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Sample records for level-i trauma center

  1. Gunshot wounds to the face: level I urban trauma center: a 10-year level I urban trauma center experience.

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    Pereira, Clifford; Boyd, J Brian; Dickenson, Brian; Putnam, Brant

    2012-04-01

    Gunshot wounds (GSWs) to the face are an infrequent occurrence outside of a war zone. However, when they occur, they constitute a significant reconstructive challenge. We present our 10-year experience at an urban level I trauma center to define the patterns of injury, assess the morbidity and mortality, and estimate the cost to the health care system. A retrospective review was performed on all patients admitted to Harbor-UCLA Medical Center with GSWs to the head and neck region between January 1997 and January 2007. Those who had sustained GSWs to the face requiring operative intervention were closely reviewed. Between 1997 and 2007, a total of 702 patients were admitted to the Harbor UCLA Emergency Department having sustained GSWs to the head and neck region, of which 501 patients survived. Of the survivors, 28 patients (26 male, 2 female) sustained GSWs to their face requiring operative intervention. The mean age of these patients was 28 (±8.3) years. They generally presented within a few hours of the injury, but 1 individual arrived over 24 hours later. Low-velocity single gunshots (from handguns) were predominantly involved, with facial fractures occurring in all cases. Fractures were of a localized shattering type without the major displacement of bony complexes seen in motor vehicle accidents. Most required wound debridement and fracture fixation. A few patients (14.2%) underwent free tissue transfer for reconstruction (3 fibular flaps, 1 TRAM). Tracheostomy was performed in 35.7% of patients. Mean length of hospital stay was 8.3 (±7.1) days, with 50% of cases requiring admission to the intensive care unit. Mean length of intensive care unit stay was 5.2 (±5.7) days. The average cost per patient exceeded $100,000.

  2. Quality and Dose Optimized CT Trauma Protocol - Recommendation from a University Level-I Trauma Center.

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    Kahn, Johannes; Kaul, David; Böning, Georg; Rotzinger, Roman; Freyhardt, Patrick; Schwabe, Philipp; Maurer, Martin H; Renz, Diane Miriam; Streitparth, Florian

    2017-09-01

    Purpose  As a supra-regional level-I trauma center, we evaluated computed tomography (CT) acquisitions of polytraumatized patients for quality and dose optimization purposes. Adapted statistical iterative reconstruction [(AS)IR] levels, tube voltage reduction as well as a split-bolus contrast agent (CA) protocol were applied. Materials and Methods  61 patients were split into 3 different groups that differed with respect to tube voltage (120 - 140 kVp) and level of applied ASIR reconstruction (ASIR 20 - 50 %). The CT protocol included a native acquisition of the head followed by a single contrast-enhanced acquisition of the whole body (64-MSCT). CA (350 mg/ml iodine) was administered as a split bolus injection of 100 ml (2 ml/s), 20 ml NaCl (1 ml/s), 60 ml (4 ml/s), 40 ml NaCl (4 ml/s) with a scan delay of 85 s to detect injuries of both the arterial system and parenchymal organs in a single acquisition. Both the quantitative (SNR/CNR) and qualitative (5-point Likert scale) image quality was evaluated in parenchymal organs that are often injured in trauma patients. Radiation exposure was assessed. Results  The use of IR combined with a reduction of tube voltage resulted in good qualitative and quantitative image quality and a significant reduction in radiation exposure of more than 40 % (DLP 1087 vs. 647 mGyxcm). Image quality could be improved due to a dedicated protocol that included different levels of IR adapted to different slice thicknesses, kernels and the examined area for the evaluation of head, lung, body and bone injury patterns. In synopsis of our results, we recommend the implementation of a polytrauma protocol with a tube voltage of 120 kVp and the following IR levels: cCT 5mm: ASIR 20; cCT 0.625 mm: ASIR 40; lung 2.5 mm: ASIR 30, body 5 mm: ASIR 40; body 1.25 mm: ASIR 50; body 0.625 mm: ASIR 0. Conclusion  A dedicated adaptation of the CT trauma protocol (level of reduction of tube voltage and of IR

  3. Quality and dose optimized CT trauma protocol. Recommendation from a university level-I trauma center

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    Kahn, Johannes; Boening, Georg; Rotzinger, Roman; Freyhardt, Patrick; Streitparth, Florian [Charite School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Kaul, David [Charite School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schwabe, Philipp [Charite School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Trauma Surgery; Maurer, Martin H. [Inselspital Bern (Switzerland). Dept. of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology; Renz, Diane Miriam [Univ. Hospital Jena (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-09-15

    As a supra-regional level-I trauma center, we evaluated computed tomography (CT) acquisitions of polytraumatized patients for quality and dose optimization purposes. Adapted statistical iterative reconstruction [(AS)IR] levels, tube voltage reduction as well as a split-bolus contrast agent (CA) protocol were applied. Materials and Methods 61 patients were split into 3 different groups that differed with respect to tube voltage (120 - 140 kVp) and level of applied ASIR reconstruction (ASIR 20 - 50%). The CT protocol included a native acquisition of the head followed by a single contrast-enhanced acquisition of the whole body (64-MSCT). CA (350 mg/ml iodine) was administered as a split bolus injection of 100 ml (2 ml/s), 20 ml NaCl (1 ml/s), 60 ml (4 ml/s), 40 ml NaCl (4 ml/s) with a scan delay of 85s to detect injuries of both the arterial system and parenchymal organs in a single acquisition. Both the quantitative (SNR/CNR) and qualitative (5-point Likert scale) image quality was evaluated in parenchymal organs that are often injured in trauma patients. Radiation exposure was assessed. The use of IR combined with a reduction of tube voltage resulted in good qualitative and quantitative image quality and a significant reduction in radiation exposure of more than 40% (DLP 1087 vs. 647 mGy x cm). Image quality could be improved due to a dedicated protocol that included different levels of IR adapted to different slice thicknesses, kernels and the examined area for the evaluation of head, lung, body and bone injury patterns. In synopsis of our results, we recommend the implementation of a polytrauma protocol with a tube voltage of 120 kVp and the following IR levels: cCT 5mm: ASIR 20; cCT 0.625 mm: ASIR 40; lung 2.5 mm: ASIR 30, body 5 mm: ASIR 40; body 1.25 mm: ASIR 50; body 0.625 mm: ASIR 0. A dedicated adaptation of the CT trauma protocol (level of reduction of tube voltage and of IR) according to the examined body region (head, lung, body, bone) combined with a

  4. Quality and dose optimized CT trauma protocol. Recommendation from a university level-I trauma center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, Johannes; Boening, Georg; Rotzinger, Roman; Freyhardt, Patrick; Streitparth, Florian; Kaul, David; Schwabe, Philipp; Maurer, Martin H.; Renz, Diane Miriam

    2017-01-01

    As a supra-regional level-I trauma center, we evaluated computed tomography (CT) acquisitions of polytraumatized patients for quality and dose optimization purposes. Adapted statistical iterative reconstruction [(AS)IR] levels, tube voltage reduction as well as a split-bolus contrast agent (CA) protocol were applied. Materials and Methods 61 patients were split into 3 different groups that differed with respect to tube voltage (120 - 140 kVp) and level of applied ASIR reconstruction (ASIR 20 - 50%). The CT protocol included a native acquisition of the head followed by a single contrast-enhanced acquisition of the whole body (64-MSCT). CA (350 mg/ml iodine) was administered as a split bolus injection of 100 ml (2 ml/s), 20 ml NaCl (1 ml/s), 60 ml (4 ml/s), 40 ml NaCl (4 ml/s) with a scan delay of 85s to detect injuries of both the arterial system and parenchymal organs in a single acquisition. Both the quantitative (SNR/CNR) and qualitative (5-point Likert scale) image quality was evaluated in parenchymal organs that are often injured in trauma patients. Radiation exposure was assessed. The use of IR combined with a reduction of tube voltage resulted in good qualitative and quantitative image quality and a significant reduction in radiation exposure of more than 40% (DLP 1087 vs. 647 mGy x cm). Image quality could be improved due to a dedicated protocol that included different levels of IR adapted to different slice thicknesses, kernels and the examined area for the evaluation of head, lung, body and bone injury patterns. In synopsis of our results, we recommend the implementation of a polytrauma protocol with a tube voltage of 120 kVp and the following IR levels: cCT 5mm: ASIR 20; cCT 0.625 mm: ASIR 40; lung 2.5 mm: ASIR 30, body 5 mm: ASIR 40; body 1.25 mm: ASIR 50; body 0.625 mm: ASIR 0. A dedicated adaptation of the CT trauma protocol (level of reduction of tube voltage and of IR) according to the examined body region (head, lung, body, bone) combined with a

  5. Influence of podiatry on orthopedic surgery at a level I trauma center.

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    Jakoi, Andre M; Old, Andrew B; O'Neill, Craig A; Stein, Benjamin E; Stander, Eric P; Rosenblatt, Joseph; Herman, Martin J

    2014-06-01

    Level I trauma centers frequently see trauma at or below the ankle, which requires consultation with the orthopedic surgery department. However, as podiatry programs begin to firmly establish themselves in more Level I trauma centers, their consultations increase, ultimately taking those once seen by orthopedic surgery. A review of the literature demonstrates that this paradigm shift has yet to be discussed. The purpose of this study was to determine how many, if any, lower extremity fracture consultations a newly developed podiatry program would take from the orthopedic surgery department. A retrospective review was performed of emergency department records from January 2007 to December 2011. Seventeen different emergency department diagnoses were used to search the database. Ultimately, each patient's emergency department course was researched. Several trends were noted. First, if trauma surgery was involved, only the orthopedic surgery department was consulted for any injuries at or below the ankle. Second, the emergency department tended to consult the podiatry program only between the hours of 8 am and 6 pm. Third, as the podiatry program became more established, their number of consultations increased yearly, and, coincidentally, the orthopedic surgery department's consultations decreased. Finally, high-energy traumas involved only the orthopedic surgery department. Whether the orthopedic surgery department or podiatry program is consulted regarding trauma surgery is likely hospital dependent. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Function of "nontrauma" surgeons in level I trauma centers in the United States.

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    Pate, J W

    1997-06-01

    Although the general "trauma" surgeon is usually the team leader in level I trauma centers, the use of surgical subspecialists and nonsurgeons is frequently ill-defined. This study was done to gain data in regard to actual use of subspecialists in busy centers. First, a survey of the patterns of staffing in 140 trauma centers was elicited by mail questionnaire, supplemented by telephone cells. Second, records of 400 consecutive patients at the Elvis Presley Trauma Center were reviewed to determine the use of subspecialists during the first 24 hours of care of individual patients. There were differences in the use of surgical subspecialists and nonsurgeons at different centers: in receiving, admitting, operating, and critical care areas and in privileges for admission and attending of inpatients. Consultation "guidelines" are used for many specific injuries. At our center, a mean of 1.92 subspecialists, in addition to general surgeons, were involved in the early care of each patient. Problems exist in many centers regarding the use of subspecialists, especially for management of facial and chest injuries. In some centers nonsurgeons function in the intensive care unit, and as admitting and attending physicians of trauma patients.

  7. Factors affecting mortality after penetrating cardiac injuries: 10-year experience at urban level I trauma center.

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    Mina, Michael J; Jhunjhunwala, Rashi; Gelbard, Rondi B; Dougherty, Stacy D; Carr, Jacquelyn S; Dente, Christopher J; Nicholas, Jeffrey M; Wyrzykowski, Amy D; Salomone, Jeffrey P; Vercruysse, Gary A; Feliciano, David V; Morse, Bryan C

    2017-06-01

    Despite the lethality of injuries to the heart, optimizing factors that impact mortality for victims that do survive to reach the hospital is critical. From 2003 to 2012, prehospital data, injury characteristics, and clinical patient factors were analyzed for victims with penetrating cardiac injuries (PCIs) at an urban, level I trauma center. Over the 10-year study, 80 PCI patients survived to reach the hospital. Of the 21 factors analyzed, prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (odds ratio [OR] = 30), scene time greater than 10 minutes (OR = 58), resuscitative thoracotomy (OR = 19), and massive left hemothorax (OR = 15) had the greatest impact on mortality. Cardiac tamponade physiology demonstrated a "protective" effect for survivors to the hospital (OR = .08). Trauma surgeons can improve mortality after PCI by minimizing time to the operating room for early control of hemorrhage. In PCI patients, tamponade may provide a physiologic advantage (lower mortality) compared to exsanguination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Trauma pattern in a level I east-European trauma center

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    Bogdan Stoica

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Our trauma pattern profile is similar to the one found in west-European countries, with a predominance of traffic-related injuries and falls. The severity and anatomical puzzle for trauma lesions were more complex secondary to motorcycle or bicycle-to-auto vehicles collisions. A trauma registry, with prospective enrollment of patients, is a very effective tool for constant improvements in trauma care.

  9. Burnout, Perceived Stress, and Job Satisfaction Among Trauma Nurses at a Level I Safety-Net Trauma Center.

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    Munnangi, Swapna; Dupiton, Lynore; Boutin, Anthony; Angus, L D George

    Nurses are at the forefront of our health care delivery system and have been reported to exhibit a high level of burnout. Burnout and stress in trauma nurses at a safety-net hospital can negatively impact patient care. Safety-net hospitals are confronted with unique social, financial, as well as resource problems that can potentially make the work environment frustrating. The purpose of this study was to explore the levels of burnout, stress, and job satisfaction in nurses providing care to trauma patients at a Level I safety-net trauma center. A cross-sectional survey design was used to investigate principal factors including personal and professional demographics, burnout, perceived stress, and job satisfaction. Trauma nurses working at a Level I safety-net trauma center are stressed and exhibited moderate degree of burnout. The extent of emotional exhaustion experienced by the nurses varied with work location and was highest in surgical intensive care unit nurses. The level of job satisfaction in terms of opportunities for promotion differed significantly by race and the health status of the nurses. Satisfaction with coworkers was lowest in those nurses between the ages of 60-69 years. Female nurses were more satisfied with their coworkers than male nurses. In addition, the study revealed that significant relationships exist among perceived stress, burnout, and job satisfaction. Work environment significantly impacts burnout, job satisfaction, and perceived stress experienced by trauma nurses in a safety-net hospital. Nursing administration can make an effort to understand the levels of burnout and strategically improve work environment for trauma nurses in order to minimize stressors leading to attrition and enhance job satisfaction.

  10. Epidemiology, demographics, and outcomes of craniomaxillofacial gunshot wounds in a level I trauma center.

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    Tholpady, Sunil S; DeMoss, Patrick; Murage, Kariuki P; Havlik, Robert J; Flores, Roberto L

    2014-07-01

    Gunshot injuries to the craniomaxillofacial region are a challenge to the trauma and reconstructive surgeon. Although management of these injuries has been standardized and early rather than late intervention is advocated, the patient characteristics before, during, and after have been poorly elucidated. A prospectively maintained Level I trauma center database was queried as to gunshot wounds of the craniomaxillofacial skeleton. Over a five-year period (2007-2011), 168 patients were identified with these injuries. Charts were reviewed as to demographics, presentations, and outcomes and these were tested for significant relationships with hospital length of stay, numbers and types of procedures, morbidity, and mortality. Gunshot wounds to the craniofacial skeleton resulted in 71 deaths in this patient population. Those that died were significantly older, presented with a lower GCS, had a shorter LOS, and a higher INR than those that lived. Subgroup analysis of mechanism demonstrated mortality was more likely to occur as a result of self-inflicted injury in whites and due to assault in the African-American population. Data gathered from this study disputes some commonly held beliefs regarding the epidemiology of gunshot injuries and should allow for better characterization of which outcomes are consistent with which presentations. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Outcome of penetrating chest injuries in an urban level I trauma center in the Netherlands.

