamics, structures, manufacturability and life-cycle cost.

  19. Cryogenically enhanced magneto-Archimedes levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catherall, A T; Lopez-Alcaraz, P; Benedict, K A; King, P J; Eaves, L [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2005-05-01

    The application of both a strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient to a diamagnetic body can produce a vertical force which is sufficient to counteract its weight due to gravity. By immersing the body in a paramagnetic fluid, an additional adjustable magneto-buoyancy force is generated which enhances the levitation effect. Here we show that cryogenic oxygen and oxygen-nitrogen mixtures in both gaseous and liquid form provide sufficient buoyancy to permit the levitation and flotation of a wide range of materials. These fluids may provide an alternative to synthetic ferrofluids for the separation of minerals. We also report the dynamics of corrugation instabilities on the surface of magnetized liquid oxygen.

  20. Wigner Function Reconstruction in Levitated Optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muddassar; Toroš, Marko; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrate the reconstruction of theWigner function from marginal distributions of the motion of a single trapped particle using homodyne detection. We show that it is possible to generate quantum states of levitated optomechanical systems even under the efect of continuous measurement by the trapping laser light. We describe the opto-mechanical coupling for the case of the particle trapped by a free-space focused laser beam, explicitly for the case without an optical cavity. We use the scheme to reconstruct the Wigner function of experimental data in perfect agreement with the expected Gaussian distribution of a thermal state of motion. This opens a route for quantum state preparation in levitated optomechanics.

  1. Cryogenically enhanced magneto-Archimedes levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catherall, A T; Lopez-Alcaraz, P; Benedict, K A; King, P J; Eaves, L

    2005-01-01

    The application of both a strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient to a diamagnetic body can produce a vertical force which is sufficient to counteract its weight due to gravity. By immersing the body in a paramagnetic fluid, an additional adjustable magneto-buoyancy force is generated which enhances the levitation effect. Here we show that cryogenic oxygen and oxygen-nitrogen mixtures in both gaseous and liquid form provide sufficient buoyancy to permit the levitation and flotation of a wide range of materials. These fluids may provide an alternative to synthetic ferrofluids for the separation of minerals. We also report the dynamics of corrugation instabilities on the surface of magnetized liquid oxygen

  2. Cavity Cooling a Single Charged Levitated Nanosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, J.; Fonseca, P. Z. G.; Mavrogordatos, T.; Monteiro, T. S.; Barker, P. F.

    2015-03-01

    Optomechanical cavity cooling of levitated objects offers the possibility for laboratory investigation of the macroscopic quantum behavior of systems that are largely decoupled from their environment. However, experimental progress has been hindered by particle loss mechanisms, which have prevented levitation and cavity cooling in a vacuum. We overcome this problem with a new type of hybrid electro-optical trap formed from a Paul trap within a single-mode optical cavity. We demonstrate a factor of 100 cavity cooling of 400 nm diameter silica spheres trapped in vacuum. This paves the way for ground-state cooling in a smaller, higher finesse cavity, as we show that a novel feature of the hybrid trap is that the optomechanical cooling becomes actively driven by the Paul trap, even for singly charged nanospheres.

  3. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  4. 75 FR 70300 - USEC, Inc.; American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility; American Centrifuge Plant; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility; American Centrifuge Plant; Notice of Receipt of a License Transfer... SNM-2011, for the American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and the American Centrifuge Plant... USEC Inc., (the Licensee), for its American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility (LCF) and American...

  5. Optimisation of a double-centrifugation method for preparation of canine platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeok-Soo; Woo, Heung-Myong; Kang, Byung-Jae

    2017-06-26

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been expected for regenerative medicine because of its growth factors. However, there is considerable variability in the recovery and yield of platelets and the concentration of growth factors in PRP preparations. The aim of this study was to identify optimal relative centrifugal force and spin time for the preparation of PRP from canine blood using a double-centrifugation tube method. Whole blood samples were collected in citrate blood collection tubes from 12 healthy beagles. For the first centrifugation step, 10 different run conditions were compared to determine which condition produced optimal recovery of platelets. Once the optimal condition was identified, platelet-containing plasma prepared using that condition was subjected to a second centrifugation to pellet platelets. For the second centrifugation, 12 different run conditions were compared to identify the centrifugal force and spin time to produce maximal pellet recovery and concentration increase. Growth factor levels were estimated by using ELISA to measure platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) concentrations in optimised CaCl 2 -activated platelet fractions. The highest platelet recovery rate and yield were obtained by first centrifuging whole blood at 1000 g for 5 min and then centrifuging the recovered platelet-enriched plasma at 1500 g for 15 min. This protocol recovered 80% of platelets from whole blood and increased platelet concentration six-fold and produced the highest concentration of PDGF-BB in activated fractions. We have described an optimised double-centrifugation tube method for the preparation of PRP from canine blood. This optimised method does not require particularly expensive equipment or high technical ability and can readily be carried out in a veterinary clinical setting.

  6. Rotary drum for centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mitsuo; Ichinoto, Seiichi.

    1972-01-01

    An outwardly concaved metallic end plate is fitted into each end of a metallic rotary drum for a centrifuge until each end face of the drum is brought to bear upon a section of the end plate radially projected in a direction perpendicular to the axis of rotation of the drum, said section being provided at the marginal edge of the end plate. Following completion of the fitting operation, the end plate is welded to the rotary drum. During high speed rotation, the drum contracts axially and expands radially, while the concave end plate, radially tensioned due to the radial expansion of the drum, undergoes a reduction in its degree of concavity resulting in outwardly directed axial displacement of the end plate proper its marginal edge remaining unaffected relative to the drum. Such displacement conpensates for axial contraction of the drum. Since displacement of the end plate and contraction of the drum depend upon the speed of rotation, substantial axial distortion of the drum can be avoided relative to the end plates at both low and high speeds to permit a high degree of balance for the rotary drum. (Ohno, Y.)

  7. Centrifugal gas separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, M

    1970-03-27

    A centrifugal gas separator of a highly endurable construction and with improved gas sealing qualities utilizes a cylincrical elastic bellows or similar system in cooperation with a system of dynamic pressure operable gas seals as means for removing separated gases from the interior of the rotor drum, collecting the separated gases in their respective separated gas chambers defined by the corresponding bellows and their supporting stationary wall members, gas seals and rotor end caps, and means for discharging to the exterior of the surrounding cylindrical wall member the gaseous components from their respective separated gas chambers. In the vicinity of the rotary drum motor is a mixed gas chamber and means for providing the gas mixture along a co-axial passage into the rotary drum chamber. Orifices are bored into the end caps of the rotary drum to direct the separated gases into the aforementioned separated gas chambers which, through the action of the gas seals, freely slide upon the rotating drum to collect and thereafter discharge the thus separated gases. Therefore, according to the present invention, helium gas used to prevent separated gas remixture is unnecessary and, furthermore, the gas seals and elastic bellows means provide an air-tight seal superior to that of the contact sealing system of the former art.

  8. Centrifugal gas separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mitsuo.

    1970-01-01

    A centrifugal gas separator of a highly endurable construction and with improved gas sealing qualities utilizes a cylincrical elastic bellows or similar system in cooperation with a system of dynamic pressure operable gas seals as means for removing separated gases from the interior of the rotor drum, collecting the separated gases in their respective separated gas chambers defined by the corresponding bellows and their supporting stationary wall members, gas seals and rotor end caps, and means for discharging to the exterior of the surrounding cylindrical wall member the gaseous components from their respective separated gas chambers. In the vicinity of the rotary drum motor is a mixed gas chamber and means for providing the gas mixture along a co-axial passage into the rotary drum chamber. Orifices are bored into the end caps of the rotary drum to direct the separated gases into the aforementioned separated gas chambers which, through the action of the gas seals, freely slide upon the rotating drum to collect and thereafter discharge the thus separated gases. Therefore, according to the present invention, helium gas used to prevent separated gas remixture is unnecessary and, furthermore, the gas seals and elastic bellows means provide an air-tight seal superior to that of the contact sealing system of the former art. (K.J. Owens)

  9. Radwaste disposal drum centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, L.S.; Deltete, C.P.; Crook, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    The drum or processing bowl of the DDC becomes the disposal container when the filling operation is completed. Rehandling of the processed resin is eliminated. By allowing the centrifugally compacted resin to remain in the processing container, extremely efficient waste packaging can be achieved. The dewatering results and volume reductions reported during 1986 were based upon laboratory scale testing sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Department of Energy (DOE). Since the publication of these preliminary results, additional testing using a full-scale prototype DDC has been completed, again under the auspices of the DOE. Full-scale testing has substantiated the results of earlier testing and has formed the basis for preliminary discussions with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regarding DDC licensing for radioactive applications. A comprehensive Topical Report and Process Control Program is currently being prepared for submittal to the NRC for review under a utility licensing action. Detailed cost-benefit analyses for actual plant operations have been prepared to substantiate the attractiveness of the DDC. Several methods to physically integrate a DDC into a nuclear power plant have also been developed

  10. Theoretical investigations on plasma centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S.H.

    1978-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of the steady-state dynamics of plasma centrifuges is dealt with to understand the physics of rotating plasmas and their feasibility for isotope separation. The centrifuge systems under consideration employ cylindrical gas discharge chambers with externally-applied axial magnetic fields. The cathode and anode are symmetric about the cylinder axis and arranged in such a way for each system, i.e., (1) two ring electrodes of different radii in the chamber end plates or (2) two ring electrodes embedded in the mantle of the cylinder. They produce converging and/or diverging current density field lines, which intersect the external magnetic field under a nonvanishing angle. The associated Lorentz forces set the plasma, which is produced through an electrical discharge, into rotation around the cylinder axis. Three boundary-value problems for the coupled partial differential equations of the centrifuge fields are formulated, respectively, on the basis of the magnetogasdynamic equations. The electric field, electrostatic potential, current density, induced magnetic field, and velocity distributions are discussed in terms of the Hartmann number, the Hall coefficient, and the magnetic Reynolds number. The plasma centrifuge analyses presented show that the speeds of plasma rotation up to the order of 10 4 m/sec are achievable at typical conditions. The associated centrifugal forces produce a significant spatial isotope separation, which is somewhat reduced in the viscous boundary layers at the centrifuge walls. The speeds of plasma rotation increase with increasing Hartmann number and Hall coefficient. For small Hall coefficient, the induced azimuthal magnetic field does not affect the plasma rotation. For large volumes of rotating isotope mixtures, a multidischarge centrifuge can be constructed by setting up a large number of centrifuge systems in series

  11. Flow visualization of acoustic levitation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroth, ED

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic levitation experiments for space applications were performed. Holographic interferometry is being used to study the heat transfer rates on a heated rod enclosed in a 6 cu in chamber. Acoustic waves at levels up to 150 db increased the heating rates to the rod by factors of three to four. High speed real time holographic interferometry was used to measure the boundary layer on the heated rod. Data reduction and digitization of the interferograms are being implemented.

  12. Magnetic levitation railways. 2. enlarged ed. Magnetschwebebahnen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miedtank, R [comp.

    1989-01-01

    The bibliography contains 129 literature references, mostly with German abstracts on: Representation of the magnetic levitation railway (MAGLEV railway) as a fast modern railway; type of design of tracks and stations; manufacture of track supports made of steel and reinforced concrete with the accuracy required for this fast railway system. Introduction of experimental sections and planning study for this means of transport. (orig./HP).

  13. Sputter coating of microspherical substrates by levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, A.T.; Hosford, C.D.

    Microspheres are substantially uniformly coated with metals or nonmetals by simltaneously levitating them and sputter coating them at total chamber pressures less than 1 torr. A collimated hole structure comprising a parallel array of upwardly projecting individual gas outlets is machined out to form a dimple. Glass microballoons,, which are particularly useful in laser fusion applications, can be substantially uniformly coated using the coating method and apparatus.

  14. Quantum levitation by left-handed metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Philbin, Thomas G [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Left-handed metamaterials make perfect lenses that image classical electromagnetic fields with significantly higher resolution than the diffraction limit. Here, we consider the quantum physics of such devices. We show that the Casimir force of two conducting plates may turn from attraction to repulsion if a perfect lens is sandwiched between them. For optical left-handed metamaterials, this repulsive force of the quantum vacuum may levitate ultra-thin mirrors.

  15. Quantum levitation by left-handed metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Philbin, Thomas G

    2007-01-01

    Left-handed metamaterials make perfect lenses that image classical electromagnetic fields with significantly higher resolution than the diffraction limit. Here, we consider the quantum physics of such devices. We show that the Casimir force of two conducting plates may turn from attraction to repulsion if a perfect lens is sandwiched between them. For optical left-handed metamaterials, this repulsive force of the quantum vacuum may levitate ultra-thin mirrors

  16. Electrostatic Levitation Furnace for the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keiji; Koshikawa, Naokiyo; Shibasaki, Kohichi; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Okada, Junpei; Takada, Tetsuya; Arai, Tatsuya; Fujino, Naoki; Yamaura, Yukiko

    2012-01-01

    JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) has just started the development of Electrostatic Levitation Furnace to be launched in 2014 for the ISS. This furnace can control the sample position with electrostatic force and heat it above 2000 degree Celsius using semiconductor laser from four different directions. The announcement of Opportunity will be issued soon for this furnace. In this paper, we will show the specifications of this furnace and also the development schedule

  17. Centrifugal Compressor Aeroelastic Analysis Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are very widely used in the turbomachine industry where low mass flow rates are required. Gas turbine engines for tanks, rotorcraft and small jets rely extensively on centrifugal compressors for rugged and compact design. These compressors experience problems related with unsteadiness of flowfields, such as stall flutter, separation at the trailing edge over diffuser guide vanes, tip vortex unsteadiness, etc., leading to rotating stall and surge. Considerable interest exists in small gas turbine engine manufacturers to understand and eventually eliminate the problems related to centrifugal compressors. The geometric complexity of centrifugal compressor blades and the twisting of the blade passages makes the linear methods inapplicable. Advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are needed for accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of centrifugal compressors. Most of the current day industrial turbomachines and small aircraft engines are designed with a centrifugal compressor. With such a large customer base and NASA Glenn Research Center being, the lead center for turbomachines, it is important that adequate emphasis be placed on this area as well. Currently, this activity is not supported under any project at NASA Glenn.

  18. Laser Techniques on Acoustically Levitated Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannuli Antonio

    2018-01-01

    acoustically levitated droplets of trehalose aqueous solutions in order to perform spectroscopic analyses as a function of concentration and to test the theoretical diameter law. The study of such systems is important in order to better understand the behaviour of trehalose-synthesizing extremophiles that live in extreme environments. In particular, it will be shown how acoustic levitation, combined with optical spectroscopic instruments allows to explore a wide concentration range and to test the validity of the diameter law as a function of levitation lag time, i.e. the D2 vs t law. On this purpose a direct diameter monitoring by a video camera and a laser pointer was first performed; then the diameter was also evaluated by an indirect measure through an OH/CH band area ratio analysis of collected Raman and Infrared spectra. It clearly emerges that D2 vs t follows a linear trend for about 20 minutes, reaching then a plateau at longer time. This result shows how trehalose is able to avoid total water evaporation, this property being essential for the surviving of organisms under extreme environmental conditions.

  19. Laser Techniques on Acoustically Levitated Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannuli, Antonio; Caccamo, Maria Teresa; Castorina, Giuseppe; Colombo, Franco; Magazù, Salvatore

    2018-01-01

    This work reports the results of an experimental study where laser techniques are applied to acoustically levitated droplets of trehalose aqueous solutions in order to perform spectroscopic analyses as a function of concentration and to test the theoretical diameter law. The study of such systems is important in order to better understand the behaviour of trehalose-synthesizing extremophiles that live in extreme environments. In particular, it will be shown how acoustic levitation, combined with optical spectroscopic instruments allows to explore a wide concentration range and to test the validity of the diameter law as a function of levitation lag time, i.e. the D2 vs t law. On this purpose a direct diameter monitoring by a video camera and a laser pointer was first performed; then the diameter was also evaluated by an indirect measure through an OH/CH band area ratio analysis of collected Raman and Infrared spectra. It clearly emerges that D2 vs t follows a linear trend for about 20 minutes, reaching then a plateau at longer time. This result shows how trehalose is able to avoid total water evaporation, this property being essential for the surviving of organisms under extreme environmental conditions.

  20. Torsional Optomechanics of a Levitated Nonspherical Nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thai M.; Ma, Yue; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Robicheaux, F.; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Li, Tongcang

    2016-09-01

    An optically levitated nanoparticle in vacuum is a paradigm optomechanical system for sensing and studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. While its center-of-mass motion has been investigated intensively, its torsional vibration has only been studied theoretically in limited cases. Here we report the first experimental observation of the torsional vibration of an optically levitated nonspherical nanoparticle in vacuum. We achieve this by utilizing the coupling between the spin angular momentum of photons and the torsional vibration of a nonspherical nanoparticle whose polarizability is a tensor. The torsional vibration frequency can be 1 order of magnitude higher than its center-of-mass motion frequency, which is promising for ground state cooling. We propose a simple yet novel scheme to achieve ground state cooling of its torsional vibration with a linearly polarized Gaussian cavity mode. A levitated nonspherical nanoparticle in vacuum will also be an ultrasensitive nanoscale torsion balance with a torque detection sensitivity on the order of 10-29 N m /√{Hz } under realistic conditions.

  1. Cavity optomechanics in a levitated helium drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, L.; Schmidt, M. P.; Kashkanova, A. D.; Brown, C. D.; Harris, G. I.; Aiello, A.; Marquardt, F.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2017-12-01

    We describe a proposal for a type of optomechanical system based on a drop of liquid helium that is magnetically levitated in vacuum. In the proposed device, the drop would serve three roles: its optical whispering-gallery modes would provide the optical cavity, its surface vibrations would constitute the mechanical element, and evaporation of He atoms from its surface would provide continuous refrigeration. We analyze the feasibility of such a system in light of previous experimental demonstrations of its essential components: magnetic levitation of mm-scale and cm-scale drops of liquid He , evaporative cooling of He droplets in vacuum, and coupling to high-quality optical whispering-gallery modes in a wide range of liquids. We find that the combination of these features could result in a device that approaches the single-photon strong-coupling regime, due to the high optical quality factors attainable at low temperatures. Moreover, the system offers a unique opportunity to use optical techniques to study the motion of a superfluid that is freely levitating in vacuum (in the case of 4He). Alternatively, for a normal fluid drop of 3He, we propose to exploit the coupling between the drop's rotations and vibrations to perform quantum nondemolition measurements of angular momentum.

  2. Meissner-levitated micro-systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, T A; Samad, I; Hong, Z; Eves, D; Rastogi, A [Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 PZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-01

    Advanced silicon processing techniques developed for the Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) industry have been exploited in recent years to enable the production of micro-fabricated moving mechanical systems known as Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). These devices offer advantages in terms of cost, scalability and robustness over their preceding equivalents. Cambridge University have worked for many years on the investigation of high temperature superconductors (HTS) in flywheel energy storage applications. This experience is now being used to research into superconducting Micro-Bearings for MEMS, whereby circular permanent magnet arrays are levitated and spun above a superconductor to produce bearings suitable for motors and other micron scale devices. The novelty in the device lies in the fact that the rotor is levitated into position by Meissner flux exclusion, whilst stability is provided by flux pinned within the body of the superconductor. This work includes: the investigation of the properties of various magnetic materials, their fabrication processes and their suitability for MEMS; finite element analysis to analyse the interaction between the magnetic materials and YBCO to determine the stiffness and height of levitation. Finally a micro-motor with the above principles is currently being fabricated within the group.

