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Sample records for levels aortic stiffness

  1. Aortic stiffness in patients with cardiac syndrome X.

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    Gorgulu, Sevket; Uslu, Nevzat; Eren, Mehmet; Celik, Seden; Yildirim, Aydin; Dagdeviren, Bahadir; Tezel, Tuna

    2003-12-01

    Recently, the close relationship between aortic stiffness and cardiovascular mortality has aroused the interest of investigators in carrying out studies related to aortic stiffness. This study aims to investigate the aortic stiffness parameters in patients with cardiac syndrome X, a disorder that is believed to be a generalized disturbance of the vasodilator function of small arteries. 18 patients with typical chest pain and angiographically normal coronary arteries associated with a positive exercise test were included in the study. The control group consisted of 27 patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries and no ischaemia on exercise testing. Antianginal medication was withheld 4 weeks before the study and transthoracic echocardiography was performed using a Hewlett-Packard Sonos 1500 instrument with a 2.5 MHz phased array transducer. Ascending aorta diameters were measured on the M-mode tracing at a level 3 cm above the aortic valve. Diameter change, pulse pressure, aortic strain and distensibility were measured as aortic stiffness parameters. The aortic diameter change was less in the syndrome X group than in the control group (0.15 +/- 0.04 cm/m2 vs. 0.28 +/- 0.12 cm/m2, p < 0.001). Likewise, aortic strain (9 +/- 3% vs. 18 +/- 8%, p < 0.001) and distensibility (4.01 +/- 1.71 cm2 x dyn(-1) x 10(-3) vs. 9.95 +/- 5.08 cm2 x dyn(-1) x 10(-3), p < 0.001) was significantly lower in the syndrome X group than in the control group. The deterioration in aortic elasticity properties in patients with cardiac syndrome X suggests that this disease may be a more generalized disturbance of the vasculature.

  2. Hemoglobin A1c levels and aortic arterial stiffness: the Cardiometabolic Risk in Chinese (CRC study.

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    Jun Liang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The American Diabetes Association (ADA recently published new clinical guidelines in which hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c was recommended as a diagnostic test for diabetes. The present study was to investigate the association between HbA1c and cardiovascular risk, and compare the associations with fasting glucose and 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (2 h OGTT. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The study samples are from a community-based health examination survey in central China. Carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV and HbA1c were measured in 5,098 men and women. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, sex, and BMI, the levels of HbA1c were significantly associated with an increasing trend of cfPWV in a dose-dependent fashion (P for trend 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: HbA1c was related to high cfPWV, independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Senior age and high blood pressure might amplify the adverse effects of HbA1c on cardiovascular risk.

  3. Alcohol intake and aortic stiffness in young men and women

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    Elzen, A.P. van den; Sierksma, A.; Oren, A.; Vos, L.E.; Witteman, J.C.; Grobbee, D.E.; Hendriks, H.F.; Uiterwaal, C.S.; Bots, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to protect against cardiovascular disease. Aortic stiffness can be regarded as a marker of cardiovascular disease risk. Previously we have shown an inverse to J-shaped association between alcohol intake and aortic stiffness in middle-aged and e

  4. Biomarkers of Hemodynamic Stress and Aortic Stiffness after STEMI: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

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    Sebastian Johannes Reinstadler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Increased aortic stiffness might adversely affect cardiac structure, function, and perfusion. Release of biomarkers of hemodynamic stress is thought to be enhanced by these alterations. We aimed to evaluate the association between biomarkers of hemodynamic stress and aortic stiffness assessed at a chronic stage after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI. Methods. Fifty-four patients four months after STEMI were enrolled in this cross-sectional, single-center study. N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, mid-regional pro–A-type natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP, and mid-regional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM levels were measured by established assays. Aortic stiffness was assessed by the measurement of pulse wave velocity using phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Results. NT-proBNP, MR-proANP, and MR-proADM concentrations were all correlated with aortic stiffness in univariate analysis (r=0.378, r=0.425, and r=0.532; all P<0.005, resp.. In multiple linear regression analysis, NT-proBNP (β=0.316, P=0.005 and MR-proADM (β=0.284, P<0.020 levels were associated with increased aortic stiffness independently of age, blood pressure, and renal function. NT-proBNP was the strongest predictor for high aortic stiffness (area under the curve: 0.82, 95% CI 0.67–0.96. Conclusion. At a chronic stage after STEMI, concentrations of biomarkers for hemodynamic stress, especially NT-proBNP, are positively correlated with aortic stiffness. These biomarkers might also be useful as predictors of high aortic stiffness after STEMI.

  5. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs are associated with increased aortic stiffness

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    Martin Claridge

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Martin Claridge1, Simon Hobbs1, Clive Quick2, Nick Day3, Andrew Bradbury1, Teun Wilmink11Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Birmingham, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital Birmingham, UK; 2Department of Surgery, Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Huntingdon, UK; 3Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UKObjectives: Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDS have been shown to retard aneurysm growth in animal models. In vitro studies have shown an inhibitory effect of NSAIDS on matrix metalloproteinase-9, interleukin-1β, and IL-6 mediated arterial wall elastolysis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of NSAIDs on arterial stiffness, a surrogate marker of elastolysis.Methods: 447 subjects enrolled in a community-based abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA screening program were assessed for age, blood pressure, smoking status, and drug history. Aortic diameter and stiffness were measured by M-Mode ultrasound. The concentration of the amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen was used as a proxy measurement of type III collagen turnover.Results: NSAID ingestion was significantly (p = 0.006 associated with increased aortic wall stiffness after adjusting for age, aortic diameter, blood pressure, and smoking status. No such effect was seen for β-blockers, calcium channel antagonists, nitrates, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics, or antiplatelet agents.Discussion: These novel data show that NSAIDS are associated with increased aortic stiffness, possibly through the effects of cytokine mediated elastolysis. This in turn may prevent aortic expansion and the development of AAA.Keywords: nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, abdominal aortic aneurysm, aortic stiffness, elastolysis

  6. Weight reduction and aortic stiffness in obese children and adolescents

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    Hvidt, K. N.; Olsen, M. H.; Ibsen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of weight reduction on aortic stiffness and especially so in the young. The present study investigates whether weight reduction influences aortic stiffness in obese children and adolescents. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and augmentation index at heart...... rate 75 (AIx@HR75) were measured in 72 obese patients aged 10-18 years at baseline and after 1-year of lifestyle intervention (follow-up). We found that although the degree of obesity decreased (Delta body mass index z-score: -0.24 +/- 0.45, P ....27 +/- 0.47 ms(-1), P obesity measures. No significant change...

  7. NAFLD and Increased Aortic Stiffness: Parallel or Common Physiopathological Mechanisms?

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    Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A.; Leite, Nathalie C.; Cardoso, Claudia R. L.; Salles, Gil F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. Liver inflammation and fibrosis related to NAFLD contribute to disease progression and increasing liver-related mortality and morbidity. Increasing data suggest that NAFLD may be linked to atherosclerotic vascular disease independent of other established cardiovascular risk factors. Central arterial stiffness has been recognized as a measure of cumulative cardiovascular risk marker load, and the measure of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) is regarded as the gold standard assessment of aortic stiffness. It has been shown that increased aortic stiffness predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several clinical settings, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, a well-known condition associated with advanced stages of NAFLD. Furthermore, recently-published studies reported a strong association between NAFLD and increased arterial stiffness, suggesting a possible link in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and NAFLD. We sought to review the published data on the associations between NAFLD and aortic stiffness, in order to better understand the interplay between these two conditions and identify possible common physiopathological mechanisms. PMID:27104526

  8. FUNCTIONAL AORTIC STIFFNESS:ROLE OF CD4+ T LYMPHOCYTES

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    Beenish A. Majeed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The immune system is suggested to be essential in vascular remodeling and stiffening. To study the dependence upon lymphocytes in vascular stiffening, we compared an angiotensin II-model of vascular stiffening in normal C57BL/6J mice with lymphocyte-deficient RAG 1-/- mice and additionally characterized the component of vascular stiffness due to vasoconstriction versus vascular remodeling. Chronic angiotensin II increased aortic pulse wave velocity, effective wall stiffness, and effective Young’s modulus in C57BL/6J mice by 3-fold but caused no change in the RAG 1-/- mice. These functional measurements were supported by aortic morphometric analysis. Adoptive transfer of CD4+ T helper lymphocytes restored the angiotensin II-mediated aortic stiffening in the RAG 1-/- mice. In order to account for the hydraulic versus material effects of angiotensin II on pulse wave velocity, subcutaneous osmotic pumps were removed after 21 days of angiotensin II-infusion in the WT mice to achieve normotensive values. The pulse wave velocity decreased from 3- to 2-fold above baseline values up to 7 days following pump removal. This study supports the pivotal role of the CD4+ T-lymphocytes in angiotensin II-mediated vascular stiffening and that angiotensin II-mediated aortic stiffening is due to the additive effect of active vascular smooth muscle vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling.

  9. Nondiabetic glucometabolic status and progression of aortic stiffness

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    McEniery, Carmel M; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Johansen, Nanna B.

    2017-01-01

    wave velocity (cfPWV) at baseline and follow-up in 2012-13, in 4, 386 participants without diabetes of theWhitehall II Study. RESULTS The mean age of the cohort at cfPWV baseline was 60 years, and 74% were male. cfPWV increased from (mean ± SE) 8.30± 0.03 to 8.98± 0.04 m/s during 4 years of follow...... of aortic stiffness in individuals without diabetes. These findings suggest that long-term glucometabolic status, even in individuals without diabetes, could be an important target for preventative strategies against vascular aging....

  10. Aortic stiffness is associated with white matter integrity in patients with type 1 diabetes

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    Tjeerdema, Nathanja; Schinkel, Linda D. van [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology and General Internal Medicine (C7-Q), Albinusdreef 2, PO Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Westenberg, Jos J.; Elderen, Saskia G. van; Buchem, Mark A. van; Grond, Jeroen van der; Roos, Albert de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Smit, Johannes W. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology and General Internal Medicine (C7-Q), Albinusdreef 2, PO Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); University Medical Center Nijmegen, Department of General Internal Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    To assess the association between aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a marker of arterial stiffness and diffusion tensor imaging of brain white matter integrity in patients with type 1 diabetes using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. Forty-one patients with type 1 diabetes (23 men, mean age 44 ± 12 years, mean diabetes duration 24 ± 13 years) were included. Aortic PWV was assessed using through-plane velocity-encoded MRI. Brain diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements were performed on 3-T MRI. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated for white and grey matter integrity. Pearson correlation and multivariable linear regression analyses including cardiovascular risk factors as covariates were assessed. Multivariable linear regression analyses revealed that aortic PWV is independently associated with white matter integrity FA (β = -0.777, p = 0.008) in patients with type 1 diabetes. This effect was independent of age, gender, mean arterial pressure, body mass index, smoking, duration of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin levels. Aortic PWV was not significantly related to grey matter integrity. Our data suggest that aortic stiffness is independently associated with reduced white matter integrity in patients with type 1 diabetes. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of aortic wall stiffness in patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever.

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    Tavil, Yusuf; Oztürk, Mehmet Akif; Ureten, Kemal; Sen, Nihat; Kaya, Mehmet Güngör; Cemri, Mustafa; Cengel, Atiye

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate aortic wall stiffness and its relation between the aortic stiffness and the left ventricular function in patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF). The study population was composed of 31 patients with FMF in attack-free period (12 men, 19 women; mean age: 36+/-7 years) and 27 healthy subjects (10 men, 17 women; mean age: 34+/-7 years) who had volunteered to participate. Aortic stiffness indices, aortic strain and distensibility, were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometry. There were significant differences between the control and the patient group in aortic strain (mean (SD), 7.23+/-2.14 versus 4.91+/-1.66%, p=0.01) and distensibility (4.02+/-1.42 versus 2.84+/-1.46, 10(-6)cm(2)dyn(-1), p=0.001). Although there was no correlation between the aortic stiffness parameters and the left ventricular function parameters, there were significant negative correlations between the disease duration and aortic strain index (r=-0.29, p<0.001), and between the disease duration and distensibility (r=-0.32, p<0.001). Aortic stiffness measurements were found abnormal in patients with FMF. We have also demonstrated that there were significant correlations between aortic stiffness parameters and disease duration.

  12. Elastic properties of the aorta and factors affecting aortic stiffness in patients with

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    Derya Tok

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, we evaluated aortic stiffnessand echocardiographic and laboratory factors affectingaortic stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome(MetS.Materials and methods: Forty-six patients (25 male,mean age 47.3±6.5 years with the diagnosis of MetS accordingto the Adult Treatment Panel III Final Report criteriawere included. Forty-four age and gender matchedhealthy subjects (18 male, mean age 46.0±6.1 yearswere recruited as the control group. Aortic strain, distensibilityand stiffness index were calculated by M-modeechocardiography and diastolic parameters were measured.Results: Left ventricular mass index (LVMI, decelerationtime (DT, isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT wereincreased and mitral E/A ratio was decreased in patientswith MetS compared to controls. In the MetS patients,aortic distensibility was significantly decreased (10.4±3.5cm2.dyn-1.10-6 vs. 12.7±3.4 cm2.dyn-1.10-6, p=0.002,and ASI was significantly increased (6.5±2.0 vs. 3.2±0.8,p<0.001. ASI was positively correlated with triglycerides,fasting glucose, uric acid, hsCRP, LVMI, DT, IVRT andsystolic blood pressure level, and was negatively correlatedwith HDL-cholesterol and mitral E/A ratio. In regressionanalysis, hsCRP (p=0.05 and systolic blood pressurelevel (p<0.001 were independent predictors of ASI.Conclusions: ASI is increased in patients with MetS. Inthese patients; decrease in aortic elasticity properties wasassociated with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Highsystolic pressure and hsCRP levels were found to be independentpredictors of ASI.Key words: Metabolic syndrome, Echocardiography,elastic properties of aorta, hsCRP

  13. Level Classifications of Foundation Stiffness

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    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, Morten

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a foundation module developed and implemented in both HAWC and FLEX capable of to simulate the frequency dependent stiffness and damping of foundations e.g. pile, gravitation and bucket foundations.......This article describes a foundation module developed and implemented in both HAWC and FLEX capable of to simulate the frequency dependent stiffness and damping of foundations e.g. pile, gravitation and bucket foundations....

  14. Arterial Stiffness Alterations and Inflammatory Response Following Endovascular Aortic Repair: Based on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19-23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA).

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    Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Mylonas, Spyridon N; Kakisis, John; Kadoglou, Nikolaos P E; Papadakis, Ioannis; Sfyroeras, George S; Antonopoulos, Constantine C N; Mantas, George; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Liapis, Christos D

    2015-04-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and thoracic aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) have been widely incorporated into clinical practice. However, changes in arterial stiffness and post-implantation syndrome after aortic endografting remain important issues under investigation. The aneurysm sac wall motion after successful EVAR and TEVAR reflects complex interactions between all the components of the excluded aneurysm, including true compliance of the aneurysm wall itself, intra-aneurysm sac pressure, remodeling of the thrombus, and mechanical characteristics of the endograft. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that aortic endografting results in increased arterial stiffness in animal models. It can be assumed that the alterations of aortic mechanical properties can have a direct impact on heart output. The long-term impact of these mechanical changes on cardiovascular outcomes and the potential effects of different endografts on hemodynamics are important issues under investigation. Post-implantation syndrome (PIS) is a systemic inflammatory response frequently observed after endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies. The main features of PIS include fever, leukocytosis, elevated C-reactive protein levels, and coagulation disturbances. Endograft design appears to influence this inflammatory response following aortic endografting; woven polyester endografts have been shown to be associated with greater inflammatory response compared to PTFE stent grafts. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature to elucidate arterial stiffness alterations and inflammatory response after EVAR and TEVAR and the impact of endograft design on aortic stiffness and the post-inflammatory response.

  15. Aging impairs smooth muscle-mediated regulation of aortic stiffness: a defect in shock absorption function?

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    Gao, Yuan Z; Saphirstein, Robert J; Yamin, Rina; Suki, Bela; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2014-10-15

    Increased aortic stiffness is an early and independent biomarker of cardiovascular disease. Here we tested the hypothesis that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute significantly to aortic stiffness and investigated the mechanisms involved. The relative contributions of VSMCs, focal adhesions (FAs), and matrix to stiffness in mouse aorta preparations at optimal length and with confirmed VSMC viability were separated by the use of small-molecule inhibitors and activators. Using biomechanical methods designed for minimal perturbation of cellular function, we directly quantified changes with aging in aortic material stiffness. An alpha adrenoceptor agonist, in the presence of N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to remove interference of endothelial nitric oxide, increases stiffness by 90-200% from baseline in both young and old mice. Interestingly, increases are robustly suppressed by the Src kinase inhibitor PP2 in young but not old mice. Phosphotyrosine screening revealed, with aging, a biochemical signature of markedly impaired agonist-induced FA remodeling previously associated with Src signaling. Protein expression measurement confirmed a decrease in Src expression with aging. Thus we report here an additive model for the in vitro biomechanical components of the mouse aortic wall in which 1) VSMCs are a surprisingly large component of aortic stiffness at physiological lengths and 2) regulation of the VSMC component through FA signaling and hence plasticity is impaired with aging, diminishing the aorta's normal shock absorption function in response to stressors.

  16. The presence of fructosamine in human aortic valves is associated with valve stiffness.

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    Kishabongo, Antoine S; Katchunga, Philippe; Cikomola, Justin C; De Somer, Filip M; De Buyzere, Marc L; Speeckaert, Marijn M; Delanghe, Joris R

    2016-09-01

    Human heart valves are prone to glycation, a fundamental process of ageing. The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between fructosamine formation and the mechanical properties of human aortic valves. 67 patients (age: 76±8 years) diagnosed with an aortic valve stenosis, who underwent an aortic valve replacement were enrolled. Fructosamine and calcium concentrations in aortic valves were determined. Using a transthoracic Doppler echocardiography, aortic valve orifice area and transvalvular pressure gradients were measured. In a subgroup of 32 patients, the aortic valve orifice area was sufficient to carry out mechanical testing on a LFPlus Universal material tester. An in vitro removal of fructosamine of the valve was initiated using ATP-dependent fructosamine 3-kinase (FN3K). A significant correlation was found between the aortic valve fructosamine concentration and the calculated aortic valve orifice area: Y (aortic valve orifice area, mm(2))=1.050-0.228X (aortic valve fructosamine concentration, µmol/g valve) (r=-0.38). A significantly higher calcium concentration was measured in the aortic valves of diabetics in comparison with those of non-diabetics. A multiple regression analysis revealed that the presence of diabetes mellitus and aortic valve fructosamine concentration were the main predictors of the extensibility of the aortic valves. In the in vitro deglycation study, a significant lower aortic valve fructosamine concentration was detected after treatment with FN3K. This resulted in an increased flexibility of the aortic valves. Although no direct causativeness is proven with the presented results, which just show an association between fructosamine, the effect of FN3K and aortic valve stiffness, the present study points for the first time towards a possible additional role of the Amadori products in the biomechanical properties of ageing aortic valves. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  17. Determinants of aortic stiffness: 16-year follow-up of the Whitehall II study.

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    Nanna B Johansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aortic stiffness is a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease endpoints. Cross-sectional studies have shown associations of various cardiovascular risk factors with aortic pulse wave velocity, a measure of aortic stiffness, but the long-term impact of these factors on aortic stiffness is unknown. METHODS: In 3,769 men and women from the Whitehall II cohort, a wide range of traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors were determined at baseline (1991-1993 and aortic pulse wave velocity was measured at follow-up (2007-2009. The prospective associations between each baseline risk factor and aortic pulse wave velocity at follow-up were assessed through sex stratified linear regression analysis adjusted for relevant confounders. Missing data on baseline determinants were imputed using the Multivariate Imputation by Chained Equations. RESULTS: Among men, the strongest predictors were waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, heart rate and interleukin 1 receptor antagonist, and among women, adiponectin, triglycerides, pulse pressure and waist-hip ratio. The impact of 10 centimeter increase in waist circumference on aortic pulse wave velocity was twice as large for men compared with women (men: 0.40 m/s (95%-CI: 0.24;0.56; women: 0.17 m/s (95%-CI: -0.01;0.35, whereas the opposite was true for the impact of a two-fold increase in adiponectin (men: -0.30 m/s (95%-CI: -0.51;-0.10; women: 0.61 m/s (95%-CI: -0.86;-0.35. CONCLUSION: In this large prospective study, central obesity was a strong predictor of aortic stiffness. Additionally, heart rate in men and adiponectin in women predicted aortic pulse wave velocity suggesting that strategies to prevent aortic stiffening should be focused differently by sex.

  18. High Central Aortic Rather than Brachial Blood Pressure is Associated with Carotid Wall Remodeling and Increased Arterial Stiffness in Childhood.

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    Peluso, Gonzalo; García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Marota, Marco; Castro, Juan; Chiesa, Pedro; Giachetto, Gustavo; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina

    2017-03-01

    In adults, central blood pressure (cBP) is reported to associate target organ damages (TODs) rather than peripheral blood pressure (pBP). However, data regarding the association of pre-clinical TODs with cBP and pBP in pediatric populations are scarce. To evaluate in children and adolescents the importance of cBP and pBP levels, in terms of their association with hemodynamic and vascular changes. 315 subjects [age (mean/range) 12/8-18 years] were included. pBP (oscillometry, Omron-HEM433INT and Mobil-O-Graph), cBP levels and waveforms (oscillometry, Mobil-O-Graph; applanation tonometry, SphygmoCor), aortic wave reflection-related parameters, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid (elastic modulus, stiffness-index) and aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, PWV). Four groups were defined considering pBP and cBP percentiles (th): cBP ≥90th, cBP blood pressure (cBP or pBP). Subgroups were matched for anthropometric and cardiovascular risk factors (propensity matching-score). Subjects with high cBP showed a worse cardiovascular risk profile in addition to worse peripheral hemodynamic conditions. The CIMT, carotid and aortic stiffness levels were also higher in those subjects. CIMT and carotid stiffness remained statistically higher when subjects were matched for pBP and other cardiovascular risk factors. There were no differences in arterial properties when subjects were analyzed (compared) considering similar pBP levels, during normal and high cBP conditions. Compared with pBP, the cBP levels show a greater association with vascular alterations (high CIMT and arterial stiffness), in children and adolescents.

  19. Flow cytometric assessment of circulating platelet and erythrocytes microparticles in young thalassemia major patients: relation to pulmonary hypertension and aortic wall stiffness.

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    Tantawy, Azza A G; Adly, Amira A M; Ismail, Eman A R; Habeeb, Nevin M

    2013-06-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in β-thalassemia major (β-TM). Aggregability of abnormal red cells and membrane-derived microparticles (MPs) stemming from activated platelets and erythrocytes are responsible for thrombotic risk. We measured platelet and erythrocyte MPs (PMPs and ErMPs) in 60 young β-TM patients compared with 40 age- and sex-matched healthy controls and assessed their relation to clinicopathological characteristics and aortic elastic properties. Patients were studied stressing on transfusion history, splenectomy, thrombotic events, chelation therapy, hematological and coagulation profiles, flow cytometric measurement of PMPs (CD41b(+) ) and ErMPs (glycophorin A(+) ) as well as echocardiographic assessment of aortic elastic properties. Aortic stiffness index and pulmonary artery pressure were significantly higher, whereas aortic strain and distensibility were lower in TM patients than controls (P 2500 μg/L (P < 0.001). Compliant patients on chelation therapy had lower MPs levels than non-compliant patients (P < 0.001). PMPs and ErMPs were positively correlated to markers of hemolysis, serum ferritin, D-dimer, vWF Ag, and aortic stiffness, whereas negatively correlated to hemoglobin level and aortic distensibility (P < 0.05). We suggest that increased MPs may be implicated in vascular dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension risk, and aortic wall stiffness observed in thalassemia patients. Their quantification could provide utility for early detection of cardiovascular abnormalities and monitoring the biological efficacy of chelation therapy.

  20. Experimental investigation of the influence of the aortic stiffness on hemodynamics in the ascending aorta.

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    Gülan, Utku; Lüthi, Beat; Holzner, Markus; Liberzon, Alex; Tsinober, Arkady; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) pulsatile aortic flow in a human ascending aorta is studied to investigate the effect of the aortic stiffness on the flow field and turbulent fluctuating velocities in the ascending aorta. A nonintrusive optical measurement technique, 3-D particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV), has been applied to anatomically accurate phantoms under clinically realistic conditions. A compliant silicon phantom was used to mimic the healthy aorta, and a rigid model was used to imitate the pathological case that appears in aortas for example as a result of aging. The realistic models are transparent which allows optical access to the investigation domain, and the index of refraction was matched to avoid optical distortions. Our results revealed that the aortic stiffness leads to an increase in systolic velocity and a decrease in the Windkessel effect, which is associated with the diastolic blood pressure. Furthermore, we found that the turbulent kinetic energy is about an order of magnitude higher for the rigid aorta, that is, an increase in aortic stiffness increases the magnitude of turbulent fluctuating velocities. The spatial distribution of the flow velocity showed that the flow is more organized and coherent spiraling patterns develop for the compliant aorta which helps to dampen the influence of disturbed flow. Finally, we observed higher Lagrangian acceleration and hence higher instantaneous forces acting on blood particles in the stiff case which implies that aging and hence arterial stiffening provokes distinctive alterations in blood flow, and these alterations may cause pathological symptoms in the cardiovascular system.

  1. The study of aortic stiffness in different hypertension subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    布海霞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether there is any difference in aortic stiffness among different hypertension subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease.Methods Six hundred and twenty-six patients with chronic kidney disease were included in the present analysis.They were classified into four groups:normotension(n=391)with systolic blood pressure(SBP)<140 mmHg and diastolic

  2. Comparison of arterial stiffness and microcirculatory changes following abdominal aortic aneurysm grafting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, M A

    2010-11-11

    BACKGOUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of arterial stiffness on central haemodynamics, reflected in augmentation index (AI). The aneurysmal aorta is significantly stiffer than undilated age-matched aorta. AIM: We investigated whether replacement of an aneurysmal aorta with a compliant graft would result in a decrease in AI, which would thus decrease myocardial workload parameters. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective open or endovascular AAA repair were assessed with applanation tonometry and laser fluximetry pre-operatively, immediately and long-term post-operatively. RESULTS: Replacement of a small segment of abnormal conduit vessel resulted in improvements in AI, demonstrating that arterial stiffness can be surgically manipulated. CONCLUSIONS: These results reflect a decreased myocardial workload post-aortic grafting. This decrease in AI is important from a risk factor management perspective, and arterial stiffness should become a further recognised and screened for risk factor in patients with known aneurysmal disease.

  3. Comparison of arterial stiffness and microcirculatory changes following abdominal aortic aneurysm grafting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, M A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGOUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of arterial stiffness on central haemodynamics, reflected in augmentation index (AI). The aneurysmal aorta is significantly stiffer than undilated age-matched aorta. AIM: We investigated whether replacement of an aneurysmal aorta with a compliant graft would result in a decrease in AI, which would thus decrease myocardial workload parameters. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective open or endovascular AAA repair were assessed with applanation tonometry and laser fluximetry pre-operatively, immediately and long-term post-operatively. RESULTS: Replacement of a small segment of abnormal conduit vessel resulted in improvements in AI, demonstrating that arterial stiffness can be surgically manipulated. CONCLUSIONS: These results reflect a decreased myocardial workload post-aortic grafting. This decrease in AI is important from a risk factor management perspective, and arterial stiffness should become a further recognised and screened for risk factor in patients with known aneurysmal disease.

  4. Evaluation of aortic stiffness (aortic pulse-wave velocity) before and after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair procedures: a pilot study.

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    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Bessias, Nikolaos; Psathas, Chrysovalantis; Akridas, Konstantinos; Dragios, Theodoros; Nikitas, Georgios; Andrikopoulos, Vassilios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Kyriakides, Zenon S

    2009-12-09

    The main clinical criterion for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair operations is an AAA diameter >/=5.5 cm. When AAAs increase in size, specific changes occur in the mechanical properties of the aortic wall. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV) has been used as an indicator of vascular stiffness. A low PWV may predict AAA rupture risk and is an early predictor of cardiovascular mortality. We investigated the prognostic value of PWV before and after elective AAA repair procedures. Twenty four patients scheduled for an open AAA repair underwent a preoperative carotid-femoral aortic PWV measurement. A second aortic PWV measurement was carried out 6 months postoperatively. The mean aortic PWV increased from 7.84 +/- 1.85 preoperatively to 10.08 +/- 1.57 m/sec 6 months postoperatively (mean change: 2.25; 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 3.1 m/sec; p<0.0001). The preprocedural PWV measurement did not correlate with AAA diameter (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rho=0.12; p=0.59). Whether the increase in aortic PWV postoperatively suggests a decreased cardiovascular risk following AAA repair remains to be established. Aortic PWV should also be investigated as an adjunct tool for assessing AAA rupture risk.

  5. Aortic stiffness: an old concept for new insights into the pathophysiology of functional mitral regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Bonapace, Stefano; Cicoira, Mariantonietta; Conte, Luca; Anselmi, Anna; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2013-09-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is thought to be linked with ventricular afterload. However, the relation between aortic stiffness, which is a main determinant of ventricular afterload, and quantitatively assessed mitral regurgitation is unknown. A total of 175 patients (age 61 ± 13; 85 % male) with left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction were studied consecutively. Left ventricular volumes, ejection fraction, and LV outflow tract stroke volume were measured. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), a known marker of aortic stiffness, was determined using Doppler flow recordings as the distance (d) traveled by the pulse wave, measured over the body surface as the distance between the two recording sites, divided by the time (t) taken by the pulse wave to travel from the descending aorta to the abdominal aorta. Mitral effective regurgitant orifice (ERO), regurgitant volume (RV), and fraction (RF) were measured using the proximal isovelocity surface area method. The mean PWV was 6.0 ± 3.5 m/s (range 2.6-25). PWV was significantly associated with ERO (r = 0.35; p FMR. Aortic stiffness should be considered an important therapeutic target in patients with LV dysfunction in order to ameliorate both LV systolic and diastolic function and mitral regurgitation.

  6. Plasma homocysteine is associated with aortic arterial stiffness but not wave reflection in Chinese hypertensive subjects.

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    Wenkai Xiao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy acts synergistically with hypertension to exert a multiplicative effect on cardiovascular diseases risk. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between tHcy concentration and blood pressure, and to evaluate the role of plasma tHcy in arterial stiffness and wave reflection in hypertension. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, a community-based sample of 1680 subjects (mean age 61.6 years was classified into four groups according to tHcy level (<21.6 vs. ≥ 21.6 µmol/l and blood pressure (hypertensive vs. normotensive. Levels of plasma tHcy and other biochemical parameters (e.g., lipids, glucose were determined. Central arterial blood pressure, reflected pressure wave, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV were assessed by tonometry within 2 days of obtaining the blood specimen. RESULTS: Neither peripheral nor central blood pressure differed according to tHcy levels in normotensive and hypertensive subjects. Differences in cf-PWV according to tHcy were observed only in hypertensive subjects; differences in cf-PWV in normotensive subjects were not significant after adjusting for confounding factors. Central augmentation index did not differ according to tHcy level in either normotensive or hypertensive subjects. Results of univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between blood pressure parameters and tHcy concentration only among normotensive subjects; however, these correlations were not significant in a partial correlation analysis. Results of multiple regression analysis showed that plasma tHcy levels were independently correlated with cf-PWV in hypertensive subjects (β = 0.713, P = 0.004. The independent relationship between tHcy and central augmentation index was not significant by further multiple analyses in normotensive or hypertensive individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma tHcy level is strongly and independently correlated with arterial

  7. Effect of dragon fruit extract on oxidative stress and aortic stiffness in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats.

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    Anand Swarup, Kolla R L; Sattar, Munavvar A; Abdullah, Nor A; Abdulla, Mohammed H; Salman, Ibrahim M; Rathore, Hassaan A; Johns, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are consistently observed in diabetic patients across all age groups. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of the fruit pulp of Hylocereus undatus (DFE) on aortic stiffness and oxidative stress in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats. Twenty-four male, Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups: I (control), II (diabetic), III (DFE, 250 mg/kg) and IV (DFE 500 mg/kg). Diabetes was induced in groups II, III and IV by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of STZ (40 mg/kg). After confirmation of diabetes, group III and IV received DFE for 5 weeks. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was used as a marker of aortic stiffness and was determined at the end of 5 weeks. DFE significantly decreased (P < 0.05) the fasting blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, but not to normal levels. Systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and PWV were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in diabetic rats at the end of 5 weeks in comparison with control group. DFE treatment significantly decreased (P < 0.05) these elevations. Oxidative damage was observed in group II after 5 weeks. Plasma malondialdehyde levels significantly decreased (P < 0.05), while superoxide dismutase and total antioxidant capacity significantly increased (P < 0.05) with DFE treatment in comparison with group II. These data demonstrate that DFE treatment was effective in controlling oxidative damage and decreasing the aortic stiffness measured by PWV in STZ-induced diabetes in rats.

  8. Effect of dragon fruit extract on oxidative stress and aortic stiffness in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats

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    Kolla R. L Anand Swarup

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular complications are consistently observed in diabetic patients across all age groups. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of the fruit pulp of Hylocereus undatus (DFE on aortic stiffness and oxidative stress in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes in rats. Twenty-four male, Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups: I (control, II (diabetic, III (DFE, 250 mg/kg and IV (DFE 500 mg/kg. Diabetes was induced in groups II, III and IV by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of STZ (40 mg/kg. After confirmation of diabetes, group III and IV received DFE for 5 weeks. Pulse wave velocity (PWV was used as a marker of aortic stiffness and was determined at the end of 5 weeks. DFE significantly decreased ( P < 0.05 the fasting blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, but not to normal levels. Systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and PWV were significantly increased ( P < 0.05 in diabetic rats at the end of 5 weeks in comparison with control group. DFE treatment significantly decreased ( P < 0.05 these elevations. Oxidative damage was observed in group II after 5 weeks. Plasma malondialdehyde levels significantly decreased ( P < 0.05, while superoxide dismutase and total antioxidant capacity significantly increased ( P < 0.05 with DFE treatment in comparison with group II. These data demonstrate that DFE treatment was effective in controlling oxidative damage and decreasing the aortic stiffness measured by PWV in STZ-induced diabetes in rats.

  9. Telemetric ambulatory arterial stiffness index, a predictor of cardio-cerebro-vascular mortality, is associated with aortic stiffness-determining factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Xu, Tian-Ying; Zhang, Sai-Long; Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xue-Wen; Guan, Yun-Feng; Lo, Ming; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2013-09-01

    Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) has been proposed as a new measure of arterial stiffness for predicting cardio-cerebro-vascular morbidity and mortality. However, there has been no research on the direct relationships between AASI and arterial stiffness-determining factors. We utilized beat-to-beat intra-aortic blood pressure (BP) telemetry to characterize AASI in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). By determination of aortic structural components and analysis of their correlations with AASI, we provided the first direct evidence for the associations between AASI and arterial stiffness-determining factors including the collagen content and collagen/elastin. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index was positively correlated with pulse pressure in both WKY and SHR, less dependent on BP and BP variability than pulse pressure, and relatively stable, especially the number of BP readings not less than ~36. The correlations between AASI and aortic components were comparable for various AASI values derived from BP readings not less than ~36. Not only AASI but also BP variability and pulse pressure demonstrated a direct relationship with arterial stiffness. These findings indicate AASI may become a routine measure in human arterial stiffness assessment. It is recommended to use a cluster of parameters such as AASI, BP variability, and pulse pressure for evaluating arterial stiffness. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Desphospho-uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein is associated with increased aortic stiffness in a general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, O; Seidlerová, J; Wohlfahrt, P; Filipovský, J; Vaněk, J; Cífková, R; Windrichová, J; Topolčan, O; Knapen, M H J; Drummen, N E A; Vermeer, C

    2016-07-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP), a natural inhibitor of calcification, strongly correlates with the extent of coronary calcification. Vitamin K is the essential cofactor for the activation of MGP. The nonphosphorylated-uncarboxylated isoform of MGP (dp-ucMGP) reflects the status of this vitamin. We investigated whether there is an association between dp-ucMGP and stiffness of elastic and muscular-type large arteries in a random sample from the general population. In a cross-sectional design, we analyzed 1087 subjects from the Czech post-MONICA study. Aortic and femoro-popliteal pulse wave velocities (PWVs) were measured using a Sphygmocor device. Dp-ucMGP concentrations were assessed in freshly frozen samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods using the InaKtif MGP iSYS pre-commercial kit developed by IDS and VitaK. Aortic PWV significantly (P<0.0001) increased across the dp-ucMGP quartiles. After adjustment for all potential confounders, aortic PWV independently correlated with dp-ucMGP (with beta coefficient (s.d.) 11.61 (5.38) and P-value=0.031). In a categorized manner, subjects in the top quartile of dp-ucMGP (⩾ 671 pmol l(-1)) had a higher risk of elevated aortic PWV, with corresponding adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.73 (1.17-2.5). In contrast, no relation between dp-ucMGP and femoro-popliteal PWV was found. In conclusion, increased dp-ucMGP, which is a circulating biomarker of vitamin K status and vascular calcification, is independently associated with aortic stiffness, but not with stiffness of distal muscular-type arteries.

  11. The combined effect of hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus on aortic stiffness and endothelial dysfunction: an integrated study with high-resolution MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yan; Lin, Jiang; Xu, Pengju; Zeng, Mengsu; Lin, Huandong; Yan, Hongmei

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined effect of hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) on aortic stiffness and endothelial dysfunction by using an integrated MRI approach. A total of 31 non-hypertensive DM2 patients and 31 hypertensive DM2 patients underwent 3.0-T MRI. Aortic distensibility (AD), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were assessed. Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, chi-squared test, Pearson correlation analysis, and univariable and multiple linear regression analyses were used for statistical analyses. The hypertensive patients showed lower AD at multiple levels (ascending aorta [AA]: 2.07±0.98×10(-3)mm Hg(-1) vs. 3.21±1.70×10(-3)mm Hg(-1), pHypertension has a contributive effect on aortic stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in DM2 patients. © 2013.

  12. Increased aortic stiffness and related factors in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Mariella; Scandale, Giovanni; Carzaniga, Gianni; Cinquini, Michela; Minola, Marzio; Dimitrov, Gabriel; Carotta, Maria

    2013-10-01

    A number of conditions have been associated with functional changes of large arteries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with aortic stiffness in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The authors studied 86 patients with PAD (ankle-brachial pressure index [ABPI] ≤0.9) and 86 controls. Aortic stiffness was determined by pulse wave velocity (aPWV) using applanation tonometry. In PAD patients, aPWV was higher compared with controls (11 ± 3 vs 9.8 ± 1.8; P=.002). In multiple regression analysis, aPWV was independently associated with pulse pressure (β=0.05, P=.01) in the PAD patients and with age in the control group (β=0.08, P=.0005). The results of this study confirm an aPWV increase in patients with PAD and emphasize the association between blood pressure and aPWV. Further studies are necessary to assess whether higher aortic stiffening adds prognostic value to ABPI, which is the most powerful prognostic indicator in PAD. ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Performance comparison of ultrasound-based methods to assess aortic diameter and stiffness in normal and aneurysmal mice.

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    Bram Trachet

    Full Text Available Several ultrasound-based methods are currently used to assess aortic diameter, circumferential strain and stiffness in mice, but none of them is flawless and a gold standard is lacking. We aimed to assess the validity and sensitivity of these methods in control animals and animals developing dissecting abdominal aortic aneurysm.We first compared systolic and diastolic diameters as well as local circumferential strains obtained in 47 Angiotensin II-infused ApoE(-/- mice with three different techniques (BMode, short axis MMode, long axis MMode, at two different abdominal aortic locations (supraceliac and paravisceral, and at three different time points of abdominal aneurysm formation (baseline, 14 days and 28 days. We found that short axis BMode was preferred to assess diameters, but should be avoided for strains. Short axis MMode gave good results for diameters but high standard deviations for strains. Long axis MMode should be avoided for diameters, and was comparable to short axis MMode for strains. We then compared pulse wave velocity measurements using global, ultrasound-based transit time or regional, pressure-based transit time in 10 control and 20 angiotensin II-infused, anti-TGF-Beta injected C57BL/6 mice. Both transit-time methods poorly correlated and were not able to detect a significant difference in PWV between controls and aneurysms. However, a combination of invasive pressure and MMode diameter, based on radio-frequency data, detected a highly significant difference in local aortic stiffness between controls and aneurysms, with low standard deviation.In small animal ultrasound the short axis view is preferred over the long axis view to measure aortic diameters, local methods are preferred over transit-time methods to measure aortic stiffness, invasive pressure-diameter data are preferred over non-invasive strains to measure local aortic stiffness, and the use of radiofrequency data improves the accuracy of diameter, strain as well

  14. Prostate-specific antigen levels are associated with arterial stiffness in essential hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssoulis, Gregory; Karpanou, Eva; Kyvelou, Stella-Maria; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Tzamou, Vanessa; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2012-12-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been recently related to cardiovascular system in a multifactorial way. Arterial stiffness is a independent predictor of cardiovascular events and is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether PSA values, are associated with arterial stiffness indices in patients with essential arterial hypertension. The study comprised 150 consecutive male patients (mean age 60 years) with uncomplicated never-treated essential hypertension. All patients underwent a complete clinical and laboratory evaluation, including measurement of PSA levels. Aortic stiffness and arterial wave reflection assessment was made by using carotid-femoral (PWVc-f) pulse wave velocity and aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate (AIx75). Patients with prostate cancer or benign prostate hyperplasia (PSA > 4 ng/mL) were excluded from the study. PSA was positively associated with waist-to-hip ratio (r = 0.235, P = 0.04), PWVc-f (r = 0.426, P stiffness in untreated essential hypertensive males. Potential causal relationships between PSA and arterial stiffness remain to be further explored. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. Effect of beta-1-blocker, nebivolol, on central aortic pressure and arterial stiffness in patients with essential hypertension

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    Radhika Soanker

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Nebivolol 5 mg demonstrated antihypertensive efficacy in patients with essential hypertension by reducing not only peripheral brachial pressures, but also significantly reducing central aortic pressures, augmentation index, and carotid femoral pulse wave velocity, which is the marker of arterial stiffness.

  16. Assessment of Serum ADMA Levels and Aortic Elastic Properties in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

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    Hasan Kaya

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disease which may be associated with cardiovascular complications. The aim of the study was to investigate aortic elastic properties and serum asymetric dimethylarginine (ADMA levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis without any cardiac involvement.Patients and Methods: Fifty-five ankylosing spondylitis patients and 30 age/gender matched healthy subjects were enrolled into this study. Fasting glucose, serum lipids, C-reactive protein (CRP, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and ADMA were studied. Aortic strain, distensibility and stiffness index were calculated from aortic diameters measured by transthoracic echocardiography and simultaneous blood pressure measurements.Results: ESR and CRP were higher in patients group. Serum ADMA levels were also higher in ankylosing spondylitis than in controls (0.76 ± 0.19 vs. 0.55 ± 0.12, p< 0.001. In subgroup analysis, ADMA was significantly lower in anti-TNF-alfa treatment group than conventional treatment group (0.68 ± 0.15 vs. 0.87 ± 0.18, p< 0.001. Mean aortic strain and distensibility were lower and stiffness index was higher in ankylosing spondylitis group than controls. No correlation between ADMA and aortic elastic properties was observed. In ankylosing spondylitis group, a negative significant correlation was found between duration of ankylosing spondylitis and aortic strain and distensibility.Conclusion: Our study suggest that patients with ankylosing spondylitis without cardiac involvement, aortic elasticity was impaired and ADMA levels were increased, while there was no significant correlation between aortic elastic properties and ADMA levels.

  17. P-wave dispersion and its relationship to aortic stiffness in patients with acute myocardial infarction after cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Rezzan Deniz; Bulut, Mustafa; Ergün, Sunay; Yesin, Mahmut; Boztosun, Bilal; Akçakoyun, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of our study was to investigate the P-wave dispersion from standard electrocardiograms (ECGs) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and determine its relation to arterial stiffness. METHODS This is a prospective study included 33 patients with AMI and successfully re-vascularized by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) underwent CR. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was measured by biplane Simpson’s method. Left atrium (LA) volume was calculated. The maximum and minimum durations of P-waves (Pmax and Pmin, respectively) were detected, and the difference between Pmax and Pmin was defined as P-wave dispersion (Pd = Pmax-Pmin). Aortic elasticity parameters were measured. RESULTS LVEF was better after CR. The systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased after CR, these differences were statistically significant. With exercise training, LA volume decreased significantly. Pmax and Pd values were significantly shorter after the CR program. The maximum and minimum P-waves and P-wave dispersion after CR were 97 ± 6 ms, 53 ± 5 ms, and 44 ± 5 ms, respectively. Aortic strain and distensibility increased and aortic stiffness index was decreased significantly. Aortic stiffness index was 0.4 ± 0.2 versus 0.3 ± 0.2, P = 0.001. Aortic stiffness and left atrial volume showed a moderate positive correlation with P-wave dispersion (r = 0.52, P = 0.005; r = 0.64, P < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION This study showed decreased arterial stiffness indexes in AMI patient’s participated CR, with a significant relationship between the electromechanical properties of the LA that may raise a question of the preventive effect of CR from atrial fibrillation and stroke in patients with acute myocardial infarction. PMID:25258633

  18. Epicardial fat volume and aortic stiffness in healthy individuals. A quantitative cardiac magnetic resonance study

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    Homsi, R.; Thomas, D.; Meier-Schroers, M.; Dabir, D.; Kuetting, D.; Luetkens, J.A.; Marx, C.; Schild, H.H. [Bonn University Hospital (Germany). Radiology; Gieseke, J. [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Sprinkart, A. [Bonn University Hospital (Germany). Radiology; Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Medical Engineering

    2016-09-15

    To determine epicardial fat volume (EFV) and aortic stiffness (assessed by aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV)) in healthy individuals, and to investigate the relationship of these parameters, and their association with body mass index (BMI) and age. 58 subjects (29 men, mean age 44.7 ± 13.9 years[y]) underwent a CMR exam at 1.5 Tesla. A 2 D velocity-encoded CMR scan was acquired to determine PWV. The EFV was measured based on a 3 D-mDixon sequence. Group comparisons were made between younger (age < 45y; n=30; mean age 33.4 ± 6.6y) and older (> 45y; n=28; 56.7 ± 8.4y) subjects and between subjects with a BMI < 25 kg/m{sup 2} (n=28; BMI 21.9 ± 2.5 kg/m{sup 2}) and a BMI > 25 kg/m{sup 2} (n=30; 28.7 ± 4.0 kg/m{sup 2}). Associations between the determined parameters were assessed by analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs). The mean values of PWV and EFV (normalized to body surface area) were 6.9 ±1.9 m/s and 44.2 ± 25.0 ml/m{sup 2}, respectively. The PWV and EFV were significantly higher in the older group (PWV=7.9 ± 2.0 m/s vs. 6.0 ± 1.2 m/s; EFV=54.7 ml/m{sup 2} vs. 34.5 ml/m{sup 2}; p < 0.01, each), with no significant differences in BMI or sex. In the overweighted group the EFV was significantly higher than in subjects with a BMI < 25kg/m{sup 2} (EFV=56.1 ± 27.1 ml/m{sup 2} vs. 31.5 ± 14.6 ml/m{sup 2}; p < 0.01) but without a significant difference in PWV. ANCOVA revealed a significant correlation between EFV and PWV, also after adjustment for age (p=0.025). An association was found between age and EFV as well as PWV. EFV and PWV were related to each other also after adjustment for age. The metabolic and pro-inflammatory activity found with increased epicardial fat volume may promote the development of atherosclerosis and aortic stiffness. CMR may be valuable for future studies investigating the relationship between EFV and PWV in patients with increased cardiovascular risk.

  19. Differential impact of belatacept and cyclosporine A on central aortic blood pressure and arterial stiffness after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Felix S; Steltzer, Julia; Melilli, Eduardo; Grannas, Gerrit; Pagonas, Nikolaos; Bauer, Frederic; Zidek, Walter; Grinyó, Josep; Westhoff, Timm H

    2014-09-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) are potent vasoconstrictors and induce an acceleration of arteriosclerosis, thus contributing to the cardiovascular risk after renal transplantation. The study compares the impact of belatacept and cyclosporine A (CsA) on arterial stiffness and central aortic blood pressure. We performed a case-control study in 46 patients (23 on belatacept and 23 on CsA) matched for age, body mass index, time after transplantation, and time on dialysis prior to transplantation. Pulse wave analysis (SphygmoCor, AtCor(®) ) was used to assess central aortic blood pressure, aortic augmentation pressure, and pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a marker of arterial stiffness. Assessment of vascular function was performed after a minimum of 20 months and a median follow-up of 81 months post-transplant. Peripheral systolic and diastolic blood pressure did not significantly differ in the two groups (p > 0.05 each). The central aortic augmentation pressure was higher in the CsA group (12.7 mmHg vs. 7.3 mmHg, p = 0.048). PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness did not differ in the two groups. Thus, belatacept is not associated with a significant difference in arterial stiffness compared to CsA after a median of 81 months post-transplant. It is associated, however, with a lower aortic augmentation pressure, a strong independent cardiovascular risk factor. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Serum free thyroxine levels are positively associated with arterial stiffness in the SardiNIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitala, Alessandro P; Orrù, Marco; Filigheddu, Fabiana; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Delitala, Giuseppe; Ganau, Antonello; Saba, Pier Sergio; Decandia, Federica; Scuteri, Angelo; Marongiu, Michele; Lakatta, Edward G; Strait, James; Cucca, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid dysfunction may accelerate atherosclerosis. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an early index of arterial stiffness and an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and might therefore be linked to changes in thyroid activity. We investigated the relationship between thyroid function and carotid-femoral PWV, as an index of arterial stiffness. Cross-sectional cohort study. Participants from the SardiNIA study. Those being treated for thyroid diseases were excluded, yielding a sample of 5875 aged 14-102. Clinical parameters, blood tests including serum TSH and serum FT4, and carotid-femoral PWV were measured. After adjusting for confounders, a direct and linear association between FT4 and PWV was shown (multiple regression analysis). The model containing age, mean blood pressure, body mass index, heart rate, FT4, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidaemia accounted for 55% of the variation in PWV. Like several other known risk factors, serum FT4 levels are associated with carotid-femoral PWV, suggesting that high FT4 levels have a detrimental effect on aortic stiffness and may contribute to ageing process of the vascular system. This finding may help to understand the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and contribute to improve prevention therapy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Aortic stiffness is related to left ventricular diastolic function in patients with diabetes mellitus type 1: assessment with MRI and speckle tracking strain analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, L.D. van; Auger, D.; Elderen, S.G. van; Ajmone Marsan, N.; Delgado, V.; Lamb, H.J.; Ng, A.C.; Smit, J.W.A.; Bax, J.J.; Westenberg, J.J.; Roos, A. de

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) is associated with aortic stiffening and left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction, however the relationship between aortic stiffness and LV diastolic dysfunction in DM1 patients is still largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether an increased

  2. Aortic stiffness is related to left ventricular diastolic function in patients with diabetes mellitus type 1: assessment with MRI and speckle tracking strain analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, L.D. van; Auger, D.; Elderen, S.G. van; Ajmone Marsan, N.; Delgado, V.; Lamb, H.J.; Ng, A.C.; Smit, J.W.A.; Bax, J.J.; Westenberg, J.J.; Roos, A. de

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) is associated with aortic stiffening and left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction, however the relationship between aortic stiffness and LV diastolic dysfunction in DM1 patients is still largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether an increased

  3. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

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    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 {+-} 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 {+-} 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  4. The Effects of Fetuin-A Levels on Aortic Stenosis

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    Ahmet Tutuncu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to investigate the relation between fetuin-A and calcific aortic stenosis in non diabetic patients whose renal function were normal. Material and Method: 26 patients followed for aortic stenosis by our cardiology clinic for outpatients and 25 voluntary healthy subjects were included in the study. The fetuin%u2013A levels were measured from the venous blood samples of the study population. All patients underwent transthorasic echocardiography, the aortic valvular area and left ventricular parameters of the patients were measured. Results: The average age of the patients in degenerative aortic stenosis group was significantly higher than the control group. The parameters related to aortic valve were naturally higher in patients with dejenerative aortic valve. There was no siginificant difference between two groups about fetuin-A levels. Further more there was no significant relation between fetuin-a levels and aortic stenosis severity. Discussion: In conclusion fetuin-A is a multifunctional glycoprotein that plays important role in systemic calcification inhibition and valvular calcification. Finally aortic stenosis is an active process and larger studies that investigate the relation between fetuin-a and the progression and prognosis of aortic stenosis are needed.

  5. The relationship between aortic stiffness and cardiac function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, independently from systemic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavil, Yusuf; Kanbay, Asiye; Sen, Nihat; Ulukavak Ciftçi, Tansu; Abaci, Adnan; Yalçin, M Ridvan; Köktürk, Oğuz; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-04-01

    We sought to evaluate aortic function and its relationship with left ventricular (LV) function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), with or without systemic hypertension. A total of 29 patients with OSAS, 28 patients with systemic hypertension without OSAS, and 19 patients having both disorders were chosen as a study group, and 29 participants without these two disorders were taken as the control group; none of the patients had a history of cardiac disease. All of them underwent echocardiography and polysomnography. Aortic strain and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by cuff-sphygmomanometer. Cardiac functions were determined using echocardiography comprising standard 2-dimensional and conventional Doppler and Doppler tissue imaging. Aortic strain (mean +/- SD; 6.1 +/- 2.7% vs 6.4 +/- 2.4%, 4.7 +/- 1.8%, and 13.7 +/- 4.5%, P < .001, respectively) and distensibility (mean +/- SD 2.8 +/- 1.6 vs 2.5 +/- 0.9, 1.7 +/- 0.7, and 6.2 +/- 3.2 10(-6) cm(2) dyn(-1)P < .001, respectively) were significantly decreased in the patient groups (OSAS, hypertensive, and OSAS and hypertensive) compared with the control group. LV long-axis and diastolic functions were also impaired in the study group. There were good correlations between the aortic stiffness and LV function parameters. In a multivariate analysis, aortic strain was the parameter found to be most strongly associated both with the Doppler tissue imaging mean peak early/late diastolic velocity ratio and the LV mitral lateral annular plane systolic excursion. Aortic stiffness parameters (aortic strain and distensibility), LV systolic long-axis function indicators (mitral lateral annular plane systolic excursion, peak systolic myocardial velocity at lateral annulus, peak systolic myocardial velocity at septal annulus), and Doppler tissue imaging-derived LV diastolic indices were found abnormal in patients with OSAS

  6. Assessment of arterial stiffness among schizophrenia-spectrum disorders using aortic pulse wave velocity and arterial compliance: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Aaron A; Warburton, Darren E R; Flynn, Sean W; Fredrikson, Diane; Lang, Donna J

    2014-01-30

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Arterial stiffness provides a non-invasive indication of cardiovascular disease risk. To date, arterial stiffness, which has been shown to have independent predictive value for CVD morbidity and mortality, has not been evaluated in this population. We aimed to examine aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) as well as large and small artery compliance (Comp1 and Comp2) in patients being treated for schizophrenia, compared to healthy volunteers. Ten patients and 10 age and gendermatched volunteers underwent a comprehensive evaluation of arterial stiffness including: aPWV, Comp1, Comp2, stroke volume, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance. Patient aPWV was significantly elevated compared to healthy volunteers (9.1 ± 4.11 vs. 5.7 ± 1.4, P=0.03). Increased age, blood pressure, heart rate, and cigarettes/day were associated with reduced arterial health in patients. This is the first time aPWV has been described in those treated for schizophrenia. Arterial stiffness is increased in this population. Measuring arterial stiffness is a non-invasive, sensitive and effective tool for evaluating CVD risk in this population. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Estimated aortic blood pressure based on radial artery tonometry underestimates directly measured aortic blood pressure in patients with advancing chronic kidney disease staging and increasing arterial stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Rasmus K; Peters, Christian D; Khatir, Dinah S;

    2016-01-01

    we compared invasive aortic systolic BP (SBP) with estimated central SBP obtained by radial artery tonometry and examined the influence of renal function and arterial stiffness on this relationship. We evaluated 83 patients with stage 3 to 5 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 30 ml......% confidence interval -14.9 to -11.4) mm Hg. Arterial stiffness was evaluated by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) and was significantly increased in CKD patients compared with (versus) control patients (mean 10.7 vs. 9.3 m/s). The difference in BP significantly increased 1.0 mm Hg for every 10 ml....../min decrease in eGFR and by 1.6 mm Hg per 1 m/s increase in cfPWV. Using multivariate regression analysis including both eGFR and cfPWV, the difference between estimated central and invasive aortic SBP was significantly increased by 0.7 mm Hg. For the entire cohort brachial SBP significantly better reflected...

  8. Drug therapies and presence of coronary artery disease may affect aortic stiffness in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bektaş O

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Osman Bektaş,1 Zeki Yüksel Günaydin,1 Ahmet Karagöz,2 Ahmet Kaya1 1Ordu University, Department of Cardiology, Ordu, 2Giresun University, Department of Cardiology, Giresun, TurkeyWe have read the original research entitled "Altered diastolic function and aortic stiffness in Alzheimer’s disease" by Çalık et al1 which was published in the July 2014 issue of Clinical Interventions in Aging, with great interest. We would like to touch on some points about this article.View original paper by Çalık and colleagues

  9. Evaluation of Distensibility and Stiffness of Ascending Aortic Aneurysm using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Kaushal Kishore Tiwari

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: MRI measurement of aortic diameters, distensibility, and flow wave velocity is an easy, reliable and reproducible technique. Distensibility and pulse wave velocity define the elasticity of the aorta. We have observed that elasticity of aortic wall is decreased in ascending aorta aneurysm patients. Keywords: ascending aorta aneurysm; distensibility; pulse wave velocity; MRI. | PubMed

  10. Assessment of aortic stiffness among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Galia; Wolak, Arik; Baumfeld, Yael; Bar-Am, Nina; Novack, Victor; Wolak, Talya; Fuchs, Lior; Shalev, Aryeh; Shelef, Ilan; Abu-Shakra, Mahmoud

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate aortic stiffness by MRI in female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in comparison to controls. We measured aortic strain, distensibility and pulse wave velocity (PWV) by MRI in 30 SLE patients, 31 RA patients and 53 matched controls. Mean PWV in SLE and RA patients were higher in comparison to controls (9.2 ± 4.4 vs. 7.6 ± 3.0 m/s, p = 0.04) and (6.2 ± 2.3 vs. 5.4 ± 1.7, p = 0.04) respectively. Aortic distensibility among RA patients was significantly lower in comparison to controls (4.4 ± 4.6 vs. 5.8 ± 4.9 kPa(-1) × 10(-3), p = 0.04). A significant correlation was found between PWV and age (r = 0.67, p < 0.001), Framingham risk score (r = 0.61, p < 0.001), waist to hip ratio (r = 0.45, p < 0.001), systolic blood pressure (r = 0.37, p = 0.01), diabetes (r = 0.32, p = 0.001) and dyslipidemia (r = 0.32, p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis for the prediction of PWV, variables which were found significant included: RA (p = 0.01), age (p < 0.001) and hypertension (p = 0.01) for patients with RA and SLE (p = 0.02), waist to hip ratio (p < 0.001) and total cholesterol (p < 0.001) for patients with SLE. Arterial stiffness, characterized by metrics of aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity derived from MRI, is increased in SLE and RA female patients.

  11. Self-gated CINE MRI for combined contrast-enhanced imaging and wall-stiffness measurements of murine aortic atherosclerotic lesions.

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    Brigit den Adel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-resolution contrast-enhanced imaging of the murine atherosclerotic vessel wall is difficult due to unpredictable flow artifacts, motion of the thin artery wall and problems with flow suppression in the presence of a circulating contrast agent. METHODS AND RESULTS: We applied a 2D-FLASH retrospective-gated CINE MRI method at 9.4T to characterize atherosclerotic plaques and vessel wall distensibility in the aortic arch of aged ApoE(-/- mice after injection of a contrast agent. The method enabled detection of contrast enhancement in atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic arch after I.V. injection of micelles and iron oxides resulting in reproducible plaque enhancement. Both contrast agents were taken up in the plaque, which was confirmed by histology. Additionally, the retrospective-gated CINE method provided images of the aortic wall throughout the cardiac cycle, from which the vessel wall distensibility could be calculated. Reduction in plaque size by statin treatment resulted in lower contrast enhancement and reduced wall stiffness. CONCLUSIONS: The retrospective-gated CINE MRI provides a robust and simple way to detect and quantify contrast enhancement in atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic wall of ApoE(-/- mice. From the same scan, plaque-related changes in stiffness of the aortic wall can be determined. In this mouse model, a correlation between vessel wall stiffness and atherosclerotic lesions was found.