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    Heus, C; Mellema, J J; Giannakopoulos, G F; Zuidema, W P

    2015-04-25

    Most patients with penetrating chest injuries benefit from early treatment with chest tube drainage or surgery. Although penetrating chest injury is not uncommon, few descriptive studies are published, especially in Europe. The aim of this study was to review our experience and further improve our management of penetrating chest injuries in a level I trauma center in the Netherlands. All patients with penetrating chest injury between August 2004 and December 2012 were included. Demographics, mechanism of injury, physiological parameters, Injury Severity Scores (ISS), surgical and non-surgical treatment, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, length of hospital stay (LOS), complications and rate of mortality were collected. A total of 159 patients were analyzed. Patients included 116 (73 %) stab wounds and 34 (21 %) gunshot wounds. In 27 patients (17 %), cardiac injury was seen. The mean ISS was 12. Almost half of all patients (49 %) were treated with only chest tube drainage. Alternatively, surgical treatment was performed in 24 % of all cases. Anterolateral incision was most frequently used to gain access to the thoracic cavity. The mean LOS was 9 days. Among all patients, 17 % were admitted to the ICU with a mean stay of 3 days. In 18 (11 %) patients, one or more complications occurred. The 30-day mortality was 7.5 %. Patients presenting with penetrating chest injury are not uncommon in the Netherlands and can mostly be treated conservatively. In one-fourth of the patients, surgical treatment is performed. A structural and vigorous approach is needed for good clinical outcome.

  12. The Intensive Care Unit Perspective of Becoming a Level I Trauma Center: Challenges of Strategy, Leadership, and Operations Management.

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    Savel, Richard H; Cohen, Wess; Borgia, Dena; Simon, Ronald J

    2018-01-01

    The primary purpose of this narrative is to elucidate the numerous significant changes that occur at the intensive care unit (ICU) level as a medical center pursues becoming a Level I trauma center. Specifically, we will focus on the following important areas: (1) leadership and strategy issues behind the decision to move forward with becoming a trauma center; (2) preparation needed to take a highly functioning surgical ICU and align it for the inevitable changes that happen as trauma go-live occurs; (3) intensivist staffing changes; (4) roles for and training of advanced practice practitioners; (5) graduate medical education issues; (6) optimizing interactions with closely related services; (7) nursing, staffing, and training issues; (8) bed allocation issues; and (9) reconciling the advantages of a "unified adult critical care service" with the realities of the central relationship between trauma and surgical critical care.

  13. The Intensive Care Unit Perspective of Becoming a Level I Trauma Center: Challenges of Strategy, Leadership, and Operations Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Savel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this narrative is to elucidate the numerous significant changes that occur at the intensive care unit (ICU level as a medical center pursues becoming a Level I trauma center. Specifically, we will focus on the following important areas: (1 leadership and strategy issues behind the decision to move forward with becoming a trauma center; (2 preparation needed to take a highly functioning surgical ICU and align it for the inevitable changes that happen as trauma go-live occurs; (3 intensivist staffing changes; (4 roles for and training of advanced practice practitioners; (5 graduate medical education issues; (6 optimizing interactions with closely related services; (7 nursing, staffing, and training issues; (8 bed allocation issues; and (9 reconciling the advantages of a “unified adult critical care service” with the realities of the central relationship between trauma and surgical critical care.

  14. Evaluating trauma team performance in a Level I trauma center: Validation of the trauma team communication assessment (TTCA-24).

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    DeMoor, Stephanie; Abdel-Rehim, Shady; Olmsted, Richard; Myers, John G; Parker-Raley, Jessica

    2017-07-01

    Nontechnical skills (NTS), such as team communication, are well-recognized determinants of trauma team performance and good patient care. Measuring these competencies during trauma resuscitations is essential, yet few valid and reliable tools are available. We aimed to demonstrate that the Trauma Team Communication Assessment (TTCA-24) is a valid and reliable instrument that measures communication effectiveness during activations. Two tools with adequate psychometric strength (Trauma Nontechnical Skills Scale [T-NOTECHS], Team Emergency Assessment Measure [TEAM]) were identified during a systematic review of medical literature and compared with TTCA-24. Three coders used each tool to evaluate 35 stable and 35 unstable patient activations (defined according to Advanced Trauma Life Support criteria). Interrater reliability was calculated between coders using the intraclass correlation coefficient. Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to establish concurrent validity between TTCA-24 and the other two validated tools. Coders achieved an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.87 for stable patient activations and 0.78 for unstable activations scoring excellent on the interrater agreement guidelines. The median score for each assessment showed good team communication for all 70 videos (TEAM, 39.8 of 54; T-NOTECHS, 17.4 of 25; and TTCA-24, 87.4 of 96). A significant correlation between TTTC-24 and T-NOTECHS was revealed (p = 0.029), but no significant correlation between TTCA-24 and TEAM (p = 0.77). Team communication was rated slightly better across all assessments for stable versus unstable patient activations, but not statistically significant. TTCA-24 correlated with T-NOTECHS, an instrument measuring nontechnical skills for trauma teams, but not TEAM, a tool that assesses communication in generic emergency settings. TTCA-24 is a reliable and valid assessment that can be a useful adjunct when evaluating interpersonal and team communication during trauma

  15. Successful Conviction of Intoxicated Drivers at a Level I Trauma Center

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    James F. Holmes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Conviction rates for drivers driving under the influence (DUI and in motor vehicle collisions (MVC presenting to trauma centers are based primarily on data from the 1990s. Our goal was to identify DUI conviction rates of intoxicated drivers in MVCs presenting to a trauma center and to identify factors associated with the failure to obtain a DUI conviction. Methods: Retrospective study of adults (>18 years presenting to a trauma center emergency department (ED in 2007. Eligible subjects were drivers involved in a MVC with an ED blood alcohol level (BAL ≥ 80mg/dL. Subjects were matched to their Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV records to identify DUI convictions from the collision, the legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC, and arresting officer’s impression of the driver’s sobriety. We entered potential variables predictive of failure to obtain a DUI conviction into a regression model. Results: The 241 included subjects had a mean age of 34.1 ± 12.8 years, and 185 (77% were male. Successful DUI convictions occurred in 142/241 (58.9%, 95% CI 52.4, 65.2% subjects. In a regression model, Injury Severity Score > 15 (odds ratio = 2.70 (95% CI 1.06, 6.85 and a lower ED BAL from 80 to 200mg/dL (odds ratio = 5.03 (95% CI 1.69, 14.9 were independently associated with a failure to obtain a DUI conviction. Conclusion: Slightly more than half of drivers who present to an ED after a MVC receive a DUI conviction. The most severely injured subjects and those with lower BALs are least likely to be convicted of a DUI.

  16. Motorcycle-related hospitalization of adolescents in a Level I trauma center in southern Taiwan: a cross-sectional study.

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    Liang, Chi-Cheng; Liu, Hang-Tsung; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2015-08-28

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the injury pattern, mechanisms, severity, and mortality of adolescents and adults hospitalized for treatment of trauma following motorcycle accidents in a Level I trauma center. Detailed data regarding patients aged 13-19 years (adolescents) and aged 30-50 years (adults) who had sustained trauma due to a motorcycle accident were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012. The Pearson's chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, or the independent Student's t-test were performed to compare the adolescent and adult motorcyclists and to compare the motorcycle drivers and motorcycle pillion. Analysis of Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) scores revealed that the adolescent patients had sustained higher rates of facial, abdominal, and hepatic injury and of cranial, mandibular, and femoral fracture but lower rates of thorax and extremity injury; hemothorax; and rib, scapular, clavicle, and humeral fracture compared to the adults. No significant differences were found between the adolescents and adults regarding Injury Severity Score (ISS), New Injury Severity Score (NISS), Trauma-Injury Severity Score (TRISS), mortality, length of hospital stay, or intensive care unit (ICU) admission rate. A significantly greater percentage of adolescents compared to adults were found not to have worn a helmet. Motorcycle riders who had not worn a helmet were found to have a significantly lower first Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, and a significantly higher percentage was found to present with unconscious status, head and neck injury, and cranial fracture compared to those who had worn a helmet. Adolescent motorcycle riders comprise a major population of patients hospitalized for treatment of trauma. This population tends to present with a higher injury severity compared to other hospitalized trauma patients and a bodily injury pattern differing from that of adult motorcycle riders, indicating the

  17. Incidence and etiology of mortality in polytrauma patients in a Dutch level I trauma center.

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    El Mestoui, Zainab; Jalalzadeh, Hamid; Giannakopoulos, Georgios F; Zuidema, Wietse P

    2017-02-01

    Earlier studies assessing mortality in polytrauma patients have focused on improving trauma care and reducing complications during hospital stay. The same studies have shown that the complication rate in these patients is high, often resulting in death. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and causes of mortality in polytrauma patients in our institute. Secondarily, we assessed the donation and autopsy rates and outcome in these patients. All polytrauma patients (injury severity score≥16) transported to and treated in our institute during a period of 6 years were retrospectively analyzed. We included all patients who died during hospital stay. Prehospital and in-hospital data were collected on patients' condition, diagnostics, and treatment. The chance of survival was calculated according to the TRISS methodology. Patients were categorized according to the complications during treatment and causes of death. Logistic regression analysis was used to design a prediction model for mortality in major trauma. A statistical analysis was carried out. Of the 1073 polytrauma patients who were treated in our institute during the study period, 205 (19.1%) died during hospital stay. The median age of the deceased patients was 58.8 years and 125 patients were men. Their mean injury severity score was 30.4. The most common mechanism of injury involved fall from height, followed by bicycle accidents. Almost 50% of the patients underwent an emergency intervention. Almost 92% of the total population died because of the effects of the accident (primary trauma). Of these, 24% died during primary assessment in the emergency department. Most patients died because of the effects of severe head injury (63.4%), followed by exsanguination (17.6%). The most common type of complications causing death during treatment was respiratory failure (6.3%), followed by multiple organ failure (1.5%). Autopsy was performed in 10.4%. Organ donation procedure was performed in 14

  18. Trend and Demographic Characteristics of Maxillofacial Fractures in Level I Trauma Center.

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    Emodi, Omri; Wolff, Amir; Srouji, Hanna; Bahouth, Hany; Noy, Dani; Abu El Naaj, Imad; Rachmiel, Adi

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the pattern and treatment of craniomaxillofacial injuries in the northern part of Israel, within a Jewish majority and large Arab minority population. A 5-year retrospective study evaluated patients treated for craniomaxillofacial fractures. Fracture cause, type, site, and patient demographics were evaluated. Patient age ranged from 1 to 94 years with an average age of 36.7 years; 52% of the victims were Jews and 48% Arabs. There was male predilection in both sectors (78.3% vs 21.7%). The main site of injury was the zygomatic bone (33.5%) followed by nasal bone, orbital, mandible, frontal sinus, and maxillary fractures. The main etiology of injuries was falls (45.4%) with significantly more falls reported by females (52.1% vs 43.2% in males). Motor vehicle accidents caused injuries more frequent in males. Arabs experienced CMF fractures at a younger age compared to Jews (27.8 and 44.8 average age, respectively). In the elderly, the trend reversed where Jews were more prone to craniomaxillofacial fractures. Compared to their weight in the population, the Arab sector experiences more craniomaxillofacial injuries. The Jewish elderly population tends to reside in nursing homes where they are more susceptible to accidental falls, whereas young Arab males are more exposed to motor vehicle accidents and interpersonal violence. Falls were the main cause of injuries particularly in women. This may reflect the women's fear of reporting domestic violence. We believe that increased government investments in infrastructures and education will lower the incidence of craniomaxillofacial trauma and balance the gap between both sectors and sexes.

  19. Retrospective analysis of facial dog bite injuries at a Level I trauma center in the Denver metro area.

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    Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Glasgow, Mark; Arton, Jamie; Bronsert, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Facial dog bite injuries pose a significant public health problem. Seventy-five consecutive patients (45 males, 30 females) treated solely by plastic surgery service for facial dog bite injuries at a Level I trauma center in the Denver Metro area between 2006 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The following information were recorded: breed, relationship of patient to dog, location and number of wounds, the duration between injury and surgical repair and dog bite incident, type of repair, and antibiotic prophylaxis. Primary end points measured were wound infection, the need for revision surgery, and patient satisfaction. Ninety-eight wounds in the head and neck region were repaired (46 children; mean age, 6.8 years) and (29 adults; mean age, 47.3 years). Twelve different breeds were identified. There was no significant association between the type of dog breed and the number of bite injuries. The duration between injury and repair ranged from 4 hours to 72 hours (mean [SD], 13.7 [10.9] hours). The majority of bite wounds (76 of 98) involved the cheek, lip, nose, and chin region. Direct repair was the most common surgical approach (60 of 98 wounds) (p reconstruction versus direct repair according to dog breed (p = 0.25). Ten wounds required grafting. Twenty-five wounds were managed by one-stage or two-stage flaps. Only three patients (3.06 %) underwent replantation/revascularization of amputated partial lip (n = 2) and of cheek (n = 1). There was one postoperative infection. Data from five-point Likert scale were available for fifty-two patients. Forty patients were satisfied (5) with the outcome, while five patients were somewhat satisfied (4), and seven were neutral. Availability of the plastic surgery service at a Level I trauma center is vital for the optimal treatment of facial dog bite injuries. Direct repair and reconstruction of facial dog bite injuries at the earliest opportunity resulted in good outcomes as evidenced by the satisfaction survey data and

  20. Extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (EFAST) in the diagnosis of pneumothorax: experience at a community based level I trauma center.

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    Nandipati, Kalyana C; Allamaneni, Shyam; Kakarla, Ravindra; Wong, Alfredo; Richards, Neil; Satterfield, James; Turner, James W; Sung, Kae-Jae

    2011-05-01

    Early identification of pneumothorax is crucial to reduce the mortality in critically injured patients. The objective of our study is to investigate the utility of surgeon performed extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (EFAST) in the diagnosis of pneumothorax. We prospectively analysed 204 trauma patients in our level I trauma center over a period of 12 (06/2007-05/2008) months in whom EFAST was performed. The patients' demographics, type of injury, clinical examination findings (decreased air entry), CXR, EFAST and CT scan findings were entered into the data base. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated. Of 204 patients (mean age--43.01+/-19.5 years, sex--male 152, female 52) 21 (10.3%) patients had pneumothorax. Of 21 patients who had pneumothorax 12 were due to blunt trauma and 9 were due to penetrating trauma. The diagnosis of pneumothorax in 204 patients demonstrated the following: clinical examination was positive in 17 patients (true positive in 13/21, 62%; 4 were false positive and 8 were false negative), CXR was positive in 16 (true positive in 15/19, 79%; 1 false positive, 4 missed and 2 CXR not performed before chest tube) patients and EFAST was positive in 21 patients (20 were true positive [95.2%], 1 false positive and 1 false negative). In diagnosing pneumothorax EFAST has significantly higher sensitivity compared to the CXR (P=0.02). Surgeon performed trauma room extended FAST is simple and has higher sensitivity compared to the chest X-ray and clinical examination in detecting pneumothorax. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Declining trend in the use of repeat computed tomography for trauma patients admitted to a level I trauma center for traffic-related injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Psoter, Kevin J., E-mail: kevinp2@u.washington.edu [Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Box 357236, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Roudsari, Bahman S., E-mail: roudsari@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology, Comparative Effectiveness, Cost and Outcomes Research Center, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359960, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Graves, Janessa M., E-mail: janessa@u.washington.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359960, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Mack, Christopher, E-mail: cdmack@uw.edu [Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359960, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Jarvik, Jeffrey G., E-mail: jarvikj@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology and Department of Neurological Surgery, Comparative Effectiveness, Cost and Outcomes Research Center, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359960, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: To evaluate the trend in utilization of repeat (i.e. ≥2) computed tomography (CT) and to compare utilization patterns across body regions for trauma patients admitted to a level I trauma center for traffic-related injuries (TRI). Materials and Methods: We linked the Harborview Medical Center trauma registry (1996–2010) to the billing department data. We extracted the following variables: type and frequency of CTs performed, age, gender, race/ethnicity, insurance status, injury mechanism and severity, length of hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and final disposition. TRIs were defined as motor vehicle collisions, motorcycle, bicycle and pedestrian-related injuries. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between utilization of different body region repeat (i.e. ≥2) CTs and year of admission, adjusting for patient and injury-related characteristics that could influence utilization patterns. Results: A total of 28,431 patients were admitted for TRIs over the study period and 9499 (33%) received repeat CTs. From 1996 to 2010, the proportion of patients receiving repeat CTs decreased by 33%. Relative to 2000 and adjusting for other covariates, patients with TRIs admitted in 2010 had significantly lower odds of undergoing repeat head (OR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.49–0.76), pelvis (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.27–0.52), cervical spine (OR = 0.23; 95% CI: 0.12–0.43), and maxillofacial CTs (OR = 0.24; 95% CI: 0.10–0.57). However, they had higher odds of receiving repeat thoracic CTs (OR = 1.86; 95% CI: 1.02–3.38). Conclusion: A significant decrease in the utilization of repeat CTs was observed in trauma patients presenting with traffic-related injuries over a 15-year period.