  3. MSFC Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Rapid Quench System

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Craven, Paul D.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Laboratory is a unique facility for investigators studying high-temperature materials. The laboratory boasts two levitators in which samples can be levitated, heated, melted, undercooled, and resolidified, all without the interference of a container or data-gathering instrument. The ESL main chamber has been upgraded with the addition of a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. Up to 8 quench vessels can be loaded into the quench wheel, which is indexed with LabVIEW control software. This allows up to 8 samples to be rapidly quenched before having to open the chamber. The system has been tested successfully on several zirconium samples. Future work will be done with other materials using different quench mediums. Microstructural analysis will also be done on successfully quench samples.

  4. Levitating Micro-Actuators: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill V. Poletkin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Through remote forces, levitating micro-actuators completely eliminate mechanical attachment between the stationary and moving parts of a micro-actuator, thus providing a fundamental solution to overcoming the domination of friction over inertial forces at the micro-scale. Eliminating the usual mechanical constraints promises micro-actuators with increased operational capabilities and low dissipation energy. Further reduction of friction and hence dissipation by means of vacuum leads to dramatic increases of performance when compared to mechanically tethered counterparts. In order to efficiently employ the benefits provided by levitation, micro-actuators are classified according to their physical principles as well as by their combinations. Different operating principles, structures, materials and fabrication methods are considered. A detailed analysis of the significant achievements in the technology of micro-optics, micro-magnets and micro-coil fabrication, along with the development of new magnetic materials during recent decades, which has driven the creation of new application domains for levitating micro-actuators is performed.

  5. Influence of the ramp angle on levitation characteristics of HTS maglev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Qingyong; Wang Jiasu; Zhang Longcai; Wang Suyu; Pan Siting

    2008-01-01

    The gradeability is one of the advantages of the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev vehicle, and it is relative to the levitation characteristic of the maglev system on the ramp. The influence of the ramp angle on the levitation characteristics of the HTS maglev model was investigated. Some levitation characteristic parameters on the uphill guideway with different ramp angles were studied by the equivalent experiment, such as the levitation force, the levitation gap, the levitation stiffness and the guidance force. Compared with the experimental results on the horizontal guideway, it was found that the levitation gap increased, but the levitation force and the levitation stiffness decreased. The levitation gap and the levitation stiffness are considered as the main maglev characteristic parameters needed to be taken into account

  6. Effects of magnetic history on the levitation characteristics in a superconducting levitation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xingyi [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment and Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Zhou Youhe [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment and Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China)], E-mail: zhouyh@lzu.edu.cn; Zhou Jun [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment and Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China)

    2008-07-15

    Using an updated high-temperature superconductor maglev measurement system, influences of the motion mode in which both the superconductor and the magnet are placed close to each other on the magnetic forces and their relaxation are measured. It is found that Method 1, in which the magnet coaxially approaches the superconductor which is subsequently displaced laterally, leads to reduce the relaxation both in the levitation force and in the lateral force in comparison to Method 2, where lateral displacement of superconductor occurs before vertical motion of the magnet. The results are relevant for the practical levitation systems.

  7. Centrifugation. A theoretical study of oxygen enrichment by centrifugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kierkegaard, P.; Raetz, E.

    1998-12-01

    In the present paper we first investigate what happens if we fill a cylinder with air, close it and rotate it. The results show that no matter which peripheral speed is used, it is not possible by means of the radial separation effect alone, to enrich the oxygen concentration from the previous 21% to more then 23.3%, which is of no practical value. In case of a too low enrichment in one centrifuge, the wanted material from this centrifuge can be used as an input for a second centrifuge and so on, in this way forming a cascade of centrifuges. Oxygen will be enriched in each step, until the desired concentration is reached. Cascading was the technology in the very beginning by enrichment plants for uraniumhexaflouride, used for atomic weapons and nuclear power plants. In this study we try to avoid cascading by aiming for higher separation factors. Therefore, we next investigate the possibilities of using a countercurrent centrifuge where in principle the enriched gas is subjected to several centrifugation in the same centrifuge. The calculations show, that in this way it is possible to produce nearly a 100% pure oxygen (polluted with some heavier molecules like argon) in one machine. Our third step was to calculate the amount of oxygen produced per hour. Using a countercurrent centrifuge of the Zippe type, 100 cm high and 20 cm in diameter, it is or will be possible in the near future to produce 17 g enriched air per hour enriched to 50% oxygen. That corresponds to processing 1 m{sup 3} atmospherical air in the period of approximately 24 hours. This is not very impressive. Our fourth step was to estimate the amount of power used for producing this amount of oxygen. A rough, but complicated, estimate shows that the power consumption at the production level will be about the double of the consumption used today. The overall conclusion is, that centrifugation as a production method for oxygen (or nitrogen) will not be competitive with the currently used method in the

  8. Microfluidic size separation of cells and particles using a swinging bucket centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Wang, Zhiping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular separation is crucial for downstream analysis. Separation technique mainly relies on centrifugal sedimentation. However, minuscule sample volume separation and extraction is difficult with conventional centrifuge. Furthermore, conventional centrifuge requires density gradient centrifugation which is laborious and time-consuming. To overcome this challenge, we present a novel size-selective bioparticles separation microfluidic chip on a swinging bucket minifuge. Size separation is achieved using passive pressure driven centrifugal fluid flows coupled with centrifugal force acting on the particles within the microfluidic chip. By adopting centrifugal microfluidics on a swinging bucket rotor, we achieved over 95% efficiency in separating mixed 20 μm and 2 μm colloidal dispersions from its liquid medium. Furthermore, by manipulating the hydrodynamic resistance, we performed size separation of mixed microbeads, achieving size efficiency of up to 90%. To further validate our device utility, we loaded spiked whole blood with MCF-7 cells into our microfluidic device and subjected it to centrifugal force for a mere duration of 10 s, thereby achieving a separation efficiency of over 75%. Overall, our centrifugal microfluidic device enables extremely rapid and label-free enrichment of different sized cells and particles with high efficiency.

  9. Mixed-μ magnetic levitation for advanced ground transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, F.M.

    1977-12-01

    The possibility of applying the mixed-μ principle for magnetic levitation to ground transport systems is examined. The system is developed specifically for suspension and useful lift to passive weight ratios exceeding 8:1 have been calculated. Application to a hybrid system where conventional wheel drive is used in conjunction with magnetic levitation is explained for urban transport. (author)

  10. Toward quantum-limited position measurements using optically levitated microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libbrecht, Kenneth G.; Black, Eric D.

    2004-01-01

    We propose the use of optically levitated microspheres as test masses in experiments aimed at reaching and potentially exceeding the standard quantum limit for position measurements. Optically levitated microspheres have low mass and are essentially free of suspension thermal noise, making them well suited for experimentally testing our understanding of quantum-limited measurements

  11. Toward quantum-limited position measurements using optically levitated microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libbrecht, Kenneth G.; Black, Eric D

    2004-01-26

    We propose the use of optically levitated microspheres as test masses in experiments aimed at reaching and potentially exceeding the standard quantum limit for position measurements. Optically levitated microspheres have low mass and are essentially free of suspension thermal noise, making them well suited for experimentally testing our understanding of quantum-limited measurements.

  12. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap.

  13. Characteristics on electodynamic suspension simulator with HTS levitation magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Bae, D.K.; Sim, K.; Chung, Y.D.; Lee, Y.-S.

    2009-01-01

    High-T c superconducting (HTSC) electrodynamic suspension (EDS) system basically consists of the HTSC levitation magnet and the ground conductor. The levitation force of EDS system is forms by the interaction between the moving magnetic field produced by the onboard levitation magnet and the induced magnetic field produced by eddy current in the ground conductor. This paper deals with the characteristics of the EDS simulators with high-T c superconducting (HTS) levitation magnet. Two EDS simulator systems, rotating type EDS simulator and static type EDS simulator, were studied in this paper. The rotating type EDS simulator consists of a HTS levitation magnet and a 1.5 m diameter rotating ground conductor, a motor, the supporting structure and force measuring devices. In the static type EDS simulator, instead of moving magnetic field, AC current was applied to the fixed HTS levitation magnet to induce the eddy current. The static type EDS simulator consists of a HTS levitation magnet, a ground conductor, force measuring devices and supporting structure. The double-pancake type HTSC levitation magnet was designed, manufactured and tested in the EDS simulator.

  14. Characteristics on electodynamic suspension simulator with HTS levitation magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Bae, D. K.; Sim, K.; Chung, Y. D.; Lee, Y.-S.

    2009-10-01

    High- Tc superconducting (HTSC) electrodynamic suspension (EDS) system basically consists of the HTSC levitation magnet and the ground conductor. The levitation force of EDS system is forms by the interaction between the moving magnetic field produced by the onboard levitation magnet and the induced magnetic field produced by eddy current in the ground conductor. This paper deals with the characteristics of the EDS simulators with high- Tc superconducting (HTS) levitation magnet. Two EDS simulator systems, rotating type EDS simulator and static type EDS simulator, were studied in this paper. The rotating type EDS simulator consists of a HTS levitation magnet and a 1.5 m diameter rotating ground conductor, a motor, the supporting structure and force measuring devices. In the static type EDS simulator, instead of moving magnetic field, AC current was applied to the fixed HTS levitation magnet to induce the eddy current. The static type EDS simulator consists of a HTS levitation magnet, a ground conductor, force measuring devices and supporting structure. The double-pancake type HTSC levitation magnet was designed, manufactured and tested in the EDS simulator.

  15. The Advanced Gas Centrifuge program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riepe, R.

    1984-01-01

    Although the gas centrifuge process for uranium enrichment is often referred to as a ''new technology,'' it has been under development for approximately 25 years to bring it to its current state of deployment. Centrifuges are now being installed in a new gas centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) at Portsmouth, Ohio. The objective of this new plant was to provide additional U.S. uranium enrichment capacity at a production cost comparable to the U.S. diffusion process but requiring much less power per separative work unit (SWU) produced. The current, commercial scale centrifuge technology being installed meets that objective. The objective for new U.S. enrichment capacity has changed. The objective is not to provide more SWUs but to provide cheaper SWUs. The objective is to make the U.S. uranium enrichment enterprise competitive on the international market. Where the U.S. at one time supplied virtually all of the free world SWU demand, the U.S. market share has now dropped to approximately 35% of the foreign free world market. The Advanced Gas Centrifuge (AGC) program provides an avenue for making the U.S. the economically attractive, reliable enrichment supplier

  16. Acoustic levitation for high temperature containerless processing in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, C. A.; Sisler, R.; Merkley, D. R.; Danley, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    New facilities for high-temperature containerless processing in space are described, including the acoustic levitation furnace (ALF), the high-temperature acoustic levitator (HAL), and the high-pressure acoustic levitator (HPAL). In the current ALF development, the maximum temperature capabilities of the levitation furnaces are 1750 C, and in the HAL development with a cold wall furnace they will exceed 2000-2500 C. The HPAL demonstrated feasibility of precursor space flight experiments on the ground in a 1 g pressurized-gas environment. Testing of lower density materials up to 1300 C has also been accomplished. It is suggested that advances in acoustic levitation techniques will result in the production of new materials such as ceramics, alloys, and optical and electronic materials.

  17. Trial Application of Pulse-Field Magnetization to Magnetically Levitated Conveyor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihito Miyatake

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically levitated conveyor system using superconductors is discussed. The system is composed of a levitated conveyor, magnetic rails, a linear induction motor, and some power supplies. In the paper, pulse-field magnetization is applied to the system. Then, the levitation height and the dynamics of the conveyor are controlled. The static and dynamic characteristics of the levitated conveyor are discussed.

  18. Detection and quantification of subtle changes in red blood cell density using a cell phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Edward J; Velasquez, Anthony; Lu, Shulin; Murphy, Ryann O; ElKhal, Abdala; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Sharda, Anish; Ghiran, Ionita C

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic levitation has emerged as a technique that offers the ability to differentiate between cells with different densities. We have developed a magnetic levitation system for this purpose that distinguishes not only different cell types but also density differences in cells of the same type. This small-scale system suspends cells in a paramagnetic medium in a capillary placed between two rare earth magnets, and cells levitate to an equilibrium position determined solely by their density. Uniform reference beads of known density are used in conjunction with the cells as a means to quantify their levitation positions. In one implementation images of the levitating cells are acquired with a microscope, but here we also introduce a cell phone-based device that integrates the magnets, capillary, and a lens into a compact and portable unit that acquires images with the phone's camera. To demonstrate the effectiveness of magnetic levitation in cell density analysis we carried out levitation experiments using red blood cells with artificially altered densities, and also levitated those from donors. We observed that we can distinguish red blood cells of an anemic donor from those that are healthy. Since a plethora of disease states are characterized by changes in cell density magnetic cell levitation promises to be an effective tool in identifying and analyzing pathologic states. Furthermore, the low cost, portability, and ease of use of the cell phone-based system may potentially lead to its deployment in low-resource environments.

  19. Centrifugal force: a few surprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, M.A.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching

    1990-01-01

    The need for a rather fundamental revision in understanding of the nature of the centrifugal force is discussed. It is shown that in general relativity (and contrary to the situation in Newtonian theory) rotation of a reference frame is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the centrifugal force to appear. A sufficient condition for its appearance, in the instantaneously corotating reference frame of a particle, is that the particle motion in space (observed in the global rest frame) differs from a photon trajectory. The direction of the force is the same as that of the gradient of the effective potential for photon motion. In some cases, the centrifugal force will attract towards the axis of rotation. (author)

  20. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    Full Text Available Particles leaving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E×B drift. This effect which we refer to as "centrifugal trapping" appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E×B drift speed plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  1. Centrifugal trapping in the magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Particles leaving the neutral sheet in the distant magnetotail at times display adiabatic trajectory sequences characterized by an inflection toward the equator and subsequent mirroring in its vicinity. We demonstrate that this low-latitude mirroring results primarily from a centrifugal deceleration due to the fast direction-changing E×B drift. This effect which we refer to as "centrifugal trapping" appears both in guiding centre and full particle treatments. It thus does not directly relate to nonadiabatic motion. However, pitch angle scattering due to nonadiabatic neutral sheet interaction does play a role in reducing the parallel speed of the particles. We show that centrifugal trapping is an important mechanism for the confinement of the slowest (typically below the equatorial E×B drift speed plasma sheet populations to the midplane vicinity.

  2. Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphall, Michael S; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-08-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air-droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-microL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing charge recombination after ion desorption.

  3. Automated cellular sample preparation using a Centrifuge-on-a-Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Albert J; Kim, Jae Hyun; Arshi, Armin; Hur, Soojung Claire; Di Carlo, Dino

    2011-09-07

    The standard centrifuge is a laboratory instrument widely used by biologists and medical technicians for preparing cell samples. Efforts to automate the operations of concentration, cell separation, and solution exchange that a centrifuge performs in a simpler and smaller platform have had limited success. Here, we present a microfluidic chip that replicates the functions of a centrifuge without moving parts or external forces. The device operates using a purely fluid dynamic phenomenon in which cells selectively enter and are maintained in microscale vortices. Continuous and sequential operation allows enrichment of cancer cells from spiked blood samples at the mL min(-1) scale, followed by fluorescent labeling of intra- and extra-cellular antigens on the cells without the need for manual pipetting and washing steps. A versatile centrifuge-analogue may open opportunities in automated, low-cost and high-throughput sample preparation as an alternative to the standard benchtop centrifuge in standardized clinical diagnostics or resource poor settings.

  4. Physical simulations using centrifuge techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Centrifuge techniques offer a technique for doing physical simulations of the long-term mechanical response of deep ocean sediment to the emplacement of waste canisters and to the temperature gradients generated by them. Preliminary investigations of the scaling laws for pertinent phenomena indicate that the time scaling will be consistent among them and equal to the scaling factor squared. This result implies that this technique will permit accelerated-life-testing of proposed configurations; i.e, long-term studies may be done in relatively short times. Presently, existing centrifuges are being modified to permit scale model testing. This testing will start next year

  5. New type of centrifugal extractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyauchi, T.; Tolich, A.

    1975-01-01

    The main principles of a centrifugal extractor design which can be used in the reprocessing of spent fuel with high degree of burning out are given. The extractor consists of two rotating coaxial cylinders. The contact of liquid phases is done in the circular space between the cylinders. By the cylinder rotating the phases are dispersed and the interface, as well as the extraction rate is increased. The given principles of the extractor design are realized in two simplified laboratory installations. The preliminary data obtained point out that much greater rates of the phases contact are achieved in centrifugal extractors than in extraction columns

  6. Centrifugation and the Manhattan Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Cameron

    2009-05-01

    A study of U. S. Army Manhattan Engineer District documents reveals that consideration of centrifugation as a means of uranium enrichment during World War II was considerably more extensive than is commonly appreciated. By the time the centrifuge project was abandoned in early 1944 a full-scale prototype unit had been fabricated and tested at near-production speeds, enrichments of close to theoretically-expected levels had been demonstrated with pilot-plant units, and plans for production plants had been developed. This paper will review the history of this little-known aspect of the Project and examine the circumstances of how it came to be discontinued.

  7. Forces on Centrifugal Pump Impellers

    OpenAIRE

    Jery, Belgacem; Brennen, Christopher E.; Caughey, Thomas K.; Acosta, Allan

    1985-01-01

    Forces are exerted on a centrifugal pump impeller, due to the asymmetry of the flow caused by the volute of diffuser, and to the motion of the center of the impeller whenever the shaft whirls. Recent work in the measurement of these forces as a function of the whirl speed to shaft speed ratio, and the influence of the volute, is reviewed. These forces may be decomposed into a steady force, a static stiffness matrix, a damping matrix and an inertia matrix. It is shown that for centrifugal p...

  8. MEANS FOR DETERMINING CENTRIFUGE ALIGNMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W.Q.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for remotely determining the alignment of a centrifuge. The centrifage shaft is provided with a shoulder, upon which two followers ride, one for detecting radial movements, and one upon the shoulder face for determining the axial motion. The followers are attached to separate liquid filled bellows, and a tube connects each bellows to its respective indicating gage at a remote location. Vibrations produced by misalignment of the centrifuge shaft are transmitted to the bellows, and tbence through the tubing to the indicator gage. This apparatus is particularly useful for operation in a hot cell where the materials handled are dangerous to the operating personnel.

  9. Description of a double centrifugation tube method for concentrating canine platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Perazzi, Anna; Busetto, Roberto; Martinello, Tiziana; Drigo, Michele; Pasotto, Daniela; Cian, Francesco; Patruno, Marco; Iacopetti, Ilaria

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficiency of platelet-rich plasma preparations by means of a double centrifugation tube method to obtain platelet-rich canine plasma at a concentration at least 4 times higher than the baseline value and a concentration of white blood cells not exceeding twice the reference range. A complete blood count was carried out for each sample and each concentrate. Whole blood samples were collected from 12 clinically healthy dogs (consenting blood donors). Blood was proces...