  12. Is there alteration in aortic stiffness in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemes, A.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Spruijt, L.; Smeets, H.J.; Chinnery, P.F.; Soliman, O.I.; Geleijnse, M.L.; Cate, FJ Ten

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is recognized as the most common cause of isolated blindness in young men. The current study was designed to test whether LHON as a mitochondrial disease is associated with vascular functional alterations characterized by aortic elastic properties

  13. Is there alteration in aortic stiffness in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemes, A.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Spruijt, L.; Smeets, H.J.; Chinnery, P.F.; Soliman, O.I.; Geleijnse, M.L.; Cate, FJ Ten

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is recognized as the most common cause of isolated blindness in young men. The current study was designed to test whether LHON as a mitochondrial disease is associated with vascular functional alterations characterized by aortic elastic properties du

  14. Low arginine plasma levels in patients after thoracoabdominal aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijveldt, R J; Prins, H A; Siroen, M P; Rauwerda, J A; Teerlink, T; van Leeuwen, P A

    2000-08-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic surgery is a high-risk procedure and associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. Ischemia reperfusion of visceral organs and lower extremities is one of the most important determinants of this morbidity. Arginine is the precursor of nitric oxide and arginine plasma levels are important in maintaining organ blood flow. Furthermore, arginine is important in wound healing and the immune system. Because of increased utilization of arginine, low arginine plasma levels could be expected after thoracoabdominal aortic surgery. We therefore measured arginine plasma levels in these patients. Six patients with thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm were included in this study. University Hospital Vrije Universiteit, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Six patients undergoing thoracoabdominal aortic surgery. Plasma levels of arginine were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Very low arginine plasma levels were seen on the first postoperative day. From day 1 arginine slowly increased, but did not reach normal plasma levels on day 6. A significant decrease of arginine plasma levels was found and because of the fact that arginine has multiple functions, it may be important to keep these arginine plasma levels at normal or even higher levels in patients undergoing major vascular surgery. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2000) 54, 615-617.

  15. Higher Physical Activity Is Associated With Lower Aortic Stiffness but Not With Central Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anne Sofie Dam; Hansen, Anne-Louise Smidt; Wiinberg, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk. However, improvements in conventional risk factors due to physical activity do not explain its full benefit. Therefore, we examined associations of objectively measured physical activity energy expenditure and intensity...... was assessed by applanation tonometry, as aortic pulse wave velocity, and central blood pressure was estimated from radial waveforms. Associations between physical activity energy expenditure and central hemodynamics were examined by linear regression. Furthermore, the consequence of substituting 1 hour...... sedentary behavior with 1 hour light or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on central hemodynamics was examined. Median physical activity energy expenditure was 28.0 kJ/kg/d (IQR: 19.8; 38.7). A 10 kJ/kg/d higher energy expenditure was associated with 0.75% lower aortic pulse wave velocity (CI: -1...

  16. SERUM MAGNESIUM LEVELS IN AORTIC AND MITRAL VALVE REPLACEMENT SURGERIES

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    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The purpose of the study was to analyze serum magnesium concentration in patients undergoing Aortic and Mitral Valve replacement surgeries. METHODS: This prospective study was conducted in 60 patients who underwent elective Aortic and Mitral va lve replacement surgeries. Blood samples from radial artery were collected just before induction of anesthesia and three days post - operatively for estimation of serum magnesium. RESULTS: Magnesium level was 2.02mg/dl at baseline, 2.28mg/dl, 2.08mg/dl and 1 .90mg/dl respectively on three consecutive days post - operatively. CONCLUSION: The lowering of serum magnesium in Aortic and Mitral valve replacement surgeries postoperatively recommends the use of routine serum magnesium determination and administration to prevent post - operative arrhythmias.

  17. Altered diastolic function and aortic stiffness in Alzheimer’s disease

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    Çalık AN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ali Nazmi Çalik,3 Kazim Serhan Özcan,4 Gülbün Yüksel,2 Baris Güngör,1 Emre Arugarslan,1 Figen Varlibas,2 Ahmet Ekmekci,1 Damirbek Osmonov,1 Mustafa Adem Tatlisu,1 Mehmet Karaca,1 Osman Bolca,1 Izzet Erdinler1 1Department of Cardiology, Siyami Ersek Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery Center, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Department of Neurology, Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Department of Cardiology, Yozgat State Hospital, Yozgat, Turkey; 4Department of Cardiology, Derince Training and Research Hospital, Kocaeli, Turkey Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is closely linked to cardiovascular risk factors.Methods: Echocardiographic studies were performed, including left ventricular diastolic functions, left and right atrial conduction times, and arterial stiffness parameters, namely stiffness index, pressure-strain elastic modulus, and distensibility, on 29 patients with AD and 24 age-matched individuals with normal cognitive function.Results: The peak mitral flow velocity of the early rapid filling wave (E was lower, and the peak velocity of the late filling wave caused by atrial contraction (A, deceleration time of peak E velocity, and isovolumetric relaxation time were higher in the AD group. The early myocardial peak (Ea velocity was significantly lower in AD patients, whereas the late diastolic (Aa velocity and E/Ea ratio were similar between the two groups. In Alzheimer patients, stiffness index and pressure-strain elastic modulus were higher, and distensibility was significantly lower in the AD group compared to the control. Interatrial electromechanical delay was significantly longer in the AD group.Conclusion: Our findings suggest that patients with AD are more likely to have diastolic dysfunction, higher atrial conduction times, and increased arterial stiffness compared to the controls of same sex and similar age. Keywords: diastolic dysfunction, atrial conduction timeA Letter to the Editor has been

  18. Dependence of elbow joint stiffness measurements on speed, angle, and muscle contraction level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuxhaus, Laurel; Zeng, Sisi; Robinson, Charles J

    2014-03-21

    Elbow joint stiffness is critical to positioning the hand. Abnormal elbow joint stiffness may affect a person's ability to participate in activities of daily living. In this work, elbow joint stiffness was measured in ten healthy young adults with a device adapted from one previously used to measure stiffness in other joints. Measurements of elbow stiffness involved applying a constant-velocity rotational movement to the elbow and measuring the resultant displacement, torque, and acceleration. Elbow stiffness was then computed using a previously-established model for joint stiffness. Measurements were made at two unique elbow joint angles, two speeds, and two forearm muscle contraction levels. The results indicate that the elbow joint stiffness is significantly affected by both rotational speed and forearm muscle contraction level.

  19. Beyond type 2 diabetes, obesity and hypertension: an axis including sleep apnea, left ventricular hypertrophy, endothelial dysfunction, and aortic stiffness among Mexican Americans in Starr County, Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Hanis, Craig L.; Redline, Susan; Cade, Brian E.; Bell, Graeme I.; Cox, Nancy J.; Below, Jennifer E.; Brown, Eric L.; Aguilar, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing appreciation for a series of less traditional risk factors that should not be ignored when considering type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. These include aortic stiffness, cardiac structure, impaired endothelial function and obstructive sleep apnea. They are associated to varying degrees with each disease categorization and with each other. It is not clear whether they represent additional complications, concomitants or anteced...

  20. Plasma Lactate Dehydrogenase Levels Predict Mortality in Acute Aortic Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Morello, Fulvio; Ravetti, Anna; Nazerian, Peiman; Liedl, Giovanni; Veglio, Maria Grazia; Battista, Stefania; Vanni, Simone; Pivetta, Emanuele; Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Mengozzi, Giulio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Moiraghi, Corrado; Lupia, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In acute aortic syndromes (AAS), organ malperfusion represents a key event impacting both on diagnosis and outcome. Increased levels of plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a biomarker of malperfusion, have been reported in AAS, but the performance of LDH for the diagnosis of AAS and the relation of LDH with outcome in AAS have not been evaluated so far. This was a bi-centric prospective diagnostic accuracy study and a cohort outcome study. From 2008 to 2014, patients from 2 Emergency...

  1. Aortic Stiffness and Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tove Lekva

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD in later life, but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate indices of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, and arterial stiffness (as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV, in women with and without a history of GDM, using both the old WHO and new IADPSG diagnostic criteria, at 5 years after the index pregnancy. Dyslipidemia and PWV were used as surrogate markers for CVD risk. The population-based prospective cohort included 300 women from the original STORK study. All participants had an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT during pregnancy. Five years later, the OGTT was repeated along with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, lipid analysis, and PWV analysis. Measurements were compared between those women who did and did not have GDM based on both the WHO and IADPSG criteria. We found that women with GDM based on the old WHO criteria had higher CVD risk at 5 years than those without GDM, with markedly elevated PWV and more severe dyslipidemia (higher triglycerides (TG/HDL cholesterol ratio. After adjusting for known risk factors, the most important predictors for elevated PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio at 5-year follow-up were maternal age, BMI, GDM, systolic blood pressure, and indices of glucose metabolism in the index pregnancy. In conclusion, we found a higher risk for CVD, based on the surrogate markers PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio, at 5-year follow-up in women diagnosed with GDM in the index pregnancy when using the old WHO diagnostic criteria.

  2. Aortic Stiffness and Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekva, Tove; Bollerslev, Jens; Norwitz, Errol R; Aukrust, Pål; Henriksen, Tore; Ueland, Thor

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in later life, but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate indices of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, and arterial stiffness (as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV)), in women with and without a history of GDM, using both the old WHO and new IADPSG diagnostic criteria, at 5 years after the index pregnancy. Dyslipidemia and PWV were used as surrogate markers for CVD risk. The population-based prospective cohort included 300 women from the original STORK study. All participants had an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during pregnancy. Five years later, the OGTT was repeated along with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, lipid analysis, and PWV analysis. Measurements were compared between those women who did and did not have GDM based on both the WHO and IADPSG criteria. We found that women with GDM based on the old WHO criteria had higher CVD risk at 5 years than those without GDM, with markedly elevated PWV and more severe dyslipidemia (higher triglycerides (TG)/HDL cholesterol ratio). After adjusting for known risk factors, the most important predictors for elevated PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio at 5-year follow-up were maternal age, BMI, GDM, systolic blood pressure, and indices of glucose metabolism in the index pregnancy. In conclusion, we found a higher risk for CVD, based on the surrogate markers PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio, at 5-year follow-up in women diagnosed with GDM in the index pregnancy when using the old WHO diagnostic criteria.

  3. A decreased level of serum soluble Klotho is an independent biomarker associated with arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

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    Masashi Kitagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Klotho was originally identified in a mutant mouse strain unable to express the gene that consequently showed shortened life spans. In humans, low serum Klotho levels are related to the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in community-dwelling adults. However, it is unclear whether the serum Klotho levels are associated with signs of vascular dysfunction such as arterial stiffness, a major determinant of prognosis, in human subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD. METHODS: We determined the levels of serum soluble Klotho in 114 patients with CKD using ELISA and investigated the relationship between the level of Klotho and markers of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD and various types of vascular dysfunction, including flow-mediated dilatation, a marker of endothelial dysfunction, ankle-brachial pulse wave velocity (baPWV, a marker of arterial stiffness, intima-media thickness (IMT, a marker of atherosclerosis, and the aortic calcification index (ACI, a marker of vascular calcification. RESULTS: The serum Klotho level significantly correlated with the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D level and inversely correlated with the parathyroid hormone level and the fractional excretion of phosphate. There were significant decreases in serum Klotho in patients with arterial stiffness defined as baPWV≥1400 cm/sec, atherosclerosis defined as maximum IMT≥1.1 mm and vascular calcification scores of ACI>0%. The serum Klotho level was a significant determinant of arterial stiffness, but not endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis or vascular calcification, in the multivariate analysis in either metabolic model, the CKD model or the CKD-MBD model. The adjusted odds ratio of serum Klotho for the baPWV was 0.60 (p = 0.0075. CONCLUSIONS: Decreases in the serum soluble Klotho levels are independently associated with signs of vascular dysfunction such as arterial stiffness in patients with CKD. Further research exploring whether therapeutic approaches

  4. Estimated aortic blood pressure based on radial artery tonometry underestimates directly measured aortic blood pressure in patients with advancing chronic kidney disease staging and increasing arterial stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Rasmus K; Peters, Christian D; Khatir, Dinah S; Laugesen, Esben; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Winther, Simon; Buus, Niels H

    2016-10-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) can be assessed noninvasively based on radial tonometry and may potentially be a better predictor of clinical outcome than brachial BP. However, the validity of noninvasively obtained estimates has never been examined in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here we compared invasive aortic systolic BP (SBP) with estimated central SBP obtained by radial artery tonometry and examined the influence of renal function and arterial stiffness on this relationship. We evaluated 83 patients with stage 3 to 5 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) and 41 controls without renal disease undergoing scheduled coronary angiography. BP in the ascending aorta was measured through the angiography catheter and simultaneously estimated using radial tonometry. The mean difference between estimated central and aortic SBP was -13.2 (95% confidence interval -14.9 to -11.4) mm Hg. Arterial stiffness was evaluated by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) and was significantly increased in CKD patients compared with (versus) control patients (mean 10.7 vs. 9.3 m/s). The difference in BP significantly increased 1.0 mm Hg for every 10 ml/min decrease in eGFR and by 1.6 mm Hg per 1 m/s increase in cfPWV. Using multivariate regression analysis including both eGFR and cfPWV, the difference between estimated central and invasive aortic SBP was significantly increased by 0.7 mm Hg. For the entire cohort brachial SBP significantly better reflected invasive SBP than estimated SBP. Thus, tonometry-based estimates of central BP progressively underestimate invasive central SBP with decreasing renal function and increasing arterial stiffness in CKD patients.

  5. Regular cocaine use is associated with increased systolic blood pressure, aortic stiffness and left ventricular mass in young otherwise healthy individuals.

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    Rebecca Kozor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cardiovascular impact of cocaine use in otherwise healthy individuals who consider themselves 'social' users is not well established. METHODS/RESULTS: Twenty regular cocaine users and 20 control subjects were recruited by word-of-mouth. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance was performed to assess cardiac and vascular structure and function. Cocaine users had higher systolic blood pressure compared to non-users (134±11 vs 126±11 mmHg, p = 0.036, a finding independent of age, body surface area, smoking and alcohol consumption. Cocaine use was associated with increased arterial stiffness - reflected by reduced aortic compliance (1.3±0.2 vs 1.7±0.5 cm2×10-2.mmHg-1, p = 0.004, decreased distensibility (3.8±0.9 vs 5.1±1.4 mmHg-1.10-3, p = 0.001, increased stiffness index (2.6±0.6 vs 2.1±0.6, p = 0.005, and higher pulse wave velocity (5.1±0.6 vs 4.4±0.6 m.s-1, p = 0.001. This change in aortic stiffness was independent of vessel wall thickness. Left ventricular mass was 18% higher in cocaine users (124±25 vs 105±16 g, p = 0.01, a finding that was independent of body surface area, and left atrial diameter was larger in the user group than controls (3.8±0.6 vs 3.5±0.3 cm, p = 0.04. The increased left ventricular mass, systolic blood pressure and vascular stiffness measures were all associated with duration and/or frequency of cocaine use. No late gadolinium enhancement or segmental wall motion abnormalities were seen in any of the subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the non-user control cohort, cocaine users had increased aortic stiffness and systolic blood pressure, associated with greater left ventricular mass. These measures are all well known risk factors for premature cardiovascular events, highlighting the dangers of cocaine use, even in a 'social' setting, and have important public health implications.

  6. Comprehensive assessment of biventricular function and aortic stiffness in athletes with different forms of training by three-dimensional echocardiography and strain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitarelli, Antonio; Capotosto, Lidia; Placanica, Giuseppe; Caranci, Fiorella; Pergolini, Mario; Zardo, Francesco; Martino, Francesco; De Chiara, Stefania; Vitarelli, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have shown distinct models of cardiac adaptations to the training in master athletes and different effects of endurance and strength-training on cardiovascular function. We attempted to assess left-ventricular (LV) function, aortic (Ao) function, and right-ventricular (RV) function in athletes with different forms of training by using three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography, tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) and speckle-tracking imaging (STI). We examined 35 male marathon runners (endurance-trained athletes, ETA), 35 powerlifting athletes (strength-trained athletes, STA), 35 martial arts athletes (mixed-trained athletes, MTA), and 35 sedentary untrained healthy men (controls, CTR). Two-dimensional and three-dimensional echocardiography were performed for the assessment of LV and RV systolic/diastolic function. LV and RV longitudinal strain (LS) and LV torsion (LVtor) were determined using STI (EchoPAC BT11, GE-Ultrasound). Maximum velocity of systolic wall expansion peaks (AoSvel) was determined using TDI. ETA experienced LV eccentric hypertrophy with increased 3D LV end-diastolic volume and mass and significant increase in peak systolic apical rotation and LVtor. In all groups of athletes, RV-LS was reduced at rest and improved after exercise. AoSvel was significantly increased in ETA and MTA and significantly decreased in STA compared with CTR. There were good correlations between LV remodelling and aortic stiffness values. Multivariate analysis showed aortic wall velocities to be independently related to LV mass index. In strength-trained, endurance-trained, and mixed-trained athletes, ventricular and vascular response assessed by 3DE, TDI, and STI underlies different adaptations of LV, RV, and aortic indexes.

  7. Relative Importance of Aortic Stiffness and Volume as Predictors of Treatment-Induced Improvement in Left Ventricular Mass Index in Dialysis.

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    Panagiotis I Georgianos

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the relative contribution of aortic stiffness and volume in treatment-induced change of left ventricular mass in dialysis. Hypertension in Hemodialysis Patients Treated with Atenolol or Lisinopril trial compared the effect of lisinopril versus atenolol in reducing left ventricular mass index; 179 patients with echo measurements of aortic pulse wave velocity and left ventricular mass at baseline were included. In unadjusted analysis, overall reductions of 26.24 g/m2 (95% CI: -49.20, -3.29 and 35.67 g/m2 (95% CI: -63.70, -7.64 in left ventricular mass index were noted from baseline to 6 and 12 months respectively. Volume control emerged as an important determinant of regression of left ventricular mass index due to the following reasons: (i additional control for change in ambulatory systolic blood pressure mitigated the reduction in left ventricular mass index in the statistical model above [6-month visit: -18.6 g/m2 (95% CI: -43.7, 6.5; 12-month visit: -22.1 g/m2 (95% CI: -52.2, 8.0] (ii regression of left ventricular hypertrophy was primarily due to reduction in left ventricular chamber and not wall thickness and (iii adjustment for inferior vena cava diameter (as a proxy for volume removed the effect of time on left ventricular mass index reduction [6-month visit: -6.6 g/m2 (95% CI: (-41.6, 28.4; 12-month visit: 0.6 g/m2 (95% CI: -39.5, 40.7]. In contrast, aortic pulse wave velocity was neither a determinant of baseline left ventricular mass index nor predictor of its reduction. Among dialysis patients, ambulatory systolic pressure, a proxy for volume expansion, but not aortic stiffness is more important predictor of reduction in left ventricular mass index. Improving blood pressure control via adequate volume management appears as an effective strategy to improve left ventricular hypertrophy in dialysis.

  8. Plasma cathepsin S and cystatin C levels and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Cheng, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) lesions contain high levels of cathepsin S (CatS), but are deficient in its inhibitor, cystatin C. Whether plasma CatS and cystatin C levels are also altered in AAA patients remains unknown.......Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) lesions contain high levels of cathepsin S (CatS), but are deficient in its inhibitor, cystatin C. Whether plasma CatS and cystatin C levels are also altered in AAA patients remains unknown....

  9. Plasma Lactate Dehydrogenase Levels Predict Mortality in Acute Aortic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Fulvio; Ravetti, Anna; Nazerian, Peiman; Liedl, Giovanni; Veglio, Maria Grazia; Battista, Stefania; Vanni, Simone; Pivetta, Emanuele; Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Mengozzi, Giulio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Moiraghi, Corrado; Lupia, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In acute aortic syndromes (AAS), organ malperfusion represents a key event impacting both on diagnosis and outcome. Increased levels of plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a biomarker of malperfusion, have been reported in AAS, but the performance of LDH for the diagnosis of AAS and the relation of LDH with outcome in AAS have not been evaluated so far. This was a bi-centric prospective diagnostic accuracy study and a cohort outcome study. From 2008 to 2014, patients from 2 Emergency Departments suspected of having AAS underwent LDH assay at presentation. A final diagnosis was obtained by aortic imaging. Patients diagnosed with AAS were followed-up for in-hospital mortality. One thousand five hundred seventy-eight consecutive patients were clinically eligible, and 999 patients were included in the study. The final diagnosis was AAS in 201 (20.1%) patients. Median LDH was 424 U/L (interquartile range [IQR] 367–557) in patients with AAS and 383 U/L (IQR 331–460) in patients with alternative diagnoses (P < 0.001). Using a cutoff of 450 U/L, the sensitivity of LDH for AAS was 44% (95% confidence interval [CI] 37–51) and the specificity was 73% (95% CI 69–76). Overall in-hospital mortality for AAS was 23.8%. Mortality was 32.6% in patients with LDH ≥ 450 U/L and 16.8% in patients with LDH < 450 U/L (P = 0.006). Following stratification according to LDH quartiles, in-hospital mortality was 12% in the first (lowest) quartile, 18.4% in the second quartile, 23.5% in the third quartile, and 38% in the fourth (highest) quartile (P = 0.01). LDH ≥ 450 U/L was further identified as an independent predictor of death in AAS both in univariate and in stepwise logistic regression analyses (odds ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.11–4.66; P = 0.025), in addition to well-established risk markers such as advanced age and hypotension. Subgroup analysis showed excess mortality in association with LDH ≥ 450 U/L in elderly, hemodynamically stable

  10. Lowering plasma cholesterol levels halts progression of aortic valve disease in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jordan D.; Weiss, Robert M.; Serrano, Kristine M.; Brooks, Robert M.; Berry, Christopher J.; Zimmerman, Kathy; Young, Stephen G.; Heistad, Donald D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment of hyperlipidemia produces functional and structural improvements in atherosclerotic vessels. However, the effects of treating hyperlipidemia on the structure and function of the aortic valve has been controversial, and any effects could be confounded by pleiotropic effects of hypolipidemic treatment. The goal of this study was to determine whether reducing elevated plasma lipid levels with a “genetic switch” in Reversa mice (Ldlr−/−/Apob100/100/Mttpfl/fl/Mx1Cre+/+) reduces oxidative stress, reduces proosteogenic signaling, and retards the progression of aortic valve disease. Methods and Results After 6 months of hypercholesterolemia, Reversa mice exhibited increases in superoxide, lipid deposition, myofibroblast activation, calcium deposition, and pro-osteogenic protein expression in the aortic valve. Maximum aortic valve cusp separation, as judged by echocardiography, was not altered. During an additional 6 months of hypercholesterolemia, superoxide levels, valvular lipid deposition, and myofibroblast activation remained elevated. Furthermore, calcium deposition and pro-osteogenic gene expression became more pronounced and the aortic cusp separation decreased from 0.85 ± 0.04 to 0.70 ± 0.04 mm (mean ± SE; p < 0.05). Rapid normalization of cholesterol levels at 6 months of age (by inducing expression of Cre recombinase) normalized aortic valve superoxide levels, decreased myofibroblast activation, reduced valvular calcium burden, suppressed pro-osteogenic signaling cascades, and prevented the reductions in aortic valve cusp separation. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that reducing plasma lipid levels by genetic inactivation of the mttp gene in hypercholesterolemic mice with early aortic valve disease normalizes oxidative stress, reduces pro-osteogenic signaling, and halts the progression of aortic valve stenosis. PMID:19433756

  11. Effect of cholesterol lowering on stiffness of aortic and femoral arterial walls in rabbits on a high fat diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Li; XU Wan-hai; XU Jin-zhi; ZHANG Tong; BI Hong-yuan; SHEN Bao-zhong

    2009-01-01

    Background Researches in arterial elasticity have increased over the past few years. We investigated the effects of simvastatin on vascular stiffness in fat fed rabbits by ultrasonography.Methods Thirty rabbits were assigned randomly to 3 groups: normal control group (A), the cholesterol group (B), simvastatin group (C: high fat diet for 4 weeks and high fat diet + simvastatin for further 4 weeks). Stiffness coefficient, pressure strain elastic modulus and velocity of pulse waves in abdominal aorta and femoral artery were measured by ultrasonographic echo tracking at the end of the 4th and the 8th weeks.Results At the end of the 4th week, stiffness coefficient, pressure strain elastic modulus and pulse wave velocity of femoral artery were significantly increased in group B compared with those in group A. Similarly, at the end of the 8th week, the same parameters of abdominal aorta were significantly increased in group B compared with those in group A. In contrast, stiffness coefficient, pressure strain elastic modulus and pulse wave velocity of femoral artery were significantly decreased in group C compared with those in group B, however, there was no significant difference in parameters of abdominal aorta between groups B and C.Conclusion Short term administration of simvastatin can improve the elasticity of femoral artery but not abdominal aorta.

  12. Soluble TWEAK plasma levels predict expansion of human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martín-Ventura, J L; Lindholt, Jes S.; Pavón Moreno, Miguel Ángel;

    2010-01-01

    Diminished soluble tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (sTWEAK) concentrations are associated with cardiovascular diseases. We have analyzed sTWEAK levels and its relation with expansion rate in subjects with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)....

  13. Serum soluble Klotho level is associated with abdominal aortic calcification in patients on maintenance hemodialysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡宏

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between serum soluble Klotho(sKL) level and abdominal aortic calcification in maintenance hemodialysis(MHD) patients.Methods One hundred and twenty nine cases of MHD patients were

  14. Plasma cytokine levels and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Mengyang; Liu, Cong-Lin; Lv, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by inflammatory cell accumulation in AAA lesions that produce inflammatory cytokines and advance its pathogenesis. Peripheral cytokines may predict the degree or risk of AAA. METHODS AND RESULTS: ELISA determined plasma interleukin-6 (IL6......), IL10, IL17A, IFN-γ, and C-reactive protein (CRP) from 476 AAA patients and 200 controls. AAA patients had lower IL6, IFN-γ, IL10, IL17A, and higher CRP than controls. IL10 correlated positively with IFN-γ, IL17A, or IL6, but not CRP in control or AAA populations. IL10 associated negatively...... with systolic blood pressure, whereas CRP associated positively with diastolic blood pressure and body mass index. CRP was an independent AAA risk factor and correlated positively with aortic diameters before and after adjustments for other risk factors. IFN-γ, IL17A, and CRP correlated positively with cross...

  15. Beyond type 2 diabetes, obesity and hypertension: an axis including sleep apnea, left ventricular hypertrophy, endothelial dysfunction, and aortic stiffness among Mexican Americans in Starr County, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanis, Craig L; Redline, Susan; Cade, Brian E; Bell, Graeme I; Cox, Nancy J; Below, Jennifer E; Brown, Eric L; Aguilar, David

    2016-06-08

    There is an increasing appreciation for a series of less traditional risk factors that should not be ignored when considering type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. These include aortic stiffness, cardiac structure, impaired endothelial function and obstructive sleep apnea. They are associated to varying degrees with each disease categorization and with each other. It is not clear whether they represent additional complications, concomitants or antecedents of disease. Starr County, Texas, with its predominantly Mexican American population has been shown previously to bear a disproportionate burden of the major disease categories, but little is known about the distribution of these less traditional factors. Type 2 diabetes, obesity and hypertension frequencies were determined through a systematic survey of Starr County conducted from 2002 to 2006. Individuals from this examination and an enriched set with type 2 diabetes were re-examined from 2010 to 2014 including assessment of cardiac structure, sleep apnea, endothelial function and aortic stiffness. Individual and combined frequencies of these inter-related (i.e., axis) conditions were estimated and associations evaluated. Household screening of 5230 individuals aged 20 years and above followed by direct physical assessment of 1610 identified 23.7 % of men and 26.7 % of women with type 2 diabetes, 46.2 and 49.5 % of men and women, respectively with obesity and 32.1 and 32.4 % with hypertension. Evaluation of pulse wave velocity, left ventricular mass, endothelial function and sleep apnea identified 22.3, 12.7, 48.6 and 45.2 % of men as having "at risk" values for each condition, respectively. Corresponding numbers in women were 16.0, 17.9, 23.6 and 28.8 %. Cumulatively, 88 % of the population has one or more of these while 50 % have three or more. The full axis of conditions is high among Mexican Americans in Starr County, Texas. Individual and joint patterns suggest a genesis well

  16. Serum Uric Acid Level and Diverse Impacts on Regional Arterial Stiffness and Wave Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyan Bian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Both increased arterial stiffness and hyperuricaemia are associated with elevated cardiovascular risks. Little is known about the relations of serum uric acid (UA level to regional arterial stiffness and wave reflection. The aim of the study was to investigate the gender-specific association of serum UA and indices of arterial function in a community-based investigation in China.Methods: Cross-sectional data from 2374 adults (mean age 58.24 years who underwent routine laboratory tests, regional pulse wave velocity (PWV and pulse wave analysis measurements were analyzed in a gender-specific manner. None of the participants had atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, chronic renal failure, systemic inflammatory disease, gout, or were under treatment which would affect serum UA level.Results: Men had higher serum UA level than women. Subjects with hyperuricaemia had significantly higher carotid-ankle PWV in both genders (P< 0.05, and the carotid-femoral PWV (PWVc-f was higher in women (P< 0.001 while the augmentation index was marginally lower in men (P = 0.049. Multiple regression analysis showed that serum UA was an independent determinant only for PWVc-f in women (β = 0.104, P = 0.027 when adjusted for atherogenic confounders. No other independent relationship was found between UA level and other surrogates of arterial stiffness.Conclusions: Serum UA levels are associated with alterations in systemic arterial stiffness that differ in men and women. Women might be more susceptible to large vascular damage associated with hyperuricaemia.

  17. Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

  18. Left atrial volume index and aortic stiffness index in adult hemodialysed patients - link between compliance and pressure mediated by endothelium dysfunction; a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zapolski Tomasz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to investigate the relationship between elastic properties of aorta and left atrium volume index (LAVI in hemodialyzed (HD patients. Methods Study group was consisted of 73 patients (age 51,6 ± 7,6 years treated by hemodialysis. In all patients standard echocardiography was performed. Aortic stiffness index (ASI was calculated using formula: ASI = log (SBP/DBP/[(Aomax-Aomin/Aomin]. LAVI was calculated according to the formula: LAVI = [π/6 x (LAmax x LAshort x LAlong]/m2. Additionally several indices were calculated: left ventricle mass (LVM, left ventricle mass index (LVMI, midwall fractional shortening (mFS, endsystolic stress (ESS, mFS/ESS. Additionally the laboratory parameters including lipidogram, troponin T (cTnT, NT-proBNP and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA were measured. Results The ASI was strong and significantly correlated with left atrium volume (LAV and LAVI (respectively: 0,601; p  Conclusions There is correlation between ASI and ADMA, marker of endothelium dysfunction. There is also association between LAVI and NT-proBNP, signs of elevated left atrium pressure. The strong correlation between ASI and LAVI, improved by associations of specific biochemical markers with these echocardiographic indices, suggests there is the link between elastic properties of aorta and left atrium pressure in hemodialysed patients mediated by endothelial dysfunction.

  19. Association between aerobic exercise training effects of serum adropin level, arterial stiffness, and adiposity in obese elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujie, Shumpei; Hasegawa, Natsuki; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Iemitsu, Motoyuki

    2017-01-01

    Serum levels of adropin, which enhances endothelial cell release of nitric oxide (NO), are lower in obese patients. Although habitual aerobic exercise reduces arterial stiffness and adiposity, the relationship between these effects and circulating levels of adropin remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine if serum adropin level is associated with the effects of aerobic exercise training on arterial stiffness and adiposity in obese adults. In Experiment 1, we examined whether serum adropin levels are associated with cardiorespiratory fitness, carotid β-stiffness, plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) level, and abdominal visceral fat in 27 normal, 20 overweight, and 25 obese adults (age, 41-79 years). In Experiment 2, we examined the effects of an 8-week aerobic exercise training program on the relationship between serum adropin level and arterial stiffness or adiposity in 13 obese adults (age, 54-76 years). Serum adropin levels in normal, overweight, and obese adults negatively correlated with carotid β-stiffness and abdominal visceral fat, and positively correlated with plasma NOx level and cardiorespiratory fitness. After the 8-week exercise program, serum adropin levels in obese adults were elevated, and correlated with training-induced changes in carotid β-stiffness (r = -0.573, P exercise training-induced increase in serum adropin may be related to the training effects of arterial stiffness and adiposity in obese adults.

  20. Serum ferritin levels are associated with arterial stiffness in healthy Korean adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ji Yoon; Kim, Min Kyung; Kang, Shinae; Nam, Ji Sun; Ahn, Chul Woo; Kim, Kyung Rae; Park, Jong Suk

    2016-08-01

    Although an association between serum ferritin and atherosclerosis has been suggested, limited epidemiologic data are available regarding the association between ferritin and arterial stiffness in healthy adults. A total of 2932 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Anthropometric and biochemical profiles including ferritin were measured. The arterial stiffness was measured using brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Serum ferritin levels were classified into quartiles and baPWV values gradually increased with each ferritin quartile. Multiple regression analysis showed that ferritin levels were independently correlated with baPWV. After adjusting for multiple risk factors, as compared with the lowest quartile, the odds ratios for high baPWV (>75(th) percentile) were 1.15 (0.84-1.56), 1.37 (0.97-1.73), and 1.46 (1.29-2.17) among men (p for trend ferritin, respectively. In conclusion, serum ferritin levels are independently associated with arterial stiffness in healthy Korean adults. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Plasma levels of cathepsins L, K, and V and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes S; Wang, Jing;

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin L (CatL), cathepsin K (CatK), and cathepsin V (CatV) are potent elastases implicated in human arterial wall remodeling. Whether plasma levels of these cathepsins are altered in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown.......Cathepsin L (CatL), cathepsin K (CatK), and cathepsin V (CatV) are potent elastases implicated in human arterial wall remodeling. Whether plasma levels of these cathepsins are altered in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown....

  2. Intrinsic Wave Propagation of Myocardial Stretch, A New Tool to Evaluate Myocardial Stiffness: A Pilot Study in Patients with Aortic Stenosis and Mitral Regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pislaru, Cristina; Alashry, Mahmoud M; Thaden, Jeremy J; Pellikka, Patricia A; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Pislaru, Sorin V

    2017-08-16

    Left ventricular (LV) filling following atrial contraction generates LV myocardial stretch that propagates from base to apex with a speed proportional to myocardial elasticity. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that intrinsic velocity propagation of myocardial stretch (iVP) would be altered in patients with valvular disease and chronic LV pressure overload or volume overload, which may adversely affect mechanical properties of the LV tissue. A second aim was to compare iVP with flow propagation velocity in the chamber. Sixty subjects were prospectively recruited: 20 with severe aortic stenosis (AS), 20 with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR), and 20 normal control subjects. LV iVP was measured using ultrahigh-frame rate tissue Doppler (350-460 frames/sec) and flow propagation velocity by color flow M-mode imaging. Follow-up data (up to 2 years) were retrieved from medical records. iVP was highest in patients with AS (2.2 ± 0.7 m/sec), intermediate in those with MR (1.6 ± 0.5 m/sec), and lowest in control subjects (1.4 ± 0.2 m/sec; P  1.8 m/sec. Overall, iVP correlated with age, LV morphology, severity of aortic valve obstruction, and measures of LV preload and afterload. At follow-up, patients with high iVP had lower survival free of major adverse cardiac events (P = .002). Flow propagation velocity was similar between groups and correlated poorly with iVP (r = 0.26, P = .10). A significant number of patients with severe AS and severe MR had rapid transmission of myocardial stretch, indicating increased myocardial stiffness. This information was not conveyed by measurement of flow propagation. Larger studies are needed to investigate the clinical utility of this novel measurement. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Angiotensin Receptor Blockades Effect on Peripheral Muscular and Central Aortic Arterial Stiffness: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials and Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chih-Hsuan; Lai, Yau-Huei; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Lee, Ping-Ying; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Yeh, Hung-I; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous clinical trials have demonstrated the impact of blocking upstream renin-angiotensin-axis with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) on arterial stiffness as evaluated by pulse-wave velocity (PWV). We ran a meta-analysis to evaluate the anti-stiffness effect of powerful downstream angiotensin receptor blockades (ARBs) on peripheral and central arterial stiffness (brachial to ankle, ba-PWV; carotid to femoral, cf-PWV, respectively), using a systematic review to assess the clinical arterial stiffness issues. Methods For our study, we searched the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases from inception to June 2013, targeting randomized controlled trials. ARBs along with other antihypertensive agents, ACEIs, calcium channel blockers (CCBs), beta-blockers and diuretics were evaluated to ascertain their comparable effect on ba-PWV and cf-PWV, respectively. A meta-analysis was conducted utilizing the fixed or random effect of the weighted mean change difference between the ARB and comparator groups, depending on the I2 statistic heterogeneity measurement. Results In 2 trials treating patients with ARBs (n = 30), the ARBs insignificantly reduced levels of ba-PWV (pooled mean change difference -188, 95% CI -687, 311, p = 0.24 with significant heterogeneity) as compared to other hypertensive agents (ACEIs and CCBs, n = 77). Interestingly, ARBs (n = 20) had a superior capacity to reduce levels of ba-PWV than CCBs (n = 20) in single study results (mean change difference -400, 95% CI -477, -322, p < 0.05). In 7 trials which included a total of 653 patients, treatment with ARBs (n = 308) also insignificantly reduced cf-PWV (pool mean change difference -0.197, 95% CI -0.54, 0.14, p = 0.218) as compared to other anti-hypertensive agents. Conclusions Our data suggested that ARBs had a similar effect as other anti-hypertensive agents in reducing ba-PWV and cf-PWV. Upon systematic review, the renin-angiotensin-axis system mechanism seems more significant

  4. Effects of Short-Term Exenatide Treatment on Regional Fat Distribution, Glycated Hemoglobin Levels, and Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity of Obese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Young Hong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMost type 2 diabetes mellitus patients are obese and have obesity related vascular complications. Exenatide treatment is well known for both decreasing glycated hemoglobin levels and reduction in body weight. So, this study aimed to determine the effects of exenatide on body composition, glycated hemoglobin levels, and vascular stiffness in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.MethodsFor 1 month, 32 obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients were administered 5 µg of exenatide twice daily. The dosage was then increased to 10 µg. Patients' height, body weight, glycated hemoglobin levels, lipid profile, pulse wave velocity (PWV, body mass index, fat mass, and muscle mass were measured by using Inbody at baseline and after 3 months of treatment.ResultsAfter 3 months of treatment, glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly (P=0.007. Triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein levels decreased, while aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were no change. Body weight, and fat mass decreased significantly (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively, while interestingly, muscle mass did not decrease (P=0.289. In addition to, Waist-to-hip ratio and aortic PWV decreased significantly (P=0.006 and P=0.001, respectively.ConclusionEffects of short term exenatide use in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus with cardiometabolic high risk patients not only reduced body weight without muscle mass loss, body fat mass, and glycated hemoglobin levels but also improved aortic PWV in accordance with waist to hip ratio.

  5. MOESM3 of Beyond type 2 diabetes, obesity and hypertension: an axis including sleep apnea, left ventricular hypertrophy, endothelial dysfunction, and aortic stiffness among Mexican Americans in Starr County, Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Hanis, Craig; Redline, Susan; Cade, Brian; Bell, Graeme; Cox, Nancy; Below, Jennifer; Brown, Eric; Aguilar, David

    2016-01-01

    Additional file 3: Figure S2. The impact of prediabetes on obesity, hypertension, aortic stiffness, left ventricular hypertrophy (moderate plus severe indexed by height2.7), impaired endothelial function and sleep apnea (moderate plus severe) among Mexican American women (2a) and men (2b) in Starr County, Texas. Prediabetes based on fasting blood glucose (100–125 mg/dl) or 2-h post-load glucose (140–199 mg/dl) or HbA1c (5.7–6.4 %). P values are those obtained from Chi square statistics (or Fi...

  6. Data on the circulating levels of endothelial microparticles are elevated in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and are related to aortic dilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Alegret

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data included here support the research article “Circulating endothelial microparticles are elevated in bicuspid aortic valve (BAV disease and related to aortic dilation” (Alegret et al., 2016 [1] where circulating levels of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM+ endothelial microparticles (EMPs were identified as a biological variable related to aortic dilation in patients with BAV disease. The data presented in this article are composed by four tables and one figure containing the clinical and echocardiographic characteristics of the patients (Alegret et al., 2016 [1] included in this study, and summarize the results of multivariate linear analyses. Furthermore, is also included a figure showing a representative flow cytometry dot plots and histograms used in PECAM+ EMPs quantification is also included.

  7. Through-Plane Movement at Multiple Aortic Levels on Dynamic Computed Tomography Angiography Is Limited in Patients With an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Jeroen C; Zandvoort, Herman J A; Vonken, Evert-Jan P A; Moll, Frans L; van Herwaarden, JA

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze the movement of the aorta in the craniocaudal direction (through-plane movement) during the cardiac cycle at several levels to determine any potential impact on endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). METHODS: For this study, 30 patients (median ag

  8. Aerobic exercise training increases plasma Klotho levels and reduces arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Tomoko; Miyaki, Asako; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Choi, Youngju; Ra, Song-Gyu; Tanahashi, Koichiro; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Oikawa, Satoshi; Maeda, Seiji

    2014-02-01

    The Klotho gene is a suppressor of the aging phenomena, and the secretion as well as the circulation of Klotho proteins decrease with aging. Although habitual exercise has antiaging effects (e.g., a decrease in arterial stiffness), the relationship between Klotho and habitual exercise remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect of habitual exercise on Klotho, with a particular focus on arterial stiffness. First, we examined the correlation between plasma Klotho concentration and arterial stiffness (carotid artery compliance and β-stiffness index) or aerobic exercise capacity [oxygen uptake at ventilatory threshold (VT)] in 69 healthy, postmenopausal women (50-76 years old) by conducting a cross-sectional study. Second, we tested the effects of aerobic exercise training on plasma Klotho concentrations and arterial stiffness. A total of 19 healthy, postmenopausal women (50-76 years old) were divided into two groups: control group and exercise group. The exercise group completed 12 wk of moderate aerobic exercise training. In the cross-sectional study, plasma Klotho concentrations positively correlated with carotid artery compliance and VT and negatively correlated with the β-stiffness index. In the interventional study, aerobic exercise training increased plasma Klotho concentrations and carotid artery compliance and decreased the β-stiffness index. Moreover, the changes in plasma Klotho concentration and arterial stiffness were found to be correlated. These results suggest a possible role for secreted Klotho in the exercise-induced modulation of arterial stiffness.

  9. Leg and Joint Stiffness in Children with Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy during Level Walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ming Wang

    Full Text Available Individual joint deviations are often identified in the analysis of cerebral palsy (CP gait. However, knowledge is limited as to how these deviations affect the control of the locomotor system as a whole when striving to meet the demands of walking. The current study aimed to bridge the gap by describing the control of the locomotor system in children with diplegic CP in terms of their leg stiffness, both skeletal and muscular components, and associated joint stiffness during gait. Twelve children with spastic diplegia CP and 12 healthy controls walked at a self-selected pace in a gait laboratory while their kinematic and forceplate data were measured and analyzed during loading response, mid-stance, terminal stance and pre-swing. For calculating the leg stiffness, each of the lower limbs was modeled as a non-linear spring, connecting the hip joint center and the corresponding center of pressure, with varying stiffness that was calculated as the slope (gradient of the axial force vs. the deformation curve. The leg stiffness was further decomposed into skeletal and muscular components considering the alignment of the lower limb. The ankle, knee and hip of the limb were modeled as revolute joints with torsional springs whose stiffness was calculated as the slope of the moment vs. the angle curve of the joint. Independent t-tests were performed for between-group comparisons of all the variables. The CP group significantly decreased the leg stiffness but increased the joint stiffness during stance phase, except during terminal stance where the leg stiffness was increased. They appeared to rely more on muscular contributions to achieve the required leg stiffness, increasing the muscular demands in maintaining the body posture against collapse. Leg stiffness plays a critical role in modulating the kinematics and kinetics of the locomotor system during gait in the diplegic CP.

  10. Aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aortic aneurysm - dissecting; Chest pain - aortic dissection; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - dissection ... the chest and abdomen (the descending aorta). Aortic dissection most often happens because of a tear or ...

  11. Association of circulating omentin-1 level with arterial stiffness and carotid plaque in type 2 diabetes

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    Yoo Hye

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipokines contribute directly to the atherosclerotic process, connecting metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes to cardiovascular disease. Omentin-1 is a recently discovered novel adipokine, so data about the relationship of this adipokine to vascular health in type 2 diabetes is limited. Methods We enrolled 60 people with type 2 diabetes, with or without carotid plaque, and 30 participants with normal glucose tolerance. We measured serum omentin-1, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP levels, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, as well as other cardiovascular risk factors. Vascular health was assessed by brachial ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT. Results Serum omentin-1 levels were significantly decreased in type 2 diabetes patients compared to normal glucose controls and was further reduced in type 2 diabetes patients with carotid plaque compared to those without carotid plaque. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that age, systolic blood pressure, history of use of statins, angiotensin receptor blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and serum omentin-1 level were independent factors determining baPWV in people with type 2 diabetes (r2 = 0.637. Furthermore, in multivariate logistic regression analysis, circulating omentin-1 level was an independent decisive factor for the presence of carotid plaque in type 2 diabetes patients, even after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and history of smoking and medication (odds ratio, 0.621; 95% confidence interval, 0.420-0.919; P = 0.017. Conclusions Circulating omentin-1 level was independently correlated with arterial stiffness and carotid plaque in type 2 diabetes, even after adjusting for other cardiovascular risk factors and detailed medication history.

  12. Prognostic value of aortic stiffness and calcification for cardiovascular events and mortality in dialysis patients: outcome of the calcification outcome in renal disease (CORD) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Francis; Van Biesen, Wim; Honkanen, Eero;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Radiographic calcification and arterial stiffness each individually are predictive of outcome in dialysis patients. However, it is unknown whether combined assessment of these intermediate endpoints also provides additional predictive value. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANT...

  13. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in aortic stiffening with age: the role of smooth muscle cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: Age-related aortic stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Although oxidative stress is implicated in aortic stiffness, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unelucidated. Here, we examined the source of oxidative stress in aging and i...

  14. Retrograde coronary sinus versus aortic root perfusion with cold cardioplegia: randomized study of levels of cardiac enzymes in 40 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiraudon, G.M.; Campbell, C.S.; McLellan, D.G.; Kostuk, W.J.; Purves, P.D.; MacDonald, J.L.; Cleland, A.G.; Tadros, N.B.

    1986-11-01

    Myocardial injury was assessed with the use of enzyme indexes in 40 patients randomly assigned to one of two groups undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Twenty patients received cold cardioplegia delivered by retrograde coronary sinus perfusion and 20 received cardioplegic solution by anterograde aortic root perfusion. Creatine kinase isoenzyme MB and lactate dehydrogenese isoenzyme 1 and isoenzyme 2 assays were carried out on blood samples obtained from the coronary sinus before aortic cross-clamping and 0, 5, and 30 min after aortic unclamping. Levels of these enzymes were also obtained from venous blood samples before aortic cross-clamping and 3, 8, 14, and 20 hr after aortic unclamping and 2, 3, 4, and 5 days after surgery. Preoperative and postoperative hemodynamic measurements (Swan-Ganz catheter) and radionuclide wall motion studies were also obtained for comparison. There was no overall significant difference between the two groups postoperatively in terms of enzyme indexes, hemodynamic measurements, or results of wall motion studies. We conclude that retrograde coronary sinus perfusion is an alternative to aortic root perfusion in delivering cold cardioplegia. More studies are required to determine which subgroup of patients with coronary artery disease may benefit from retrograde coronary perfusion.

  15. From tissue iron retention to low systemic haemoglobin levels, new pathophysiological biomarkers of human abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Pinna, R; Lindholt, J S; Madrigal-Matute, J; Blanco-Colio, L M; Esteban-Salan, M; Torres-Fonseca, M M; Lefebvre, T; Delbosc, S; Laustsen, J; Driss, F; Vega de Ceniga, M; Gouya, L; Weiss, G; Egido, J; Meilhac, O; Michel, J-B; Martin-Ventura, J

    2014-07-03

    Iron deposits are observed in tissue of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients, although the underlying mechanisms are not completely elucidated. Therefore we explored circulating markers of iron metabolism in AAA patients, and tested if they could serve as biomarkers of AAA. Increased red blood cell (RBC)-borne iron retention and transferrin, transferrin receptor and ferritin expression was observed in AAA tissue compared to control aorta (immunohistochemistry and western blot). In contrast, decreased circulating iron, transferrin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and haemoglobin concentration, along with circulating RBC count, were observed in AAA patients (aortic diameter >3 cm, n=114) compared to controls (aortic diameter aortic diameter in AAA patients. The association of low haemoglobin with AAA presence or aortic diameter was independent of specific risk factors. Moreover, MCHC negatively correlated with thrombus area in another cohort of AAA patients (aortic diameter 3-5 cm, n=357). We found that anaemia was significantly more prevalent in AAA patients (aortic diameter >5 cm, n=8,912) compared to those in patients with atherosclerotic aorto-iliac occlusive disease (n=17,737) [adjusted odds ratio=1.77 (95% confidence interval: 1.61;1.93)]. Finally, the mortality risk among AAA patients with anaemia was increased by almost 30% [adjusted hazard ratio: 1.29 (95% confidence interval: 1.16;1.44)] as compared to AAA subjects without anaemia. In conclusion, local iron retention and altered iron recycling associated to high hepcidin and low transferrin systemic concentrations could lead to reduced circulating haemoglobin levels in AAA patients. Low haemoglobin levels are independently associated to AAA presence and clinical outcome.

  16. Leukotriene B4 levels in human atherosclerotic plaques and abdominal aortic aneurysms.

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    Pleunie van den Borne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leukotriene B4 (LTB4 has been associated with the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA formation. However, associations of LTB4 levels with tissue characteristics and adverse clinical outcome of advanced atherosclerosis and AAA are scarcely studied. We hypothesized that LTB4 levels are associated with a vulnerable plaque phenotype and adverse clinical outcome. Furthermore, that LTB4 levels are associated with inflammatory AAA and adverse clinical outcome. METHODS: Atherosclerotic plaques and AAA specimens were selected from two independent databases for LTB4 measurements. Plaques were isolated during carotid endarterectomy from asymptomatic (n = 58 or symptomatic (n = 317 patients, classified prior to surgery. LTB4 levels were measured without prior lipid extraction and levels were corrected for protein content. LTB4 levels were related to plaque phenotype, baseline patient characteristics and clinical outcome within three years following surgery. Seven non-diseased mammary artery specimens served as controls. AAA specimens were isolated during open repair, classified as elective (n = 189, symptomatic (n = 29 or ruptured (n = 23. LTB4 levels were measured similar to the plaque measurements and were related to tissue characteristics, baseline patient characteristics and clinical outcome. Twenty-six non-diseased aortic specimens served as controls. RESULTS: LTB4 levels corrected for protein content were not significantly associated with histological characteristics specific for vulnerable plaques or inflammatory AAA as well as clinical presentation. Moreover, it could not predict secondary manifestations independently investigated in both databases. However, LTB4 levels were significantly lower in controls compared to plaque (p = 0.025 or AAA (p = 0.017. CONCLUSIONS: LTB4 levels were not associated with a vulnerable plaque phenotype or inflammatory AAA or clinical

  17. From tissue iron retention to low systemic haemoglobin levels, new pathophysiological biomarkers of human abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Pinna, Roxanna; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Madrigal-Matute, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Iron deposits are observed in tissue of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients, although the underlying mechanisms are not completely elucidated. Therefore we explored circulating markers of iron metabolism in AAA patients, and tested if they could serve as biomarkers of AAA. Increased red blood...... cell (RBC)-borne iron retention and transferrin, transferrin receptor and ferritin expression was observed in AAA tissue compared to control aorta (immunohistochemistry and western blot). In contrast, decreased circulating iron, transferrin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC......) and haemoglobin concentration, along with circulating RBC count, were observed in AAA patients (aortic diameter >3 cm, n=114) compared to controls (aortic diameter AAA subjects (MS/MS assay). Moreover, iron, transferrin and haemoglobin levels...

  18. Arterial Stiffness and Pulse Wave Reflection in Young Adult Heterozygous Sickle Cell Carriers

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    Tünzale Bayramoğlu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pulse wave velocity (PWV and aortic augmentation index (AI are indicators of arterial stiffness. Pulse wave reflection and arterial stiffness are related to cardiovascular events and sickle cell disease. However, the effect of these parameters on the heterozygous sickle cell trait (HbAS is unknown. The aim of this study is to evaluate the arterial stiffness and wave reflection in young adult heterozygous sickle cell carriers. METHODS: We enrolled 40 volunteers (20 HbAS cases, 20 hemoglobin AA [HbAA] cases aged between 18 and 40 years. AI and PWV values were measured by arteriography. RESULTS: Aortic blood pressure, aortic AI, and brachial AI values were significantly higher in HbAS cases compared to the control group (HbAA (p=0.033, 0.011, and 0.011, respectively. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between aortic pulse wave velocity and mean arterial pressure, age, aortic AI, brachial AI, weight, and low-density lipoprotein levels (p=0.000, 0.017, 0.000, 0.000, 0.034, and 0.05, respectively in the whole study population. Aortic AI and age were also significantly correlated (p=0.026. In addition, a positive correlation between aortic PWV and systolic blood pressure and a positive correlation between aortic AI and mean arterial pressure (p=0.027 and 0.009, respectively were found in HbAS individuals. Our study reveals that mean arterial pressure and heart rate are independent determinants for the aortic AI. Mean arterial pressure and age are independent determinants for aortic PWV. CONCLUSION: Arterial stiffness measurement is an easy, cheap, and reliable method in the early diagnosis of cardiovascular disease in heterozygous sickle cell carriers. These results may depend on the amount of hemoglobin S in red blood cells. Further studies are required to investigate the blood pressure changes and its effects on arterial stiffness in order to explain the vascular aging mechanism in the HbAS trait population.

  19. Increased levels of thioredoxin in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). A potential link of oxidative stress with AAA evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Pinna, R; Lindholt, Jes S.; Blanco-Colio, L M

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a main mechanism involved in vascular pathologies. Increased thioredoxin (TRX) levels have been observed in several oxidative stress-associated cardiovascular diseases. We aim to test the potential role of TRX as a biomarker of oxidative stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)....

  20. Aortic insufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Aortic insufficiency is a heart valve disease in which the aortic valve does not close ... aortic insufficiency Images Aortic insufficiency References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  1. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries’ Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria García-Espinosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries’ stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4–15 years, 92 females were assigned to normal weight (NW, n=137 or obesity (OB, n=84 groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4–8; 8–12; 12–15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus, BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children.

  2. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4–15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4–8; 8–12; 12–15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children. PMID:27066273

  3. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  4. Aerobic exercise training-induced changes in serum adropin level are associated with reduced arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujie, Shumpei; Hasegawa, Natsuki; Sato, Koji; Fujita, Satoshi; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Iemitsu, Motoyuki

    2015-11-15

    Aging-induced arterial stiffening is reduced by aerobic exercise training, and elevated production of nitric oxide (NO) participates in this effect. Adropin is a regulator of endothelial NO synthase and NO release, and circulating adropin level decreases with age. However, the effect of habitual aerobic exercise on circulating adropin levels in healthy middle-aged and older adults remains unclear. We sought to determine whether serum adropin level is associated with exercise training-induced changes in arterial stiffness. First, in a cross-sectional study, we investigated the association between serum adropin level and both arterial stiffness and cardiorespiratory fitness in 80 healthy middle-aged and older subjects (65.6 ± 0.9 yr). Second, in an intervention study, we examined the effects of 8-wk aerobic exercise training on serum adropin level and arterial stiffness in 40 healthy middle-aged and older subjects (67.3 ± 1.0 yr) divided into two groups: aerobic exercise training and sedentary controls. In the cross-sectional study, serum adropin level was negatively correlated with carotid β-stiffness (r = -0.437, P aerobic exercise training intervention, and training-induced changes in serum adropin level were correlated with training-induced changes in carotid β-stiffness (r = -0.399, P exercise-induced reduction of arterial stiffness.

  5. Changes in Central Aortic Pressure Levels, Wave Components and Determinants Associated with High Peripheral Blood Pressure States in Childhood: Analysis of Hypertensive Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Marotta, Marco; Castro, Juan M; Arana, Maite; Peluso, Gonzalo; Chiesa, Pedro; Giachetto, Gustavo; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina

    2016-10-01

    The aims were to determine whether children's high peripheral blood pressure states (HBP) are associated with increased central aortic blood pressure (BP) and to characterize hemodynamic and vascular changes associated with HBP in terms of changes in cardiac output (stroke volume, SV), arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity, PWV), peripheral vascular resistances (PVR) and net and relative contributions of reflected waves to the aortic pulse amplitude. We included 154 subjects (mean age 11; range 4-16 years) assigned to one of two groups: normal peripheral BP (NBP, n = 101), defined as systolic and diastolic BP wave-derived parameters (augmentation index, forward and backward wave components' amplitude) were measured using gold-standard techniques, applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor) and oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph). Independent of the presence of dyslipidemia and/or obesity, aortic systolic and pulse BP were higher in HBP than in NBP children. The increase in central BP could not be explained by an increase in the relative contribution of reflections to the aortic pressure wave, higher PVR or by an augmented peripheral reflection coefficient. Instead, the rise in central BP would be explained by an increase in the amplitude of both incident and reflected wave components.

  6. ApoA-I/HDL-C levels are inversely associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burillo, Elena; Lindholt, Jes S.; Molina-Sánchez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) evolution is unpredictable, and there is no therapy except surgery for patients with an aortic size> 5 cm (large AAA). We aimed to identify new potential biomarkers that could facilitate prognosis and treatment of patients with AAA. A differential quantitative...... a negative correlation with aortic size (r=-0.4, paneurysmal growth rate in multiple linear regression analysis (n=122, p=0...... proteomic analysis of plasma proteins was performed in AAA patients at different stages of evolution [small AAA (aortic size=3-5 cm) vs large AAA] using iTRAQ labelling, high-throughput nano-LC-MS/MS and a novel multi-layered statistical model. Among the proteins identified, ApoA-I was decreased in patients...

  7. Novel biaxial tensile test for studying aortic failure phenomena at a microscopic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Shukei; Matsumoto, Takeo

    2013-01-11

    An aortic aneurysm is a local dilation of the aorta, which tends to expand and often results in a fatal rupture. Although larger aneurysms have a greater risk of rupture, some small aneurysms also rupture. Since the mechanism of aortic rupture is not well understood, clarification of the microstructure influencing the failure to rupture is important. Since aortic tissues are stretched biaxially in vivo, we developed a technique to microscopically observe the failure of an aortic rupture during biaxial stretch. A thinly sliced porcine thoracic aortic specimen was adhered to a circular frame and pushed onto a cylinder with a smaller diameter to stretch the specimen biaxially. To induce failure to rupture at the center, the specimen was thinned at the center of the hole as follows: the specimen was frozen while being compressed with metal plates having holes, which were 3 mm in diameter at their centers; the specimen was then sliced at 50-μm intervals and thawed. The ratio of the thickness at the center to the peripheral area was 99.5% for uncompressed specimens. The ratio decreased with an increase in the compression ratio εc and was 47.3% for specimens with εc = 40%. All specimens could be stretched until failure to rupture. The probability for crack initiation within the cylinder was 30%, respectively. Among specimens ruptured within the cylinder, 93% of those obtained from the mid-media showed crack initiation at the thin center area. Aortic tissues were successfully stretched biaxially until failure, and their crack initiation points were successfully observed under a microscope. This could be a very useful and powerful method for clarifying the mechanism of aortic rupture. We are planning to use this technique for a detailed investigation of events occurring at the point of failure when the crack initiates in the aortic aneurysm wall.

  8. Novel biaxial tensile test for studying aortic failure phenomena at a microscopic level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugita Shukei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An aortic aneurysm is a local dilation of the aorta, which tends to expand and often results in a fatal rupture. Although larger aneurysms have a greater risk of rupture, some small aneurysms also rupture. Since the mechanism of aortic rupture is not well understood, clarification of the microstructure influencing the failure to rupture is important. Since aortic tissues are stretched biaxially in vivo, we developed a technique to microscopically observe the failure of an aortic rupture during biaxial stretch. Methods A thinly sliced porcine thoracic aortic specimen was adhered to a circular frame and pushed onto a cylinder with a smaller diameter to stretch the specimen biaxially. To induce failure to rupture at the center, the specimen was thinned at the center of the hole as follows: the specimen was frozen while being compressed with metal plates having holes, which were 3 mm in diameter at their centers; the specimen was then sliced at 50-μm intervals and thawed. Results The ratio of the thickness at the center to the peripheral area was 99.5% for uncompressed specimens. The ratio decreased with an increase in the compression ratio εc and was 47.3% for specimens with εc = 40%. All specimens could be stretched until failure to rupture. The probability for crack initiation within the cylinder was εc εc >30%, respectively. Among specimens ruptured within the cylinder, 93% of those obtained from the mid-media showed crack initiation at the thin center area. Conclusions Aortic tissues were successfully stretched biaxially until failure, and their crack initiation points were successfully observed under a microscope. This could be a very useful and powerful method for clarifying the mechanism of aortic rupture. We are planning to use this technique for a detailed investigation of events occurring at the point of failure when the crack initiates in the aortic aneurysm wall.