  2. Journey to a safe environment: fall prevention in an emergency department at a level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Danette; Kinsley, Terry L; Waszinski, Christine

    2013-07-01

    Predicting which patients will fall is a challenging task, especially in the often unpredictable setting of an emergency department of a Level I Trauma Center. Unfortunately, there is a great potential for falls to occur in this environment. Fall risk assessment tools used in inpatient settings do not adequately capture the risk factors of patients presenting to the emergency department. The ability to accurately identify patients at risk for falling at the point of entry is the first step toward preventing patient harm. Once patients are identified as at risk for a fall, the next challenge is to be sure that they do not fall. We created the KINDER1 Fall Risk Assessment Tool for use in the emergency department. This instrument was specifically designed for the rapid identification of patients at risk for a fall as well as the re-evaluation of patients for fall risk throughout their stay in the emergency department. Once we had an appropriate assessment tool, our next challenge was for staff to consistently apply fall prevention interventions. Performing a mini-root cause analysis on each fall showed trends and in turn led to the design and implementation of specific fall prevention interventions to motivate the nursing staff to focus on fall prevention that the ED nursing leadership used to select change strategies. With improved identification of fall risk patients and consistent application of innovative prevention strategies, we were able to show a trend toward reduction of falls and fall-related injuries in our emergency department. Copyright © 2013 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cumulative effective radiation dose received by blunt trauma patients arriving to a military level I trauma center from point of injury and interhospital transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Arnem, Kerri A; Supinski, David P; Tucker, Jonathan E; Varney, Shawn

    2016-12-01

    Trauma patients sustaining blunt injuries are exposed to multiple radiologic studies. Evidence indicates that the risk of cancer from exposure to ionizing radiation rises in direct proportion to the cumulative effective dose (CED) received. The purpose of this study is to quantify the amount of ionizing radiation accumulated when arriving directly from point of injury to San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC), a level I trauma center, compared with those transferred from other facilities. A retrospective record review was conducted from 1st January 2010 through 31st December 2012. The SAMMC trauma registry, electronic medical records, and the digital radiology imaging system were searched for possible candidates. The medical records were then analyzed for sex, age, mechanism of injury, received directly from point of injury (direct group), transfer from another medical facility (transfer group), computed tomographic scans received, dose-length product, CED of radiation, and injury severity score. A diagnostic imaging physicist then calculated the estimated CED each subject received based on the dose-length product of each computed tomographic scan. A total of 300 patients were analyzed, with 150 patients in the direct group and 150 patients in the transfer group. Both groups were similar in age and sex. Patients in the transfer group received a significantly greater CED of radiation compared with the direct group (mean, 37.6 mSv vs 28 mSv; P=.001). The radiation received in the direct group correlates with a lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of 1 in 357 compared with the transfer group with an increase in LAR to 1 in 266. Patients transferred to our facility received a 34% increase in ionizing radiation compared with patients brought directly from the injury scene. This increased dose of ionizing radiation contributes to the LAR of cancer and needs to be considered before repeating imaging studies. III. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Comparison of Helicopter Emergency Medical Services Transport Types and Delays on Patient Outcomes at Two Level I Trauma Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Brodie; Tien, Homer; Sawadsky, Bruce; Rizoli, Sandro; McFarlan, Amanda; Phillips, Andrea; Ackery, Alun

    2017-01-01

    Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) have become an engrained component of trauma systems. In Ontario, transportation for trauma patients is through one of three ways: scene call, modified scene call, or interfacility transfer. We hypothesize that differences exist between these types of transports in both patient demographics and patient outcomes. This study compares the characteristics of patients transported by each of these methods to two level 1 trauma centers and assesses for any impact on morbidity or mortality. As a secondary outcome reasons for delay were identified. A local trauma registry was used to identify and abstract data for all patients transported to two trauma centers by HEMS over a 36-month period. Further chart abstraction using the HEMS patient care reports was done to identify causes of delay during HEMS transport. During the study period HEMS transferred a total of 911 patients of which 139 were scene calls, 333 were modified scene calls and 439 were interfacility transfers. Scene calls had more patients with an ISS of less than 15 and had more patients discharged home from the ED. Modified scene calls had more patients with an ISS greater than 25. The most common delays that were considered modifiable included the sending physician doing a procedure, waiting to meet a land EMS crew, delays for diagnostic imaging and confirming disposition or destination. Differences exist between the types of transports done by HEMS for trauma patients. Many identified reasons for delay to HEMS transport are modifiable and have practical solutions. Future research should focus on solutions to identified delays to HEMS transport. Key words: helicopter emergency medical services; trauma; prehospital care; delays.

  5. Bed wise cost analysis of in-patient treatment of brachial plexus injury at a Level I trauma Center in India

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Nityanand; Gupta, Deepak; Mahapatra, Ashok; Harshvardhan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to calculate, in monetary terms, total cost incurred by a Level I trauma center in providing in-patient care to brachial plexus injury patients during their preoperative and the postoperative stay. Subjects and Methods: All patients of brachial plexus injury admitted and discharged between January and December 2010 were included in the study. Total cost per bed was calculated under several cost heads in pre- and post-operative ward care. Intra-operative costs were excluded. R...

  6. The prevalence and impact of prescription controlled substance use among injured patients at a Level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Robert; Bozeman, Matthew; Miller, Keith Roy; Smith, Jason Wayne; Harbrecht, Brian; Franklin, Glen; Benns, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing attention focused on the epidemic of prescription drug use in the United States, but little is known about its effects in trauma. The purpose of this study was to define the prevalence of prescription controlled substance use among trauma patients and determine its effects on outcome. A retrospective review of all patients admitted to a Level 1 trauma center from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2011, was performed. Patients dying within 24 hours or without home medication reconciliations were excluded. Data review included preexisting benzodiazepine or narcotic use, sex, age, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Scores (ISSs), intensive care unit (ICU) and overall length of stay, ventilator days, and overall cost. SAS version 9.3 was used for the analysis, and p ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 1,700 patients met inclusion criteria. Of these, 340 (20.0%) were on prescription narcotics and/or benzodiazepines at the time of admission. Patients in the narcotic/benzodiazepine group were significantly older (48 years vs. 43 years) and more likely to be women (43.7% vs. 28.9%). There was no difference in mechanism, ISS, or the presence of head injury between groups. Both ICU length of stay (3.3 days vs. 2.1 days) and total length of stay (7.8 days vs. 6.1 days) were significantly longer in patients on outpatient narcotics and/or benzodiazepines. Excluding severely injured patients, the need for mechanical ventilation was also increased among outpatient controlled substance users (15.8% vs. 11.0%). There is a substantial prevalence of preexisting controlled substance use (20%) among patients at our Level 1 trauma center. Preexisting controlled substance use is associated with longer total hospital and ICU stays. Among mildly to moderately injured patients, preinjury controlled substance is also associated with the need for mechanical ventilation. Prognostic study, level III.

  7. Injuries of the Medial Clavicle: A Cohort Analysis in a Level-I-Trauma-Center. Concomitant Injuries. Management. Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakir, Mustafa Sinan; Merschin, David; Unterkofler, Jan; Guembel, Denis; Langenbach, Andreas; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Schulz-Drost, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Although shoulder girdle injuries are frequent, those of the medial clavicle are widely unexplored. An applied classification is less used just as a standard management. Methods: A retrospective analysis of medial clavicle injuries (MCI) during a 5-year-term in a Level-1-Trauma-Center. We analyzed amongst others concomitant injuries, therapy strategies and the classification following the AO standards. Results: 19 (2.5%) out of 759 clavicula injuries were medial ones (11 A, 6 B and 2 C-Type fractures) thereunder 27,8% were displaced and thus operatively treated Locked plate osteosynthesis was employed in unstable fractures and a reconstruction of the ligaments at the sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) in case of their disruption. 84,2% of the patients sustained relevant concomitant injuries. Numerous midshaft fractures were miscoded as medial fracture, which limited the study population. Conclusions: MCI resulted from high impact mechanisms of injury, often with relevant dislocation and concomitant injuries. Concerning medial injury's complexity, treatment should occur in specialized hospitals. Unstable fractures and injuries of the SCJ ligaments should be considered for operative treatment. Midshaft fractures should be clearly distinguished from the medial ones in ICD-10-coding. Further studies are required also regarding a subtyping of the AO classification for medial clavicle fractures including ligamental injuries. Celsius.

  8. Contemporary management of rectal injuries at Level I trauma centers: The results of an American Association for the Surgery of Trauma multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carlos V R; Teixeira, Pedro G; Furay, Elisa; Sharpe, John P; Musonza, Tashinga; Holcomb, John; Bui, Eric; Bruns, Brandon; Hopper, H Andrew; Truitt, Michael S; Burlew, Clay C; Schellenberg, Morgan; Sava, Jack; VanHorn, John; Eastridge, Pa-C Brian; Cross, Alicia M; Vasak, Richard; Vercruysse, Gary; Curtis, Eleanor E; Haan, James; Coimbra, Raul; Bohan, Phillip; Gale, Stephen; Bendix, Peter G

    2018-02-01

    Rectal injuries have been historically treated with a combination of modalities including direct repair, resection, proximal diversion, presacral drainage, and distal rectal washout. We hypothesized that intraperitoneal rectal injuries may be selectively managed without diversion and the addition of distal rectal washout and presacral drainage in the management of extraperitoneal injuries are not beneficial. This is an American Association for the Surgery of Trauma multi-institutional retrospective study from 2004 to 2015 of all patients who sustained a traumatic rectal injury and were admitted to one of the 22 participating centers. Demographics, mechanism, location and grade of injury, and management of rectal injury were collected. The primary outcome was abdominal complications (abdominal abscess, pelvic abscess, and fascial dehiscence). After exclusions, there were 785 patients in the cohort. Rectal injuries were intraperitoneal in 32%, extraperitoneal in 58%, both in 9%, and not documented in 1%. Rectal injury severity included the following grades I, 28%; II, 41%; III, 13%; IV, 12%; and V, 5%. Patients with intraperitoneal injury managed with a proximal diversion developed more abdominal complications (22% vs 10%, p = 0.003). Among patients with extraperitoneal injuries, there were more abdominal complications in patients who received proximal diversion (p = 0.0002), presacral drain (p = 0.004), or distal rectal washout (p = 0.002). After multivariate analysis, distal rectal washout [3.4 (1.4-8.5), p = 0.008] and presacral drain [2.6 (1.1-6.1), p = 0.02] were independent risk factors to develop abdominal complications. Most patients with intraperitoneal injuries undergo direct repair or resection as well as diversion, although diversion is not associated with improved outcomes. While 20% of patients with extraperitoneal injuries still receive a presacral drain and/or distal rectal washout, these additional maneuvers are independently associated with a three

  9. Low hemorrhage-related mortality in trauma patients in a Level I trauma center employing transfusion packages and early thromboelastography-directed hemostatic resuscitation with plasma and platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Sørensen, Anne Marie Møller; Larsen, Claus F

    2013-01-01

    (ISS), transfusion therapy, and mortality were registered. Hemostatic resuscitation was based on a massive transfusion protocol encompassing transfusion packages and thromboelastography (TEG)-guided therapy. RESULTS: A total of 182 patients were included (75% males, median age 43 years, ISS of 17, 92....... Nonsurvivors had lower clot strength by kaolin-activated TEG and TEG functional fibrinogen and lower kaolin-tissue factor-activated TEG α-angle and lysis after 30 minutes compared to survivors. None of the TEG variables were independent predictors of massive transfusion or mortality. CONCLUSION: Three......-fourths of the patients transfused with plasma or PLTs within 24 hours received these in the first 2 hours. Hemorrhage caused 14% of the deaths. We introduced transfusion packages and early TEG-directed hemostatic resuscitation at our hospital 10 years ago and this may have contributed to reducing hemorrhagic trauma...

  10. Improvement in the workflow efficiency of treating non-emergency outpatients by using a WLAN-based real-time location system in a level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stübig, Timo; Suero, Eduardo; Zeckey, Christian; Min, William; Janzen, Laura; Citak, Musa; Krettek, Christian; Hüfner, Tobias; Gaulke, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Patient localization can improve workflow in outpatient settings, which might lead to lower costs. The existing wireless local area network (WLAN) architecture in many hospitals opens up the possibility of adopting real-time patient tracking systems for capturing and processing position data; once captured, these data can be linked with clinical patient data. To analyze the effect of a WLAN-based real-time patient localization system for tracking outpatients in our level I trauma center. Outpatients from April to August 2009 were included in the study, which was performed in two different stages. In phase I, patient tracking was performed with the real-time location system, but acquired data were not displayed to the personnel. In phase II tracking, the acquired data were automatically collected and displayed. Total treatment time was the primary outcome parameter. Statistical analysis was performed using multiple linear regression, with the significance level set at 0.05. Covariates included sex, age, type of encounter, prioritization, treatment team, number of residents, and radiographic imaging. 1045 patients were included in our study (540 in phase I and 505 in phase 2). An overall improvement of efficiency, as determined by a significantly decreased total treatment time (23.7%) from phase I to phase II, was noted. Additionally, significantly lower treatment times were noted for phase II patients even when other factors were considered (increased numbers of residents, the addition of imaging diagnostics, and comparison among various localization zones). WLAN-based real-time patient localization systems can reduce process inefficiencies associated with manual patient identification and tracking.

  11. Level I center triage and mass casualties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoey, Brian A; Schwab, C William

    2004-05-01

    The world has been marked by a recent series of high-profile terrorist attacks, including the attack of September 11, 2001, in New York City. Similar to natural disasters, these attacks often result in a large number of casualties necessitating triage strategies. The end of the twentieth century was marked by the development of trauma systems in the United States and abroad. By their very nature, trauma centers are best equipped to handle mass casualties resulting from natural and manmade disasters. Triage assessment tools and scoring systems have evolved to facilitate this triage process and to potentially reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with these events.

  12. Readmission after treatment of Grade 3 and 4 renal injuries at a Level I trauma center: Statewide assessment using the Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Brian; Wessells, Hunter; Voelzke, Bryan B

    2016-03-01

    One criticism of the existing renal trauma research is the limited outpatient follow-up after index hospitalization. We assessed readmission rates following treatment for American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) Grade 3 and 4 renal injury using the Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System (CHARS). We evaluated all patients with AAST Grade 3 and 4 renal injuries admitted to Harborview Medical Center (HMC) between 1998 and 2010, the only Level 1 trauma center in Washington state. Grade 4 renal injuries were stratified by collecting system laceration (CSL) or segmental vascular injury. Data were abstracted from the CHARS database for readmissions to any Washington state hospital within 6 months of renal injury. Clinical variables, diagnoses, and procedures were queried based on DRG International Classification of Diseases-9th Rev. codes. A total of 477 Grade 3 and 159 Grade 4 renal injuries were initially treated at HMC. On admission, 111 patients required intervention: 75 (16%) of 477 Grade 3 and 36 (23%) of 159 Grade 4 injuries. Within 6 months of index hospitalization, 86 (18%) of 477 Grade 3 and 38 (24%) of 159 Grade 4 patients were readmitted to any Washington state hospital. Eighty percent of Grade 3 injuries and 66% of Grade 4 injuries returned to HMC compared with secondary hospitals (p = 0.08). At readmission, 19 (22%) of 86 Grade 3 and 16 (42%) of 38 Grade 4 injuries had a urologic diagnosis. Subsequent procedural intervention was required on readmission in 6 (7%) of 86 Grade 3 and 5 (13%) of 38 Grade 4 renal injuries (all CSL injuries). A subset of patients treated for Grade 3 and 4 renal trauma will be readmitted for further management. While urologic diagnoses and additional procedures may be low overall, readmission to outside hospitals may preclude accurate determination of renal trauma outcomes. Based on these data, patients with Grade 4 CSL injuries seem to be at the highest risk for readmission and to require a subsequent

  13. Current Trends in the Management of Ballistic Fractures of the Hand and Wrist: Experiences of a High-Volume Level I Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghareeb, Paul A; Daly, Charles; Liao, Albert; Payne, Diane

    2018-03-01

    Ballistic fractures of the carpus and hand are routinely treated in large urban centers. These injuries can be challenging due to many factors. Various treatment options exist for these complicated injuries, but there are limited data available. This report analyzes patient demographics, treatments, and outcomes at a large urban trauma center. All ballistic fractures of the hand and wrist of the patients who presented to a single center from 2011 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, injury mechanism, treatment modalities, and outcomes were analyzed. Seventy-seven patients were identified; 70 were male, and 7 were female. Average age of the patients was 29.6 years. Seventy-five injuries were low velocity, whereas 2 were high velocity. Sixty-seven patients had fractures of a metacarpal or phalanx, whereas 4 had isolated carpal injuries. Six had combined carpal and metacarpal or phalanx fractures. Thirty-six patients had concomitant tendon, nerve, or vascular injuries requiring repair. Sixty-three patients underwent operative intervention, with the most common intervention being percutaneous fixation. Sixteen patients required secondary surgery. Eighteen complications were reported. The majority of patients in this report underwent early operative intervention with percutaneous fixation. Antibiotics were administered in almost all cases and can usually be discontinued within 24 hours after surgery. It is important to consider concomitant nerve, vascular, or tendon injuries requiring repair. We recommend early treatment of these injuries with debridement and stabilization. Due to lack of follow-up and patient noncompliance, early definitive treatment with primary bone grafting should be considered.