  10. Use of short-radius centrifugation to augment ankle-brachial indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenon, S Marlene; Mateus, Jaime; Hsiang, York; Sidhu, Ravi; Young, Laurence; Gagnon, Joel

    2009-06-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is mainly caused by atherosclerosis and is characterized by decreased circulation, lower blood pressure, and insufficient tissue perfusion in the lower extremities. The hemodynamics of standing and altered gravity environments have been well studied relative to arm blood pressures but are less well understood for ankle pressures. Because regional blood pressure depends, in part, on the gravitational pressure gradient, we hypothesized that artificial gravity exposure on a short-arm centrifuge with the center of rotation above the head would increase blood pressure in the lower extremities. Cardiovascular parameters for 12 healthy subjects were measured during exposure to supine short-arm centrifugation at 20, 25, and 30 revolutions per minute (rpm), corresponding to centripetal accelerations of 0.94, 1.47, and 2.11 Gz at the foot level, respectively. Systolic ankle blood pressure significantly increased at all levels of centrifugation. Ankle-brachial indices (the ratio of systolic ankle to arm blood pressures) increased significantly from 1.17 +/- 0.03 to 1.58 +/- 0.03 at 0.94 Gz (P blood pressure significantly increased at 2.11 Gz, but heart rate did not change significantly. All parameters returned to normal after cessation of centrifugation. We demonstrated that short-radius centrifugation leads to an increase in ankle-brachial indices. This could have potential implications for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease.

  11. Applying of centrifugal chromatography on DEAE cellulose and viscosity measurement to estimate damage caused by gamma irradiation in lymphocyte DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinski, R.

    1977-01-01

    DNA isolated from limphocytes of pig blood was irradiated by γ radiation in the range of 0.5-50 Krads. Changes caused by irradiation (single and double breaks) were determined by using viscosity measurement and centrifugal chromatography on DEAE cellulose. Study of DNA chromatograms showed possibility to apply centrifugal chromatography on DEAE cellulose to estimate changes caused by irradiation. (author)

  12. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a reduced production of red blood cells, including: Iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and ... inflammatory bowel disease are especially likely to have iron deficiency anemia. Anemia due to chronic disease. People with chronic ...

  13. 76 FR 9613 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [EA-11-013] USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order Approving Direct Transfer of Licenses and Conforming Amendment I USEC... Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility (Lead Cascade) and American Centrifuge Plant (ACP), respectively, which...

  14. 77 FR 9273 - USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0355] USEC Inc. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Direct Transfer of Licenses In the Matter of USEC INC. (American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and American Centrifuge Plant); Order EA-12- [[Page 9274

  15. Magnetically levitated space elevator to low-earth orbit.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, J. R.; Mulcahy, T. M.

    2001-07-02

    The properties of currently available NbTi superconductor and carbon-fiber structural materials enable the possibility of constructing a magnetically levitated space elevator from the earth's surface up to an altitude of {approx} 200 km. The magnetic part of the elevator consists of a long loop of current-carrying NbTi, composed of one length that is attached to the earth's surface in an east-west direction and a levitated-arch portion. The critical current density of NbTi is sufficiently high that these conductors will stably levitate in the earth's magnetic field. The magnetic self-field from the loop increases the levitational force and for some geometries assists levitational stability. The 200-km maximum height of the levitated arch is limited by the allowable stresses of the structural material. The loop is cryogenically cooled with helium, and the system utilizes intermediate pumping and cooling stations along both the ground and the levitated portion of the loop, similar to other large terrestrial cryogenic systems. Mechanically suspended from the basic loop is an elevator structure, upon which mass can be moved between the earth's surface and the top of the loop by a linear electric motor or other mechanical or electrical means. At the top of the loop, vehicles may be accelerated to orbital velocity or higher by rocket motors, electromagnetic propulsion, or hybrid methods.

  16. Magnetically levitated space elevator to low-earth orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, J. R.; Mulcahy, T. M.

    2001-01-01

    The properties of currently available NbTi superconductor and carbon-fiber structural materials enable the possibility of constructing a magnetically levitated space elevator from the earth's surface up to an altitude of(approx) 200 km. The magnetic part of the elevator consists of a long loop of current-carrying NbTi, composed of one length that is attached to the earth's surface in an east-west direction and a levitated-arch portion. The critical current density of NbTi is sufficiently high that these conductors will stably levitate in the earth's magnetic field. The magnetic self-field from the loop increases the levitational force and for some geometries assists levitational stability. The 200-km maximum height of the levitated arch is limited by the allowable stresses of the structural material. The loop is cryogenically cooled with helium, and the system utilizes intermediate pumping and cooling stations along both the ground and the levitated portion of the loop, similar to other large terrestrial cryogenic systems. Mechanically suspended from the basic loop is an elevator structure, upon which mass can be moved between the earth's surface and the top of the loop by a linear electric motor or other mechanical or electrical means. At the top of the loop, vehicles may be accelerated to orbital velocity or higher by rocket motors, electromagnetic propulsion, or hybrid methods

  17. New technique for levitating solid particles using a proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misconi, N.Y.

    1996-01-01

    A new technique for levitating solid particles inside a vacuum chamber is developed using a proton beam. This new technique differs from the classical laser-levitation technique invented by Ashkin in that it does not heat up light-absorbing levitated particles to vaporization. This unique property of the method will make it possible to levitate real interplanetary dust particles in a vacuum chamber and study their spin-up dynamics in a ground-based laboratory. It is found that a flux of protons from a proton gun of ∼ 10 15 cm -2 sec -1 is needed to levitate a 10-mm particle. Confinement of the levitated particle can be achieved by a Z or θ pinch to create a gravity well, or by making the beam profile doughnut in shape. In levitating real interplanetary particles, two spin-up mechanisms can be investigated using this technique: one is the Paddack Effect and the other is a spin-up mechanism by the interaction of F-coronal dust with CMEs (Coronal Mass Ejections). The real interplanetary particles were collected by Brownie and associates (also known as the Brownie Particles) from the earth's upper atmosphere. (author)

  18. A levitation instrument for containerless study of molten materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, Paul C; Merkley, Dennis; Sickel, Jeffrey; Finkelman, Steve; Telle, Rainer; Kaiser, Arno; Prieler, Robert

    2012-12-01

    A new aero-acoustic levitation instrument (AAL) has been installed at the Institute for Mineral Engineering at RWTH University in Aachen, Germany. The AAL employs acoustically stabilized gas jet levitation with laser-beam heating and melting to create a contact-free containerless environment for high temperature materials research. Contamination-free study of liquids is possible at temperatures in excess of 3000 °C and of undercooled liquids at temperatures far below the melting point. Digital control technology advances the art of containerless experiments to obtain long-term levitation stability, allowing new experiments in extreme temperature materials research and to study operation of the levitation instrument itself. Experiments with liquid Al(2)O(3) at temperatures more than 3200 °C, 1200 °C above the melting point, and with liquid Y(3)Al(5)O(12) far below the melting point are reported. Fast pyrometry and video recording instruments yield crystallization rates in undercooled liquid Al(2)O(3) as a function of temperature. Levitation of dense liquid HfO(2) at temperatures above 2900 °C is demonstrated. Capabilities are described for resonant frequency matching in the three-axis acoustic positioning system, acoustic control of sample spin, and position control of standing wave nodes to stabilize levitation under changing experimental conditions. Further development and application of the levitation technology is discussed based on the results of experiments and modeling of instrument operations.

  19. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the status of the Centrifuge Facility being developed by ARC for flight on the International Space Station Alpha. The assessment includes technical status, schedules, budgets, project management, performance of facility relative to science requirements, and identifies risks and issues that need to be considered in future development activities.

  20. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinonen, Olli [Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  1. Reflection of centrifugal pumps maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozos Fernandez, V.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to prove that is not necessary a deep and complex knowledge to manage the centrifugal pumps maintenance. According to the author, only deep but single technical knowledge about causes of breakdowns in the different and simple component parts of the pumps, are required. (Author)

  2. ELSA- The European Levitated Spherical Actruator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, M.; Serin, J.; Telteu-Nedelcu, D.; De La Vallee Poussin, H.; Onillon, E.; Rossini, L.

    2014-08-01

    The reaction sphere is a magnetic bearing spherical actuator consisting of a permanent magnet spherical rotor that can be accelerated in any direction. It consists of an 8-pole permanent magnet spherical rotor that is magnetically levitated and can be accelerated about any axis by a 20-pole stator with electromagnets. The spherical actuator is proposed as a potential alternative to traditional momentum exchange devices such as reaction wheels (RWs) or control moment gyroscopes (CMGs). This new actuator provides several benefits such as reduced mass and power supply allocated to the attitude and navigation unit, performance gain, and improved reliability due to the absence of mechanical bearings. The paper presents the work done on the levitated spherical actuator and more precisely the electrical drive including its control unit and power parts. An elegant breadboard is currently being manufactured within the frame of an FP7 project. This project also comprises a feasibility study to show the feasibility of integrating such a system on a flight platform and to identify all the challenges to be solved in terms of technology or components to be developed.

  3. Centrifugal separator cascade connected in zigzag manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Tsunetoshi; Inoue, Yoshiya; Oya, Akio; Nagakura, Masaaki.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To effectively accommodate centrifugal separators of the entire cascade within the available space in a plant by freely selecting perpendicular direction of connection of the centrifugal separator. Structure: Centrifugal separators are connected in zigzag fashion by using a single header for each stage so that in a rectangular shape the entire cascade is arranged. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. 21 CFR 864.5350 - Microsedimentation centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microsedimentation centrifuge. 864.5350 Section 864.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5350 Microsedimentation centrifuge. (a) Identification. A microsedimentation centrifuge is a...

  5. Chemical analysis of acoustically levitated drops by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Puskar, Ljiljana; Zavabeti, Mahta; Sekine, Ryo; McNaughton, Don

    2009-07-01

    An experimental apparatus combining Raman spectroscopy with acoustic levitation, Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy (RALS), is investigated in the field of physical and chemical analytics. Whereas acoustic levitation enables the contactless handling of microsized samples, Raman spectroscopy offers the advantage of a noninvasive method without complex sample preparation. After carrying out some systematic tests to probe the sensitivity of the technique to drop size, shape, and position, RALS has been successfully applied in monitoring sample dilution and preconcentration, evaporation, crystallization, an acid-base reaction, and analytes in a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy colloidal suspension.

  6. Note: Attenuation motion of acoustically levitated spherical rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, P.; Hong, Z. Y.; Yin, J. F.; Yan, N.; Zhai, W.; Wang, H. P.

    2016-11-01

    Here we observe the attenuation motion of spherical rotors levitated by near-field acoustic radiation force and analyze the factors that affect the duration time of free rotation. It is found that the rotating speed of freely rotating rotor decreases exponentially with respect to time. The time constant of exponential attenuation motion depends mainly on the levitation height, the mass of rotor, and the depth of concave ultrasound emitter. Large levitation height, large mass of rotor, and small depth of concave emitter are beneficial to increase the time constant and hence extend the duration time of free rotation.

  7. Tunable Stable Levitation Based on Casimir Interaction between Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianglei; Zhang, Zhuomin M.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum levitation enabled by repulsive Casimir force has been desirable due to the potential exciting applications in passive-suspension devices and frictionless bearings. In this paper, dynamically tunable stable levitation is theoretically demonstrated based on the configuration of dissimilar gratings separated by an intervening fluid using exact scattering theory. The levitation position is insensitive to temperature variations and can be actively tuned by adjusting the lateral displacement between the two gratings. This work investigates the possibility of applying quantum Casimir interactions into macroscopic mechanical devices working in a noncontact and low-friction environment for controlling the position or transducing lateral movement into vertical displacement at the nanoscale.

  8. Containerless solidification of acoustically levitated Ni-Sn eutectic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, D.L.; Xie, W.J.; Wei, B. [Northwestern Polytechnical University, Department of Applied Physics, Xi' an (China)

    2012-10-15

    Containerless solidification of Ni-18.7at%Sn eutectic alloy has been achieved with a single-axis acoustic levitator. The temperature, motion, and oscillation of the sample were monitored by a high speed camera. The temperature of the sample can be determined from its image brightness, although the sample moves vertically and horizontally during levitation. The experimentally observed frequency of vertical motion is in good agreement with theoretical prediction. The sample undergoes shape oscillation before solidification finishes. The solidification microstructure of this alloy consists of a mixture of anomalous eutectic plus regular lamellar eutectic. This indicates the achievement of rapid solidification under acoustic levitation condition. (orig.)

  9. Amorphization of Molecular Liquids of Pharmaceutical Drugs by Acoustic Levitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Benmore

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is demonstrated that acoustic levitation is able to produce amorphous forms from a variety of organic molecular compounds with different glass forming abilities. This can lead to enhanced solubility for pharmaceutical applications. High-energy x-ray experiments show that several viscous gels form from saturated pharmaceutical drug solutions after 10–20 min of levitation at room temperature, most of which can be frozen in solid form. Laser heating of ultrasonically levitated drugs can also result in the vitrification of molecular liquids, which is not attainable using conventional amorphization methods.

  10. Centrifugal dewatering of acid casein curd: effect of casein manufacturing and centrifugation variables on curd compression in a laboratory centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, P A; Van Til, H J

    1988-10-20

    Data relevant to curd compression in a horizontal, solid bowl decanter centrifuge have been obtained by studying the dewatering of acid casein curd in a batch laboratory centrifuge. Analysis of curd compression under centrifugal force predicts a moisture content gradient in the dewatered curd from a maximum at the curd-liquid interface to a minimum at the centrifuge bowl wall. This moisture content gradient was also measured experimentally, and its practical implications are discussed. Increases in centrifugal force, centrifugation time, and centrifugation temperature all caused a marked de crease in dewatered curd moisture content, whereas in creases in precipitation pH and maximum washing temperature caused a smaller decrease in dewatered curd moisture content.

  11. Centrifuges for Microgravity Simulation. The Reduced Gravity Paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loon, Jack J. W. A. van

    2016-01-01

    Due to the cumbersome nature of performing real microgravity—spaceflight research scientists have been searching for alternatives to perform simulated microgravity or partial gravity experiments on Earth. For more than a century one uses the slow rotating clinostat as developed by von Sachs at the end of the nineteenth century. Since then, the fast rotating clinostat, the 3D clinostat or the random positioning machine, the rotating wall vessels, tail suspension and bed rest head down tilt and lately the levitating magnets have been introduced. Several of these simulation systems provide some similarities of the responses and phenotypes as seen in real microgravity experiments. However, one should always realize that we cannot reduce gravity on Earth, other than the relative short duration free fall studies in e.g., drop towers or parabolic aircraft. In this paper we want to explore the possibility to apply centrifuges to simulate microgravity or maybe better to simulate hypo-gravity. This Reduced Gravity Paradigm, RGP is based on the premise that adaptations seen going from a hypergravity level to a lower gravity are similar as changes seen going from unit gravity to microgravity.

  12. Centrifuges for Microgravity Simulation. The Reduced Gravity Paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loon, Jack J. W. A. van, E-mail: j.vanloon@vumc.nl [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery / Oral Pathology, Dutch Experiment Support Center, VU University Medical Center and Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); TEC-MMG LIS Lab, European Space Agency Technology Center, Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2016-07-19

    Due to the cumbersome nature of performing real microgravity—spaceflight research scientists have been searching for alternatives to perform simulated microgravity or partial gravity experiments on Earth. For more than a century one uses the slow rotating clinostat as developed by von Sachs at the end of the nineteenth century. Since then, the fast rotating clinostat, the 3D clinostat or the random positioning machine, the rotating wall vessels, tail suspension and bed rest head down tilt and lately the levitating magnets have been introduced. Several of these simulation systems provide some similarities of the responses and phenotypes as seen in real microgravity experiments. However, one should always realize that we cannot reduce gravity on Earth, other than the relative short duration free fall studies in e.g., drop towers or parabolic aircraft. In this paper we want to explore the possibility to apply centrifuges to simulate microgravity or maybe better to simulate hypo-gravity. This Reduced Gravity Paradigm, RGP is based on the premise that adaptations seen going from a hypergravity level to a lower gravity are similar as changes seen going from unit gravity to microgravity.

  13. Analysis of the particle stability in a new designed ultrasonic levitation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Sebastian; Andrade, Marco A B; Esen, Cemal; Adamowski, Julio Cezar; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    The use of acoustic levitation in the fields of analytical chemistry and in the containerless processing of materials requires a good stability of the levitated particle. However, spontaneous oscillations and rotation of the levitated particle have been reported in literature, which can reduce the applicability of the acoustic levitation technique. Aiming to reduce the particle oscillations, this paper presents the analysis of the particle stability in a new acoustic levitator device. The new acoustic levitator consists of a piezoelectric transducer with a concave radiating surface and a concave reflector. The analysis is conducted by determining numerically the axial and lateral forces that act on the levitated object and by measuring the oscillations of a sphere particle by a laser Doppler vibrometer. It is shown that the new levitator design allows to increase the lateral forces and reduce significantly the lateral oscillations of the levitated object.

  14. A simple levitation system using wireless power supply system and Lorentz force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Koichi; Tanaka, Masako

    2016-01-01

    A new type of magnetic levitation mechanism has been proposed. The feature of this mechanism is using wireless power supply system and Lorentz forces for levitation. The stability of levitation is performed by passive control by magnetic flux configuration between permanent magnets and active control of electromagnets. In this paper, the concept of levitation mechanism is introduced, FEM analyses for levitation force and wireless power supply performance is examined. In concept two types of levitation systems which are different on the point of active control directions are introduced. In FEM analyses, the required current for levitation and the directions of generating forces are calculated. In the study of wireless power supply system, the required voltage for the levitation is expected. Finally the feasibility of the proposed levitation system will be verified. (paper)

  15. Dynamic characteristics and finite element analysis of a magnetic levitation system using a YBCO bulk superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, H; Ishiyama, A

    2004-01-01

    We have been developing a magnetic levitating device with two-dimensional movement, namely a 'levitating X-Y transporter'. For the real design of a levitating X-Y transporter, it is necessary to clarify the levitation characteristics, such as the lift, the levitation height and the stability against mechanical disturbances. Furthermore various kinds of force may be applied to the levitating part and cause mechanical oscillation. Therefore the characteristics of oscillation are also important factors in the dynamic stability of such a levitation system. In this paper, we examine experimentally the lift and the restoring force and develop a new simulation code based on the three-dimensional hybrid finite and boundary element method to analyse the dynamic electromagnetic behaviour of the HTS bulk. We have investigated a suitable permanent-magnet arrangement to enhance the levitation characteristics through experiment and numerical simulation. We can then determine the suitable conditions for stable levitation from those results

  16. Droplet Vaporization In A Levitating Acoustic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, G. A.; Liu, S.; Ciobanescu, I.

    2003-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. To eliminate the effect of the fiber, several researchers have conducted microgravity experiments using unsupported droplets. Jackson and Avedisian investigated single, unsupported drops while Nomura et al. studied droplet clouds formed by a condensation technique. The overall objective of this research is to extend the study of unsupported drops by investigating the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. In this work, the formation of drop clusters is precisely controlled using an acoustic levitation system so that dilute, as well as dense clusters can be created and stabilized before combustion in microgravity is begun. While the low-gravity test facility is being completed, tests have been conducted in 1-g to characterize the effect of the acoustic field on the vaporization of single and multiple droplets. This is important because in the combustion experiment, the droplets will be formed and

  17. Isolating peripheral lymphocytes by density gradient centrifugation and magnetic cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseron, Frederic; Marcus, Katrin; May, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Combining density gradient centrifugation with magnetic cell sorting provides a powerful tool to isolate blood cells with high reproducibility, yield, and purity. It also allows for subsequent separation of multiple cell types, resulting in the possibility to analyze different purified fractions from one donor's sample. The centrifugation step divides whole blood into peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), erythrocytes, and platelet-rich plasma. In the following, lymphocyte subtypes can be consecutively isolated from the PBMC fraction. This chapter describes enrichment of erythrocytes, CD14-positive monocytes and CD3-positive T lymphocytes. Alternatively, other cell types can be targeted by using magnetic beads specific for the desired subpopulation.