  9. Circulating level of miR-378 predicts left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxiu Chen

    Full Text Available Excessively high left ventricle mass is an independent predictor of adverse prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRs play crucial roles in the regulation of left ventricle hypertrophy (LVH. However, few circulating miRs have been established as predictors of LVH in aortic stenosis (AS patients. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether circulating levels of miR-1, miR-133, and miR-378 predict LVH in patients with AS.One-hundred twelve patients with moderate to severe AS and 40 healthy controls were included in the study. Levels of miR-1, miR-133, and miR-378 in the plasma were measured by qPCR. Compared with healthy controls, AS patients had significantly lower circulating levels of miR-1, miR-133, and miR-378. AS patients with LVH had significantly lower miR-378 but not miR-1 and miR-133 compared with those without LVH. Linear regression analysis showed circulating miR-378 had strong correlation with left ventricular mass index (r = 0.283, p = 0.002 and logistic regression showed that lower miR-378 was an independent predictor for LVH in patients with AS (p = 0.037, OR 4.110, 95% CI 1.086 to 15.558.Circulating levels of miR-1, miR-133 and miR-378 were decreased in AS patients, and miR-378 predicts LVH independent of the pressure gradient. Further prospective investigations are needed to elucidate whether these circulating miRs affect clinical outcome.

  10. Elevated expression levels of lysyl oxidases protect against aortic aneurysm progression in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busnadiego, O; Gorbenko Del Blanco, D; González-Santamaría, J; Habashi, J P; Calderon, J F; Sandoval, P; Bedja, D; Guinea-Viniegra, J; Lopez-Cabrera, M; Rosell-Garcia, T; Snabel, J M; Hanemaaijer, R; Forteza, A; Dietz, H C; Egea, G; Rodriguez-Pascual, F

    2015-08-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) are at high risk of life-threatening aortic dissections. The condition is caused by mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1, an essential component in the formation of elastic fibers. While experimental findings in animal models of the disease have shown the involvement of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)- and angiotensin II-dependent pathways, alterations in the vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) may also play a role in the onset and progression of the aortic disease. Lysyl oxidases (LOX) are extracellular enzymes, which initiates the formation of covalent cross-linking of collagens and elastin, thereby contributing to the maturation of the ECM. Here we have explored the role of LOX in the formation of aortic aneurysms in MFS. We show that aortic tissue from MFS patients and MFS mouse model (Fbn1(C1039G/+)) displayed enhanced expression of the members of the LOX family, LOX and LOX-like 1 (LOXL1), and this is associated with the formation of mature collagen fibers. Administration of a LOX inhibitor for 8weeks blocked collagen accumulation and aggravated elastic fiber impairment, and these effects correlated with the induction of a strong and rapidly progressing aortic dilatation, and with premature death in the more severe MFS mouse model, Fbn1(mgR/mgR), without any significant effect on wild type animals. This detrimental effect occurred preferentially in the ascending portion of the aorta, with little or no involvement of the aortic root, and was associated to an overactivation of both canonical and non-canonical TGF-β signaling pathways. The blockade of angiotensin II type I receptor with losartan restored TGF-β signaling activation, normalized elastic fiber impairment and prevented the aortic dilatation induced by LOX inhibition in Fbn1(C1039G/+) mice. Our data indicate that LOX enzymes and LOX-mediated collagen accumulation play a critical protective role in aneurysm formation in MFS.

  11. Aortic Valve Stenosis and Atrial Fibrillation Influence Plasma Fibulin-1 Levels in Patients Treated with Coronary Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria Lyck; Dahl, Jordi S; Argraves, W Scott;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Aortic valve stenosis (AS) causes cardiac fibrosis and left ventricular hypertrophy, and over time heart failure can occur. To date, a reliable marker to predict progression of AS or the development of heart failure is still lacking. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis that fib......Objectives: Aortic valve stenosis (AS) causes cardiac fibrosis and left ventricular hypertrophy, and over time heart failure can occur. To date, a reliable marker to predict progression of AS or the development of heart failure is still lacking. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis...... that fibulin-1 levels reflect myocardial fibrosis. Methods: Patients undergoing heart surgery at the Odense University were investigated. By 2012 data on outcome were obtained. Results: In 293 patients, plasma fibulin-1 levels were measured. Patients with AS or atrial fibrillation (AF) had significantly higher...

  12. Arterial Stiffness and Dialysis Calcium Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Mac-Way

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness is the major determinant of isolated systolic hypertension and increased pulse pressure. Aortic stiffness is also associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease, hypertension, and general population. Hemodynamically, arterial stiffness results in earlier aortic pulse wave reflection leading to increased cardiac workload and decreased myocardial perfusion. Although the clinical consequence of aortic stiffness has been clearly established, its pathophysiology in various clinical conditions still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present paper is to review the studies that have looked at the impact of dialysis calcium concentration on arterial stiffness. Overall, the results of small short-term studies suggest that higher dialysis calcium is associated with a transient but significant increase in arterial stiffness. This calcium dependant increase in arterial stiffness is potentially explained by increased vascular smooth muscle tone of the conduit arteries and is not solely explained by changes in mean blood pressure. However, the optimal DCa remains to be determined, and long term studies are required to evaluate its impact on the progression of arterial stiffness.

  13. Evaluation of arterial stiffness with plasma GGT levels and pulse wave velocity measurement in patients with FMF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Filiz; Ulu, Sena; Akcı, Önder; Ahsen, Ahmet; Demir, Kasım; Yüksel, Şeref

    2014-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a non-invasive technique used to evaluate the arterial elasticity, which is an early indicator of atherosclerosis. Lately, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) is considered a determiner of arterial stiffness (AS). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between GGT levels and AS with PWV in patients with Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). The study was conducted with 60 patients with FMF and 40 controls. Genetic analysis of the patients were performed. AS was assessed by PWV and, after the measurement of PWV, the presence of AS was determined. Mean PWV values and AS frequency were significantly higher in patients with FMF compared with the control group (pFMF patients were higher than in the control group but the difference was not statistically different. In the correlation analysis, PWV and AS were positively correlated with FMF (r=0349, pFMF duration and FMF were associated with GGT (r=0.300, p=0.02; r=0199, p=0.047, respectively). Increased PWV values in FMF patients may indicate arterial stiffness. These patients may be followed closely with PWV as an early indicator of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the cardiovascular risk can be determined in the early stages of disease and it may be possible to take necessary precautions.

  14. 中心动脉脉压是影响大动脉僵硬度的主要因素%Central pulse pressure but not brachial blood pressure is the predominant factor affecting aortic arterial stiffness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖文凯; 叶平; 白永怿; 骆雷鸣; 吴红梅; 高鹏

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察高血压患者及血压正常人群中心动脉血流动力学差异;探讨哪种血压指标与动脉僵硬度及血管损害标志物更密切相关。方法从北京地区社区人群中筛选出820名高血压患者,同时入选820名与之年龄、性别相匹配的血压正常者。采用脉搏波传播速度(PWV)自动测量系统测定颈-股动脉PWV和颈-桡动脉PWV;应用张力测量法测量中心动脉压和中心动脉脉搏波增强指数(AIx)。同时血浆同型半胱氨酸(HCY),高敏C反应蛋白(HsCRP)及N末端脑利钠肽前体(NT-proBNP)被测定。结果无论是高血压患者还是血压正常人群,中心动脉收缩压和脉压显著低于相应的肱动脉收缩压和脉压,这种脉压扩增在血压正常组9.85±6.55 mmHg明显低于高血压组12.64±6.69 mmHg,但在脉压扩增比上两组未见差异。大动脉僵硬度受血压及年龄的影响,高血压组具有较高的颈股动脉PWV和中心动脉AIx,脉压扩增比随年龄的增长而递减。单因素分析见中心脉压相对其它血压指标与动脉僵硬度和血管损害标志物的相关性更强;多元逐步回归分析显示颈股动脉PWV和中心动脉AIx受中心脉压的独立影响而外周平均动脉压及脉压未进入回归方程。结论中心动脉脉压相对其它血压指标可能是中心动脉僵硬度更直接的指示器和更好的血管老化的标志,未来的临床试验中可能更多地将中心动脉压作为治疗的靶目标值。%Objective To investigate the differences in central hemodynamic indices between hypertensive and normotensive subjects and identify the blood pressure index that the most strongly correlate with arterial stiffness and vascular damage markers. Methods A cohort of 820 hypertensive patients and 820 normotensive individuals matched for age and gender were enrolled in this study. We measured carotid-femoral and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV), aortic

  15. Elevated expression levels of lysyl oxidases protect against aortic aneurysm progression in Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busnadiego, O.; Gorbenko del Blanco, D.; González-Santamaría, J.; Habashi, J.P.; Calderon, J.F.; Sandoval, P.; Bedja, D.; Guinea-Viniegra, J.; Lopez-Cabrera, M.; Rosell-Garcia, T.; Snabel, J.M.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Forteza, A.; Dietz, H.C.; Egea, G.; Rodriguez-Pascual, F.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) are at high risk of life-threatening aortic dissections. The condition is caused by mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1, an essential component in the formation of elastic fibers. While experimental findings in animal models of the disease have shown the in

  16. Systemic levels of cotinine and elastase, but not pulmonary function, are associated with the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Jørgensen, B; Klitgaard, N A

    2003-01-01

    to study whether smoking and impaired pulmonary function are associated with the expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA).......to study whether smoking and impaired pulmonary function are associated with the expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)....

  17. Combining dynamic stretch and tunable stiffness to probe cell mechanobiology in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Throm Quinlan

    Full Text Available Cells have the ability to actively sense their mechanical environment and respond to both substrate stiffness and stretch by altering their adhesion, proliferation, locomotion, morphology, and synthetic profile. In order to elucidate the interrelated effects of different mechanical stimuli on cell phenotype in vitro, we have developed a method for culturing mammalian cells in a two-dimensional environment at a wide range of combined levels of substrate stiffness and dynamic stretch. Polyacrylamide gels were covalently bonded to flexible silicone culture plates and coated with monomeric collagen for cell adhesion. Substrate stiffness was adjusted from relatively soft (G' = 0.3 kPa to stiff (G' = 50 kPa by altering the ratio of acrylamide to bis-acrylamide, and the silicone membranes were stretched over circular loading posts by applying vacuum pressure to impart near-uniform stretch, as confirmed by strain field analysis. As a demonstration of the system, porcine aortic valve interstitial cells (VIC and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC were plated on soft and stiff substrates either statically cultured or exposed to 10% equibiaxial or pure uniaxial stretch at 1 Hz for 6 hours. In all cases, cell attachment and cell viability were high. On soft substrates, VICs cultured statically exhibit a small rounded morphology, significantly smaller than on stiff substrates (p<0.05. Following equibiaxial cyclic stretch, VICs spread to the extent of cells cultured on stiff substrates, but did not reorient in response to uniaxial stretch to the extent of cells stretched on stiff substrates. hMSCs exhibited a less pronounced response than VICs, likely due to a lower stiffness threshold for spreading on static gels. These preliminary data demonstrate that inhibition of spreading due to a lack of matrix stiffness surrounding a cell may be overcome by externally applied stretch suggesting similar mechanotransduction mechanisms for sensing stiffness and

  18. Molecular-level characterization of elastin-like constructs and human aortic elastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Andrea; Schräder, Christoph U; Baud, Stéphanie; Keeley, Fred W; Mithieux, Suzanne M; Weiss, Anthony S; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Schmelzer, Christian E H

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to characterize the structures of two elastin-like constructs, one composed of a cross-linked elastin-like polypeptide and the other one of cross-linked tropoelastin, and native aortic elastin. The structures of the insoluble materials and human aortic elastin were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, all samples were digested with enzymes of different specificities, and the resultant peptide mixtures were characterized by ESI mass spectrometry and MALDI mass spectrometry. The MS(2) data was used to sequence linear peptides, and cross-linked species were analyzed with the recently developed software PolyLinX. This enabled the identification of two intramolecularly cross-linked peptides containing allysine aldols in the two constructs. The presence of the tetrafunctional cross-link desmosine was shown for all analyzed materials and its quantification revealed that the cross-linking degree of the two in vitro cross-linked materials was significantly lower than that of native elastin. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed, based on molecular species identified in the samples, to follow the formation of elastin cross-links. The results provide evidence for the significance of the GVGTP hinge region of domain 23 for the formation of elastin cross-links. Overall, this work provides important insight into structural similarities and differences between elastin-like constructs and native elastin. Furthermore, it represents a step toward the elucidation of the complex cross-linking pattern of mature elastin. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Acute effects of aerobic exercise intensity on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Hashimoto, Yuto; Hatakeyama, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Takanobu

    2016-10-18

    Arterial stiffness increases after glucose ingestion. Acute low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise decreases arterial stiffness. However, the acute effects of 30 min of cycling at low- and moderate-intensity [25% (LE trial) and 65% (ME trial) peak oxygen uptake, respectively] on arterial stiffness at 30, 60 and 120 min of a postexercise glucose ingestion. Ten healthy young men (age, 22·4 ± 0·5 years) performed LE and ME trials on separate days in a randomized controlled crossover fashion. Carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity (PWV), femoral-ankle (leg) PWV, carotid augmentation index (AIx) and carotid blood pressure (BP) (applanation tonometry), brachial and ankle BP (oscillometric device), heart rate (HR) (electrocardiography), blood glucose (UV-hexokinase method) and blood insulin (CLEIA method) levels were measured at before (baseline) and at 30, 60 and 120 min after the 75-g OGTT. Leg PWV, ankle pulse pressure and BG levels significantly increased from baseline after the 75-g OGTT in the LE trial (P<0·05), but not in the ME trial. Insulin levels and HR significantly increased from baseline after the 75-g OGTT in both trials (P<0·05). Aortic PWV, carotid AIx, brachial BP and carotid BP did not change from baseline after the 75-g OGTT in both trials. The present findings indicate that aerobic exercise at moderate intensity before glucose ingestion suppresses increases leg arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion.

  20. Reference values for local arterial stiffness. Part B : femoral artery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossuyt, Jelle; Engelen, Lian; Ferreira, Isabel; Stehouwer, Coen D; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Laurent, Stéphane; Segers, Patrick; Reesink, Koen; Van Bortel, Luc M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered the gold standard measure of arterial stiffness, representing mainly aortic stiffness. As compared with the elastic carotid and aorta, the more muscular femoral artery may be differently associated with cardiovascular risk factors (C

  1. Association between one-hour post-load plasma glucose levels and vascular stiffness in essential hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Sciacqua

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Pulse wave velocity (PWV is a surrogate end-point for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A plasma glucose value ≥155 mg/dl for the 1-hour post-load plasma glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT is able to identify subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT at high-risk for type-2 diabetes (T2D and for subclinical organ damage. Thus, we addressed the question if 1-hour post-load plasma glucose levels, affects PWV and its central hemodynamic correlates, as augmentation pressure (AP and augmentation index (AI. METHODS: We enrolled 584 newly diagnosed hypertensives. All patients underwent OGTT and measurements of PWV, AP and AI. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by Matsuda-index. RESULTS: Among participants, 424 were NGT and 160 had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT. Of 424 NGT, 278 had 1-h post-load plasma glucose <155 mg/dl (NGT<155 and 146 had 1-h post-load plasma glucose ≥155 mg/dl (NGT≥155. NGT≥155 had a worse insulin sensitivity and higher hs-CRP than NGT<155, similar to IGT subjects. In addition, NGT ≥155 in comparison with NGT<155 had higher central systolic blood pressure (134±12 vs 131±10 mmHg, as well as PWV (8.4±3.7 vs 6.7±1.7 m/s, AP (12.5±7.1 vs 9.8±5.7 mmHg and AI (29.4±11.9 vs 25.1±12.4%, and similar to IGT. At multiple regression analysis, 1-h post-load plasma glucose resulted the major determinant of all indices of vascular stiffness. CONCLUSION: Hypertensive NGT≥155 subjects, compared with NGT<155, have higher PWV and its hemodynamic correlates that increase their cardiovascular risk profile.

  2. Increased transcript level of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) in human tricuspid compared with bicuspid aortic valves correlates with the stenosis severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Edit, E-mail: edit.nagy@karolinska.se [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Caidahl, Kenneth [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Franco-Cereceda, Anders [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Throracic Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Baeck, Magnus [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathomechanism of calcific aortic valve stenosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed the transcript levels for PARP-1 (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase), acts as a DNA damage nick sensor in stenotic valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early stage of diseased tricuspid valves exhibited higher mRNA levels for PARP-1 compared to bicuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mRNA levels for PARP-1 inversely correlated with the clinical stenosis severity in tricuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data demonstrated that DNA damage pathways might be associated with stenosis severity only in tricuspid valves. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress may contribute to the hemodynamic progression of aortic valve stenosis, and is associated with activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1. The aim of the present study was to assess the transcriptional profile and the topological distribution of PARP-1 in human aortic valves, and its relation to the stenosis severity. Human stenotic aortic valves were obtained from 46 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery and used for mRNA extraction followed by quantitative real-time PCR to correlate the PARP-1 expression levels with the non invasive hemodynamic parameters quantifying the stenosis severity. Primary isolated valvular interstitial cells (VICs) were used to explore the effects of cytokines and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) on valvular PARP-1 expression. The thickened areas of stenotic valves with tricuspid morphology expressed significantly higher levels of PARP-1 mRNA compared with the corresponding part of bicuspid valves (0.501 vs 0.243, P = 0.01). Furthermore, the quantitative gene expression levels of PARP-1 were inversely correlated with the aortic valve area (AVA) (r = -0.46, P = 0.0469) and AVA indexed for body surface area (BSA) (r = -0.498; P = 0.0298) only in tricuspid aortic valves

  3. Stiff railguns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, W. F.; Bacon, J. L.; Weeks, D. A.; Zowarka, R. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stiff guns have been operated with both plasma and solid armatures. A performance gain was seen in the plasma railgun as stiffness was increased. A stiff gun will help to maintain the bore shape and preserve the integrity of the seam between rail and insulator under the extreme asymmetric loads sustained during high-pressure operation. The hydraulically preloaded moly and ceramic gun has been fired six times at pressures as high as 87 ksi, and the bore still holds roughing vacuum up to two hours after the test. The elimination of seam leakage helps control bore erosion associated with plasma reconstitution from the rail and plasma perturbation that might result in loss-initiating instabilities. Reduced rail deflection allows solid and transitioning armatures to track the bore surface. An analysis of the strain energy associated with the deflection of the railgun structure is presented, and this mechanism is found to be a small fraction of the energy associated with armature loss and the rail resistive loss.

  4. Does the serum uric acid level have any relation to arterial stiffness or blood pressure in adults with congenital renal agenesis and/or hypoplasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Raziye; Guney, İbrahim; Altintepe, Lutfullah; Yazici, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between serum uric acid and arterial stiffness or blood pressure is not clear. The serum uric acid level and its association with cardiovascular risk is not well known in patients with reduced renal mass. We aimed to investigate the relation between serum uric acid levels and arterial stiffness and also blood pressure in patients with congenital renal agenesis and/or hypoplasia. In this single center, cross-sectional study, a total of 55 patients (39 (% 70.9) with unilateral small kidney and 16 (%29.1) with renal agenesis) were included. The median age was 35 (21-50) years. The study population was divided into tertiles of serum uric acid (according to 2.40-3.96, 3.97-5.10, and 5.11-9.80 mg/dl cut-off values of serum uric acid levels). Official and 24-h ambulatory non-invasive blood pressures of all patients were measured. The arterial stiffness was assessed by pulse wave velocity (PWV). PWV values were increased from first to third tertile (5.5 ± 0.6, 5.7 ± 0.8, 6.1 ± 0.7, respectively), but this gradual increase between tertiles did not reach significance. Linear regression analyses showed a positive correlation between serum uric acid levels and PWV (β = 0.40, p = 0.010), but no correlation was found between uric acid and daytime systolic blood pressure (β = 0.24, p = 0.345). In congenital renal agenesis/hypoplasia, the serum uric acid level was positively correlated with arterial stiffness, but there was no correlation with blood pressure.

  5. There's an app for that: A handheld smartphone-based infrared imaging device to assess adequacy and level of aortic occlusion during REBOA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Kyle K; Black, George E; Willey, Sandra B; Kniery, Kevin; Marko, Shannon T; Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    Advances in thermal imaging devices have made them an appealing noninvasive point-of-care imaging adjunct in the trauma setting. We sought to assess whether a smartphone-based infrared imaging device (SBIR) could determine presence and location of aortic occlusion in a swine model. We hypothesized that various levels of aortic occlusion would transmit significantly different heat signatures at various anatomical points. Six swine (35-50 kg) underwent sequential zone 1 (Z1) aortic cross clamping as well as zone 3 (Z3) aortic balloon occlusion (resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta [REBOA]). SBIR images and readings (FLIR One) were taken at five anatomic points (axilla [A], subcostal [S], umbilical [U], inguinal [I], medial malleolar [M]) and were used to determine significant thermal trends 5 minutes to 10 minutes after Z1 and Z3 occlusion. Significant (p ≤ 0.05) thermal ratio patterns were identified and compared among groups, and images were reviewed for obvious qualitative differences at the various levels of occlusion. Body temperatures were similar during control (CON), Z1 occlusion, and Z3 occlusion, ranging from 94.0 °F to 100.9 °F (p = 0.126). No significant temperature differences were found among A, S, U, I, M points prior to and after aortic occlusions. Among the anatomical 2-point ratios evaluated, A/M and S/M ratios were the best predictors of aortic occlusion, whether at Z1 (8.2 °F, p < 0.01; 10.9 °F, p < 0.01) or Z3 (7.3 °F, p < 0.01; 8.4 °F, p < 0.01), respectively. The best predictor of Z1 versus Z3 level of occlusion was the S/I ratio (5.2 °F, p < 0.05 vs. 3.4 °F, p = 0.27). SBIR generated qualitatively different thermal signatures among groups. SBIR was capable of detecting thermal trends during Z1 and Z3 aortic occlusion by using an anatomical 2-point thermal ratio. There were also easily recognized qualitative differences between control and occlusion images that would allow immediate determination of adequate

  6. Aortic valve stenosis and atrial fibrillation influence plasma fibulin-1 levels in patients treated with coronary bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maria Lyck; Dahl, Jordi S; Argraves, W Scott; Irmukhamedov, Akhmadjon; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) causes cardiac fibrosis and left ventricular hypertrophy, and over time heart failure can occur. To date, a reliable marker to predict progression of AS or the development of heart failure is still lacking. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis that fibulin-1 levels reflect myocardial fibrosis. Patients undergoing heart surgery at the Odense University were investigated. By 2012 data on outcome were obtained. In 293 patients, plasma fibulin-1 levels were measured. Patients with AS or atrial fibrillation (AF) had significantly higher fibulin-1 levels compared to those with coronary artery disease only (p = 0.005). Patients with preoperatively diagnosed chronic AF had significantly higher levels of fibulin-1 compared to those without (p = 0.004). Plasma fibulin-1 levels showed no relationship to echocardiographic size and had no impact on outcome, death or other adverse events. This study shows that plasma fibulin-1 levels are increased in patients with AS and AF compared to patients with coronary disease only. Our study results suggest fibulin-1, a vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, as a marker of ECM turnover perhaps due to the increased myocardial stretch that is related to pressure overload. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Numerical assessment of the stiffness index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Sally; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Elliott, Paul; Chowienczyk, Phil; Alastruey, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Elevated systemic vascular stiffness is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. It has been suggested that the time difference between the two characteristic peaks of the digital volume pulse (DVP) measured at the finger using photoplethysmography is related to the stiffness of the arterial tree, and inversely proportional to the stiffness index (SI). However, the precise physical meaning of the SI and its relation to aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) is yet to be ascertained. In this study we investigated numerically the effect of changes in arterial wall stiffness, peripheral resistances, peripheral compliances or peripheral wave reflections on the SI and aPWV. The SI was calculated from the digital area waveform simulated using a nonlinear one-dimensional model of pulse wave propagation in a 75-artery network, which includes the larger arteries of the hand. Our results show that aPWV is affected by changes in aortic stiffness, but the SI is primarily affected by changes in the stiffness of all conduit vessels. Thus, the SI is not a direct substitute for aPWV. Moreover, our results suggest that peripheral reflections in the upper body delay the time of arrival of the first peak in the DVP. The second peak is predominantly caused by the impedance mismatch within the 75 arterial segments, rather than by peripheral reflections.

  8. Age- and direction-related adaptations of lumbar vertebral trabecular bone with respect to apparent stiffness and tissue level stress distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, He; Fan, Yubo; Zhang, Ming; Qin, Ling

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to study the age-related adaptation of lumbar vertebral trabecular bone at the apparent level, as well as the tissue level in three orthogonal directions. Ninety trabecular specimens were obtained from six normal L4 vertebral bodies of six male cadavers in two age groups, three aged 62 years and three aged 69 years, and were scanned using a high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) system, then converted to micro-finite element models to do micro-finite element analyses. The relationship between apparent stiffness and bone volume fraction, and the tissue level von Mises stress distribution for each trabecular specimen when compressed separately in the longitudinal direction, medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions (transverse directions) were derived and compared between two age groups. The results showed that at the apparent level, trabecular bones from 69-year group had stiffer bone structure relative to their volume fractions in all three directions, and in both age groups, changes in bone volume fraction could explain more variations in apparent stiffness in the longitudinal direction than the transverse directions; at the tissue level, aging had little effect on the tissue von Mises stress distributions for the compressions in all the three directions. The novelty of the present study was that it provided quantitative assessments on the age and direction-related adaptation of Chinese male lumbar vertebral trabecular bone from two different levels: stiffness at the apparent level and stress distribution at the tissue level. It may help to understand the failure mechanisms and fracture risks of vertebral body associated with aging and direction for the prevention of fracture risks in elder individuals.

  9. Age- and direction-related adaptations of lumbar vertebral trabecular bone with respect to apparent stiffness and tissue level stress distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Gong; Yubo Fan; Ming Zhang; Ling Qin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to study the age-related adaptation of lumbar vertebral trabecular bone at the apparent level, as well as the tissue level in three orthog-onal directions. Ninety trabecular specimens were obtained from six normal L4 vertebral bodies of six male cadavers in two age groups, three aged 62 years and three aged 69 years, and were scanned using a high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) system, then converted to micro-finite element models to do micro-finite element analyses. The relationship between apparent stiffness and bone volume fraction, and the tissue level von Mises stress distribution for each trabecular specimen when compressed separately in the longitudinal direction, medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions (transverse directions) were derived and compared between two age groups. The results showed that at the appar-ent level, trabecular bones from 69-year group had stiffer bone structure relative to their volume fractions in all three directions, and in both age groups, changes in bone volume fraction could explain more variations in apparent stiffness in the longitudinal direction than the transverse directions; at the tissue level, aging had little effect on the tissue von Mises stress distributions for the compressions in all the three directions. The novelty of the present study was that it provided quantitative assessments on the age and direction-related adaptation of Chinese male lumbar vertebral trabec-ular bone from two different levels: stiffness at the apparent level and stress distribution at the tissue level. It may help to understand the failure mechanisms and fracture risks of vertebral body associated with aging and direction for the prevention of fracture risks in elder individuals.

  10. Arterial Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts.

  11. Optimal design of the hydrodynamic multi-arc bearing in a centrifugal blood pump for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Kazuya; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to establish an optimal design of the multi-arc hydrodynamic bearing in a centrifugal blood pump for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level. The multi-arc bearing was designed to fulfill the required specifications: (i) ensuring the uniform bearing stiffness for various bearing angles; (ii) ensuring a higher bearing stiffness than the centrifugal force to prevent impeller whirl; and (iii) adjusting the bearing clearance as much as possible to reduce hemolysis. First, a numerical analysis was performed to optimize three design parameters of the multi-arc bearing: number of arcs N, bearing clearance C, and groove depth H. To validate the accuracy of the numerical analysis, the impeller trajectories for six pump models were measured. Finally, an in vitro hemolysis test was conducted to evaluate the hemolytic property of the multi-arc bearing. As a result of the numerical analysis, the optimal parameter combination was determined as follows: N=4, C=100 μm, and H ≥ 100 μm. In the measurements of the impeller trajectory, the optimal parameter combination was found to be as follows: N=4, C=90 μm, and H=100 μm. This result demonstrated the high reliability of the numerical analysis. In the hemolysis test, the parameter combination that achieved the smallest hemolysis was obtained as follows: N=4, C=90 μm, and H=100 μm. In conclusion, the multi-arc bearing could be optimized for the improvement of bearing stiffness and hemolysis level.

  12. Prognostic value of circulating microRNA-210 levels in patients with moderate to severe aortic stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helge Røsjø

    Full Text Available Circulating micro-RNAs have been proposed as a novel class of cardiovascular (CV biomarkers, but whether they meet analytical requirements and provide additional information to establish risk indices have not been established. miR-210 levels are increased in subjects with low VO2 max, which is a recognized risk factor in patients with aortic stenosis (AS, and we hypothesized that circulating miR-210 levels may be increased in patients with AS and associated with a poor prognosis.We measured circulating miR-210 levels by real-time PCR in 57 patients with moderate to severe AS and in 10 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The merit of miR-210 as a biomarker was assessed according to established criteria, including by comparing miR-210 levels with NT-proBNP and miR-22 levels, which is another miRNA biomarker candidate.All patients and control subjects had miR-210 levels within the range of detection (Cq<35 and the analytical variability was low. Circulating miR-210 levels were 2.0±0.2 [mean±SEM] fold increased in AS patients compared to controls (p = 0.002, whereas miR-22 levels were not differently expressed in the AS patients (0.12±0.06 fold increase, p = 0.45. The increase in miR-210 levels in AS patients was comparable to the increment in NT-proBNP levels: [AUC] 0.82 (95% CI 0.70-0.90 vs. 0.85 (0.75-0.93, respectively, p = 0.71. During a median follow-up of 1287 days, 15 patients (26% died. There was a significant association between higher circulating levels of miR-210 and increased mortality during follow-up: hazard ratio [supra- vs. inframedian levels] 3.3 (95% CI 1.1-10.5, p = 0.039. Adjusting for other risk indices in multivariate analysis did not attenuate the prognostic merit of circulating miR-210 levels.Circulating miR-210 levels are increased in patients with AS and provide independent prognostic information to established risk indices. Analytical characteristics were also excellent supporting the potential of

  13. The hemodynamic effects of acute aortic regurgitation into a stiffened left ventricle resulting from chronic aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Ikechukwu; Raghav, Vrishank; Midha, Prem; Kumar, Gautam; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic regurgitation (AR) post-chronic aortic stenosis is a prevalent phenomenon occurring in patients who undergo transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of left ventricular diastolic stiffness (LVDS) and AR severity on LV performance. Three LVDS models were inserted into a physiological left heart simulator. AR severity was parametrically varied through four levels (ranging from trace to moderate) and compared with a competent aortic valve. Hemodynamic metrics such as average diastolic pressures (DP) and reduction in transmitral flow were measured. AR index was calculated as a function of AR severity and LVDS, and the work required to make up for lost volume due to AR was estimated. In the presence of trace AR, higher LVDS had up to a threefold reduction in transmitral flow (13% compared with 3.5%) and a significant increase in DP (2-fold). The AR index ranged from ∼42 to 16 (no AR to moderate AR), with stiffer LVs having lower values. To compensate for lost volume due to AR, the low, medium, and high LVDS models were found to require 5.1, 5.5, and 6.6 times more work, respectively. This work shows that the LVDS has a significant effect on the LV performance in the presence of AR. Therefore, the LVDS of potential TAVR patients should be assessed to gain an initial indication of their ability to tolerate post-procedural AR.

  14. Effect of membrane permeability on inflammation and arterial stiffness: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Philip Kam-Tao; Cheng, Yuk Lun; Leung, Chi Bon; Szeto, Cheuk Chun; Chow, Kai Ming; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Ng, Esther Siu-Chun; Fok, Queenie Wing-Yi; Poon, Yuet Ling; Yu, Alex Wai-Yin

    2010-04-01

    Both larger molecule removal and dialyzer biocompatibility have been implicated in the high-flux hemodialysis (HD)-associated favorable outcome. In an attempt to delineate the effect of membrane permeability, we performed a randomized, crossover study to compare the inflammatory biomarkers, lipid profile, and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) of two dialyzers that are composed of identical membranes but with different flux characteristics. Stable patients who had anuria and were on low-flux polysulfone membrane were randomly allocated either to HD with high-flux polyamide membrane (group A; 22 patients) or to HD with low-flux polyamide membrane (group B; 24 patients) for 24 weeks, then they were started on 24 weeks of the alternative HD treatment. Apart from the dialyzer, the dialysis prescription remained unchanged. Nineteen patients from group A and 23 patients from group B completed the study. Predialysis beta(2)-microglobulin levels decreased significantly when using the high-flux polyamide membrane. No difference between membranes was observed for serum albumin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, IL-6, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and lipoprotein(a) during the study. A significant increase in aortic PWV, a marker of aortic stiffness, was noted after patients switched from high-flux to low-flux polyamide membranes. Similarly, the rate of change in aortic PWV was significantly decreased with the use of the high-flux polyamide membrane. Our findings suggest that dialysis with polyamide membranes with different flux characteristics did not modify the inflammatory indices and lipid profile in stable HD patients; however, a seemingly beneficial effect on aortic stiffness was noted for patients who were maintained on high-flux polyamide membrane.

  15. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  16. Cystatin C Associates with Arterial Stiffness in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madero, Magdalena; Wassel, Christina L.; Peralta, Carmen A.; Najjar, Samer S.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Fried, Linda; Canada, Robert; Newman, Anne; Shlipak, Michael G.; Sarnak, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Large arteries commonly become stiff in kidney failure, but few studies have investigated arterial stiffness in earlier stages of kidney disease. We evaluated the association between kidney function and aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and its potential modification by race, diabetes, or coronary heart disease in older adults. We measured aPWV in 2468 participants in the Health Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) study; mean age was 73.7 yr, 40% were black, and 24% had diabetes. After categorizing kidney function into three groups on the basis of cystatin C level, multivariable analysis revealed that the medium and high cystatin C groups associated with a 5.3% (95% confidence interval 0.8 to 10.0%) and 8.0% (95% confidence interval 2.2 to 14.1%) higher aPWV than the low cystatin C group; however, chronic kidney disease, as defined by estimated GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2, did not significantly associate with aPWV. We did not identify interactions between cystatin C and race, diabetes, or coronary heart disease. In conclusion, stiffness of large arteries, a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, may partially mediate the association between cystatin C and cardiovascular risk in older adults. PMID:19357259

  17. A Novel Marker of Impaired Aortic Elasticity in Never Treated Hypertensive Patients: Monocyte/High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayla, Kadriye Gayretli; Canpolat, Uğur; Yayla, Çagri; Akboğa, Mehmet Kadri; Akyel, Ahmet; Akdi, Ahmet; Çiçek, Gökhan; Ozcan, Firat; Turak, Osman; Aydoğdu, Sinan

    2017-01-01

    Monocyte to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (MHR) is generally understood to be a candidate marker of inflammation and oxidative stress. Therefore, we aimed to assess the association between MHR and aortic elastic properties in hypertensive patients. A total of 114 newly-diagnosed untreated patients with hypertension and 71 healthy subjects were enrolled. Aortic stiffness index, aortic strain and aortic distensibility were measured by using echocardiography. Patients with hypertension had a significantly higher MHR compared to the control group (p MHR with aortic stiffness index (r = 0.294, p MHR and high sensitivity C-reactive protein have a positive correlation (r = 0.30, p MHR was found to be an independent predictor of aortic distensibility and aortic stiffness index. In patients with newly-diagnosed untreated essential hypertension, higher MHR was significantly associated with impaired aortic elastic properties.

  18. Stiffness of desiccating insect wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengesha, T E; Vallance, R R [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The George Washington University, 738 Phillips Hall, 801 22nd St NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Mittal, R, E-mail: vallance@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 126 Latrobe Hall, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The stiffness of insect wings is typically determined through experimental measurements. Such experiments are performed on wings removed from insects. However, the wings are subject to desiccation which typically leads to an increase in their stiffness. Although this effect of desiccation is well known, a comprehensive study of the rate of change in stiffness of desiccating insect wings would be a significant aid in planning experiments as well as interpreting data from such experiments. This communication presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of the change in mass and stiffness of gradually desiccating forewings of Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa cardui). Mass and stiffness of the forewings of five butterflies were simultaneously measured every 10 min over a 24 h period. The averaged results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 21.1% over this time period with a time constant of 9.8 h, while wing stiffness increased linearly by 46.2% at a rate of 23.4 {mu}N mm{sup -1} h{sup -1}. For the forewings of a single butterfly, the experiment was performed over a period of 1 week, and the results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 52.2% with a time constant of 30.2 h until it reached a steady-state level of 2.00 mg, while wing stiffness increased exponentially by 90.7% until it reached a steady-state level of 1.70 mN mm{sup -1}. (communication)

  19. Aortic stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Images Aortic stenosis Heart valves References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  20. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... an abdominal aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  1. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    OpenAIRE

    Fiona Gifford; Robert Kimmitt; Chula Herath; Webb, David J.; Vanessa Melville; Sisira Siribaddana; Michael Eddleston; Neeraj Dhaun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 wi...

  2. Red wine, arterial stiffness and central hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatzi, Kalliopi; Papaioannou, Theodore G; Papamichael, Christos; Lekakis, John; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Zampelas, Antonis

    2009-01-01

    Red wine is considered to reduce cardiovascular risk and decrease peripheral systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Central aortic pressures are often more sensitive clinical and prognostic factors than peripheral pressures, while arterial stiffness is an independent prognostic factor for cardiovascular events. Great efforts are being made to find natural sources of improving health. In order to clarify the mechanisms under which a widely used drink, like red wine, is affecting heart and vessels, we aimed to review the available data regarding the effects of red wine on arterial stiffness, wave reflections and central blood pressures. The effect of red wine on central hemodynamics has been poorly explored with divergent results. Possible consequences of acute and long-term intake on arterial stiffness, wave reflections and central pressures are not clear. This might make someone skeptical when suggesting the consumption of a glass of red wine, although its cardioprotective actions (when moderately consumed) are already shown from epidemiological studies.

  3. Aortic root geometry in aortic stenosis patients (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahlmann, Edda; Nienaber, Christoph A; Cramariuc, Dana

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: To report aortic root geometry by echocardiography in a large population of healthy, asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) patients in relation to current vendor-specified requirements for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). METHODS AND RESULTS: Baseline data in 1481 patients...... with asymptomatic AS (mean age 67 years, 39% women) in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in AS study were used. The inner aortic diameter was measured at four levels: annulus, sinus of Valsalva, sinotubular junction and supracoronary, and sinus height as the annulo-junctional distance. Analyses were based on vendor......-specified requirements for the aortic root geometry for current available prostheses, CoreValve and Edwards-Sapien. The ratio of sinus of Valsalva height to sinus width was 1:2. In multivariate linear regression analysis, larger sinus of Valsalva height was associated with older age, larger sinus of Valsalva diameter...

  4. Evaluation of regional aortic distensibility using color kinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshimasa; Kotoh, Keiju; Yamashita, Akio; Furuta, Hidetoshi; Shimazu, Chikasi; Misaki, Takurou

    2003-01-01

    Regional aortic stiffness cannot be evaluated by conventional methods. Regional aortic wall velocity during systole in the descending aorta was evaluated by using transesophageal echocardiography with color kinesis. The authors defined regional aortic distensibility (RAD) by considering pulse pressure, with RAD (microm/s/mm Hg) = (regional aortic wall velocity)/(pulse pressure). RAD was evaluated in 38 patients who had coronary artery disease (CAD) and 10 who did not. RAD decreased depending on aging (partial regression coefficient was -5.39 x 10(-1), pkinesis provides information on characteristic difference between calcified and noncalcified plaque.

  5. Elevation of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6levels in aortic intima of Chinese Guizhou minipigs with streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Lin; DING Feng-hua; SHEN Jie; CHEN Qiu-jin; LOU Sheng; FANG Dan-hong; SHEN Wei-feng; ZHANG Qi; PU Li-jin; XU Xue-wei; ZHANG Rui-yan; ZHANG Jian-sheng; HU Jian; YANG Zheng-kun; L(U) An-kang

    2007-01-01

    Background Large animal models with toxin-mediated pancreatic damage have been used extensively in researches with respect to diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diabetic complications. The present study aimed to establish Chinese Guizhou minipig models with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and characterize the animal models by analyzing inflammatory cytokine levels in aortic wall, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6).Methods Twenty-two male Chinese Guizhou minipigs (age, 4 to 6 months; weight, 20 kg to 30 kg) were divided into STZ-induced diabetic group (n=12) and control group (n=10). STZ (125 mg/kg) was administrated to induce hyperglycemia and afterwards insulin was used to control fasting blood glucose levels below 10 mmol/L. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed before and one month after STZ administration and serum concentrations of alanine transaminase, asparagine transaminase, albumin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, lipids and white blood cell count were measured before and six months later. Animals in both groups were euthanized after six months and pancreas was examined immunohistochemically for islet β cells. Aortic intima of diabetic minipigs and controls was analyzed for TNF-α level in tissue conditioned medium by Western blot. TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA levels in aortic intima were assayed by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results Significant elevation in serum glucose levels was observed one month and six months after STZ induction (P<0.001) and markedly increased OGTT values were noted, compared with baseline data. The normal pancreas had many irregular sized islets and small clusters of islet β cells, while in pancreas of diabetic minipigs islet β cells almost disappeared. No statistical difference was notified in serum concentrations of biochemical examinations before and six months after STZ induction. Western blot demonstrated

  6. Testosterone suppression in men with prostate cancer is associated with increased arterial stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, F; Bulpitt, C J; Agarwal, S; Rajkumar, C

    2002-12-01

    Low androgen levels in men are associated with increased cardiovascular risk, through unclear mechanisms. We measured arterial stiffness ('compliance') in 21 men receiving complete testosterone suppression therapy for prostate cancer, and in 25 controls. Systemic arterial compliance (SAC), which assesses proximal aortic stiffness, was calculated by simultaneous recording of aortic flow and carotid artery pressure (the 'area method'). Aorto-femoral (A-F), aorto-radial (A-R) and femoral-dorsalis pedis (F-DP) pulse-wave velocities (PWVs) were recorded using the 'Complior' system. SAC was significantly lower in the androgen-depleted men compared to controls (0.81 +/- 0.53 vs. 1.18 +/- 0.43 arbitrary compliance units, p = 0.01, mean +/- SD). Correspondingly, their A-F PWV was higher (14.1 (10.1-21.8) vs. 12.4 (9.6-17.4) m/s, p = 0.03, median (range)). Cases tended to be older (75 +/- 7 vs. 71 +/- 6 years, p = 0.07), and to have higher systolic blood pressure (148 +/- 22 vs. 143 +/- 17 mmHg, p = 0.40); however, SAC was still significantly lower (p = 0.03) after adjustment for age and stratification for central systolic pressure ( the median). Adjustment of A-F PWV for age and central systolic pressure reduced significance to p = 0.07. There was no significant difference in peripheral PWVs between groups. In conclusion, testosterone suppression is associated with increased aortic stiffness, only partly explained by age and blood pressure. Loss of androgens in men might therefore adversely affect cardiovascular risk.

  7. [Aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Fernando; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Vila, Ramón; Lahoz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is one important cause of death in our country. The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) is around 5% for men older than 50 years of age. Some factors are associated with increased risk for AAA: age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease and, in particular, smoking. The medical management of patients with an AAA includes cardiovascular risk treatment, particularly smoking cessation. Most of major societies guidelines recommend ultrasonography screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked because it leads to decreased AAA-specific mortality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.

  8. Aortic Blood Flow Reversal Determines Renal Function: Potential Explanation for Renal Dysfunction Caused by Aortic Stiffening in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Aortic stiffness determines the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and predicts the progressive decline of the GFR. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanism remains obscure. Recent evidence has shown a close link between aortic stiffness and the bidirectional (systolic forward and early diastolic reverse) flow characteristics. We hypothesized that the aortic stiffening-induced renal dysfunction is attributable to altered central flow dynamics. In 222 patients with hypertension, Doppler velocity waveforms were recorded at the proximal descending aorta to calculate the reverse/forward flow ratio. Tonometric waveforms were recorded to measure the carotid-femoral (aortic) and carotid-radial (peripheral) pulse wave velocities, to estimate the aortic pressure from the radial waveforms, and to compute the aortic characteristic impedance. In addition, renal hemodynamics was evaluated by duplex ultrasound. The estimated GFR was inversely correlated with the aortic pulse wave velocity, reverse/forward flow ratio, pulse pressure, and characteristic impedance, whereas it was not correlated with the peripheral pulse wave velocity or mean arterial pressure. The association between aortic pulse wave velocity and estimated GFR was independent of age, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and antihypertensive medication. However, further adjustment for the aortic reverse/forward flow ratio and pulse pressure substantially weakened this association, and instead, the reverse/forward flow ratio emerged as the strongest determinant of estimated GFR (P=0.001). A higher aortic reverse/forward flow ratio was also associated with lower intrarenal forward flow velocities. These results suggest that an increase in aortic flow reversal (ie, retrograde flow from the descending thoracic aorta toward the aortic arch), caused by aortic stiffening and impedance mismatch, reduces antegrade flow into the kidney and thereby deteriorates renal function. © 2015 American Heart Association

  9. Decreased expression of fibulin-4 in aortic wall of aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huawei, P; Qian, C; Chuan, T; Lei, L; Laing, W; Wenlong, X; Wenzhi, L

    2014-02-01

    In this research, we will examine the expression of Fibulin-4 in aortic wall to find out its role in aortic dissection development. The samples of aortic wall were obtained from 10 patients operated for acute ascending aortic dissection and five patients for chronic ascending aortic dissection. Another 15 pieces of samples from patients who had coronary artery bypass were as controls. The aortic samples were stained with aldehyde magenta dyeing to evaluate the arrangement of elastic fibers. The Fibulin-4 protein and mRNA expression were both determined by Western blot and realtime quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the control group, both in acute and chronic ascending aortic dissection, elastic fiber fragments increased and the expression of fibulin-4 protein significantly decreased (P= 0.045 < 0.05). The level of fibulin-4 mRNA decreased in acute ascending aortic dissection (P= 0.034 < 0.05), while it increased in chronic ascending aortic dissection (P=0.004 < 0.05). The increased amounts of elastic fiber fragments were negatively correlated with the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA in acute ascending aortic dissection. In conclusion, in aortic wall of ascending aortic dissection, the expression of fibulin-4 protein decreased and the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA was abnormal. Fibulin-4 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of aortic dissection.

  10. Stiffness in the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: Arthritis Fractures Dislocations Bad sprains Tendon and muscle injuries Evaluating Hand Stiffness Your doctor will ask when the stiffness ... scan. CAUSES SIGNS AND ... stretching exercises for the joints and muscles to help loosen them. Different types of splints ...

  11. Surgical management for Stanford type A aortic dissection: direct cannulation of real lumen at the level of the Botallo's ligament by Seldinger technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbölös, Laszlo; Philipp, Alois; Foltan, Maik; Wiebe, Karsten

    2008-12-01

    A 50-year-old man was diagnosed with Stanford type A acute aortic dissection with cerebral malperfusion and unconsciousness. This clinical presentation was investigated by computed tomography which revealed a severe type A dissection involving all limb arteries. Successful operative treatment based on the direct arterial cannulation of the real lumen of dissected aorta at the level of Botallo's ligament by Seldinger technique achieves an appropriate perfusion and rapid cooling of the instable patient. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in the literature.

  12. Reinforced aortic root reconstruction for acute type A aortic dissection involving the aortic root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Qing-qi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There are debates regarding the optimal approach for AAAD involving the aortic root. We described a modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction approach for treating AAAD involving the aortic root. METHODS: A total of 161 patients with AAAD involving the aortic root were treated by our modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction approach from January 1998 to December 2008. Key features of our modified approach were placement of an autologous pericardial patch in the false lumen, lining of the sinotubular junction lumen with a polyester vascular ring, and wrapping of the vessel with Teflon strips. Outcome measures included post-operative mortality, survival, complications, and level of aortic regurgitation. RESULTS: A total of 161 patients were included in the study (mean age: 43.3 1 15.5 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.1 1 2.96 years (2-12 years. A total of 10 (6.2% and 11 (6.8% patients died during hospitalization and during follow-up, respectively. Thirty-one (19.3% patients experienced postoperative complications. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 99.3%, 98%, 93.8%, and 75.5%, respectively. There were no instances of recurrent aortic dissection, aortic aneurysm, or pseudoaneurysm during the entire study period. The severity of aortic regurgitation dramatically decreased immediately after surgery (from 28.6% to 0% grade 3-4 and thereafter slightly increased (from 0% to 7.2% at 5 years and 9.1% at 10 years. CONCLUSION: This modified reinforced aortic root reconstruction was feasible, safe and durable/effective, as indicated by its low mortality, low postoperative complications and high survival rate.

  13. Stiff person syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccoto, Giuseppe; Blaya, Maike; Kelley, Roger E

    2013-02-01

    Recognizing stiff person syndrome is clinically important. It is uncommon, characterized by body stiffness associated with painful muscle spasms, and varies in location and severity. It is subdivided into stiff trunk versus stiff limb presentation, and as a progressive encephalomyelitis. Stiff person-type syndrome also reflects a paraneoplastic picture. Most patients demonstrate exaggerated lumbar lordosis. Roughly 60% of patients have antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid. The differential diagnosis includes many severe conditions. There are reports of response to muscle relaxants, immunosuppressants, intravenous gamma globulin, plasma exchange, a number of anticonvulsants, and botulinum toxin.

  14. Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that are ... Transplantation End-stage Lung Disease Adult Lung Transplantation Pediatric Lung ... Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Valve Disease Overview The human heart has ...

  15. Effects of preemptive enoximone on left ventricular diastolic function after valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maaten, Joost M. A. A.; de Vries, Adrianus J.; Rietman, Gerrit W.; Gallandat Huet, Rolf C. G.; De Hert, Stefan G.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy is associated with increased diastolic chamber stiffness early after aortic valve replacement for valve stenosis. Enoximone, a phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, has been shown to improve myocardial contractility and relaxation when administered as a single

  16. Augmented vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and adhesion when hypertension is superimposed on aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgel, Nancy L; Sun, Zhe; Hong, Zhongkui; Hunter, William C; Hill, Michael A; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F; Meininger, Gerald A

    2015-02-01

    Hypertension and aging are both recognized to increase aortic stiffness, but their interactions are not completely understood. Most previous studies have attributed increased aortic stiffness to changes in extracellular matrix proteins that alter the mechanical properties of the vascular wall. Alternatively, we hypothesized that a significant component of increased vascular stiffness in hypertension is due to changes in the mechanical and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells, and that aging would augment the contribution from vascular smooth muscle cells when compared with the extracellular matrix. Accordingly, we studied aortic stiffness in young (16-week-old) and old (64-week-old) spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar-Kyoto wild-type controls. Systolic and pulse pressures were significantly increased in young spontaneously hypertensive rats when compared with young Wistar-Kyoto rats, and these continued to rise in old spontaneously hypertensive rats when compared with age-matched controls. Excised aortic ring segments exhibited significantly greater elastic moduli in both young and old spontaneously hypertensive rats versus Wistar-Kyoto rats. were isolated from the thoracic aorta, and stiffness and adhesion to fibronectin were measured by atomic force microscopy. Hypertension increased both vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion, and these increases were both augmented with aging. By contrast, hypertension did not affect histological measures of aortic collagen and elastin, which were predominantly changed by aging. These findings support the concept that stiffness and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells are novel mechanisms contributing to the increased aortic stiffness occurring with hypertension superimposed on aging.

  17. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    aortic valvular disease, endocarditis, ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection.1-4 There is also an association of BAV with coarctation of...for aortic aneurysm , patients with BAV appear to have additional risks for aortic disease. Nistri et al.12 reported significant aortic root...Congenital heart disease in patients with Turner’s syndrome. Italian study group for Turner syndrome (ISGTS). J Pediatr 1998; 133:688-692. 7. Schmid

  18. Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaeen, Faisal G; Rosengart, Todd K; Carabello, Blase A

    2017-01-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of aortic stenosis, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  19. Aortic stenosis: From diagnosis to optimal treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavčiovski Dragan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis is the most frequent valvular heart disease. Aortic sclerosis is the first characteristic lesion of the cusps, which is considered today as the process similar to atherosclerosis. Progression of the disease is an active process leading to forming of bone matrix and heavily calcified stiff cusps by inflammatory cells and osteopontin. It is a chronic, progressive disease which can remain asymptomatic for a long time even in the presence of severe aortic stenosis. Proper physical examination remains an essential diagnostic tool in aortic stenosis. Recognition of characteristic systolic murmur draws attention and guides further diagnosis in the right direction. Doppler echocardiography is an ideal tool to confirm diagnosis. It is well known that exercise tests help in stratification risk of asymptomatic aortic stenosis. Serial measurements of brain natriuretic peptide during a follow-up period may help to identify the optimal time for surgery. Heart catheterization is mostly restricted to preoperative evaluation of coronary arteries rather than to evaluation of the valve lesion itself. Currently, there is no ideal medical treatment for slowing down the disease progression. The first results about the effect of ACE inhibitors and statins in aortic sclerosis and stenosis are encouraging, but there is still not enough evidence. Onset symptoms based on current ACC/AHA/ESC recommendations are I class indication for aortic valve replacement. Aortic valve can be replaced with a biological or prosthetic valve. There is a possibility of percutaneous aortic valve implantation and transapical operation for patients that are contraindicated for standard cardiac surgery.

  20. Evaluation of arterial stiffness in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodanapu Mastanvalli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing problem worldwide. Clinical and epidemiologic studies have shown that structural and functional changes that occur in major arteries are a major contributing factor to the high mortality in uremic patients. Recent studies have shown a stepwise increase of the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV from CKD Stage 1 to Stage 5. We evaluated the cfPWV and augmentation index (AIx, as indirect markers of arterial stiffness in patients with nondiabetic CKD and compared the values with normal population; we also evaluated the relationship between various stages of CKD and arterial stiffness markers. This cross-sectional study was carried out in the Department of Nephrology for a duration of two years from January 15, 2012, to January 14, 2014. Fifty patients with nondiabetic CKD were studied along with 50 healthy volunteers who did not have CKD, who served as controls. Assessment of arterial stiffness (blood pressure, PWV, heart rate, aortic augmentation pressure, and AIx was performed using the PeriScope device. PWV positively correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean aortic arterial pressure, serum creatinine, and serum uric acid and negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate. Arterial stiffness increased as CKD stage increased and was higher in nondiabetic CKD group than in the general population. Arterial stiffness progressed gradually from CKD Stage 2 to 5, and then abruptly, in dialysis patients. Measures to decrease the arterial stiffness and its influence on decreasing cardiovascular events need further evaluation.

  1. Large Artery Stiffness Assessment Using SphygmoCor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butlin, Mark; Qasem, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Large artery stiffness assessment has been an integral part of the SphygmoCor technology since 1998. Aortic stiffness is approximated with non-invasive measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, with improvements made with time to make the assessment procedure quicker and more user independent. Also standard in the devices is the ability to reliably calculate the central aortic waveform shape from a peripheral pressure waveform from either the brachial or radial artery. This waveform contains much information beyond peak and trough (systolic and diastolic pressure). Relative waveform features such as the augmentation index, wave reflection magnitude, reflection time index, and subendocardial viability ratio are parameters that are influenced by the stiffness of systemic arteries. This article briefly describes these parameters related to large artery stiffness and provides reference to validation and repeatability studies relative to the clinical use of the SphygmoCor devices. It is beyond the scope to review here the 424 original research articles that have employed SphygmoCor devices in measuring arterial stiffness. Instead, the method of measurement across the devices is described, including tonometry, volumetric displacement through cuff placement around limbs, and ambulatory monitoring. Key population and subpopulation studies are cited where the average stiffness parameter progression with age and gender, as measured by SphygmoCor devices, is quantified in the healthy and general population. Finally, with reference to guidelines from working groups on arterial stiffness and hypertension, the clinical utility of large artery stiffness measurement is discussed in the context of the arterial stiffness parameters provided by the SphygmoCor systems. PMID:28229053

  2. Estimating Gear Teeth Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of gear stiffness is important for determining the load distribution between the gear teeth when two sets of teeth are in contact. Two factors have a major influence on the stiffness; firstly the boundary condition through the gear rim size included in the stiffness calculation...... and secondly the size of the contact. In the FE calculation the true gear tooth root profile is applied. The meshing stiffness’s of gears are highly non-linear, it is however found that the stiffness of an individual tooth can be expressed in a linear form assuming that the contact length is constant....

  3. Stiffness of compression devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Mosti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Veins and Lymphatics collects papers coming from the International Compression Club (ICC Meeting on Stiffness of Compression Devices, which took place in Vienna on May 2012. Several studies have demonstrated that the stiffness of compression products plays a major role for their hemodynamic efficacy. According to the European Committee for Standardization (CEN, stiffness is defined as the pressure increase produced by medical compression hosiery (MCH per 1 cm of increase in leg circumference.1 In other words stiffness could be defined as the ability of the bandage/stockings to oppose the muscle expansion during contraction.

  4. Extracellular-purine metabolism in blood vessels (part I). Extracellular-purine level in blood of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecka, Joanna; Molski, Stanislaw; Komoszynski, Michal

    2010-09-01

    Adenosine and adenosine derivatives are the main regulators of purinoceptors (P1 and P2) mediated hemostasis and blood pressure. Since impaired hemostasis and high blood pressure lead to atherosclerosis and to the development of aneurysm, in this study we tested and compared the concentration of extracellular purines (e-purines) in the blood in of patients having abdominal aortic aneurysm with that from healthy volunteers. Whereas adenine nucleosides and nucleotides level in human blood plasma was analysed using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), cholesterol concentration was estimated by an enzymatic assay. We did not find any correlation between e-purines concentration and the age of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, the sum level of e-purines (ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, and inosine) in the control group did not exceed 70 microM, while it was nearly two-fold higher in the blood of patients having abdominal aortic aneurysm, (123 microM). In a special case of people with Leriche Syndrome, a disease characterized by deep atherosclerotic changes, the e-purines level had further increased. Additionally, we also report typical atherosclerotic changes in the aorta using histological assays as well as total cholesterol rise. The significant rise in cholesterol concentration in the blood of the patients with abdominal aortas aneurysm, compared with the control groups, was not unique since 23% of the healthy people also exceeded the normal level of cholesterol. Therefore, our results strongly indicate that the estimation of e-purines concentration in the blood may serve as another indicator of atherosclerosis and warrant further consideration as a futuristic diagnostic tool.

  5. [Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis Combined with Aortic Coarctation;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takehiro; Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2016-06-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve in an adult is extremely rare. In addition, 90% of the patients with aortic coarctation are reported to die before the age 50. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of exertional dyspnea which had begun one year before. She had been under medical treatment for hypertension since early thirties, and had been also diagnosed with moderate aortic stenosis at 50 years of age. She was at 1st diagnosed with aortic coarctation combined with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The aortic valve was then found unicuspid and was replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass with perfusion to both the ascending aorta and the femoral artery. Repair of aortic coarctation was performed 3 months later through left thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation due to the rich collateral circulation. She had no postoperative complications, and hypertension as well as ankle-brachial index improved to the normal levels.

  6. Patch annulo-aortoplasty in an adult patient with congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Naoto; Morimoto, Keisuke; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2011-08-01

    A 39-year-old woman with familial homozygous hypercholesterolemia had supravalvular and valvular aortic stenosis. Modified Nick's procedure and aortic valve replacement was performed to relieve both the supravalvular and annular stenoses. At surgery, the ascending aorta was found to be narrowing at the level of the sinotubular junction, which was compatible with congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis. Histological examination of the aortic cusps showed sclerotic change due to hypercholesterolemia. These findings indicated that familial homozygous hypercholesterolemia caused valvular aortic stenosis and exacerbated congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis.

  7. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI...