  14. Early versus delayed decompression in acute subaxial cervical spinal cord injury: A prospective outcome study at a Level I trauma center from India

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Deepak Kumar; Vaghani, Gaurang; Siddiqui, Saquib; Sawhney, Chhavi; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Kumar, Atin; Kale, S. S.; Sharma, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study was done with the aim to compare the clinical outcome and patients’ quality of life between early versus delayed surgically treated patients of acute subaxial cervical spinal cord injury. The current study was based on the hypothesis that early surgical decompression and fixations in acute subaxial cervical spinal cord trauma is safe and is associated with improved outcome as compared to delayed surgical decompression. Materials and Methods: A total of 69 patients were recrui...

  15. Rib fracture fixation in the 65 years and older population: A paradigm shift in management strategy at a Level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Michael T; Ashley, Dennis W; Abukhdeir, Hesham; Christie, D Benjamin

    2017-03-01

    Rib fractures after chest wall trauma are a common injury; however, they carry a significant morbidity and mortality risk. The impact of rib fractures in the 65-year and older patient population has been well documented as have the mortality and pneumonia rates. We hypothesize that patients 65 years and older receiving rib plating (RP) have decreased mortality, complication rates, and an accelerated return to normal functional states when compared with controls. With institutional review board approval, a retrospective review analyzed patients 65 years and older with rib fractures admitted from 2009 to 2015 receiving RP (RP group) (n = 23) compared to nonoperative, injury-matched controls admitted from 2003 to 2008 (NO group) (n = 50). Patients were followed prospectively with regard to lifestyle and functional satisfaction. Independent variables analyzed included Injury Severity Score (ISS), number of rib fractures, mortalities, hospital days, intensive care unit days, pneumonia development, respiratory complications, readmission rates, need for and length of rehabilitation stay time. Comparisons were by χ tests/Fisher's exact tests, Student's t tests and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. From 2003 to 2008, 50 NO patients were admitted with ages ranging 65 to 97 years, average ISS of 18.47 (14.28-22.66) versus ages ranging from 63 to 89 years, average ISS of 20.71 (15.7-25.73) for the RP group (n = 23). Average hospital days were 16.76 (10.35-23.18) and 18.36 (13.61-23.11) in the NO and RP groups, respectively. Average intensive care unit days were 11.65 (6.45-16.85) and 8.29 (5.31-11.26) days in the NO and RP groups, respectively. Four respiratory readmissions, two deaths, seven pneumonias, seven pleural-effusions, and 19 recurrent pneumothoraces were encountered in the NO group versus 0 in the RP group (p < 0.001). An equal percentage of patients in both groups entered rehabilitation facilities with average stay time of 18.5 and 28.53 days for the RP and NO groups

  16. The impact of morbid obesity on solid organ injury in children using the ATOMAC protocol at a pediatric level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Nathan; Tweed, Jeff; Greenwell, Cynthia; Notrica, David M; Langlais, Crystal S; Peter, Shawn D St; Leys, Charles M; Ostlie, Daniel J; Maxson, R Todd; Ponsky, Todd; Tuggle, David W; Eubanks, James W; Bhatia, Amina; Greenwell, Cynthia; Garcia, Nilda M; Lawson, Karla A; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Letton, Robert W; Alder, Adam C

    2017-02-01

    Obesity is an epidemic in the pediatric population. Childhood obesity in trauma has been associated with increased incidence of long-bone fractures, longer ICU stays, and decreased closed head injuries. We investigated for differences in the likelihood of failure of non-operative management (NOM), and injury grade using a subset of a multi-institutional, prospective database of pediatric patients with solid organ injury (SOI). We prospectively collected data on all pediatric patients (hepatic injury (36.8% versus 15.3%, P=0.048) but not a significant difference in likelihood of severe (grade 4 or 5) splenic injury (15.3% versus 10.5%, P=0.736). Obese patients had a higher mean ISS (22.5 versus 16.1, P=0.021) and mean abdominal AIS (3.5 versus 2.9, P=0.024). Obesity is a risk factor for more severe abdominal injury, specifically liver injury, but without an associated increase in failure of NOM. This may be explained by the presence of hepatic steatosis making the liver more vulnerable to injury. A protocol based upon physiologic parameters was associated with a low rate of failure regardless of the pediatric obesity status. Level II prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Trauma Center Staffing, Infrastructure, and Patient Characteristics that Influence Trauma Center Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faul, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most effective use of trauma center resources helps reduce morbidity and mortality, while saving costs. Identifying critical infrastructure characteristics, patient characteristics and staffing components of a trauma center associated with the proportion of patients needing major trauma care will help planners create better systems for patient care.   Methods: We used the 2009 National Trauma Data Bank-Research Dataset to determine the proportion of critically injured patients requiring the resources of a trauma center within each Level I-IV trauma center (n=443. The outcome variable was defined as the portion of treated patients who were critically injured. We defined the need for critical trauma resources and interventions (“trauma center need” as death prior to hospital discharge, admission to the intensive care unit, or admission to the operating room from the emergency department as a result of acute traumatic injury. Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM was used to determine how hospital infrastructure, staffing Levels, and patient characteristics contributed to trauma center need.     Results: Nonprofit Level I and II trauma centers were significantly associated with higher levels of trauma center need. Trauma centers that had a higher percentage of transferred patients or a lower percentage of insured patients were associated with a higher proportion of trauma center need.  Hospital infrastructure characteristics, such as bed capacity and intensive care unit capacity, were not associated with trauma center need. A GLM for Level III and IV trauma centers showed that the number of trauma surgeons on staff was associated with trauma center need. Conclusion: Because the proportion of trauma center need is predominantly influenced by hospital type, transfer frequency, and insurance status, it is important for administrators to consider patient population characteristics of the catchment area when planning the

  18. The changing epidemiology of spinal trauma: a 13-year review from a Level I trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, M; Inaba, K; Tang, A; Branco, B C; Barmparas, G; Schnüriger, B; Lustenberger, T; Demetriades, D

    2012-08-01

    Spinal injuries secondary to trauma are a major cause of patient morbidity and a source of significant health care expenditure. Increases in traffic safety standards and improved health care resources may have changed the characteristics and incidence of spinal injury. The purpose of this study was to review a single metropolitan Level I trauma centre's experience to assess the changing characteristics and incidence of traumatic spinal injuries and spinal cord injuries (SCI) over a 13-year period. A retrospective review of patients admitted to a Level I trauma centre between 1996 and 2008 was performed. Patients with spinal fractures and SCI were identified. Demographics, mechanism of injury, level of spinal injury and Injury Severity Score (ISS) were extracted. The outcomes assessed were the incidence rate of SCI and in-hospital mortality. Over the 13-year period, 5.8% of all trauma patients suffered spinal fractures, with 21.7% of patients with spinal injuries having SCI. Motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) were responsible for the majority of spinal injuries (32.6%). The mortality rate due to spinal injury decreased significantly over the study period despite a constant mean ISS. The incidence rate of SCI also decreased over the years, which was paralleled by a significant reduction in MVA associated SCI (from 23.5% in 1996 to 14.3% in 2001 to 6.7% in 2008). With increasing age there was an increase in spinal injuries; frequency of blunt SCI; and injuries at multiple spinal levels. This study demonstrated a reduction in mortality attributable to spinal injury. There has been a marked reduction in SCI due to MVAs, which may be related to improvements in motor vehicle safety and traffic regulations. The elderly population was more likely to suffer SCI, especially by blunt injury, and at multiple levels. Underlying reasons may be anatomical, physiological or mechanism related. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of chest trauma, associated injuries and mortality: a level I trauma centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysi, Veysi T; Nikolaou, Vassilios S; Paliobeis, Christos; Efstathopoulos, Nicolas; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2009-10-01

    A review of prospectively collected data in our trauma unit for the years 1998-2003 was undertaken. Adult patients who suffered multiple trauma with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) of >/=16, admitted to hospital for more than 72 hours and with sustained blunt chest injuries were included in the study. Demographic details including pre-hospital care, trauma history, admission vital signs, blood transfusions, details of injuries and their abbreviated injury scores (AIS), operations, length of intensive care unit and hospital stays, Injury Severity Score (ISS) and mortality were analysed. Fulfilling the inclusion criteria with at least one chest injury were 1,164 patients. The overall mortality reached 18.7%. As expected, patients in the higher AIS groups had both a higher overall ISS and mortality rate with one significant exception; patients with minor chest injuries (AIS(chest) = 1) were associated with mortality comparable to injuries involving an AIS(chest) = 3. Additionally, the vast majority of polytraumatised patients with an AIS(chest) = 1 died in ICU sooner than patients of groups 2-5.

  20. What Are the Costs of Trauma Center Readiness? Defining and Standardizing Readiness Costs for Trauma Centers Statewide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Dennis W; Mullins, Robert F; Dente, Christopher J; Garlow, Laura; Medeiros, Regina S; Atkins, Elizabeth V; Solomon, Gina; Abston, Dena; Ferdinand, Colville H

    2017-09-01

    Trauma center readiness costs are incurred to maintain essential infrastructure and capacity to provide emergent services on a 24/7 basis. These costs are not captured by traditional hospital cost accounting, and no national consensus exists on appropriate definitions for each cost. Therefore, in 2010, stakeholders from all Level I and II trauma centers developed a survey tool standardizing and defining trauma center readiness costs. The survey tool underwent minor revisions to provide further clarity, and the survey was repeated in 2013. The purpose of this study was to provide a follow-up analysis of readiness costs for Georgia's Level I and Level II trauma centers. Using the American College of Surgeons Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient guidelines, four readiness cost categories were identified: Administrative, Clinical Medical Staff, Operating Room, and Education/Outreach. Through conference calls, webinars and face-to-face meetings with financial officers, trauma medical directors, and program managers from all trauma centers, standardized definitions for reporting readiness costs within each category were developed. This resulted in a survey tool for centers to report their individual readiness costs for one year. The total readiness cost for all Level I trauma centers was $34,105,318 (avg $6,821,064) and all Level II trauma centers was $20,998,019 (avg $2,333,113). Methodology to standardize and define readiness costs for all trauma centers within the state was developed. Average costs for Level I and Level II trauma centers were identified. This model may be used to help other states define and standardize their trauma readiness costs.

  1. New Orleans Charity Hospital--your trauma center at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockinger, Zsolt T; Holloway, Vicki L; McSwain, Norman E; Thomas, Dwayne; Fontenot, Cathi; Hunt, John P; Mederos, Eileen; Hewitt, Robert L

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Center of Louisiana at New Orleans-Charity Hospital stands with pride as one of only two level I trauma centers in the state and one of the largest trauma centers in the United States, seeing over 4,000 trauma patients per year. Despite perennial funding issues, Charity Hospital's Emergency Department treated almost 200,000 patients in 2003. This brief report gives an overview of the emergency- and trauma-related services provided by Charity Hospital and underscores its value as a critical asset to healthcare in the Louisiana.

  2. Comparison of quality control for trauma management between Western and Eastern European trauma center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambale Giorgio

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality control of trauma care is essential to define the effectiveness of trauma center and trauma system. To identify the troublesome issues of the system is the first step for validation of the focused customized solutions. This is a comparative study of two level I trauma centers in Italy and Romania and it has been designed to give an overview of the entire trauma care program adopted in these two countries. This study was aimed to use the results as the basis for recommending and planning changes in the two trauma systems for a better trauma care. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a total of 182 major trauma patients treated in the two hospitals included in the study, between January and June 2002. Every case was analyzed according to the recommended minimal audit filters for trauma quality assurance by The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACSCOT. Results Satisfactory yields have been reached in both centers for the management of head and abdominal trauma, airway management, Emergency Department length of stay and early diagnosis and treatment. The main significant differences between the two centers were in the patients' transfers, the leadership of trauma team and the patients' outcome. The main concerns have been in the surgical treatment of fractures, the outcome and the lacking of documentation. Conclusion The analyzed hospitals are classified as Level I trauma center and are within the group of the highest quality level centers in their own countries. Nevertheless, both of them experience major lacks and for few audit filters do not reach the mmum standard requirements of ACS Audit Filters. The differences between the western and the eastern European center were slight. The parameters not reaching the minimum requirements are probably occurring even more often in suburban settings.

  3. Frequency of adoption of practice management guidelines at trauma centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino, Justin; Barnes, Sunni A.; Dahr, Nadine; Kudyakov, Rustam; Berryman, Candice; Nathens, Avery B.; Hemmila, Mark R.; Neal, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based management guidelines have been shown to improve patient outcomes, yet their utilization by trauma centers remains unknown. This study measured adoption of practice management guidelines or protocols by trauma centers. A survey of 228 trauma centers was conducted over 1 year; 55 completed the survey. Centers were classified into three groups: noncompliant, partially compliant, and compliant with adoption of management protocols. Characteristics of compliant centers were compared with those of the other two groups. Most centers were Level I (58%) not-for-profit (67%) teaching hospitals (84%) with a surgical residency (74%). One-third of centers had an accredited fellowship in surgical critical care (37%). Only one center was compliant with all 32 management protocols. Half of the centers were compliant with 14 of 32 protocols studied (range, 4 to 32). Of the 21 trauma center characteristics studied, only two were independently associated with compliant centers: use of physician extenders and daily attending rounds (both P < .0001). Adoption of management guidelines by trauma centers is inconsistent, with wide variations in practices across centers. PMID:23814383

  4. The trauma ecosystem: The impact and economics of new trauma centers on a mature statewide trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesla, David J; Pracht, Etienne E; Leitz, Pablo T; Spain, David A; Staudenmayer, Kristan L; Tepas, Joseph J

    2017-06-01

    Florida serves as a model for the study of trauma system performance. Between 2010 and 2104, 5 new trauma centers were opened alongside 20 existing centers. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of trauma system expansion on system triage performance and trauma center patients' profiles. A statewide data set was queried for all injury-related discharges from adult acute care hospitals using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for 2010 and 2014. The data set, inclusion criteria, and definitions of high-risk injury were chosen to match those used by the Florida Department of Health in its trauma registry. Hospitals were classified as existing Level I (E1) or Level II (E2) trauma centers and new E2 (N2) centers. Five N2 centers were established 11.6 to 85.3 miles from existing centers. Field and overall trauma system triage of high-risk patients was less accurate with increased overtriage and no change in undertriage. Annual volume at N2 centers increased but did not change at E1 and E2 centers. In 2014, Patients at E1 and E2 centers were slightly older and less severely injured, while those at N2 centers were substantially younger and more severely injured than in 2010. The injured patient-payer mix changed with a decrease in self-pay and commercial patients and an increase in government-sponsored patients at E1 and E2 centers and an increase in self-pay and commercial patients with a decrease in government-sponsored patients at N2 centers. Designation of new trauma centers in a mature system was associated with a change in established trauma center demographics and economics without an improvement in trauma system triage performance. These findings suggest that the health of an entire trauma system network must be considered in the design and implementation of a regional trauma system. Therapeutic/care management study, level IV; epidemiological, level IV.