  18. Platelet adhesiveness: the effect of centrifugation on the measurement of adhesiveness in platelet-rich plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been measured in citrated whole blood and in platelet-rich plasma obtained from normal subjects, splenectomized patients, and from patients in whom the diagnosis of recurrent venous thrombosis had been made. The duration of centrifugation used in the preparation of platelet-rich plasma was found to have a profound effect on the measurement of platelet adhesiveness because the figure for platelet adhesiveness measured in platelet-rich plasma obtained by centrifugation was considerably lower than that found in citrated whole blood. This effect was particularly marked when platelet-rich plasma was obtained from subjects in whom platelet adhesiveness measured in whole blood was increased. PMID:5699080

  19. Simulated stand tests and centrifuge training to prevent orthostatic intolerance on Earth, moon, and Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Brandon W; Sharp, M Keith

    2010-03-01

    One proposed method to overcome postflight orthostatic intolerance is for astronauts to undergo inflight centrifugation. Cardiovascular responses were compared between centrifuge and gravitational conditions using a seven-compartment cardiovascular model. Vascular resistance, heart rate, and stroke volume values were adopted from literature, while compartmental volumes and compliances were derived from impedance plethysmography of subjects (n=8) riding on a centrifuge. Three different models were developed to represent the typical male subject who completed a 10-min postflight stand test ("male finisher"), "non-finishing male" and "female" (all non-finishers). A sensitivity analysis found that both cardiac output and arterial pressure were most sensitive to total blood volume. Simulated stand tests showed that female astronauts were more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance due to lower initial blood pressure and higher pressure threshold for presyncope. Rates of blood volume loss by capillary filtration were found to be equivalent in female and male non-finishers, but four times smaller in male finishers. For equivalent times to presyncope during centrifugation as those during constant gravity, lower G forces at the level of the heart were required. Centrifuge G levels to match other cardiovascular parameters varied depending on the parameter, centrifuge arm length, and the gravity level being matched.

  20. Acoustic levitation: recent developments and emerging opportunities in biomaterials research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Richard J K; Benmore, Chris J; Tumber, Sonia K; Tailor, Amit N; Rey, Charles A; Taylor, Lynne S; Byrn, Stephen R

    2012-04-01

    Containerless sample environments (levitation) are useful for study of nucleation, supercooling, and vitrification and for synthesis of new materials, often with non-equilibrium structures. Elimination of extrinsic nucleation by container walls extends access to supercooled and supersaturated liquids under high-purity conditions. Acoustic levitation is well suited to the study of liquids including aqueous solutions, organics, soft materials, polymers, and pharmaceuticals at around room temperature. This article briefly reviews recent developments and applications of acoustic levitation in materials R&D. Examples of experiments yielding amorphous pharmaceutical materials are presented. The implementation and results of experiments on supercooled and supersaturated liquids using an acoustic levitator at a high-energy X-ray beamline are described.

  1. Holographic acoustic elements for manipulation of levitated objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Asier; Seah, Sue Ann; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Sahoo, Deepak Ranjan; Long, Benjamin; Subramanian, Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Sound can levitate objects of different sizes and materials through air, water and tissue. This allows us to manipulate cells, liquids, compounds or living things without touching or contaminating them. However, acoustic levitation has required the targets to be enclosed with acoustic elements or had limited manoeuvrability. Here we optimize the phases used to drive an ultrasonic phased array and show that acoustic levitation can be employed to translate, rotate and manipulate particles using even a single-sided emitter. Furthermore, we introduce the holographic acoustic elements framework that permits the rapid generation of traps and provides a bridge between optical and acoustical trapping. Acoustic structures shaped as tweezers, twisters or bottles emerge as the optimum mechanisms for tractor beams or containerless transportation. Single-beam levitation could manipulate particles inside our body for applications in targeted drug delivery or acoustically controlled micro-machines that do not interfere with magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Electron spin control of optically levitated nanodiamonds in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thai M; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Li, Tongcang

    2016-07-19

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining NV spins with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centres in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this system, we investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. We also observe that oxygen and helium gases have different effects on both the photoluminescence and the ESR contrast of nanodiamond NV centres, indicating potential applications of NV centres in oxygen gas sensing. Our results pave the way towards a levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics.

  3. Electron spin control of optically levitated nanodiamonds in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thai M.; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Li, Tongcang

    2016-07-01

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining NV spins with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centres in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this system, we investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. We also observe that oxygen and helium gases have different effects on both the photoluminescence and the ESR contrast of nanodiamond NV centres, indicating potential applications of NV centres in oxygen gas sensing. Our results pave the way towards a levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics.

  4. Electrostatic charging and levitation of helium II drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemela, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Liquid Helium II drops, of diameter 1 mm or less, are charged with positive helium ions and subsequently levitated by static electric fields. Stable levitation was achieved for drops of order 100-150 micrometers in diameter. The suspended drops could be translated to arbitrary positions within the levitator using additional superimposed DC electric fields, and also could be made to oscillate stably about their average positions by means of an applied time-varying electric field. A weak corona discharge was used to produce the necessary ions for levitation. A novel superfluid film flow device, developed for the controlled deployment of large charged drops, is described. Also discussed is an adjustable electric fountain that requires only a field emission tip operating at modest potentials, and works in both Helium I and Helium II

  5. Burning and graphitization of optically levitated nanodiamonds in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A. T. M. A.; Frangeskou, A. C.; Kim, M. S.; Bose, S.; Morley, G. W.; Barker, P. F.

    2016-02-01

    A nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centre in a nanodiamond, levitated in high vacuum, has recently been proposed as a probe for demonstrating mesoscopic centre-of-mass superpositions and for testing quantum gravity. Here, we study the behaviour of optically levitated nanodiamonds containing NV- centres at sub-atmospheric pressures and show that while they burn in air, this can be prevented by replacing the air with nitrogen. However, in nitrogen the nanodiamonds graphitize below ≈10 mB. Exploiting the Brownian motion of a levitated nanodiamond, we extract its internal temperature (Ti) and find that it would be detrimental to the NV- centre’s spin coherence time. These values of Ti make it clear that the diamond is not melting, contradicting a recent suggestion. Additionally, using the measured damping rate of a levitated nanoparticle at a given pressure, we propose a new way of determining its size.

  6. Near-field levitated quantum optomechanics with nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, M. L.; Molina-Terriza, G.; Volz, T.; Romero-Isart, O.

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically show that the dipole force of an ensemble of quantum emitters embedded in a dielectric nanosphere can be exploited to achieve near-field optical levitation. The key ingredient is that the polarizability from the ensemble of embedded quantum emitters can be larger than the bulk polarizability of the sphere, thereby enabling the use of repulsive optical potentials and consequently the levitation using optical near fields. In levitated cavity quantum optomechanics, this could be used to boost the single-photon coupling by combining larger polarizability to mass ratio, larger field gradients, and smaller cavity volumes while remaining in the resolved sideband regime and at room temperature. A case study is done with a nanodiamond containing a high density of silicon-vacancy color centers that is optically levitated in the evanescent field of a tapered nanofiber and coupled to a high-finesse microsphere cavity.

  7. Effect of the levitating microparticle cloud on radiofrequency argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitic, S.; Pustylnik, M. Y.; Klumov, B. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of a levitating cloud of microparticles on the parameters of a radiofrequency (RF) plasma has been studied by means of two experimental techniques. Axial distributions of 1s excited states of argon were measured by a self-absorption method. A correction of a standard self-absorption method for the extinction of the light by the levitating microparticles is proposed. In addition the electron temperature was estimated using the optical emission spectroscopy. Measurements at the same discharge conditions in a microparticle-free discharge and discharge, containing a cloud of levitating microparticles, revealed the non-local influence of the microparticle cloud on the discharge plasma. The most probable cause of this influence is the disturbance of the ionization balance by the levitating microparticles.

  8. Efficient Fuzzy Logic Controller for Magnetic Levitation Systems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Akorede

    ABSTRACT: Magnetic levitation is a system of suspending a body or a complete system against gravity. Suspending a system ... disturbance signal was applied to the input of the control system. Fuzzy ..... Automatic Control System, fifth edition.

  9. Quantifying the levitation picture of extended states in lattice models

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Ana. L. C.; Schulz, P. A.

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of extended states is quantitatively analyzed for two-dimensional lattice models. A levitation picture is established for both white-noise and correlated disorder potentials. In a continuum limit window of the lattice models we find simple quantitative expressions for the extended states levitation, suggesting an underlying universal behavior. On the other hand, these results point out that the quantum Hall phase diagrams may be disorder dependent.

  10. Superconducting levitation applications to bearings and magnetic transportation

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Francis C

    1994-01-01

    Presents the fundamental principles governing levitation of material bodies by magnetic fields without too much formal theory. Defines the technology of magnetic bearings, especially those based on superconductivity, and demonstrates the key roles that magnetics, mechanics and dynamics play in the complete understanding of magnetic levitation and its bearings. Features extensive figures and photos of Mag-Lev devices and summarizes recent U.S. research studies in an effort to regain the lead in Mag-Lev technologies

  11. Basic characteristics of centrifuges, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Tsunetoshi

    1977-01-01

    A method of numerically solving the convection-diffusion equation is presented for a binary isotopic gas mixture in the axisymmetric velocity field. A modified Newton's method is employed to perform the numerical integration without the assumptions that the pressure can be estimated from the rigid rotation model and the temperature of gas is uniform. A suitable form of the finite difference equation gives a computationally stable integration with reasonable representation of the molar concentration distribution of isotopic molecules in a rotating cylinder. The method includes a Gaussian elimination procedure which consists of the transformation of the Jacobian matrix to a triangular matrix followed by the backward elimination. Computations are made on UF 6 gas in various centrifuges which have the openings for feed, product and waste on the end plates. Discussions are also presented on gas flows and separative efficiencies for the centrifuges which have baffle plates, skirting plates and bellows. (auth.)

  12. Centrifugal pumps: fundamentals and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar Manuel, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Centrifugal pumps are usually employed to impulse water to elevate it, dose it or give it pressure or speed. They can be used with clean water or loaded with high solid concentration and don't work properly with air or another gas flow. There are another less used pumps, coming from volumetric or ram pumps to magnetic ones for specific uses. Centrifugal ones are rotokinetic pumps, like peripherical or lateral channel pumps. They work in a different way that non rotational kinetic ones and static ones. The work approaches their pre definition, selection, installation, operation and maintenance. It also review their morphology, hidromechanic principles and the basic elements pumps are made of. (Author)

  13. Analysis and experimental study on the effect of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic levitation devices

    OpenAIRE

    Hai Jiang; Jianfang Liu; Qingqing Lv; Shoudong Gu; Xiaoyang Jiao; Minjiao Li; Shasha Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The influence of a resonant tube on the performance of acoustic standing wave-based levitation device (acoustic levitation device hereinafter) is studied by analyzing the acoustic pressure and levitation force of four types of acoustic levitation devices without a resonance tube and with resonance tubes of different radii R using ANSYS and MATLAB. Introducing a resonance tube either enhances or weakens the levitation strength of acoustic levitation device, depending on the resonance tube radi...

  14. Sensorless magnetically levitated system with reduced observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, T [Inst. fuer Elektrische Maschinen, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Henneberger, G [Inst. fuer Elektrische Maschinen, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Ress, C [Inst. fuer Elektrische Maschinen, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    The present paper describes the use of a reduced observer for a hybrid excited magnetic levitation system. The latter is part of a contactless and energy saving driven conveyance system. Thereby one has to select the working point of the system in such a way, that the force due to the weight of the vehicle including its load will be compensated only by the permanent magnets. The linearized model is observable even if only the current in the coils is measured. Therefore it seems reasonable to evaluate the other variables of the state vector by an observer. Thus the sensors for the airgap can be omitted. Using an observer has another advantage as well. It will tune the airgap automatically to the value which is necessary in order to operate the system in the most energy saving way. The whole design was simulated. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic levitation Maglev technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Hyung-Suk

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of magnetic levitation (Maglev) technologies, from fundamental principles through to the state-of-the-art, and describes applications both realised and under development. It includes a history of Maglev science and technology showing the various milestones in its advancement. The core concepts, operating principles and main challenges of Maglev applications attempted across various fields are introduced and discussed. The principle difficulties encountered when applying Maglev technology to different systems, namely air gap control and stabilization, are addressed in detail. The book describes how major advancements in linear motor and magnet technologies have enabled the development of the linear-motor-powered Maglev train, which has a high speed advantage over conventional wheeled trains and has the potential to reach speed levels achieved by aircraft. However, many expect that Maglev technology to be a green technology that is applied not only in rail transportat...

  16. Stability of magnets levitated above superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, L.C.; Logothetis, E.M.; Soltis, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The stability of a permanent magnet levitated above a slab of hard superconductor is considered. The force on a dipole magnet over a perfectly diamagnetic disk is calculated. It is found that the radial component of the force is directed outward and is 10%--20% of the image (vertical) force near the edge. Estimates of the magnetic friction force due to flux motion in a hard superconductor are made using Bean's model. The magnitude of the magnetic friction is large enough to stabilize the magnet over most of the disk for typical values of the critical current in ceramic superconductors (∼10 3 A/cm 2 ), but too small for the highest values reported (>10 6 A/cm 2 ). It is conjectured that flux trapping due to inhomogeneities gives rise to transient restoring forces

  17. Nano-optomechanics with optically levitated nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukirch, Levi P.; Vamivakas, A. Nick

    2015-01-01

    Nano-optomechanics is a vibrant area of research that continues to push the boundary of quantum science and measurement technology. Recently, it has been realised that the optical forces experienced by polarisable nanoparticles can provide a novel platform for nano-optomechanics with untethered mechanical oscillators. Remarkably, these oscillators are expected to exhibit quality factors approaching ?. The pronounced quality factors are a direct result of the mechanical oscillator being freed from a supporting substrate. This review provides an overview of the basic optical physics underpinning optical trapping and optical levitation experiments, it discusses a number of experimental approaches to optical trapping and finally outlines possible applications of this nano-optomechanics modality in hybrid quantum systems and nanoscale optical metrology.

  18. Magnetically levitated autoparametric broadband vibration energy harvesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurmann, L.; Jia, Y.; Manoli, Y.; Woias, P.

    2016-01-01

    Some of the lingering challenges within the current paradigm of vibration energy harvesting (VEH) involve narrow operational frequency range and the inevitable non-resonant response from broadband noise excitations. Such VEHs are only suitable for limited applications with fixed sinusoidal vibration, and fail to capture a large spectrum of the real world vibration. Various arraying designs, frequency tuning schemes and nonlinear vibratory approaches have only yielded modest enhancements. To fundamentally address this, the paper proposes and explores the potentials in using highly nonlinear magnetic spring force to activate an autoparametric oscillator, in order to realize an inherently broadband resonant system. Analytical and numerical modelling illustrate that high spring nonlinearity derived from magnetic levitation helps to promote the 2:1 internal frequency matching required to activate parametric resonance. At the right internal parameters, the resulting system can intrinsically exhibit semi-resonant response regardless of the bandwidth of the input vibration, including broadband white noise excitation. (paper)

  19. Rapid Quench in an Electrostatic Levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Matson, Douglas M.

    2016-01-01

    The Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) Laboratory at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a unique facility for investigators studying high-temperature materials. The ESL laboratory's main chamber has been upgraded with the addition of a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy, as a quench medium. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. Up to eight quench vessels can be loaded into a wheel inside the chamber that is indexed with control software. The system has been tested successfully with samples of zirconium, iron-cobalt alloys, titanium-zirconium-nickel alloys, and a silicon-cobalt alloy. This new rapid quench system will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development. In this presentation, the system is described and some initial results are presented.

  20. Centrifuge pellet injector for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andelfinger, C.; Buchelt, E.; Jacobi, D.; Lackner, E.; Schilling, H.B.; Ulrich, M.; Weber, G.

    1983-08-01

    An engineering design of a centrifuge pellet injector for JET is reported as part of the Phase I contract number JE 2/9016. A rather detailed design is presented for the mechanical and electronic features. Stress calculations, dynamic behaviour and life estimates are considered. The interfaces to the JET vacuum system and CODAS are discussed. Proposals for the pellet diagnostics (velocity, mass and shape) are presented. (orig.)

  1. Centrifugal separation of mixture gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, M.S.; Chen, W.N.; Yin, Y.T.

    2008-01-01

    An attempt for single centrifugal separation of mixtures with different molecular formula was presented in this paper. The mixtures of SF 6 and CCl 3 F, and SF 6 and CCl 4 were chosen as the processing gases, which were prepared in three mass ratios, 0.5, 0.8 and 0.2, respectively. The separating characteristics such as the overall separation factors and the variation of cuts were studied. (author)

  2. Gas centrifuge bibliography 1970 - 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, G.E.; Edwards, K.J.

    1978-05-01

    A bibliography, with abstract, is presented of the gas centrifuge literature published during 1970 to 1974. It supplements PG Information Series 25 (CA) which covered the period 1895 to 1970. Following reference to bibliographies, books and pamphlets, and a few items omitted from the previous bibliography, main items are grouped under the headings Reports, Journal articles and Conference papers and are listed chronologically. There are indexes to subject, author, and document number, the latter including the issuing body. (UK)

  3. Centrifugal pumps and allied machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, HH

    1994-01-01

    This book will be of vital interest to all engineers and designers concerned with centrifugal pumps and turbines. Including statistical information derived from 20000 pumps and 700 turbines with capacities of 5gpm to 5000000gpm, this book offers the widest range and scope of information currently available. Statistical analyses suggest practical methods of increasing pump performance and provide valuable data for new design aspects.

  4. Eddy damping effect of additional conductors in superconducting levitation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhao-Fei; Gou, Xiao-Fan

    2015-12-01

    Passive superconducting levitation systems consisting of a high temperature superconductor (HTSC) and a permanent magnet (PM) have demonstrated several fascinating applications such as the maglev system, flywheel energy storage. Generally, for the HTSC-PM levitation system, the HTSC with higher critical current density Jc can obtain larger magnetic force to make the PM levitate over the HTSC (or suspended below the HTSC), however, the process of the vibration of the levitated PM, provides very limited inherent damping (essentially hysteresis). To improve the dynamic stability of the levitated PM, eddy damping of additional conductors can be considered as the most simple and effective approach. In this article, for the HTSC-PM levitation system with an additional copper damper attached to the HTSC, we numerically and comprehensively investigated the damping coefficient c, damping ratio, Joule heating of the copper damper, and the vibration frequency of the PM as well. Furthermore, we comparatively studied four different arrangements of the copper damper, on the comprehensive analyzed the damping effect, efficiency (defined by c/VCu, in which VCu is the volume of the damper) and Joule heating, and finally presented the most advisable arrangement.

  5. What Happens to Donated Blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... database. Most whole blood donations are spun in centrifuges to separate it into transfusable components: red cells, ... 2, your test tubes arrive at a testing laboratory. A dozen tests are performed, to establish the ...