  8. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Taşar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Quadricuspid aortic valve is an extremely rare congenital defect. Isolated form appears frequently. It is seen with aortic valve regurgitation in adulthood. This case report presents a rare clinical finding of an isolated quadricuspid aortic valve with aortic regurgitation in an 64-year-old female who was referred for cardiac evaluation due to newly identified murmur.

  9. Aortic dilatation in children with systemic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha; Devereux, Richard B; Dave, Archana; Bell, Cynthia; Portman, Ronald; Milewicz, Diana

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the presence of aortic dilatation in hypertensive children, the prevalence of which is 4% to 10% in hypertensive adults. Prospectively enrolled multiethnic children, untreated for their hypertension, underwent an echocardiogram to exclude congenital heart disease and evaluate for end-organ damage and aortic size. The aorta was measured in the parasternal long-axis view at three levels: the sinus of Valsalva, supra-tubular junction, and the ascending aorta. Aortic dilatation was determined by z-score >2 at any one of the levels measured. Hypertension was defined as blood pressure above the 95th percentile based on the Fourth Working Group criteria confirmed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Among 142 consecutive hypertensive children (median age, 14 years; 45% females) aortic dilatation was detected in 2.8% (95% confidence interval, 1%-7%; median age, 16 years; 100% females). Children with aortic dilatation, when compared with those without, had significantly more aortic valve insufficiency (P = .005) and left ventricular hypertrophy (P = .018). Prevalence of aortic dilatation was 2.8% and was associated with significantly more aortic insufficiency and left ventricular hypertrophy in comparison to those without aortic dilatation.

  10. Clinical Correlates and Prognostic Value of Plasma Galectin-3 Levels in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis: A Single-Center Prospective Study of Patients Referred for Invasive Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Bobrowska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 (Gal-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, has been implicated in myocardial fibrosis, development of left ventricular (LV dysfunction and transition from compensated LV hypertrophy to overt heart failure (HF, being a novel prognostic marker in HF. Risk stratification is crucial for the choice of the optimal therapy in degenerative aortic stenosis (AS, affecting elderly subjects with coexistent diseases. Our aim was to assess correlates and prognostic value of circulating Gal-3 in real-world patients with degenerative AS referred for invasive treatment. Gal-3 levels were measured at admission in 80 consecutive patients with symptomatic degenerative AS (mean age: 79 ± 8 years; aortic valve area (AVA index: 0.4 ± 0.1 cm2/m2. The therapeutic strategy was chosen following a dedicated multidisciplinary team-oriented approach, including surgical valve replacement (n = 11, transcatheter valve implantation (n = 19, balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV (n = 25 and optimal medical therapy (n = 25. Besides routine echocardiographic indices, valvulo-arterial impedance (Zva, an index of global LV afterload, was computed. There were 22 deaths over a median follow-up of 523 days. Baseline Gal-3 correlated negatively with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR (r = −0.61, p < 0.001 and was unrelated to age, symptomatic status, AVA index, LV ejection fraction, LV mass index or Zva. For the study group as a whole, Gal-3 tended to predict mortality (Gal-3 >17.8 vs. Gal-3 <17.8 ng/mL; hazard ratio (HR: 2.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.88–4.69, p = 0.09, which was abolished upon adjustment for eGFR (HR: 1.70 (0.61–4.73, p = 0.3. However, in post-BAV patients multivariate-adjusted pre-procedural Gal-3 was associated with worse survival (HR: 7.41 (1.52–36.1, p = 0.01 regardless of eGFR. In conclusion, the inverse eGFR–Gal-3 relationship underlies a weak association between Gal-3 and adverse outcome in patients with degenerative AS referred for

  11. Critical appraisal of the differential effects of antihypertensive agents on arterial stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Kum

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Kum, Janaka KarallieddeUnit for Metabolic Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Kings College-Waterloo Campus, King’s College London, United KingdomAbstract: Increased central arterial stiffness, involving accelerated vascular ageing of the aorta, is a powerful and independent risk factor for early mortality and provides prognostic information above and beyond traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Central arterial stiffness is an important determinant of pulse pressure; therefore, any pathological increase may result in left ventricular hypertrophy and impaired coronary perfusion. Central artery stiffness can be assessed noninvasively by measurement of aortic pulse wave velocity, which is the gold standard for measurement of arterial stiffness. Earlier, it was believed that changes in arterial stiffness, which are primarily influenced by long-term pressure-dependent structural changes, may be slowed but not reversed by pharmacotherapy. Recent studies with drugs that inhibit the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, advanced glycation end products crosslink breakers, and endothelin antagonists suggest that blood pressure (BP-independent reduction and reversal of arterial stiffness are feasible. We review the recent literature on the differential effect of antihypertensive agents either as monotherapy or combination therapy on arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness is an emerging therapeutic target for CVD risk reduction; however, further clinical trials are required to confirm whether BP-independent changes in arterial stiffness directly translate to a reduction in CVD events.Keywords: aortic pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, blood pressure, renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system

  12. Abdominal Aortic Dissection with Acute Mesenteric Ischemia in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chii-Shyan Lay

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of connective tissue, with various complications manifested primarily in the cardiovascular system. It potentially leads to aortic dissection and rupture, these being the major causes of death. We report a patient who complained of acute abdominal pain, which presented as acute mesenteric ischemia combined with abdominal aortic dissection. Echocardiography showed enlargement of the aortic root and mitral valve prolapse. Abdominal computed tomography scan revealed acute mesenteric ischemia due to abdominal aortic dissection. Finally, the patient underwent surgery of aortic root replacement and had a successful outcome. Therefore, we suggest that for optimal risk assessment and monitoring of patients with Marfan syndrome, both aortic stiffness and the diameter of the superior mesenteric vein compared with that of the superior mesenteric artery are useful screening methods to detect acute mesenteric ischemia secondary to abdominal aortic dissection. Early diagnosis and early treatment can decrease the high mortality rate of patients with Marfan syndrome.

  13. Effect of vitamin D on aortic remodeling in streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salum Erik

    2012-07-01

    diabetic rats and improved by vitamin D supplementation. Conclusion PWV profile determined under isobaric conditions demonstrated differential effects of uncontrolled diabetes on aortic stiffness. Diabetes was also associated with elevated serum levels of ADMA. Vitamin D supplementation did not improve the functional indices of aortic stiffness or endothelial function, but prevented the fragmentation of elastic fibers in the aortic media.

  14. MicroRNAs, fibrotic remodeling, and aortic aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2012-01-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common clinical condition that can cause death due to aortic dissection or rupture. The association between aortic aneurysm pathogenesis and altered TGF-β signaling has been the subject of numerous investigations. Recently, a TGF-β–responsive microRNA (miR), miR-29, has been identified to play a role in cellular phenotypic modulation during aortic development and aging. In this issue of JCI, Maegdefessel and colleagues demonstrate that decreasing the levels of miR-29b in the aortic wall can attenuate aortic aneurysm progression in two different mouse models of abdominal aortic aneurysms. This study highlights the relevance of miR-29b in aortic disease but also raises questions about its specific role. PMID:22269322

  15. Aortic root size and prevalence of aortic regurgitation in elite strength trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee Bigi, Mohammad Ali; Aslani, Amir

    2007-08-01

    Athletes involved in mainly static or isometric exercise (e.g., weight lifting, power lifting, and bodybuilding) develop pressure overloads due to the high systemic arterial pressure found in this type of exercise. It is hypothesized that chronically elevated aortic wall tension in strength-trained athletes is associated with aortic dilatation and regurgitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate aortic root size and the prevalence of aortic regurgitation in elite strength-trained athletes. The cohort included 100 male athletes (mean age 22.1 +/- 3.6 years; all were finalists or medalists in the country) and 128 healthy age- and height-matched subjects (the control group). Aortic root diameters at end-diastole were measured at 4 locations: (1) the aortic annulus, (2) the sinuses of Valsalva, (3) the sinotubular junction, and (4) the maximal diameter of the proximal ascending aorta. Aortic root diameters at all levels were significantly greater in the strength-trained athletes (p 18 and 36 and 54 months), progressive enlargement was found at all aortic diameters. In conclusion, aortic root diameters in all segments of the aortic root were significantly greater in elite strength-trained athletes compared with an age- and height-matched population.

  16. Association between arterial stiffness and peritoneal small solute transport rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhe, Xing-wei; Tian, Xin-kui; Chen, Wei; Guo, Li-juan; Gu, Yue; Chen, Hui-min; Tang, Li-jun; Wang, Tao

    2008-05-01

    While cardiovascular disease accounts for 40-50% of the mortality in dialysis patients, and while a high peritoneal transport in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) is an independent predictor of outcome, it is unclear if there are any links. Aortic stiffness has become established as a cardiovascular risk factor. We thus studied pulse wave velocity (PWV) in CAPD patients to explore the possible link between peritoneal small solute transport and aortic stiffness. CAPD patients (n = 76, 27 M/49 F) in our center were included in the present study. Aortic stiffness was assessed by brachial pulse pressure (PP) and carotid-femoral PWV. Patients' peritoneal small solute transport rate was assessed by D/P(cr) at 4 h. Extracellular water over total body water (E/T ratio) was assessed by means of bioimpedance analysis. C-reactive protein was also measured. Carotid-femoral PWV was positively associated with patients' age (r = 0.555; P < 0.01), time on peritoneal dialysis (r = 0.332; P < 0.01), diabetic status (r = 0.319; P < 0.01), D/P(cr) (r = 0.241; P < 0.05), PP (r = 0.475; P < 0.01), and E/T (r = 0.606; P < 0.01). In a multivariate regression analysis, carotid-femoral PWV was independently determined by E/T (P < 0.01), PP (P < 0.01), age (P < 0.01), and D/P(cr) (P < 0.05). D/P(cr), in addition to E/T, age, and PP, was an independent predictor of elevated carotid-femoral PWV in CAPD patients, suggesting that there might be a link between high aortic stiffness and increased peritoneal small solute transport rate.

  17. Assessment of Effect of Angiotensin Ⅱ Receptor Antagonist Losartan on Aortic Distensibility in Patients With Essential Hypertension by Echocardiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨好意; 邓又斌; 黎春蕾; 毕小军; 潘敏; 常青

    2002-01-01

    Summary: The effects of angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist losartan on elastic properties of aorta in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension were assessed. The ascending aortic distensibili-ty in 26 patients (48± 3 years) with mild to moderate essential hypertension before and after 12 weeks of treatment with losartan (50 mg/day) was evaluated by using two-dimensional echocardio graphy. M-mode measurements of aortic systolic (Ds) and diastolic diameter (Dd) were taken at a level approximately 3 cm above the aortic valve. Simultaneously, cuff brachial artery systolic (SBP)and diastolic(DBP) pressures were measured. Aortic pressure-strain elastic modulus (Ep) was calcu lated as Dd × (SBP-DBP)/(Ds-Dd) × 1333 and stiffness index beta (β) was defined as Dd × Ln (SBP/DBP)/(Ds-Dd). Blood pressure significantly decreased from 148±13/95±9 mmHg to 138± 12/88±8 mmHg (systolic blood pressure, P=0. 001; diastolic blood pressure, P=0. 003). Therewas no significant difference in pulse pressure before and after treatment with losartan (53±10 mmHg vs 50± 7 mmHg). The distensibility of ascending aorta increased significantly as showed by the significant decrease in pressure-strain elastic modulus from 4.42± 5.79 × 106 dynes/cm2 to 1.99 ± 1.49 × 106 dynes/cm2 (P=0. 02) and stiffness index beta from 27.4 ± 32.9 to 13.3 ± 9.9 (P = 0. 02). Although there was a weak correlation between the percent changes in pressure-strain elastic modulus and stiffness index beta and that in diastolic blood pressure after losartan treatment (r= 0. 40, P = 0. 04 and r = 0.55, P = 0. 004, respectively), no correlation was found between the percent changes in pressure-strain elastic modulus and stiffness index beta and that in systolic blood pressure (r = 0. 04, P = 0. 8 and r = 0. 24, P = 0. 2, respectively). Our study demonstrated that angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist losartan has a beneficial effect on aortic distensibility in patients with mild to moderate essential

  18. Posttraumatic stiff elbow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Mittal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stiff elbow is a frequent and disabling complication and poses serious challenges for its management. In this review forty studies were included to know about the magnitude of the problem, causes, pathology, prevention, and treatment of posttraumatic stiff elbow. These studies show that simple measures such as internal fixation, immobilization in extension, and early motion of elbow joint are the most important steps that can prevent elbow stiffness. It also supports conservative treatment in selected cases. There are no clear guidelines about the choice between the numerous procedures described in literature. However, this review article disproves two major beliefs-heterotopic ossification is a bad prognostic feature, and passive mobilization of elbow causes elbow stiffness.

  19. Posttraumatic stiff elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Posttraumatic stiff elbow is a frequent and disabling complication and poses serious challenges for its management. In this review forty studies were included to know about the magnitude of the problem, causes, pathology, prevention, and treatment of posttraumatic stiff elbow. These studies show that simple measures such as internal fixation, immobilization in extension, and early motion of elbow joint are the most important steps that can prevent elbow stiffness. It also supports conservative treatment in selected cases. There are no clear guidelines about the choice between the numerous procedures described in literature. However, this review article disproves two major beliefs-heterotopic ossification is a bad prognostic feature, and passive mobilization of elbow causes elbow stiffness.

  20. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  1. Arterial wall stiffness in patients with essential hypertension at young age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesnik E.L.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Research objective was investigating arterial wall stiffness in patients with hypertension at young age and assessing the relationship between subclinical target organs damage and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM parameters. 30 male patients aged 18-35 years with essential hypertension stage I and II, hypertension 1 and 2nd grade were surveyed. The examination included general clinical methods, echocardiography, ABPM and suprasystolic sfigmography. It was found that the pulse wave velocity (PWVao (r = 0,557 p <0,01, central aortic blood pressure (SBPao (r = 0,492 p <0,01 and augmentation index (AIxao (r = 0,489 p <0.01 significantly increased with the pa¬tients’ age. Abdominal obesity (r = 0,566 p <0,01 and BMI (r = 0,599 p <0,01 impacted on the PWVao acceleration. Increasing of the left ventricular mass index (LVMI is highly associated with SBPao (r = 0,506 p <0,05 and PWVao (r = 0,434 p <0,05. According to ABPM the most significant correlation with arterial wall stiffness parameters demon¬strated diastolic blood pressure (DBP daytime level (AIxao (r = 0,418 p <0,01, with PWVao (r = 0,699 p <0.01 and SBPao (r = 0,695 p <0,01. Thus, age, excessive body weight and obesity should be considered as unfavorable factors that worsen arterial wall stiffness in patients with hypertension at the age before 35 years. Increase of DBP levels especially during the day causes maximum negative impact on the arterial wall stiffness parameters according to ABPM. Increased SBPao and PWVao in patients with hypertension at a young age are associated with increased left ventricular mass index.

  2. Testosterone suppression in men with prostate cancer leads to an increase in arterial stiffness and hyperinsulinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, Frances; Bulpitt, Christopher J; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Donaldson, Mandy; Rajkumar, Chakravarthi

    2003-02-01

    The role of androgens in cardiovascular disease is uncertain. We aimed to determine the vascular effects of androgen suppression in men with prostate cancer. Arterial stiffness (or 'compliance') was measured in 16 men (71+/-9 years, mean+/-S.D.) prior to, and 3 months after, complete androgen suppression with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues as treatment for prostate cancer. Fifteen control men (70+/-7 years) also had arterial stiffness studies at baseline and 3 months later. Two measures of arterial stiffness were employed: systemic arterial compliance (SAC) was measured by simultaneous recording of aortic flow and carotid artery pressure ('area method'), and pulse wave velocities (PWVs) were recorded with the 'Complior' system. The 16 cases underwent glucose-tolerance and fasting-lipids tests on both visits. After 3 months of testosterone suppression, there was a significant fall in SAC, which was not seen in the controls [mean change+/-S.E.M., -0.26+/-0.09 a.c.u. (arbitrary compliance unit) in the cases versus +0.06+/-0.11 in the controls; P =0.03). Central, but not peripheral, PWVs tended to increase in the cases (mean change+/-S.E.M. for aorto-femoral PWV, +0.5+/-0.4 m/s for cases versus -0.3+/-0.3 m/s for controls; P =0.08). After testosterone suppression, fasting insulin levels increased from 6.89+/-4.84 m-units/l to 11.34+/-8.16 m-units/l (mean+/-S.D.), total cholesterol increased from 5.32+/-0.77 mmol/l to 5.71+/-0.82 mmol/l and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased from 1.05+/-0.24 mmol/l to 1.26+/-0.36 mmol/l; P stiffness and serum insulin levels, and may therefore adversely affect cardiovascular risk.

  3. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... Endovascular aortic repair is done because your aneurysm is very large, growing quickly, or is leaking or bleeding. You may have ...

  4. Aortic dissection (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aortic dissection is a condition in which there is bleeding into and along the wall of the aorta (the ... the inner wall of the artery. Although aortic dissection can affect anybody, it is most often seen ...

  5. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  6. Aortic growth rates in chronic aortic dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Division of Thoracic Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center (United States)]. E-mail: ainekell@med.umich.edu; Quint, L.E. [Department of Radiology, Division of Thoracic Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center (United States); Nan, B. [School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zheng, J. [School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cronin, P. [Department of Radiology, Division of Thoracic Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center (United States); Deeb, G.M. [Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center (United States); Williams, D.M. [Division of Vascular Interventional Imaging, University of Michigan Medical Center (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Aim: To determine and compare rates of descending aortic enlargement and complications in chronic aortic dissection with and without a proximal aortic graft. Methods and materials: Fifty-two patients with dissection involving the descending aorta and who had undergone at least two computed tomography (CT) examinations at our institution between November, 1993 and February, 2004 were identified, including 24 non-operated patients (four type A, 20 type B) and 28 operated patients (type A). CT examinations per patient ranged from two to 10, and follow-up ranged from 1-123 months (mean 49 months, median 38.5 months). On each CT image, the aortic short axis (SA), false lumen (FL), and true lumen (TL) diameters were measured at the longitudinal midpoint of the dissection and at the point of maximum aortic diameter. Complications were tabulated, including aortic rupture and aortic enlargement requiring surgery. Results: For non-operated patients, the midpoint and maximum point SA, TL, and FL diameters increased significantly over time. For operated patients, the midpoint and maximum point SA and FL diameters increased significantly over time. In both groups, aortic enlargement was predominantly due to FL expansion. Diameter increases in non-operated patients were significantly larger than those in operated patients. The rate of change in aortic diameter was constant, regardless of aortic size. Four non-operated and six operated patients developed aortic complications. Conclusions: In patients with a dissection involving the descending thoracic aorta, the FL increased in diameter over time, at a constant rate, and to a greater degree in non-operated patients (mostly type B) compared with operated patients (all type A)

  7. Biomechanics and gene expression in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeps, Christian; Kehl, Sebastian; Tanios, Fadwa; Biehler, Jonas; Pelisek, Jaroslav; Wall, Wolfgang A; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Gee, Michael W

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to detect inter-relations between the mechanical conditions and material properties of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall and the underlying local gene expression of destabilizing inflammatory, proteolytic, and structural factors. During open surgery, 51 tissue samples from 31 AAA patients were harvested. Gene expression of collagen types I and III, inflammatory factors CD45 and MSR1, proteolytic enzymes matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1 was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Material properties of corresponding AAA tissue samples were assessed by cyclic sinusoidal and destructive testing. Local mechanical conditions of stress and strain were determined by advanced nonlinear finite element analysis based on patient-specific three-dimensional AAA models derived from preoperative computed tomography data. In the AAA wall, all parameters analyzed were significantly expressed at the messenger RNA level. With respect to mechanical properties of the aneurysmatic wall, expression of collagen III correlated with the stiffness parameter α (r = -0.348; P = .017), and matrix metalloprotease 2 correlated with the stiffness parameter β and wall strength (r = -0.438 and -0.593; P = .005 and P mechanical properties of the AAA wall. However, we found no influence of local mechanical conditions on gene expression of these factors. Therefore, these preliminary results are still ambiguous. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Correlation between arterial wall stiffness, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiac autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Aleksandrovna Serhiyenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess arterial wall stiffness, plasma levels of of N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, as well as functional state and structure of the myocardium in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN.Materials and Methods. The study involved a total of 65 patients with T2DM. 12 had no evidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD or CAN, 14 were diagnosed with subclinical stage of CAN, 18 – with functional stage, and 21 – with organic stage. We measured aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV, aortic augmentation index (AIx, brachial artery AIx, ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI and plasma levels of NT-proBNP. Clinical examination included ECG, Holter monitoring, ambulatory BP measurement and echocardiography.Results. Patients with isolated T2DM showed a trend for increased vascular wall stiffness. PWV was increased in patients with subclinical stage of CAN. Aortic and brachial AIx, PWV and AASI were elevated in patients with functional stage of CAN, PWV being significantly higher vs. subclinical CAN subgroup. Organic stage was characterized by pathologically increased values of all primary parameters; PWV and AASI were significantly higher compared with other groups. Development and progression of CAN was accompanied by an increase in NT-proBNP plasma levels. Concentration of NT-proBNP was in direct correlation with left ventricular mass (LVM and PWV. PWV and LVM values also directly correlated between themselves.Conclusion. Development and progression of CAN in patients with T2DM is accompanied by an increase in vascular wall stiffness. The elevation of plasma NT-proBNP in patients with T2DM correlates with the development of CAN and is significantly and independently associated with an increase in LVM and PWV. Our data suggests the pathophysiological interconnection between metabolic, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with T2DM and CAN.

  9. Arterial stiffness: pathophysiology and clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Gérard M; Marchais, Sylvain J; Guerin, Alain P; Pannier, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    The ill effects of hypertension are usually attributed to a reduction in the caliber or the number of arterioles, resulting in an increase in total peripheral resistance (TPR). This definition does not take into account the fact that BP is a cyclic phenomenon with systolic and diastolic BP being the limits of these oscillations. The appropriate term to define the arterial factor(s) opposing LV ejection is aortic input impedance which depends on TPR, arterial distensibility (D), and wave reflections (WR). D defines the capacitive properties of arterial stiffness, whose role is to dampen pressure and flow oscillations and to transform pulsatile flow and pressure in arteries into a steady flow and pressure in peripheral tissues. Stiffness is the reciprocal value of D. These parameters are BP dependent, and arteries become stiffer at high pressure. In to D which provides information about the elasticity> of artery as a hollow structure, the elastic incremental modulus (Einc) characterizes the properties of the arterial wall biomaterials, independently of vessel geometry. As an alternative, arterial D can be evaluated by measuring the pulse wave velocity (PWV) which increases with the stiffening of arteries. Arterial stiffening increases left ventricular (LV) afterload and alters the coronary perfusion. With increased PWV, the WR impacts on the aorta during systole, increasing systolic pressures and myocardial oxygen consumption, and decreasing diastolic BP and coronary flow. The arterial stiffness is altered primarily in association with increased collagen content and alterations of extracellular matrix (arteriosclerosis) as classically observed during aging or in arterial hypertension. The arterial stiffening estimated by changes in aortic PWV and intensity of WR are independent predictors of survival in end stage renal disease (ESRD) and general population. Improvement of arterial stiffening could be obtained by antihypertensive treatmen as observed with the calcium

  10. Correlates of Osteoprotegerin and Association with Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Mary B.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Appel, Lawrence; Wolf, Myles; Budoff, Matt J.; Chen, Jing; Lustigova, Eva; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Glenn, Melanie; Hanish, Asaf; Raj, Dominic; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Seliger, Stephen L.; Weir, Matthew R.; Parekh, Rulan S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a cytokine that regulates bone resorption, has been implicated in the process of vascular calcification and stiffness. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Serum OPG was measured in 351 participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD) from one site of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Cortical bone mineral content (BMC) was measured by quantitative computed tomography in the tibia. Multivariable linear regression was used to test the association between serum OPG and traditional cardiovascular risk factors, measures of abnormal bone and mineral metabolism, and pulse wave velocity. Results Higher serum OPG levels were associated with older age, female gender, greater systolic BP, lower estimated GFR, and lower serum albumin. OPG was not associated with measures of abnormal bone or mineral metabolism including serum phosphorus, albumin-corrected serum calcium, intact parathyroid hormone, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, or cortical BMC. Among 226 participants with concurrent aortic pulse wave velocity measurements, increasing tertiles of serum OPG were associated with higher aortic pulse wave velocity after adjustment for demographics, traditional vascular risk factors, and nontraditional risk factors such as estimated GFR, albuminuria, serum phosphate, corrected serum calcium, presence of secondary hyperparathyroidism, serum albumin, and C-reactive protein or after additional adjustment for cortical BMC in a subset (n = 161). Conclusions These data support a strong relationship between serum OPG and arterial stiffness independent of many potential confounders including traditional cardiovascular risk factors, abnormal bone and mineral metabolism, and inflammation. PMID:21940840

  11. Leg stiffness primarily depends on ankle stiffness during human hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, C T; Morgenroth, D C

    1999-03-01

    When humans hop in place or run forward, they adjust leg stiffness to accommodate changes in stride frequency or surface stiffness. The goal of the present study was to determine the mechanisms by which humans adjust leg stiffness during hopping in place. Five subjects hopped in place at 2.2 Hz while we collected force platform and kinematic data. Each subject completed trials in which they hopped to whatever height they chose ("preferred height hopping") and trials in which they hopped as high as possible ("maximum height hopping"). Leg stiffness was approximately twice as great for maximum height hopping as for preferred height hopping. Ankle torsional stiffness was 1.9-times greater while knee torsional stiffness was 1.7-times greater in maximum height hopping than in preferred height hopping. We used a computer simulation to examine the sensitivity of leg stiffness to the observed changes in ankle and knee stiffness. Our model consisted of four segments (foot, shank, thigh, head-arms-trunk) interconnected by three torsional springs (ankle, knee, hip). In the model, increasing ankle stiffness by 1.9-fold, as observed in the subjects, caused leg stiffness to increase by 2.0-fold. Increasing knee stiffness by 1.7-fold had virtually no effect on leg stiffness. Thus, we conclude that the primary mechanism for leg stiffness adjustment is the adjustment of ankle stiffness.

  12. Observed variations of monopile foundation stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallehave, Dan; Thilsted, C.L.; Diaz, Alberto Troya

    2015-01-01

    The soil-structure stiffness of monopile foundations for offshore wind turbines has a high impact on the fatigue loading during normal operating conditions. Thus, a robust design must consider the evolution of pile-soil stiffness over the lifetime of the wind farm. This paper present and discuss...... full-scale measurements obtained from one offshore wind turbine structure located within Horns Reef II offshore wind farm. Data are presented for a 2.5 years period and covers normal operating conditions and one larger storm event. A reduction of the pile-soil stiffness was observed during the storm...... events, followed by a complete regain to a pre-storm level when the storm subsided. In additional, no long term variations of the pile-soil stiffness was observed. The wind turbine is located in dense to very dense sand deposits....

  13. Catalase overexpression in aortic smooth muscle prevents pathological mechanical changes underlying abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiellaro-Rafferty, Kathryn; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Wan, William; Gleason, Rudolph L; Taylor, W Robert

    2011-08-01

    The causality of the associations between cellular and mechanical mechanisms of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation has not been completely defined. Because reactive oxygen species are established mediators of AAA growth and remodeling, our objective was to investigate oxidative stress-induced alterations in aortic biomechanics and microstructure during subclinical AAA development. We investigated the mechanisms of AAA in an angiotensin II (ANG II) infusion model of AAA in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice that overexpress catalase in vascular smooth muscle cells (apoE(-/-)xTg(SMC-Cat)). At baseline, aortas from apoE(-/-)xTg(SMC-Cat) exhibited increased stiffness and the microstructure was characterized by 50% more collagen content and less elastin fragmentation. ANG II treatment for 7 days in apoE(-/-) mice altered the transmural distribution of suprarenal aortic circumferential strain (quantified by opening angle, which increased from 130 ± 1° at baseline to 198 ± 8° after 7 days of ANG II treatment) without obvious changes in the aortic microstructure. No differences in aortic mechanical behavior or suprarenal opening angle were observed in apoE(-/-)xTg(SMC-Cat) after 7 days of ANG II treatment. These data suggest that at the earliest stages of AAA development H(2)O(2) is functionally important and is involved in the control of local variations in remodeling across the vessel wall. They further suggest that reduced elastin integrity at baseline may predispose the abdominal aorta to aneurysmal mechanical remodeling.

  14. Dynamic stiffness of suction caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, Morten; Andersen, Lars

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the dynamic soil-structure interaction of suction caissons for offshore wind turbines. The investigation is limited to a determination of the vertical dynamic stiffness of suction caissons. The soil surrounding the foundation is homogenous with linear...... of the skirt length, Poisson's ratio and the ratio between soil stiffness and skirt stiffness. Finally the dynamic behaviour at high frequencies is investigated....... viscoelastic properties. The dynamic stiffness of the suction caisson is expressed by dimensionless frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness coefficients corresponding to the vertical degree of freedom. The dynamic stiffness coefficients for the foundations are evaluated by means of a dynamic three...

  15. Intraventricular filling in physical models of the left ventricle: influence of aortic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelsen, Nicholas; Samaee, Milad; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2016-11-01

    Clinical studies using medical imaging have provided evidence on the formation of an intraventricular vortex in the left ventricle (LV) during diastolic phase of the cardiac cycle. However, the question of how the vortex characteristics are altered with aortic pressure remains unclear. This is of relevance to hypertensive heart disease and heart failure with normal ejection fraction. Using an experimental left heart simulator, we have previously shown that increasing LV wall stiffness results in reduction of the filling vortex circulation. In this study, we investigate the effects of varying aortic pressure in addition to wall stiffness. A series of flexible-walled LV models with varying wall stiffness were tested in a pulsatile flow loop. 2D particle image velocimetry was used to visualize intraventricular flow and calculate filling vortex circulation. The flow circuit was first setup with the least stiffness LV physical model, and tuned to physiological aortic pressure, cardiac output and ejection fraction. We then iteratively tested LV models with increasing stiffness without changing circuit variables. Comparisons of the filling vortex circulation with changing aortic pressure relative to the baseline and increased LV stiffness models will be presented.

  16. Stiff Quantum Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinert, H

    2007-01-01

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the second and fourth moments of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  17. Surgical management of a hypoplastic distal aortic arch and coarctation of aorta in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, ascending aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, Frantisek; Kolesar, Adrián; Toporcer, Tomás; Bajmoczi, Milan

    2014-10-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome has been associated with cardiovascular malformations, but only 3 cases have been reported to be associated with aortic coarctation and surgical management is not defined. A 51-year old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome associated with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta, hypoplastic aortic arch and aortic coarctation at the level of the left subclavian artery presented with shortness of breath 2 years after diagnosis. Imaging identified interim development of a 7.2-cm aneurysm at the level of the aortic coarctation. She underwent surgical repair with a Dacron interposition graft under hypothermic circulatory arrest. She continues to do well 18 months following repair.

  18. Pressure dependency of aortic pulse wave velocity in vivo is not affected by vasoactive substances that alter aortic wall tension ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butlin, Mark; Lindesay, George; Viegas, Kayla D; Avolio, Alberto P

    2015-05-15

    Aortic stiffness, a predictive parameter in cardiovascular medicine, is blood pressure dependent and experimentally requires isobaric measurement for meaningful comparison. Vasoactive drug administration to change peripheral resistance and blood pressure allows such isobaric comparison but may alter large conduit artery wall tension, directly changing aortic stiffness. This study quantifies effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, vasodilator) and phenylephrine (PE, vasoconstrictor) on aortic stiffness measured by aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) assessed by invasive pressure catheterization in anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 7). This was compared with nondrug-dependent alteration of blood pressure through reduced venous return induced by partial vena cava occlusion. In vivo drug concentration was estimated by modeling clearance rates. Ex vivo responses of excised thoracic and abdominal aortic rings to drugs was measured using myography. SNP administration did not alter aPWV compared with venous occlusion (P = 0.21-0.87). There was a 5% difference in aPWV with PE administration compared with venous occlusion (P arteries in vivo. However, similar drug concentrations affect aortic ring wall tension ex vivo. Future studies investigating in vivo and ex vivo kinetics will need to elucidate mechanisms for this marked difference.

  19. Familial history of hypertension as a predictor of increased arterial stiffness in normotensive offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Youssef

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The aortic and carotid stiffness parameters and SIDVP were higher in normotensive offspring of hypertensive parents. This finding could direct the attention towards the increased cardiovascular risk in this group and thus prompt earlier and tighter prevention of cardiovascular risk factors.

  20. Metabolomic profiles of lipid metabolism, arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in male coronary artery disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaido Paapstel

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: We demonstrated an independent association between the serum medium- and long-chain acylcarnitine profile and aortic stiffness for the CAD patients. In addition to the lipid-related classical CVD risk markers, the intermediates of lipid metabolism may serve as novel indicators for altered vascular function.

  1. Depression, Anxiety, and Arterial Stiffness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldenrijk, Adrie; van Hout, Hein P. J.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; de Groot, Eric; Gort, Johan; Rustemeijer, Cees; Diamant, Michaela; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Arterial stiffness gains attention as a potential mechanism underlying the frequently found association between depression or anxiety and cardiovascular disease. However, observations regarding stiffness and psychopathology were often based on small samples. The current study aimed to

  2. Genetics of Stiff Child Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A Chinese boy with a DYT1 gene mutation presented with muscle stiffness, painful muscle spasms, myoclonus, and dystonia, compatible with stiff child syndrome, and is reported from Queen Mary Hospital, the University of Hong Kong.

  3. Obtaining the biomechanical behavior of ascending aortic aneurysm via the use of novel speckle tracking echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alreshidan, Mohammed; Shahmansouri, Nastaran; Chung, Jennifer; Lash, Vynka; Emmott, Alexander; Leask, Richard L; Lachapelle, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    Ex vivo measurement of ascending aortic biomechanical properties may help understand the risk for rupture or dissection of dilated ascending aortas. A validated in vivo method that can predict aortic biomechanics does not exist. Speckle tracking transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been used to measure ventricular stiffness; we sought to determine whether speckle TEE could be adapted to estimate aortic stiffness in vivo and compare these findings with those obtained by ex vivo tissue measurements. A total of 17 patients undergoing ascending aortic resection were recruited to with a mean aortic diameter was 56.16 ± 15 mm. Intraoperative speckle TEE tracking analysis was used to calculate aortic stiffness index using the following equation: β2=ln(SBP/DBP)/AoS, where β2 is the stiffness index; SBP is systolic blood pressure; DBP is diastolic blood pressure; and AoS is the circumferential strain. Ex vivo stiffness was obtained by mechanical tissue testing according to previously described methods. The aortic ring at the pulmonary trunk was divided into 4 equal quadrants. The in vivo stiffness index for the inner curvature, anterior wall, outer curvature, and posterior wall were 0.0544 ± 0.0490, 0.0295 ± 0.0199, 0.0411 ± 0.0328, and 0.0502 ± 0.0320, respectively. The mean ex vivo 25% apparent stiffness for inner curvature, anterior wall, outer curvature, and posterior wall were 0.0616 ± 0.0758 MPa, 0.0352 ± 0.00992 MPa, 0.0405 ± 0.0199 MPa, and 0.0327 ± 0.0106 MPa, respectively. The patient-matched ex vivo 25% apparent stiffness and in vivo stiffness index were not significantly different (P = .8617, 2-way analysis of variance with repeated measures). The use of speckle TEE appears to be a promising technique to estimate ex vivo mechanical properties of the ascending aortic tissue. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. Supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult with anomalies of aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Acrisio Sales; Alencar, Polyanna; Santos, Alana Neiva; Lobo, Roberto Augusto de Mesquita; de Mesquita, Fernando Antônio; Guimarães, Aloyra Guedis

    2013-01-01

    The supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare congenital heart defect being very uncommon in adults. We present a case of supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult associated with anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation, which was submitted to aortic valve replacement and arterioplasty of the ascending aorta with a good postoperative course. PMID:24598962

  5. Physical inactivity and arterial stiffness in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sievi NA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Noriane A Sievi,1 Daniel Franzen,1 Malcolm Kohler,1,2 Christian F Clarenbach1 1Division of Pulmonology, University Hospital of Zurich, 2Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Background: Arterial stiffness is an important predictor of cardiovascular risk besides classic cardiovascular risk factors. Previous studies showed that arterial stiffness is increased in patients with COPD compared to healthy controls and exercise training may reduce arterial stiffness. Since physical inactivity is frequently observed in patients with COPD and exercise training may improve arterial stiffness, we hypothesized that low daily physical activity may be associated with increased arterial stiffness. Methods: In 123 patients with COPD (72% men; mean [standard deviation] age: 62 [7.5] years; median [quartile] forced expiratory volume in 1 second 35 [27/65] %predicted, arterial stiffness was assessed by augmentation index (AI. Daily physical activity level (PAL was measured by an activity monitor (SenseWear Pro™ >1 week. The association between AI and PAL was investigated by univariate and multivariate regression analysis, taking into account disease-specific characteristics and comorbidities. Results: Patients suffered from moderate (35%, severe (32%, and very severe (33% COPD, and 22% were active smokers. Median (quartile PAL was 1.4 (1.3/1.5 and mean (standard deviation AI 26% (9.2%. PAL showed a negative association with AI (B=-9.32, P=0.017 independent of age, sex, blood pressure, and airflow limitation. Conclusion: In COPD patients, a higher PAL seems to favorably influence arterial stiffness and therefore may reduce cardiovascular risk. Clinical Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01527773 Keywords: activity monitor, airflow limitation, COPD, physical activity level

  6. Abdominal Aortic Diameter Is Increased in Males with a Family History of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejnert Jørgensen, Trine; Houlind, K; Green, A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate, at a population level, whether a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is independently related to increased aortic diameter and prevalence of AAA in men, and to elucidate whether the mean aortic diameter and the prevalence of AAA are different between...... participants with male and female relatives with AAA. DESIGN: Observational population-based cross-sectional study. MATERIALS: 18,614 male participants screened for AAA in the VIVA-trial 2008-2011 with information on both family history of AAA and maximal aortic diameter. METHODS: Standardized ultrasound scan...... diagnosed with AAA, and 38 had AAA. Participants with a family history of AAA (+FH) had a significantly larger mean maximum aortic diameter (20.50 mm) compared with participants without family history of AAA (-FH) (19.07 mm, p AAA had significantly larger mean...

  7. Human cytomegalovirus infection leads to elevated levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse aortic xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abele-Ohl, S; Leis, M; Wollin, M; Mahmoudian, S; Hoffmann, J; Müller, R; Heim, C; Spriewald, B M; Weyand, M; Stamminger, T; Ensminger, S M

    2012-07-01

    Recent findings emphasized an important role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (hu-PBL)/Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mouse-xenograft-model to investigate both immunological as well as viral effector mechanisms in the progression of transplant arteriosclerosis. For this, sidebranches from the internal mammary artery were recovered during coronary artery bypass graft surgery, tissue-typed and infected with HCMV. Then, size-matched sidebranches were implanted into the infrarenal aorta of Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice. The animals were reconstituted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) 7 days after transplantation. HCMV-infection was confirmed by Taqman-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses. Arterial grafts were analyzed by histology on day 40 after transplantation. PBMC-reconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) animals showed splenic chimerism levels ranging from 1-16% human cells. After reconstitution, Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice developed human leukocyte infiltrates in their grafts and vascular lesions that were significantly elevated after infection. Cellular infiltration revealed significantly increased ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression after HCMV-infection of the graft. Arterial grafts from unreconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) recipients showed no vascular lesions. These data demonstrate a causative relationship between HCMV-infection as an isolated risk factor and the development of transplant-arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse arterial-transplant-model possibly by elevated ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression.

  8. Morning blood pressure surge and arterial stiffness in newly diagnosed hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kıvrak, Ali; Özbiçer, Süleyman; Kalkan, Gülhan Yüksel; Gür, Mustafa

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between the morning blood pressure (BP) surge and arterial stiffness in patients with newly diagnosed hypertension. Three hundred and twenty four (mean age 51.7 ± 11.4 years) patients who had newly diagnosed hypertension with 24 h ambulatory BP monitoring were enrolled. Parameters of arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity and augmentation index (Aix) were measured by applanation tonometry and aortic distensibility was calculated by echocardiography. Compared with the other groups, pulse wave velocity, day-night systolic BP (SBP) difference (p arterial stiffness which is a surrogate endpoint for cardiovascular diseases. The inverse relationship between morning BP surge and aortic distensibility and direct relation found in our study is new to the literature.

  9. Torso flexion modulates stiffness and reflex response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, K P; Rogers, E

    2007-08-01

    Neuromuscular factors that contribute to spinal stability include trunk stiffness from passive and active tissues as well as active feedback from reflex response in the paraspinal muscles. Trunk flexion postures are a recognized risk factor for occupational low-back pain and may influence these stabilizing control factors. Sixteen healthy adult subjects participated in an experiment to record trunk stiffness and paraspinal muscle reflex gain during voluntary isometric trunk extension exertions. The protocol was designed to achieve trunk flexion without concomitant influences of external gravitational moment, i.e., decouple the effects of trunk flexion posture from trunk moment. Systems identification analyses identified reflex gain by quantifying the relation between applied force disturbances and time-dependent EMG response in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Trunk stiffness was characterized from a second order model describing the dynamic relation between the force disturbances versus the kinematic response of the torso. Trunk stiffness increased significantly with flexion angle and exertion level. This was attributed to passive tissue contributions to stiffness. Reflex gain declined significantly with trunk flexion angle but increased with exertion level. These trends were attributed to correlated changes in baseline EMG recruitment in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Female subjects demonstrated greater reflex gain than males and the decline in reflex gain with flexion angle was greater in females than in males. Results reveal that torso flexion influences neuromuscular factors that control spinal stability and suggest that posture may contribute to the risk of instability injury.

  10. On gear tooth stiffness evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Jørgensen, Martin Felix

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of gear stiffness is important for determining the load distribution between the gear teeth when two sets of teeth are in contact. Two factors have a major influence on the stiffness; firstly the boundary condition through the gear rim size included in the stiffness calculation...... and secondly the size of the contact. In the FE calculation the true gear tooth root profile is applied. The meshing stiffnesses of gears are highly non-linear, it is however found that the stiffness of an individual tooth can be expressed in a linear form assuming that the contact width is constant. © 2014...

  11. Effects of olmesartan on arterial stiffness in rats with chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Yao-Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that the antioxidant properties of olmesartan (OLM, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R blocker, contribute to renal protection rather than blood pressure lowering effects despite the fact that causal relationships between hypertension and renal artery disease exist. This study aimed to examine the hypothesis whether the antioxidative activities of OLM were correlated to arterial stiffness, reactive oxygen species and advanced glycation end products (AGEs formation in rats with chronic renal failure (CRF. Methods CRF rats were induced by 5/6 nephrectomy and randomly assigned to an OLM (10 mg/day group or a control group. Hemodynamic states, oxidative stress, renal function and AGEs were measured after 8 weeks of OLM treatment. Results All the hemodynamic derangements associated with renal and cardiovascular dysfunctions were abrogated in CRF rats receiving OLM. Decreased cardiac output was normalized compared to control (p p p p p p p  Conclusion OLM treatment could ameliorate arterial stiffness in CRF rats with concomitant inhibition of MDA and AGEs levels through the reduction of oxidative stress in aortic wall.

  12. Statins for aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Thiago

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity, freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. MAIN RESULTS: We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants with placebo (1175 participants. We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2, valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2

  13. Stiffness, resilience, compressibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leu, Bogdan M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source (United States); Sage, J. Timothy, E-mail: jtsage@neu.edu [Northeastern University, Department of Physics and Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The flexibility of a protein is an important component of its functionality. We use nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to quantify the flexibility of the heme iron environment in the electron-carrying protein cytochrome c by measuring the stiffness and the resilience. These quantities are sensitive to structural differences between the active sites of different proteins, as illustrated by a comparative analysis with myoglobin. The elasticity of the entire protein, on the other hand, can be probed quantitatively from NRVS and high energy-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) measurements, an approach that we used to extract the bulk modulus of cytochrome c.

  14. Conservative management of chronic aortic dissection with underlying aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Yusuf Beebeejaun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic dissection is one of the most common aortic emergencies affecting around 2000 Americans each year. It usually presents in the acute state but in a small percentage of patients aortic dissections go unnoticed and these patients survive without any adequate therapy. With recent advances in medical care and diagnostic technologies, aortic dissection can be successfully managed through surgical or medical options, consequently increasing the related survival rate. However, little is known about the optimal long-term management of patients suffering from chronic aortic dissection. The purpose of the present report is to review aortic dissection, namely its pathology and the current diagnostic tools available, and to discuss the management options for chronic aortic dissection, infiltrates or pleural effusions. Other tion. We report a patient in which chronic aortic dissection presented with recurring episodes of vomiting and also discuss the management plan of our patient who had a chronic aortic dissection as well as an underlying aortic aneurysm.

  15. Role of chemical elements in formation of an aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuneva, G N; Levicheva, E N; Loginova, I Iu; Volkov, A M; Cherniavskiĭ, A M; Al'sov, S A; Trunova, V A; Zvereva, V V

    2008-01-01

    The method of X-ray fluorescence employing synchronous radiation was used to study the content of chemical elements (CE) in the aortic wall in patients suffering from CAD (Group I), patients diagnosed with an ascending aortic aneurysm (Group II), and those presenting with aortic dissection (Group III). The obtained findings revealed a pronounced CE disbalance in the aortic wall in Group II and III patients as compared with Group I patients, suggesting an important role of trace and macroelements in metabolic processes related to formation of artic aneurysms. Based on the degree of the ascending aorta dilatation, we determined the coefficient of the ratio of the ascending aorta maximal diameter to the fibrous ring aortic valve diameter, equalling 1.88 +/- 0.04, above which metabolic processes in the aortic wall change over to a qualitatively another level. This point was arbitrarily termed the metabolic process reversibility point.

  16. MicroRNAs, fibrotic remodeling, and aortic aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2012-01-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common clinical condition that can cause death due to aortic dissection or rupture. The association between aortic aneurysm pathogenesis and altered TGF-β signaling has been the subject of numerous investigations. Recently, a TGF-β–responsive microRNA (miR), miR-29, has been identified to play a role in cellular phenotypic modulation during aortic development and aging. In this issue of JCI, Maegdefessel and colleagues demonstrate that decreasing the levels of miR-29b i...

  17. Quantitative Aortic Distensibility Measurement Using CT in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Reproducibility and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Zha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the reproducibility of aortic distensibility (D measurement using CT and assess its clinical relevance in patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Methods. 54 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm were studied to determine their distensibility by using 64-MDCT. Aortic cross-sectional area changes were determined at two positions of the aorta, immediately below the lowest renal artery (level 1. and at the level of its maximal diameter (level 2. by semiautomatic segmentation. Measurement reproducibility was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and Bland-Altman analyses. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to assess linear associations between aortic D and anthropometric and biochemical parameters. Results. A mean distensibility of Dlevel  1.=(1.05±0.22×10-5  Pa-1 and Dlevel  2.=(0.49±0.18×10-5  Pa-1 was found. ICC proved excellent consistency between readers over two locations: 0.92 for intraobserver and 0.89 for interobserver difference in level 1. and 0.85 and 0.79 in level 2. Multivariate analysis of all these variables showed sac distensibility to be independently related (R2=0.68 to BMI, diastolic blood pressure, and AAA diameter. Conclusions. Aortic distensibility measurement in patients with AAA demonstrated high inter- and intraobserver agreement and may be valuable when choosing the optimal dimensions graft for AAA before endovascular aneurysm repair.

  18. Pharmacological modulation of arterial stiffness.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-09-10

    Arterial stiffness has emerged as an important marker of cardiovascular risk in various populations and reflects the cumulative effect of cardiovascular risk factors on large arteries, which in turn is modulated by genetic background. Arterial stiffness is determined by the composition of the arterial wall and the arrangement of these components, and can be studied in humans non-invasively. Age and distending pressure are two major factors influencing large artery stiffness. Change in arterial stiffness with drugs is an important endpoint in clinical trials, although evidence for arterial stiffness as a therapeutic target still needs to be confirmed. Drugs that independently affect arterial stiffness include antihypertensive drugs, mostly blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, hormone replacement therapy and some antidiabetic drugs such as glitazones. While the quest continues for \\'de-stiffening drugs\\

  19. Medical treatments in aortic stenosis: Role of statins and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davičević Žaklina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific arotic stenosis and atherosclerosis. Aortic stenosis is the most frequent valvular heart disease in-western world and its incidence continues to rise. Aortic sclerosis is the first characteristic lesion of the cusps, which is today considered a process similar to atherosclerosis. The progression of the disease is an active process leading to forming of bone matrix and heavily calcified stiff cusps by inflammatory cells and osteopontin. Aortic stenosis is a chronic, progressive disease which can remain asymptomatic for a long time even in the presence of severe aortic stenosis. Medical treatment for aortic stenosis. The need for alternative to aortic valve surgery is highlighted by increasing longevity of the population and new therapeutic strategies to limit disease progression are needed to delay or potentially avoid, the need for valve surgery. Currently, there are no established disease modifying treatments in regard to the progression of aortic stenosis. The first results about influence of angiotenzin-converting enzyme inhibitors and statins on aortic sclerosis and stenosis progression are promising. Statins are likely to reduce cardiovascular events rather than disease progression, but may be potentially a valuable preventive treatment in these patients. The prejudice against the use of angiotenzin-converting enzyme inhibitors by patients with aortic stenosis is changing. The cautious use of angiotenzin-converting enzyme inhibition by patients with concomitant hypertension, coronary artery disease, and heart failure seems appropriate. Definite evidence from large clinical trials is awaited.

  20. Amiloride Improves Endothelial Function and Reduces Vascular Stiffness in Female Mice Fed a Western Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Martinez-Lemus

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Obese premenopausal women lose their sex related cardiovascular disease protection and develop greater arterial stiffening than age matched men. In female mice, we have shown that consumption of a Western diet (WD, high in fat and refined sugars, is associated with endothelial dysfunction and vascular stiffening, which occur via activation of mineralocorticoid receptors and associated increases in epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC activity on endothelial cells (EnNaC. Herein our aim was to determine the effect that reducing EnNaC activity with a very-low-dose of amiloride would have on decreasing endothelial and arterial stiffness in young female mice consuming a WD. To this end, we fed female mice either a WD or control diet and treated them with or without a very-low-dose of the ENaC-inhibitor amiloride (1 mg/kg/day in the drinking water for 20 weeks beginning at 4 weeks of age. Mice consuming a WD were heavier and had greater percent body fat, proteinuria, and aortic stiffness as assessed by pulse-wave velocity than those fed control diet. Treatment with amiloride did not affect body weight, body composition, blood pressure, urinary sodium excretion, or insulin sensitivity, but significantly reduced the development of endothelial and aortic stiffness, aortic fibrosis, aortic oxidative stress, and mesenteric resistance artery EnNaC abundance and proteinuria in WD-fed mice. Amiloride also improved endothelial-dependent vasodilatory responses in the resistance arteries of WD-fed mice. These results indicate that a very-low-dose of amiloride, not affecting blood pressure, is sufficient to improve endothelial function and reduce aortic stiffness in female mice fed a WD, and suggest that EnNaC-inhibition may be sufficient to ameliorate the pathological vascular stiffening effects of WD-induced obesity in females.

  1. Differences in arterial stiffness at rest and after acute exercise between young men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doonan, Robert J; Mutter, Andrew; Egiziano, Giordano; Gomez, Yessica-Haydee; Daskalopoulou, Stella S

    2013-03-01

    There is controversy as to whether there are sex differences in arterial stiffness. Acute physical stress can elicit vascular abnormalities not present at rest. Our objective was to assess sex differences in arterial stiffness at rest and in response to acute physical stress. Healthy young men (n=67) and women (n=55) underwent pulse wave analysis and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements at rest and 2, 5, 10 and 15 min following an exercise test to exhaustion. At rest, aortic systolic, diastolic, pulse and mean pressures were all significantly higher in men as was aortic pulse pressure at 10 and 15 min post exercise and aortic systolic pressure at 15 min. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was significantly higher in men (6.0±0.7 m s(-1) vs. 5.6±0.6 m s(-1), P=0.03) at rest and at all time points post exercise. Heart rate-adjusted augmentation index was significantly lower (-10.7±10.2% vs. -4.0±10.9, Psex differences in the arterial stiffness response to acute physical stress in young men and women. Although we were not able to elicit differences in vascular function after adjustment, which were not present at rest, we found that young men and women exhibit differences in arterial stiffness at rest and after acute physical stress.

  2. Skinfold thickness as a predictor of arterial stiffness: obesity and fatness linked to higher stiffness measurements in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Ali; Bulucu, Fatih; Kalafat, Firdevs; Cakar, Mustafa; Demirbas, Seref; Karaman, Murat; Ay, Seyid Ahmet; Saglam, Kenan; Balta, Sevket; Demirkol, Sait; Arslan, Erol

    2013-01-01

    Hypertensive patients have strong evidence of endothelial dysfunction. Some novel endothelial dysfunction parameters such as pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx), and central aortic pressure (CAP) have been investigated as predictive markers of atherosclerosis. It is well known that obesity has relationships with endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate relationships between anthropometric measurements and arterial stiffness parameters in essentially hypertensive patients. The study population included 100 patients (56 females, 44 males) newly or formerly diagnosed as essentially hypertensive in an outpatient clinic. Arterial stiffness measurements, including PWV, AIx, CAP, and body mass index (BMI); waist circumference, hip circumference; waist/hip ratio; and triceps, biceps, subscapular, and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses were also applied to all the study patients. Then, the relationships between BMI, anthropometric measurements, and arterial stiffness parameters were investigated. The mean systolic arterial blood pressure of the study population was 135.85 ± 15.27 mm Hg and the mean diastolic arterial blood pressure of the study population was 84.17 ± 9.58 mm Hg. The parameters such as PWV, AIx, and CAP measured for arterial stiffness had correlations between BMI and different anthropometric measurements. The statistically significant correlations were present between PWV and triceps skinfold thickness (TST) (r = 0.377, P skinfold thickness among these correlations may be used to estimate the carotid-femoral PWV, which is an indicator of subclinical organ damage due to hypertension.

  3. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... evaluation of aortic stenosis in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 29, 2014. Mohty D, ... Valvular heart disease in elderly adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 2, 2014. Bonow RO, ...

  4. Bicuspid aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aortic disease. In: Otto CM, Bonow RO, eds. Valvular Heart Disease: A Companion to Braunwald's Heart Disease . 4th ed. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 13. Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  5. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside your heart that involves heart valves. Rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever — a complication of strep throat and once a ... the United States — can damage the aortic valve. Rheumatic fever is still prevalent in developing countries but rare ...

  6. Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Successfully Managed with One-stage Surgery of Total Aortic Arch Replacement with Supra-aortic Transposition Plus Frozen Elephant Trunk Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Lin Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute type A aortic dissection has long been a challenging issue. The surgical techniques traditionally vary with the anatomic extent of the aortic dissection. Simple ascending aortic grafting can be lifesaving, but the lesions beyond the aorta, which include the arch vessels and descending aorta, remain potential hazards. In this paper, we present a patient in which acute type A aortic dissection with lesions extending into descending thoracic aorta was successfully managed by total arch replacement with supra-aortic transposition plus the frozen elephant trunk technique to the descending aorta. A 67-year-old gentleman presented with severe tearing pain from the anterior to posterior chest. Computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis of acute type A dissection extending to the level of the right common iliac artery. An emergent operation was performed as in the aforementioned technique. The surgery went well and the patient was discharged without comorbidities on postoperative day 25. The patient had regular outpatient clinical follow-up. The follow-up computed tomography images showed adequate results with the obliteration of the false lumen. In conclusion, total aortic arch replacement with supra-aortic transposition plus frozen elephant trunk technique is a safe and feasible operative method for patients with detrimental acute type A aortic dissection.

  7. Activation of SIRT1 Attenuates Klotho Deficiency-Induced Arterial Stiffness and Hypertension by Enhancing AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Diansa; Zuo, Zhong; Tian, Jing; Ali, Quaisar; Lin, Yi; Lei, Han; Sun, Zhongjie

    2016-11-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor for stroke and myocardial infarction. This study was designed to investigate the role of SIRT1, an important deacetylase, and its relationship with Klotho, a kidney-derived aging-suppressor protein, in the pathogenesis of arterial stiffness and hypertension. We found that the serum level of Klotho was decreased by ≈45% in patients with arterial stiffness and hypertension. Interestingly, Klotho haplodeficiency caused arterial stiffening and hypertension, as evidenced by significant increases in pulse wave velocity and blood pressure in Klotho-haplodeficient (KL(+/-)) mice. Notably, the expression and activity of SIRT1 were decreased significantly in aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells in KL(+/-) mice, suggesting that Klotho deficiency downregulates SIRT1. Treatment with SRT1720 (15 mg/kg/d, IP), a specific SIRT1 activator, abolished Klotho deficiency-induced arterial stiffness and hypertension in KL(+/-) mice. Klotho deficiency was associated with significant decreases in activities of AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in aortas, which were abolished by SRT1720. Furthermore, Klotho deficiency upregulated NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide production, increased collagen expression, and enhanced elastin fragmentation in the media of aortas. These Klotho deficiency-associated changes were blocked by SRT1720. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that Klotho deficiency downregulates SIRT1 activity in arterial endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Pharmacological activation of SIRT1 may be an effective therapeutic strategy for arterial stiffness and hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. A relation between blood pressure and stiffness of joints and skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uiterwaal, CSPM; Grobbee, DE; Sakkers, RJB; Helders, PJM; Bank, RA; Engelbert, RHH

    2003-01-01

    Background. Blood pressure, particularly pulse pressure, is associated with arterial wall stiffness, but little is known about its relation to stiffness of other parts of the body. We examined the extent to which blood pressure levels in young healthy children are related to stiffness of various tis

  9. [Anaesthetic management of Stiff Man syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, T; Hernando, D; Kinast, N; Churruca, I; Sabate, S

    2015-04-01

    Stiff Man syndrome or stiff-person syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder. It is characterized by increased axial muscular tone and limb musculature, and painful spasms triggered by stimulus. The case is presented of a 44-year-old man with stiff-person syndrome undergoing an injection of botulinum toxin in the urethral sphincter under sedation. Before induction, all the surgical team were ready in order to minimise the anaesthetic time. The patient was monitored by continuous ECG, SpO2 and non-invasive blood pressure. He was induced with fractional dose of propofol 150 mg, fentanyl 50 μg and midazolam 1mg. Despite careful titration, the patient had an O2 saturation level of 90%,which was resolved by manual ventilation. There was no muscle rigidity or spasm during the operation. Post-operative recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged 2 days later. A review of other cases is presented. The anaesthetic concern in patients with stiff-person syndrome is the interaction between the anaesthetic agents, the preoperative medication, and the GABA system. For a safe anaesthetic management, total intravenous anaesthesia is recommended instead of inhalation anaesthetics, as well as the close monitoring of the respiratory function and the application of the electrical nerve stimulator when neuromuscular blockers are used.

  10. Arterial stiffness &Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-09-02

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies.

  11. Parameters which Affect the Stiffness of Bitumen and Bituminous Hot Mixes

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with bitumen and bituminous mixes, using suitable mathematical models that take into account the parameters affecting their elastic and plastic stiffnesses. These parameters are stress level and acting time, penetration index, softening time and temperature. Viscosity and the total acting time of the load affect the elastic stiffness of bitumen. The elastic stiffness of bitumen and the voluminous concentration of the aggregate influence the elastic stiffness of th...