  5. Surgical strategies in polytraumatized patients with femoral shaft fractures - comparing a German and an Australian level I trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruszkow, Hagen; Dowrick, Adam S; Frink, Michael; Zeckey, Christian; Krettek, Christian; Hildebrand, Frank; Edwards, Elton R; Mommsen, Philipp

    2013-08-01

    Femoral shaft fractures are one of the most common injuries in multiple trauma patients. Due to their prognostic relevance, there is an ongoing controversial discussion as to the optimal treatment strategy in terms of Damage Control Orthopaedics (DCO) and Early Total Care (ETC). We aimed to describe the differences in fracture management and clinical outcome of multiple trauma patients with concomitant femoral shaft fractures treated at a German and an Australian level I trauma centre using the same inclusion criteria. Polytraumatized patients (ISS ≥ 16) with a femoral shaft fracture aged ≥ 16 years treated at a German and an Australian trauma centre between 2003 and 2007 were included. According to ETC and DCO management principles, we evaluated demographic parameters as well as posttraumatic complications and clinical outcome. Seventy-three patients were treated at the German and 134 patients at the Australian trauma centre. DCO was performed in case of increased injury severity in both hospitals. Prolonged mechanical ventilation time, and length of ICU and hospital stay were demonstrated in DCO treatment regardless of the trauma centre. No differences concerning posttraumatic complications and survival were found between both centres. Survival of patients after DCO was similar to those managed using ETC despite a greater severity of injury and lower probability of survival. There was no difference in the incidence of ARDS. DCO was, however, associated with a greatly increased length of time on mechanical ventilation and length of stay in the ICU. We found no differences concerning patient demographics or clinical outcomes in terms of incidence of ARDS, MODS, or mortality. As such, we propose that comparability between German and Australian trauma populations is justified. Despite a higher ISS in the DCO group, there were no differences in posttraumatic complications and survival depending on ETC or DCO treatment. Further research is required to confirm

  6. Moving from "optimal resources" to "optimal care" at trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Shahid; Rayan, Nadine; Barnes, Sunni; Fleming, Neil; Gentilello, Larry M; Ballard, David

    2012-04-01

    The Trauma Quality Improvement Program has shown that risk-adjusted mortality rates at some centers are nearly 50% higher than at others. This "quality gap" may be due to different clinical practices or processes of care. We have previously shown that adoption of processes called core measures by the Joint Commission and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services does not improve outcomes of trauma patients. We hypothesized that improved compliance with trauma-specific clinical processes of care (POC) is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality. Records of a random sample of 1,000 patients admitted to a Level I trauma center who met Trauma Quality Improvement Program criteria (age ≥ 16 years and Abbreviated Injury Scale score 3) were retrospectively reviewed for compliance with 25 trauma-specific POC (T-POC) that were evidence-based or expert consensus panel recommendations. Multivariate regression was used to determine the relationship between T-POC compliance and in-hospital mortality, adjusted for age, gender, injury type, and severity. Median age was 41 years, 65% were men, 88% sustained a blunt injury, and mortality was 12%. Of these, 77% were eligible for at least one T-POC and 58% were eligible for two or more. There was wide variation in T-POC compliance. Every 10% increase in compliance was associated with a 14% reduction in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality. Unlike adoption of core measures, compliance with T-POC is associated with reduced mortality in trauma patients. Trauma centers with excess in-hospital mortality may improve patient outcomes by consistently applying T-POC. These processes should be explored for potential use as Core Trauma Center Performance Measures.

  7. Diversity in clinical management and protocols for the treatment of major bleeding trauma patients across European level I Trauma Centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schäfer, Nadine; Driessen, Arne; Fröhlich, Matthias; Stürmer, Ewa K.; Maegele, Marc; Johansson, Pär I.; Ostrowski, Sisse R.; Stensballe, Jakob; Goslings, J. Carel; Juffermans, Nicole; Balvers, Kirsten; Neble, Sylvie; van Dieren, Susan; Gaarder, Christine; Naess, Pål A.; Kolstadbraten, Knut Magne; Brohi, Karim; Eaglestone, Simon; Rourke, Claire; Campbell, Helen; Curry, Nicola; Stanworth, Simon; Harrison, Michael; Buchanan, James; Soyel, Hamit; Gall, Lewis; Orr, Adrian; Char, Ahmed; Görlinger, Klaus; Schubert, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Uncontrolled haemorrhage is still the leading cause of preventable death after trauma and the primary focus of any treatment strategy should be related to early detection and control of blood loss including haemostasis. Methods: For assessing management practices across six European

  8. Esophageal button battery ingestions: decreasing time to operative intervention by level I trauma activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Robert T; Griffin, Russell L; Weinstein, Elizabeth; Billmire, Deborah F

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of button battery ingestions is increasing and injury due to esophageal impaction begins within minutes of exposure. We changed our management algorithm for suspected button battery ingestions with intent to reduce time to evaluation and operative removal. A retrospective study was performed to identify and evaluate time to treatment and outcome for all esophageal button battery ingestions presenting to a major children's hospital emergency room from February 1, 2010 through February 1, 2012. During the first year, standard emergency room triage (ST) was used. During the second year, the triage protocol was changed and Trauma I triage (TT) was used. 24 children had suspected button battery ingestions with 11 having esophageal impaction. One esophageal impaction was due to 2 stacked coins. Time from arrival in emergency room to battery removal was 183minutes in ST group (n=4) and 33minutes in TT group (n=7) (p=0.04). One patient in ST developed a tracheoesophageal fistula. There were no complications in the TT group. The use of Trauma 1 activations for suspected button battery ingestions has led to more expedient evaluation and shortened time to removal of impacted esophageal batteries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Trauma center designation correlates with functional independence after severe but not moderate traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joshua B; Stassen, Nicole A; Cheng, Julius D; Sangosanya, Ayodele T; Bankey, Paul E; Gestring, Mark L

    2010-08-01

    The mortality of traumatic brain injury (TBI) continues to decline, emphasizing functional outcomes. Trauma center designation has been linked to survival after TBI, but the impact on functional outcomes is unclear. The objective was to determine whether trauma center designation influenced functional outcomes after moderate and severe TBI. Trauma subjects presenting to an American College of Surgeons (ACS) Level I or II trauma center with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) independence (FI) defined as a modified functional independence measure (FIM) of 12, and independent expression (IE) defined as a FIM component of 4. These were compared between Level I and Level II centers in subjects with both moderate (GCS 9-12) and severe (GCS Level I designation was associated with FI (odds ratio: 1.16; confidence interval: 1.07-1.24, p < 0.01) and IE (1.10; 1.03-1.17, p < 0.01) after severe TBI. Trauma center designation was not associated with FI or IE after moderate TBI. ACS trauma center designation is significantly associated with FI and IE after severe, but not moderate TBI. Prospective study is warranted to verify and explore factors contributing to this discrepancy.

  10. Illinois trauma centers and community violence resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennet Butler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elder abuse and neglect (EAN, intimate partner violence (IPV, and street-based community violence (SBCV are significant public health problems, which frequently lead to traumatic injury. Trauma centers can provide an effective setting for intervention and referral, potentially interrupting the cycle of violence. Aims: To assess existing institutional resources for the identification and treatment of violence victims among patients presenting with acute injury to statewide trauma centers. Settings and Design: We used a prospective, web-based survey of trauma medical directors at 62 Illinois trauma centers. Nonresponders were contacted via telephone to complete the survey. Materials and Methods: This survey was based on a survey conducted in 2004 assessing trauma centers and IPV resources. We modified this survey to collect data on IPV, EAN, and SBCV. Statistical Analysis: Univariate and bivariate statistics were performed using STATA statistical software. Results: We found that 100% of trauma centers now screen for IPV, an improvement from 2004 (P = 0.007. Screening for EAN (70% and SBCV (61% was less common (P < 0.001, and hospitals thought that resources for SBCV in particular were inadequate (P < 0.001 and fewer resources were available for these patients (P = 0.02. However, there was lack of uniformity of screening, tracking, and referral practices for victims of violence throughout the state. Conclusion: The multiplicity of strategies for tracking and referring victims of violence in Illinois makes it difficult to assess screening and tracking or form generalized policy recommendations. This presents an opportunity to improve care delivered to victims of violence by standardizing care and referral protocols.

  11. Geographic distribution of trauma centers and injury-related mortality in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joshua B; Rosengart, Matthew R; Billiar, Timothy R; Peitzman, Andrew B; Sperry, Jason L

    2016-01-01

    Regionalized trauma care improves outcomes; however, access to care is not uniform across the United States. The objective was to evaluate whether geographic distribution of trauma centers correlates with injury mortality across state trauma systems. Level I or II trauma centers in the contiguous United States were mapped. State-level age-adjusted injury fatality rates per 100,000 people were obtained and evaluated for spatial autocorrelation. Nearest neighbor ratios (NNRs) were generated for each state. A NNR less than 1 indicates clustering, while a NNR greater than 1 indicates dispersion. NNRs were tested for difference from random geographic distribution. Fatality rates and NNRs were examined for correlation. Fatality rates were compared between states with trauma center clustering versus dispersion. Trauma center distribution and population density were evaluated. Spatial-lag regression determined the association between fatality rate and NNR, controlling for state-level demographics, population density, injury severity, trauma system resources, and socioeconomic factors. Fatality rates were spatially autocorrelated (Moran's I = 0.35, p center distribution. Fatality rate and NNR were correlated (ρ = 0.34, p = 0.03). Clustered states had a lower median injury fatality rate compared with dispersed states (56.9 [IQR, 46.5-58.9] vs. 64.9 [IQR, 52.5-77.1]; p = 0.04). Dispersed compared with clustered states had more counties without a trauma center that had higher population density than counties with a trauma center (5.7% vs. 1.2%, p distribution of trauma centers correlates with injury mortality, with more clustered state trauma centers associated with lower fatality rates. This may be a result of access relative to population density. These results may have implications for trauma system planning and require further study to investigate underlying mechanisms. Therapeutic/care management study, level IV.

  12. Adrenal trauma: Elvis Presley Memorial Trauma Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrazin, Reza; Derweesh, Ithaar H; Kincade, Matthew C; Thomas, Adam C; Gold, Robert; Wake, Robert W

    2007-11-01

    Adrenal gland injury is a potentially devastating event if unrecognized in the treatment course of a trauma patient. We reviewed our single-center experience and outcomes in patients with adrenal gland trauma. We performed a retrospective review of all patients presenting with trauma to the Regional Medical Center at Memphis who had adrenal gland injuries from January 1991 through March 2006. Each chart was reviewed with attention to the demographics, associated injuries, complications, and outcomes. Patients were stratified into two subgroups according to age (35 years or younger and older than 35 years) to allow for an age-based comparison between the two groups. Of 58,000 patients presenting with trauma, 130 (0.22%) were identified with adrenal injuries, of which 8 (6.2%) were isolated and 122 (93.8%) were not. Of these 130 patients, 125 (96.2%) had their injury diagnosed by computed tomography and 5 (3.8%) had their injury diagnosed during exploratory laparotomy. Right-sided injuries predominated (78.5%), with six (4.6%) bilateral. Four patients (3.1%) underwent adrenalectomy. Seven patients (5.4%) with adrenal injuries died. One patient (0.77%) required chronic steroid therapy. Patients older than 35 years were more likely to have complications such as deep venous thrombosis, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. Patient age of 35 years or younger was associated with a significantly increased incidence of liver lacerations. Adrenal gland injury is uncommon, although mostly associated with greater injury severity. Although adding to morbidity, most are self-limited and do not require intervention.

  13. Geographic Distribution of Trauma Centers and Injury Related Mortality in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joshua B.; Rosengart, Matthew R.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Sperry, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Regionalized trauma care improves outcomes; however access to care is not uniform across the US. The objective was to evaluate whether geographic distribution of trauma centers correlates with injury mortality across state trauma systems. Methods Level I/II trauma centers in the contiguous US were mapped. State-level age-adjusted injury fatality rates/100,000people were obtained and evaluated for spatial autocorrelation. Nearest neighbor ratios (NNR) were generated for each state. A NNR1 indicates dispersion. NNR were tested for difference from random geographic distribution. Fatality rates and NNR were examined for correlation. Fatality rates were compared between states with trauma center clustering versus dispersion. Trauma center distribution and population density were evaluated. Spatial-lag regression determined the association between fatality rate and NNR, controlling for state-level demographics, population density, injury severity, trauma system resources, and socioeconomic factors. Results Fatality rates were spatially autocorrelated (Moran's I=0.35, pcenter distribution. Fatality rate and NNR were correlated (ρ=0.34, p=0.03). Clustered states had a lower median injury fatality rate compared to dispersed states (56.9 [IQR 46.5–58.9] versus 64.9 [IQR 52.5–77.1], p=0.04). Dispersed compared to clustered states had more counties without a trauma center that had higher population density than counties with a trauma center (5.7% versus 1.2%, pdistribution of trauma centers correlates with injury mortality, with more clustered state trauma centers associated with lower fatality rates. This may be a result of access relative to population density. These results may have implications for trauma system planning and requires further study to investigate underlying mechanisms PMID:26517780

  14. Trauma Systems. An Era of Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansink, K.W.W.

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of an inclusive trauma system in the Netherlands during last decade of the past century, has led to an improvement in Dutch trauma care. Eleven trauma regions were formed nationwide each surrounding a level I trauma center. All hospitals in a trauma region were assigned levels I, II

  15. Trauma center finances and length of stay: identifying a profitability inflection point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhry, Samir M; Couillard, Debbie; Liddy, Casey T; Adams, David; Norcross, E Douglass

    2010-05-01

    Trauma centers frequently report unfavorable financial results for the care of injured patients. Many variables contribute to these results. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship of adult trauma patient hospital length of stay (LOS) to trauma center profitability. The trauma registry of a Level I trauma center was queried for patients older than 18 years for the period July 1, 2003 to June 30, 2008. Hospital financial records were matched to patient trauma registry data. There were 7,990 patients who met selection criteria: 71% were men, mean age was 40 years, mean Injury Severity Score was 12 +/-10, 84.2% of injuries were blunt, and mean LOS was 6.23 days. In the 5 years of the study, total charges were $329,315,191, total costs were $137,680,039, and overall profit was $7,644,894. Total costs rose each year and percent collections fell. The bulk of the profit was realized from patients with LOS profitability as LOS increased. A notable "inflection point" at 11 days defined the cohort of profitable patients. Trauma patient LOS correlates closely with profitability. In this center, the vast majority of profit was realized from patients with LOS profitability and reflects the current reimbursement environment, which rewards shorter LOS over severity and quality. Copyright 2010 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Then we all fall down: fall mortality by trauma center level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubik, Daniel; Cook, Alan D; Ward, Jeanette G; Chapple, Kristina M; Teperman, Sheldon; Stone, Melvin E; Gross, Brian; Moore, Forrest O

    2017-09-01

    Ground-level falls (GLFs) are the predominant mechanism of injury in US trauma centers and accompany a spectrum of comorbidities, injury severity, and physiologic derangement. Trauma center levels define tiers of capability to treat injured patients. We hypothesized that risk-adjusted observed-to-expected mortality (O:E) by trauma center level would evaluate the degree to which need for care was met by provision of care. This retrospective cohort study used National Trauma Data Bank files for 2007-2014. Trauma center level was defined as American College of Surgeons (ACS) level I/II, ACS III/IV, State I/II, and State III/IV for within-group homogeneity. Risk-adjusted expected mortality was estimated using hierarchical, multivariable regression techniques. Analysis of 812,053 patients' data revealed the proportion of GLF in the National Trauma Data Bank increased 8.7% (14.1%-22.8%) over the 8 y studied. Mortality was 4.21% overall with a three-fold increase for those aged 60 y and older versus younger than 60 y (4.93% versus 1.46%, P < 0.001). O:E was lowest for ACS III/IV, (0.973, 95% CI: 0.971-0.975) and highest for State III/IV (1.043, 95% CI: 1.041-1.044). Risk-adjusted outcomes can be measured and meaningfully compared among groups of trauma centers. Differential O:E for ACS III/IV and State III/IV centers suggests that factors beyond case mix alone influence outcomes for GLF patients. More work is needed to optimize trauma care for GLF patients across the spectrum of trauma center capability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Trauma center variation in splenic artery embolization and spleen salvage: a multicenter analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aman; Duane, Therese M; Wilson, Sean P; Haney, Starre; O'Neill, Patrick J; Evans, Heather L; Como, John J; Claridge, Jeffrey A