  6. Dysrhythmias in Laypersons During Centrifuge-Simulated Suborbital Spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Rahul; Blue, Rebecca S; Mathers, Charles H; Castleberry, Tarah L; Vanderploeg, James M

    2017-11-01

    There are limited data on cardiac dysrhythmias in laypersons during hypergravity exposure. We report layperson electrocardiograph (ECG) findings and tolerance of dysrhythmias during centrifuge-simulated suborbital spaceflight. Volunteers participated in varied-length centrifuge training programs of 2-7 centrifuge runs over 0.5-2 d, culminating in two simulated suborbital spaceflights of combined +Gz and +Gx (peak +4.0 Gz, +6.0 Gx, duration 5 s). Monitors recorded pre- and post-run mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), 6-s average heart rate (HR) collected at prespecified points during exposures, documented dysrhythmias observed on continuous 3-lead ECG, self-reported symptoms, and objective signs of intolerance on real-time video monitoring. Participating in the study were 148 subjects (43 women). Documented dysrhythmias included sinus pause (N = 5), couplet premature ventricular contractions (N = 4), bigeminy (N = 3), accelerated idioventricular rhythm (N = 1), and relative bradycardia (RB, defined as a transient HR drop of >20 bpm; N = 63). None were associated with subjective symptoms or objective signs of acceleration intolerance. Episodes of RB occurred only during +Gx exposures. Subjects had a higher post-run vs. pre-run MAP after all exposures, but demonstrated no difference in pre- and post-run HR. RB was more common in men, younger individuals, and subjects experiencing more centrifuge runs. Dysrhythmias in laypersons undergoing simulated suborbital spaceflight were well tolerated, though RB was frequently noted during short-duration +Gx exposure. No subjects demonstrated associated symptoms or objective hemodynamic sequelae from these events. Even so, heightened caution remains warranted when monitoring dysrhythmias in laypersons with significant cardiopulmonary disease or taking medications that modulate cardiac conduction.Suresh R, Blue RS, Mathers CH, Castleberry TL, Vanderploeg JM. Dysrhythmias in laypersons during centrifuge-stimulated suborbital

  7. Impact of sample processing on the measurement of circulating microparticles: storage and centrifugation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Liante, Virtudes; Sánchez-López, Verónica; Martínez-Sales, Vicenta; Ramón-Nuñez, Luis A; Arellano-Orden, Elena; Cano-Ruiz, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Martorell, Francisco J; Gao, Lin; Otero-Candelera, Remedios

    2016-11-01

    Microparticles (MPs) have been shown to be markers of cellular activation and interactions. Pre-analytical conditions such as the centrifugation protocol and sample storage conditions represent an important source of variability in determining MPs values. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of sample storage conditions and centrifugation speed and temperature on the determination of MPs in plasma. Citrate-anticoagulated blood samples obtained from 21 healthy subjects were centrifuged under four different protocols involving different speeds (2500 g or 1500 g) and temperatures (4 °C or 20 °C) to isolate platelet-poor plasma (PPP). The number of MPs in fresh and frozen-thawed PPP were analyzed by flow cytometry, and MPs-mediated procoagulant activity was determined by a thrombin generation test and phospholipid-dependent procoagulant tests. The number of MPs and their procoagulant activity were affected by freeze-thaw cycling and centrifugation speed but not by centrifugation temperature. Sample freezing increased MPs number (six-fold) and thrombin generation (four-fold), and decreased clotting time (two-fold). Low centrifugation speed caused an increase in MPs number and a parallel increase in MP-mediated procoagulant activity. Sample storage conditions and centrifugation speed are important processing conditions affecting MPs number and activity. Before any study, the protocol for MPs isolation should be optimized to ensure a reliable characterization of MPs, which could provide important information for diagnostic purposes and for understanding the pathogenesis of diseases.

  8. Effects of different centrifugation conditions on clinical chemistry and Immunology test results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesic Predrag

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of centrifugation time of heparinized blood samples on clinical chemistry and immunology results has rarely been studied. WHO guideline proposed a 15 min centrifugation time without citing any scientific publications. The centrifugation time has a considerable impact on the turn-around-time. Methods We investigated 74 parameters in samples from 44 patients on a Roche Cobas 6000 system, to see whether there was a statistical significant difference in the test results among specimens centrifuged at 2180 g for 15 min, at 2180 g for 10 min or at 1870 g for 7 min, respectively. Two tubes with different plasma separators (both Greiner Bio-One were used for each centrifugation condition. Statistical comparisons were made by Deming fit. Results Tubes with different separators showed identical results in all parameters. Likewise, excellent correlations were found among tubes to which different centrifugation conditions were applied. Fifty percent of the slopes lay between 0.99 and 1.01. Only 3.6 percent of the statistical tests results fell outside the significance level of p Conclusion A centrifugation time of either 7 or 10 min provided identical test results compared to the time of 15 min as proposed by WHO under the conditions used in our study.

  9. Combined short-arm centrifuge and aerobic exercise training improves cardiovascular function and physical working capacity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chang-Bin; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Bing; Yao, Yong-Jie; Wang, Yong-Chun; Wu, Yan-Hong; Liang, Wen-Bin; Sun, Xi-Qing

    2010-12-01

    Musculoskeletal and cardiovascular deconditioning occurring in long-term spaceflight gives rise to the needs to develop new strategies to counteract these adverse effects. Short-arm centrifuge combined with ergometer has been proposed as a strategy to counteract adverse effects of microgravity. This study sought to investigate whether the combination of short-arm centrifuge and aerobic exercise training have advantages over short-arm centrifuge or aerobic exercise training alone. One week training was conducted by 24 healthy men. They were randomly divided into 3 groups: (1) short-arm centrifuge training, (2) aerobic exercise training, 40 W, and (3) combined short-arm centrifuge and aerobic exercise training. Before and after training, the cardiac pump function represented by stroke volume, cardiac output, left ventricular ejection time, and total peripheral resistance was evaluated. Variability of heart rate and systolic blood pressure were determined by spectral analysis. Physical working capacity was surveyed by near maximal physical working capacity test. The 1-week combined short-arm centrifuge and aerobic exercise training remarkably ameliorated the cardiac pump function and enhanced vasomotor sympathetic nerve modulation and improved physical working capacity by 10.9% (Pcentrifuge nor the aerobic exercise group showed improvements in these functions. These results demonstrate that combined short-arm centrifuge and aerobic exercise training has advantages over short-arm centrifuge or aerobic exercise training alone in influencing several physiologically important cardiovascular functions in humans. The combination of short-arm centrifuge and aerobic exercise offers a promising countermeasure to microgravity.

  10. Evaluation of a reduced centrifugation time and higher centrifugal force on various general chemistry and immunochemistry analytes in plasma and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Mette F; Søndergaard, Tove R; Kristensen, Helle T; Münster, Anna-Marie B

    2017-09-01

    Background Centrifugation of blood samples is an essential preanalytical step in the clinical biochemistry laboratory. Centrifugation settings are often altered to optimize sample flow and turnaround time. Few studies have addressed the effect of altering centrifugation settings on analytical quality, and almost all studies have been done using collection tubes with gel separator. Methods In this study, we compared a centrifugation time of 5 min at 3000 ×  g to a standard protocol of 10 min at 2200 ×  g. Nine selected general chemistry and immunochemistry analytes and interference indices were studied in lithium heparin plasma tubes and serum tubes without gel separator. Results were evaluated using mean bias, difference plots and coefficient of variation, compared with maximum allowable bias and coefficient of variation used in laboratory routine quality control. Results For all analytes except lactate dehydrogenase, the results were within the predefined acceptance criteria, indicating that the analytical quality was not compromised. Lactate dehydrogenase showed higher values after centrifugation for 5 min at 3000 ×  g, mean bias was 6.3 ± 2.2% and the coefficient of variation was 5%. Conclusions We found that a centrifugation protocol of 5 min at 3000 ×  g can be used for the general chemistry and immunochemistry analytes studied, with the possible exception of lactate dehydrogenase, which requires further assessment.

  11. Feasibility of the optical imaging of thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump by near-infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakota, Daisuke; Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2014-09-01

    Blood coagulation is one of the primary concerns when using mechanical circulatory support devices such as blood pumps. Noninvasive detection and imaging of thrombus formation is useful not only for the development of more hemocompatible devices but also for the management of blood coagulation to avoid risk of infarction. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of near-infrared light for imaging of thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump. The optical properties of a thrombus at wavelengths ranging from 600 to 750 nm were analyzed using a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system. A specially designed hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a visible bottom area was used. In vitro antithrombogenic testing was conducted five times with the pump using bovine whole blood in which the activated blood clotting time was adjusted to 200 s prior to the experiment. Two halogen lights were used for the light sources. The forward scattering through the pump and backward scattering on the pump bottom area were imaged using the HSI system. HSI showed an increase in forward scattering at wavelengths ranging from 670 to 750 nm in the location of thrombus formation. The time at which the thrombus began to form in the impeller rotating at 2780 rpm could be detected. The spectral difference between the whole blood and the thrombus was utilized to image thrombus formation. The results indicate the feasibility of dynamically detecting and imaging thrombus formation in a rotary blood pump. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Centrifuge facilities at Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Caspar Thrane; Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne; Hededal, Ole

    2008-01-01

    The geotechnical group at the Danish Technical University (DTU) operates a geotechnical beam centrifuge. The centrifuge was build in 1976 and has been upgraded through the years, latest with onboard data and control systems. The centrifuge concept involves an increased gravity field in which...... the physical model is placed and tested. The capabilities of the centrifuge at DTU makes it possible to obtain a scale factor of 75-85 in the tests which equals a soil volume in prototype scale of ø40m and a depth of 36 m. The centrifuge facilities at DTU have through the years been used for testing various...... geotechnical issues, such as suction anchors, tension piles in clay, active earth pressures on sheet piles and group effects for lateral loaded piles. The paper describes physical modelling in general, the centrifuge, present setups and shows samples of obtained results....

  13. Empirical Design Considerations for Industrial Centrifugal Compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD has been extensively used in centrifugal compressor design. CFD provides further optimisation opportunities for the compressor design rather than designing the centrifugal compressor. The experience-based design process still plays an important role for new compressor developments. The wide variety of design subjects represents a very complex design world for centrifugal compressor designers. Therefore, some basic information for centrifugal design is still very important. The impeller is the key part of the centrifugal stage. Designing a highly efficiency impeller with a wide operation range can ensure overall stage design success. This paper provides some empirical information for designing industrial centrifugal compressors with a focus on the impeller. A ported shroud compressor basic design guideline is also discussed for improving the compressor range.

  14. The near-field acoustic levitation for spheres by transducer with concave spherical radiating surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian Fang; Sun, Xu Guang; Jiao, Xiao Yang; Chen, Hong Xia; Hua, Shun Ming; Zhang, Hong Chun

    2013-01-01

    To levitate ICF target spheres in the near-field acoustic levitation, a transducer with concave spherical radiating surface and a nearfield acoustic levitation system is established. The concave spherical radiating surface of the transducer is designed by the finite element parametric method. Then the levitation height and levitation perturbation of spheres with different mass and diameters in the near-field acoustic levitation system are tested and discussed in the driving voltage at 400V, 500V and 600V, respectively, when the levitation system is under the resonant frequency. Finally, based on the experimental results, the height formula of the near-field acoustic levitation for spheres is deduced by introducing a coupling coefficient.

  15. The near-field acoustic levitation for spheres by transducer with concave spherical radiating surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian Fang; Sun, Xu Guang; Jiao, Xiao Yang; Chen, Hong Xia [Jilin University, Changchun (China); Hua, Shun Ming [Zhejiang University, Ningbo (China); Zhang, Hong Chun [Aviation University of AirForce, Changchun (China)

    2013-02-15

    To levitate ICF target spheres in the near-field acoustic levitation, a transducer with concave spherical radiating surface and a nearfield acoustic levitation system is established. The concave spherical radiating surface of the transducer is designed by the finite element parametric method. Then the levitation height and levitation perturbation of spheres with different mass and diameters in the near-field acoustic levitation system are tested and discussed in the driving voltage at 400V, 500V and 600V, respectively, when the levitation system is under the resonant frequency. Finally, based on the experimental results, the height formula of the near-field acoustic levitation for spheres is deduced by introducing a coupling coefficient.

  16. Research on typical topologies of a tubular horizontal-gap passive magnetic levitation vibration isolator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yiheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic levitation vibration isolators have attracted more and more attention in the field of high-precision measuring and machining equipment. In this paper, we describe a tubular horizontal-gap passive magnetic levitation vibration isolator. Four typical topologies of the tubular horizontal-gap passive magnetic levitation vibration isolator are proposed. The analytical expression of magnetic force is derived. The relationship between levitation force, force density, force ripple and major structural parameters are analysed by finite element method, which is conductive to the design and optimization of the tubular horizontal-gap passive magnetic levitation vibration isolator. The force characteristics of different topologies of the tubular horizontal-gap passive magnetic levitation vibration isolator are compared and evaluated from the aspect of force density, force ripple and manufacturability. In comparison with conventional passive magnetic levitation vibration isolators, the proposed tubular horizontal-gap passive magnetic levitation vibration isolator shows advantage in higher force density.

  17. Gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of $10^6$g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarisation and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modelling of the wa...

  18. Decontamination of nuclear fuels with centrifugal separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Li; Camassa, R.; Ecke, R.; Venneri, F.

    1995-01-01

    The treatment and disposal of nuclear material is a crucial element in today's nuclear power industry. We present a physical process of centrifugal separation that has potential to deal with existing waste and provide opportunities for realizing advanced accelerator-driven power generation. In our proposed process a liquid metal solution containing actinides and fission products is fed through a series of continuous flow centrifuges. We show fundamentals of centrifugation including theory and experiments and estimate how the processing can be optimized

  19. Decontamination of nuclear fuels with centrifugal separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, L.; Camassa, R.; Ecke, R.; Venneri, F.

    1995-01-01

    The treatment and disposal of nuclear material is a crucial element in today's nuclear power industry. We present a physical process of centrifugal separation that has potential to deal with existing waste and provide opportunities for realizing advanced accelerator driven power generation. In our proposed process a liquid metal solution containing actinides and fission products is fed through a series of continuous flow centrifuges. We show fundamentals of centrifugation including theory and experiments and estimate how the processing can be optimized. (authors)

  20. Some fundamental aspects of self-levitating sliding contact bearings and their practical implementations

    OpenAIRE

    Atherton, MA; Mares, C; Stolarski, TA

    2014-01-01

    In this study, fundamental aspects and mechanisms of acoustic levitation together with governing equations are presented first. Then, the acoustic levitation phenomenon is considered as a new way to design air suspension systems capable of self-levitation. A particular emphasis is laid on journal bearings and their specific geometrical configuration. A practical feasibility of using acoustic levitation to separate contacting surfaces is supported and illustrated by results of experimental tes...

  1. Testing of pyrochemical centrifugal contactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.S.; Carls, E.L.; Basco, J.K.; Johnson, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    A centrifugal contactor that performs oxidation and reduction exchange reactions between molten metals and salts at 500 degrees Centigrade has been tested successfully at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The design is based on contactors for aqueous- organic systems operation near room temperature. In tests to demonstrate the performance of the pyrocontactor, cadmium and LICl-KCl eutectic salt were the immiscible solvent phases, and rare earths were the distributing solutes. The tests showed that the pyrocontactor mixed and separated the phases well, with stage efficiencies approaching 99% at rotor speeds near 2700 rpm. The contactor ran smoothly and reliably over the entire range of speeds that was tested

  2. Optimizing platelet-rich plasma gel formation by varying time and gravitational forces during centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Chris H; Roh, Young Hak; Kim, Ji Eun; Shin, Sue; Yoon, Kang Sup

    2013-10-01

    Despite the increasing clinical use of topical platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to enhance tissue healing and regeneration, there is no properly standardized method of autologous PRP gel preparation. This study examined the effect of the centrifugation time and gravitational force (g) on the platelet recovery ratio of PRP and determined the most effective centrifugation conditions for preparing PRP. Two-step centrifugations for preparing PRP were used in 39 subjects who had consented prior to the study's start. The separating centrifugation (Step 1, used to separate whole blood into its two main components: red blood cells and plasma) was tested from 500g to 1900g at 200g increments for 5 minutes (min), and from 100g to 1300g at 200g increments for 10 minutes. After separating centrifugation, upper plasma layer was transferred to another plain tube for the condensation centrifugation and remaining lower cell layer was discarded. The condensation centrifugation (Step 2, used to condense the platelets in the separated plasma) was tested at 1000g for 15 min, 1500g for 15 min, 2000g for 5 min and 3000g for 5 min, additionally at 1000g for 10 min and 1500g for 10 min. Platelet gelation was induced by adding 10% calcium gluconate to final PRP with volume ratio of 1:10. The optimal separating centrifugation conditions were followed by 900g for 5 minutes and the condensation conditions were followed by 1500g for 15 minutes, of which recovery ratios were 92.0 ± 3.1% and 84.3 ± 10.0%, respectively.

  3. Design, implementation and control of a magnetic levitation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameli, Ehsan

    Magnetic levitation technology has shown a great deal of promise for micromanipulation tasks. Due to the lack of mechanical contact, magnetic levitation systems are free of problems caused by friction, wear, sealing and lubrication. These advantages have made magnetic levitation systems a great candidate for clean room applications. In this thesis, a new large gap magnetic levitation system is designed, developed and successfully tested. The system is capable of levitating a 6.5(gr) permanent magnet in 3D space with an air gap of approximately 50(cm) with the traveling range of 20x20x30 mm3. The overall positioning accuracy of the system is 60mum. With the aid of finite elements method, an optimal geometry for the magnetic stator is proposed. Also, an energy optimization approach is utilized in the design of the electromagnets. In order to facilitate the design of various controllers for the system, a mathematical model of the magnetic force experienced by the levitated object is obtained. The dynamic magnetic force model is determined experimentally using frequency response system identification. The response of the system components including the power amplifiers, and position measurement system are also considered in the development of the force model. The force model is then employed in the controller design for the magnetic levitation device. Through a modular approach, the controller design for the 3D positioning system is started with the controller design for the vertical direction, i.e. z, and then followed by the controller design in the horizontal directions, i.e. x and y. For the vertical direction, several controllers such as PID, feed forward and feedback linearization are designed and their performances are compared. Also a control command conditioning method is introduced as a solution to increase the control performance and the results of the proposed controller are compared with the other designs. Experimental results showed that for the magnetic

  4. The homogeneity of levitation force in single domain YBCO bulk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Keran; Xu Kexi; Wu Xingda; Pan Pengjun

    2007-01-01

    The pellet homogeneity of levitation force versus the position in comparison to the seed or to the top surface has been studied in the entire volume of a single domain YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ bulk sample processed by the top-seeded melt texturing growth (TSMTG). It is found that the levitation forces increase and peak at a depth of 3 mm from the top of the sample at liquid nitrogen temperature. In other words, the second disk has the largest levitation force density. The phenomenon can be interpreted by the interaction between the microcracks or pores produced by crystal growth and the oxygenation. We propose a model in which Y211 particles distribution leading to microcracks and pores reduces the effective induced shielding current loops (ISCL) and increases the perimeters of ISCL. This corresponds to a decrease in the grain size and results in greatly reduced levitation forces of the bottom of the bulk. From the research, we know that the density of the YBCO bulk is also an important parameter for the levitation properties. The result is very attractive and useful for the fundamental studies and fabrication of TSMTG YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ bulk

  5. The homogeneity of levitation force in single domain YBCO bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Keran; Xu, Ke-Xi; Wu, Xing-da; Pan, Peng-jun

    2007-11-01

    The pellet homogeneity of levitation force versus the position in comparison to the seed or to the top surface has been studied in the entire volume of a single domain YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ bulk sample processed by the top-seeded melt texturing growth (TSMTG). It is found that the levitation forces increase and peak at a depth of 3 mm from the top of the sample at liquid nitrogen temperature. In other words, the second disk has the largest levitation force density. The phenomenon can be interpreted by the interaction between the microcracks or pores produced by crystal growth and the oxygenation. We propose a model in which Y211 particles distribution leading to microcracks and pores reduces the effective induced shielding current loops (ISCL) and increases the perimeters of ISCL. This corresponds to a decrease in the grain size and results in greatly reduced levitation forces of the bottom of the bulk. From the research, we know that the density of the YBCO bulk is also an important parameter for the levitation properties. The result is very attractive and useful for the fundamental studies and fabrication of TSMTG YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ bulk.