  12. Vasopressor mechanisms in acute aortic coarctation hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgado H.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (ANG II and vasopressin (AVP act together with the mechanical effect of aortic constriction in the onset of acute aortic coarctation hypertension. Blockade of ANG II and AVP V1 receptors demonstrated that ANG II acts on the prompt (5 min rise in pressure whereas AVP is responsible for the maintenance (30-45 min of the arterial pressure elevation during aortic coarctation. Hormone assays carried out on blood collected from conscious rats submitted to aortic constriction supported a role for ANG II in the early stage and a combined role for both ANG II and AVP in the maintenance of proximal hypertension. As expected, a role for catecholamines was ruled out in this model of hypertension, presumably due to the inhibitory effect of the sinoaortic baroreceptors. The lack of afferent feedback from the kidneys for AVP release from the central nervous system in rats with previous renal denervation allowed ANG II to play the major role in the onset of the hypertensive response. Median eminence-lesioned rats exhibited a prompt increase in proximal pressure followed by a progressive decline to lower hypertensive levels, revealing a significant role for the integrity of the neuroaxis in the maintenance of the aortic coarctation hypertension through the release of AVP. In conclusion, the important issue raised by this model of hypertension is the likelihood of a link between some vascular territory - probably renal - below the coarctation triggering the release of AVP, with this vasoconstrictor hormone participating with Ang II and the mechanical effect of aortic constriction in the acute aortic coarctation hypertension

  13. A Reply to Stiff and Boster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Richard E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Addresses the major errors and misconceptions perpetuated by Stiff and Boster's response to criticism of Stiff's 1986 article. Focuses on the major conceptual and methodological issues of Stiff's model. (NKA)

  14. Stiffness of lipid monolayers with phase coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Benjamín; Mangiarotti, Agustín; Wilke, Natalia

    2013-08-27

    The surface dilational modulus--or compressibility modulus--has been previously studied for monolayers composed of pure materials, where a jump in this modulus was related with the onset of percolation as a result of the establishment of a connected structure at the molecular level. In this work, we focused on monolayers composed of two components of low lateral miscibility. Our aim was to investigate the compressibility of mixed monolayers at pressures and compositions in the two-phase region of the phase diagram, in order to analyze the effect of the mechanical properties of each phase on the stiffness of the composite. In nine different systems with distinct molecular dipoles and charges, the stiffness of each phase and the texture at the plane of the monolayer were studied. In this way, we were able to analyze the general compressibility of two-phase lipid monolayers, regardless of the properties of their constituent parts. The results are discussed in the light of the following two hypotheses: first, the stiffness of the composite could be dominated by the stiffness of each phase as a weighted sum according to the percentage of each phase area, regardless of the distribution of the phases in the plane of the monolayer. Alternatively, the stiffness of the composite could be dominated by the mechanical properties of the continuous phase. Our results were better explained by this latter proposal, as in all the analyzed mixtures it was found that the mechanical properties of the percolating phase were the determining factors. The value of the compression modulus was closer to the value of the connected phase than to that of the dispersed phase, indicating that the bidimensional composites displayed mechanical properties that were related to the properties of each phases in a rather complex manner.

  15. Arterial Stiffness in Nonhypertensive Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi, Daniel A.; Gyan, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Background. Increased arterial stiffness is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in diabetes patients and general population. However, the contribution of diabetes to arterial stiffness is often masked by coexistent obesity and hypertension. In this study, we assessed arterial stiffness in nonhypertensive, nonobese type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients in Ghana. Methods. In case-control design, 166 nonhypertensive, nonobese participants, comprising 96 T2DM patients and 70 nondiabetes controls, were recruited. Peripheral and central blood pressure (BP) indices were measured, and arterial stiffness was assessed as aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVao), augmentation index (AIx), cardioankle vascular index (CAVI), and heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (haPWV). Results. With similar peripheral and central BP indices, T2DM patients had higher PWVao (8.3 ± 1 versus 7.8 ± 1.3, p = 0.044) and CAVI (7.9 ± 1.2 versus 6.9 ± 0.7, p = 0.021) than nondiabetic control. AIx and haPWV were similar between T2DM and nondiabetic controls. Multiple regression models showed that, in the entire study participants, the major determinants of PWVao were diabetes status, age, gender, systolic BP, and previous smoking status (β = 0.22, 0.36, 0.48, 0.21, and 0.25, resp.; all p < 0.05); the determinants of CAVI were diabetes status, age, BMI, heart rate, HbA1c, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and previous smoking status (β = 0.21, 0.38, 0.2, 0.18, 0.24. 0.2, −0.19, and 0.2, resp.; all p < 0.05). Conclusion. Our findings suggest that nonhypertensive, nonobese T2DM patients have increased arterial stiffness without appreciable increase in peripheral and central pressure indices.

  16. Analytical theory for shape stiffness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The shape stiffness of mill m is defined as the crosswise rigidity of the unit width of steel plate, that is, m=k/b. By differentiating the steel plate crown equation in the vector model of steel plate shape, a new concise equation for the shape stiffness, kc=m+q, is obtained. Furthermore, by combining the calculation equation for steel plate crown derived from Castigliano's theorem, an analytical calculation equation for the shape rigidity of rolled steel plate is derived. The correctness and practicability of the theory for the shape stiffness are demonstrated by comparing the results from the numerical calculation with the practical data of a rolling mill.

  17. Analytical theory for shape stiffness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张进之

    2000-01-01

    The shape stiffness of mill m is defined as the crosswise rigidity of the unit width of steel plate, that is, m = k/b. By differentiating the steel plate crown equation in the vector model of steel plate shape, a new concise equation for the shape stiffness, kc = m + q, is obtained. Furthermore, by combining the calculation equation for steel plate crown derived from Castigliano’s theorem, an analytical calculation equation for the shape rigidity of rolled steel plate is derived. The correctness and practicability of the theory for the shape stiffness are demonstrated by comparing the results from the numerical calculation with the practical data of a rolling mill.

  18. Morphology of the bicuspid aortic valve and elasticity of the adjacent aorta in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pees, Christiane; Michel-Behnke, Ina

    2012-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a common congenital malformation with the known sequela of ascending aortic dilation. The morphology of the BAV and the elasticity of the adjacent ascending aorta appear to influence the outcome. We prospectively examined 48 pediatric patients with an isolated, native BAV for the morphology and size of the aortic valve, aortic root, sinotubular junction, and ascending aorta and their elasticity indexes. A cohort of 48 matching subjects with tricuspid aortic valves was investigated as controls. A comparison of the aortic valve subtypes showed normal-size aortic dimensions in the tricuspid aortic valves. In contrast, in the BAVs, the ascending aorta and aortic valve itself tended to dilate with age and aortic elasticity deteriorated. In the BAVs, the stiffness was significantly greater (4.43 ± 1.82 vs 3.43 ± 0.81 in the tricuspid aortic valves; p = 0.001). The distensibility indexes decreased inversely in the BAVs (6.57 ± 2.83 vs 7.84 ± 2.04 cm(2) × dynes(-1) × 10(-6), p = 0.013; and 53.5 ± 26.0 versus 64.3 ± 17.9 kPa(-1) × 10(-3), p = 0.020). The anteroposterior-oriented phenotype of BAVs showed significantly stiffer and less distensible elasticity even after correction for congenital valve dysfunction, which was more frequent in the left-right-oriented phenotype. In conclusion, the morphology of the BAV seems to play a major role in the outcome of BAV disease, although the left-right phenotype is more prone to congenital valve dysfunction, the anteroposterior phenotype showed worse elasticity quality.

  19. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final ...

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007392.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is surgery to fix a widened part ...

  1. Casein improves brachial and central aortic diastolic blood pressure in overweight adolescents: a randomised, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnberg, Karina; Larnkjær, Anni; Michaelsen, Kim F.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, blood pressure (BP) and blood lipids may be improved by milk in adults and the effects may be mediated via proteins. However, limited is known about the effects of milk proteins on central aortic BP and no studies have examined the effects in children. Therefore, the present...... stiffness or blood lipid concentrations. A high intake of casein improves DBP in overweight adolescents. Thus, casein may be beneficial for younger overweight subjects in terms of reducing the longterm risk of CVD. In contrast, whey protein seems to increase BP compared with drinking water; however, water...... trial examined the effect of milk and milk proteins on brachial and central aortic BP, blood lipids, inflammation and arterial stiffness in overweight adolescents. A randomised controlled trial was conducted in 193 overweight adolescents aged 12–15 years. They were randomly assigned to drink 1 litre...

  2. [Congenital aortic stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, M

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in and controversies concerning the management of children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis are discussed. In neonates with critical aortic stenosis, improved survival has recently been reported after surgical open valvotomy and balloon valvuloplasty, although it is difficult at this point to compare the results of the two procedures and determine their differential indications. Good results have also been achieved after extended aortic valvuloplasty for recurrent aortic stenosis and/or insufficiency, but the length of follow-up in these patients is still short. The technique first reported in 1991 for bilateral enlargement fo a small annulus permits the insertion of an aortic valve 3-4 sizes larger than the native annulus. It entails no risk of distorting the mitral valve, damaging the conduction system or important branches of the coronary arteries, or resulting in left ventricular dysfunction. The Ross procedure is now widely applied in the West, with reports of early mortality rates of less than 5% and event-free survival rates of 80-90% during follow-up of 4-8 years. Longer follow-up and continued careful evaluation are required to resolve the issue of possible dilatation and subsequent neoaortic valve dysfunction and pulmonary stenosis due to allograft degeneration after pulmonary autograft root replacement in children.

  3. Interleukin-37 suppresses the osteogenic responses of human aortic valve interstitial cells in vitro and alleviates valve lesions in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Q.; Song, R.; Fullerton, D.A.; Ao, L.; Zhai, Y.; Li, S.; Ballak, D.B.; Cleveland, J.C., Jr.; Reece, T.B.; McKinsey, T.A.; Xu, D.; Dinarello, C.A.; Meng, X.

    2017-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease is a chronic inflammatory process, and aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs) from diseased aortic valves express greater levels of osteogenic factors in response to proinflammatory stimulation. Here, we report that lower cellular levels of IL-37 in AVICs of diseased h

  4. The Dynamic Stiffness of Surface Footings for Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahdatirad, Mohammadjavad; Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan;

    2011-01-01

    This study concerns the dynamic stiffness of foundations for large offshore wind turbines. Especially, the purpose of the analysis is to quantify the uncertainties related to the first natural frequency of a turbine supported by a surface footing on layered soil. The dynamic properties...... due to sediment transportation. Further, the stiffness and density of the materials within a single layer is subject to uncertainties. This leads to uncertainties of the dynamic stiffness of the foundation and therefore the natural frequencies. The aim of the study is to quantify the level...... of uncertainties and discuss the utilization of reliability-based design of surface footings for wind turbines....

  5. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  6. Insights into acute aortic dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trimarchi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Aortic dissection represents one of the most catastrophic and complex cardiovascular diseases. Its origin is related to an intimal tear with course of blood flow into the aortic wall and division of the aortic lumen into two different lumens, defined as the true and false lumen, separated by a

  7. Early Biomarkers of Renal Damage in Relation to Arterial Stiffness and Inflammation in Male Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaido Paapstel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1 have emerged as promising biomarkers for both acute and chronic kidney injury that also provide prognostic value for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to evaluate their relationships with arterial stiffness and inflammation in coronary artery disease (CAD patients and in clinically healthy controls. Methods: We studied 52 patients with CAD (age 63.2 ± 9.2 years and 41 healthy controls (age 60.1 ± 7.2 years. Urinary L-FABP and KIM-1 as well as serum NGAL, adiponectin and resistin levels were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The technique of applanation tonometry was used for non-invasive pulse wave analysis and pulse wave velocity assessments. Results: Urinary L-FABP and KIM-1 were independent determinants of cf-PWV for the CAD patients (R2=0.584, Pr=0.31, P=0.028 only for the patients, while NGAL correlated with WBC count (rho=0.29, P=0.038; r=0.35, P=0.029 and resistin (rho=0.60, PConclusion: Our findings suggest that urinary L-FABP and KIM-1 may be independently associated with aortic stiffness in individuals with CAD.

  8. Systolic time intervals in congenital aortic stenosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moene, Rudolf Johannens

    1974-01-01

    Obstruction to left ventricular outflow may occur at the valvular, subvalvular and Supravalvular level. The most common congenital forms are valvular aortic stenosis and membranous subaortic stenosis, representing about 75 and l0 percent of all cases respectively. ... Zie: Chapter 1

  9. Robotic aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Cassidy; Kashef, Elika; El-Sayed, Hosam F; Bismuth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Surgical robotics was first utilized to facilitate neurosurgical biopsies in 1985, and it has since found application in orthopedics, urology, gynecology, and cardiothoracic, general, and vascular surgery. Surgical assistance systems provide intelligent, versatile tools that augment the physician's ability to treat patients by eliminating hand tremor and enabling dexterous operation inside the patient's body. Surgical robotics systems have enabled surgeons to treat otherwise untreatable conditions while also reducing morbidity and error rates, shortening operative times, reducing radiation exposure, and improving overall workflow. These capabilities have begun to be realized in two important realms of aortic vascular surgery, namely, flexible robotics for exclusion of complex aortic aneurysms using branched endografts, and robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic surgery for occlusive and aneurysmal disease.

  10. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European...... countries. METHODS: A multi-institutional, non-randomized, retrospective analysis was conducted among 2,932 patients who underwent AVR surgery at seven tertiary cardiac surgery centers throughout Europe. Demographic and perioperative variables including valve size and type, body surface area (BSA) and early...

  11. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampi, Marsha C; Faber, Courtney J; Huynh, John; Bordeleau, Francois; Zanotelli, Matthew R; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening.

  12. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha C Lampi

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening.

  13. Stiff-Person Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a blood test that measures the level of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies in the blood. People with ... a blood test that measures the level of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies in the blood. People with ...

  14. Partially uncovered Cheatham platinum-covered stent to treat complex aortic coarctation associated with aortic wall aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Gianfranco; Piazza, Luciane

    2015-04-01

    Percutaneous treatment of aortic coarctation is a widely used option. Covered stents have increased the profile of efficacy and safety of this procedure. Here we report on a 32-year-old woman with significant aortic recoarctation associated with aortic wall aneurysm and close proximity of both lesions to the origin of both the subclavian arteries. It was decided to manually and partially uncover the proximal part of the stent to have a hybrid stent that could act as a bare stent at the level of the origin of the subclavian arteries and as a covered stent at the level of the aneurysm.

  15. Long telomeres in blood leukocytes are associated with a high risk of ascending aortic aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija J Huusko

    Full Text Available Ascending aortic aneurysm is a connective tissue disorder. Even though multiple novel gene mutations have been identified, risk profiling and diagnosis before rupture still represent a challenge. There are studies demonstrating shorter telomere lengths in the blood leukocytes of abdominal aortic aneurysm patients. The aim of this study was to measure whether relative telomere lengths are changed in the blood leukocytes of ascending aortic aneurysm patients. We also studied the expression of telomerase in aortic tissue samples of ascending aortic aneurysms. Relative lengths of leukocyte telomeres were determined from blood samples of patients with ascending aortic aneurysms and compared with healthy controls. Telomerase expression, both at the level of mRNA and protein, was quantified from the aortic tissue samples. Mean relative telomere length was significantly longer in ascending aortic aneurysm blood samples compared with controls (T/S ratio 0.87 vs. 0.61, p<0.001. Expressions of telomerase mRNA and protein were elevated in the aortic aneurysm samples (p<0.05 and p<0.01. Our study reveals a significant difference in the mean length of blood leukocyte telomeres in ascending aortic aneurysm and controls. Furthermore, expression of telomerase, the main compensating factor for telomere loss, is elevated at both the mRNA and protein level in the samples of aneurysmal aorta. Further studies will be needed to confirm if this change in telomere length can serve as a tool for assessing the risk of ascending aortic aneurysm.

  16. Body composition, fitness score and arterial stiffness assesment in a chronic hemodialysis population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina Mihăescu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients undergoing long-term hemodialysis have a high risk of cardiovascular disease. Arterial stiffness is highly prevalent in this type of patients. The aim of our study was to analyse the relationship between body composition, blood chemistries and arterial stiffness in a poorly fit population of chronic hemodialysed patients. Patients and methods involved measuring body composition and fitness score by multifrequence bioimpedance with the body composition analyzer InBody720 and arterial stiffness by the measurement of aortic Pulse Wave Velocity (PWVao and Aortic Augmentation Index (Aix using an oscillometric method on 65 HD patients; measurements were made before a midweek dialysis session. Results: PWVao correlated significantly with weight (p=0.01, r2=1.14, body fat mass (p=0.007, r2=0.14, abdominal circumference (p=0.01, r2=0.12 and with fitness score (p=0.01, r2=0.11. Aix correlated with weight (p<0.05, r2=0.25, intracellular, extracellular- and total body water (p<0.05, r2=0.24 with body protein, soft lean mass, minerals, fat free mass and skeletal muscle mass (p<0.05, r2= 0.3 and with serum calcium (p=0.005, r2=0.2. Conclusions: Arterial stiffness is a common feature of the hemodialysed patients, significantly related to the blood calcium, fitness score and the body composition, especially fat body mass.

  17. Unoperated aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Nørgaard, M; Herzog, T M;

    1995-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, 1,053 patients were admitted with aortic aneurysm (AA) and 170 (15%) were not operated on. The most frequent reason for nonoperative management was presumed technical inoperability. Survivals for patients with thoracic, thoracoabdominal, and abdominal AA were comparable...... hypertension were predictive of mortality, whereas...

  18. Relation of thoracic aortic and aortic valve calcium to coronary artery calcium and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nathan D; Sciammarella, Maria; Arad, Yadon; Miranda-Peats, Romalisa; Polk, Donna; Hachamovich, Rory; Friedman, John; Hayes, Sean; Daniell, Anthony; Berman, Daniel S

    2003-10-15

    Aortic calcium, aortic valve calcium (AVC), and coronary artery calcium (CAC) have been associated with cardiovascular event risk. We examined the prevalence of thoracic aortic calcium (TAC) and AVC in relation to the presence and extent of CAC, cardiovascular risk factors, and estimated risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). In 2,740 persons without known CHD aged 20 to 79 years, CAC was assessed by electron beam- or multidetector-computed tomography. We determined the prevalence of TAC and AVC in relation to CAC, CHD risk factors, and predicted 10-year risk of CHD. A close correspondence of TAC and AVC was observed with CAC. TAC and AVC increased with age; by the eighth decade of life, the prevalence of TAC was similar to that of CAC (>80%), and 36% of men and 24% of women had AVC. Age, male gender, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were directly related to the likelihood of CAC, TAC, and AVC; higher diastolic blood pressure and cigarette smoking additionally predicted CAC. Body mass index and higher systolic and lower diastolic blood pressures were also related to TAC, and higher body mass index and lower diastolic blood pressure were related to AVC. Calculated risk of CHD increased with the presence of AVC and TAC across levels of CAC. TAC and AVC provided incremental value over CAC in association with the 10-year calculated risk of CHD. If longitudinal studies show an incremental value of aortic and aortic valve calcium over that of CAC for prediction of cardiovascular events, future guidelines for risk assessment incorporating CAC assessment may additionally incorporate the measurement of aortic and/or aortic valve calcium.

  19. "INTRAOPERATIVE SPINAL STIFFNESS MEASUREMENT IN MANAGEMENT OF SPINAL CANAL STENOSIS "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karami

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study to determine whether spine stiffness is predictive of clinical results after lumbar spinal fusion for spinal stenosis, a total of 78 patients were measured intraoperatively with Kocher clamp manual distraction technique to determine motion segment stiffness then spinal fusion was performed for any loose segment. ‎Statistical analysis revealed that stiffness measurement correlate with clinical results of surgery. During a minimum of 2 years follow up after surgery, patients who had loose motion segment before or after decompression and were fused had the same level of satisfaction with surgical results as patients without loose segments and fusion. ‎We concluded that intraoperative spinal stiffness measurement provide a good indicator to spine fusion after lumbar canal stenosis ‎surgery.

  20. Molecular Cues Guiding Matrix Stiffness in Liver Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saneyasu, Takaoki; Akhtar, Riaz

    2016-01-01

    Tissue and matrix stiffness affect cell properties during morphogenesis, cell growth, differentiation, and migration and are altered in the tissue remodeling following injury and the pathological progression. However, detailed molecular mechanisms underlying alterations of stiffness in vivo are still poorly understood. Recent engineering technologies have developed powerful techniques to characterize the mechanical properties of cell and matrix at nanoscale levels. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences mechanical tension and activation of pathogenic signaling during the development of chronic fibrotic diseases. In this short review, we will focus on the present knowledge of the mechanisms of how ECM stiffness is regulated during the development of liver fibrosis and the molecules involved in ECM stiffness as a potential therapeutic target for liver fibrosis. PMID:27800489

  1. Molecular Cues Guiding Matrix Stiffness in Liver Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaoki Saneyasu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue and matrix stiffness affect cell properties during morphogenesis, cell growth, differentiation, and migration and are altered in the tissue remodeling following injury and the pathological progression. However, detailed molecular mechanisms underlying alterations of stiffness in vivo are still poorly understood. Recent engineering technologies have developed powerful techniques to characterize the mechanical properties of cell and matrix at nanoscale levels. Extracellular matrix (ECM influences mechanical tension and activation of pathogenic signaling during the development of chronic fibrotic diseases. In this short review, we will focus on the present knowledge of the mechanisms of how ECM stiffness is regulated during the development of liver fibrosis and the molecules involved in ECM stiffness as a potential therapeutic target for liver fibrosis.

  2. Arterial Stiffness: Recommendations and Standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Raymond R.

    2017-01-01

    The use of arterial stiffness measurements in longitudinal cohorts of normal populations, hypertensive patients, diabetic patients, healthy elderly, and patients on hemodialysis have confirmed the value of this important measure of arterial health, and established its complementary role to measures of blood pressure. Its contribution to understanding cardiovascular and mortality risk beyond blood pressure measurements has moved measures of arterial stiffness into the ranks of factors such as elevated cholesterol, diabetes, and left ventricular hypertrophy in considering cardiovascular risk. The recent international collaboration's publication of reference ranges for normal people and those with hypertension, along with the American Heart Association's recent scientific statement on standardizing arterial stiffness measurements are important aspects to consider in future studies employing these valuable methods, particularly as interventions that not only lower blood pressure but improve arterial function are tested in the clinical arena. PMID:28275588

  3. Post-stenotic aortic dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahangiri Marjan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease affecting up to 4% of the elderly population. It can be associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta and subsequent dissection. Post-stenotic dilatation is seen in patients with AS and/or aortic regurgitation, patients with a haemodynamically normal bicuspid aortic valve and following aortic valve replacement. Controversy exists as to whether to replace the aortic root and ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement, an operation that potentially carries a higher morbidity and mortality. The aetiology of post-stenotic aortic dilatation remains controversial. It may be due to haemodynamic factors caused by a stenotic valve, involving high velocity and turbulent flow downstream of the stenosis, or due to intrinsic pathology of the aortic wall. This may involve an abnormality in the process of extracellular matrix remodelling in the aortic wall including inadequate synthesis, degradation and transport of extracellular matrix proteins. This article reviews the aetiology, pathology and management of patients with post-stenotic aortic dilatation.

  4. Arterial Stiffness and Pharmacological Interventions – The TRanscend Arterial stiffNess Substudy (TRANS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirar Topouchian

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Jirar Topouchian1, Ramzi El Feghali1, Bruno Pannier1, Shuyu Wang2, Feng Zhao3, Karel Smetana4, Koon Teo3, Roland Asmar11The CardioVascular Institute, Paris, France; 2Beijing Clinical Trial and Research Center, Beijing, China; 3Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton, Canada; 4Vojenska nemocnice Plzen, Pizen, Czech RepublicAbstract: The degree of arterial stiffness is correlated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases and it is a powerful predictor for morbidity and mortality. Studies have shown that arterial stiffness reduction is associated with an improvement in survival. Reduction of arterial stiffness by pharmacological drugs varies according to the drugs and doses used and duration of treatment. This effect on the arteries differs among the various classes of drugs and among individual drugs in the same class. Quantification of the stiffness and other properties of the arterial wall can be used to monitor the responses to therapy in individuals with hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. These measures can then be used as surrogate markers for the risk of clinical events. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS is associated with an important decrease in cardiovascular risk. Findings from clinical trials support the hypothesis that the protective effects of RAS inhibition are partly independent from blood pressure reduction and related to several mechanisms including vascular protective effects. The aim of the TRanscend Arterial stiffNess Substudy (TRANS is to assess the effect of an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB, telmisartan, on the arterial stiffness in a subgroup of patients from the Telmisartan Randomized Assessment Study in aCE iNtolerant subjects with cardiovascular Disease (TRANSCEND trial. The TRANSCEND trial is an international, multicenter, randomized double blind placebo controlled trial of telmisartan that enrolled patients at high risk for cardiovascular events. Some clinical baseline data of the

  5. Lase Ultrasonic Web Stiffness tester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Patterson, Ph.D., IPST at Ga Tech

    2009-01-12

    The objective is to provide a sensor that uses non-contact, laser ultrasonics to measure the stiffness of paper during the manufacturing process. This will allow the manufacturer to adjust the production process in real time, increase filler content, modify fiber refining and as result produce a quality product using less energy. The sensor operates by moving back and forth across the paper web, at pre-selected locations firing a laser at the sheet, measuring the out-of-plane velocity of the sheet then using that measurement to calculate sheet stiffness.

  6. Dynamic stiffness of suction caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, Morten; Andersen, Lars

    This report concerns the dynamic soil-structure interaction of steel suction caissons applied as foundations for offshore wind turbines. An emphasis is put on torsional vibrations and coupled sliding/rocking motion, and the influence of the foundation geometry and the properties of the surrounding...... soil is examined. The soil is simplified as a homogenous linear viscoelastic material and the dynamic stiffness of the suction caisson is expressed in terms of dimensionless frequency-dependent coefficients corresponding to the different degrees of freedom. The dynamic stiffness coefficients...

  7. DEGENERATIVE AORTIC STENOSIS: PATHOGENESIS AND NEW PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Andropova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To reveal of markers of inflammation and progression of calcification in patients with degenerative aortic stenosis (DAS. Material and methods. A single-stage study was done in 85 patients with degenerative calcification of aortic valve (42 patients with DAS and 43 patients without DAS. The techniques for assessing the severity of aortic valve calcification included ultrasonic diagnostics and multislice spiral computed tomography. Markers of inflammation and lipid profile were investigated.    Results. Higher blood levels of total holesterol and holesterol of low density lipoprotein were revealed in patients with DAS in comparison with patients without DAS. They also had higher levels of inflammation markers: C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. There were significant correlations between DAS severity, lipid metabolism disturbances and inflammation markers. Conclusion. Atherogenesis and inflammation may have pathogenic influence on progression of aortic valve calcification and DAS development by lipid infiltration and endothelium cells damage.

  8. The effect of hypertension on aortic pulse wave velocity in type-1 diabetes mellitus patients: assessment with MRI.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandts, A.; Elderen, S.G. van; Tamsma, J.T.; Smit, J.W.A.; Kroft, L.J.; Lamb, H.J.; Meer, R.W. van der; Westenberg, J.J.; Roos, A. de

    2012-01-01

    To investigate in type-1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) patients the role of hypertension and of DM1 itself on aortic stiffness by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Consecutive patients from the diabetes and hypertension outpatient clinic and healthy volunteers were included in our study. Subjects we

  9. Tobacco smoking and aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Grønbæk, Morten

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We determined the predictive power of tobacco smoking on aortic aneurysm as opposed to other risk factors in the general population. METHODS: We recorded tobacco smoking and other risk factors at baseline, and assessed hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm in 15,072 individuals...... General Population Study, respectively. According to the magnitude of the hazard ratios, tobacco consumption was the most important risk factor for hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm, followed by male sex and hypertension in both cohorts. The population attributable risk of aortic aneurysm...... outcomes due to tobacco consumption was 64% and 47% in the Copenhagen City Heart Study and Copenhagen General Population Study, respectively, and ranked highest among population attributable risks of aortic aneurysm in both cohorts. The absolute 10-year risk for hospitalization or death from aortic...

  10. Non-crossbridge stiffness in active muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombini, Barbara; Nocella, Marta; Bagni, Maria Angela

    2016-01-01

    Stretching of an activated skeletal muscle induces a transient tension increase followed by a period during which the tension remains elevated well above the isometric level at an almost constant value. This excess of tension in response to stretching has been called 'static tension' and attributed to an increase in fibre stiffness above the resting value, named 'static stiffness'. This observation was originally made, by our group, in frog intact muscle fibres and has been confirmed more recently, by us, in mammalian intact fibres. Following stimulation, fibre stiffness starts to increase during the latent period well before crossbridge force generation and it is present throughout the whole contraction in both single twitches and tetani. Static stiffness is dependent on sarcomere length in a different way from crossbridge force and is independent of stretching amplitude and velocity. Static stiffness follows a time course which is distinct from that of active force and very similar to the myoplasmic calcium concentration time course. We therefore hypothesize that static stiffness is due to a calcium-dependent stiffening of a non-crossbridge sarcomere structure, such as the titin filament. According to this hypothesis, titin, in addition to its well-recognized role in determining the muscle passive tension, could have a role during muscle activity.

  11. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J.; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies.

  12. Indices of vascular stiffness and wave reflection in relation to body mass index or body fat in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wykretowicz, Andrzej; Adamska, Karolina; Guzik, Przemyslaw; Krauze, Tomasz; Wysocki, Henryk

    2007-10-01

    1. Obesity appears to influence vascular stiffness, an important cardiovascular risk factor. An accurate picture of arterial stiffness may be obtained when a combination of various techniques is used. 2. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether the body mass index (BMI) and body fat content obtained by bioimpedance were of equal value in estimating the influence of body fatness on various indices of vascular stiffness and wave reflection. 3. A total of 175 healthy subjects was studied. Anthropometric measurements and total body bio-impedance analysis were performed to assess fat mass as a proportion of total body composition. Arterial stiffness and wave reflection were assessed using digital volume pulse analysis and tonometric measurement of the wave reflection indices and central haemodynamics. 4. Significant differences in the stiffness index (SI(DVP); P < 0.0001), peripheral augmentation index (pAI(x); P < 0.0001), central augmentation index (cAI(x); P < 0.0001), peripheral pulse pressure (pPP; P = 0.026) and central pulse pressure (cPP; P < 0.0001) were found when the population examined was divided accordingly to tertile of body fat content. However, subdividing various indices of arterial stiffness according to the tertile of BMI did not reveal any significant differences between groups, except for pPP and cPP. 5. Body fat content was significantly correlated with SI(DVP), pAI(x), cAI(x), pPP and cPP. The BMI correlated weakly with SI(DVP), pPP and cPP. 6. In conclusion, the BMI is not very useful in predicting changes in arterial stiffness and wave reflection due to obesity. However, stiffness and wave reflection indices derived from digital volume pulse analysis, the characteristics of radial and aortic pressure waveforms and peripheral and aortic pulse pressure are all related to body fat content, as estimated by bioimpedance.

  13. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  14. Infrarenal Aortic Occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, L. W.; Baker, J. D.; Dainko, E. A.; Machleder, H. I.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with total occlusion of the infrarenal aorta have been seen at the UCLA Hospitals in the past 11 years. Claudication was the presenting complaint in all but one patient, with one-third having ischemic rest pain. The average age of these patients was 54 years, and their histories revealed a surprising absence of myocardial infarction, stroke, or diabetes, although 40% had essential hypertension. Heavy tobacco use, however, was characteristic of the entire group. Arteriography proved valuable in identifying and characterizing the vascular abnormalities, but posed problems in technique and interpretation. Significant distal arterial disease was detected radiographically in only 21% of these patients. Operative correction of the aortic occlusion was performed on 26 patients, 18 by aortic bypass grafts and eight by aorto-iliac endarterectomy, with one early postoperative death. Although the thrombus extended to the renal artery origins in 77% of the cases, a well-designed technical approach did not require renal artery occlusion. Using serial creatinine determinations, one case of renal insufficiency was detected which was associated with prolonged postoperative hypotension. Although the extent of distal disease was more severe in those who underwent bypass, symptoms of claudication returned earlier and were more prominent in the endarterectomy group. This recurrence of systems was not favorably altered by sympathectomy performed concomitantly with the initial procedure. Even though this condition seems to pose difficult technical obstacles and has a poor prognosis, infrarenal aortic occlusion can be successfully treated by aortic bypass, with favorable long-term results, if particular attention is paid to elements of the preoperative evaluation and the intraoperative technical requirements peculiar to this relatively uncommon disease entity. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3. PMID:646479

  15. CT of thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posniak, H V; Olson, M C; Demos, T C; Benjoya, R A; Marsan, R E

    1990-09-01

    Aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are most often the result of arteriosclerotic disease. Other causes include degeneration of the medial layer of the aortic wall, either idiopathically or due to genetic disorders such as Marfan syndrome; aortic dissection; trauma; syphilis and other bacterial infection; noninfective aortitis; and congenital anomaly. We review normal anatomy of the aorta and discuss our technique and interpretation of computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of the thoracic aorta. We illustrate the CT appearance of different types of aortic aneurysms as well as discuss the use of CT for assessing complications of aneurysms, for postoperative follow-up, and in the differentiation of aortic aneurysm from a paraaortic mass.

  16. Micromanaging Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Maegdefessel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA disease to human morbidity and mortality has increased in the aging, industrialized world. In response, extraordinary efforts have been launched to determine the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of the diseased aorta. This work aims to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to limit AAA expansion and, ultimately, rupture. Contributions from multiple research groups have uncovered a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory milieu, which is believed to be essential for maintaining aortic vascular homeostasis. Recently, novel small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, have been identified as important transcriptional and post-transcriptional inhibitors of gene expression. MicroRNAs are thought to “fine tune” the translational output of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. With the discovery that microRNAs act as powerful regulators in the context of a wide variety of diseases, it is only logical that microRNAs be thoroughly explored as potential therapeutic entities. This current review summarizes interesting findings regarding the intriguing roles and benefits of microRNA expression modulation during AAA initiation and propagation. These studies utilize disease-relevant murine models, as well as human tissue from patients undergoing surgical aortic aneurysm repair. Furthermore, we critically examine future therapeutic strategies with regard to their clinical and translational feasibility.

  17. Using The Descending Aortic Wall Thickness Measured In Transesophageal Echocardiography As A Risk Marker For Aortic Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Fanari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to estimate whether aortic wall thickness is increased in patients with Aortic dissection (AD compared to low risk control group and can be used in addition to aortic diameter as a risk marker of AD. Background: AD occurs due to pathologies that may increase thickness of the aortic wall. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE has the ability to visualise both the thoracic aortic wall and lumen. Aortic diameter has been used to predict aortic dissection and timing of surgery, but it is not always predictive of that risk. Methods: In 48 patients with AD who underwent TEE were examined retrospectively and compared to 48 control patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO. We measured aortic diameter at different levels, intimal/medial thickness (IMT and complete wall thickness (CMT. Demographic data and cardiovascular risk factors were reviewed. The data was analysed using ANOVA and student t test. Results: (AD patients were older [mean age 66 AD vs. 51 PFO], had more hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and Coronary artery disease. Both IMT and CMT in the descending aorta were increased in AD group [(1.85 vs. 1.43 mm; P=0.03 and 2.93 vs. 2.46 mm; p=0.01. As expected the diameter of ascending aorta was also greater in AD (4.61 vs. 2.92 cm; P=0.004. Conclusions: CMT and IMT in the descending aorta detected by TEE is greater in patients with AD when compared to control and may add prognostic data to that of aortic diameter

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Lefevre, Thierry; Søndergaard, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited information exists describing the results of transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease (TAV-in-BAV). OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate clinical outcomes of a large cohort of patients undergoing TAV-in-BAV. METHODS...

  19. Giant Aortic Pseudoaneurysm with Stanford Type A Aortic Dissection after Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mertay Boran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta is a rare but dreadful complication occurring several months or years after aortic surgery. Thoracic aortic aneurysms tend to be asymptomatic and were previously often diagnosed only after a complication such as dissection or rupture. We present a rare case of giant ascending aneurysm with Stanford type A aortic dissection occurring 6 years after aortic valve replacement and also illustrate the potential dimensions the ascending aorta may reach by a pseudoaneurysm and dissection after AVR.

  20. Explicit Time-Stepping for Stiff ODEs

    CERN Document Server

    Eriksson, Kenneth; Logg, Anders; 10.1137/S1064827502409626

    2012-01-01

    We present a new strategy for solving stiff ODEs with explicit methods. By adaptively taking a small number of stabilizing small explicit time steps when necessary, a stiff ODE system can be stabilized enough to allow for time steps much larger than what is indicated by classical stability analysis. For many stiff problems the cost of the stabilizing small time steps is small, so the improvement is large. We illustrate the technique on a number of well-known stiff test problems.

  1. Hemodynamic predictors of aortic dilatation in bicuspid aortic valve by velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramamurthy Senthil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve (BAV is a significant risk factor for serious complications including valve dysfunction, aortic dilatation, dissection, and sudden death. Clinical tools for identification and monitoring of BAV patients at high risk for development of aortic dilatation, an early complication, are not available. Methods This paper reports an investigation in 18 pediatric BAV patients and 10 normal controls of links between abnormal blood flow patterns in the ascending aorta and aortic dilatation using velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Blood flow patterns were quantitatively expressed in the angle between systolic left ventricular outflow and the aortic root channel axis, and also correlated with known biochemical markers of vessel wall disease. Results The data confirm larger ascending aortas in BAV patients than in controls, and show more angled LV outflow in BAV (17.54 ± 0.87 degrees than controls (10.01 ± 1.29 (p = 0.01. Significant correlation of systolic LV outflow jet angles with dilatation was found at different levels of the aorta in BAV patients STJ: r = 0.386 (N = 18, p = 0.048, AAO: r = 0.536 (N = 18, p = 0.022, and stronger correlation was found with patients and controls combined into one population: SOV: r = 0.405 (N = 28, p = 0.033, STJ: r = 0.562 (N = 28, p = 0.002, and AAO r = 0.645 (N = 28, p Conclusions The results of this study provide new insights into the pathophysiological processes underlying aortic dilatation in BAV patients. These results show a possible path towards the development of clinical risk stratification protocols in order to reduce morbidity and mortality for this common congenital heart defect.

  2. [Interrupted aortic arch in a 68-year-old female with hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Susanna; Fineschi, Massimo; Ceccherini, Claudio; Pierli, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare congenital malformation of the aorta and aortic arch. We report the case of a 68-year-old female with hypertension and poor control of blood pressure levels. She was diagnosed with aortic coarctation by aortography during young age. A double access angiography was performed that showed a type A IAA, a rare condition in adults that may cause hypertension.

  3. Shoulder Stiffness : Current Concepts and Concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itoi, Eiji; Arce, Guillermo; Bain, Gregory I.; Diercks, Ronald L.; Guttmann, Dan; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Yoo, Yon-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder stiffness can be caused by various etiologies such as immobilization, trauma, or surgical interventions. The Upper Extremity Committee of ISAKOS defined the term "frozen shoulder" as idiopathic stiff shoulder, that is, without a known cause. Secondary stiff shoulder is a term that should be

  4. Energy-Efficient Variable Stiffness Actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Ludo C.; Carloni, Raffaella; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Variable stiffness actuators are a particular class of actuators that is characterized by the property that the apparent output stiffness can be changed independent of the output position. To achieve this, variable stiffness actuators consist of a number of elastic elements and a number of actuated

  5. The Static Stiffness Linear Regression of Parallel Mechanism Based on the Orthogonal Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Wang-Nan; Zhao-Cheng Kang; Gao-Peng; Pang-Bo; Zhou-Shasha

    2013-01-01

    Using the orthogonal experimental method, we can get the linear regression model of about parallel mechanism stiffness. Selecting four factors three levels of orthogonal experiment method, in ANSYS-workbench to space in third rotation 3-SPS/S parallel mechanism for static stiffness analysis, we have won nine of the data of the experiments, the application of the MATLAB software to experimental data is linear regression, which can get the static stiffness linear regression of parallel mechanis...

  6. Comparison of cervical spine stiffness in individuals with chronic nonspecific neck pain and asymptomatic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Lewis A; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Rivett, Darren A

    2015-03-01

    Clinical measurement, cross-sectional. To determine if spinal joint stiffness is different in individuals with nonspecific neck pain, and whether stiffness magnitude is associated with pain intensity and disability. Manual therapists commonly evaluate spinal joint stiffness in patients presenting with nonspecific neck pain. However, a relationship between stiffness and neck pain has not yet been demonstrated. Spinal stiffness at C7 was objectively measured in participants with chronic nonspecific neck pain whose symptomatic spinal level was identified as C7 (n = 12) and in age- and sex-matched asymptomatic controls (n = 12). Stiffness (slope of the linear region of the force-displacement curve) was quantified using a device that applied 5 standardized mechanical force cycles to the C7 spinous process, while concurrently measuring displacement and resistance to movement. Stiffness was compared between groups using an independent t test. Spearman rho and Pearson r were used to determine the extent to which stiffness magnitude was associated with pain intensity (visual analog scale) and level of disability (Neck Disability Index), respectively, in the group with neck pain. Participants with nonspecific neck pain had greater spinal joint stiffness at C7 compared with asymptomatic individuals (mean difference, 1.78 N/mm; 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 3.27; P = .022). However, stiffness magnitude in the group with neck pain was not associated (P>.05) with pain intensity or level of disability. These preliminary results suggest that cervical spine stiffness may be greater in the presence of nonspecific neck pain. However, judgments regarding pain intensity and level of disability should not be inferred from examinations of spinal joint stiffness.

  7. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease.

  8. Studies of chain substitution caused sub-fibril level differences in stiffness and ultrastructure of wildtype and oim/oim collagen fibers using multifrequency-AFM and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Chang, Shu-Wei; Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Buehler, Markus J; Shefelbine, Sandra; Dao, Ming; Zeng, Kaiyang

    2016-11-01

    Molecular alteration in type I collagen, i.e., substituting the α2 chain with α1 chain in tropocollagen molecule, can cause osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a brittle bone disease, which can be represented by a mouse model (oim/oim). In this work, we use dual-frequency Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and incorporated with molecular modeling to quantify the ultrastructure and stiffness of the individual native collagen fibers from wildtype (+/+) and oim/oim diseased mice humeri. Our work presents direct experimental evidences that the +/+ fibers have highly organized and compact ultrastructure and corresponding ordered stiffness distribution. In contrast, oim/oim fibers have ordered but loosely packed ultrastructure with uncorrelated stiffness distribution, as well as local defects. The molecular model also demonstrates the structural and molecular packing differences between +/+ and oim/oim collagens. The molecular mutation significantly altered sub-fibril structure and mechanical property of collagen fibers. This study can give the new insight for the mechanisms and treatment of the brittle bone disease.

  9. Variable stiffness sandwich panels using electrostatic interlocking core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2016-04-01

    Structural topology has a large impact on the flexural stiffness of a beam structure. Reversible attachment between discrete substructures allows for control of shear stress transfer between structural elements, thus stiffness modulation. Electrostatic adhesion has shown promise for providing a reversible latching mechanism for controllable internal connectivity. Building on previous research, a thin film copper polyimide laminate has been used to incorporate high voltage electrodes to Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) sandwich structures. The level of electrostatic holding force across the electrode interface is key to the achievable level of stiffness modulation. The use of non-flat interlocking core structures can allow for a significant increase in electrode contact area for a given core geometry, thus a greater electrostatic holding force. Interlocking core geometries based on cosine waves can be Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machined from Rohacell IGF 110 Foam core. These Interlocking Core structures could allow for enhanced variable stiffness functionality compared to basic planar electrodes. This novel concept could open up potential new applications for electrostatically induced variable stiffness structures.

  10. Negative stiffness in gear contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Půst L.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The tooth contact stiffness is very often included in dynamic mathematical models of gear drives. It is an important value for calculation of torsion eigenfrequencies as well as the dynamic properties of the whole transmission systems. Planetary gear drives have several advantages over simple parallel axis gears, especially due to theirs compact design and great torque-to-weight ratio caused by multiple parallel paths. However, the dimensional or mounting errors can cause that some planets have the tendency to take more load than the others. One of the ways how to improve load sharing is the application of flexible planetary pins or by using a free central wheel. However in such cases, the wheels motion is defined in one rotation coordinate and two translation coordinates — tangential and radial. The reaction force at radial change of axis distance is usually neglected. The focus of this contribution is to derive the stiffness of this radial connection and to analyse the influence of radial stiffness on planetary gear dynamics.

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems....

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation vs. surgical aortic valve replacement for treatment of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siontis, George C M; Praz, Fabien; Pilgrim, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: In view of the currently available evidence from randomized trials, we aimed to compare the collective safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) vs. surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) across the spectrum of risk and in important subgroups. METHODS AND RESULTS...

  13. [Aortic valve replacement for the small aortic annulus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, H; Usui, A; Akita, T; Ueda, Y

    2006-04-01

    Aortic valve surgery for the small aortic annulus is still challenging for surgeons. Recently, the new types of high performance prosthesis have been developed and the chance of an aortic root enlargement (ARE) is decreasing. In this study, we propose the ideal strategy of the aortic surgery for the small aortic annulus. We analyzed the clinical records of 158 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement from August 1999 to October 2005 in our institution. The small aortic annulus was observed in 38 patients (24%). Fourteen patients of this group underwent ARE. Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) was less frequently observed in patients with ARE compared to those without ARE. The additional time required for ARE was not considerable, and neither ischemic time nor cardiopulmonary bypass time was significantly prolonged by ARE. In conclusion, we have to select a prosthesis with sufficient orifice area to avoid PPM, otherwise we should choose an option of ARE. For this consideration, we definitely need the chart that demonstrates the relationship between the nominal size of various types of prostheses and the size of a patient's annulus that those prostheses actually fit.

  14. Measurement and Treatment of Passive Muscle Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Henrik

    This PhD thesis is based on research conducted at the University of Copenhagen and Helene Elsass Center from 2012 to 2015. Measurements and treatment of passive muscle stiffness in people with cerebral palsy (CP) comprise the focus of the thesis. The thesis summarizes the results from four studies...... stiffness. I introduce how to evaluate and distinguish between passive muscle stiffness and reflex-mediated stiffness in research and in clinical practice. Furthermore, I present ”the Portable Spasticity Assessment Device”, which was developed as a part of the PhD study. I discuss the validity......-mediated stiffness was considered a major problem. However, this study shows that significantly reduced RFD and increased passive muscle stiffness, rather than reflex-mediated stiffness, are the major contributors to impaired gait function in adults with CP, compared with neurologically healthy subjects. The third...

  15. MAT2A mutations predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Zhao, Ren; Cai, Bo; Veeraraghavan, Sudha; Prakash, Siddharth K; Johnson, Ralph J; Muilenburg, Ann; Willing, Marcia; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Moran, Rocio; Debacker, Julie; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Leal, Suzanne M; Raman, C S; Swindell, Eric C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2015-01-08

    Up to 20% of individuals who have thoracic aortic aneurysms or acute aortic dissections but who do not have syndromic features have a family history of thoracic aortic disease. Significant genetic heterogeneity is established for this familial condition. Whole-genome linkage analysis and exome sequencing of distant relatives from a large family with autosomal-dominant inheritance of thoracic aortic aneurysms variably associated with the bicuspid aortic valve was used for identification of additional genes predisposing individuals to this condition. A rare variant, c.1031A>C (p.Glu344Ala), was identified in MAT2A, which encodes methionine adenosyltransferase II alpha (MAT IIα). This variant segregated with disease in the family, and Sanger sequencing of DNA from affected probands from unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease identified another MAT2A rare variant, c.1067G>A (p.Arg356His). Evidence that these variants predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections includes the following: there is a paucity of rare variants in MAT2A in the population; amino acids Glu344 and Arg356 are conserved from humans to zebrafish; and substitutions of these amino acids in MAT Iα are found in individuals with hypermethioninemia. Structural analysis suggested that p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His disrupt MAT IIα enzyme function. Knockdown of mat2aa in zebrafish via morpholino oligomers disrupted cardiovascular development. Co-transfected wild-type human MAT2A mRNA rescued defects of zebrafish cardiovascular development at significantly higher levels than mRNA edited to express either the Glu344 or Arg356 mutants, providing further evidence that the p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His substitutions impair MAT IIα function. The data presented here support the conclusion that rare genetic variants in MAT2A predispose individuals to thoracic aortic disease.

  16. Surgical treatment of pararenal aortic aneurysms in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, G; D'Urso, A; Ceccanei, G; Caliò, F; Vietri, F

    2007-12-01

    Until fenestrated endografts will become the standard treatment of pararenal aortic aneurysms, open surgical repair will currently be employed for the repair of this condition. Suprarenal aortic control and larger surgical dissection represent additional technical requirements for the treatment of pararenal aneurysms compared to those of open infrarenal aortic aneurysms, which may be followed by an increased operative mortality and morbidity rate. As this may be especially true when dealing with pararenal aneurysms in an elderly patients' population, we decided to retrospectively review our results of open pararenal aortic aneurysm repair in elderly patients, in order to compare them with those reported in the literature. Twenty-one patients over 75 years of age were operated on for pararenal aortic aneurysms in a ten-year period. Exposure of the aorta was obtained by means of a retroperitoneal access, through a left flank incision on the eleventh rib. When dealing with interrenal aortic aneurysm the left renal artery was revascularized with a retrograde bypass arising from the aortic graft, proximally bevelled on the ostium of the right renal artery. Two patients died of acute intestinal ischemia, yielding a postoperative mortality of 9.5%. Nonfatal complications included 2 pleural effusions, a transitory rise in postoperative serum creatinine levels in 3 cases, and one retroperitoneal hematoma. Mean renal ischemia time was 23 min, whereas mean visceral ischemia time was 19 min. Mean inhospital stay was 11 days. Pararenal aortic aneurysms in the elderly can be surgically repaired with results that are similar to those obtained in younger patients.

  17. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinkels, B M; Jaarsma, W; Wely, L Relik-van; van Swieten, H A; Ernst, J M P G; Plokker, H W M

    2003-03-01

    This case report describes a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis who was initially considered inoperable because of a very poor left ventricular function and severe pulmonary hypertension. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty, the clinical and haemodynamic status of the patient improved to such an extent that subsequent aortic valve replacement was considered possible and eventually proved to be successful. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty has value as a potential bridge to aortic valve replacement when the risks for surgery are considered to be too high.

  18. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with acromegaly and aortic root dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Praet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are severe complications of acromegaly. The current trend for management of an aortic root aneurysm is valve-sparing root replacement as well as restoring the diameter of the aortic sinotubular junction (STJ and annulus. Our case report supports the recommendation that in patients with acromegaly, severe aortic root involvement may indicate the need for surgery.

  19. Aortic diameter >or = 5.5 cm is not a good predictor of type A aortic dissection: observations from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pape, Linda A; Tsai, Thomas T; Isselbacher, Eric M; Oh, Jae K; O'gara, Patrick T; Evangelista, Arturo; Fattori, Rossella; Meinhardt, Gabriel; Trimarchi, Santi; Bossone, Eduardo; Suzuki, Toru; Cooper, Jeanna V; Froehlich, James B; Nienaber, Christoph A; Eagle, Kim A

    2007-01-01

    .... However, few studies of acute aortic dissection patients and aortic size exist. We used data from our registry of acute aortic dissection patients to better understand the relationship between aortic diameter and type A dissection...

  20. Key Insights into Hand Biomechanics: Human Grip Stiffness Can Be Decoupled from Force by Cocontraction and Predicted from Electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Höppner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the relation between grip force and grip stiffness for the human hand with and without voluntary cocontraction. Apart from gaining biomechanical insight, this issue is particularly relevant for variable-stiffness robotic systems, which can independently control the two parameters, but for which no clear methods exist to design or efficiently exploit them. Subjects were asked in one task to produce different levels of force, and stiffness was measured. As expected, this task reveals a linear coupling between force and stiffness. In a second task, subjects were then asked to additionally decouple stiffness from force at these force levels by using cocontraction. We measured the electromyogram from relevant groups of muscles and analyzed the possibility to predict stiffness and force. Optical tracking was used for avoiding wrist movements. We found that subjects were able to decouple grip stiffness from force when using cocontraction on average by about 20% of the maximum measured stiffness over all force levels, while this ability increased with the applied force. This result contradicts the force–stiffness behavior of most variable-stiffness actuators. Moreover, we found the thumb to be on average twice as stiff as the index finger and discovered that intrinsic hand muscles predominate our prediction of stiffness, but not of force. EMG activity and grip force allowed to explain 72 ± 12% of the measured variance in stiffness by simple linear regression, while only 33 ± 18% variance in force. Conclusively the high signal-to-noise ratio and the high correlation to stiffness of these muscles allow for a robust and reliable regression of stiffness, which can be used to continuously teleoperate compliance of modern robotic hands.

  1. Key Insights into Hand Biomechanics: Human Grip Stiffness Can Be Decoupled from Force by Cocontraction and Predicted from Electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höppner, Hannes; Große-Dunker, Maximilian; Stillfried, Georg; Bayer, Justin; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the relation between grip force and grip stiffness for the human hand with and without voluntary cocontraction. Apart from gaining biomechanical insight, this issue is particularly relevant for variable-stiffness robotic systems, which can independently control the two parameters, but for which no clear methods exist to design or efficiently exploit them. Subjects were asked in one task to produce different levels of force, and stiffness was measured. As expected, this task reveals a linear coupling between force and stiffness. In a second task, subjects were then asked to additionally decouple stiffness from force at these force levels by using cocontraction. We measured the electromyogram from relevant groups of muscles and analyzed the possibility to predict stiffness and force. Optical tracking was used for avoiding wrist movements. We found that subjects were able to decouple grip stiffness from force when using cocontraction on average by about 20% of the maximum measured stiffness over all force levels, while this ability increased with the applied force. This result contradicts the force–stiffness behavior of most variable-stiffness actuators. Moreover, we found the thumb to be on average twice as stiff as the index finger and discovered that intrinsic hand muscles predominate our prediction of stiffness, but not of force. EMG activity and grip force allowed to explain 72 ± 12% of the measured variance in stiffness by simple linear regression, while only 33 ± 18% variance in force. Conclusively the high signal-to-noise ratio and the high correlation to stiffness of these muscles allow for a robust and reliable regression of stiffness, which can be used to continuously teleoperate compliance of modern robotic hands. PMID:28588472

  2. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: reading the enemy's playbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elefteriades, John A

    2008-05-01

    The vast database of the Yale Center for Thoracic Aortic Disease--which includes information on 3000 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection, with 9000 catalogued images and 9000 patient-years of follow-up--has, over the last decade, permitted multiple glimpses into the "playbook" of this virulent disease. Understanding the precise behavioral features of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection permits us more effectively to combat this disease. In this monograph, we will first review certain fundamentals--in terms of anatomy, nomenclature, imaging, diagnosis, medical, surgical, and stent treatment. After reviewing these fundamentals, we will proceed with a detailed exploration of lessons learned by peering into the operational playbook of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. Among the glimpses afforded in the behavioral playbook of this disease are the following: 1 Thoracic aortic aneurysm, while lethal, is indolent. Mortality usually does not occur until after years of growth. 2 The aneurysmal ascending thoracic aorta grows slowly: about 0.1 cm per year (the descending aorta grows somewhat faster). 3 Over a patient's lifetime, "hinge points" at which the likelihood of rupture or dissection skyrockets are seen at 5.5 cm for the ascending and 6.5 cm for the descending aorta. Intervening at 5 cm diameter for the ascending and 6 cm for the descending prevents most adverse events. 4 Symptomatic aneurysms require resection regardless of size. 5 The yearly rate of rupture, dissection, or death is 14.1% for a patient with a thoracic aorta of 6 cm diameter. 6 The mechanical properties of the aorta deteriorate markedly at 6 cm diameter (distensibility falls, and wall stress rises)--a finding that "dovetails" perfectly with observations of the clinical behavior of the thoracic aorta. 7 Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection are largely inherited diseases, with a predominantly autosomal-dominant pattern. The specific genetics are being elucidated at the

  3. Association between arterial stiffness, disease activity and functional impairment in ankylosing spondylitis patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Claudiu; Drăgoi, Răzvan Gabriel; Popoviciu, Horațiu; Drăgoi, Mihai; Avram, Adina; Amaricăi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular risk is an important factor for increased morbidity and mortality in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The aim of this study is to assess arterial stiffness in relation to the disease activity and functional limitation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Twenty-four patients (mean age 45.8 ± 11.7 years) suffering of ankylosing spondylitis (disease duration 11.1 ± 5.1 years) and 24 gender and age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Clinical, biological, and functional status of ankylosing spondylitis patients was recorded. Arterial stiffness was assessed by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA) was performed using applanation tonometry. We found significant differences between ankylosing spondylitis patients and healthy controls in regard to PWV (p = 0.047), aortic augmentation pressure-AP (p = 0.028), augmentation index-AIx (p = 0.038) and aortic augmentation index adjusted for heart rate-AIx75 (p = 0.011). PWV and AIx75 were significantly associated with the disease functioning score-BASFI (p = 0.012, r = 0.504; p = 0.041, r = 0.421). Aortic AP and augmentation indexes (AIx and AIx75) were all associated to ASDAS score (p = 0.028, r = 0.448; p = 0.005, r = 0.549; p = 0.025, r = 0.455). Our study showed that ankylosing spondylitis patients have a higher arterial stiffness than the age-matched controls, leading to an increased cardiovascular risk. We found that arterial stiffness is positively associated with disease activity and functional impairment. Chronic spondiloarthropaties should be screened for arterial stiffness, even in the absence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, in order to benefit from primary prevention measures.

  4. An Important but Forgotten Technique: Aortic Fenestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Mihriban; Tayfur, Kaptan Derya; Urkmez, Melih

    2016-10-01

    Aortic fenestration is a technique that treats organ ischemia in descending aortic dissection. Open surgical aortic fenestration is an effective yet uncommonly used and widely forgotten procedure. Here, we describe 2 patients suffering from chronic thoracoabdominal aortic dissection, and we aimed to identify under what circumstances surgical aortic fenestration should be applied, to assess its safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential regulation of the superoxide dismutase family in experimental aortic aneurysms and rat aortic explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Indranil; Pearce, Charles G; Cho, Brenda S; Hannawa, Kevin K; Roelofs, Karen J; Stanley, James C; Henke, Peter K; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2007-04-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in abdominal aortic aneurysm pathogenesis. This study sought to characterize the relevance of superoxide dismutases (SOD), a family of reactive oxygen catalyzing metalloenzymes, including manganese SOD (MnSOD), copper-zinc SOD (CuZnSOD), and extracellular SOD (EcSOD), in a rodent aortic aneurysm model. Male rat infrarenal abdominal aortas were perfused with either saline (control) or porcine pancreatic elastase (6 U/mL). Aortic diameter was measured and aortas harvested on post-operation days 1, 2, and 7 (N=5-6 per treatment group per day). MnSOD, CuZnSOD, EcSOD, catalase, MMP-2, MMP-9, and beta-actin expression in aortic tissue was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. MnSOD protein levels were measured using western immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. In subsequent experiments, aimed at understanding the mechanism by which SOD is involved in AAA pathogenesis, rat aortic explants (RAEs) were incubated in media for 24 h in the presence of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta, 2 ng/mL) and TEMPOL (SOD mimetic), catalase, or a combined SOD and catalase mimetic. Media MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity was determined by zymography. Data were analyzed by Student's t-tests and ANOVA. Elastase-perfused aortic diameters were significantly increased compared to control aortas by post-perfusion day 7 (P=0.016). MnSOD mRNA levels in elastase perfused aortas were 6.0 (P=0.05) and 7.5 times (P<0.01) greater than control aortas at post-perfusion days 1 and 2, respectively. EcSOD, CuZnSOD, catalase, and MMP-2 mRNA expression did not statistically vary between the two groups. MMP-9 expression was 3.5-fold higher in the elastase group on post-perfusion day 2 (P=0.04). Western immunoblotting confirmed MnSOD protein was up-regulated on day 4 in the elastase-perfused group compared to controls (P=0.02). Immunohistrochemistry demonstrated increased MnSOD staining in the elastase group on day 4. In RAE experiments, TEMPOL increased both MMP-9 and MMP-2

  6. Morphological Computation of Haptic Perception of a Controllable Stiffness Probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nantachai Sornkarn

    Full Text Available When people are asked to palpate a novel soft object to discern its physical properties such as texture, elasticity, and even non-homogeneity, they not only regulate probing behaviors, but also the co-contraction level of antagonistic muscles to control the mechanical impedance of fingers. It is suspected that such behavior tries to enhance haptic perception by regulating the function of mechanoreceptors at different depths of the fingertips and proprioceptive sensors such as tendon and spindle sensors located in muscles. In this paper, we designed and fabricated a novel two-degree of freedom variable stiffness indentation probe to investigate whether the regulation of internal stiffness, indentation, and probe sweeping velocity (PSV variables affect the accuracy of the depth estimation of stiff inclusions in an artificial silicon phantom using information gain metrics. Our experimental results provide new insights into not only the biological phenomena of haptic perception but also new opportunities to design and control soft robotic probes.

  7. Voluntary control of human jaw stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiller, Douglas M; Houle, Guillaume; Ostry, David J

    2005-09-01

    Recent studies of human arm movement have suggested that the control of stiffness may be important both for maintaining stability and for achieving differences in movement accuracy. In the present study, we have examined the voluntary control of postural stiffness in 3D in the human jaw. The goal is to address the possible role of stiffness control in both stabilizing the jaw and in achieving the differential precision requirements of speech sounds. We previously showed that patterns of kinematic variability in speech are systematically related to the stiffness of the jaw. If the nervous system uses stiffness control as a means to regulate kinematic variation in speech, it should also be possible to show that subjects can voluntarily modify jaw stiffness. Using a robotic device, a series of force pulses was applied to the jaw to elicit changes in stiffness to resist displacement. Three orthogonal directions and three magnitudes of forces were tested. In all conditions, subjects increased the magnitude of jaw stiffness to resist the effects of the applied forces. Apart from the horizontal direction, greater increases in stiffness were observed when larger forces were applied. Moreover, subjects differentially increased jaw stiffness along a vertical axis to counteract disturbances in this direction. The observed changes in the magnitude of stiffness in different directions suggest an ability to control the pattern of stiffness of the jaw. The results are interpreted as evidence that jaw stiffness can be adjusted voluntarily, and thus may play a role in stabilizing the jaw and in controlling movement variation in the orofacial system.