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate if variation in management of blunt splenic injury (BSI) among Level I trauma centers is associated with different outcomes related to the use of splenic artery embolization (SAE). All adult patients admitted for BSI from 2008 to 2010 at 4 Level I trauma centers were reviewed. Use of SAE was determined, and outcomes of spleen salvage and nonoperative management (NOM) failure were evaluated. A priori, a 10% SAE rate was used to group centers into high- or low-use groups. There were 1,275 BSI patients. There were intercenter differences in age, injury severity, and grade of spleen injury (Spleen Injury Scale [SIS]). Mortality was similar by center; however, BSI treatment varied significantly by center. Overall, SAE use was highest at center A compared with B, C, and D (19%, 11%, 1%, and 4%, respectively; p trauma centers. Centers with higher rates of SAE use have higher spleen salvage and less NOM failure. SAE was shown to be an independent predictor of spleen salvage. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  18. Geriatric resources in acute care hospitals and trauma centers: a scarce commodity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Cathy A; Mion, Lorraine C; Minnick, Ann

    2013-12-01

    The number of older adults admitted to acute care hospitals with traumatic injury is rising. The purpose of this study was to examine the location of five prominent geriatric resource programs in U.S. acute care hospitals and trauma centers (N = 4,865). As of 2010, 5.8% of all U.S. hospitals had at least one of these programs. Only 8.8% of trauma centers were served by at least one program; the majorities were in level I trauma centers. Slow adoption of geriatric resource programs in hospitals may be due to lack of champions who will advocate for these programs, lack of evidence of their impact on outcomes, or lack of a business plan to support adoption. Future studies should focus on the benefits of geriatric resource programs from patients' perspectives, as well as from business case and outcomes perspectives. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Insuring the uninsured: potential impact of Health Care Reform Act of 2010 on trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Shahid; Ogola, Gerald; Fleming, Neil; Rayan, Nadine; Kudyakov, Rustam; Barnes, Sunni A; Ballard, David J

    2012-11-01

    Viability of trauma centers is threatened by cost of care provided to patients without health insurance. The health care reform of 2010 is likely to benefit trauma centers by mandating universal health insurance by 2014. However, the financial benefit of this mandate will depend on the reimbursement provided. The study hypothesis was that compensation for the care of uninsured trauma patients at Medicare or Medicaid rates will lead to continuing losses for trauma centers. Financial data for first hospitalization were obtained from an urban Level I trauma center for 3 years (n = 6,630; 2006-2008) and linked with clinical information. Patients were grouped into five payments categories: commercial (29%), Medicaid (8%), Medicare (20%), workers' compensation (6%), and uninsured (37%). Prediction models for costs and payments were developed for each category using multiple regression models, adjusting for patient demographics, injury characteristics, complications, and survival. These models were used to predict payments that could be expected if uninsured patients were covered by different insurance types. Results are reported as net margin per patient (payments minus total costs) for each insurance type, with 95% confidence intervals, discounted to 2008 dollar values. Patients were typical for an urban trauma center (median age of 43 years, 66% men, 82% blunt, 5% mortality, and median length of stay 4 days). Overall, the trauma center lost $5,655 per patient, totaling $37.5 million over 3 years. These losses were encountered for patients without insurance ($14,343), Medicare ($4,838), and Medicaid ($15,740). Patients with commercial insurance were profitable ($5,295) as were those with workers' compensation ($6,860). Payments for the care of the uninsured at Medicare/Medicaid levels would lead to continued losses at $2,267 to $4,143 per patient. The health care reforms of 2010 would lead to continued losses for trauma centers if uninsured are covered with Medicare

  20. Academic time at a level 1 trauma center: no resident, no problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Dickinson, Rebecca M; Schaefer, Eric W; Armen, Scott B; Frankel, Heidi L

    2012-01-01

    Globally, the compliance of resident work-hour restrictions has no impact on trauma outcome. However, the effect of protected education time (PET), during which residents are unavailable to respond to trauma patients, has not been studied. We hypothesized that PET has no impact on the outcome of trauma patients. We conducted a retrospective review of relevant patients at an academic level I trauma center. During PET, a trauma attending and advanced practice providers (APPs) responded to trauma activations. PGY1, 3, and 4 residents were also available at all other times. The outcome of new trauma patient activations during Thursday morning 3-hours resident PET was compared with same time period on other weekdays (non-PET) using a univariate and multivariate analysis. From January 2005 to April 2010, a total of 5968 trauma patients were entered in the registry. Of these, 178 patients (2.98%) were included for study (37 PET and 141 non-PET). The mean injury severity score (ISS) was 16.2. Although no significant difference were identified in mortality, complications, or length of stay (LOS), we do see that length of emergency department stay (ED-LOS) tends to be longer during PET, although not significantly (314 vs 381 minutes, p = 0.74). On the multiple logistic regression model, PET was not a significant factor of complications, LOS, or ED-LOS. Few trauma activations occur during PET. New trauma activations can be staffed safely by trauma activations and APPs. However, there could be some delays in transferring patients to appropriate disposition. Additional study is required to determine the effect of PET on existing trauma inpatients. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Compliance with recommended care at trauma centers: association with patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Shahid; Barnes, Sunni A; Rayan, Nadine; Kudyakov, Rustam; Foreman, Michael; Cryer, H Gil; Alam, Hasan B; Hoff, William; Holcomb, John

    2014-08-01

    State health departments and the American College of Surgeons focus on the availability of optimal resources to designate hospitals as trauma centers, with little emphasis on actual delivery of care. There is no systematic information on clinical practices at designated trauma centers. The objective of this study was to measure compliance with 22 commonly recommended clinical practices at trauma centers and its association with in-hospital mortality. This retrospective observational study was conducted at 5 Level I trauma centers across the country. Participants were adult patients with moderate to severe injuries (n = 3,867). The association between compliance with 22 commonly recommended clinical practices and in-hospital mortality was measured after adjusting for patient demographics and injuries and their severity. Compliance with individual clinical practices ranged from as low as 12% to as high as 94%. After adjusting for patient demographics and injury severity, each 10% increase in compliance with recommended care was associated with a 14% reduction in the risk of death. Patients who received all recommended care were 58% less likely to die (odds ratio = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.28-0.62) compared with those who did not. Compliance with commonly recommended clinical practices remains suboptimal at designated trauma centers. Improved adoption of these practices can reduce mortality. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Statistical Machines for Trauma Hospital Outcomes Research: Application to the PRospective, Observational, Multi-Center Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E Moore

    Full Text Available Improving the treatment of trauma, a leading cause of death worldwide, is of great clinical and public health interest. This analysis introduces flexible statistical methods for estimating center-level effects on individual outcomes in the context of highly variable patient populations, such as those of the PRospective, Observational, Multi-center Major Trauma Transfusion study. Ten US level I trauma centers enrolled a total of 1,245 trauma patients who survived at least 30 minutes after admission and received at least one unit of red blood cells. Outcomes included death, multiple organ failure, substantial bleeding, and transfusion of blood products. The centers involved were classified as either large or small-volume based on the number of massive transfusion patients enrolled during the study period. We focused on estimation of parameters inspired by causal inference, specifically estimated impacts on patient outcomes related to the volume of the trauma hospital that treated them. We defined this association as the change in mean outcomes of interest that would be observed if, contrary to fact, subjects from large-volume sites were treated at small-volume sites (the effect of treatment among the treated. We estimated this parameter using three different methods, some of which use data-adaptive machine learning tools to derive the outcome models, minimizing residual confounding by reducing model misspecification. Differences between unadjusted and adjusted estimators sometimes differed dramatically, demonstrating the need to account for differences in patient characteristics in clinic comparisons. In addition, the estimators based on robust adjustment methods showed potential impacts of hospital volume. For instance, we estimated a survival benefit for patients who were treated at large-volume sites, which was not apparent in simpler, unadjusted comparisons. By removing arbitrary modeling decisions from the estimation process and concentrating

  3. Understanding the Risk Factors of Trauma Center Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Chu; Hsia, Renee Y.; Kuzma, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We analyze whether hazard rates of shutting down trauma centers are higher due to financial pressures or in areas with vulnerable populations (such as minorities or the poor). Materials and Methods This is a retrospective study of all hospitals with trauma center services in urban areas in the continental US between 1990 and 2005, identified from the American Hospital Association Annual Surveys. These data were linked with Medicare cost reports, and supplemented with other sources, including the Area Resource File. We analyze the hazard rates of trauma center closures among several dimensions of risk factors using discrete-time proportional hazard models. Results The number of trauma center closures increased from 1990 to 2005, with a total of 339 during this period. The hazard rate of closing trauma centers in hospitals with a negative profit margin is 1.38 times higher than those hospitals without the negative profit margin (P lower hazard of shutting down trauma centers (ratio: 0.58, P penetration face a higher hazard of trauma center closure (ratio: 2.06, P < 0.01). Finally, hospitals in areas with higher shares of minorities face a higher risk of trauma center closure (ratio: 1.69, P < 0.01). Medicaid load and uninsured populations, however, are not risk factors for higher rates of closure after we control for other financial and community characteristics. Conclusions Our findings give an indication on how the current proposals to cut public spending could exacerbate the trauma closure particularly among areas with high shares of minorities. In addition, given the negative effect of health maintenance organizations on trauma center survival, the growth of Medicaid managed care population should be monitored. Finally, high shares of Medicaid or uninsurance by themselves are not independent risk factors for higher closure as long as financial pressures are mitigated. Targeted policy interventions and further research on the causes, are needed to

  4. The Trauma Center Organizational Culture Survey: development and conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew L; Wehbe-Janek, Hania; Subacius, Haris; Pinto, Ruxandra; Nathens, Avery B

    2015-01-01

    The Trauma Center Organizational Culture Survey (TRACCS) instrument was developed to assess organizational culture of trauma centers enrolled in the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Program (ACS TQIP). The objective is to provide evidence on the psychometric properties of the factors of TRACCS and describe the current organizational culture of TQIP-enrolled trauma centers. A cross-sectional study was conducted by surveying a sampling of employees at 174 TQIP-enrolled trauma centers. Data collection was preceded by multistep survey development. Psychometric properties were assessed by an exploratory factor analysis (construct validity) and the item-total correlations and Cronbach alpha were calculated (internal reliability). Statistical outcomes of the survey responses were measured by descriptive statistics and mixed effect models. The response rate for trauma center participation in the study was 78.7% (n = 137). The factor analysis resulted in 16 items clustered into three factors as described: opportunity, pride, and diversity, trauma center leadership, and employee respect and recognition. TRACCS was found to be highly reliable with a Cronbach alpha of 0.90 in addition to the three factors (0.91, 0.90, and 0.85). Considerable variability of TRACCS overall and factor score among hospitals was measured, with the largest interhospital deviations among trauma center leadership. More than 80% of the variability in the responses occurred within rather than between hospitals. TRACCS was developed as a reliable tool for measuring trauma center organizational culture. Relationships between TQIP outcomes and measured organizational culture are under investigation. Trauma centers could apply TRACCS to better understand current organizational culture and how change tools can impact culture and subsequent patient and process outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Financial viability of perinatal centers in the longer term, taking legislative requirements into account. An examination of the cost-revenue structure of a Level I perinatal center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Michael P; Kraml, Florian; Wagner, Stefanie; Hack, Carolin C; Schulze, Christine; Faschingbauer, Florian; Winkler, Mathias; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Debate is currently taking place over minimum case numbers for the care of premature infants and neonates in Germany. As a result of the Federal Joint Committee (Gemeinsamer Bundesauschuss, G-BA) guidelines for the quality of structures, processes, and results, requiring high levels of staffing resources, Level I perinatal centers are increasingly becoming the focus for health-economics questions, specifically, debating whether Level I structures are financially viable. Using a multistep contribution margin analysis, the operating results for the Obstetrics Section at the University Perinatal Center of Franconia (Universitäts-Perinatalzentrum Franken) were calculated for the year 2009. Costs arising per diagnosis-related group (DRG) (separated into variable costs and fixed costs) and the corresponding revenue generated were compared for 4,194 in-patients and neonates, as well as for 3,126 patients in the outpatient ultrasound and pregnancy clinics. With a positive operating result of € 374,874.81, a Level I perinatal center on the whole initially appears to be financially viable, from the obstetrics point of view (excluding neonatology), with a high bed occupancy rate and a profitable case mix. By contrast, the costs of prenatal diagnostics, with a negative contribution margin II of € 50,313, cannot be covered. A total of 79.4% of DRG case numbers were distributed to five DRGs, all of which were associated with pregnancies and neonates with the lowest risk profiles. A Level I perinatal center is currently capable of covering its costs. However, the cost-revenue ratio is fragile due to the high requirements for staffing resources and numerous economic, social, and regional influencing factors.

  6. Influence of socioeconomic status on trauma center performance evaluations in a Canadian trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lynne; Turgeon, Alexis F; Sirois, Marie-Josée; Murat, Valérie; Lavoie, André

    2011-09-01

    Trauma center performance evaluations generally include adjustment for injury severity, age, and comorbidity. However, disparities across trauma centers may be due to other differences in source populations that are not accounted for, such as socioeconomic status (SES). We aimed to evaluate whether SES influences trauma center performance evaluations in an inclusive trauma system with universal access to health care. The study was based on data collected between 1999 and 2006 in a Canadian trauma system. Patient SES was quantified using an ecologic index of social and material deprivation. Performance evaluations were based on mortality adjusted using the Trauma Risk Adjustment Model. Agreement between performance results with and without additional adjustment for SES was evaluated with correlation coefficients. The study sample comprised a total of 71,784 patients from 48 trauma centers, including 3,828 deaths within 30 days (4.5%) and 5,549 deaths within 6 months (7.7%). The proportion of patients in the highest quintile of social and material deprivation varied from 3% to 43% and from 11% to 90% across hospitals, respectively. The correlation between performance results with or without adjustment for SES was almost perfect (r = 0.997; 95% CI 0.995-0.998) and the same hospital outliers were identified. We observed an important variation in SES across trauma centers but no change in risk-adjusted mortality estimates when SES was added to adjustment models. Results suggest that after adjustment for injury severity, age, comorbidity, and transfer status, disparities in SES across trauma center source populations do not influence trauma center performance evaluations in a system offering universal health coverage. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chest trauma in children, single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohamed Fouad; al-Refaie, Reda Ibrahim

    2012-10-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of mortality in children over one year of age in industrialized countries. In this retrospective study we reviewed all chest trauma in pediatric patients admitted to Mansoura University Emergency Hospital from January 1997 to January 2007. Our hospital received 472 patients under the age of 18. Male patients were 374 with a mean age of 9.2±4.9 years. Causes were penetrating trauma (2.1%) and blunt trauma (97.9%). The trauma was pedestrian injuries (38.3%), motor vehicle (28.1%), motorcycle crash (19.9%), falling from height (6.7%), animal trauma (2.9%), and sports injury (1.2%). Type of injury was pulmonary contusions (27.1%) and lacerations (6.9%), rib fractures (23.9%), flail chest (2.5%), hemothorax (18%), hemopneumothorax (11.8%), pneumothorax (23.7%), surgical emphysema (6.1%), tracheobronchial injury (5.3%), and diaphragm injury (2.1%). Associated lesions were head injuries (38.9%), bone fractures (33.5%), and abdominal injuries (16.7%). Management was conservative (29.9%), tube thoracostomy (58.1%), and thoracotomy (12.1%). Mortality rate was 7.2% and multiple trauma was the main cause of death (82.3%) (Ptrauma is the most common cause of pediatric chest trauma and often due to pedestrian injuries. Rib fractures and pulmonary contusions are the most frequent injuries. Delay in diagnosis and multiple trauma are associated with high incidence of mortality. Copyright © 2011 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of a TeamSTEPPS Trauma Nurse Academy at a Level 1 Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, V Kristen; Harvey, Ellen M; Wright, Andi; Bath, Jennifer; Freeman, Dan; Collier, Bryan