  6. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, Nicolás, E-mail: nico@fisica.edu.uy [Centro Universitario de Paysandú, Universidad de la República, Paysandú (Uruguay); Andrade, Marco A. B. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Canetti, Rafael [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay); Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-11-14

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  7. Modal bifurcation in a high-Tc superconducting levitation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, D; Fujiwara, S; Sugiura, T

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with modal bifurcation of a multi-degree-of-freedom high-T c superconducting levitation system. As modeling of large-scale high-T c superconducting levitation applications, where plural superconducting bulks are often used, it can be helpful to consider a system constituting of multiple oscillators magnetically coupled with each other. This paper investigates nonlinear dynamics of two permanent magnets levitated above high-T c superconducting bulks and placed between two fixed permanent magnets without contact. First, the nonlinear equations of motion of the levitated magnets were derived. Then the method of averaging was applied to them. It can be found from the obtained solutions that this nonlinear two degree-of-freedom system can have two asymmetric modes, in addition to a symmetric mode and an antisymmetric mode both of which also exist in the linearized system. One of the backbone curves in the frequency response shows a modal bifurcation where the two stable asymmetric modes mentioned above appear with destabilization of the antisymmetric mode, thus leading to modal localization. These analytical predictions have been confirmed in our numerical analysis and experiments of free vibration and forced vibration. These results, never predicted by linear analysis, can be important for application of high-T c superconducting levitation systems.

  8. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez, Nicolás; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Canetti, Rafael; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-01-01

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator

  9. Centrifuge modelling of granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A common characteristic of mass flows like debris flows, rock avalanches and mudflows is that gravity is their main driving force. Gravity defines the intensity and duration of the main interactions between particles and their surrounding media (particle-particle, particle-fluid, fluid-fluid). At the same time, gravity delimits the occurrence of phase separation, inverse segregation, and mass consolidation, among other phenomena. Therefore, in the understanding of the flow physics it is important to account for the scaling of gravity in scaled models. In this research, a centrifuge model is developed to model free surface granular flows down an incline at controlled gravity conditions. Gravity is controlled by the action of an induced inertial acceleration field resulting from the rotation of the model in a geotechnical centrifuge. The characteristics of the induced inertial acceleration field during flow are discussed and validated via experimental data. Flow heights, velocity fields, basal pressure and impact forces are measured for a range of channel inclinations and gravity conditions. Preliminary results enlighten the flow characteristics at variable gravity conditions and open a discussion on the simulation of large scale processes at a laboratory scale. Further analysis on the flow physics brings valuable information for the validation of granular flows rheology.

  10. Solid deuterium centrifuge pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Pellet injectors are needed to fuel long pulse tokamak plasmas and other magnetic confinement devices. For this purpose, an apparatus has been developed that forms 1.3-mm-diam pellets of frozen deuterium at a rate of 40 pellets per second and accelerates them to a speed of 1 km/s. Pellets are formed by extruding a billet of solidified deuterium through a 1.3-mm-diam nozzle at a speed of 5 cm/s. The extruding deuterium is chopped with a razor knife, forming 1.3-mm right circular cylinders of solid deuterium. The pellets are accelerated by synchronously injecting them into a high speed rotating arbor containing a guide track, which carries them from a point near the center of rotation to the periphery. The pellets leave the wheel after 150 0 of rotation at double the tip speed. The centrifuge is formed in the shape of a centrifugal catenary and is constructed of high strength KEVLAR/epoxy composite. This arbon has been spin-tested to a tip speed of 1 km/s

  11. Solid deuterium centrifuge pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    Pellet injectors are needed to fuel long pulse tokamak plasmas and other magnetic confinement devices. For this purpose, an apparatus has been developed that forms 1.3-mm-diam pellets of frozen deuterium at a rate of 40 pellets per second and accelerates them to a speed of 1 km/s. Pellets are formed by extruding a billet of solidified deuterium through a 1.3-mm-diam nozzle at a speed of 5 cm/s. The extruding deuterium is chopped with a razor knife, forming 1.3-mm right circular cylinders of solid deuterium. The pellets are accelerated by synchronously injecting them into a high speed rotating arbor containing a guide track, which carries them from a point near the center of rotation to the periphery. The pellets leave the wheel after 150 0 of rotation at double the tip speed. The centrifuge is formed in the shape of a centrifugal catenary and is constructed of high strength Kevlar/epoxy composite. This arbor has been spin-tested to a tip speed of 1 km/s

  12. Canadian high speed magnetically levitated vehicle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atherton, D L [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, Ont.; Belanger, P R; Burke, P E; Dawson, G E; Eastham, A R; Hayes, W F; Ooi, B T; Silvester, P; Slemon, G R

    1978-04-01

    A technically feasible high speed (400 to 480 km/h) guided ground transportation system, based on the use of the vehicle-borne superconducting magnets for electrodynamic suspension and guidance and for linear synchronous motor propulsion was defined as a future modal option for Canadian application. Analysis and design proposals were validated by large-scale tests on a rotating wheel facility and by modelling system components and their interactions. Thirty ton vehicles carrying 100 passengers operate over a flat-topped elevated guideway, which minimizes system down-time due to ice and snow accumulation and facilitates the design of turn-outs. A clearance of up to 15 cm is produced by the electrodynamic interaction between the vehicle-borne superconducting magnets and aluminum guideway strips. Propulsion and automatic system control is provided by the superconducting linear synchronous motor which operates at good efficiency (0.74) and high power factor (0.95). The vehicle is guided primarily by the interaction between the LSM field magnet array and flat null-flux loops overlying the stator windings in the guideway. The linear synchronous motor, electrodynamic suspension as well as levitation strip joints, parasitic LSM winding losses and limitations to the use of ferromagnetic guideway reinforcement were investigated experimentally on the test wheel facility. The use of a secondary suspension assures adequate dynamic stability, and good ride quality is achieved by optimized passive components with respect to lateral modes and by an actively controlled secondary suspension with respect to vertical motion.

  13. Microscopic thermodynamics with levitated nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseler, Jan; Jain, Vijay; Moritz, Clemens; Dellago, Christoph; Quidant, Romain; Novotny, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    Micsospheres trapped in liquid by so called optical tweezers have been established as useful tools to study microscopic thermodynamics. Since the sphere is in direct contact with the liquid, it is strongly coupled to the thermal bath and its dynamics is dominated by thermal fluctuations. In contrast, here we use an optically trapped nanoparticle in vacuum to study fluctuations of a system that is coupled only weakly to the thermal bath. The weak coupling allows us to resolve the ballistic dynamics and to control its motion via modulation of the trapping beam, thereby preparing it in a highly non-thermal state. We develop a theory for the effective Hamiltonian that describes the system dynamics in this state and show that all the relevant parameters can be controlled in situ. This tunability allows us to study classical fluctuation theorems for different effective Hamiltonians and for varying coupling to the thermal bath ranging over several orders of magnitude. The ultimate goal, however, is to completely suppress the effect of the thermal bath and to prepare the levitated nanoparticle in a quantum mechanical state. Our most recent result indicate that this regime is now within reach.

  14. The effect of centrifugation speed and time on pre-analytical platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Anna C; Nybo, Mads; Nielsen, Christian; Vinholt, Pernille J

    2016-12-01

    The results of laboratory analyses are affected by pre-analytical variables, and in particular can platelets be activated by shear handling stress and secrete granular substances. We therefore evaluated the effect of centrifugation speed and time on pre-analytical platelet activation. Citrate- and EDTA-anticoagulated blood from healthy volunteers were centrifuged at 80-10,000 g for 5-15 min to prepare plasma and platelet-rich plasma. Pre-analytical platelet activation was assessed by flow cytometric measurement of platelet P-selectin (CD62p) expression. Blood cell counts, mean platelet volume (MPV), immature platelet fraction (IPF), and platelet distribution width (PDW) were measured. Platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma induced by arachidonic acid (AA), ADP or thrombin receptor activator peptide-6 (TRAP) was tested by 96-well aggregometry. The median percentage of platelets expressing P-selectin in citrate- and EDTA-plasma centrifuged at 2000 g for 10 min were 43% [interquartile range (IQR), 38%-53%] and 56% (IQR, 31%-78%), respectively (p=0.82). Platelet-rich plasma prepared at 100-250 g for 10 min had significantly lower platelet P-selectin expression (11%-15%), pcentrifuged. In platelet-rich plasma, increasing centrifugation speed significantly increased platelet yield but decreased contamination from other blood cells, platelet composition was altered as platelet parameters (MPV, IPF, and PDW) was lowered. Platelet aggregation was not affected by the centrifugation speed platelet-rich plasma was prepared. Proportional to centrifugation speed, platelets in plasma and platelet-rich plasma were activated with centrifugation speed, cell content and composition changed while platelet aggregation was unaltered.

  15. Theoretical prediction and validation of cell recovery rates in preparing platelet-rich plasma through a centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Linfeng; Park, Hyungmin; Jo, Chris Hyunchul

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we propose a theoretical framework to predict the recovery rates of platelets and white blood cells in the process of centrifugal separation of whole blood contained in a tube for the preparation of platelet-rich plasma. Compared to previous efforts to optimize or standardize the protocols of centrifugation, we try to further the physical background (i.e., based on the multiphase flow phenomena) of analysis to develop a universal approach that can be applied to widely different conditions. That is, one-dimensional quasi-linear partial differential equation to describe the centrifugal sedimentation of dispersed phase (red and white blood cells) in continuous phase (plasma) is derived based on the kinematic-wave theory. With the information of whole blood volume and tube geometry considered, it is possible to determine the positions of interfaces between supernatant/suspension and suspension/sediment, i.e., the particle concentration gradient in a tube, for a wide range of centrifugation parameters (time and acceleration). While establishing a theory to predict the recovery rates of the platelet and white blood cell from the pre-determined interface positions, we also propose a new correlation model between the recovery rates of plasma and platelets, which is found to be a function of the whole blood volume, centrifugal time and acceleration, and tube geometry. The present predictions for optimal condition show good agreements with available human clinical data, obtained from different conditions, indicating the universal applicability of our method. Furthermore, the dependence of recovery rates on centrifugal conditions reveals that there exist a different critical acceleration and time for the maximum recovery rate of platelets and white blood cells, respectively. The other parameters such as hematocrit, whole blood volume and tube geometry are also found to strongly affect the maximum recovery rates of blood cells, and finally, as a strategy

  16. Rotor for a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a rotor for a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor, said rotor comprising a rotor body having a longitudinal centre axis, and at least one pivotally mounted blade being adapted to pivot around a pivot axis under rotation of the rotor body around the longitudinal centre axis....... Moreover, the present invention relates to a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor applying such a rotor....

  17. Detection methods for centrifugal microfluidic platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burger, Robert; Amato, Letizia; Boisen, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidics has attracted much interest from academia as well as industry, since it potentially offers solutions for affordable, user-friendly and portable biosensing. A wide range of so-called fluidic unit operations, e.g. mixing, metering, liquid routing, and particle separation...... for the centrifugal microfluidics platform and cover optical as well as mechanical and electrical detection principles....

  18. Isotopic enrichment in a plasma centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Bosco, E.; Dallaqua, R.S.; Ludwig, G.O.; Bittencourt, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    High rotational velocity and centrifugal isotopic separation of carbon in a vacuum-arc plasma centrifuge are presented. Enrichments of up to 390% for 13 C are measured at 6 cm radius with angular rotation frequencies in excess of 1.0 x 10 5 rad/s in an axial magnetic field of 0.12 T

  19. Centrifuge modelling of offshore monopile foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkvort, Rasmus Tofte; Hededal, Ole

    2010-01-01

    centrifuge tests on a laterally loaded monopile in dry sand. The prototype dimension of the piles was modelled to a diameter of 1 meter and penetration depth on 6 meter. The test series were designed in order to investigate the scaling laws in the centrifuge both for monotonic and cyclic loading...

  20. Modelling of hydrothermal characteristics of centrifugal nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarkho, A.A.; Omelchenko, M.P.; Borshchev, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented for the first time is a method of recalculating the hydrothermal characteristics of centrifugal nozzles obtained in laboratory conditions for full-scale nozzles. From the experimental hydrothermal characteristics of nozzles observed in the laboratory it is allowed to calculate the hydrothermal characteristics of any other centrifugal nozzle whose diameter and dimensionless geometric characteristic are known

  1. Astronaut Gordon Cooper in centrifuge for tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper, prime pilot for the Mercury-Atlas 9 mission, is strapped into the gondola while undergoing tests in the centrifuge at the Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, Pennsylvania. The centrifuge is used to investigate by simulation the pilot's capability to control the vehicle during the actual flight in its booster and reentry profile.

  2. High frequency dynamics in centrifugal compressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twerda, A.; Meulendijks, D.; Smeulers, J.P.M.; Handel, R. van den; Lier, L.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Problems with centrifugal compressors relating to high frequency, i.e. Blade passing frequency (BPF) are increasing. Pulsations and vibrations generated in centrifugal compressors can lead to nuisance, due to strong tonal noise, and even breakdown. In several cases the root cause of a failure or a

  3. Gas-centrifuge unit and centrifugal process for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, T.M.

    1979-01-01

    An invention involving a process and apparatus for isotope-separation applications such as uranium-isotope enrichment is disclosed which employs cascades of gas centrifuges. A preferred apparatus relates to an isotope-enrichment unit which includes a first group of cascades of gas centrifuges and an auxiliary cascade. Each cascade has an input, a light-fraction output, and a heavy-fraction output for separating a gaseous-mixture feed including a compound of a light nuclear isotope and a compound of a heavy nuclear isotope into light and heavy fractions respectively enriched and depleted in the light isotope. The cascades of the first group have at least one enriching stage and at least one stripping stage. The unit further includes means for introducing a gaseous-mixture feedstock into each input of the first group of cascades, means for withdrawing at least a portion of a product fraction from the light-fraction outputs of the first group of cascades, and means for withdrawing at least a portion of a waste fraction from the heavy-fraction outputs of the first group of cascades. The isotope-enrichment unit also includes a means for conveying a gaseous-mixture from a light-fraction output of a first cascade included in the first group to the input of the auxiliary cascade so that at least a portion of a light gaseous-mixture fraction produced by the first group of cascades is further separated into a light and a heavy fraction by the auxiliary cascade. At least a portion of a product fraction is withdrawn from the light fraction output of the auxiliary cascade. If the light-fraction output of the first cascade and the heavy-fraction output of the auxiliary cascade are reciprocal outputs, the concentraton of the light isotope in the heavy fraction produced by the auxiliary cascade essentially equals the concentration of the light isotope in the gaseous-mixture feedstock

  4. Acoustically levitated droplets: a contactless sampling method for fluorescence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Jork; Grabolle, Markus; Rurack, Knut; Resch-Genger, Ute; Ziegler, Jan; Nann, Thomas; Panne, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic levitation is used as a new tool to study concentration-dependent processes in fluorescence spectroscopy. With this technique, small amounts of liquid and solid samples can be measured without the need for sample supports or containers, which often limits signal acquisition and can even alter sample properties due to interactions with the support material. We demonstrate that, because of the small sample volume, fluorescence measurements at high concentrations of an organic dye are possible without the limitation of inner-filter effects, which hamper such experiments in conventional, cuvette-based measurements. Furthermore, we show that acoustic levitation of liquid samples provides an experimentally simple way to study distance-dependent fluorescence modulations in semiconductor nanocrystals. The evaporation of the solvent during levitation leads to a continuous increase of solute concentration and can easily be monitored by laser-induced fluorescence.

  5. Optical levitation of a microdroplet containing a single quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minowa, Yosuke; Kawai, Ryoichi; Ashida, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the optical levitation or trapping in helium gas of a single quantum dot (QD) within a liquid droplet. Bright single photon emission from the levitated QD in the droplet was observed for more than 200 s. The observed photon count rates are consistent with the value theoretically estimated from the two-photon-action cross section. This paper presents the realization of an optically levitated solid-state quantum emitter. This paper was published in Optics Letters and is made available as an electronic reprint with the permission of OSA. The paper can be found at the following URL on the OSA website: https://www.opticsinfobase.org/ol/abstract.cfm?uri=ol-40-6-906. Systematic or multiple reproduction or distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means is prohibited and is subject to penalties under law.

  6. Towards measuring quantum electrodynamic torque with a levitated nanorod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhujing; Bang, Jaehoon; Ahn, Jonghoon; Hoang, Thai M.; Li, Tongcang

    2017-04-01

    According to quantum electrodynamics, quantum fluctuations of electromagnetic fields give rise to a zero-point energy that never vanishes, even in the absence of electromagnetic sources. The interaction energy will not only lead to the well-known Casimir force but will also contribute to the Casimir torque for anisotropic materials. We propose to use an optically levitated nanorod in vacuum and a birefringent substrate to experimentally investigate the QED torque. We have previously observed the libration of an optically levitated non-spherical nanoparticle in vacuum and found it to be an ultrasensitive torque sensor. A nanorod with a long axis of 300nm and a diameter of 60nm levitated in vacuum at 10 (- 8) torr will have a remarkable torque detection sensitivity on the order of 10 (- 28) Nm/ √Hz, which will be sufficient to detect the Casimir torque. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.1555035-PHY.

  7. Theory and experiment on optical levitation of aerosol droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaoli; Wang Junbo; Feng Zhichao

    1994-01-01

    Optical levitation is a technique for stably supporting and manipulating transparent particles by the forces of radiation pressure (RP) from CW laser beams. The technique is of interest for support and manipulation of laser fusion targets, studies of light scattering from oriented particles, and as a sensitive detector of emitted photoelectron in studies of nonlinear photoelectric effects in transparent materials. In this paper, the expression for the incident strongly focused laser beam is obtained using the complex-source-point spherical wave theory. Based on the scattering theory, the formulas of radiation pressure of Gaussian beam exerted on a homogeneous sphere is obtained. The numerical results of the radiation pressure and their physical interpretations are presented. In the experiment of optical levitation, the authors found out that particles (one or more) can also be steadily levitated in the beam for a long time without a feedback apparatus

  8. A novel permanent magnetic rail for HTS levitation propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, F.; Tang, Y.; Ren, L.; Li, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Halbach Array has a characteristic advantage that the spatial fundamental field is canceled on one side of the array while the field intensity on the other side is enhanced. So this array could be used in the design of high temperature superconducting permanent magnetic levitation rail to improve the surface magnetic field and levitation force. This paper compared the surface magnetic field of the Halbach Array rail and two conventional levitation rails at first. Then proposed the potential advantages of Halbach Array applied in permanent magnetic rail system. But the Halbach Array rail is mechanical instability. An novel improved Halbach Array rail is proposed in this paper. The new structure combined the advantages of traditional structure and Halbach Array structure, solved the problem of mechanical instability, and carried on the advantage of Halbach Array on the magnetic field distribution at the same time.