  8. Deformation of Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valves in Systole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan

    2012-11-01

    Clinical studies have shown that patients with congenital bicuspid aortic valves (CBAVs) develop degenerative calcification of the leaflets at young ages compared to normal tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical geometry of the leaflets in CBAVs and the associate changes in flow shear stresses and excessive strain rate levels are possible causes for the early calcification. Central to the validation of this hypothesis is the need to quantify the differences in strain rate levels between the BAVs and TAVs. We simulate the CBAVs by surgically stitching two of the leaflets of a porcine aortic valve together. To quantify strain differences, we performed in-vitro experiments in both BAVs and TAVs by tracking the 3-D motion of small dots marked on each leaflet surface. We then used phase-locked stereo photogrammetry to measure the strain rates in both radial and circumferential directions during the whole cardiac cycle. In the BAVs' case, the fused leaflet experiences an almost 30% increase in the radial stretching when fully open. RNA profiling of human aortic valve interstitial cells exposed to cyclic stretch shows that the increased stretch experienced by the BAVs results in increased levels of INTERLEUKINS (ILs) and other known inflammatory markers associated with aortic valve calcification. Together, these observations suggest that the abnormal stretch experienced by BAVs activates inflammation gene expression.

  9. Acute aortic dissection: be aware of misdiagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asteri Theodora

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute aortic dissection (AAD is a life-threatening condition requiring immediate assessment and therapy. A patient suffering from AAD often presents with an insignificant or irrelevant medical history, giving rise to possible misdiagnosis. The aim of this retrospective study is to address the problem of misdiagnosing AD and the different imaging studies used. Methods From January 2000 to December 2004, 49 patients (41 men and 8 women, aged from 18–75 years old presented to the Emergency Department of our hospital for different reasons and finally diagnosed with AAD. Fifteen of those patients suffered from arterial hypertension, one from giant cell arteritis and another patient from Marfan's syndrome. The diagnosis of AAD was made by chest X-ray, contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and coronary angiography. Results Initial misdiagnosis occurred in fifteen patients (31% later found to be suffering from AAD. The misdiagnosis was myocardial infarction in 12 patients and cerebral infarction in another three patients. Conclusion Aortic dissection may present with a variety of clinical manifestations, like syncope, chest pain, anuria, pulse deficits, abdominal pain, back pain, or acute congestive heart failure. Nearly a third of the patients found to be suffering from AD, were initially otherwise diagnosed. Key in the management of acute aortic dissection is to maintain a high level of suspicion for this diagnosis.

  10. Biomechanical Effects of Stiffness in Parallel With the Knee Joint During Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamaei, Kamran; Cenciarini, Massimo; Adams, Albert A; Gregorczyk, Karen N; Schiffman, Jeffrey M; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-10-01

    The human knee behaves similarly to a linear torsional spring during the stance phase of walking with a stiffness referred to as the knee quasi-stiffness. The spring-like behavior of the knee joint led us to hypothesize that we might partially replace the knee joint contribution during stance by utilizing an external spring acting in parallel with the knee joint. We investigated the validity of this hypothesis using a pair of experimental robotic knee exoskeletons that provided an external stiffness in parallel with the knee joints in the stance phase. We conducted a series of experiments involving walking with the exoskeletons with four levels of stiffness, including 0%, 33%, 66%, and 100% of the estimated human knee quasi-stiffness, and a pair of joint-less replicas. The results indicated that the ankle and hip joints tend to retain relatively invariant moment and angle patterns under the effects of the exoskeleton mass, articulation, and stiffness. The results also showed that the knee joint responds in a way such that the moment and quasi-stiffness of the knee complex (knee joint and exoskeleton) remains mostly invariant. A careful analysis of the knee moment profile indicated that the knee moment could fully adapt to the assistive moment; whereas, the knee quasi-stiffness fully adapts to values of the assistive stiffness only up to ∼80%. Above this value, we found biarticular consequences emerge at the hip joint.

  11. Structural and biochemical characteristics of arterial stiffness in patients with atherosclerosis and in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagura, Maksim; Kals, Jaak; Serg, Martin; Kampus, Priit; Zilmer, Mihkel; Jakobson, Meelis; Unt, Eve; Lieberg, Jüri; Eha, Jaan

    2012-10-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of vascular morbidity and mortality in patients with atherosclerosis. Angiographic score (ASc) reflects severity of atherosclerosis in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Osteopontin (OPN) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) are involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between arterial stiffness, ASc, serum OPN and oxLDL in patients with symptomatic PAD, and in clinically healthy subjects. We studied 79 men with symptomatic PAD (mean age 64±7 years) and 84 healthy men (mean age 63±8 years). Calculation of the ASc was based on severity and location of atherosclerotic lesions in the arteries of the lower extremities. Aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) was evaluated by applanation tonometry using the Sphygmocor device. Serum OPN and oxLDL levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The aPWV (10±2.4 vs. 8.4±1.7 (m s(-1)); P<0.001), OPN (75 (62.3-85.8) vs. 54.8 (47.7-67.9) (ng ml(-1)); P<0.001) and oxLDL (67 (52.5-93.5) vs. 47.5 (37-65.5); P<0.001) were different for the patients and for the controls. In multiple regression models, aPWV was independently determined by ASc, log-OPN, log-oxLDL and estimated glomerular filtration rate in the patients (R2=0.44; P<0.001) and by log-OPN, log-oxLDL, age and heart rate in the controls (R2=0.38; P<0.001). The independent relationship of a PWV with serum levels of OPN and oxLDL in the patients with PAD and in the controls indicates that OPN and oxLDL might influence arterial stiffening in patients with atherosclerosis and in clinically healthy subjects.

  12. Characteristics of aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hong Ju [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Kim, Jun Suk [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sung Min [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To characterize aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) morphology using computed tomography (CT) and surgical findings. We retrospectively enrolled 209 patients with BAVs who underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and CT. BAVs were classified as anterior-posterior (BAV-AP) or lateral (BAV-LA) orientation of the cusps and divided according to the presence (raphe+) or absence (raphe-) of a raphe. Ascending aortic dimensions were measured by CT at four levels. BAV-AP was present in 129 patients (61.7 %) and raphe+ in 120 (57.4 %). Sixty-nine patients (33.0 %) had aortic regurgitation (AR), 70 (33.5 %) had aortic stenosis (AS), and 58 (27.8 %) had combined AS and AR. AR was more common in patients with BAV-AP and raphe+; AS was more common with BAV-LA and raphe-.Annulus/body surface area and tubular portion/body surface area diameters in patients with BAV-AP (17.1 ± 2.3 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.3 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe+ (17.3 ± 2.2 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) were significantly different from those with BAV-LA (15.8 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.4 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe- (15.7 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.2 ± 5.4 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively). The morphological characteristics of BAV might be associated with the type of valvular dysfunction, and degree and location of an ascending aorta dilatation. (orig.)

  13. Stiffness estimation of a parallel kinematic machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a simple yet comprehensive approach to quickly estimating the stiff-ness of a tripod-based parallel kinematic machine. This approach can be implemented in two steps. Inthe first step, the machine structure is decomposed into two substructures associated with the machineframe and parallel mechanism. The stiffness models of these two substructures are formulated bymeans of virtual work principle. This is followed by the second step that enables the stiffness model ofthe machine structure as a whole to be achieved by linear superposition. The 3D representations of themachine stiffness within the usable workspace are depicted and the contributions of different componentrigidities to the machine stiffness are discussed. The result is compared with that obtained through finiteelement analysis.

  14. Measurement and Treatment of Passive Muscle Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Henrik

    This PhD thesis is based on research conducted at the University of Copenhagen and Helene Elsass Center from 2012 to 2015. Measurements and treatment of passive muscle stiffness in people with cerebral palsy (CP) comprise the focus of the thesis. The thesis summarizes the results from four studies......, which aimed to investigate: 1) The development of a clinical method to evaluate and distinguish neural (reflex mediated stiffness) and non-neural (passive muscle stiffness) components of muscle stiffness in adults with CP by objective and reliable measurements. 2) The association between increased...... passive muscle, muscle strength and gait function in adults with CP 3) The effect of resistance training and gait training accordingly on muscle strength, passive muscle stiffness and functional gait in adults with CP. The first part of the thesis defines reflex mediated stiffness and passive muscle...

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2010-01-01

    Although the number of elective operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is increasing, the sex- and age-standardised mortality rate of AAAs continues to rise, especially among men aged 65 years or more. The lethality of ruptured AAA continues to be 80-95%, compared with 5-7% by elective...... inhibit further AAA progression. All 4 existing RCTs point in the same direction, viz. in favour of screening of men aged 65 and above. We found that screening significantly reduced AAA-related mortality by 67% within the first five years (NNT = 352). Restriction of screening to men with previous...... year gained was 157 euro [1,170 DKK] and the cost per QALY at 178 euro [1,326 DKK]. In all, the ethical dilemma of the prophylactic operation, and the limited psychological side effects seem not to outweigh the benefits of screening. Conclusively, we found that offering men aged 65-73 years screening...

  16. Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve Thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Nicolaj C; Grove, Erik L; Andersen, Henning R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing focus on transcatheter heart valve (THV) thrombosis. However, there are limited data on incidence, clinical implications and predisposing factors of THV thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVES: We assessed the incidence...

  17. Adult thoracic and abdominal aortic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa O. Kaddah

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Aortic COA could be found in any segment of the aorta. Proper identification of the anatomical details and pressure gradient studies are important factors affecting the plan of management.

  18. CONGENITAL QUADRICUSPID AORTIC-VALVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWER, MHJ; DEGRAAF, JJ; EBELS, T

    1993-01-01

    Two patients with a quadricuspid aortic valve are described, one of them with concomitant juxtaposed coronary orifices facing the right hand facing sinus. The etiology and incidence of this congenital anomaly will be discussed.

  19. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy....... The 30-day mortality rate for the 98 patients was zero, although 14 of the 98 mini-sternotomies had to be converted to complete sternotomies intraoperatively due to technical problems. Such conversion doubled the operative time over that of the planned full sternotomies. In the group of patients whose...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  20. Numerical Analysis of Plastic Gear Stiffness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This paper established practical 3-D gear models to study the stiffness influencing factors of a loaded gear by finite element method, such as friction parameters, material properties, and gear structures. The research shows that, in elastic deformation, gear stiffness increases when sliding friction ability of contact pair decreases;meanwhile, the gear structure, especially asymmetric design in gear's shaft direction will also decrease gear stiffness.

  1. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index: rationale and methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Eamon; Li,Yan; Thijs, Lutgarde; McCormack, Patricia; Staessen, Jan A; O'Brien, Eoin; Stanton, Alice

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Increased arterial stiffness is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and may even predict its development at an early stage. Increased pulse pressure is seen as a marker of increased arterial stiffness and can be readily measured by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. We propose another surrogate measure of arterial stiffness derived from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring that may predict cardiovascular mortality over and above pulse pressure, namely, the...

  2. Longitudinal perspective on the conundrum of central arterial stiffness, blood pressure, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuteri, Angelo; Morrell, Christopher H; Orrù, Marco; Strait, James B; Tarasov, Kirill V; Ferreli, Liana Anna Pina; Loi, Francesco; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Delitala, Alessandro; Spurgeon, Harold; Najjar, Samer S; AlGhatrif, Majd; Lakatta, Edward G

    2014-12-01

    The age-associated increase in arterial stiffness has long been considered to parallel or to cause the age-associated increase in blood pressure (BP). Yet, the rates at which pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, and BP trajectories change over time within individuals who differ by age and sex have not been assessed and compared. This study determined the evolution of BP and aortic PWV trajectories during a 9.4-year follow-up in >4000 community-dwelling men and women of 20 to 100 years of age at entry into the SardiNIA Study. Linear mixed effects model analyses revealed that PWV accelerates with time during the observation period, at about the same rate over the entire age range in both men and women. In men, the longitudinal rate at which BP changed over time, however, did not generally parallel that of PWV acceleration: at ages>40 years the rates of change in systolic BP (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP) increase plateaued and then declined so that SBP, itself, also declined at older ages, whereas PP plateaued. In women, SBP, diastolic BP, and mean BP increased at constant rates across all ages, producing an increasing rate of increase in PP. Therefore, increased aortic stiffness is implicated in the age-associated increase in SBP and PP. These findings indicate that PWV is not a surrogate for BP and that arterial properties other than arterial wall stiffness that vary by age and sex also modulate the BP trajectories during aging and lead to the dissociation of PWV, PP, and SBP trajectories in men.

  3. Loss of dystrophin is associated with increased myocardial stiffness in a model of left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Martín; Buchholz, Bruno; Morales, Celina; Valdez, Laura; Zaobornyj, Tamara; Baratta, Sergio; Paez, Diamela T; Matoso, Mirian; Vaccarino, Guillermo; Chejtman, Demian; Agüero, Oscar; Telayna, Juan; Navia, José; Hita, Alejandro; Boveris, Alberto; Gelpi, Ricardo J

    2017-08-01

    Transition from compensated to decompensated left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is accompanied by functional and structural changes. Here, the aim was to evaluate dystrophin expression in murine models and human subjects with LVH by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and aortic stenosis (AS), respectively. We determined whether doxycycline (Doxy) prevented dystrophin expression and myocardial stiffness in mice. Additionally, ventricular function recovery was evaluated in patients 1 year after surgery. Mice were subjected to TAC and monitored for 3 weeks. A second group received Doxy treatment after TAC. Patients with AS were stratified by normal left ventricular end-diastolic wall stress (LVEDWS) and high LVEDWS, and groups were compared. In mice, LVH decreased inotropism and increased myocardial stiffness associated with a dystrophin breakdown and a decreased mitochondrial O2 uptake (MitoMVO2). These alterations were attenuated by Doxy. Patients with high LVEDWS showed similar results to those observed in mice. A correlation between dystrophin and myocardial stiffness was observed in both mice and humans. Systolic function at 1 year post-surgery was only recovered in the normal-LVEDWS group. In summary, mice and humans present diastolic dysfunction associated with dystrophin degradation. The recovery of ventricular function was observed only in patients with normal LVEDWS and without dystrophin degradation. In mice, Doxy improved MitoMVO2. Based on our results it is concluded that the LVH with high LVEDWS is associated to a degradation of dystrophin and increase of myocardial stiffness. At least in a murine model these alterations were attenuated after the administration of a matrix metalloprotease inhibitor.

  4. A new approach to determine press stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Wanheim, Tarras

    2004-01-01

    A new procedure is proposed for measuring press stiffness, including separated horizontal and vertical loading of the press frame. The load can be eccentrically positioned for measuring rotational stiffnesses. Two loading devices and corresponding measuring equipment for registration of press...... deflections are designed. The press stiffness is presented as a 6 by 6 flexibility matrix. The approach has been tested by measuring the stiffness of a 5000 kN O-frame, ring element, hydraulic press, a 10000 kN O-frame, pillar element, hydraulic press and a 10000 kN O-frame, ring element mechanical press...

  5. WAY TO DETERMINE STIFFNESS FUNCTION OF STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-ming; GAI Bing-zheng

    2005-01-01

    For calculating the stiffness function of a structure, the differential equation of the vibration of the structure was divided into the differential equation on the original stiffness function that was known, and Fredholm integral equation of the first kind on the undetermined stiffness function that was unknown. And the stable solutions of the integral equation, when the smooth factor was equal to zero, was solved by the extrapolation with p smooth factors. So the stiffness function of the structure is obtained. Applied examples show that the method is feasible and effective.

  6. Interobserver variability of CT angiography for evaluation of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidkonz, C., E-mail: christian.schmidkonz@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Marwan, M.; Klinghammer, L.; Mitschke, M.; Schuhbaeck, A.; Arnold, M. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Lell, M. [Radiological Institute, University of Erlangen, Maximiliansplatz 1, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, S.; Pflederer, T. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    the three observers showed moderate to close agreement (between r = 0.67 and r = 0.97, all p < 0.001). Mean differences (SE) between the three observers ranged from 0.07 (0.06) mm to 0.24 (0.07) mm for assessing the mean AA diameter (D{sub mean}), from 0.28 (0.04) mm to 0.60 (0.06) mm for determining the effective AA diameter derived from the annulus area (D{sub area}) and from 0.03 (0.07) mm to 0.07 (0.11) mm derived from the AA perimeter (D{sub circ}). For measurements of LCA and RCA distances to the AA level, mean interobserver differences (SE) ranged from 0.36 (0.07) mm to 0.76 (0.09) mm and from 0.15 (0.06) mm to 0.45 (0.11) mm. Conclusion: Computed tomography provides reproducible measurements of the aortic annulus and root geometry in patients scheduled for TAVI. The perimeter-derived aortic annulus diameter shows the lowest interobserver differences. Interobserver variabilities in prosthesis size recommendation were further reduced, if all three sizing methods were considered and stated as a “consensus result”.

  7. Modifiable risk factors for increased arterial stiffness in outpatient nephrology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Elewa

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV, is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. Arterial stiffness increases with age. However, modifiable risk factors such as smoking, BP and salt intake also impact on PWV. The finding of modifiable risk factors may lead to the identification of treatable factors, and, thus, is of interest to practicing nephrologist. We have now studied the prevalence and correlates of arterial stiffness, assessed by PWV, in 191 patients from nephrology outpatient clinics in order to identify modifiable risk factors for arterial stiffness that may in the future guide therapeutic decision-making. PWV was above normal levels for age in 85/191 (44.5% patients. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced age, systolic BP, diabetes mellitus, serum uric acid and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy or calcium-containing medication were independent predictors of PWV. A new parameter, Delta above upper limit of normal PWV (Delta PWV was defined to decrease the weight of age on PWV values. Delta PWV was calculated as (measured PWV - (upper limit of the age-adjusted PWV values for the general population. Mean±SD Delta PWV was 0.76±1.60 m/sec. In multivariate analysis, systolic blood pressure, active smoking and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy remained independent predictors of higher delta PWV, while age, urinary potassium and beta blocker therapy were independent predictors of lower delta PWV. In conclusion, arterial stiffness was frequent in nephrology outpatients. Systolic blood pressure, smoking, serum uric acid, calcium-containing medications, potassium metabolism and non-use of beta blockers are modifiable factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in Nephrology outpatients.

  8. Modifiable risk factors for increased arterial stiffness in outpatient nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elewa, Usama; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Alegre, Raquel; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Mahillo-Fernández, Ignacio; Perez-Gomez, Maria Vanessa; El-Fishawy, Hussein; Belal, Dawlat; Ortiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. Arterial stiffness increases with age. However, modifiable risk factors such as smoking, BP and salt intake also impact on PWV. The finding of modifiable risk factors may lead to the identification of treatable factors, and, thus, is of interest to practicing nephrologist. We have now studied the prevalence and correlates of arterial stiffness, assessed by PWV, in 191 patients from nephrology outpatient clinics in order to identify modifiable risk factors for arterial stiffness that may in the future guide therapeutic decision-making. PWV was above normal levels for age in 85/191 (44.5%) patients. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced age, systolic BP, diabetes mellitus, serum uric acid and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy or calcium-containing medication were independent predictors of PWV. A new parameter, Delta above upper limit of normal PWV (Delta PWV) was defined to decrease the weight of age on PWV values. Delta PWV was calculated as (measured PWV) - (upper limit of the age-adjusted PWV values for the general population). Mean±SD Delta PWV was 0.76±1.60 m/sec. In multivariate analysis, systolic blood pressure, active smoking and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy remained independent predictors of higher delta PWV, while age, urinary potassium and beta blocker therapy were independent predictors of lower delta PWV. In conclusion, arterial stiffness was frequent in nephrology outpatients. Systolic blood pressure, smoking, serum uric acid, calcium-containing medications, potassium metabolism and non-use of beta blockers are modifiable factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in Nephrology outpatients.

  9. Arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the results of the arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder with two to nine years of follow-up, comparing the pre- and postoperative range of motion. This was an observational study (case series) of 18 patients who underwent arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness. The mean age was of 53.6 years (range: 39 to 68), with female predominance (77.77%) and nine cases left shoulders. There were 6 primary (33.33%) and 12 secondary cases (66.67%). Arthroscopic capsular release was performed in all patients after a mean of 9.33 months of physical therapy (range: 6 to 20 months) with a minimum follow-up of two years (range: 26 to 110 months). The mean active and passive forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation increased from 94.4°/103.3°, 11.9°/21.9°, and S1/L5 vertebral level, respectively, to 151.1°/153.8°, 57.2°/64.4°, and T12/T10 vertebral level, respectively. There was a significant difference between the pre- and postoperative range of motion (p < 0.001). According to the Constant-Murley functional score (ROM), the value increased from 14 (preoperative mean) to 30 points (postoperative mean). Postoperatively, all patients showed diminished shoulder pain (none or mild/15 or 10 points in the Constant-Murley score). Arthroscopic treatment is an effective treatment for refractory shoulder stiffness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. VASCULAR WALL STIFFNESS IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS: RESULTS OF A MULTICENTER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Z. Gaydukova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study some vascular wall stiffness parameters in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS without clinically manifest cardio­ vascular diseases. Subjects and methods. One hundred and six patients with AS and 21 healthy volunteers without cardiovascular diseases who were matched for age, gender, and cardiovascular risk were examined at two centers. Cardiovascular risk and vascular wall stiffness (augmentation index and pulse wave propagation velocity (PWPV were assessed by oscillography. Results. Vascular wall stiffness was comparable in the patients with AS (at both centers and in the healthy individuals. PWPV was 7.45 (5.4–8.71 m/sec in the AS patients (n = 106 and 8.53 (6.28–9.5 m/sec in the healthy individuals (n = 21; the aortic augmentation in­ dex was 15.6 (7.9–31.1 and 21.1 (10.2–24 %, respectively; p > 0.05 for all. Correlation analysis revealed associations between aug­ mentation index, age, blood pressure, disease activity (BASDAI and spine mobility (BASMI scores. Conclusion. The vascular wall stiffness did not differ between AS patients without cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk­matched healthy individuals. Its parameters were related to age, blood pressure, and disease activity (BASDAI and axial skeleton immobility (BASMI indices. 

  11. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index derived from 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang; Dolan, Eamon; Gao, Ping-Jin; Guo, Hui-Feng; Nawrot, Tim; Stanton, Alice V; Zhu, Ding-Liang; O'Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A

    2006-03-01

    We hypothesized that 1 minus the slope of diastolic on systolic pressure during 24-hour ambulatory monitoring (ambulatory arterial stiffness index [AASI]) might reflect arterial stiffness. We compared AASI with established measures of arterial stiffness and studied its distribution in Chinese and European populations. We used 90207 SpaceLabs monitors and the SphygmoCor device to measure AASI, central and peripheral pulse pressures, the central (CAIx) and peripheral (PAIx) systolic augmentation indexes, and aortic pulse wave velocity. In 166 volunteers, the correlation coefficient between AASI and pulse wave velocity was 0.51 (Ppressure (r=0.50). AASI increased with age and mean arterial pressure but decreased with body height. Both before and after adjustment for arterial wave reflections by considering height and heart rate as covariates, AASI correlated more (Ppressure. Among normotensive subjects, the 95th percentile of AASI was 0.55 in Chinese and 0.57 in 1617 Europeans enrolled in the International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring. The upper boundary of the 95% prediction interval of AASI in relation to age ranged from 0.53 at 20 years to 0.72 at 80 years. In conclusion, AASI is a new index of arterial stiffness that can be easily measured under ambulatory conditions. Pending additional validation in outcome studies, normal values of AASI are probably <0.50 and 0.70 in young and older subjects, respectively.

  12. Chronic over-expression of heat shock protein 27 attenuates atherogenesis and enhances plaque remodeling: a combined histological and mechanical assessment of aortic lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles M Cuerrier

    Full Text Available AIMS: Expression of Heat Shock Protein-27 (HSP27 is reduced in human coronary atherosclerosis. Over-expression of HSP27 is protective against the early formation of lesions in atherosclerosis-prone apoE(-/- mice (apoE(-/-HSP27(o/e - however, only in females. We now seek to determine if chronic HSP27 over-expression is protective in a model of advanced atherosclerosis in both male and female apoE(-/- mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: After 12 weeks on a high fat diet, serum HSP27 levels rose more than 16-fold in male and female apoE(-/-HSP27(o/e mice, although females had higher levels than males. Relative to apoE(-/- mice, female apoE(-/-HSP27(o/e mice showed reductions in aortic lesion area of 35% for en face and 30% for cross-sectional sinus tissue sections - with the same parameters reduced by 21% and 24% in male cohorts; respectively. Aortic plaques from apoE(-/-HSP27(o/e mice showed almost 50% reductions in the area occupied by cholesterol clefts and free cholesterol, with fewer macrophages and reduced apoptosis but greater intimal smooth muscle cell and collagen content. The analysis of the aortic mechanical properties showed increased vessel stiffness in apoE(-/-HSP27(o/e mice (41% in female, 34% in male compare to apoE(-/- counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic over-expression of HSP27 is atheroprotective in both sexes and coincides with reductions in lesion cholesterol accumulation as well as favorable plaque remodeling. These data provide new clues as to how HSP27 may improve not only the composition of atherosclerotic lesions but potentially their stability and resilience to plaque rupture.

  13. Anesthetic management for percutaneous aortic valve implantation: an overview of worldwide experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, L; Gerli, C; Franco, A; Barile, L; Magnano di San Lio, M S; Villari, N; Zangrillo, A

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an emergent technique for high risk patients with aortic stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation poses significant challenges about its management, due to the procedure itself (i.e. the passage of large stiff sheaths in diseased vessels, the valve dilatation and the prosthesis positioning during a partial cardiac standstill) and the population of elder and high-risk patients who undergo the implantation. Retrograde transfemoral approach is the most popular procedure and a great number of cases is reported. Nevertheless, there is not a consensus regarding the intraoperative anesthesiological strategies, which vary in the different Centers. Sedation plus local anesthesia or general anesthesia are both valid alternatives and can be applied according to patient's characteristics and procedural instances. Most groups started the implantation program with a general anesthesia; indeed, it offers many advantages, mainly regarding the possibility of an early diagnosis and treatment of potential complications, through the use of the transesophageal echocardiography. However, after the initial experiences, many groups began to employ routinely sedation plus local anesthesia for transcatheter aortic valve implantation and their procedural and periprocedural success demonstrates that it is feasible, with many possible advantages. Many aspects about perioperative anesthetic management for transcatheter aortic valve implantation are still to be defined. Aim of this work is to clarify the different management strategies through a review of the available literature published in pubmed till June 2011.

  14. [New aspects in aortic valve disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornos, P

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest for aortic valve disease has evolved in recent years. Aortic valve replacement has become the second most frequent cause of cardiac surgery, following coronary bypass surgery. In addition, the etiologic and physiopathologic knowledge of this disorder has improved. In the present paper we analyze three aspects of the disease which are, at present, the subject of study and controversy: first, we discuss the possible relationship between degenerative aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis; second, the involvement of the aortic root in cases of bicuspid aortic valve; and third, the surgical indications in asymptomatic patients with either aortic stenosis or regurgitation.

  15. Nuclear lamin-A scales with tissue stiffness and enhances matrix-directed differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Joe; Ivanovska, Irena L; Buxboim, Amnon; Harada, Takamasa; Dingal, P C Dave P; Pinter, Joel; Pajerowski, J David; Spinler, Kyle R; Shin, Jae-Won; Tewari, Manorama; Rehfeldt, Florian; Speicher, David W; Discher, Dennis E

    2013-08-30

    Tissues can be soft like fat, which bears little stress, or stiff like bone, which sustains high stress, but whether there is a systematic relationship between tissue mechanics and differentiation is unknown. Here, proteomics analyses revealed that levels of the nucleoskeletal protein lamin-A scaled with tissue elasticity, E, as did levels of collagens in the extracellular matrix that determine E. Stem cell differentiation into fat on soft matrix was enhanced by low lamin-A levels, whereas differentiation into bone on stiff matrix was enhanced by high lamin-A levels. Matrix stiffness directly influenced lamin-A protein levels, and, although lamin-A transcription was regulated by the vitamin A/retinoic acid (RA) pathway with broad roles in development, nuclear entry of RA receptors was modulated by lamin-A protein. Tissue stiffness and stress thus increase lamin-A levels, which stabilize the nucleus while also contributing to lineage determination.

  16. Nuclear Lamin-A Scales with Tissue Stiffness and Enhances Matrix-Directed Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Joe; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Buxboim, Amnon; Harada, Takamasa; Dingal, P. C. Dave P.; Pinter, Joel; Pajerowski, J. David; Spinler, Kyle R.; Shin, Jae-Won; Tewari, Manorama; Rehfeldt, Florian; Speicher, David W.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissues can be soft like fat, which bears little stress, or stiff like bone, which sustains high stress, but whether there is a systematic relationship between tissue mechanics and differentiation is unknown. Here, proteomics analyses revealed that levels of the nucleoskeletal protein lamin-A scaled with tissue elasticity, E, as did levels of collagens in the extracellular matrix that determine E. Stem cell differentiation into fat on soft matrix was enhanced by low lamin-A levels, whereas differentiation into bone on stiff matrix was enhanced by high lamin-A levels. Matrix stiffness directly influenced lamin-A protein levels, and, although lamin-A transcription was regulated by the vitamin A/retinoic acid (RA) pathway with broad roles in development, nuclear entry of RA receptors was modulated by lamin-A protein. Tissue stiffness and stress thus increase lamin-A levels, which stabilize the nucleus while also contributing to lineage determination. PMID:23990565

  17. Effect of High-Fat Diet upon Inflammatory Markers and Aortic Stiffening in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Bento Chaves Santana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in lifestyle such as increase in high-fat food consumption are an important cause for vascular diseases. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of ACE and TGF-β in the aorta stiffness induced by high-fat diet. C57BL/6 male mice were divided in two groups according to their diet for 8 weeks: standard diet (ST and high-fat diet (HF. At the end of the protocol, body weight gain, adipose tissue content, serum lipids and glucose levels, and aorta morphometric and biochemical measurements were performed. Analysis of collagen fibers by picrosirius staining of aorta slices showed that HF diet promoted increase of thin (55% and thick (100% collagen fibers deposition and concomitant disorganization of these fibers orientations in the aorta vascular wall (50%. To unravel the mechanism involved, myeloperoxidase (MPO and angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE were evaluated by protein expression and enzyme activity. HF diet increased MPO (90% and ACE (28% activities, as well as protein expression of ACE. TGF-β was also increased in aorta tissue of HF diet mice after 8 weeks. Altogether, we have observed that the HF diet-induced aortic stiffening may be associated with increased oxidative stress damage and activation of the RAS in vascular tissue.

  18. Diagnostic implication of fibrin degradation products and D-dimer in aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jian; Duan, Xianli; Feng, Rui; Zhao, Zhiqing; Feng, Xiang; Lu, Qingsheng; Jing, Qing; Zhou, Jian; Bao, Junmin; Jing, Zaiping

    2017-01-01

    Fibrin degradation products (FDP) and D-dimer have been considered to be involved in many vascular diseases. In this study we aimed to explore the diagnostic implication of FDP and D-dimer in aortic dissection patients. 202 aortic dissection patients were collected as the case group, 150 patients with other cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction (MI, n = 45), pulmonary infarction (n = 51) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (n = 54) were collected as non-dissection group, and 27 healthy people were in the blank control group. The FDP and D-dimer levels were detected with immune nephelometry. Logist regression analysis was performed to evaluate the influence of FDP and D-dimer for the aortic dissection patients. ROC curve was used to determine the diagnostic value of FDP and D-dimer. The FDP and D-dimer levels were significantly higher in aortic dissection patients than in non-dissection patients and the healthy controls. FDP and D-dimer were both the risk factors for patients with aortic dissection. From the ROC analysis, diagnostic value of FDP and D-dimer were not high to distinguish aortic dissection patients from the non-dissection patients. However FDP and D-dimer could be valuable diagnostic marker to differentiate aortic dissection patients and healthy controls with both AUC 0.863. PMID:28262748

  19. Early Results of Chimney Technique for Type B Aortic Dissections Extending to the Aortic Arch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen [Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Department of General Surgery (China); Tang, Hanfei; Qiao, Tong; Liu, Changjian; Zhou, Min, E-mail: 813477618@qq.com [The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Department of Vascular Surgery, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital (China)

    2016-01-15

    ObjectiveTo summarize our early experience gained from the chimney technique for type B aortic dissection (TBAD) extending to the aortic arch and to evaluate the aortic remodeling in the follow-up period.MethodsFrom September 2011 to July 2014, 27 consecutive TBAD patients without adequate proximal landing zones were retrograde analyzed. Chimney stent-grafts were deployed parallel to the main endografts to reserve flow to branch vessels while extending the landing zones. In the follow-up period, aortic remodeling was observed with computed tomography angiography.ResultsThe technical success rate was 100 %, and endografts were deployed in zone 0 (n = 3, 11.1 %), zone 1 (n = 18, 66.7 %), and zone 2 (n = 6, 22.2 %). Immediately, proximal endoleaks were detected in 5 patients (18.5 %). During a mean follow-up period of 17.6 months, computed tomography angiography showed all the aortic stent-grafts and chimney grafts to be patent. Favorable remodeling was observed at the level of maximum descending aorta and left subclavian artery with expansion of true lumen (from 18.4 ± 4.8 to 25 ± 0.86 mm, p < 0.001 and 27.1 ± 0.62 to 28.5 ± 0.37 mm, p < 0.001) and depressurization of false lumen (from 23.7 ± 2.7 to 8.7 ± 3.8 mm, p < 0.001, from 5.3 ± 1.2 to 2.1 ± 2.1 mm, p < 0.001). While at the level of maximum abdominal aorta, suboptimal remodeling of the total aorta (from 24.1 ± 0.4 to 23.6 ± 1.5 mm, p = 0.06) and true lumen (from 13.8 ± 0.6 to 14.5 ± 0.4 mm, p = 0.08) was observed.ConclusionBased on our limited experience, the chimney technique with thoracic endovascular repair is demonstrated to be promising for TBAD extending to the arch with favorable aortic remodeling.

  20. Patient values and preferences on transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytvyn, Lyubov; Guyatt, Gordon H; Manja, Veena; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Zhang, Yuan; Agoritsas, Thomas; Vandvik, Per O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate patients' values and preferences regarding aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis. Setting Studies published after transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI) became available (2002). Participants Adults with aortic stenosis who are considering or have had valve replacement, either TAVI or via surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). Outcome measures We sought quantitative measurements, or qualitative descriptions, of values and preferences. When reported, we examined correlations between preferences and objective (eg, ejection fraction) or subjective (eg, health-related quality of life) measures of health. Results We reviewed 1348 unique citations, of which 2 studies proved eligible. One study of patients with severe aortic stenosis used a standard gamble study to ascertain that the median hypothetical mortality risk patients were willing to tolerate to achieve full health was 25% (IQR 25–50%). However, there was considerable variability; for mortality risk levels defined by current guidelines, 130 participants (30%) were willing to accept low-to-intermediate risk (≤8%), 224 (51%) high risk (>8–50%) and 85 (19%) a risk that guidelines would consider prohibitive (>50%). Study authors did not, however, assess participants' understanding of the exercise, resulting in a potential risk of bias. A second qualitative study of 15 patients identified the following factors that influence patients to undergo assessment for TAVI: symptom burden; expectations; information support; logistical barriers; facilitators; obligations and responsibilities. The study was limited by serious risk of bias due to authors' conflict of interest (5/9 authors industry-funded). Conclusions Current evidence on patient values and preferences of adults with aortic stenosis is very limited, and no studies have enrolled patients deciding between TAVI and SAVR. On the basis of the data available, there is evidence of variability in individual

  1. Is arterial stiffness in HIV-infected individuals associated with HIV-related factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Monteiro

    Full Text Available We investigated the association between pulse wave velocity (PWV and HIV infection, antiretroviral treatment-related characteristics, viral load, immune status, and metabolic changes in a cross-sectional study nested in a cohort of HIV/AIDS patients who have been followed for metabolic and cardiovascular changes since 2007. The study included patients recruited from the cohort (N = 261 and a comparison group (N = 82 of uninfected individuals, all enrolled from April to November 2009. Aortic stiffness was estimated using the carotid-femoral PWV (Complior-Artech, Paris, France. The groups were similar with respect to age, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, Framingham score, and use of antihypertensive and hypolipidemic medications. Hypertension was more frequent among the controls. Individuals with HIV had higher triglyceride, glucose and HDL cholesterol levels. Among individuals with HIV/AIDS, those with a nadir CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/mm³ had a higher PWV (P = 0.01. There was no statistically significant difference when subjects were stratified by gender. Heart rate, age, male gender, and blood pressure were independently correlated with PWV. Nadir CD4+ T-cell count did not remain in the final model. There was no significance difference in PWV between HIV-infected individuals and uninfected controls. PWV was correlated with age, gender, and blood pressure across the entire population and among those infected with HIV. We recommend cohort studies to further explore the association between inflammation related to HIV infection and/or immune reconstitution and antiretroviral use and PWV.

  2. Is arterial stiffness in HIV-infected individuals associated with HIV-related factors?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, P. [Serviço de Doenças Infecciosas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Miranda-Filho, D.B. [Departamento de Medicina Clínica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Bandeira, F. [Serviço de Endocrinologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Lacerda, H.R. [Departamento de Medicina Clínica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Departamento de Medicina Tropical, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Chaves, H. [Departamento de Cardiologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Albuquerque, M.F.P.M. [Centro de Pesquisa Aggeu Magalhães,FIOCRUZ, Recife, PE (Brazil); Montarroyos, U.R. [Departamento de Medicina Tropical, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Ximenes, R.A.A. [Departamento de Medicina Clínica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Departamento de Medicina Tropical, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2012-07-13

    We investigated the association between pulse wave velocity (PWV) and HIV infection, antiretroviral treatment-related characteristics, viral load, immune status, and metabolic changes in a cross-sectional study nested in a cohort of HIV/AIDS patients who have been followed for metabolic and cardiovascular changes since 2007. The study included patients recruited from the cohort (N = 261) and a comparison group (N = 82) of uninfected individuals, all enrolled from April to November 2009. Aortic stiffness was estimated using the carotid-femoral PWV (Complior-Artech, Paris, France). The groups were similar with respect to age, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, Framingham score, and use of antihypertensive and hypolipidemic medications. Hypertension was more frequent among the controls. Individuals with HIV had higher triglyceride, glucose and HDL cholesterol levels. Among individuals with HIV/AIDS, those with a nadir CD4{sup +} T-cell count <200 cells/mm{sup 3} had a higher PWV (P = 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference when subjects were stratified by gender. Heart rate, age, male gender, and blood pressure were independently correlated with PWV. Nadir CD4{sup +} T-cell count did not remain in the final model. There was no significance difference in PWV between HIV-infected individuals and uninfected controls. PWV was correlated with age, gender, and blood pressure across the entire population and among those infected with HIV. We recommend cohort studies to further explore the association between inflammation related to HIV infection and/or immune reconstitution and antiretroviral use and PWV.

  3. Stiff person syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia A; Kuberski, Carolyn

    2014-08-01

    The case report features a patient who had a diagnosis of a common type of breast cancer with an uncommon neurologic syndrome. She had extreme pain and progressive stiffness with cognitive and functional decline. This article includes the pathogenesis and treatment options for a rare, but treatable, autoimmune disorder of malignancy called stiff person syndrome.

  4. Aortic and Cardiac Structure and Function Using High-Resolution Echocardiography and Optical Coherence Tomography in a Mouse Model of Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ling; Cui, Jason Z.; Cua, Michelle; Esfandiarei, Mitra; Sheng, Xiaoye; Chui, Winsey Audrey; Xu, Michael Haoying; Sarunic, Marinko V.; Beg, Mirza Faisal; van Breemen, Cornelius; Sandor, George G. S.

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene. Mortality is often due to aortic dissection and rupture. We investigated the structural and functional properties of the heart and aorta in a [Fbn1C1039G/+] MFS mouse using high-resolution ultrasound (echo) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Echo was performed on 6- and 12-month old wild type (WT) and MFS mice (n = 8). In vivo pulse wave velocity (PWV), aortic root diameter, ejection fraction, stroke volume, left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, LV mass and mitral valve early and atrial velocities (E/A) ratio were measured by high resolution echocardiography. OCT was performed on 12-month old WT and MFS fixed mouse hearts to measure ventricular volume and mass. The PWV was significantly increased in 6-mo MFS vs. WT (366.6 ± 19.9 vs. 205.2 ± 18.1 cm/s; p = 0.003) and 12-mo MFS vs. WT (459.5 ± 42.3 vs. 205.3 ± 30.3 cm/s; pMarfan patients including significant aortic dilation, central aortic stiffness, LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction. This is the first demonstration of the direct measurement in vivo of pulse wave velocity non-invasively in the aortic arch of MFS mice, a robust measure of aortic stiffness and a critical clinical parameter for the assessment of pathology in the Marfan syndrome. PMID:27824871

  5. Particle Image Velocimetry studies of bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yap, Choon-Hwai; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2010-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) are a congenital anomaly of the aortic valve with two fused leaflets, affecting about 1-2% of the population. BAV patients have much higher incidence of valve calcification & aortic dilatation, which may be related to altered mechanical forces from BAV hemodynamics. This study aims to characterize BAV hemodynamics using Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV). BAV models are constructed from normal explanted porcine aortic valves by suturing two leaflets together. The valves are mounted in an acrylic chamber with two sinuses & tested in a pulsatile flow loop at physiological conditions. 2D PIV is performed to obtain flow fields in three planes downstream of the valve. The stenosed BAV causes an eccentric jet, resulting in a very strong vortex in the normal sinus. The bicuspid sinus vortex appears much weaker, but more unstable. Unsteady oscillatory shear stresses are also observed, which have been associated with adverse biological response; characterization of the hemodynamics of BAVs will provide the first step to understanding these processes better. Results from multiple BAV models of varying levels of stenosis will be presented & higher stenosis corresponded to stronger jets & increased aortic wall shear stresses.

  6. Determination of 6 stiffnesses for a press

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Eriksen, Morten; Wanheim, Tarras

    2000-01-01

    the workpiece will result in deflections of the press, which will decrease the tolerances of the component. At present, it is possible to measure the reaction forces from the workpiece, for instance by use of the model material technique as described in [1-2]. If the stiffness and clearances of the press...... is known too, the final dimensions can be predicted by divide the force by the stiffness and add the clearance. If the stiffness of the press is known, it is possible to optimize the orientation of the workpiece too, so the direction, in which the best tolerances is demanded, is equal to the direction...... in which the press has the highest stiffness. Furthermore, knowledge about the stiffnesses of all presses in a production system makes it possible to choose the press which best fit to a specific process....

  7. Measurement and Treatment of Passive Muscle Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This PhD thesis is based on research conducted at the University of Copenhagen and Helene Elsass Center from 2012 to 2015. Measurements and treatment of passive muscle stiffness in people with cerebral palsy (CP) comprise the focus of the thesis. The thesis summarizes the results from four studies......, which aimed to investigate: 1) The development of a clinical method to evaluate and distinguish neural (reflex mediated stiffness) and non-neural (passive muscle stiffness) components of muscle stiffness in adults with CP by objective and reliable measurements 2) The association between increased......, and good correlation to measurements from a stationary dynamometer. The second part of the thesis discusses the finding of a significant correlation between gait function, reduced rate of force development (RFD), and increased passive muscle stiffness in adults with CP. Previously, the reflex...

  8. Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

  9. Stiffness Control of Surgical Continuum Manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahvash, Mohsen; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the first stiffness controller for continuum robots. The control law is based on an accurate approximation of a continuum robot’s coupled kinematic and static force model. To implement a desired tip stiffness, the controller drives the actuators to positions corresponding to a deflected robot configuration that produces the required tip force for the measured tip position. This approach provides several important advantages. First, it enables the use of robot deflection sensing as a means to both sense and control tip forces. Second, it enables stiffness control to be implemented by modification of existing continuum robot position controllers. The proposed controller is demonstrated experimentally in the context of a concentric tube robot. Results show that the stiffness controller achieves the desired stiffness in steady state, provides good dynamic performance, and exhibits stability during contact transitions. PMID:24273466

  10. Relationships between retinal arteriole anatomy and aortic geometry and function and peripheral resistance in hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, David; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Koch, Edouard; Paques, Michel; Cluzel, Philippe; Redheuil, Alban; Girerd, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Microvascular remodeling and large artery stiffness are key determinants of cardiovascular hemodynamics and can now be studied with new non-invasive methods. Our objective was to study the relationships between retinal arteriole anatomy and aortic geometry and function and peripheral resistance (total peripheral resistance (TPR)) in hypertensives. In 80 subjects (age 52±13 years; 53% males; including 23 normotensives and 57 hypertensives, among which 29 were uncontrolled hypertensives), we used: (1) the new non-invasive RTX1 adaptive optics (AO) camera (Imagine Eyes, Orsay, France) to measure the wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) on retinal microvasculature; (2) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging to assess aortic stiffness, geometry and cardiac output; and (3) the validated SphymoCor Xcel device to measure central blood pressure (BP) and carotido-femoral pulse wave velocity (Cf-PWV). TPR was calculated as the central mean BP/cardiac output ratio. WLR and TPR were significantly higher and aortic distensibility was significantly lower in hypertensives. Aortic dilation and arch elongation were found in uncontrolled hypertensives. In the univariate analysis, WLR was positively correlated with central BP (PTPR (PTPR (P=0.002) independent of age, BMI, gender, antihypertensive treatments, aortic diameter and central SBP. As expected, age was the major correlate of ascending aorta distensibility and Cf-PWV. New non-invasive vascular imaging methods are complementary for the detection of the deleterious effects of aging or high BP on large and small arteries. AO examination could represent a useful tool for the study and follow-up of microvasculature anatomical changes.

  11. The age‐dependent association between aortic pulse wave velocity and telomere length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin; Butcher, Lee; Cockcroft, John R.; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Erusalimsky, Jorge D.; McEniery, Carmel M.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Age significantly modifies the relationship between aortic pulse wave velocity and telomere length.The differential relationships observed between aortic pulse wave velocity and telomere length in younger and older individuals suggest that the links between cellular and vascular ageing reflect a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors acting over the life‐course. Abstract Ageing is associated with marked large artery stiffening. Telomere shortening, a marker of cellular ageing, is linked with arterial stiffening. However, the results of existing studies are inconsistent, possibly because of the confounding influence of variable exposure to cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between telomere length (TL) and aortic stiffness in well‐characterized, younger and older healthy adults, who were pre‐selected on the basis of having either low or high aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), a robust measure of aortic stiffness. Demographic, haemodynamic and biochemical data were drawn from participants in the Anglo‐Cardiff Collaborative Trial. Two age groups with an equal sex ratio were examined: those aged 50 years (older). Separately for each age group and sex, DNA samples representing the highest (n = 125) and lowest (n = 125) extremes of aPWV (adjusted for blood pressure) were selected for analysis of leukocyte TL. Ultimately, this yielded complete phenotypic data on 904 individuals. In younger subjects, TL was significantly shorter in those with high aPWV vs. those with low aPWV (P = 0.017). By contrast, in older subjects, TL was significantly longer in those with high aPWV (P = 0.001). Age significantly modified the relationship between aPWV and TL (P ageing reflect a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors acting over the life‐course. PMID:28247509

  12. Spontaneous aortic dissection within an infrarenal AAA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Kathryn J; Bailey, Marc A; McAree, Barry; Mekako, Anthony; Berridge, David C; Nicholson, Tony; Scott, D Julian A

    2012-12-01

    Aortic dissection occurring in the infrarenal abdominal aorta is uncommon. We present the case of a patient presenting with an enlarging abdominal aortic aneurysm and concurrent dissection (with associated radiological imaging) and briefly discuss the literature relating to this phenomenon.

  13. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000240.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge To use the sharing features ... References Orandi BJ, Black JH. Open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms. In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical ...

  14. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Current aortic endografts for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvard, Benjamin; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil; Swanstrom, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular Aneurysm Repair is a widely adopted method of treatment for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. The minimally invasive approach offered with EVAR has become popular not only among physicians and patients, but in the medical device industry as well. Over the past 25 years the global market for aortic endografts has increased rapidly, resulting in a wide range of devices from various companies. Currently, there are seven endografts approved by the FDA for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. These devices offer a wide range of designs intended to increase inclusion criteria while decreasing technical complications such as endoleak and migration. Despite advances in device design, secondary interventions and follow-up requirements remain a significant issue. New devices are currently being studied in the U.S. and abroad and may significantly reduce complications and secondary interventions.

  16. Management of bicuspid aortic valve with or without involvement of ascending aorta and aortic root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neragi-Miandoab, S

    2014-06-01

    Patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) constitute a heterogeneous population with variable clinical presentation and complications. More than 50% of the patients who require aortic valve replacement have a BAV, a condition that may be associated with dilation of ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency caused by cusp disease or aortic root pathology. Of the potential BAV-related complications, dilation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are among the most serious. The dilation of ascending aorta and aortic root have been the subject of controversy. Whereas some surgeons believe that the dilation of the aorta is caused by the hemodynamic properties of the BAV, others believe that the dilation of the aortic root is secondary to genetic defects associated with the BAV. Management of a BAV should be tailored to each patient's clinical condition. The surgical approach varies from aortic valve replacement to combined aortic valve and root replacement to aortic-valve-sparing root replacement.

  17. Extracellular matrix stiffness dictates Wnt expression through integrin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jing; Zu, Yan; Li, Jing; Du, Shuyuan; Xu, Yipu; Zhang, Lang; Jiang, Li; Wang, Zhao; Chien, Shu; Yang, Chun

    2016-02-08

    It is well established that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness plays a significant role in regulating the phenotypes and behaviors of many cell types. However, the mechanism underlying the sensing of mechanical cues and subsequent elasticity-triggered pathways remains largely unknown. We observed that stiff ECM significantly enhanced the expression level of several members of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in both bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and primary chondrocytes. The activation of β-catenin by stiff ECM is not dependent on Wnt signals but is elevated by the activation of integrin/ focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway. The accumulated β-catenin then bound to the wnt1 promoter region to up-regulate the gene transcription, thus constituting a positive feedback of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. With the amplifying effect of positive feedback, this integrin-activated β-catenin/Wnt pathway plays significant roles in mediating the enhancement of Wnt signal on stiff ECM and contributes to the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and primary chondrocyte phenotype maintenance. The present integrin-regulated Wnt1 expression and signaling contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell behaviors by ECM elasticity.

  18. A Multiscale Mechanical Model for Plant Tissue Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiano Pasini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant petioles and stems are hierarchical cellular structures, displaying structuralfeatures defined at multiple length scales. The current work focuses on the multi-scalemodelling of plant tissue, considering two orders of structural hierarchy, cell wall and tissue.The stiffness of plant tissue is largely governed by the geometry of the tissue cells, thecomposition of the cell wall and the structural properties of its constituents. The cell wallis analogous to a fiber reinforced composite, where the cellulose microfibril (CMF is theload bearing component. For multilayered cell wall, the microfibril angle (MFA in themiddle layer of the secondary cell wall (S2 layer largely affects the longitudinal stiffnessfor values up to 40o. The MFA in turn influences the overall wall stiffness. In this work,the effective stiffness of a model system based on collenchyma cell wall of a dicotyledonousplant, the Rheum rhabarbarum, is computed considering generic MFA and volume fractions.At the cellular level, a 2-D Finite Edge Centroidal Voronoi tessellation (FECVT has beendeveloped and implemented to generate the non-periodic microstructure of the plant tissue.The effective elastic properties of the cellular tissue are obtained through finite elementanalysis (FEA of the Voronoi model coupled with the cell wall properties. The stiffness ofthe hierarchically modeled tissue is critically important in determining the overall structuralproperties of plant petioles and stems.

  19. Stiffness mapping of lower leg muscles during passive dorsiflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Sant, Guillaume; Nordez, Antoine; Andrade, Ricardo; Hug, François; Freitas, Sandro; Gross, Raphaël

    2017-05-01

    It is challenging to differentiate the mechanical properties of synergist muscles in vivo. Shear wave elastography can be used to quantify the shear modulus (i.e. an index of stiffness) of a specific muscle. This study assessed the passive behavior of lower leg muscles during passive dorsiflexion performed with the knee fully extended (experiment 1, n = 22) or with the knee flexed at 90° (experiment 2, n = 20). The shear modulus measurements were repeated twice during experiment 1 to assess the inter-day reliability. During both experiments, the shear modulus of the following plantar flexors was randomly measured: gastrocnemii medialis (GM) and lateralis (GL), soleus (SOL), peroneus longus (PL), and the deep muscles flexor digitorum longus (FDL), flexor hallucis longus (FHL), tibialis posterior (TP). Two antagonist muscles tibialis anterior (TA), and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were also recorded. Measurements were performed in different proximo-distal regions for GM, GL and SOL. Inter-day reliability was adequate for all muscles (coefficient of variation muscles and PL exhibited low levels of stiffness during the stretch in young asymptomatic adults, which was unknown until now. These results provide a deeper understanding of passive mechanical properties and the distribution of stiffness between and within the plantar flexor muscles during stretching between them and thus could be relevant to study the effects of aging, disease progression, and rehabilitation on stiffness. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  20. Arterial stiffness as a risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Josh; Farmer, John

    2014-02-01

    Hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor, and clinical trials have demonstrated that successful reduction of elevated blood pressure to target levels translates into decreased risk for the development of coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, and renal failure. The arterial system had previously been regarded as a passive conduit for the transportation of arterial blood to peripheral tissues. The physiologic role the arterial system was greatly expanded by the recognition of the central role of the endothelial function in a variety of physiologic processes. The role of arterial function and structure in cardiovascular physiology was expanded with the development of a variety of parameters that evaluate arterial stiffness. Markers of arterial stiffness have been correlated with cardiovascular outcomes, and have been classified as an emerging risk factor that provides prognostic information beyond standard stratification strategies involving hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia and smoking. Multiple epidemiologic studies have correlated markers of arterial stiffness such as pulse-wave velocity, augmentation index and pulse pressure with risk for the development of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events. Additionally, measurements of arterial stiffness had clarified the results of clinical trials that demonstrated differing impacts on clinical outcomes, despite similar reductions in blood pressure, as measured by brachial and sphygmomanometry.

  1. Cardiovascular Health and Arterial Stiffness: The Maine Syracuse Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Georgina E; Elias, Merrill F; Robbins, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Ideal cardiovascular health is a recently defined construct by the American Heart Association (AHA) to promote cardiovascular disease reduction. Arterial stiffness is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The extent to which the presence of multiple prevalent cardiovascular risk factors and health behaviors is associated with arterial stiffness is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the AHA construct of cardiovascular health and arterial stiffness, as indexed by pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. The AHA health metrics, comprising of four health behaviors (smoking, body mass index, physical activity, and diet) and three health factors (total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose) were evaluated among 505 participants in the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study. Outcome measures were carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse pressure measured at 4 to 5-year follow-up. Better cardiovascular health, comprising both health factors and behaviors, was associated with lower arterial stiffness, as indexed by pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. Those with at least five health metrics at ideal levels had significantly lower PWV (9.8 m/s) than those with two or less ideal health metrics (11.7 m/s) (P<0.001). This finding remained with the addition of demographic and PWV-related variables (P=0.004). PMID:24384629

  2. Endovascular treatment of acute type B dissection complicating aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Abbasi, Kyomars; Mousavi, Mehdi; Sahebjam, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment poses a high risk to patients with concomitant aortic coarctation and dissection, and an interventional approach could be an alternative. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a long history of untreated hypertension and aortic coarctation who emergently presented at our institution with an acute Stanford type B dissection. The patient's elevated serum creatinine level, perfusion deficit in the right lower limb, and hypertension did not respond to medical therapy, and he did not consent to surgery. By endovascular means, we used a self-expandable stent-graft to cover the entry point of the dissection; then, we deployed a balloon-expandable bare-metal stent to correct residual stenosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the endovascular treatment of aortic coarctation complicated by type B dissection.

  3. Open aortic surgery after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coselli, Joseph S; Spiliotopoulos, Konstantinos; Preventza, Ourania; de la Cruz, Kim I; Amarasekara, Hiruni; Green, Susan Y

    2016-08-01

    In the last decade, thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has emerged as an appealing alternative to the traditional open aortic aneurysm repair. This is largely due to generally improved early outcomes associated with TEVAR, including lower perioperative mortality and morbidity. However, it is relatively common for patients who undergo TEVAR to need a secondary intervention. In select circumstances, these secondary interventions are performed as an open procedure. Although it is difficult to assess the rate of open repairs after TEVAR, the rates in large series of TEVAR cases (>300) have ranged from 0.4 to 7.9 %. Major complications of TEVAR that typically necessitates open distal aortic repair (i.e., repair of the descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aorta) include endoleak (especially type I), aortic fistula, endograft infection, device collapse or migration, and continued expansion of the aneurysm sac. Conversion to open repair of the distal aorta may be either elective (as for many endoleaks) or emergent (as for rupture, retrograde complicated dissection, malperfusion, and endograft infection). In addition, in select patients (e.g., those with a chronic aortic dissection), unrepaired sections of the aorta may progressively dilate, resulting in the need for multiple distal aortic repairs. Open repairs after TEVAR can be broadly classified as full extraction, partial extraction, or full salvage of the stent-graft. Although full and partial stent-graft extraction imply failure of TEVAR, such failure is generally absent in cases where the stent-graft can be fully salvaged. We review the literature regarding open repair after TEVAR and highlight operative strategies.

  4. [Anesthesic management of thoracic aortic stent graft deployment using rapid ventricular pacing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Akio; Kunisawa, Takayuki; Katsumi, Norifumi; Nagashima, Michio; Takahata, Osamu; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    Controlled hypotension is useful for accurate deployment of an aortic endograft. We describe the use of rapid ventricular pacing during thoracic aortic stent graft deployment. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with intravenous propofol and remifentanil. A pulmonary artery catheter with pacing function was introduced, and rapid ventricular pacing was started before stent graft deployment. Pacing mode was VVI and pacing rate was 120-160 beats min(-1). Aortic pressure and flow decreased immediately and were maintained at low levels during surgical manipulation. After stopping rapid ventricular pacing, heart rate and aortic pressure recovered immediately. Rapid ventricular pacing was performed 4 times, and there were no complications such as entailed arrhythmia. With rapid ventricular pacing maneuver, which is thought to cause a rapid change in cardiac output, continuous cardiac output measurement can be a useful monitor. This procedure has advantages over pharmacologic or other methods of aortic pressure reduction. Rapid ventricular pacing is safe and effective during stent graft positioning and deployment.

  5. A modified technique for Gore Excluder limb deployment in difficult iliac anatomy during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourliotakis, George; Katsargyris, Αthanasios; Tielliu, Ignace F J; Zeebregts, Clark J; Verhoeven, Eric L G

    2015-02-01

    Complex iliac anatomy including extreme tortuosity constitutes a relative contraindication for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with additional risk of limb-graft occlusion. The Gore Excluder limb-graft is a flexible stent-graft, which adapts easily to iliac tortuosity. Nevertheless, the presence of the stiff guide wire does not always allow for an ideal apposition of the stent graft to the angulated common iliac artery vessel wall. We describe herein a modified technique for Gore Excluder limb-graft deployment with partial removal of the stiff wire in cases with difficult tortuous or narrow iliac arteries during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  7. Aortic root replacement with a pulmonary autograft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Hokken (Raymond)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAortic valve disease in the pediatric age group is usually a consequence of congenital aortic stenosis, which may be isolated or may be a part of an anomaly of the left ventricular outflow tract or the aortic root. Management of these patients is difficult. Neonates and infants with seve

  8. Genetic determinants of arterial stiffness: Results from the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.S. Sie (Mark)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractArterial stiffness increases with age. It is also associated with various diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Recently, arterial stiffness has also been found to independently predict cardiovascular disease. The pathogenesis of arterial stiffness, however, has n

  9. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  10. Stiff substrates enhance cultured neuronal network activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan-You; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Xie, Jing; Li, Chen-Xu; Chen, Wei-Yi; Liu, Bai-Lin; Wu, Xiao-an; Li, Shu-Na; Huo, Bo; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Hu-Cheng

    2014-08-28

    The mechanical property of extracellular matrix and cell-supporting substrates is known to modulate neuronal growth, differentiation, extension and branching. Here we show that substrate stiffness is an important microenvironmental cue, to which mouse hippocampal neurons respond and integrate into synapse formation and transmission in cultured neuronal network. Hippocampal neurons were cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates fabricated to have similar surface properties but a 10-fold difference in Young's modulus. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel currents determined by patch-clamp recording were greater in neurons on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Ca(2+) oscillations in cultured neuronal network monitored using time-lapse single cell imaging increased in both amplitude and frequency among neurons on stiff substrates. Consistently, synaptic connectivity recorded by paired recording was enhanced between neurons on stiff substrates. Furthermore, spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic activity became greater and more frequent in neurons on stiff substrates. Evoked excitatory transmitter release and excitatory postsynaptic currents also were heightened at synapses between neurons on stiff substrates. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence to show that substrate stiffness is an important biophysical factor modulating synapse connectivity and transmission in cultured hippocampal neuronal network. Such information is useful in designing instructive scaffolds or supporting substrates for neural tissue engineering.