    2018-01-01

    Nurses are crucial members of the team caring for the acutely injured trauma patient. Until recently, nurses and physicians gained an understanding of leadership and supportive roles separately. With the advent of a multidisciplinary team approach to trauma care, formal team training and simulation has transpired. Since 2007, our Level I trauma system has integrated TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies & Tools to Enhance Performance & Patient Safety; Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD) into our clinical care, joint training of nurses and physicians, using simulations with participation of all health care providers. With the increased expectations of a well-orchestrated team and larger number of emergency nurses, our program created the Trauma Nurse Academy. This academy provides a core of experienced nurses with an advanced level of training while decreasing the variability of personnel in the trauma bay. Components of the academy include multidisciplinary didactic education, the Essentials of TeamSTEPPS, and interactive trauma bay learning, to include both equipment and drug use. Once completed, academy graduates participate in the orientation and training of General Surgery and Emergency Medicine residents' trauma bay experience and injury prevention activities. Internal and published data have demonstrated growing evidence linking trauma teamwork training to knowledge and self-confidence in clinical judgment to team performance, patient outcomes, and quality of care. Although trauma resuscitations are stressful, high risk, dynamic, and a prime environment for error, new methods of teamwork training and collaboration among trauma team members have become essential. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating trauma center structural performance: The experience of a Canadian provincial trauma system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Moore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indicators of structure, process, and outcome are required to evaluate the performance of trauma centers to improve the quality and efficiency of care. While periodic external accreditation visits are part of most trauma systems, a quantitative indicator of structural performance has yet to be proposed. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a trauma center structural performance indicator using accreditation report data. Materials and Methods: Analyses were based on accreditation reports completed during on-site visits in the Quebec trauma system (1994-2005. Qualitative report data was retrospectively transposed onto an evaluation grid and the weighted average of grid items was used to quantify performance. The indicator of structural performance was evaluated in terms of test-retest reliability (kappa statistic, discrimination between centers (coefficient of variation, content validity (correlation with accreditation decision, designation level, and patient volume and forecasting (correlation between visits performed in 1994-1999 and 1998-2005. Results: Kappa statistics were >0.8 for 66 of the 73 (90% grid items. Mean structural performance score over 59 trauma centers was 47.4 (95% CI: 43.6-51.1. Two centers were flagged as outliers and the coefficient of variation was 31.2% (95% CI: 25.5% to 37.6%, showing good discrimination. Correlation coefficients of associations with accreditation decision, designation level, and volume were all statistically significant (r = 0.61, -0.40, and 0.24, respectively. No correlation was observed over time (r = 0.03. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of quantifying trauma center structural performance using accreditation reports. The proposed performance indicator shows good test-retest reliability, between-center discrimination, and construct validity. The observed variability in structural performance across centers and over-time underlines the importance of

  10. A National Coordinating Center for Trauma Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    and disability policy and a trauma survivor, himself; Patrick Downes, a survivor of the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing and an amputee who advocates...order to determine survivability; the appropriateness of EMS response and the care delivered; and the potential for survivability. 2. Organize a...Develop; Out of Scope Type NTI Requirement Related BRICS Module(s) How BRICS Solution meets NTIs Requirements Sy st em Customized portal

  11. Trauma Center Based Youth Violence Prevention Programs: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Judy Nanette; Nemeth, Lynne Sheri

    2016-12-01

    Youth violence recidivism remains a significant public health crisis in the United States. Violence prevention is a requirement of all trauma centers, yet little is known about the effectiveness of these programs. Therefore, this systematic review summarizes the effectiveness of trauma center-based youth violence prevention programs. A systematic review of articles from MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO databases was performed to identify eligible control trials or observational studies. Included studies were from 1970 to 2013, describing and evaluating an intervention, were trauma center based, and targeted youth injured by violence (tertiary prevention). The social ecological model provided the guiding framework, and findings are summarized qualitatively. Ten studies met eligibility requirements. Case management and brief intervention were the primary strategies, and 90% of the studies showed some improvement in one or more outcome measures. These results held across both social ecological level and setting: both emergency department and inpatient unit settings. Brief intervention and case management are frequent and potentially effective trauma center-based violence prevention interventions. Case management initiated as an inpatient and continued beyond discharge was the most frequently used intervention and was associated with reduced rearrest or reinjury rates. Further research is needed, specifically longitudinal studies using experimental designs with high program fidelity incorporating uniform direct outcome measures. However, this review provides initial evidence that trauma centers can intervene with the highest of risk patients and break the youth violence recidivism cycle. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Transforming trauma healthcare delivery in rural areas by use of an integrated call center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    There is poor penetration of trauma healthcare delivery in rural areas. On the other hand, mobile penetration in India is now averaging 80% with most families having access to mobile phone. The aim of this study was to assess the implementation and socioeconomic impact of a call center in providing healthcare delivery for patients with head and spinal injuries. This was a prospective observational study carried out over a 6-month period at a level I trauma Center in New Delhi, India. A nine-seater call center was outsourced to a private company and the hospital's electronic medical records were integrated with the call-center operations. The call center was given responsibility of maintaining appointments and scheduling clinics for the whole hospital as well as ensuring follow-up visits. Trained call-center staff handled simple patient queries and referred the rest via email to concerned doctors. A telephonic survey was done prior to the start of call-center operations and after 3 months to assess for user satisfaction. The initial cost of outsourcing the call center was Rs 1.6 lakhs (US$ 4000), with a recurring cost of Rs 80,000 (US$ 2000) per month. A total of 484 patients were admitted in the department of Neurosurgery during the study period. Of these, 63% (n=305) were from rural areas. Patients' overall experience for clinic visits improved markedly following implementation of call center. Patient satisfaction for follow-up visits increased from a mean of 32-96%. Ninety-five percent patients reported a significant decrease in waiting time in clinics 80.4% reporting improved doctor-patient interaction. A total of 52 visits could be postponed/cancelled for patients living in far flung areas resulting in major socioeconomic benefits to these families. As shown by our case study, call centers have the potential to revolutionize delivery of trauma healthcare to rural areas in an extremely cost-effective manner.

  13. Trauma center accessibility for road traffic injuries in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Takashi; Takamori, Ayako; Kimura, Yoshinari; Kimura, Akio; Hashizume, Makoto; Nakahara, Shinji

    2011-09-30

    Rapid economic growth in Vietnam over the last decade has led to an increased frequency of road traffic injury (RTI), which now represents one of the leading causes of death in the nation. Various efforts toward injury prevention have not produced a significant decline in the incidence of RTIs. Our study sought to describe the geographic distribution of RTIs in Hanoi, Vietnam and to evaluate the accessibility of trauma centers to those injured in the city. We performed a cross-sectional study using Hanoi city police reports from 2006 to describe the epidemiology of RTIs occurring in Hanoi city. Additionally, we identified geographic patterns and determined the direct distance from injury sites to trauma centers by applying geographical information system (GIS) software. Factors associated with the accessibility of trauma centers were evaluated by multivariate regression analysis. We mapped 1,271 RTIs in Hanoi city. About 40% of RTIs occurred among people 20-29 years of age. Additionally, 63% of RTIs were motorcycle-associated incidents. Two peak times of injury occurrence were observed: 12 am-4 pm and 8 pm-0 am. "Hot spots" of road traffic injuries/fatalities were identified in the city area and on main highways using Kernel density estimation. Interestingly, RTIs occurring along the two north-south main roads were not within easy access of trauma centers. Further, fatal cases, gender and injury mechanism were significantly associated with the distance between injury location and trauma centers. Geographical patterns of RTIs in Hanoi city differed by gender, time, and injury mechanism; such information may be useful for injury prevention. Specifically, RTIs occurring along the two north-south main roads have lower accessibility to trauma centers, thus an emergency medical service system should be established.

  14. Can We Train Military Surgeons in a Civilian Trauma Center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, H; Kong, V Y; Oosthuizen, G V; Bruce, J L; Bekker, W; Laing, G L; Clarke, D L

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the trauma workload and operative exposure in a major South African trauma center and provide a comparison with contemporary experience from major military conflict. All patients admitted to the PMTS following trauma were identified from the HEMR. Basic demographic data including mechanism of injury and body region injured were reviewed. All operative procedures were categorized. The total operative volume was compared with those available from contemporary literature documenting experience from military conflict in Afghanistan. Operative volume was converted to number of cases per year for comparison. During the 4-year study period, 11,548 patients were admitted to our trauma center. Eighty-four percent were male and the mean age was 29 years. There were 4974 cases of penetrating trauma, of which 3820 (77%) were stab wounds (SWs), 1006 (20%) gunshot wounds (GSWs) and the remaining 148 (3%) were animal injuries. There were 6574 cases of blunt trauma. The mechanism of injuries was as follows: assaults 2956, road traffic accidents 2674, falls 664, hangings 67, animal injuries 42, sports injury 29 and other injuries 142. A total of 4207 operations were performed. The volumes per year were equivalent to those reported from the military surgical literature. South Africa has sufficient burden of trauma to train combat surgeons. Each index case as identified from the military surgery literature has a sufficient volume in our center. Based on our work load, a 6-month rotation should be sufficient to provide exposure to almost all the major traumatic conditions likely to be encountered on the modern battlefield.

  15. A Civilian/Military Trauma Institute: National Trauma Research Coordinating Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Rebuttals, Q&A Salon A Craniofacial Trauma LtCol Cecila Schmalbach 1540-1550 Speaker: Dr. Manuel Lopez Title: OIF: Perspective of H&N Surgeon in...Intubation Endoscope. Station 10 Video Laryngoscope Dr. (Maj) Elvin Cruz , Staff Anesthesiologist, Wilford Hall Medical Center Practice video

  16. Does EMS Perceived Anatomic Injury Predict Trauma Center Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, E. Brooke; Roberts, Jennifer; Guse, Clare E.; Shah, Manish N.; Swor, Robert; Cushman, Jeremy T.; Blatt, Alan; Jurkovich, Gregory J.; Brasel, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to determine the predictive value of the anatomic step of the 2011 Field Triage Decision Scheme for identifying trauma center need. Methods EMS providers caring for injured adults transported to regional trauma centers in 3 midsized communities were interviewed over two years. Patients were included, regardless of injury severity, if they were at least 18 years old and were transported by EMS with a mechanism of injury that was an assault, motor vehicle or motorcycle crash, fall, or pedestrian or bicyclist struck. The interview was conducted upon ED arrival and collected physiologic condition and anatomic injury data. Patients who met the physiologic criteria were excluded. Trauma center need was defined as non-orthopedic surgery within 24 hours, intensive care unit admission, or death prior to hospital discharge. Data were analyzed by calculating descriptive statistics including positive likelihood ratios (+LR) with 95% confidence intervals. Results 11,892 interviews were conducted. One was excluded because of missing outcome data and 1,274 were excluded because they met the physiologic step. EMS providers identified 1,167 cases that met the anatomic criteria, of which 307 (26%) needed the resources of a trauma center (38% sensitivity, 91% specificity, +LR 4.4; CI: 3.9 - 4.9). Criteria with a +LR ≥5 were flail chest (9.0; CI: 4.1 - 19.4), paralysis (6.8; CI: 4.2 - 11.2), two or more long bone fractures (6.3; CI: 4.5 - 8.9), and amputation (6.1; CI: 1.5 - 24.4). Criteria with a +LR >2 and <5 were penetrating injury (4.8; CI: 4.2 - 5.6), and skull fracture (4.8; CI: 3.0 - 7.7). Only pelvic fracture (1.9; CI: 1.3 - 2.9) had a +LR less than 2. Conclusions The anatomic step of the Field Triage Guidelines as determined by EMS providers is a reasonable tool for determining trauma center need. Use of EMS perceived pelvic fracture as an indicator for trauma center need should be re-evaluated. PMID:23627418

  17. 11.361 sports injuries in a 15-year survey of a Level I emergency trauma department reveal different severe injury types in the 6 most common team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutsch, Werner; Krutsch, Volker; Hilber, Franz; Pfeifer, Christian; Baumann, Florian; Weber, Johannes; Schmitz, Paul; Kerschbaum, Maximilian; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter

    2018-06-01

     Severe sports-related injuries are a common affliction treated in Level I trauma departments. Detailed knowledge on injury characteristics from different medical settings is essential to improve the development of injury prevention strategies in different team sports.  Team sport injuries were retrospectively analysed in a Level I trauma department registry over 15 years. Injury and treatment data were compared with regard to competition and training exposure. Injury data such as "time of visitation", "type of injury", "multiple injured body regions" and "immediate hospitalisation" helped to define the severity level of each team sports injury.  At the Level I trauma department, 11.361 sports-related injuries were seen over 15 years, of which 34.0 % were sustained during team sports. Soccer injuries were the most common injuries of all team sports (71.4 %). The lower extremity was the most affected body region overall, followed by the upper extremity. Head injuries were mainly seen in Ice hockey and American football and concussion additionally frequently in team handball. Slight injuries like sprains or contusions occurred most frequently in all team sports. In soccer and team handball, injuries sustained in competition were significantly more severe (p team sports, injury prevention strategies should address competitive as well as training situations, whichmay need different strategies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Video registration of trauma team performance in the emergency department: the results of a 2-year analysis in a Level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbert, Pieter H W; Kaasschieter, Edgar G; Hoorntje, Lidewij E; Leenen, Loek P H

    2009-12-01

    Trauma teams responsible for the first response to patients with multiple injuries upon arrival in a hospital consist of medical specialists or resident physicians. We hypothesized that 24-hour video registration in the trauma room would allow for precise evaluation of team functioning and deviations from Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. We analyzed all video registrations of trauma patients who visited the emergency room of a Level I trauma center in the Netherlands between September 1, 2000, and September 1, 2002. Analysis was performed with a score list based on ATLS protocols. From a total of 1,256 trauma room presentations, we found a total of 387 video registrations suitable for analysis. The majority of patients had an injury severity score lower than 17 (264 patients), whereas 123 patients were classified as multiple injuries (injury severity score >or=17). Errors in team organization (omission of prehospital report, no evident leadership, unorganized resuscitation, not working according to protocol, and no continued supervision of the patient) lead to significantly more deviations in the treatment than when team organization was uncomplicated. Video registration of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures by a multidisciplinary trauma team facilitates an accurate analysis of possible deviations from protocol. In addition to identifying technical errors, the role of the team leader can clearly be analyzed and related to team actions. Registration strongly depends on availability of video tapes, timely started registration, and hardware functioning. The results from this study were used to develop a training program for trauma teams in our hospital that specifically focuses on the team leader's functioning.

  19. SWOT analysis in Sina Trauma and Surgery Research Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamati, Payman; ashraf Eghbali, Ali; Zarghampour, Manijeh

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted with the aim of identifying and evaluating the internal and external factors, affecting the Sina Trauma and Surgery Research Center, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences and propose some of related strategies to senior managers. We used a combined quantitative and qualitative methodology. Our study population consisted of personnel (18 individuals) at Sina Trauma and Surgery Research Center. Data-collection tools were the group discussions and the questionnaires. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunities and Threats) analysis. 18 individuals participated in sessions, consisting of 8 women (44.4%) and 10 men (55.6%). The final scores were 2.45 for internal factors (strength-weakness) and 2.17 for external factors (opportunities-threats). In this study, we proposed 36 strategies (10 weakness-threat strategies, 10 weakness-opportunity strategies, 7 strength-threat strategies, and 9 strength-opportunity strategies). The current status of Sina Trauma and Surgery Research Center is threatened weak. We recommend the center to implement the proposed strategies.

  20. Use of laparoscopy in trauma at a level II trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzana, Daniel C; Kotwall, Cyrus A; Clancy, Thomas V; Hope, William W

    2011-01-01

    Enthusiasm for the use of laparoscopy in trauma has not rivaled that for general surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with laparoscopy at a level II trauma center. A retrospective review of all trauma patients undergoing diagnostic or therapeutic laparoscopy was performed from January 2004 to July 2010. Laparoscopy was performed in 16 patients during the study period. The average age was 35 years. Injuries included left diaphragm in 4 patients, mesenteric injury in 2, and vaginal laceration, liver laceration, small bowel injury, renal laceration, urethral/pelvic, and colon injury in 1 patient each. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed in 11 patients (69%) with 3 patients requiring conversion to an open procedure. Successful therapeutic laparoscopy was performed in 5 patients for repair of isolated diaphragm injuries (2), a small bowel injury, a colon injury, and placement of a suprapubic bladder catheter. Average length of stay was 5.6 days (range, 0 to 23), and 75% of patients were discharged home. Morbidity rate was 13% with no mortalities or missed injuries. Laparoscopy is a seldom-used modality at our trauma center; however, it may play a role in a select subset of patients.