  9. Acoustic levitation with self-adaptive flexible reflectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Z Y; Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2011-07-01

    Two kinds of flexible reflectors are proposed and examined in this paper to improve the stability of single-axis acoustic levitator, especially in the case of levitating high-density and high-temperature samples. One kind is those with a deformable reflecting surface, and the other kind is those with an elastic support, both of which are self-adaptive to the change of acoustic radiation pressure. High-density materials such as iridium (density 22.6 gcm(-3)) are stably levitated at room temperature with a soft reflector made of colloid as well as a rigid reflector supported by a spring. In addition, the containerless melting and solidification of binary In-Bi eutectic alloy (melting point 345.8 K) and ternary Ag-Cu-Ge eutectic alloy (melting point 812 K) are successfully achieved by applying the elastically supported reflector with the assistance of a laser beam.

  10. Acoustic levitation of liquid drops: Dynamics, manipulation and phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Duyang; Yu, Yinkai; Chen, Zhen; Li, Xiaoguang; Wu, Hongjing; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-05-01

    The technique of acoustic levitation normally produces a standing wave and the potential well of the sound field can be used to trap small objects. Since no solid surface is involved it has been widely applied for the study of fluid physics, nucleation, bio/chemical processes, and various forms of soft matter. In this article, we survey the works on drop dynamics in acoustic levitation, focus on how the dynamic behavior is related to the rheological properties and discuss the possibility to develop a novel rheometer based on this technique. We review the methods and applications of acoustic levitation for the manipulation of both liquid and solid samples and emphasize the important progress made in the study of phase transitions and bio-chemical analysis. We also highlight the possible open areas for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optically Levitated Microspheres as a Probe for New Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Alexander; Moore, David; Blakemore, Charles; Lu, Marie; Gratta, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    We are developing novel techniques to probe new interactions at micron distances using optically levitated dielectric microspheres. Levitated microspheres are an ideal probe for short-range interactions because they are suspended using the radiation pressure at the focus of a laser beam, which means that the microspheres can be precisely manipulated and isolated from the surrounding environment at high vacuum. We have performed a search for unknown charged particles bound within the bulk of the microspheres. Currently, we are searching for the presence of a Chameleon field postulated to explain the presence of dark energy in the universe. In the future we plan to use optically levitated microspheres to search for micron length-scale gravity like interactions that could couple between a microsphere and another mass. We will present resent results from these experiments and plans for future searches for new interactions.

  12. Simulation of magnetization and levitation characteristics of HTS tape stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anischenko, I. V.; Pokrovskii, S. V.; Mineev, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    In this work it is presented a computational model of a magnetic levitation system based on stacks of high-temperature second generation superconducting tapes (HTS) GdBa2Cu3O7-x. Calculated magnetic field and the current distributions in the system for different stacks geometries in the zero-field cooling mode are also presented. The magnetization curves of the stacks in the external field of a permanent NdFeB magnet and the levitation force dependence on the gap between the magnet and the HTS tapes stack were obtained. A model of the magnetic system, oriented to levitation application, is given. Results of modeling were compared with the experimental data.

  13. Electrostatic Levitation: A Tool to Support Materials Research in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jan; SanSoucie, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Containerless processing represents an important topic for materials research in microgravity. Levitated specimens are free from contact with a container, which permits studies of deeply undercooled melts, and high-temperature, highly reactive materials. Containerless processing provides data for studies of thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable state formation, microstructure formation, undercooling, and nucleation. The European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) jointly developed an electromagnetic levitator facility (MSL-EML) for containerless materials processing in space. The electrostatic levitator (ESL) facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center provides support for the development of containerless processing studies for the ISS. Apparatus and techniques have been developed to use the ESL to provide data for phase diagram determination, creep resistance, emissivity, specific heat, density/thermal expansion, viscosity, surface tension and triggered nucleation of melts. The capabilities and results from selected ESL-based characterization studies performed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center will be presented.

  14. Water induced sediment levitation enhances downslope transport on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raack, Jan; Conway, Susan J; Herny, Clémence; Balme, Matthew R; Carpy, Sabrina; Patel, Manish R

    2017-10-27

    On Mars, locally warm surface temperatures (~293 K) occur, leading to the possibility of (transient) liquid water on the surface. However, water exposed to the martian atmosphere will boil, and the sediment transport capacity of such unstable water is not well understood. Here, we present laboratory studies of a newly recognized transport mechanism: "levitation" of saturated sediment bodies on a cushion of vapor released by boiling. Sediment transport where this mechanism is active is about nine times greater than without this effect, reducing the amount of water required to transport comparable sediment volumes by nearly an order of magnitude. Our calculations show that the effect of levitation could persist up to ~48 times longer under reduced martian gravity. Sediment levitation must therefore be considered when evaluating the formation of recent and present-day martian mass wasting features, as much less water may be required to form such features than previously thought.

  15. Polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide under magnetic levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Y; Katsumoto, Y; Ohishi, Y; Koyama, M; Ohno, K; Akita, M; Inoue, K; Tanimoto, Y

    2006-01-01

    A study of an effect of the magnetic levitation on polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide at room temperature was carried out. The magnetic levitation environment, which is created by strong and upward magnetic force counterbalanced with the downward gravitational force, is multiple environment consisting of both the microgravity and the strong magnetic field which is lacking in a space vehicle orbiting around the earth. In this work, the effect was evaluated from the viewpoint of the number-average molecular weight (M n ) and the polydispersity (the index of the molecular weight distribution) of the synthesized polymer. A small extent (∼10 %) of the effect was observed on both the parameters. When the polymer was synthesized under the magnetic levitation environment, M n increased while the polydispersity decreased as compared with those of the polymer synthesized under the gravity

  16. Enhanced infectivity of bluetongue virus in cell culture by centrifugation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sundin, D R; Mecham, J O

    1989-01-01

    The effects of centrifugation of the infection of cell culture with bluetongue virus (BTV) were investigated. Baby hamster kidney cells were infected with BTV with or without centrifugation. Viral antigen was detected by immunofluorescence at 24 h in both centrifuged and noncentrifuged cultures. However, after 24 h of infection, the production of PFU in centrifuged cell cultures was 10- to 20-fold greater than that seen in cultures not centrifuged. In addition, centrifugation enhanced the dir...

  17. Progress in ultra-centrifuge enrichment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Dawson

    2006-01-01

    Urenco have undertaken a continuous development programme in centrifuge technology for over 35 years. This has seen development from sub-critical machines in the mid 1970's through to the company's world leading TC12 supercritical centrifuge, which has been deployed on a large-scale basis over the last decade. The latest centrifuge to emerge from this programme is Urenco's sixth generation centrifuge, the TC21, which will be commercially deployed from mid-2007 onwards. In recent times Urenco has vested its centrifuge technology in Enrichment Technology Company (ETC) as a vehicle to enable the use of this advanced technology by other operators for commercial purposes. This paper reviews why Urenco and ETC believe this technology represents the best choice for creating new global commercial enrichment capacity and its future development prospects. (author)

  18. Eddy damping effect of additional conductors in superconducting levitation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zhao-Fei; Gou, Xiao-Fan, E-mail: xfgou@hhu.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • In this article, for the eddy current damper attached to the HTSC, we • quantitatively investigated the damping coefficient c, damping ratio, Joule heating of the copper damper, and the vibration frequency of the PM as well. • presented four different arrangements of the copper damper, and comparatively studied their damping effects and Joule heating, and finally proposed the most advisable arrangement. - Abstract: Passive superconducting levitation systems consisting of a high temperature superconductor (HTSC) and a permanent magnet (PM) have demonstrated several fascinating applications such as the maglev system, flywheel energy storage. Generally, for the HTSC–PM levitation system, the HTSC with higher critical current density J{sub c} can obtain larger magnetic force to make the PM levitate over the HTSC (or suspended below the HTSC), however, the process of the vibration of the levitated PM, provides very limited inherent damping (essentially hysteresis). To improve the dynamic stability of the levitated PM, eddy damping of additional conductors can be considered as the most simple and effective approach. In this article, for the HTSC–PM levitation system with an additional copper damper attached to the HTSC, we numerically and comprehensively investigated the damping coefficient c, damping ratio, Joule heating of the copper damper, and the vibration frequency of the PM as well. Furthermore, we comparatively studied four different arrangements of the copper damper, on the comprehensive analyzed the damping effect, efficiency (defined by c/V{sub Cu}, in which V{sub Cu} is the volume of the damper) and Joule heating, and finally presented the most advisable arrangement.

  19. Holding characteristics of planar objects suspended by near-field acoustic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo; Koike; Nakamura; Ueha; Hashimoto

    2000-03-01

    The authors have found the acoustic levitation phenomenon where planar objects of 10 kg weight can be levitated near a vibration surface. This phenomenon has been studied for non-contact transportation. A circular planar object can be suspended without contacting a circular vibration plate. We have studied the holding force which acts horizontally on the levitated objects. The horizontal position of the object is stabilized by this force. In this paper, we discuss the effect of the radius of a levitated object, levitation distance, displacement amplitude of the vibration plate and the vibration mode on the suspending force.

  20. Effects of acoustic levitation on the development of zebrafish, Danio rerio, embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Sundvik, Maria; Nieminen, Heikki J.; Salmi, Ari; Panula, Pertti; Hæggström, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic levitation provides potential to characterize and manipulate material such as solid particles and fluid in a wall-less environment. While attempts to levitate small animals have been made, the biological effects of such levitation have been scarcely documented. Here, our goal was to explore if zebrafish embryos can be levitated (peak pressures at the pressure node and anti-node: 135 dB and 144 dB, respectively) with no effects on early development. We levitated the embryos (n = 94) a...

  1. On the force relaxation in the magnetic levitation system with a high-Tc superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolyak, B M; Zakharov, M S

    2014-01-01

    The effect of magnetic flux creep on the lift force in a magnet/superconductor system was studied. It was shown experimentally that in the case of real levitation (when a levitating object bears only on a magnetic field) the suspension height and consequently the lift force did not change over a long period of time. When the levitating object is fixed for some time (i.e. a rigid constraint is imposed on it), the levitation height decreases after removal of the external constraint. It is assumed that free oscillations of the levitating object slow down the flux creep process, which is activated when these oscillations are suppressed. (paper)

  2. Dual-temperature acoustic levitation and sample transport apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E.; Robey, J.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T.

    1986-01-01

    The properties of a dual-temperature resonant chamber to be used for acoustical levitation and positioning have been theoretically and experimentally studied. The predictions of a first-order dissipationless treatment of the generalized wave equation for an inhomogeneous medium are in close agreement with experimental results for the temperature dependence of the resonant mode spectrum and the acoustic pressure distribution, although the measured magnitude of the pressure variations does not correlate well with the calculated one. Ground-based levitation of low-density samples has been demonstrated at 800 C, where steady-state forces up to 700 dyn were generated.

  3. Structural morphology of acoustically levitated and heated nanosilica droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ranganathan; Tijerino, Erick; Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi

    2010-01-01

    We study the vaporization and precipitation dynamics of a nanosilica encapsulated water droplet by levitating it acoustically and heating it with a CO 2 laser. For all concentrations, we observe three phases: solvent evaporation, surface agglomeration, and precipitation leading to bowl or ring shaped structures. At higher concentrations, ring reorientation and rotation are seen consistently. The surface temperature from an infrared camera is seen to be dependent on the final geometrical shape of the droplet and its rotation induced by the acoustic field of the levitator. With nonuniform particle distribution, these structures can experience rupture which modifies the droplet rotational speed.

  4. Spherical Nb single crystals containerlessly grown by electrostatic levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Y.S.; Takeya, H.; Hirata, K.; Togano, K.

    2003-01-01

    Spherical Nb (T m =2750 K) single crystals were grown via containerless electrostatic levitation (ESL). Samples became spherical at melting in levitation and undercooled typically 300-450 K prior to nucleation. As-processed samples were still spherical without any macroscopic shape change by solidification showing a uniform dendritic surface morphology. Crystallographic {111} planes exposed in equilateral triangular shapes on the surface by preferential macroetching and spotty back-reflection Laue patterns confirm the single crystal nature of the ESL-processed Nb samples. No hysteresis in magnetization between zero field and field cooling also implies a clean defect-free condition of the spherical Nb single crystals

  5. Internal flow of acoustically levitated drops undergoing sectorial oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J.; Yan, Z.L.; Wei, B.

    2010-01-01

    We present the experimental observation and theoretical analysis of fluid flow in acoustically levitated water drop undergoing sectorial oscillations. The fluid always flows between the extended sections and the compressed sections. The magnitude of fluid velocity decreases from the equatorial fringe to the centre of levitated drop. The maximum fluid velocity is 60-160 mm/s and the Reynolds number of the oscillations is estimated to be 137-367. The internal flow of the drop is analyzed as potential flow, and the fluid velocity is found to be horizontal. In the equatorial plane, the calculated stream lines and velocity profiles agree well with the experimental observations.

  6. Levitation of a magnet over a flat type II superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, F.; Gyorgy, E.M.; Johnson, D.W. Jr.; O'Bryan, H.M.; Sherwood, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Levitation of a magnet over a type II superconductor where the field at the superconductor exceeds H/sub c/ 1 is described and shown. The penetration and pinning of the flux lines in the superconductor cause the position of the magnet to be stable over a flat disk; a complete Meissner effect would make this position unstable. Furthermore, the observed dependence of the height of levitation on such variables as the thickness of the superconducting disk and the size of the magnet are consistent with a model described in this paper based on the energy cost of flux penetration through vortices and inconsistent with a Meissner effect model

  7. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S H; Hashi, S; Ishiyama, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and 19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  8. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  9. The effect of centrifugation speed and time on pre-analytical platelet activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderström, Anna Cecilia; Nybo, Mads; Nielsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The results of laboratory analyses are affected by pre-analytical variables, and in particular can platelets be activated by shear handling stress and secrete granular substances. We therefore evaluated the effect of centrifugation speed and time on pre-analytical platelet activation....... METHODS: Citrate- and EDTA-anticoagulated blood from healthy volunteers were centrifuged at 80-10,000 g for 5-15 min to prepare plasma and platelet-rich plasma. Pre-analytical platelet activation was assessed by flow cytometric measurement of platelet P-selectin (CD62p) expression. Blood cell counts, mean...... of platelets expressing P-selectin in citrate- and EDTA-plasma centrifuged at 2000 g for 10 min were 43% [interquartile range (IQR), 38%-53%] and 56% (IQR, 31%-78%), respectively (p=0.82). Platelet-rich plasma prepared at 100-250 g for 10 min had significantly lower platelet P-selectin expression (11%-15%), p...

  10. Microvascular pressure responses of second-generation rats chronically exposed to 2 g centrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, D. R.; Knapp, C. F.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for a study aimed at a quantitative comparison of microvascular dynamics in second-generation rats reared in a 2-g force field produced by centrifugation with similar data from animals reared in a centrifuge that produced only a 1-g force. It is shown that the pressure distribution in the mesenteric microvasculature of the second generation of rats reared in a 2-g environment, as well as the animals' blood pressure response to epinephrine, are significantly different compared to their 1-g counterparts. In particular, 1-g and 2-g chronic centrifugation enhances the arterial blood pressure, and the 2-g force field attenuates the pressor effects of norepinephrine.

  11. Centrifugal and axial compressor control

    CERN Document Server

    McMillan, Gregory K

    2009-01-01

    Control engineers, mechanical engineers and mechanical technicians will learn how to select the proper control systems for axial and centrifugal compressors for proper throughput and surge control, with a particular emphasis on surge control. Readers will learn to understand the importance of transmitter speed, digital controller sample time, and control valve stroking time in helping to prevent surge. Engineers and technicians will find this book to be a highly valuable guide on compressor control schemes and the importance of mitigating costly and sometimes catastrophic surge problems. It can be used as a self-tutorial guide or in the classroom with the book's helpful end-of-chapter questions and exercises and sections for keeping notes.

  12. Detection of circulating microparticles by flow cytometry: influence of centrifugation, filtration of buffer, and freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey-Hazra, Emily; Hertel, Barbara; Kirsch, Torsten; Woywodt, Alexander; Lovric, Svjetlana; Haller, Hermann; Haubitz, Marion; Erdbruegger, Uta

    2010-12-06

    The clinical importance of microparticles resulting from vesiculation of platelets and other blood cells is increasingly recognized, although no standardized method exists for their measurement. Only a few studies have examined the analytical and preanalytical steps and variables affecting microparticle detection. We focused our analysis on microparticle detection by flow cytometry. The goal of our study was to analyze the effects of different centrifugation protocols looking at different durations of high and low centrifugation speeds. We also analyzed the effect of filtration of buffer and long-term freezing on microparticle quantification, as well as the role of Annexin V in the detection of microparticles. Absolute and platelet-derived microparticles were 10- to 15-fold higher using initial lower centrifugation speeds at 1500 × g compared with protocols using centrifugation speeds at 5000 × g (P centrifugation speeds. Filtration of buffer with a 0.2 μm filter reduced a significant amount of background noise. Storing samples for microparticle detection at -80°C decreased microparticle levels at days 28, 42, and 56 (P centrifugation speeds should be used to minimize contamination by smaller size platelets.

  13. Magnetic levitation/suspension system by high-temperature superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, I.; Hsu, J.; Jamn, G.; Lin, C.E.; Wu, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, with the advance of materials processing techniques, such as top-seeding and melt-texturing (TSMT) method, very large single-grained Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) samples up to several centimeters in diameter can be produced. Each sample is capable of levitating over kilograms of weight. A HTS magnetic levitation (MagLev) transportation prototype has been constructed at National Cheng-Kung University (NCKU) to validate the concept of HTS-MagLev system based on Meissner effect. This HTS-MagLev is an inherent stable levitation system, unlike traditional MagLev system that requires sensors and feedback circuits to dynamically adjust its unstable levitation position. In this report, the results of various magnetic levitation parameters, such as different permanent magnet configurations, relative levitation stability, levitation force, etc., as well as magnetic field intensity and distribution will be discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  14. A containerless levitation setup for liquid processing in a superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui-Meng; Yin, Da-Chuan; Li, Hai-Sheng; Geng, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Lu, Qin-Qin; Guo, Yun-Zhu; Guo, Wei-Hong; Shang, Peng; Wakayama, Nobuko I

    2008-09-01

    Containerless processing of materials is considered beneficial for obtaining high quality products due to the elimination of the detrimental effects coming from the contact with container walls. Many containerless processing methods are realized by levitation techniques. This paper describes a containerless levitation setup that utilized the magnetization force generated in a gradient magnetic field. It comprises a levitation unit, a temperature control unit, and a real-time observation unit. Known volume of liquid diamagnetic samples can be levitated in the levitation chamber, the temperature of which is controlled using the temperature control unit. The evolution of the levitated sample is observed in real time using the observation unit. With this setup, containerless processing of liquid such as crystal growth from solution can be realized in a well-controlled manner. Since the levitation is achieved using a superconducting magnet, experiments requiring long duration time such as protein crystallization and simulation of space environment for living system can be easily succeeded.