  11. Dynamic stiffness of suction caissons - vertical vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, M.; Andersen, Lars

    2006-12-15

    The dynamic response of offshore wind turbines are affected by the properties of the foundation and the subsoil. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the dynamic soil-structure interaction of suction caissons for offshore wind turbines. The investigation is limited to a determination of the vertical dynamic stiffness of suction caissons. The soil surrounding the foundation is homogenous with linear viscoelastic properties. The dynamic stiffness of the suction caisson is expressed by dimensionless frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness coefficients corresponding to the vertical degree of freedom. The dynamic stiffness coefficients for the foundations are evaluated by means of a dynamic three-dimensional coupled Boundary Element/Finite Element model. Comparisons are made with known analytical and numerical solutions in order to evaluate the static and dynamic behaviour of the Boundary Element/Finite Element model. The vertical frequency dependent stiffness has been determined for different combinations of the skirt length, Poisson's ratio and the ratio between soil stiffness and skirt stiffness. Finally the dynamic behaviour at high frequencies is investigated. (au)

  12. Accelerated Solutions for Transcendental Stiffness Matrix Eigenproblems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.W. Williams

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines many existing and forthcoming methods that can be used alone, or in various combinations, to accelerate the solutions of the transcendental stiffness matrix eigenproblems that arise when the stiffness matrix is assembled from exact member stiffnesses, which are obtained by solving the member differential equations exactly. Thus distributed member mass and/or the flexural effect of axial loading are incorporated exactly, and the solutions are the natural frequencies for vibration problems or the critical load factors for buckling problems.

  13. Double prosthetic aortic valve. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, J E; Bekassy, S M; De Bakey, M E

    1975-05-01

    A 55-year-old man underwent insection of a Hufnagel valve into his descending thoracic aorta for aortic valve insufficiency 18 years ago. He remained asymptomatic for 16 years. Because of progressive left ventricular failure his incompetent aortic valve was replaced with a De Bakey carbon ball aortic valve prosthesis 2 years later. Currently, 21 months after the operation, he is doing well with two aortic valves. Review of the literature suggests that he is the first patient reported with two aortic valves functioning concomitantly and one of the longest surviving patients with a Hufnagel valve.

  14. Renal perfusion with venous blood extends the permissible suprarenal clamp time in abdominal aortic surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pichlmaier, Maximilian; Hoy, Ludwig; Wilhelmi, Mathias; Khaladj, Nawid; Haverich, Axel; Teebken, Omke E

    2008-01-01

    ... suprarenal clamping for aortic reconstructive surgery. Renal perfusion was achieved using a roller pump supplied with venous blood from a central venous catheter under medium-level heparinization to feed two perfusion balloon catheters...

  15. Measurement of the aortic diameter in the asymptomatic Korean population: Assessment with multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hwan; Lee, Whal; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Kim, Dae Jin; Park, Eun Ah; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    To determine normal reference values for aortic diameters in asymptomatic Korean adults. Three hundred adults without signs or symptoms of cardiovascular diseases were enrolled in this study. Aortic diameters were measured at nine predetermined levels on CT images. Aortic diameter measurements were adjusted for body surface area. Analysis of data was performed with regard to age, sex, weight, height and hypertension. Aortic diameters were 2.99 ± 0.57 cm at the ascending aorta, 2.54 ± 0.35 cm at the transverse aortic arch, 2.36 ± 0.35 cm at the proximal descending thoracic aorta (DTA), 2.23 ± 0.37 cm at the mid DTA, 2.17 ± 0.38 cm at the distal DTA, 2.16 ± 0.37 cm at the thoracoabdominal junction, 2.10, 00B1, 0.35 cm at the level of the celiac axis, 1.94, 00B1, 0.36 cm at the suprarenal aorta, 1.58 ± 0.24 cm at the aortic bifurcation. Men had slightly larger diameters than women (p < 0.05). All diameters increased with age and hypertension, with statistical significance (p < 0.01). And all aortic diameters increased with height (p < 0.05) except at the level of the aortic arch (p = 0.056), and increased with weight (p < 0.05) except at the level of the suprarenal aorta (p = 0.067). Male sex, higher weight and height, age and hypertension are associated with larger aortic diameters in asymptomatic Korean adults.

  16. Vascular Aging and Arterial Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikael, Luana de Rezende; Paiva, Anelise Machado Gomes de; Gomes, Marco Mota; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima; Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga; Vitorino, Priscila Valverde de Oliveira; Euzébio, Maicon Borges; Sousa, Wátila de Moura; Barroso, Weimar Kunz Sebba

    2017-06-29

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) account annually for almost one third of all deaths worldwide. Among the CVD, systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is related to more than half of those outcomes. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for SAH because it causes functional and structural damage to the arterial wall, leading to stiffness. Several studies have related oxidative stress, production of free radicals, and neuroendocrine and genetic changes to the physiopathogenesis of vascular aging. Indirect ways to analyze that aging process have been widely studied, pulse wave velocity (PWV) being considered gold standard to assess arterial stiffness, because there is large epidemiological evidence of its predictive value for cardiovascular events, and it requires little technical knowledge to be performed. A pulse wave is generated during each cardiac contraction and travels along the arterial bed until finding peripheral resistance or any bifurcation point, determining the appearance of a reflected wave. In young individuals, arteries tend to be more elastic, therefore, the reflected wave occurs later in the cardiac cycle, reaching the heart during diastole. In older individuals, however, the reflected wave occurs earlier, reaching the heart during systole. Because PWV is an important biomarker of vascular damage, highly valuable in determining the patient's global cardiovascular risk, we chose to review the articles on vascular aging in the context of cardiovascular risk factors and the tools available to the early identification of that damage. Resumo As doenças cardiovasculares são anualmente responsáveis por quase um terço do total de mortes no mundo. Dentre elas, a hipertensão arterial sistêmica (HAS) está relacionada com mais da metade desses desfechos. O diabetes mellitus tipo 2 é visto com um fator de risco independente para HAS por causar lesões funcionais e estruturais na parede arterial, ocasionando-lhe enrijecimento. Diversos estudos

  17. Left ventricular and aortic dysfunction in cystic fibrosis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Zachary M; Kovacs, Attila; Weinheimer, Carla J; Best, Philip M

    2013-09-01

    Left ventricular (LV) abnormalities have been reported in cystic fibrosis (CF); however, it remains unclear if loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function causes heart defects independent of lung disease. Using gut-corrected F508del CFTR mutant mice (ΔF508), which do not develop human lung disease, we examined in vivo heart and aortic function via 2D transthoracic echocardiography and LV catheterization. ΔF508 mouse hearts showed LV concentric remodeling along with enhanced inotropy (increased +dP/dt, fractional shortening, decreased isovolumetric contraction time) and greater lusitropy (-dP/dt, Tau). Aortas displayed increased stiffness and altered diastolic flow. β-adrenergic stimulation revealed diminished cardiac reserve (attenuated +dP/dt,-dP/dt, LV pressure). In a mouse model of CF, CFTR mutation leads to LV remodeling with alteration of cardiac and aortic functions in the absence of lung disease. As CF patients live longer, more active lives, their risk for cardiovascular disease should be considered. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Aortic Wall Injury Related to Endovascular Therapy for Aortic Coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretter, Justin T; Jones, Thomas K; McElhinney, Doff B

    2015-09-01

    Aortic wall complications can occur in unrepaired aortic coarctation (CoA) and after surgical repair or endovascular treatment. This review summarizes the available literature and current understanding of aortic wall injury (AWI) surrounding the management of CoA, focusing specifically on acute and follow-up AWI after endovascular treatment. There have been 23 reported cases of aortic rupture after endovascular treatment for CoA, including angioplasty alone, bare metal stenting, and primary covered stent therapy. Even if these published cases represent only a minority of ruptures that have actually occurred, the incidence is substantially <1%. The incidence of acute aneurysm formation was 0% to 13% after angioplasty, 0% to 5% after bare metal stent placement, and <1% after covered stent placement. The reported incidence and natural history of both acute and new AWI during follow-up after endovascular therapy for CoA varies considerably, likely secondary to ascertainment and reporting biases and inconsistent definitions. Although important AWI after endovascular treatment of CoA seems to be declining in frequency with increasing experience and improving technology, it remains one of the most important potential adverse outcomes. Long-term surveillance for new AWI and monitoring of existing AWI is mandatory, with institution of appropriate treatment when necessary. A central research focus in this population should be determination of the appropriate treatment for both native and recurrent CoA across various ages with regard to limiting recurrent CoA and preventing associated aortic wall complications, in addition to determining the appropriate treatment of various AWI. Consistent definitions and reporting are necessary to truly understand the incidence of, risk factors for, and measures protective against AWI after angioplasty or stent implantation for CoA.

  19. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with a severe aortic stenosis and cardiogenic shock requiring intra-aortic balloon pump support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodór, Piotr; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Przybylski, Roman; Świątkowski, Andrzej; Głowacki, Jan; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The following paper presents a patient with severe aortic stenosis and severely reduced left ventricular ejection fraction with intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation support, who underwent transfemoral aortic valve implantation of a CoreValve prosthesis.

  20. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with a severe aortic stenosis and cardiogenic shock requiring intra-aortic balloon pump support

    OpenAIRE

    Chodór, Piotr; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Przybylski, Roman; Świątkowski, Andrzej; Głowacki, Jan; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The following paper presents a patient with severe aortic stenosis and severely reduced left ventricular ejection fraction with intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation support, who underwent transfemoral aortic valve implantation of a CoreValve prosthesis.

  1. Differential Progressive Remodeling of Coronary and Cerebral Arteries and Arterioles in an Aortic Coarctation Model of Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather N. Hayenga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Effects of hypertension on arteries and arterioles often manifest first as a thickened wall, with associated changes in passive material properties (e.g., stiffness or function (e.g., cellular phenotype, synthesis and removal rates, and vasomotor responsiveness. Less is known, however, regarding the relative evolution of such changes in vessels from different vascular beds.METHODS: We used an aortic coarctation model of hypertension in the mini-pig to elucidate spatiotemporal changes in geometry and wall composition (including layer-specific thicknesses as well as presence of collagen, elastin, smooth muscle, endothelial, macrophage, and hematopoietic cells in three different arterial beds, specifically aortic, cerebral, and coronary, and vasodilator function in two different arteriolar beds, the cerebral and coronary.RESULTS: Marked geometric and structural changes occurred in the thoracic aorta and left anterior descending coronary artery within 2 weeks of the establishment of hypertension and continued to increase over the 8-week study period. In contrast, no significant changes were observed in the middle cerebral arteries from the same animals. Consistent with these differential findings at the arterial level, we also found a diminished nitric oxide-mediated dilation to adenosine at 8 weeks of hypertension in coronary arterioles, but not cerebral arterioles.CONCLUSION: These findings, coupled with the observation that temporal changes in wall constituents and the presence of macrophages differed significantly between the thoracic aorta and coronary arteries, confirm a strong differential progressive remodeling within different vascular beds. Taken together, these results suggest a spatiotemporal progression of vascular remodeling, beginning first in large elastic arteries and delayed in distal vessels.

  2. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G. Baikoussis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve replacement (AVR in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM post aortic valve replacement (AVR is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI.

  3. Genetic and Epigenetic Regulation of Aortic Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha Won

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysms are characterized by structural deterioration of the vascular wall leading to progressive dilatation and, potentially, rupture of the aorta. While aortic aneurysms often remain clinically silent, the morbidity and mortality associated with aneurysm expansion and rupture are considerable. Over 13,000 deaths annually in the United States are attributable to aortic aneurysm rupture with less than 1 in 3 persons with aortic aneurysm rupture surviving to surgical intervention. Environmental and epidemiologic risk factors including smoking, male gender, hypertension, older age, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and family history are highly associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms, while heritable genetic mutations are commonly associated with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. Similar to other forms of cardiovascular disease, family history, genetic variation, and heritable mutations modify the risk of aortic aneurysm formation and provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of human aortic aneurysms. This review will examine the relationship between heritable genetic and epigenetic influences on thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation and rupture. PMID:28116311

  4. Remodelling of the aortic root in severe tricuspid aortic stenosis: implications for transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolzmann, Paul; Desbiolles, Lotus; Scheffel, Hans; Leschka, Sebastian; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Knight, Joseph; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Poulikakos, Dimos [Laboratory of Thermodynamics in Emerging Technologies, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Maier, Willibald [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Plass, Andre [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-06-15

    Detailed knowledge of aortic root geometry is a prerequisite to anticipate complications of transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) implantation. We determined coronary ostial locations and aortic root dimensions in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and compared these values with normal subjects using computed tomography (CT). One hundred consecutive patients with severe tricuspid AS and 100 consecutive patients without valvular pathology (referred to as the controls) undergoing cardiac dual-source CT were included. Distances from the aortic annulus (AA) to the left coronary ostium (LCO), right coronary ostium (RCO), the height of the left coronary sinus (HLS), right coronary sinus (HRS), and aortic root dimensions [diameters of AA, sinus of Valsalva (SV), and sino-tubular junction(STJ)] were measured. LCO and RCO were 14.9 {+-} 3.2 mm (8.2-25.9) and 16.8 {+-} 3.6 mm (12.0-25.7) in the controls, 15.5 {+-} 2.9 mm (8.8-24.3) and 17.3 {+-} 3.6 mm (7.3-26.0) in patients with AS. Controls and patients with AS had similar values for LCO (P = 0.18), RCO (P = 0.33) and HLS (P = 0.88), whereas HRS (P < 0.05) was significantly larger in patients with AS. AA (r = 0.55,P < 0.001), SV (r = 0.54,P < 0.001), and STJ (r = 0.52,P < 0.001) significantly correlated with the body surface area in the controls; whereas no correlation was found in patients with AS. Patients with AS had significantly larger AA (P < 0.01) and STJ (P < 0.01) diameters when compared with the controls. In patients with severe tricuspid AS, coronary ostial locations were similar to the controls, but a transverse remodelling of the aortic root was recognized. Owing to the large distribution of ostial locations and the dilatation of the aortic root, CT is recommended before TAV implantation in each patient. (orig.)

  5. Stiff Neck, Torticollis, and Pseudotumor Cerebri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Three prepubertal children diagnosed with pseudotumor cerebri and presenting with stiff neck and torticollis are reported from Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv, Israel.

  6. Strength and stiffness of engineering systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leckie, Frederick A

    2009-01-01

    This book on the stiffness and strength of engineering systems integrates a wide array of topics into a unified text, including plasticity, fracture, composite materials, energy approaches, and mechanics of microdevices (MEMs)..

  7. Vascular Stiffness in Insulin Resistance and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghong eJia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are associated with a substantially increased prevalence of vascular fibrosis and stiffness, with attendant increased risk of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Although the underlying mechanisms and mediators of vascular stiffness are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports the role of metabolic and immune dysregulation related to increased adiposity, activation of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, reduced bioavailable nitric oxide, increased vascular extracellular matrix (ECM and ECM remodeling in the pathogenesis of vascular stiffness. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between obesity, insulin resistance and increased vascular stiffness to provide a contemporary understanding of the proposed underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic strategies.

  8. Stiff person syndrome and myasthenia gravis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan P

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Association of stiff person syndrome, an immune related disorder of anterior horn cells and myasthenia gravis an endplate disorder with similar pathogenesis, is rare. This communication documents this association in the Indian literature for the first time.

  9. Determination of 6 stiffnesses for a press

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Eriksen, Morten; Wanheim, Tarras

    2000-01-01

    The industry is increasingly demanding for better tolerances at cold forged products caused by the tough competition at the market. Near net-shape or net-shape production save resources for machining and reduce therefore also the material costs. During the forming process, the reaction forces fro...... in which the press has the highest stiffness. Furthermore, knowledge about the stiffnesses of all presses in a production system makes it possible to choose the press which best fit to a specific process....... is known too, the final dimensions can be predicted by divide the force by the stiffness and add the clearance. If the stiffness of the press is known, it is possible to optimize the orientation of the workpiece too, so the direction, in which the best tolerances is demanded, is equal to the direction...

  10. Spectrum of Aortic Valve Abnormalities Associated with Aortic Dilation Across Age Groups in Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Baba, Ridhwan Y.; Arai, Andrew E.; Bandettini, W. Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R.; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome (TS). Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with TS, and determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. Methods and Results The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in 208 subjects with TS in an IRB-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve, and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) 64%(n=133), partially fused aortic valve (PF) 12%(n=25), bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) 23%(n=47), and unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) 1%(n=3). Age and body surface area (BSA) were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, towards larger BSA-indexed ascending aortic diameters (AADi) with increasing valve fusion. AADi were (mean +/− SD) 16.9 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, 18.3 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, and 19.8 +/− 3.9 mm/m2 (p<0.0001) for TAV, PF and BAV+UAV respectively. PF, BAV, and UAV were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Conclusions Aortic valve abnormalities in TS occur with a spectrum of severity, and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased AADi. PMID:24084490

  11. Haemodynamic and extracellular matrix cues regulate the mechanical phenotype and stiffness of aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Caitlin; Osborne, Lukas D; Guilluy, Christophe; Chen, Zhongming; O'Brien, E Tim; Reader, John S; Burridge, Keith; Superfine, Richard; Tzima, Ellie

    2014-06-11

    Endothelial cells (ECs) lining blood vessels express many mechanosensors, including platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), that convert mechanical force into biochemical signals. While it is accepted that mechanical stresses and the mechanical properties of ECs regulate vessel health, the relationship between force and biological response remains elusive. Here we show that ECs integrate mechanical forces and extracellular matrix (ECM) cues to modulate their own mechanical properties. We demonstrate that the ECM influences EC response to tension on PECAM-1. ECs adherent on collagen display divergent stiffening and focal adhesion growth compared with ECs on fibronectin. This is because of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent serine phosphorylation and inactivation of RhoA. PKA signalling regulates focal adhesion dynamics and EC compliance in response to shear stress in vitro and in vivo. Our study identifies an ECM-specific, mechanosensitive signalling pathway that regulates EC compliance and may serve as an atheroprotective mechanism that maintains blood vessel integrity in vivo.

  12. Associations between glycaemic deterioration and aortic stiffness and central blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Nanna B; Rasmussen, Signe S; Wiinberg, Niels

    2017-01-01

    wave velocity (aPWV) and assessment of central blood pressure (BP). We compared differences in central haemodynamics at follow-up between the diabetes risk groups and analysed the impact of HbA1c at screening and HbA1c change on central haemodynamics at follow-up adjusting for relevant confounders....... RESULTS: At screening, median age was 59.0 years, and median HbA1c was 5.7%. At follow-up, median aPWV was 8.0 m/s, and median central SBP was 123.5 mmHg. Among individuals with high DRS, aPWV, central SBP and DBP, and pulse pressure were higher in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance than normal...

  13. Higher usual dietary intake of phytoestrogens is associated with lower aortic stiffness in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouw, van der Y.T.; Pijpe, A.; Lebrun, C.E.I.; Bots, M.L.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Staveren, van W.A.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Grobbee, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective¿ Phytoestrogens have been postulated to protect against cardiovascular diseases, but few studies have focused on the effect of Western dietary phytoestrogen intake. Methods and Results¿ Four hundred three women with natural menopause either between 1987 and 1989 or between 1969 and 1979 we

  14. Stiffness of Railway Soil-Steel Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machelski, Czesław

    2015-12-01

    The considerable influence of the soil backfill properties and that of the method of compacting it on the stiffness of soil-steel structures is characteristic of the latter. The above factors (exhibiting randomness) become apparent in shell deformation measurements conducted during construction and proof test loading. A definition of soil-shell structure stiffness, calculated on the basis of shell deflection under the service load, is proposed in the paper. It is demonstrated that the stiffness is the inverse of the deflection influence function used in structural mechanics. The moving load methodology is shown to be useful for testing, since it makes it possible to map the shell deflection influence line also in the case of group loads (concentrated forces), as in bridges. The analyzed cases show that the shell's span, geometry (static scheme) and the height of earth fill influence the stiffness of the structure. The soil-steel structure's characteristic parameter in the form of stiffness k is more suitable for assessing the quality of construction works than the proposed in code geometric index ω applied to beam structures. As shown in the given examples, parameter k is more effective than stiffness parameter λ used to estimate the deformation of soil-steel structures under construction. Although the examples concern railway structures, the methodology proposed in the paper is suitable also for road bridges.

  15. Substrate Stiffness Controls Osteoblastic and Chondrocytic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells without Exogenous Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyzy, Sharon L.; Doroudi, Maryam; Williams, Joseph K.; Gall, Ken; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell fate has been linked to the mechanical properties of their underlying substrate, affecting mechanoreceptors and ultimately leading to downstream biological response. Studies have used polymers to mimic the stiffness of extracellular matrix as well as of individual tissues and shown mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could be directed along specific lineages. In this study, we examined the role of stiffness in MSC differentiation to two closely related cell phenotypes: osteoblast and chondrocyte. We prepared four methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate (MA/MMA) polymer surfaces with elastic moduli ranging from 0.1 MPa to 310 MPa by altering monomer concentration. MSCs were cultured in media without exogenous growth factors and their biological responses were compared to committed chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Both chondrogenic and osteogenic markers were elevated when MSCs were grown on substrates with stiffness <10 MPa. Like chondrocytes, MSCs on lower stiffness substrates showed elevated expression of ACAN, SOX9, and COL2 and proteoglycan content; COMP was elevated in MSCs but reduced in chondrocytes. Substrate stiffness altered levels of RUNX2 mRNA, alkaline phosphatase specific activity, osteocalcin, and osteoprotegerin in osteoblasts, decreasing levels on the least stiff substrate. Expression of integrin subunits α1, α2, α5, αv, β1, and β3 changed in a stiffness- and cell type-dependent manner. Silencing of integrin subunit beta 1 (ITGB1) in MSCs abolished both osteoblastic and chondrogenic differentiation in response to substrate stiffness. Our results suggest that substrate stiffness is an important mediator of osteoblastic and chondrogenic differentiation, and integrin β1 plays a pivotal role in this process. PMID:28095466

  16. Meal ingestion markedly increases liver stiffness suggesting the need for liver stiffness determination in fasting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Daniel; Orozco, Federico; Mella, José María; Anders, Maria; Antinucci, Florencia; Mastai, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of noninvasive liver stiffness (LS) determination has heralded a new stage in the diagnosis and treatment of liver fibrosis. We evaluated the effect of food intake on LS in patients with different degrees of liver disease. We evaluated 24 patients (F≤1, n=11 and F> 1, n=13). LS (Fibroscan®) and portal blood flow (PBF) (Doppler ultrasound) were studied before and 30min after ingestion of a standard liquid meal. Food intake increased PBF (51±10%, p1). Hemodynamic and LS values returned to baseline pre-meal levels within 2hours. LS increases markedly after ingestion of a standard meal, irrespective of the degree of fibrosis. Our results strongly suggest that LS should be measured in fasting conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in severe aortic stenosis has proven to be a feasible and effective treatment modality for inoperable patients. Until now, neither aortic regurgitation nor degenerated bioprostheses has been an indication for TAVI. However, this article reports...... a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  18. Cooperative effects of matrix stiffness and fluid shear stress on endothelial cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Julie C; Zhou, Dennis W; Bordeleau, François; Zhou, Allen L; Mason, Brooke N; Mitchell, Michael J; King, Michael R; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-02-03

    Arterial hemodynamic shear stress and blood vessel stiffening both significantly influence the arterial endothelial cell (EC) phenotype and atherosclerosis progression, and both have been shown to signal through cell-matrix adhesions. However, the cooperative effects of fluid shear stress and matrix stiffness on ECs remain unknown. To investigate these cooperative effects, we cultured bovine aortic ECs on hydrogels matching the elasticity of the intima of compliant, young, or stiff, aging arteries. The cells were then exposed to laminar fluid shear stress of 12 dyn/cm(2). Cells grown on more compliant matrices displayed increased elongation and tighter EC-cell junctions. Notably, cells cultured on more compliant substrates also showed decreased RhoA activation under laminar shear stress. Additionally, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in response to fluid shear stress occurred more rapidly in ECs cultured on more compliant substrates, and nitric oxide production was enhanced. Together, our results demonstrate that a signaling cross talk between stiffness and fluid shear stress exists within the vascular microenvironment, and, importantly, matrices mimicking young and healthy blood vessels can promote and augment the atheroprotective signals induced by fluid shear stress. These data suggest that targeting intimal stiffening and/or the EC response to intima stiffening clinically may improve vascular health.

  19. Arterial Stiffness and Walk Time in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbi D. Lane

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: End-stage renal disease patients experience increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease. Heart-artery interaction may be shifted, impacting blood pressure lability, and exercise tolerance. The coupling ratio consists of the ratio of indexed arterial elastance (EaI, arterial load to ElvI, a measure of cardiac contractility or stiffness. Our purpose was to explore the relationship between elastances and functional capacity. We hypothesized that arterial stiffness (central pulse wave velocity, PWV and elastances would be correlated to shuttle walk time. Methods: We used applanation tonometry, ultrasonography, and a shuttle walk test to evaluate our hypothesis. Spearman's correlations were used to assess relationships between variables. Block regression was also performed. Results: Forty-two subjects on maintenance hemodialysis participated. Average age=44±5 years, body surface area=2.01 kg/m2. Mean EaI=4.45 and mean ElvI=6.89; the coupling ratio=0.82. Mean aortic pulse pressure=51 mmHg and PWV=9.6 m/s. PWV(r=-0.385 and EaI (r=-0.424 were significantly and inversely related to walking time while stroke volume index (SVI was positively correlated to shuttle walk time (r=0.337, pConclusions: We conclude that, like other clinical populations, both arterial and heart function predict walking ability and represent potential targets for intervention; arterial stiffness and SVI are strongly related to shuttle walk time in patients with ESRD.

  20. A cohort evaluation on arterial stiffness and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Wai Yee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are associated with systemic endothelial dysfunction leading to impaired physiological vasodilation. Recent evidence has shown central aortic pressures obtained through pulse wave analysis, at less than 14 weeks of gestation, to be predictive of pre-eclampsia. In light of this, we aimed to evaluate the role of central aortic stiffness in the prediction and discrimination of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Methods A cohort study of women with viable, singleton pregnancies at less than 14 weeks of amenorrhoea, and without multiple pregnancies, autoimmune or renal disease, diagnosed with aneuploidy or fetal anomaly will be recruited from a single maternity hospital and followed up till delivery and puerperium. A targeted sample size of 1000 eligible pregnant women will be enrolled into the study from antenatal clinics. Main exposure under study is central aortic pulse pressure using radial pulse wave recording, and the outcomes under follow-up are gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia. Other measures include lifestyle factors such as smoking, physical exercise, psychometric evaluations, vasoactive factors, uterine artery pulsatility index, height and weight measurements. These measures will be repeated over 4 antenatal visits at 11-14, 18-22, 28-32 and above 34 weeks of gestation. Double data entry will be performed on Microsoft Access, and analysis of data will include the use of random effect models and receiver operating characteristic curves on Stata 11.2. Discussion The proposed study design will enable a longitudinal evaluation of the central aortic pressure changes as a marker for vascular compliance during pregnancy. As measures are repeated over time, the timing and severity of changes are detectable, and findings may yield important information on how aberrant vascular responses occur and its role in the early detection and prediction of hypertensive disorders.

  1. Matrix stiffness-mediated effects on stemness characteristics occurring in HCC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yang; Zheng, Qiongdan; Dong, Yinying; Xie, Xiaoying; Wang, Yaohui; Wu, Sifan; Zhang, Lan; Wang, Yingcong; Xue, Tongchun; Wang, Zhiming; Chen, Rongxin; Wang, Yanhong; Cui, Jiefeng; Ren, Zhenggang

    2016-05-31

    Matrix stiffness as an important physical attribute of extracellular matrix exerts significant impacts on biological behaviors of cancer cells such as growth, proliferation, motility, metabolism and invasion. However, its influence on cancer stemness still remains elusive. Here, we explore whether matrix stiffness-mediated effects on stemness characteristics occur in HCC cells. As the substrate stiffness increased, HCC cells exhibited high proportion of cells with CD133(+)/EpCAM(+), high expression levels of CD133, EpCAM, Nanog and SOX2, greater self-renewing ability and oxaliplatin resistance. Simultaneously, their phosphorylation levels of Akt and mTOR, as well as p-4E-BP and SOX2 expressions were also obviously upregulated. Conversely, knockdown of integrin β1 partially attenuated higher stiffness-mediated stemness characteristics in HCC cells, and reversed the phosphorylation levels of Akt and mTOR, and expressions of p-4E-BP and SOX2, suggesting that integrin β1 may deliver higher stiffness signal into HCC cells and activate mTOR signaling pathway. Additionally, mTOR inhibitor suppressed the mTOR phosphorylation level and expression levels of p-4E-BP and SOX2 in HCC cells grown on higher stiffness substrate, as well as depressed their stemness properties significantly, favoring a regulating role of mTOR signaling pathway in matrix stiffness-mediated effects on stemness. In summary, matrix stiffness may be involved in the process of stemness regulation via activating integrin β1/Akt/mTOR/SOX2 signaling pathway. To the best of our knowledge, this study first reveals a novel regulating pathway to direct the stemness characteristics in HCC cells.

  2. Stress State and Stress Rate Dependencies of Stiffness of Soft Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachavorasinskun, Supot

    The influence of the stress anisotropy imposed during consolidation on the stiffness of soft Bangkok clays was explored using the triaxial equipment. Several testing conditions were imposed on the samples to examine the effects of stress state as well as the rate of loading. It was found the stiffness at moderate strain levels was almost independent to the stress state; i.e., the deviator stress level. On the contrary, the rate of stress application played a very important role. The faster the rate of stress application, the higher the values of the stiffness at moderate strains. Nevertheless, a simple empirical equation can be given based on the test results to represent the influence of rate of application on the stiffness of soft clay.

  3. Uncertainty quantification of inflow boundary condition and proximal arterial stiffness coupled effect on pulse wave propagation in a vascular network

    CERN Document Server

    Brault, A; Lucor, D

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY This work aims at quantifying the effect of inherent uncertainties from cardiac output on the sensitivity of a human compliant arterial network response based on stochastic simulations of a reduced-order pulse wave propagation model. A simple pulsatile output form is utilized to reproduce the most relevant cardiac features with a minimum number of parameters associated with left ventricle dynamics. Another source of critical uncertainty is the spatial heterogeneity of the aortic compliance which plays a key role in the propagation and damping of pulse waves generated at each cardiac cycle. A continuous representation of the aortic stiffness in the form of a generic random field of prescribed spatial correlation is then considered. Resorting to a stochastic sparse pseudospectral method, we investigate the spatial sensitivity of the pulse pressure and waves reflection magnitude with respect to the different model uncertainties. Results indicate that uncertainties related to the shape and magnitude of th...

  4. Computational singular perturbation analysis of stochastic chemical systems with stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijin; Han, Xiaoying; Cao, Yanzhao; Najm, Habib N.

    2017-04-01

    Computational singular perturbation (CSP) is a useful method for analysis, reduction, and time integration of stiff ordinary differential equation systems. It has found dominant utility, in particular, in chemical reaction systems with a large range of time scales at continuum and deterministic level. On the other hand, CSP is not directly applicable to chemical reaction systems at micro or meso-scale, where stochasticity plays an non-negligible role and thus has to be taken into account. In this work we develop a novel stochastic computational singular perturbation (SCSP) analysis and time integration framework, and associated algorithm, that can be used to not only construct accurately and efficiently the numerical solutions to stiff stochastic chemical reaction systems, but also analyze the dynamics of the reduced stochastic reaction systems. The algorithm is illustrated by an application to a benchmark stochastic differential equation model, and numerical experiments are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the construction.

  5. SuPAR Predicts Cardiovascular Events and Mortality in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodges, Gethin W; Bang, Casper N; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is an inflammatory marker associated with subclinical cardiovascular damage and cardiovascular events. Whether suPAR is of prognostic value in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS) remains unknown. METHODS: Plasma su......PAR levels were measured in 1503 patients with a mean age of 68 years who were recruited in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. Cox regression analysis was performed to evaluate associations between suPAR and the composite end points of ischemic cardiovascular events (ICEs), aortic...

  6. Aortic Coarctation Diagnosed During Pregnancy in a Woman With Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Zakaria; Iriart, Xavier; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2015-09-01

    Aortic coarctation is thought to be a rare condition in patients with tetralogy of Fallot. We report the case of a 26 year old woman presenting with systemic hypertension at 17 weeks of pregnancy after repair of tetralogy of Fallot in childhood. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed right aortic arch with severe isthmic coarctation. Her blood pressure was controlled medically during the rest of her pregnancy, and delivery was uneventful. Successful transcatheter placement of a covered stent at the level of the coarctation was performed after delivery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of aortic coarctation diagnosed in an adult patient late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot.

  7. Investigating the effect of cell substrate on cancer cell stiffness by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad Sulaiman; Coceano, Giovanna; Bonin, Serena; Niemela, Joseph; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2017-07-26

    The mechanical properties of cells are influenced by their microenvironment. Here we report cell stiffness alteration by changing the cell substrate stiffness for isolated cells and cells in contact with other cells. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is used to prepare soft substrates with three different stiffness values (173, 88 and 17kPa respectively). Breast cancer cells lines, namely HBL-100, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 with different level of aggressiveness are cultured on these substrates and their local elasticity is investigated by vertical indentation of the cell membrane. Our preliminary results show an unforeseen behavior of the MDA-MB-231 cells. When cultured on glass substrate as isolated cells, they are less stiff than the other two types of cells, in agreement with the general statement that more aggressive and metastatic cells are softer. However, when connected to other cells the stiffness of MDA-MB-231 cells becomes similar to the other two cell lines. Moreover, the stiffness of MDA-MB-231 cells cultured on soft PDMS substrates is significantly higher than the stiffness of the other cell types, demonstrating thus the strong influence of the environmental conditions on the mechanical properties of the cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. The stable stiffness triangle - drained sand during deformation cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaliauskas, Tomas; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic, drained sand stiffness was observed using the Danish triaxial appa- ratus. New, deformation dependant soil property (the stable stiffness triangle) was detected. Using the the stable stiffness triangle, secant stiffness of drained sand was plausible to predict (and control) even during ir...

  9. The Effect of Rib Shape on Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Sven A; Wang, Stewart C; Grotberg, James B

    2016-11-01

    This study investigates the isolated effect of rib shape on the mechanical characteristics of ribs subjected to multiple forms of loading. It aims to measure the variation in stiffness due to shape that is seen throughout the population and, in particular, provide a tool for researchers to better understand the influence of shape on resulting stiffness. A previously published six-parameter shape model of the central axis of human ribs was used. It has been shown to accurately model the overall rib path using intrinsic geometric properties such as size, aspect ratio, and skewness, through shapes based on logarithmic spirals with high curvature continuity. In this study the model was fitted to 19,500 ribs from 989 adult female and male CT scans having demographic distributions matching the US adult population. Mechanical loading was simulated through a simplified finite element model aimed at isolating rib shape from other factors influencing mechanical response. Four loading scenarios were used representing idealized free and constrained loading conditions in axial (body-anterior) and lateral directions. Characteristic rib stiffness and maximum stress location were tracked as simulation output measures. Regression models of rib stiffness found that all shape model parameters added information when predicting stiffness under each loading condition, with their linear combination able to account for 95% of the population stiffness variation due to shape in midlevel ribs for free axial loading, and 92%-98% in other conditions. Full regression models including interactive terms explained up to 99% of population variability. Results allow researchers to better evaluate the differences in stiffness results that are obtained from physical testing by providing a framework with which to explain variation due to rib shape.

  10. Waves in geomaterials exhibiting negative stiffness behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esin, Maxim; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Negative stiffness denotes the type of material behaviour when the force applied to the body decreases the body's deformation increases. Some geomaterials, for instance, rocks, demonstrate behaviour of this type at certain loads: during the compression tests the loading curves exhibit descending branch (post-peak softening). One of the possible mechanisms of the negative stiffness appearance in geomaterials is rotation of non-spherical grains. It is important to emphasize that in this case the descending branch may be reversible given that the testing machine is stiff enough (in general case it means an importance of boundary conditions). Existence of geomaterials with a negative modulus associated with rotations may have significant importance. In particular, important is understanding of the wave propagation in such materials. We study the stability of geomaterials with negative stiffness inclusions and wave propagation in it using two approaches: Cosserat continuum and discrete mass-spring models. In both cases we consider the rotational degrees of freedom in addition to the conventional translational ones. We show that despite non positiveness of the energy the materials with negative stiffness elements can be stable if certain conditions are met. In the case of Cosserat continuum the Cosserat shear modulus (the modulus relating the non-symmetrical part of shear stress and internal rotations) is allowed to assume negative values as long as its value does not exceed the value of the standard (positive) shear modulus. In the case of discrete mass-spring systems (with translational and rotational springs) the concentration of negative stiffness springs and the absolute values of negative spring stiffness are limited. The critical concentration when the system loses stability and the amplitude of the oscillations tends to infinity is equal to 1/2 and 3/5 for two- and three-dimensional cases respectively.

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis: a meta analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yi-cheng; ZHANG Jian-feng; SHEN Wei-feng; ZHAO Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as the treatment choice for non-operable patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) and may be a good alternative to surgery for those at very high or prohibitive surgical risk.We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the comparative benefits of TAVI versus surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in patients with severe AS.Methods A comprehensive literature search of PubMed,Embase,ScienceDirect and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials was performed,and randomized trials as well as cohort studies with propensity score analysis were included.Results One randomized trial (n=699) and six retrospective cohort studies (n=781) were selected for meta-analysis.Mortality at 30-day and 1-year follow-up was comparable between TAVI and SAVR.Despite similar incidences of stroke,myocardial infarction,re-operation for bleeding,and renal failure requiring dialysis,TAVI was associated with a lower occurrence rate of new-onset atrial fibrillation (OR 0.51,95% CI 0.33-0.78) and shorter procedural time (mean difference -67.50 minutes,95% CI-87.20 to-47.81 minutes).Post-operative aortic regurgitation and permanent pacemaker implantation were more common in patients after TAVI than in those with SAVR (OR 5.53,95% CI 3.41-8.97; OR 1.71,95% Cl 1.02-2.84,respectively).Conclusion In patients with severe symptomatic AS,TAVI and SAVR did not differ with respect to short-and mid-term survival,but the incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation and post-procedural aortic regurgitation remain relatively high after TAVI.

  12. Blood pressure and arterial stiffness in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvidt, Kristian Nebelin

    2015-03-01

    Obesity, elevated blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. A strong relationship exists between obesity and elevated BP in both children and adults. Obesity and elevated BP in childhood track into adult life increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Ambulatory BP is the most precise measure to evaluate the BP burden, whereas carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating arterial (i.e. aortic) stiffness. These measures might contribute to a better understanding of obesity's adverse impact on the cardiovascular system, and ultimately a better prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. The overall aim of the present PhD thesis is to investigate arterial stiffness and 24-hour BP in obese children and adolescents, and evaluate whether these measures are influenced by weight reduction. The present PhD thesis is based on four scientific papers.  In a cross-sectional design, 104 severe obese children and adolescents with an age of 10-18 years were recruited when newly referred to the Children's Obesity Clinic, Holbæk University Hospital, and compared to 50 normal weighted age and gender matched control individuals. Ambulatory BP was measured, and cfPWV was investigated in two ways in respect to the distance measure of aorta; the previously recommended length - the so called subtracted distance, and the currently recommended length - the direct distance. In a longitudinal design, the obese patients were re-investigated after one-year of lifestyle intervention at the Children's Obesity Clinic in purpose of reducing the degree of obesity. In the cross-sectional design, the obese group had higher measures of obesity, while matched for age, gender and height, when compared to the control group. In the longitudinal design, 74% of the 72 followed up obese patients experienced a significant weight reduction. CfPWV was dependent on the method used to measure the

  13. Variable stiffness design of redundantly actuated planar rotational parallel mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Kangkang; Jiang Hongzhou; Cui Zuo; Huang Qun

    2017-01-01

    Redundantly actuated planar rotational parallel mechanisms (RAPRPMs) adapt to the requirements of robots under different working conditions by changing the antagonistic internal force to tune their stiffness. The geometrical parameters of the mechanism impact the performances of modulating stiffness. Analytical expressions relating stiffness and geometrical parameters of the mechanism were formulated to obtain the necessary conditions of variable stiffness. A novel method of variable stiffness design was presented to optimize the geometrical parameters of the mechanism. The stiffness variation with the internal force was maximized. The dynamic change of stiffness with the dynamic location of the mechanism was minimized, and the robustness of stiff-ness during the motion of the mechanism was ensured. This new approach to variable stiffness design can enable off-line planning of the internal force to avoid the difficulties of on-line control of the internal force.

  14. Microenvironmental stiffness enhances glioma cell proliferation by stimulating epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhavi Umesh

    Full Text Available The aggressive and rapidly lethal brain tumor glioblastoma (GBM is associated with profound tissue stiffening and genomic lesions in key members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR pathway. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that increasing microenvironmental stiffness in culture can strongly enhance glioma cell behaviors relevant to tumor progression, including proliferation, yet it has remained unclear whether stiffness and EGFR regulate proliferation through common or independent signaling mechanisms. Here we test the hypothesis that microenvironmental stiffness regulates cell cycle progression and proliferation in GBM tumor cells by altering EGFR-dependent signaling. We began by performing an unbiased reverse phase protein array screen, which revealed that stiffness modulates expression and phosphorylation of a broad range of signals relevant to proliferation, including members of the EGFR pathway. We subsequently found that culturing human GBM tumor cells on progressively stiffer culture substrates both dramatically increases proliferation and facilitates passage through the G1/S checkpoint of the cell cycle, consistent with an EGFR-dependent process. Western Blots showed that increasing microenvironmental stiffness enhances the expression and phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream effector Akt. Pharmacological loss-of-function studies revealed that the stiffness-sensitivity of proliferation is strongly blunted by inhibition of EGFR, Akt, or PI3 kinase. Finally, we observed that stiffness strongly regulates EGFR clustering, with phosphorylated EGFR condensing into vinculin-positive focal adhesions on stiff substrates and dispersing as microenvironmental stiffness falls to physiological levels. Our findings collectively support a model in which tissue stiffening promotes GBM proliferation by spatially and biochemically amplifying EGFR signaling.

  15. [Surgical technique of aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, T; Fujiwara, K; Furukawa, H; Tsushima, Y; Yoshitaka, H; Kuinose, M; Minami, H; Ishida, A; Tamura, K; Totsugawa, T; Kanemitsu, H; Ozawa, M

    2006-04-01

    Recent reports have shown that aortic valve replacement in elderly patients over 65 years with atherosclerotic aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus is possible by using a small sized bioprosthesis (Carpentier-Edwards pericardial valve). Here we present out surgical technique. Firstly, the native calcified aortic valve was removed completely to gain total exposure of the surrounding aortic root and sinus of Valsalva like Bentall procedure. Secondly, a small sized bioprosthesis was implanted with intermittent noneverting mattress 2-0 sutures with spaghetti and small polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt. Aortic annulus is the dilated by inserting Hegar dilator sizing from 25 to 27 mm. Therefore, aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in intra- or supra-annular position should be easily accomplished. Good surgical results and hemodynamic state were achieved in 25 consecutive cases using this technique.

  16. Magnetorheological elastomer with stiffness-variable characteristics based on induced current applied to differential mount of vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Un-Chang; Yoon, Ji-Hyun; Yang, In-Hyung; Jeong, Jae-Eun; Kim, Jin-Su; Chung, Kyung-Ho; Oh, Jae-Eung

    2013-11-01

    A differential mount with elastomers is installed to insulate vibration transmitted from the engine to the body through the propeller shaft. Since existing differential mounts adopt an elastomer of uniform stiffness, it is difficult to meet both the requirements for steering performance and driving comfort at the same time. In order to overcome this limitation, this study suggests a magnetorheological elastomer (MRE)-based stiffness-variable differential mount which allows the mount’s stiffness to vary reversibly or instantly. The stiffness-variable differential mount was designed with a new inner structure where a magnetic field can be induced in the MRE. Further, the geometry of the MRE was optimized by means of the response surface method to achieve a targeted level of stiffness. The variable performance of the stiffness-variable differential mount was evaluated with the dynamic stiffness when a current of 3 A (0.287 T) was applied. As a result, it was found that the average increase in dynamic stiffness was 4.41 kgf mm-1 over an excitation frequency range of 60-100 Hz, a critical point of variation for dynamic stiffness, and 3.60 kgf mm-1 over an excitation frequency range of less than 100 Hz.

  17. Simulation study and function analysis of the dynamic aortic valve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Dongdong; BAI Jing

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic aortic valve (DAV) is a new left ventricular assist device, a micro-axial blood pump implemented at the position of the aortic valve, pumping blood from the left ventricle into the aortic artery. The present dynamic aortic valve operates at 7 different rotation speeds, ranging from 3000 r/min (speed 1) to 9000 r/min (speed 7). Because in vivo experiments need a lot of live animals and take a long period of time, modeling and simulation have been widely used to simulate and analyze hydra-dynamic property of the DAV and its assisting effects. With the measurements from the mock circulatory loop, a mathematic model of the DAV is established and embedded into the previously developed canine circulatory system. Using this model, the effect of the DAV on the failing heart at each rotation speed level is investigated. The vital cardiac variables are computed and compared with in vivo experimental results, which are in good agreement with an acceptable difference mostly 15 %. The establishment of the DAV model and its simulation are useful for further improvement of the DAV device.

  18. Single motor–variable stiffness actuator using bistable switching mechanisms for independent motion and stiffness control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, S.S.; Carloni, R.; Stramigioli, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a proof of concept of a variable stiffness actuator (VSA) that uses only one (high power) input motor. In general, VSAs use two (high power) motors to be able to control both the output position and the output stiffness, which possibly results in a heavy, and bulky system. In thi

  19. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are......To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are...

  20. [Stiff-person syndrome and related autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Ryo; Tanaka, Keiko

    2013-04-01

    Central nervous system hyperexcitability disorders, known as stiff-man/person syndrome (SPS), are thought to be related to the regulatory disturbance of inhibitory synaptic transmission of motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord. SPS is characterized by stiffness and spasms of the axis and limbs and is divided into two clinical subgroups: classic SPS, which affects the lumbar, trunk, and proximal limb muscles, and SPS-plus syndrome. The latter comprises (1) the stiff-limb subtype, in which symptom is limited to the lower limbs; (2) jerking stiff-man syndrome, characterized by chronically progressive stiffness and myoclonus; and (3) acute-onset and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. Almost 80% of patients with classic SPS harbor autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). In approximately 30-40% of patients, SPS accompanies type I diabetes, and anti-GAD65 antibodies are detected frequently in type I diabetes. However, the antibody-recognizing epitopes might be different between SPS and diabetes. Other autoantibodies against glycine receptor α1 (12% of patients with SPS) and GABA(A)-receptor associated protein (70% of patients with SPS) have been reported. In paraneoplastic SPS, anti-amphiphysin antibodies have been shown in patients with breast cancer or small cell lung cancer. One case of mediastinal tumor with anti-gephyrin antibodies has also been reported. However, the roles of these autoantibodies in the pathomechanisms of SPS have not yet been elucidated.

  1. Big Bang nucleosynthesis with a stiff fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Sourish

    2010-01-01

    Models that lead to a cosmological stiff fluid component, with a density $\\rho_S$ that scales as $a^{-6}$, where $a$ is the scale factor, have been proposed recently in a variety of contexts. We calculate numerically the effect of such a stiff fluid on the primordial element abundances. Because the stiff fluid energy density decreases with the scale factor more rapidly than radiation, it produces a relatively larger change in the primordial helium-4 abundance than in the other element abundances, relative to the changes produced by an additional radiation component. We show that the helium-4 abundance varies linearly with the density of the stiff fluid at a fixed fiducial temperature. Taking $\\rho_{S10}$ and $\\rho_{R10}$ to be the stiff fluid energy density and the standard density in relativistic particles, respectively, at $T = 10$ MeV, we find that the change in the primordial helium abundance is well-fit by $\\Delta Y_p = 0.00024(\\rho_{S10}/\\rho_{R10})$. The changes in the helium-4 abundance produced by ad...

  2. Aortic endograft sizing in trauma patients with hemodynamic instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Frederik H. W.; Verhagen, Hence J. M.; Mojibian, Hamid; Davis, Kimberly A.; Moll, Frans L.; Muhs, Bart E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate changes in aortic diameter in hemodynamically unstable trauma patients and the implications for sizing of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with traumatic thoracic aortic injury (TTAI). Methods: We retrospectively evaluated all trauma patients that we

  3. A Novel Variable Stiffness Mechanism Capable of an Infinite Stiffness Range and Unlimited Decoupled Output Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Groothuis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel variable stiffness mechanism is presented, which is capable of achieving an output stiffness with infinite range and an unlimited output motion, i.e., the mechanism output is completely decoupled from the rotor motion, in the zero stiffness configuration. The mechanism makes use of leaf springs, which are engaged at different positions by means of two movable supports, to realize the variable output stiffness. The Euler–Bernoulli leaf spring model is derived and validated through experimental data. By shaping the leaf springs, it is shown that the stiffness characteristic of the mechanism can be changed to fulfill different application requirements. Alternative designs can achieve the same behavior with only one leaf spring and one movable support pin.

  4. Knee stiffness following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: the incidence and associated factors of knee stiffness following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, G A J; Coleman, S G S; Keating, J F

    2009-08-01

    We reviewed 100 patients retrospectively following primary ACL reconstruction with quadruple hamstring autografts to evaluate the incidence and factors associated with postoperative stiffness. Stiffness was defined as any loss of motion using the contra-lateral leg as a control. The median delay between injury and operation was 15 months. The incidence of stiffness was 12% at 6 months post-reconstruction. Both incomplete attendance at physiotherapy (pAnterior knee pain was also associated with the stiffness (p<0.029). Factors that failed to show a significant association with the stiffness included associated MCL sprain at injury (p=0.32), post-injury stiffness (p=1.00) and concomitant menisectomy at reconstruction (p=0.54). Timing of surgery also did not appear to influence the onset of stiffness (median delays: 29 months for stiff patients; 14 months for non-stiff patients). The rate of stiffness fell to 5% at 12 months postreconstruction, without operative intervention.

  5. Length-dependent [Ca2+] sensitivity adds stiffness to muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistemaker, Dinant A; Van Soest, Arthur Knoek J; Bobbert, Maarten F

    2005-09-01

    It is well documented that muscle fibers become more sensitive for [Ca2+] with increasing sarcomere length. In mechanical terms this length-dependent [Ca2+] sensitivity (LDCS) adds to the stiffness of muscle fibers, because muscle force, normalized for the force-length relationship at maximal stimulation, increases with contractile element (CE) length. Although LDCS is well-documented in the physiological literature, it is ignored in most motor control studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the importance of LDCS as a contributor to the stiffness of a muscle. Comparison of experimental data with predictions derived from the model of activation dynamics proposed by Hatze (Myocybernetic Control Models of Skeletal Muscle, University of South Africa, Pretoria, 1981, pp. 31-42) indicated that this model captures the main characteristics of LDCS well. It was shown that LDCS accounts for the experimentally observed shifts in optimum length at sub-maximal stimulation levels. Furthermore, it was shown that in conditions with low-to-medium muscle stimulation, the contribution of LDCS to the total amount of stiffness provided by the muscle is substantial. It was concluded that LDCS is an important muscle property and should be taken into account in studies concerning motor control.

  6. Joint stiffness of the ankle and the knee in running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Michael; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2002-11-01

    The spring-mass model is a valid fundament to understand global dynamics of fast legged locomotion under gravity. The underlying concept of elasticity, implying leg stiffness as a crucial parameter, is also found on lower motor control levels, i.e. in muscle-reflex and muscle-tendon systems. Therefore, it seems reasonable that global leg stiffness emerges from local elasticity established by appropriate joint torques. A recently published model of an elastically operating, segmented leg predicts that proper adjustment of joint elasticities to the leg geometry and initial conditions of ground contact provides internal leg stability. Another recent study suggests that in turn the leg segmentation and the initial conditions may be a consequence of metabolic and bone stress constraints. In this study, the theoretical predictions were verified experimentally with respect to initial conditions and elastic joint characteristics in human running. Kinematics and kinetics were measured and the joint torques were estimated by inverse dynamics. Stiffnesses and elastic nonlinearities describing the resulting joint characteristics were extracted from parameter fits. Our results clearly support the theoretical predictions: the knee joint is always stiffer and more extended than the ankle joint. Moreover, the knee torque characteristic on the average shows the higher nonlinearity. According to literature, the leg geometry is a consequence of metabolic and material stress limitations. Adapted to this given geometry, the initial joint angle conditions in fast locomotion are a compromise between metabolic and control effort minimisation. Based on this adaptation, an appropriate joint stiffness ratio between ankle and knee passively safeguards the internal leg stability. The identified joint nonlinearities contribute to the linearisation of the leg spring.

  7. Aortic root vasculitis associated with Cogan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparovic, Hrvoje; Djuric, Zeljko; Bosnic, Dubravka; Petricevic, Mate; Brida, Margita; Dotlic, Snjezana; Biocina, Bojan

    2011-07-01

    Cogan's syndrome is characterized by nonsyphilitic interstitial keratitis and an audiovestibular disorder resembling Meniere disease. We report a patient with progressive congestive heart failure due to massive aortic and mitral insufficiency coupled with aortitis leading to an ascending aortic aneurysm. The patient underwent successful aortic root replacement and mitral valve repair. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Aortic valvuloplasty of calcific aortic stenosis with monofoil and trefoil balloon catheters: practical considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Plante (Sylvain); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); L.C.P. van Veen; C. di Mario (Carlo); C.E. Essed; K.J. Beatt (Kevin); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractIn order to evaluate the relation between balloon design (monofoil, trefoil) and valvular configuration, experimental aortic valvuloplasty was performed in four post-mortem hearts with calcific aortic stenosis of various morphology. The degree of obstruction of the aortic orifice was ass

  9. The Efficacy of Autologous Femoropopliteal Vein Reconstruction for Primary Aortic and Aortic Graft Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, M.; Jagt, M.F.P. van der; Barendregt, W.B.; Vliet, D. van der

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of our study was to analyze the efficacy of autologous superficial femoropopliteal vein reconstruction for primary aortic or aortic graft infection. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of 14 patients treated for an infected aortic prosthesis or primary infected a

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for bicuspid aortic stenosis 13years post heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Maureen B; Desai, Nimesh; Brozena, Susan; Herrmann, Howard C

    2016-12-16

    Despite the widespread use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for moderate and high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, it is utilized less frequently in patients with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV). Orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) donors tend to be younger and may have undiagnosed BAV. We present a case of successful TAVR in a patient with BAV thirteen years after OHT.

  11. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav;

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...

  12. New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav;

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...

  13. New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...

  14. TGFB2 loss of function mutations cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections associated with mild systemic features of the Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boileau, Catherine; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Hanna, Nadine; Regalado, Ellen S.; Detaint, Delphine; Gong, Limin; Varret, Mathilde; Prakash, Siddharth; Li, Alexander H.; d’Indy, Hyacintha; Braverman, Alan C.; Grandchamp, Bernard; Kwartler, Callie S.; Gouya, Laurent; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Abifadel, Marianne; Leal, Suzanne M.; Muti, Christine; Shendure, Jay; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Rieder, Mark J.; Vahanian, Alec; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Michel, Jean Baptiste; Jondeau, Guillaume; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    A predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. Genome-wide linkage analysis of two large unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease, followed by whole exome sequencing of affected relatives, identified causative mutations in TGFB2. These mutations, a frameshift mutation in exon 6 and a nonsense mutation in exon 4, segregated with disease with a combined LOD score of 7.7. Sanger sequencing of 276 probands from families with inherited thoracic aortic disease identified two additional TGFB2 mutations. TGFB2 encodes the transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGF-β2) and the mutations are predicted to cause haploinsufficiency for TGFB2, but aortic tissue from cases paradoxically shows increased TGF-β2 expression and immunostaining. Thus, haploinsufficiency of TGFB2 predisposes to thoracic aortic disease, suggesting the initial pathway driving disease is decreased cellular TGF-β2 levels leading to a secondary increase in TGF-β2 production in the diseased aorta. PMID:22772371

  15. MDCT evaluation of aortic root and aortic valve prior to TAVI. What is the optimal imaging time point in the cardiac cycle?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurencak, Tomas; Turek, Jakub; Nijssen, Estelle C. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P. Debyelaan 25, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kietselaer, Bastiaan L.J.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P. Debyelaan 25, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, CARIM School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Mihl, Casper; Kok, Madeleine; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Das, Marco [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P. Debyelaan 25, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, CARIM School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht (Netherlands); Ommen, Vincent G.V.A. van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Garsse, Leen A.F.M. van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    To determine the optimal imaging time point for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) therapy planning by comprehensive evaluation of the aortic root. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) examination with retrospective ECG gating was retrospectively performed in 64 consecutive patients referred for pre-TAVI assessment. Eighteen different parameters of the aortic root were evaluated at 11 different time points in the cardiac cycle. Time points at which maximal (or minimal) sizes were determined, and dimension differences to other time points were evaluated. Theoretical prosthesis sizing based on different measurements was compared. Largest dimensions were found between 10 and 20 % of the cardiac cycle for annular short diameter (10 %); mean diameter (10 %); effective diameter and circumference-derived diameter (20 %); distance from the annulus to right coronary artery ostium (10 %); aortic root at the left coronary artery level (20 %); aortic root at the widest portion of coronary sinuses (20 %); and right leaflet length (20 %). Prosthesis size selection differed depending on the chosen measurements in 25-75 % of cases. Significant changes in anatomical structures of the aortic root during the cardiac cycle are crucial for TAVI planning. Imaging in systole is mandatory to obtain maximal dimensions. (orig.)

  16. Myocardial infarction with aortic banding. A combined rat model of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthonio, R L; van Veldhuisen, D J; Scholtens, E; van Bekkum, C; de Boer, E; van Gilst, W H

    1997-09-01

    The effect of additional abdominal aortic banding on parameters of heart failure was studied in male Wistar rats with myocardial infarction. Contractile function was studied 8-9 weeks after operation, with an isoprenaline dose response protocol, in a retrograde Langendorff perfusion. Also, plasma noradrenaline concentration, infarct size and morphology were determined. Compared with controls, myocardial infarction/aortic banding animals showed a decreased contractile function, both at baseline and after maximal isoprenaline stimulation, and elevated noradrenaline levels (1316 +/- 94) vs 1909 +/- 174 pg/ml, both p Emax was significantly decreased. In aortic banding rats, contractile parameters were not significantly impaired, compared with controls. Both myocardial infarction and the myocardial infarction/aortic banding animals, but not aortic banding rats, had a significantly increased heart weight (1.4 +/- 0.04 g for controls vs 1.7 +/- 0.08 g for myocardial infarction and 2.0 +/- 0.12 g for myocardial infarction/aortic banding), and left ventricular cavity volume (19 +/- 1.4 mm3 for controls vs 49 +/- 5.5 mm3 for myocardial infarction and 48 +/- 4.3 mm3 for myocardial infarction/aortic banding) compared to control animals. Infarct size was 36.0% and 39.4% for the myocardial infarction and myocardial infarction/aortic banding animals, respectively. We conclude that myocardial infarction/aortic banding provides a new experimental model, which may yield important information and pathophysiology which allow evaluation of changes that may mimic clinical myocardial infarction with concomitant hypertension.