  15. Tolerance of centrifuge-simulated suborbital spaceflight by medical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Rebecca S; Pattarini, James M; Reyes, David P; Mulcahy, Robert A; Garbino, Alejandro; Mathers, Charles H; Vardiman, Johnené L; Castleberry, Tarah L; Vanderploeg, James M

    2014-07-01

    We examined responses of volunteers with known medical disease to G forces in a centrifuge to evaluate how potential commercial spaceflight participants (SFPs) might tolerate the forces of spaceflight despite significant medical history. Volunteers were recruited based upon suitability for each of five disease categories (hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, lung disease, back or neck problems) or a control group. Subjects underwent seven centrifuge runs over 2 d. Day 1 consisted of two +G(z) runs (peak = +3.5 G(z), Run 2) and two +G(x), runs (peak = +6.0 G(x), Run 4). Day 2 consisted of three runs approximating suborbital spaceflight profiles (combined +G(x) and +G(z), peak = +6.0 G(x)/+4.0 G(z)). Data collected included blood pressure, electrocardiogram, pulse oximetry, neurovestibular exams, and post-run questionnaires regarding motion sickness, disorientation, grayout, and other symptoms. A total of 335 subjects registered for participation, of which 86 (63 men, 23 women, age 20-78 yr) participated in centrifuge trials. The most common causes for disqualification were weight and severe and uncontrolled medical or psychiatric disease. Five subjects voluntarily withdrew from the second day of testing: three for anxiety reasons, one for back strain, and one for time constraints. Maximum hemodynamic values recorded included HR of 192 bpm, systolic BP of 217 mmHg, and diastolic BP of 144 mmHg. Common subjective complaints included grayout (69%), nausea (20%), and chest discomfort (6%). Despite their medical history, no subject experienced significant adverse physiological responses to centrifuge profiles. These results suggest that most individuals with well-controlled medical conditions can withstand acceleration forces of launch and re-entry profiles of current commercial spaceflight vehicles.

  16. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  17. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom

  18. Distribution, recovery and concentration of platelets and leukocytes in L-PRP prepared by centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Bruna Alice Gomes; Martins Shimojo, Andréa Arruda; Marcelino Perez, Amanda Gomes; Duarte Lana, José Fabio Santos; Andrade Santana, Maria Helena

    2018-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous product prepared from whole blood (WB) that is widely used in regenerative medicine. In clinical practice, discontinuous centrifugation is used for both hand- and machine-prepared PRP. However, separation of WB fractions via centrifugation is a complex process, and the lack of clear mechanisms limits the understanding and evaluation of PRP preparation methods This paper focuses on the distribution, recovery and concentration factor of platelets and leukocytes in L-PRP (leukocyte and platelet-rich plasma) to define a concentration pattern for these blood components due to centrifugation conditions. WB collected from three healthy donors was centrifuged for 10min at 50-800 xg in a first step and then at 400 xg in a second step. The results from the first centrifugation step showed most platelets to be distributed in the upper layer (UL) and the buffy coat (BC), with approximately 14.5±5.2% retained in the bottom layer (BL). Most leukocytes were present in the BL. The greatest platelet recoveries from L-PRP were obtained at up to 150 xg (88.5±16.9%). The cumulative concentration factors with respect to the WB from the second centrifugation step were 6 and 1.2 for platelets and leukocytes, respectively. Thus, the concentration patterns delineated three centrifugation ranges with platelet/leukocyte ratios of 205±18, 325±15 and 107±4 and lymphocyte/granulocyte ratios of 1.54±0.74, 0.90±0.08 and 0.42±0.07. These findings contribute to a scientifically based standardization of L-PRP preparations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Centrifugation protocols: tests to determine optimal lithium heparin and citrate plasma sample quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeski, Goce; Solano, Connie; Petroff, Mark K; Hynd, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    Currently, no clear guidelines exist for the most appropriate tests to determine sample quality from centrifugation protocols for plasma sample types with both lithium heparin in gel barrier tubes for biochemistry testing and citrate tubes for coagulation testing. Blood was collected from 14 participants in four lithium heparin and one serum tube with gel barrier. The plasma tubes were centrifuged at four different centrifuge settings and analysed for potassium (K(+)), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), glucose and phosphorus (Pi) at zero time, poststorage at six hours at 21 °C and six days at 2-8°C. At the same time, three citrate tubes were collected and centrifuged at three different centrifuge settings and analysed immediately for prothrombin time/international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, derived fibrinogen and surface-activated clotting time (SACT). The biochemistry analytes indicate plasma is less stable than serum. Plasma sample quality is higher with longer centrifugation time, and much higher g force. Blood cells present in the plasma lyse with time or are damaged when transferred in the reaction vessels, causing an increase in the K(+), LD and Pi above outlined limits. The cells remain active and consume glucose even in cold storage. The SACT is the only coagulation parameter that was affected by platelets >10 × 10(9)/L in the citrate plasma. In addition to the platelet count, a limited but sensitive number of assays (K(+), LD, glucose and Pi for biochemistry, and SACT for coagulation) can be used to determine appropriate centrifuge settings to consistently obtain the highest quality lithium heparin and citrate plasma samples. The findings will aid laboratories to balance the need to provide the most accurate results in the best turnaround time.

  20. Gas dynamics in strong centrifugal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogovalov, S.V.; Kislov, V.A.; Tronin, I.V. [National research nuclear university “MEPhI”, Kashirskoje shosse, 31,115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-10

    Dynamics of waves generated by scopes in gas centrifuges (GC) for isotope separation is considered. The centrifugal acceleration in the GC reaches values of the order of 106g. The centrifugal and Coriolis forces modify essentially the conventional sound waves. Three families of the waves with different polarisation and dispersion exist in these conditions. Dynamics of the flow in the model GC Iguasu is investigated numerically. Comparison of the results of the numerical modelling of the wave dynamics with the analytical predictions is performed. New phenomena of the resonances in the GC is found. The resonances occur for the waves polarized along the rotational axis having the smallest dumping due to the viscosity.

  1. Plasma instability of a vacuum arc centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hole, M.J.; Dallaqua, R.S.; Simpson, S.W.; Del Bosco, E.

    2002-01-01

    Ever since conception of the vacuum arc centrifuge in 1980, periodic fluctuations in the ion saturation current and floating potential have been observed in Langmuir probe measurements in the rotation region of a vacuum arc centrifuge. In this work we develop a linearized theoretical model to describe a range of instabilities in the vacuum arc centrifuge plasma column, and then test the validity of the description through comparison with experiment. We conclude that the observed instability is a 'universal' instability, driven by the density gradient, in a plasma with finite conductivity

  2. A new, simple electrostatic-acoustic hybrid levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lierke, E. G.; Loeb, H.; Gross, D.

    1990-01-01

    Battelle has developed a hybrid levitator by combining the known single-axis acoustic standing wave levitator with a coaxial DC electric field. The resulting Coulomb forces on the charged liquid or solid sample support its weight and, together with the acoustic force, center the sample. Liquid samples with volumes approximately less than 100 micro-liters are deployed from a syringe reservoir into the acoustic pressure node. The sample is charged using a miniature high voltage power supply (approximately less than 20 kV) connected to the syringe needle. As the electric field, generated by a second miniature power supply, is increased, the acoustic intensity is reduced. The combination of both fields allows stable levitation of samples larger than either single technique could position on the ground. Decreasing the acoustic intensity reduces acoustic convection and sample deformation. Neither the electrostatic nor the acoustic field requires sample position sensing or active control. The levitator, now used for static and dynamic fluid physics investigations on the ground, can be easily modified for space operations.

  3. Viscoacoustic model for near-field ultrasonic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikhov, Ivan; Chivilikhin, Sergey; Amosov, Alexey; Jeanson, Romain

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasonic near-field levitation allows for contactless support and transportation of an object over vibrating surface. We developed an accurate model predicting pressure distribution in the gap between the surface and levitating object. The formulation covers a wide range of the air flow regimes: from viscous squeezed flow dominating in small gap to acoustic wave propagation in larger gap. The paper explains derivation of the governing equations from the basic fluid dynamics. The nonreflective boundary conditions were developed to properly define air flow at the outlet. Comparing to direct computational fluid dynamics modeling our approach allows achieving good accuracy while keeping the computation cost low. Using the model we studied the levitation force as a function of gap distance. It was shown that there are three distinguished flow regimes: purely viscous, viscoacoustic, and acoustic. The regimes are defined by the balance of viscous and inertial forces. In the viscous regime the pressure in the gap is close to uniform while in the intermediate viscoacoustic and the acoustic regimes the pressure profile is wavy. The model was validated by a dedicated levitation experiment and compared to similar published results.

  4. Annoyance caused by the sounds of a magnetic levitation train

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.

    2004-01-01

    In a laboratory study, the annoyance caused by the passby sounds from a magnetic levitation (maglev) train was investigated. The listeners were presented with various sound fragments. The task of the listeners was to respond after each presentation to the question: "How annoying would you find the

  5. Force analysis of linear induction motor for magnetic levitation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, A.A.; Nemlioglu, C.; Sahin, F.; Verdel, A.J.D.; Compter, J.C.; Lomonova, E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the analyses of thrust and normal forces of linear induction motor (LIM) segments which are implemented in a rotating ring system. To obtain magnetic levitation in a cost effective and sustainable way, decoupled control of thrust and normal forces is required. This study includes

  6. Measuring viscosity with a levitating magnet: application to complex fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even, C; Bouquet, F; Deloche, B; Remond, J

    2009-01-01

    As an experimental project proposed to students in fourth year of university, a viscometer was developed, consisting of a small magnet levitating in a viscous fluid. The viscous force acting on the magnet is directly measured: viscosities in the range 10-10 6 mPa s are obtained. This experiment is used as an introduction to complex fluids and soft matter physics

  7. NASA MSFC Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Rapid Quench System

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Craven, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic levitation, a form of containerless processing, is an important tool in materials research. Levitated specimens are free from contact with a container; therefore, heterogeneous nucleation on container walls is not possible. This allows studies of deeply undercooled melts. Furthermore, studies of high-temperature, highly reactive materials are also possible. Studies of the solidification and crystallization of undercooled melts is vital to the understanding of microstructure development, particularly the formation of alloys with unique properties by rapid solidification. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) lab has recently been upgraded to allow for rapid quenching of levitated materials. The ESL Rapid Quench System uses a small crucible-like vessel that can be partially filled with a low melting point material, such as a Gallium alloy, as a quench medium. An undercooled sample can be dropped into the vessel to rapidly quench the sample. A carousel with nine vessels sits below the bottom electrode assembly. This system allows up to nine rapid quenches before having to break vacuum and remove the vessels. This new Rapid Quench System will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development. In this presentation, the system is described and initial results are presented.

  8. A Novel Noncontact Ultrasonic Levitating Bearing Excited by Piezoelectric Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel ultrasonic levitating bearing excited by three piezoelectric transducers is presented in this work. The transducers are circumferentially equispaced in a housing, with their center lines going through the rotation center of a spindle. This noncontact bearing has the ability to self-align and carry radical and axial loads simultaneously. A finite element model of the bearing is built in ANSYS, and modal analysis and harmonious response analysis are conducted to investigate its characteristics and driving parameters. Based on nonlinear acoustic theory and a thermodynamic theory of ideal gas, the radical and lateral load-carrying models are built to predict the bearing’s carrying capacity. In order to validate the bearing’s levitation force, a test system is established and levitating experiments are conducted. The experimental data match well with the theoretical results. The experiments reveal that the maximum radical and axial levitating loads of the proposed bearing are about 15 N and 6 N, respectively, when the piezoelectric transducers operate at a working frequency of 16.11 kHz and a voltage of 150 Vp-p.

  9. Dexterous ultrasonic levitation of millimeter-sized objects in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Sue Ann; Drinkwater, Bruce W; Carter, Tom; Malkin, Rob; Subramanian, Sriram

    2014-07-01

    Acoustic levitation in air has applications in contactless handling and processing. Here a first-order Bessel function-shaped acoustic field, generated using an 8-element circular array operating at 40 kHz, traps millimeter-sized objects against gravity. The device can manipulate objects in a vertical plane over a few millimeters with an accuracy of ± 0.09 mm.

  10. Acoustic levitator for containerless measurements on low temperature liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benmore, Chris J [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weber, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Rey, Charles A A [Charles Ray, Inc.

    2009-01-01

    A single-axis acoustic levitator was constructed and used to levitate liquid and solid drops at temperatures from -40 to +40 C. The levitator consisted of: (i) two acoustic transducers mounted on a rigid vertical support that was bolted to an optical breadboard, (ii) a acoustic power supply that controlled acoustic intensity, relative phase of the drive to the transducers, and could modulate the acoustic forces at frequencies up to 1kHz, (iii) a video camera, and (iv) a system for providing a stream of controlled temperature gas flow over the sample. The acoustic transducers were operated at their resonant frequency of ~ 22 kHz and could produce sound pressure levels up to 160 dB. The force applied by the acoustic field could be modulated using a frequency generator to excite oscillations in the sample. Sample temperature was controlled using a modified Cryostream Plus and measured using thermocouples and an infrared thermal imager. The levitator was installed at x-ray beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source and used to investigate the structure of supercooled liquids.

  11. Contact-free handling using actively controlled electrostatic levitating fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woo, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    In general electric field forces have the distinctive property of being able to mediate forces to virtually any material in a fully non-invasive and contact-free fashion. Based on this property, electrostatic levitation holds great promise for the semiconductor, solar panel, and flat-panel display

  12. The power of magnetic levitation-Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, F.C.

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses how new magnetic-levitation (MAGLEV) transportation technologies can be used to relieve airport congestion. New superconducting materials may improve the cost/benefits ratio for some MAGLEV systems. According to the author, postponement of research in MAGLEV technology in the United States will mean the loss of jobs and worsening trade balances near the end of the decade

  13. On Some Aspects of Levitation Heating of Metal Bodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mach, M.; Karban, P.; Doležel, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2005), s. 5-10 ISSN 1335-8243 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/04/0095 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : electrodynamic levitation * induction heating * magnetic field Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  14. Measuring Viscosity with a Levitating Magnet: Application to Complex Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, C.; Bouquet, F.; Remond, J.; Deloche, B.

    2009-01-01

    As an experimental project proposed to students in fourth year of university, a viscometer was developed, consisting of a small magnet levitating in a viscous fluid. The viscous force acting on the magnet is directly measured: viscosities in the range 10-10[superscript 6] mPa s are obtained. This experiment is used as an introduction to complex…

  15. Efficient fuzzy logic controller for magnetic levitation systems | Shu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper magnetic levitation controller using fuzzy logic is proposed. The proposed Fuzzy logic controller (FLC) is designed, and developed using triangular membership function with 7×7 rules. The system model was implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK and the system responses to Fuzzy controller with different input ...

  16. Description of a double centrifugation tube method for concentrating canine platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perazzi, Anna; Busetto, Roberto; Martinello, Tiziana; Drigo, Michele; Pasotto, Daniela; Cian, Francesco; Patruno, Marco; Iacopetti, Ilaria

    2013-07-22

    To evaluate the efficiency of platelet-rich plasma preparations by means of a double centrifugation tube method to obtain platelet-rich canine plasma at a concentration at least 4 times higher than the baseline value and a concentration of white blood cells not exceeding twice the reference range. A complete blood count was carried out for each sample and each concentrate. Whole blood samples were collected from 12 clinically healthy dogs (consenting blood donors). Blood was processed by a double centrifugation tube method to obtain platelet concentrates, which were then analyzed by a flow cytometry haematology system for haemogram. Platelet concentration and white blood cell count were determined in all samples. Platelet concentration at least 4 times higher than the baseline value and a white blood cell count not exceeding twice the reference range were obtained respectively in 10 cases out of 12 (83.3%) and 11 cases out of 12 (91.6%). This double centrifugation tube method is a relatively simple and inexpensive method for obtaining platelet-rich canine plasma, potentially available for therapeutic use to improve the healing process.

  17. Some engineering considerations when designing centrifuge enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.T.

    1982-01-01

    A review is given of the three main areas where flexibility is needed in the design of centrifuge enrichment plants. These are: the need to cope with market requirements, the limitations imposed by currently available centrifuges and ever advancing centrifuge technology. Details of BNFL's experience with centrifuge enrichment at Capenhurst are presented. (U.K.)

  18. Internal resonance of an elastic body levitated above high-Tc superconducting bulks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokuzawa, T; Toshihiko, S; Yoshizawa, M

    2010-01-01

    In high-Tc superconducting magnetic levitation systems, levitated bodies can keep stable levitation with no contact and no control and thus their damping is very small. Thanks to these features, their applications to various apparatus are expected. However, on account of their small damping, the nonlinearity of electromagnetic levitation force can give notable effects upon motion of the levitated bodies. Therefore this nonlinearity must be taken into account to accurately analyze the dynamical behavior of the levitated bodies. Structures of such a levitated body can show elastic deformation if the large electromagnetic force acts on it. Therefore, we need to deal with the model as an elastic body. As mentioned above, nonlinear characteristics easily appear in this elastic vibration on account of the small damping. Especially when the ratio of the natural frequencies of the eigenmodes is integer, internal resonance can occur. This nonlinear resonance is derived from nonlinear interactions among the eigenmodes of the elastic levitated body. This kind of internal resonance of an elastic body appearing in high-Tc superconducting levitation systems has not been studied so far. This research especially deals with internal resonance of a beam supported at both its ends by electromagnetic forces acting on permanent magnets. The governing equation with the nonlinear boundary conditions for the dynamics of a levitated beam has been derived. Numerical results show internal resonance of the 1st mode and the 3rd mode. Experimental results are qualitatively in good agreement with numerical ones.

  19. Centrifuge advances using HTS magnetic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, F. N.; Flögel-Delor, U.; Rothfeld, R.; Wippich, D.; Riedel, T.

    2001-05-01

    Passive magnetic bearings are of increasing technical interest. We performed experiments with centrifugal rotors to analyze gyroscopic forces in terms imbalance, rotor elasticity and damping. Centrifuge rotors need to be operated soft and stable without whirling the sediments. In order to evaluate optimal parameters critical and resonance behaviors are investigated. Eccentricities up 2 mm are safely passed by accelerating test wheels. In a simple model we describe the effect of passing critical rotational speeds. Measurements of bearing properties and wheel performance are presented. We have constructed a first prototype centrifuge designed with a HTS double bearing which operates a titanium rotor safely up to 30 000 rpm. A 15 W Stirling cooler serves cryogenics of the YBCO stators. From the experiments design guidelines for centrifugal applications with HTS bearings are given.

  20. Safety aspects of gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Uranium enrichment by gas centrifuge is a commercially proven, viable technology. Gas centrifuge enrichment plant operations pose hazards that are also found in other industries as well as unique hazards as a result of processing and handling uranium hexafluoride and the handling of enriched uranium. Hazards also found in other industries included those posed by the use of high-speed rotating equipment and equipment handling by use of heavy-duty cranes. Hazards from high-speed rotating equipment are associated with the operation of the gas centrifuges themselves and with the operation of the uranium hexafluoride compressors in the tail withdrawal system. These and related hazards are discussed. It is included that commercial gas centrifuge enrichment plants have been designed to operate safely