  17. Low-gradient aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-09-07

    An important proportion of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) have a 'low-gradient' AS, i.e. a small aortic valve area (AVA <1.0 cm(2)) consistent with severe AS but a low mean transvalvular gradient (<40 mmHg) consistent with non-severe AS. The management of this subset of patients is particularly challenging because the AVA-gradient discrepancy raises uncertainty about the actual stenosis severity and thus about the indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) if the patient has symptoms and/or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The most frequent cause of low-gradient (LG) AS is the presence of a low LV outflow state, which may occur with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e. classical low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG), or preserved LVEF, i.e. paradoxical LF-LG. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with AS may have a normal-flow, low-gradient (NF-LG) AS: i.e. a small AVA-low-gradient combination but with a normal flow. One of the most important clinical challenges in these three categories of patients with LG AS (classical LF-LG, paradoxical LF-LG, and NF-LG) is to differentiate a true-severe AS that generally benefits from AVR vs. a pseudo-severe AS that should be managed conservatively. A low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography may be used for this purpose in patients with classical LF-LG AS, whereas aortic valve calcium scoring by multi-detector computed tomography is the preferred modality in those with paradoxical LF-LG or NF-LG AS. Although patients with LF-LG severe AS have worse outcomes than those with high-gradient AS following AVR, they nonetheless display an important survival benefit with this intervention. Some studies suggest that transcatheter AVR may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with LF-LG AS.

  18. Early and midterm outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for acute and chronic complicated type B aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min-Hong; Du, Xin; Guo, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Jia, Xin; Ge, Yang-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in the current era has been chosen as a dominant and minimally invasive treatment for complicated aorta dissection. This study aimed to assess safety and feasibility of TEVAR in acute and chronic type B aortic dissection. Between January 2011 and December 2013, 85 patients with complicated type B aortic dissection undergoing TEVAR were divided into acute aortic dissection (AAD) (n = 60) group and chronic aortic dissection (CAD) group (n = 25). Computed tomography was used to evaluate postoperative changes in maximal aortic diameter and true and false lumen diameters at 3 levels during a mean follow-up period of 26.4 ± 15.6 months. The technical success rate was 100%. In-hospital and 30-day rates of death were 3.3% in acute group and 0 in chronic group. Postdischarge rates of type I leak, type II leak, and retrograde type A dissection were 6.7%, 5.2%, and 3.4% (acute) and 0%, 4.0%, and 4.0% (chronic), respectively. The maximal aorta diameter remained stable in all the 3 levels in both acute and chronic group. The cumulative freedom from all-cause mortality at 3 years was similar in acute and chronic groups (89.5% vs 95.5%, P = .308). The cumulative freedom from aortic-related mortality was also not significantly different in the acute and chronic groups (92.8% vs 95.2%, P = .531). In the thoracic aorta, TEVAR treatment resulted in a significant increase in true lumen (TL) diameter and decrease in false lumen (FL). However, in the abdominal aorta, TEVAR did not lead to significant change in TL and FL diameters. The rates of complete thrombosis thoracic false lumens were better than that in the abdominal false lumen. TEVAR was a safe and effect therapy for complicated acute and chronic type B dissection with low early and mid-term mortality and morbidity. PMID:28700467

  19. Electrochemical stiffness in lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassol, Hadi; Jones, Elizabeth M. C.; Sottos, Nancy R.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-11-01

    Although lithium-ion batteries are ubiquitous in portable electronics, increased charge rate and discharge power are required for more demanding applications such as electric vehicles. The high-rate exchange of lithium ions required for more power and faster charging generates significant stresses and strains in the electrodes that ultimately lead to performance degradation. To date, electrochemically induced stresses and strains in battery electrodes have been studied only individually. Here, a new technique is developed to probe the chemomechanical response of electrodes by calculating the electrochemical stiffness via coordinated in situ stress and strain measurements. We show that dramatic changes in electrochemical stiffness occur due to the formation of different graphite-lithium intercalation compounds during cycling. Our analysis reveals that stress scales proportionally with the lithiation/delithiation rate and strain scales proportionally with capacity (and inversely with rate). Electrochemical stiffness measurements provide new insights into the origin of rate-dependent chemomechanical degradation and the evaluation of advanced battery electrodes.

  20. Dynamic stiffness model of spherical parallel robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata, Alessandro; Caliò, Ivo; D`Urso, Domenico; Greco, Annalisa; Lacagnina, Michele; Fichera, Gabriele

    2016-12-01

    A novel approach to study the elastodynamics of Spherical Parallel Robots is described through an exact dynamic model. Timoshenko arches are used to simulate flexible curved links while the base and mobile platforms are modelled as rigid bodies. Spatial joints are inherently included into the model without Lagrangian multipliers. At first, the equivalent dynamic stiffness matrix of each leg, made up of curved links joined by spatial joints, is derived; then these matrices are assembled to obtain the Global Dynamic Stiffness Matrix of the robot at a given pose. Actuator stiffness is also included into the model to verify its influence on vibrations and modes. The latter are found by applying the Wittrick-Williams algorithm. Finally, numerical simulations and direct comparison to commercial FE results are used to validate the proposed model.

  1. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romeo, Daniela de Araujo; Escudero, Carlos Caparros; Falcon, Maria del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi, E-mail: jaherrero5@hotmail.com [Unidade de Gestao Clinica (UGC) de Diagnostico por Imagem - Hosppital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilha (Spain); Vazquez, Rosa Maria Lepe [Unit of Radiodiagnosis - Hospital Nuestra Senora de la Merced, Osuna, Sevilha (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease. (author)

  2. [Surgery of aortic dissection: for which patient?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoye, Jean-Philippe; Abouliatim, Issam; Larralde, Antoine; Beneux, Xavier; Heautot, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    In the acute stage (less than two weeks), surgery is indicated for Stanford type A aortic dissections. With respect to the initial work-up, surgery consists in replacing the ascending aorta, sometimes the aortic arch (with supra aortic vessels reimplantation), and aortic valve replacement (valve replacement, Bentall valved tube or valve sparing Tyron David technique). Ischemic visceral complications must be searched for and treated by endovascular techniques or surgery. Aneurismal evolution of chronic dissections must be treated surgically. Replacement can encompass the entire aorta. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Aortic dissection: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amparo, E G; Higgins, C B; Hricak, H; Sollitto, R

    1985-05-01

    Fifteen patients with suspected or known aortic dissection were imaged with magnetic resonance (MR). Thirteen of these patients were eventually shown to have dissection. In most instances the diagnosis was established by aortography and/or computed tomography (CT) prior to the MR study. Surgical proof (6/13) and/or aortographic proof (10/13) were available in 11/13 patients with aortic dissection. MR demonstrated the intimal flap and determined whether the dissection was type A or type B. In addition, MR: differentiated between the true and false lumens; determined the origins of the celiac, superior mesenteric, and renal arteries from the true or false lumen in the cases where the dissection extended into the abdominal aorta (8/12); allowed post-surgical surveillance of the dissection; and identified aortoannular ectasia in the three patients who had Marfan syndrome. In addition to the 13 cases with dissection, there were two cases in whom the diagnosis of dissection was excluded by MR. Our early experience suggests that MR can serve as the initial imaging test in clinically suspected cases of aortic dissection and that the information provided by MR is sufficient to manage many cases. Additionally, MR obviates the use of iodinated contrast media.

  4. Increased patellar tendon microcirculation and reduction of tendon stiffness following knee extension eccentric exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Nai-Hao; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wu, Ying-Tai; Shih, Tiffany Tingfang; Rolf, Christer; Wang, Hsing-Kuo

    2014-04-01

    Controlled laboratory study. To measure and compare patellar tendon stiffness and microcirculation in college tennis players and nonathletic students when performing eccentric knee extension exercises that do and do not reduce tendon stiffness. Previous studies suggest that tendon microcirculation response during exercises may vary based on the tendon's plastic properties. Methods The study included 3 groups of college-age male students: tennis players who performed 4 sets of either 40 (n = 12) or 80 (n = 13) repetitions of eccentric knee extension exercise and nonathletic students (n = 14) who performed 4 sets of 40 repetitions. Tendon stiffness was measured before and after exercise completion. Changes in total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation (OSat) were analyzed while performing the 4 sets. Comparisons were made within and between the groups. The level of association between tendon microcirculation and stiffness reduction was assessed. The 2 groups (player/4 × 80 and student/4 × 40) exhibiting patellar tendon stiffness reductions (Pexercise levels, in the fourth set compared to the first set of exercises (Pknee extension eccentric exercises that resulted in a reduction in tendon stiffness.

  5. Interleukin-37 suppresses the osteogenic responses of human aortic valve interstitial cells in vitro and alleviates valve lesions in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qingchun; Song, Rui; Fullerton, David A.; Ao, Lihua; Zhai, Yufeng; Li, Suzhao; Ballak, Dov B.; Cleveland, Joseph C.; Reece, T. Brett; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Xu, Dingli; Dinarello, Charles A.; Meng, Xianzhong

    2017-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease is a chronic inflammatory process, and aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs) from diseased aortic valves express greater levels of osteogenic factors in response to proinflammatory stimulation. Here, we report that lower cellular levels of IL-37 in AVICs of diseased human aortic valves likely account for augmented expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) following stimulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 or 4. Treatment of diseased AVICs with recombinant human IL-37 suppresses the levels of BMP-2 and ALP as well as calcium deposit formation. In mice, aortic valve thickening is observed when exposed to a TLR4 agonist or a high fat diet for a prolonged period; however, mice expressing human IL-37 exhibit significantly lower BMP-2 levels and less aortic valve thickening when subjected to the same regimens. A high fat diet in mice results in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) deposition in aortic valve leaflets. Moreover, the osteogenic responses in human AVICs induced by oxLDL are suppressed by recombinant IL-37. Mechanistically, reduced osteogenic responses to oxLDL in human AVICs are associated with the ability of IL-37 to inhibit NF-κB and ERK1/2. These findings suggest that augmented expression of osteogenic factors in AVICs of diseased aortic valves from humans is at least partly due to a relative IL-37 deficiency. Because recombinant IL-37 suppresses the osteogenic responses in human AVICs and alleviates aortic valve lesions in mice exposed to high fat diet or a proinflammatory stimulus, IL-37 has therapeutic potential for progressive calcific aortic valve disease. PMID:28137840

  6. Effect of yoga on arterial stiffness in elderly subjects with increased pulse pressure: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Satish Gurunathrao; Aithala, Manjunatha R; Das, Kusal Kanti

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to determine the effect of yoga on arterial function in elderly with increased pulse pressure (PP). Randomized controlled study with two parallel groups. Elderly subjects with PP≥60 mmHg (n=60). Yoga group (n=30) was assigned for yoga training and brisk-walking (BW) group (n=30) for brisk-walk with stretching exercise for 1h in the morning for 6 days in a week for 12 weeks. Arterial stiffness measures: Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (c-f PWV), aortic augmentation index (AIx@75), arterial stiffness index at brachial (bASI) and tibial arteries (aASI). Total serum nitric oxide concentration (NOx) as an index of endothelial function. Heart rate variability (HRV) measures: Low frequency and high frequency in normalized units (LFnu, HFnu) and LF/HF ratio. The mean between-group change (with 95% CI) in arterial stiffness: c-f PWV(m/s) [1.25(0.59-1.89); pyoga group in vascular function, BP and autonomic function, while no significant change within-BW group was observed. Our findings suggest that yoga program offered was more effective than brisk-walk in reducing arterial stiffness along with BP in elderly individuals with increased PP. Yoga can also significantly reduce sympathetic activity and improve endothelial function with enhancement in bioavailability of NO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A prospective, randomised trial of transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation vs. surgical aortic valve replacement in operable elderly patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller; Klaaborg, Kaj E; Nissen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In a prospective randomised trial we aimed to compare transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (a-TAVI) with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in operable elderly patients.......In a prospective randomised trial we aimed to compare transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (a-TAVI) with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in operable elderly patients....

  8. Variable stiffness and damping magnetorheological isolator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang ZHOU; Xingyu WANG; Xianzhou ZHANG; Weihua LI

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the development and characterization of a magnetorheological (MR) fluid-based variable stiffness and damping isolator. The prototype of the MR fluid isolator is fabricated, and its dynamic behavior is measured under various applied magnetic fields. The parameters of the model under various magnetic fields are identified, and the dynamic perfor-mance of the isolator is evaluated in simulation. Experi-mental results indicate that both the stiffness and damping capability of the developed MR isolator can be controlled by an external magnetic field.

  9. Slowly Progressive and Painless Thoracic Aortic Dissection Presenting with a Persistent Fever in an Elderly Patient: The Usefulness of Combined Measurement of Biochemical Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Yamada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic dissection is a fatal medical condition that requires urgent diagnosis and appropriate intervention. Because acute aortic dissection often manifests as sudden onset excruciating chest pain, physicians can easily reach a proper diagnosis. However, some patients with aortic dissection present with varied clinical manifestations without exhibiting typical chest pain, leading to a delayed diagnosis and possible fatality. We herein present the case of an elderly subject with a fever of unknown origin who was ultimately diagnosed with aortic dissection. In the present case, a negative procalcitonin test, increased D-dimer and serum creatinine phosphokinase-BB levels, and reelevation of the CPR level led us to the correct diagnosis.

  10. [Emergent transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis in cardiogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzighini, S; Finet, G; Obadia, J-F; Revel, D; Bresson, D; Rioufol, G

    2015-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a therapeutic option for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and with cardiac symptoms. This procedure requires the preliminary evaluation by a "heart team" and presents some contraindications. We report the case of a 58-year-old man with severe bicuspid aortic valve stenosis and cardiogenic shock. In spite of contraindications and because of the failure of balloon aortic valvuloplasty, transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed in emergency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved aortic allograft: ten-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, J R; Salazar, J D; Liddicoat, J R; Flores, J H; Doty, D B

    1998-02-01

    Cryopreserved aortic allograft can be used for aortic valve replacement in congenital, rheumatic, degenerative, and infected native valve conditions, as well as failed prosthetic valves. This study was conducted to determine the long-term results of aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved aortic allografts. Aortic valve replacement with cryopreserved aortic allografts was performed in 117 patients from July 1985 until August 1996. All patients requiring aortic valve replacement regardless of valve disease were considered for allograft replacement; the valve was preferentially used in patients under age 55 years and in the setting of bacterial endocarditis. Four operative techniques involving cryopreserved aortic allografts were used: freehand aortic valve replacement with 120-degree rotation, freehand aortic valve replacement with intact noncoronary sinus, aortic root enlargement with intact noncoronary sinus, and total aortic root replacement. Valve function was assessed by echocardiography during the operation in 78 patients (66%) and after the operation in 77 patients (65%). One-hundred eighteen aortic valve replacements with cryopreserved aortic allografts were performed on 117 patients; mean age was 45.6 years (range 15 to 83 years) and mean follow-up was 4.6 years (range up to 11 years). Intraoperative echocardiography disclosed no significant aortic valve incompetence. There were four operative deaths (3%) and seven late deaths; freedom from valve-related mortality at 10 years was 9:3% +/- 4.55%. New York Heart Association functional status at latest follow-up was normal in 98 (94%) patients. On postoperative echocardiography, 90% had no or trivial aortic valve incompetence. Freedom from thromboembolism at 10 years was 100% and from endocarditis, 98% +/- 2.47%. Seven (6%) patients required valve explantation, four for structural deterioration. At 10 years, freedom from reoperation for allograft-related causes was 92% +/- 3.47%. Aortic valve replacement

  12. Aortic dilatation in Turner syndrome: the role of MRI in early recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalard, Francois; Ferey, Solene; Kalifa, Gabriel [Saint Vincent de Paul Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Teinturier, Cecile [Saint Vincent de Paul Hospital, Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Paris (France)

    2005-03-01

    Aortic dilatation and dissection are rare but important complications of Turner syndrome that increase the risk of sudden death in young patients. To assess the value of aortic MRI in patients with Turner syndrome; in particular to demonstrate early aortic dilatation. A total of 21 patients with Turner syndrome underwent MRI of the thoracic aorta with measurement of vessel diameter at four levels. Measurements were normal for age in 15 cases, two patients presented with values at the upper limit of normal and four had obvious dilatation of the ascending aorta. All were symptom free. MRI allows the non-invasive demonstration of early aortic dilatation, which may lead to earlier surgery in asymptomatic individuals. (orig.)

  13. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small aortic annulus in a patient having Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogawa, M; Kasuya, S; Yamamoto, K; Koshika, M; Oguma, F; Hayashi, J

    2001-12-01

    Werner's syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by premature aging and scleroderma-like involvement of the skin. We report a case of aortic valve replacement for severely calcified aortic valve stenosis with a small annulus in a patient suffering from Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis

  14. Modulation of fixation stiffness from flexible to stiff in a rat model of bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnikowski, Nicole; Claes, Lutz E; Koval, Lidia; Glatt, Vaida; Bindl, Ronny; Steck, Roland; Ignatius, Anita; Schuetz, Michael A; Epari, Devakara R

    2016-11-14

    Background and purpose - Constant fixator stiffness for the duration of healing may not provide suitable mechanical conditions for all stages of bone repair. We therefore investigated the influence of stiffening fixation on callus stiffness and morphology in a rat diaphyseal osteotomy model to determine whether healing time was shortened and callus stiffness increased through modulation of fixation from flexible to stiff. Material and methods - An external unilateral fixator was applied to the osteotomized femur and stiffened by decreasing the offset of the inner fixator bar at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after operation. After 5 weeks, the rats were killed and healing was evaluated with mechanical, histological, and microcomputed tomography methods. Constant fixation stiffness control groups with either stiff or flexible fixation were included for comparison. Results - The callus stiffness of the stiff group and all 4 experimental groups was greater than in the flexible group. The callus of the flexible group was larger but contained a higher proportion of unmineralized tissue and cartilage. The stiff and modulated groups (3, 7, 14, and 21 days) all showed bony bridging at 5 weeks, as well as signs of callus remodeling. Stiffening fixation at 7 and 14 days after osteotomy produced the highest degree of callus bridging. Bone mineral density in the fracture gap was highest in animals in which the fixation was stiffened after 14 days. Interpretation - The predicted benefit of a large robust callus formed through early flexible fixation could not be shown, but the benefits of stabilizing a flexible construct to achieve timely healing were demonstrated at all time points.

  15. A Quantitative Study of Simulated Bicuspid Aortic Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Nguyen, Tran; Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that congentially bicuspid aortic valves develop degenerative diseases earlier than the standard trileaflet, but the causes are not well understood. It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical flow patterns and turbulence found in the bileaflet valves together with abnormally high levels of strain may result in an early thickening and eventually calcification and stenosis. Central to this hypothesis is the need for a precise quantification of the differences in the strain rate levels between bileaflets and trileaflet valves. We present here some in-vitro dynamic measurements of the spatial variation of the strain rate in pig aortic vales conducted in a left ventricular heart flow simulator device. We measure the strain rate of each leaflet during the whole cardiac cycle using phase-locked stereoscopic three-dimensional image surface reconstruction techniques. The bicuspid case is simulated by surgically stitching two of the leaflets in a normal valve.

  16. Impaired Muscle Oxygenation and Elevated Exercise Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients: Links With Vascular Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipla, Konstantina; Triantafyllou, Areti; Koletsos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Stavros; Sachpekidis, Vasileios; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Douma, Stella

    2017-08-01

    This study examined in vivo (1) skeletal muscle oxygenation and microvascular function, at rest and during handgrip exercise, and (2) their association with macrovascular function and exercise blood pressure (BP), in newly diagnosed, never-treated patients with hypertension and normotensive individuals. Ninety-one individuals (51 hypertensives and 40 normotensives) underwent office and 24-hour ambulatory BP, arterial stiffness, and central aortic BP assessment, followed by a 5-minute arterial occlusion and a 3-minute submaximal handgrip exercise. Changes in muscle oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy and beat-by-beat BP by Finapres. Hypertensives had higher (Pexercising at the same submaximal intensity, hypertensives required a significantly greater (Pexercise. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Surgery for aortic dilatation in patients with bicuspid aortic valves: A statement of clarification from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratzka, Loren F; Creager, Mark A; Isselbacher, Eric M; Svensson, Lars G; Nishimura, Rick A; Bonow, Robert O; Guyton, Robert A; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2016-04-01

    Two guidelines from the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and collaborating societies address the risk of aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and severe aortic enlargement: The "2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Thoracic Aortic Disease" (J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010;55:e27-130) and the "2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease" (J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014;63:e57-185). However, the 2 guidelines differ with regard to the recommended threshold of aortic root or ascending aortic dilatation that would justify surgical intervention in patients with bicuspid aortic valves. The ACC and AHA therefore convened a subcommittee representing members of the 2 guideline writing committees to review the evidence, reach consensus, and draft a statement of clarification for both guidelines. This statement of clarification uses the ACC/AHA revised structure for delineating the Class of Recommendation and Level of Evidence to provide recommendations that replace those contained in Section 9.2.2.1 of the thoracic aortic disease guideline and Section 5.1.3 of the valvular heart disease guideline. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Aortic annuloplasty with aortic root reconstruction to prevent patient-prosthesis mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Richard A

    2006-07-01

    Part of the ongoing argument concerning patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) following aortic valve replacement (AVR) is due to the perception that aortic annulus enlargement procedures increase the risk and technical difficulty of aortic valve surgery. Here, an aortic root reconstruction that involves enlargement of the annulus and tailoring of the aortic root to accommodate larger stented prostheses is presented that has been personally performed in 196 patients with no technique-related surgical deaths or complications, and thus can be carried out without additional risk. This aortic root enlargement aortoplasty and annuloplasty method can be calibrated to all AVRs involving stented manufactured prostheses when these are deemed the prosthesis of choice for the patient with a relatively small annulus and/or aortic root, severe left ventricular hypertrophy, compromised LV function or a very active lifestyle, to achieve predicted EOA values > or = 1.00 cm2/m2.

  19. Sutureless Medtronic 3f Enable aortic valve replacement in a heavily calcified aortic root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vola, Marco; Fuzellier, Jean-Francois; Kasra, Azarnoush; Morel, Jérôme; Campisi, Salvatore; Ruggeri, Gianvito; Favre, Jean Pierre

    2013-05-01

    The case is reported of a surgical aortic valvular stenosis with a severely calcified ascending aortic root in a 76-year-old woman. The morphology and size of the aortic annulus were unsuitable for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI); thus, surgery was scheduled. Aortic calcifications allowed a transverse aortotomy 4 cm superior to the sinotubular junction, with a remote endoaortic view of the valve. A Medtronic 3f Enable sutureless bioprosthesis was then implanted after aortic annular decalcification. Sutureless bioprostheses are new tools that promise to reduce technical difficulties and cross-clamp times in minimally invasive aortic valve replacement surgery. In addition, sutureless techniques may have other possible advantages in special circumstances requiring full sternotomy access, such as in the present case.

  20. "Stiffness has different meanings, I think, to everyone": examining stiffness from the perspective of people living with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; Smith, Katherine C; Bartlett, Susan J; De Leon, Elaine; Bingham, Clifton O

    2014-11-01

    Stiffness is a well-recognized symptom of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is frequently queried during clinic visits as an indicator of disease activity and was included in the 1961 and 1987 RA classification criteria. Little is known about how people with RA experience stiffness and its impact on their lives. We conducted 4 focus groups including 20 people with RA (4-6 participants per group) from 1 academic clinical practice and 1 private practice to generate accounts of stiffness experiences. Qualitative inductive thematic data analysis was conducted. Five overarching themes were identified: relationship of stiffness with other symptoms, exacerbating or alleviating factors and self-management, stiffness timing and location, individual meanings of stiffness experiences, and impact of stiffness on daily life. Focus group discussions revealed individual stiffness experiences as diverse and complex. Several stiffness features were endorsed by a majority of participants, but few, if any, were universally experienced; thus, the significance of stiffness as an expression of the disease varied widely. Discussions yielded descriptions of how individual limits imposed by RA in general and stiffness in particular may change over time and were intertwined with adaptations to preserve participation in valued life activities. These results concerning the diversity of the stiffness experience, consequential adaptations, and its impact suggest that a more individualized approach to stiffness measurement may be needed to improve stiffness assessments. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  1. [Surgical treatment of stiff metacarpophalangeal joint after hand injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yongjun; Shi, Haifeng; Mi, Jingyi; Chen, Guang; Wang, Jun; Qian, Jun

    2011-05-01

    To discuss the surgical procedures and curative effect of stiff 2-5 metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints after crash injury in hand. Between January 2006 and June 2009, 7 cases of stiff 2-5 MP joints were treated by releasing the stiff MP joints and reconstructing the function of lumbrical muscle in one stage. There were 6 males and 1 female with an average age of 32 years (range, 18-56 years). All injuries were caused by crash. Six cases suffered from multiple metacarpal fracture or complex dislocation of MP joint and 1 case suffered from complete amputation at level of middle palm of hand. The interval from initial wound healing to hospitalization was 3 to 15 months. Before operation, the X-ray films showed fracture healed and the results of nipping paper test were positive. All hands were treated with physical therapy for 1 month. After the plaster external fixation for 6 weeks, the physical therapy and function training were given. All wounds healed by first intention. The patients had no joint instability and extensor tendon side-slipping with normal finger function. Six patients were followed up from 6 months to 3 years. The extension and flexion of MP joint were 0 degree and 67-90 degrees, respectively. The average grip strength of injured dominant hand reached 86.70% of normal side and non-dominant hand reached 66.70% of normal side. The average injured dominant tip pinch strength reached 83.52% of normal side and non-dominant tip pinch strength reached 61.30% of normal side. Based on total active motion (TAM) system of Chinese Medical Association for Hand Surgery, the results were excellent in 4 cases, good in 1 case, and fair in 1 case; the excellent and good rate was 83.33%. In patients with stiff MP joint and lumbrical muscle defect, releasing stiff MP joint and reconstructing lumbrical function in one stage can recover the function of MP joint and achieve good outcome. Physical therapy plays an important role before operation.

  2. Plant fibre composites - porosity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Thygesen, Anders; Lilholt, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Plant fibre composites contain typically a relatively large amount of porosity which influences their performance. A model, based on a modified rule of mixtures, is presented to include the influence of porosity on the composite stiffness. The model integrates the volumetric composition of the co......Plant fibre composites contain typically a relatively large amount of porosity which influences their performance. A model, based on a modified rule of mixtures, is presented to include the influence of porosity on the composite stiffness. The model integrates the volumetric composition...... of the composites with their mechanical properties. The fibre weight fraction is used as an independent parameter to calculate the complete volumetric composition. A maximum obtainable stiffness of the composites is calculated at a certain transition fibre weight fraction, which is characterised by a best possible...... combination of high fibre volume fraction and low porosity. The model is validated with experimental data from the literature on several types of composites. A stiffness diagram is presented to demonstrate that the calculations can be used for tailoring and design of composites with a given profile...

  3. Stiff directed lines in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the localization of stiff directed lines with bending energy by a short-range random potential. We apply perturbative arguments, Flory scaling arguments, a variational replica calculation, and functional renormalization to show that a stiff directed line in 1+d dimensions undergoes a localization transition with increasing disorder for d>2/3. We demonstrate that this transition is accessible by numerical transfer matrix calculations in 1+1 dimensions and analyze the properties of the disorder-dominated phase in detail. On the basis of the two-replica problem, we propose a relation between the localization of stiff directed lines in 1+d dimensions and of directed lines under tension in 1+3d dimensions, which is strongly supported by identical free-energy distributions. This shows that pair interactions in the replicated Hamiltonian determine the nature of directed line localization transitions with consequences for the critical behavior of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation. We support the proposed relation to directed lines via multifractal analysis, revealing an analogous Anderson transition-like scenario and a matching correlation length exponent. Furthermore, we quantify how the persistence length of the stiff directed line is reduced by disorder.

  4. Non-singular inhomogeneous stiff fluid cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Jambrina, L

    2009-01-01

    In this talk we show a stiff fluid solution of the Einstein equations for a cylindrically symmetric spacetime. The main features of this metric are that it is non-separable in comoving coordinates for the congruence of the worldlineS of the fluid and that it yields regular curvature invariants.

  5. Monitoring the Bending Stiffness of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chongli; Lou, Xiongwen; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Chen, Huimin; Archer, Lynden

    2007-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the accessibility of genomic sequences provides an inherent regulation mechanism for gene expression through variations in bending stiffness encoded by the nucleic acid sequence. Cyclization of dsDNA is the prevailing method for determining DNA bending stiffness. Recent cyclization data for short dsDNA raises several fundamental questions about the soundness of the cyclization method, particularly in cases where the probability of highly bent DNA conformations is low. We herein evaluate the role of T4 DNA ligase in the cyclization reaction by inserting an environmental sensitive base analogue, 2-amino purine, to the DNA molecule. By monitoring the 2-AP fluorescence under standard cyclization conditions, it is found that in addition to trapping highly-bent cyclic DNA conformations, T4 DNA ligase enhances the apparent base pair flip out rate, thus exaggerating the measured flexibility. This result is further confirmed using fluorescence anisotropy experiments. We show that fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements on suitably labeled dsDNA provides an alternative approach for quantifying the bending stiffness of short fragments. DNA bending stiffness results obtained using FRET are compared with literature values.

  6. Measurement and Treatment of Passive Muscle Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Henrik

    This PhD thesis is based on research conducted at the University of Copenhagen and Helene Elsass Center from 2012 to 2015. Measurements and treatment of passive muscle stiffness in people with cerebral palsy (CP) comprise the focus of the thesis. The thesis summarizes the results from four studies...

  7. Influence of footings stiffness on punching resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ĺudovít Fillo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper brings new aspects of punching resistance due to influence of footing stiffness and consequential ground stresses distribution. Diagrams of design load versus effective depth were created coming from new design criteria which depend on the maximum punching resistance defined from shear-bending failure and on the maximum punching resistance defined from crushing of concrete struts.

  8. Improved Stiff ODE Solvers for Combustion CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imren, A.; Haworth, D. C.

    2016-11-01

    Increasingly large chemical mechanisms are needed to predict autoignition, heat release and pollutant emissions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of in-cylinder processes in compression-ignition engines and other applications. Calculation of chemical source terms usually dominates the computational effort, and several strategies have been proposed to reduce the high computational cost associated with realistic chemistry in CFD. Central to most strategies is a stiff ordinary differential equation (ODE) solver to compute the change in composition due to chemical reactions over a computational time step. Most work to date on stiff ODE solvers for computational combustion has focused on backward differential formula (BDF) methods, and has not explicitly considered the implications of how the stiff ODE solver couples with the CFD algorithm. In this work, a fresh look at stiff ODE solvers is taken that includes how the solver is integrated into a turbulent combustion CFD code, and the advantages of extrapolation-based solvers in this regard are demonstrated. Benefits in CPU time and accuracy are demonstrated for homogeneous systems and compression-ignition engines, for chemical mechanisms that range in size from fewer than 50 to more than 7,000 species.

  9. A Modified approach for calculating dynamic shear modulus of stiff specimens by resonant column tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Xiaoming; Sun Jing; Sun Rui

    2006-01-01

    An error analysis of the dynamic shear modulus of stiff specimens from tests performed by a new resonant column device developed by the Institute of Engineering Mechanics, China was conducted. A modified approach for calculating the dynamic shear modulus of the stiff specimens is presented. The error formula of the tests was deduced and parameters that impact the accuracy of the test were identified. Using six steel specimens with known standard stiffness as a base, a revised dynamic shear modulus calculation for stiff specimens was formulated by comparing three of the models.The maximum error between the test results and the calculated results shown by curves from both the free-vibration and the resonant-vibration tests is less than 6%. The free-vibration and resonant-vibration tests for three types of stiff samples with a known modulus indicate that the maximum deviation between the actual and the tested value using the modified approach were less than 10%. As a result, the modified approach presented here is shown to be reliable and the new device can be used for testing dynamic shear modulus of any stiff materials at low shear strain levels

  10. Assessing musculo-articular stiffness using free oscillations: theory, measurement and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Watsford, Mark; Murphy, Aron; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    Stiffness, the relationship between applied load and elastic deformation, is an important neuromechanical component related to muscular performance and injury risk. The free-oscillation technique is a popular method for stiffness assessment. There has been wide application of this technique assessing a variety of musculature, including the triceps surae, knee flexors, knee extensors and pectorals. The methodology involves the modelling of the system as a linear damped mass-spring system. The use of such a model has certain advantages and limitations that will be discussed within this review. Perhaps the major advantage of such a model is the specificity of the measure, whereby it is possible for the assessment conditions to simulate the type of loading witnessed during functional tasks and sporting situations. High levels of reliability and construct validity have typically been reported using such procedures. Despite these assurances of accuracy, a number of issues have also been identified. The literature reveals some concerns surrounding the use of a linear model for stiffness assessment. Further, procedural issues surrounding the administration of the perturbation, attention focus of the participant during the perturbation, signal collection, data processing and analysis, presentation of stiffness as a linear or torsional value, assessment load (single vs multiple vs maximal) and the stiffness-load relationship have been identified, and are all fundamentally related to the quality of the calculated output data. Finally, several important considerations for practitioners have been recommended to ensure the quality and consistency of stiffness data collection, processing and interpretation.

  11. The interaction between the tennis court and the player: how does surface affect leg stiffness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2013-03-01

    An adequate level of leg stiffness is necessary for an optimal tennis performance and leg stiffness should be adapted to frequently changing surfaces as tennis players usually play on different courts. The aim of this study was to evaluate leg stiffness in competitive tennis players on different court surfaces. Ten healthy competitive tennis players (nine men and one woman; mean age = 17.6 +/- 3.2 years) underwent leg stiffness testing by modeling the vertical ground reaction force using an optical system. Flight time and contact time were determined during hopping on two different tennis court surfaces (clay and acrylic). No significant difference was found in the flight time, contact time, and jump height between the surfaces. No significant difference in leg stiffness was found between the surfaces (18.25 +/- 5.8 and 19.27 +/- 4.9 kN/m for clay and acrylic, respectively; p = 0.28). This study demonstrated that contact time and flight time as well as leg stiffness of tennis players remained unchanged when hopping on two different tennis surfaces. Results of this research provide objective data regarding the tennis-specific loading of the locomotor system and proper mechanical adaptation of the player on different surfaces, which may be useful for testing protocols and planning training programs.

  12. Time-varying identification of ankle dynamic joint stiffness during movement with constant muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarin, Diego L; Kearney, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic joint stiffness defines the torque generated at the joint in response to position perturbations. Dynamic stiffness is modulated by the angular position and the muscle activation level, making it difficult to estimate during large movements and/or time-varying muscle contractions. This paper presents a new methodology for estimating dynamic joint stiffness during movement and muscle activation. For this, we formulate a novel, nonlinear, dynamic joint stiffness model and present a new algorithm to estimate its parameters. The algorithm assumes that the variability in the model parameters is a function of the mean joint position. Using this methodology we estimated the dynamic joint stiffness at the ankle throughout ramp and hold displacements during a constant muscle contraction. The estimated model accurately predicted the intrinsic and reflex torques produced at the ankle as a response to small position perturbations during large displacement with muscle activation. Preliminary results show that during muscle contraction, ankle intrinsic stiffness estimated during movement is significantly lower than that estimated during quasi-stationary experiments.

  13. Childhood Obesity Associates Haemodynamic and Vascular Changes That Result in Increased Central Aortic Pressure with Augmented Incident and Reflected Wave Components, without Changes in Peripheral Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Castro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims were to determine if childhood obesity is associated with increased central aortic blood pressure (BP and to characterize haemodynamic and vascular changes associated with BP changes in obese children and adolescents by means of analyzing changes in cardiac output (stroke volume, SV, arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity, PWV, peripheral vascular resistances (PVR, and net and relative contributions of reflected waves to the aortic pulse wave amplitude. We included 117 subjects (mean/range age: 10 (5–15 years, 49 females, who were obese (OB or had normal weight (NW. Peripheral and central aortic BP, PWV, and pulse wave-derived parameters (augmentation index, amplitude of forward and backward components were measured with tonometry (SphygmoCor and oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph. With independence of the presence of dyslipidemia, hypertension, or sedentarism, the aortic systolic and pulse BP were higher in OB than in NW subjects. The increase in central BP could not be explained by the elevation in the relative contribution of reflections to the aortic pressure wave and higher PVR or by an augmented peripheral reflection coefficient. Instead, the rise in central BP could be explained by an increase in the amplitude of both incident and reflect wave components associated to augmented SV and/or PWV.

  14. Childhood Obesity Associates Haemodynamic and Vascular Changes That Result in Increased Central Aortic Pressure with Augmented Incident and Reflected Wave Components, without Changes in Peripheral Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Juan M.; García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Arana, Maite; Chiesa, Pedro; Giachetto, Gustavo; Zócalo, Yanina; Bia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The aims were to determine if childhood obesity is associated with increased central aortic blood pressure (BP) and to characterize haemodynamic and vascular changes associated with BP changes in obese children and adolescents by means of analyzing changes in cardiac output (stroke volume, SV), arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity, PWV), peripheral vascular resistances (PVR), and net and relative contributions of reflected waves to the aortic pulse wave amplitude. We included 117 subjects (mean/range age: 10 (5–15) years, 49 females), who were obese (OB) or had normal weight (NW). Peripheral and central aortic BP, PWV, and pulse wave-derived parameters (augmentation index, amplitude of forward and backward components) were measured with tonometry (SphygmoCor) and oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph). With independence of the presence of dyslipidemia, hypertension, or sedentarism, the aortic systolic and pulse BP were higher in OB than in NW subjects. The increase in central BP could not be explained by the elevation in the relative contribution of reflections to the aortic pressure wave and higher PVR or by an augmented peripheral reflection coefficient. Instead, the rise in central BP could be explained by an increase in the amplitude of both incident and reflect wave components associated to augmented SV and/or PWV. PMID:26881081

  15. Predictors of mortality after aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjang, Yanto Sandy; van Hees, Yvonne; Koerfer, Reiner; Grobbee, Diederick E.; van der Heijden, Geert J. M. G.

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is recommended as a standard surgical procedure for aortic valve disease. Still the evidence for commonly claimed predictors of post-AVR prognosis, in particular mortality, appears scant. This systematic review reports on the evidence for predictors of post-AVR

  16. Thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm branched repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, E. L. G.; Tielliu, I. F. J.; Ferreira, M.; Zipfel, B.; Adam, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Open thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is a demanding procedure with high impact on the patient and the operating team. Results from expert centres show mortality rates between 3-21%, with extensive morbidity including renal failure and paraplegia. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneu

  17. Severe aortic stenosis: diagnosis, treatment and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.A. van Geldorp (Martijn)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDegenerative aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in developed countries. The prevalence of severe aortic stenosis increases with age from 1% in people below 65 years of age to nearly 6% in people over the age of 85. Since the population life expectancy continues to

  18. Thoracic aortic catastrophes : towards the endovascular solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, F.H.W.

    2010-01-01

    Descending thoracic aortic catastrophes include a variety of acute pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta, which are all associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, requiring immediate intervention. For this thesis, we explored the management and outcomes of several thoracic aortic cat

  19. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Osnabrugge, Ruben L J; Windecker, Stephan;

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy.......The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy....

  20. Spontaneous resolution late after aortic dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeebregts, CJAM; Schepens, MAAM; Vermeulen, FEE

    A 50-year-old man was operated on for acute type I (DeBakey classification) aortic dissection. The supracoronary ascending aorta was replaced with an interposition graft. Postoperative computed tomography and angiography clearly revealed a double-barrelled aortic arch, left common carotid artery and

  1. ON THE STIFFNESS OF DEMINERALIZED DENTIN MATRICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryou, Heonjune; Turco, Gianluca; Breschi, Lorenzo; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    Resin bonding to dentin requires the use of self-etching primers or acid etching to decalcify the surface and expose a layer of collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix. Acid-etching reduces the stiffness of demineralized dentin from approximately 19 GPa to 1 MPa, requiring that it floats in water to prevent it from collapsing during bonding procedures. Several publications show that crosslinking agents like gluteraladehyde, carbodiimide or grape seed extract can stiffen collagen and improve resin-dentin bond strength. Objective The objective was to assess a new approach for evaluating the changes in stiffness of decalcified dentin by polar solvents and a collagen cross-linker. Methods Fully demineralized dentin beams and sections of etched coronal dentin were subjected to indentation loading using a cylindrical flat indenter in water, and after treatment with ethanol or ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). The stiffness was measured as a function of strain and as a function of loading rate from 1 to 50 µm/sec. Results At a strain of 0.25% the elastic modulus of the fully demineralized dentin was approximately 0.20 MPa. It increased to over 0.90 MPa at strains of 1%. Exposure to ethanol caused an increase in elastic modulus of up to four times. Increasing the loading rate from 1 to 50 µm/sec caused an increase in the apparent modulus of up to three times in both water and ethanol. EDC treatment caused increases in the stiffness in fully demineralized samples and in acid-etched demineralized dentin surfaces in situ. Significance Changes in the mechanical behavior of demineralized collagen matrices can be measured effectively under hydration via indentation with cylindrical flat indenters. This approach can be used for quantifying the effects of bonding treatments on the properties of decalcified dentin after acid etching, as well as to follow the loss of stiffness over time due to enzymatic degradation. PMID:26747822

  2. Vascular Health Assessment of The Hypertensive Patients (VASOTENS) Registry: Study Protocol of an International, Web-Based Telemonitoring Registry for Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parati, Gianfranco; Avolio, Alberto; Rogoza, Anatoly N; Kotovskaya, Yulia V; Mulè, Giuseppe; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Orlova, Iana A; Grigoricheva, Elena A; Cardona Muñoz, Ernesto; Zelveian, Parounak H; Pereira, Telmo; Peixoto Maldonado, João Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension guidelines recommend ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), central aortic pressure (CAP), and pulse wave velocity (PWV) as parameters for estimating blood pressure (BP) control and vascular impairment. Recent advances in technology have enabled devices to combine non-invasive estimation of these parameters over the 24-hour ABP monitoring. However, currently there is limited evidence on the usefulness of such an approach for routine hypertension management. Objective We recently launched an investigator-initiated, international, multicenter, observational, prospective study, the Vascular health Assessment Of The Hypertensive patients (VASOTENS) Registry, aimed at (1) evaluating non-invasive 24-hour ABP and arterial stiffness estimates (through 24-hour pulse wave analysis, PWA) in hypertensive subjects undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for clinical reasons; (2) assessing the changes in estimates following treatment; (3) weighing the impact of 24-hour PWA on target organ damage and cardiovascular prognosis; (4) assessing the relationship between arterial stiffness, BP absolute mean level and variability, and prognosis; and (5) validating the use of a 24-hour PWA electronic health (e-health) solution for hypertension screening. Methods Approximately 2000 subjects, referred to 20 hypertension clinics for routine diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of hypertension of any severity or stage, will be recruited. Data collection will include ABPM, performed with a device allowing simultaneous non-invasive assessment of 24-hour CAP and arterial stiffness (BPLab), and clinical data (including cardiovascular outcomes). As recommended by current guidelines, each patient will be followed-up with visits occurring at regular intervals (ideally every 6 months, and not less than once a year depending on disease severity). A Web-based telemedicine platform (THOLOMEUS) will be used for data collection. The use of the telemedicine system will allow

  3. Material selection for acoustic radiators that are light and stiff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, S P; Markley, D C; Van Tol, D J; Meyer, R J

    2011-01-01

    The headmass is a key element in tonpilz transducer design. As an acoustic radiator, a successful headmass must be built from a material that is both light and stiff. To assess the suitability of ceramics for this application, the authors used the mechanical properties of candidate materials to perform a theoretical comparison based on the flexural behavior of square plates. Although not a comprehensive metric for identifying the best headmass materials, the headmass flexure may be usefully employed as a first-level selection criteria. A software routine based on thin plate and thick plate theory was created to evaluate the flexural behavior in candidate materials.

  4. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimytri Siqueira; Alexandre Abizaid; Magaly Arrais J.; Eduardo Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common native valve disease, affecting up to 5% of the elderly population. Surgical aortic valve replacement reduces symptoms and improves survival, and is the definitive therapy in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. However, despite the good results of classic surgery, risk is markedly increased in elderly patients with co-morbidities. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) allows implantation of a prosthetic heart valve within the diseased native aortic valve without the need for open heart surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass, offering a new therapeutic option to elderly patients considered at high surgical risk or with contraindications to surgery. To date, several multicenter registries and a randomized trial have confirmed the safety and efficacy of TAVR in those patients. In this chapter, we review the background and clinical applications of TAVR in elderly patients.

  5. Valvular and aortic diseases in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanna, Arvin; Fayers, Trevor; Clarke, Sophie; Parsonage, William

    2013-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inheritable connective tissue disorder caused by defective collagen synthesis with the principal manifestations of bone fragility. OI has been associated with left sided valvular regurgitation and aortic dilation. Valve and aortic surgery are technically feasible in patients with OI but are inherently high risk due to the underlying connective tissue defect. This report reviews the valvular and aortic pathology associated with OI and their management. We describe two cases of patients with OI who have significant aortic and mitral valve regurgitation, one of whom has been managed conservatively and the other who has undergone successful mitral valve repair and aortic valve replacement. The latter case represents the fifth case of mitral valve repair in a patient with OI reported in the medical literature.

  6. Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) attenuates diet-induced aortic stiffening independent of changes in body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Tyler; Ouyang, An; Berrones, Adam J; Campbell, Marilyn S; Du, Bing; Fleenor, Bradley S

    2017-08-01

    We hypothesized a sweet potato intervention would prevent high-fat (HF) diet-induced aortic stiffness, which would be associated with decreased arterial oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial uncoupling. Young (8-week old) C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: low fat (LF; 10% fat), HF (60% fat), low-fat sweet potato (LFSP; 10% fat containing 260.3 μg/kcal sweet potato), or high-fat sweet potato diet (HFSP; 60% fat containing 260.3 μg/kcal sweet potato) for 16 weeks. Compared with LF and LFSP, HF- and HFSP-fed mice had increased body mass and percent fat mass with lower percent lean mass (all, P 0.05). Arterial stiffness, assessed by aortic pulse wave velocity and ex vivo mechanical testing of the elastin region elastic modulus (EEM) was greater in HF compared with LF and HFSP animals (all, P mitochondrial uncoupler, for 72 h reduced the EEM of HF arteries compared with nontreated HF segments (P mitochondrial uncoupling.

  7. [Modern aortic surgery in Marfan syndrome--2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, K; Schwill, S; Karck, M

    2011-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a hereditary disease with a prevalence of 2-3 in 10,000 births, leading to a fibrillin connective tissue disorder with manifestations in the skeleton, eye, skin, dura mater and in particular the cardiovascular system. Since other syndromes demonstrate similar vascular manifestations, but therapy may differ significantly, diagnosis should be established using the revised Ghent nosology in combination with genotypic analysis in specialized Marfan centres. The formation of aortic root aneurysms with the subsequent risk of acute aortic dissection type A (AADA) or aortic rupture limits life expectancy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Therefore, prophylactic replacement of the aortic root needs to be performed before the catastrophic event of AADA can occur. The goal of surgery is the complete resection of pathological aortic tissue. This can be achieved with excellent results by using a (mechanically) valved conduit that replaces both the aortic valve and the aortic root (Bentall operation). However, the need for lifelong anticoagulation with Coumadin can be avoided using the aortic valve sparing reimplantation technique according to David. The long-term durability of the reconstructed valve is favourable, and further technical improvements may improve longevity. Although results of prospective randomised long-term studies comparing surgical techniques are lacking, the David operation has become the surgical method of choice for aortic root aneurysms, not only at the Heidelberg Marfan Centre. Replacement of the aneurysmal dilated aortic arch is performed under moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion using a heart-lung machine, which we also use in thoracic or thoracoabdominal aneurysms. Close post-operative follow-up in a Marfan centre is pivotal for the early detection of pathological changes on the diseased aorta.

  8. A review on in situ stiffness adjustment methods in MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, M. L. C.; Pérez Garza, H. H.; Herder, J. L.; Ghatkesar, M. K.

    2016-06-01

    In situ stiffness adjustment in microelectromechanical systems is used in a variety of applications such as radio-frequency mechanical filters, energy harvesters, atomic force microscopy, vibration detection sensors. In this review we provide designers with an overview of existing stiffness adjustment methods, their working principle, and possible adjustment range. The concepts are categorized according to their physical working principle. It is concluded that the electrostatic adjustment principle is the most applied method, and narrow to wide ranges in stiffness can be achieved. But in order to obtain a wide range in stiffness change, large, complex devices were designed. Mechanical stiffness adjustment is found to be a space-effective way of obtaining wide changes in stiffness, but these methods are often discrete and require large tuning voltages. Stiffness adjustment through stressing effects or change in Young’s modulus was used only for narrow ranges. The change in second moment of inertia was used for stiffness adjustment in the intermediate range.

  9. Laterality and imbalance of muscle stiffness relate to personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Naoki; Kumano, Hiroaki; Minoda, Keiji; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Fukudo, Shin

    2004-01-01

    The authors' purpose in this study was to test the hypothesis that laterality and imbalance of muscle stiffness relate to personality. The authors selected 23 healthy volunteers and divided them into two groups based on the predominance of muscle stiffness on the left or right side. Imbalance of muscle stiffness was calculated as the absolute value of the difference of muscle stiffness between the right and left sides. The authors evaluated personality with the Japanese version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Subjects with left predominant muscle stiffness of the rectal abdominis had significantly higher neuroticism score than those with right predominant muscle stiffness. Subjects with more imbalance of muscle stiffness in the latissimus dorsi and in the trapezius had significantly higher neuroticism and psychoticism scores than those with less imbalance. The findings suggest that laterality and imbalance of muscle stiffness relate to personality.

  10. Reoperation on aortic disease in patients with previous aortic valve surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-gang; ZHANG Liang; YU Cun-tao; QIAN Xiang-yang; CHANG Qian

    2013-01-01

    Background Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is a safe and effective method in the treatment of aortic valve diseases.This study aimed to increase the understanding on re-treatment of aortic diseases after aortic valve surgery through a retrospective analysis of 47 related cases.Methods Forty-seven patients (38 males and 9 females) with previous aortic valve surgery have received reoperation on aorta from January 2003 to June 2012,and the mean interval time of re-intervention to aortic disease was 6 years ((6.0± 3.8) years).The secondary aortic surgery included aortic root replacement (14 cases),ascending aorta replacement (10 cases),aortic root/ascending aorta plus total arch replacement with stented elephant trunk implantation (21 cases),and total thoracoabdominal aorta replacement (2 cases).All these patients have received outpatient re-exams or follow-up by phone calls.Results After the initial aortic valve replacement,patients suffered from aortic dissection (25 cases,53%),ascending aortic aneurysm (12 cases,26%) or aortic root aneurysm (10 cases,21%).Diameter in ascending aorta increased (5.2±7.1) mm per year and aortic sinus (3.3±3.1) mm per year.The annual growth value of diameter in ascending aorta was higher in patients with rheumatic heart disease than that in Marfan syndrome (P<0.05).All 47 patients have received reoperation on aorta.One patient died in operating room because aortic dissection seriously involved right coronary artery.Seven patients had renal insufficiency after operation; neurological complications occurred in 14 patients including 7 patients with stroke and the others with transient brain dysfunction.All patients were followed up,the mean survival time was (97.25±17.63) months,95% confidence interval was 55.24-73.33 months.Eight cases were died during follow-up and five-year survival rate was 83%.Conclusion To reduce the aortic adverse events after first aortic valve surgery,it is necessary to actively treat and strictly

  11. Structural and Histochemical Alterations in the Aortic Valves of Elderly Patients: A Comparative Study of Aortic Stenosis, Aortic Regurgitation, and Normal Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR) by comparing differences in mechanical and biochemical alterations. We applied scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) to measure the speed of sound (SOS) through valves to estimate the elasticity and monitor sensitivity to protease treatment, as the SOS is correlated with the stiffness of materials, which is reduced after digestion by proteases. The fibrosa of both the AS and AR groups were stiffer than the fibrosa of the normal group. The AR group displayed significantly stiffer fibrosa than the AS group, with the exception of calcified areas. The AS group showed significantly decreased SOS values following protease digestion, whereas the AR showed little reduction. The AS group presented type III collagen in the fibrosa and the ventricularis. In the AR group, both type I collagen and type III collagen coexisted in the fibrosa and the ventricularis. Upon immunostaining for advanced glycation end-products, the AS group showed sparse, weak staining, whereas the AR group presented a strong, band-like positive reaction in the fibrosa. In conclusion, tissue remodelling associated with damage and repair is associated with AS pathogenesis, whereas static chemical alterations with slow collagen turnover induce AR. PMID:27747234

  12. Increased burden and severity of metabolic syndrome and arterial stiffness in treatment naïve HIV+ patients from Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngatchou W

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available William Ngatchou,1 Daniel Lemogoum,1 Pierre Ndobo,2,† Euloge Yagnigni,2 Emiline Tiogou,2 Elisabeth Nga,2 Charles Kouanfack,2 Philippe van de Borne,1 Michel P Hermans3 1Hypertension Clinic, Erasme University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium; 2Department of Cardiology, Central Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 3Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Cliniques Universitaires St-Luc, Brussels, Belgium †Professor Pierre Ndobo passed away on January 21, 2013 Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and its therapy are associated with increased aortic stiffness and metabolic syndrome (MetS phenotype in Caucasian patients. We hypothesized that, independently of antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection in native black African patients is associated with increased burden of cardiometabolic risk factors that may accelerate arterial structural damage and translate into increased aortic stiffness. Patients and methods: Ninety-six apparently healthy Cameroonian subjects (controls were compared to 108 untreated Cameroonian HIV+ patients (HIV-UT of similar age. In each participant, pulse wave velocity (Complior, aortic augmentation index (SphygmoCor, brachial blood pressure (Omron 705 IT, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, and lipids were recorded, as well as the prevalence and severity of MetS, based on the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute score ≥3/5. Results: Prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (FPG 100–125 mg · dL-1 and of diabetes (FPG > 125 mg · dL-1 was higher in HIV-UT than in controls (47% versus 27%, and 26% versus 1%, respectively; both P < 0.01. Fasting triglycerides and the atherogenic dyslipidemia ratio were significantly higher in HIV-UT than in controls. Hypertension prevalence was high and comparable in both groups (41% versus 44%, respectively; not significant. HIV-UT patients exhibited a twice-higher prevalence of MetS than controls (47% versus 21%; P = 0.02. Age- and sex-adjusted pulse wave velocity was

  13. Quantitative image analysis for planning of aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, M.A.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common and frequent cause of sudden death among all valvular heart diseases. Symptomatic aortic stenosis is considered to be a fatal disease if left untreated. Aortic valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment of symptomatic aortic stenosis. Traditional treatment of s

  14. Quantitative image analysis for planning of aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, M.A.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common and frequent cause of sudden death among all valvular heart diseases. Symptomatic aortic stenosis is considered to be a fatal disease if left untreated. Aortic valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment of symptomatic aortic stenosis. Traditional treatment of

  15. Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease and Ascending Aortic Aneurysms: Gaps in Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L. Losenno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital cardiac anomaly in developed nations. The abnormal bicuspid morphology of the aortic valve results in valvular dysfunction and subsequent hemodynamic derangements. However, the clinical presentation of bicuspid aortic valve disease remains quite heterogeneous with patients presenting from infancy to late adulthood with variable degrees of valvular stenosis and insufficiency and associated abnormalities including aortic coarctation, hypoplastic left heart structures, and ascending aortic dilatation. Emerging evidence suggests that the heterogeneous presentation of bicuspid aortic valve phenotypes may be a more complex matter related to congenital, genetic, and/or connective tissue abnormalities. Optimal management of patients with BAV disease and associated ascending aortic aneurysms often requires a thoughtful approach, carefully assessing various risk factors of the aortic valve and the aorta and discerning individual indications for ongoing surveillance, medical management, and operative intervention. We review current concepts of anatomic classification, pathophysiology, natural history, and clinical management of bicuspid aortic valve disease with associated ascending aortic aneurysms.

  16. Aortic valve and ascending aortic root modeling from 3D and 3D+t CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbic, Saša; Ionasec, Razvan I.; Zäuner, Dominik; Zheng, Yefeng; Georgescu, Bogdan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-02-01

    Aortic valve disorders are the most frequent form of valvular heart disorders (VHD) affecting nearly 3% of the global population. A large fraction among them are aortic root diseases, such as aortic root aneurysm, often requiring surgical procedures (valve-sparing) as a treatment. Visual non-invasive assessment techniques could assist during pre-selection of adequate patients, planning procedures and afterward evaluation of the same. However state of the art approaches try to model a rather short part of the aortic root, insufficient to assist the physician during intervention planning. In this paper we propose a novel approach for morphological and functional quantification of both the aortic valve and the ascending aortic root. A novel physiological shape model is introduced, consisting of the aortic valve root, leaflets and the ascending aortic root. The model parameters are hierarchically estimated using robust and fast learning-based methods. Experiments performed on 63 CT sequences (630 Volumes) and 20 single phase CT volumes demonstrated an accuracy of 1.45mm and an performance of 30 seconds (3D+t) for this approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a complete model of the aortic valve (including leaflets) and the ascending aortic root, estimated from CT, has been proposed.

  17. [Aortic valve replacement as an independent predictive factor for later development of aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kodolitsch, Y; Simic, O; Bregenzer, T; Dresler, C; Haverich, A; Nienaber, C A

    1998-08-01

    Dissection of the ascending aorta (type A) following later after aortic valve replacement has been described with increasing frequency. This study analyzes the role of aortic valve replacement for the evolution of late dissection. In a series of 80 consecutive patients with type A dissection, a previous aortic valve replacement had been performed in 12 cases (15%). In addition to arterial hypertension (p syndrome (p factor for type A dissection. Dissection occurred 3 +/- 4 years after aortic valve replacement with a clinical and anatomical profile similar to classic dissection as proven by comparison to a group of 62 patients with classic dissection associated with arterial hypertension or Marfan syndrome. With 75% and 66%, respectively, 30 day and 1 year survival of patients with dissection following later after aortic valve replacement was similar to patients with classic type A dissection. Extensive thinning and/or fragility (p associated with a high risk for late dissection; this finding was substantiated by comparison to a control group of 10 consecutive patients with a similarly dilated aortic root but no dissection. Type and diameter of valve prostheses, cross-clamp time, NYHA functional class, and left ventricular ejection fraction were unrelated to late dissection. Previous aortic valve replacement is an independent predisposing factor for a dissection of the ascending aorta later. At the time of aortic valve replacement, prophylactic replacement or wrapping of the ascending aorta should be considered in patients with a thinned/fragile aortic wall even without a markedly dilated aortic root.

  18. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Horn

    Full Text Available Circulating microparticles (MPs derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification.In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation.Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs, endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation.In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification.

  19. Deformation Differences between Tricuspid and Bicuspid Aortic Valves in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kai; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Pastuszko, Peter; Nigam, Vishal; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2011-11-01

    It has been shown in clinical studies that patients with congenital bicuspid aortic valves (CBAVs) develop degenerative calcification of the leaflets at young ages compared to patients with the normal tricuspid aortic valves (TAVs). It has been hypothesized that the asymmetrical geometry of the leaflets in CBAVs, flow shear stresses (SS), disturbed flow, and excessive strain rate levels are possible causes for the early calcification and stenosis. Central to the validation of this hypothesis is the need to quantify the differences in strain rate levels between the BAVs and TAVs. We simulate the CBAVs by surgically stitching two of the leaflets of a porcine aortic valve together. To quantify strain differences, we performed in-vitro experiments in both trileaflet and bileaflet valves by tracking the motion of small ink dots marked on each leaflet surface. We then used phase-locked stereo photogrammetry to reconstruct at each instant of time the 3D surface of the leaflets and measure the strain rates in both radial and circumferential directions during the whole cardiac cycle. Our results indicate that the total strain rate of the simulated BAVs is about 15 to 20% higher than the normal leaflets of TAVs at systole. In the BAVs' case, the fused leaflet stretches radially up to 25% higher than the reference length. The excessive stretching in both directions in the fused leaflet results in large changes in the flow patterns and associated wall SS.

  20. Effects of weight loss and insulin reduction on arterial stiffness in the SAVE trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Timothy M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic arterial stiffness contributes to the negative health effects of obesity and insulin resistance, which include hypertension, stroke, and increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity are individually associated with improved central arterial stiffness; however, their combined effects on arterial stiffness are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine how insulin levels modify the improvements in arterial stiffness seen with weight loss in overweight and obese young adults. Methods To assess the effects of weight loss and decreased fasting insulin on vascular stiffness, we studied 339 participants in the Slow the Adverse Effects of Vascular Aging (SAVE trial. At study entry, the participants were aged 20–45, normotensive, non-diabetic, and had a body-mass index of 25–39.9 kg/m2. Measures of pulse wave velocity (PWV in the central (carotid-femoral (cfPWV, peripheral (femoral-ankle (faPWV, and mixed (brachial-ankle (baPWV vascular beds were collected at baseline and 6 months. The effects of 6-month change in weight and insulin on measures of PWV were estimated using multivariate regression. Results After adjustment for baseline risk factors and change in systolic blood pressure, 6-month weight loss and 6-month change in fasting insulin independently predicted improvement in baPWV but not faPWV or cfPWV. There was a significant interaction between 6-month weight change and change in fasting insulin when predicting changes in baPWV (p baPWV. Conclusions Young adults with excess