  1. Dynamical structure of center-of-pressure trajectories with and without functional taping in children with cerebral palsy level I and II of GMFCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavão, Silvia Leticia; Ledebt, Annick; Savelsbergh, Geert J P; Rocha, Nelci Adriana C F

    2017-08-01

    Postural control during quiet standing was examined in typical children (TD) and children with cerebral palsy (CP) level I and II of GMFCS. The immediate effect on postural control of functional taping on the thighs was analyzed. We evaluated 43 TD, 17 CP children level I, and 10 CP children level II. Participants were evaluated in two conditions (with and without taping). The trajectories of the center of pressure (COP) were analyzed by means of conventional posturography (sway amplitude, sway-path-length) and dynamic posturography (degree of twisting-and-turning, sway regularity). Both CP groups showed larger sway amplitude than the TD while only the CP level II showed more regular COP trajectories with less twisting-and-turning. Functional taping didn't affect sway amplitude or sway-path-length. TD children exhibited more twisting-and-turning with functional taping, whereas no effects on postural sway dynamics were observed in CP children. Functional taping doesn't result in immediate changes in quiet stance in CP children, whereas in TD it resulted in faster sway corrections. Children level II invest more attention in postural control than level I, and TD. While quiet standing was more automatized in children level I than in level II, both CP groups showed a less stable balance than TD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Does Mechanism of Injury Predict Trauma Center Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, E. Brooke; Shah, Manish N.; Cushman, Jeremy T.; Swor, Robert; Guse, Clare E.; Brasel, Karen; Blatt, Alan; Jurkovich, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the predictive value of the Mechanism of Injury step of the American College of Surgeon’s Field Triage Decision Scheme for determining trauma center need. Methods EMS providers caring for injured adult patients transported to the regional trauma center in 3 midsized communities over two years were interviewed upon ED arrival. Included was any injured patient, regardless of injury severity. The interview collected patient physiologic condition, apparent anatomic injury, and mechanism of injury. Using the 1999 Scheme, patients who met the physiologic or anatomic steps were excluded. Patients were considered to need a trauma center if they had non-orthopedic surgery within 24 hours, intensive care unit admission, or died prior to hospital discharge. Data were analyzed by calculating positive likelihood ratios (+LR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each mechanism of injury criteria. Results 11,892 provider interviews were conducted. Of those, 1was excluded because outcome data were not available and 2,408 were excluded because they met the other steps of the Field Triage Decision Scheme. Of the remaining 9,483 cases, 2,363 met one of the mechanism of injury criteria, 204 (9%) of which needed the resources of a trauma center. Criteria with a +LR ≥5 were death of another occupant in the same vehicle (6.8; CI:2.7–16.7), fall >20 ft.(5.2; CI:2.4–11.3), and motor vehicle crash (MVC) extrication >20 minutes (5.0; CI:3.2–8.0). Criteria with a +LR between 2 and 12 inches (3.7; CI:2.6–5.3), ejection (3.2; CI:1.3–8.2), and deformity >20 inches (2.3; CI:1.7–3.0). The criteria with a +LR 40 mph (1.9; CI:1.5–2.2), pedestrian/bicyclist struck >5mph (1.2; CI:1.0–1.5), bicyclist/pedestrian thrown or run over (1.2; CI:0.9–1.6), motorcycle crash >20mph (1.1; CI:0.96–1.3), rider separated from motorcycle (1.0; CI:0.9–1.2), and MVC rollover (1.0; CI:0.7–1.5). Conclusion Death of another occupant, fall distance, and extrication time

  3. Transforming trauma healthcare delivery in rural areas by use of an integrated call center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is poor penetration of trauma healthcare delivery in rural areas. On the other hand, mobile penetration in India is now averaging 80% with most families having access to mobile phone. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the implementation and socioeconomic impact of a call center in providing healthcare delivery for patients with head and spinal injuries. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study carried out over a 6-month period at a level I trauma Center in New Delhi, India. A nine-seater call center was outsourced to a private company and the hospital′s electronic medical records were integrated with the call-center operations. The call center was given responsibility of maintaining appointments and scheduling clinics for the whole hospital as well as ensuring follow-up visits. Trained call-center staff handled simple patient queries and referred the rest via email to concerned doctors. A telephonic survey was done prior to the start of call-center operations and after 3 months to assess for user satisfaction. Results: The initial cost of outsourcing the call center was Rs 1.6 lakhs (US$ 4000, with a recurring cost of Rs 80,000 (US$ 2000 per month. A total of 484 patients were admitted in the department of Neurosurgery during the study period. Of these, 63% (n=305 were from rural areas. Patients′ overall experience for clinic visits improved markedly following implementation of call center. Patient satisfaction for follow-up visits increased from a mean of 32-96%. Ninety-five percent patients reported a significant decrease in waiting time in clinics 80.4% reporting improved doctor-patient interaction. A total of 52 visits could be postponed/cancelled for patients living in far flung areas resulting in major socioeconomic benefits to these families. Conclusions: As shown by our case study, call centers have the potential to revolutionize delivery of trauma healthcare to

  4. Transforming trauma healthcare delivery in rural areas by use of an integrated call center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: There is poor penetration of trauma healthcare delivery in rural areas. On the other hand, mobile penetration in India is now averaging 80% with most families having access to mobile phone. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the implementation and socioeconomic impact of a call center in providing healthcare delivery for patients with head and spinal injuries. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study carried out over a 6-month period at a level I trauma Center in New Delhi, India. A nine-seater call center was outsourced to a private company and the hospital's electronic medical records were integrated with the call-center operations. The call center was given responsibility of maintaining appointments and scheduling clinics for the whole hospital as well as ensuring follow-up visits. Trained call-center staff handled simple patient queries and referred the rest via email to concerned doctors. A telephonic survey was done prior to the start of call-center operations and after 3 months to assess for user satisfaction. Results: The initial cost of outsourcing the call center was Rs 1.6 lakhs (US$ 4000), with a recurring cost of Rs 80,000 (US$ 2000) per month. A total of 484 patients were admitted in the department of Neurosurgery during the study period. Of these, 63% (n=305) were from rural areas. Patients’ overall experience for clinic visits improved markedly following implementation of call center. Patient satisfaction for follow-up visits increased from a mean of 32-96%. Ninety-five percent patients reported a significant decrease in waiting time in clinics 80.4% reporting improved doctor-patient interaction. A total of 52 visits could be postponed/cancelled for patients living in far flung areas resulting in major socioeconomic benefits to these families. Conclusions: As shown by our case study, call centers have the potential to revolutionize delivery of trauma healthcare to rural areas in an

  5. Emergency CT for assessment and management of blunt traumatic splenic injuries at a Level 1 Trauma Center: 13-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margari, Sergio; Garozzo Velloni, Fernanda; Tonolini, Massimo; Colombo, Ettore; Artioli, Diana; Allievi, Niccolò Ettore; Sammartano, Fabrizio; Chiara, Osvaldo; Vanzulli, Angelo

    2018-05-12

    To determine the relationship between multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings, management strategies, and ultimate clinical outcomes in patients with splenic injuries secondary to blunt trauma. This Institutional Review Board-approved study collected 351 consecutive patients admitted at the Emergency Department (ED) of a Level I Trauma Center with blunt splenic trauma between October 2002 and November 2015. Their MDCT studies were retrospectively and independently reviewed by two radiologists to grade splenic injuries according to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) organ injury scale (OIS) and to detect intraparenchymal (type A) or extraparenchymal (type B) active bleeding and/or contained vascular injuries (CVI). Clinical data, information on management, and outcome were retrieved from the hospital database. Statistical analysis relied on Student's t, chi-squared, and Cohen's kappa tests. Emergency multiphase MDCT was obtained in 263 hemodynamically stable patients. Interobserver agreement for both AAST grading of injuries and vascular lesions was excellent (k = 0.77). Operative management (OM) was performed in 160 patients (45.58% of the whole cohort), and high-grade (IV and V) OIS injuries and type B bleeding were statistically significant (p trauma event, without significant increase of mortality. Both intraparenchymal and extraparenchymal active bleeding were predictive of NOM failure (p splenic traumas and contributes to the shift toward NOM in hemodynamically stable patients.

  6. The effects of Hurricane Sandy on trauma center admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, T; Bogdanovski, D A; Hicks, A S; Bilaniuk, J W; Adams, J M; Siegel, B K; DiFazio, L T; Durling-Grover, R; Nemeth, Z H

    2018-02-01

    Hurricane Sandy was a particularly unusual storm with regard to both size and location of landfall. The storm landed in New Jersey, which is unusual for a tropical storm of such scale, and created hazardous conditions which caused injury to residents during the storm and in the months following. This study aims to describe differences in trauma center admissions and patterns of injury during this time period when compared to a period with no such storm. Data were collected for this study from patients who were admitted to the trauma center at Morristown Medical Center during Hurricane Sandy or the ensuing cleanup efforts (patients admitted between 29 October 2012 and 27 December 2012) as well as a control group consisting of all patients admitted to the trauma center between 29 October 2013 and 27 December 2013. Patient information was collected to compare the admissions of the trauma center during the period of the storm and cleanup to the control period. A total of 419 cases were identified in the storm and cleanup period. 427 were identified for the control. Striking injuries were more common in the storm and cleanup group by 266.7% (p = 0.0107); cuts were more common by 650.8% (p = 0.0044). Medical records indicate that many of these injuries were caused by Hurricane Sandy. Self-inflicted injuries were more common by 301.3% (p = 0.0294). There were no significant differences in the total number of patients, mortality, or injury severity score between the two cohorts. The data we have collected show that the conditions caused by Hurricane Sandy and the following cleanup had a significant effect on injury patterns, with more patients having been injured by being struck by falling or thrown objects, cut while using tools, or causing self-inflicted injuries. These changes, particularly during the cleanup period, are indicative of environmental changes following the storm which increase these risks of injury.

  7. Mountain biking injuries requiring trauma center admission: a 10-year regional trauma system experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter T W; Jangra, Dalbhir; Ritchie, Alec H; Lower, Mary Ellen; Kasic, Sharon; Brown, D Ross; Baldwin, Greg A; Simons, Richard K

    2006-02-01

    Mountain biking has become an increasingly popular recreational and competitive sport with increasingly recognized risks. The purpose of this study was to review a population based approach to serious injuries requiring trauma center admission related to mountain biking, identify trends and develop directions for related injury prevention programs. Three trauma centers in the Greater Vancouver area exclusively serve a major mountain bike park and the North Shore Mountains biking trails. The Trauma Registries and the patient charts were reviewed for mountain bike injuries from 1992 to 2002. The data were analyzed according to demographics, distribution, and severity of injuries, and need for operative intervention. Findings were reviewed with injury prevention experts and regional and national mountain-biking stakeholders to provide direction to injury prevention programs. A total of 1,037 patients were identified as having bicycling-related injuries. Of these, 399 patients sustained 1,092 injuries while mountain biking. There was a threefold increase in the incidence of mountain biking injuries over a 10-year period. Young males were most commonly affected. Orthopedic injuries were most common (46.5%) followed by head (12.2%), spine (12%), chest (10.3%), facial (10.2%), abdominal (5.4%), genitourinary (2.2%), and neck injuries (1%). High operative rate was observed: 38% of injuries and 66% of patients required surgery. One patient died from his injuries. Injury prevention programs were developed and successfully engaged the target population. Mountain biking is a growing cause of serious injuries. Young males are principally at risk and serious injuries result from intended activity and despite protective equipment. Injury prevention programs were developed to address these concerns.

  8. Interdisciplinary trauma room management: staff-related apparative and logistic concepts in three level trauma centers in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroetz, M.; Linsenmaier, U.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Reiser, M.; Bode, P.J.; Haeuser, H.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To analyse common and divergent features of staff-related, equipmental and spatial/logistical concepts of three large trauma centers of highest health care level.Methods. The health care mandate as well as the staff management, the organisational and the constructional-spacial structure of trauma room diagnostics and therapy of the trauma centers of the Universities of Leiden and Munich (Innenstadt) and the Zentralklinikum Augsburg are described. In particular the technical equipment and the process of the radiological diagnostic procedures in the trauma room are outlined.Results. Staff availability and basic technical equipment of the trauma rooms are comparable between the three hospitals. Divergent concepts exist concerning the complexity of the initial radiologic examination protocols. Spacial connection and importance of computed tomography are also discussed controversially. Urgent interventional procedures are increasingly performed within the trauma room. Magnetic-resonance-tomography does not play a role in early care from multiple injured patients.Conclusion. Trauma centers have to meet certain personnel and technical prerequisites to guarantee a temporally optimised care for multiple injured patients. Differences between the three centers concerning the logistic sequence and the radiologic examination techniques used are mainly due to variable emphasis put on CT in the initial phase of patient care. (orig.) [de

  9. The role of the trauma nurse leader in a pediatric trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Lee Ann; Coffey, Carla; Haley, Kathy; Covert, Julia

    2009-01-01

    The trauma nurse leader role was developed by a group of trauma surgeons, hospital administrators, and emergency department and trauma leaders at Nationwide Children's Hospital who recognized the need for the development of a core group of nurses who provided expert trauma care. The intent was to provide an experienced group of nurses who could identify and resolve issues in the trauma room. Through increased education, exposure, mentoring, and professional development, the trauma nurse leader role has become an essential part of the specialized pediatric trauma care provided at Nationwide Children's Hospital.

  10. Trauma team activation: Not just for trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phoenix Vuong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialized trauma teams have been shown to improve outcomes in critically injured patients. At our institution, an the American College of Surgeons Committee on trauma level I Trauma center, the trauma team activation (TTA criteria includes both physiologic and anatomic criteria, but any attending physician can activate the trauma team at their discretion outside criteria. As a result, the trauma team has been activated for noninjured patients meeting physiologic criteria secondary to nontraumatic hemorrhage. We present two cases in which the trauma team was activated for noninjured patients in hemorrhagic shock. The utilization of the TTA protocol and subsequent management by the trauma team are reviewed as we believe these were critical factors in the successful recovery of both patients. Beyond the primary improved survival outcomes of severely injured patients, trauma center designation has a “halo effect” that encompasses patients with nontraumatic hemorrhage.

  11. The epidemiological trends of head injury in the largest Canadian adult trauma center from 1986 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadotte, David W; Vachhrajani, Shobhan; Pirouzmand, Farhad

    2011-06-01

    This study documents the epidemiology of head injury over the course of 22 years in the largest Level I adult trauma center in Canada. This information defines the current state, changing pattern, and relative distribution of demographic factors in a defined group of trauma patients. It will aid in hypothesis generation to direct etiological research, administrative resource allocation, and preventative strategies. Data on all the trauma patients treated at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (SHSC) from 1986 to 2007 were collected in a consecutive, prospective fashion. The authors reviewed these data from the Sunnybrook Trauma Registry Database in a retrospective fashion. The aggregate data on head injury included demographic data, cause of injury, and Injury Severity Score (ISS). The collected data were analyzed using univariate techniques to depict the trend of variables over years. The authors used the length of stay (LOS) and number of deaths per year (case fatality rate) as crude measures of outcome. A total of 16,678 patients were treated through the Level I trauma center at SHSC from January 1986 to December 2007. Of these, 9315 patients met the inclusion criteria (ISS > 12, head Abbreviated Injury Scale score > 0). The median age of all trauma patients was 36 years, and 69.6% were male. The median ISS of the head-injury patients was 27. The median age of this group of patients increased by 12 years over the study period. Motorized vehicle accidents accounted for the greatest number of head injuries (60.3%) although the relative percentage decreased over the study period. The median transfer time of patients sustaining a head injury was 2.58 hours, and there was an approximately 45 minute improvement over the 22-year study period. The median LOS in our center decreased from 19 to 10 days over the study period. The average case fatality rate was 17.4% over the study period. In multivariate analysis, more severe injuries were associated with increased LOS as

  12. Utilization of tracheostomy in craniomaxillofacial trauma at a level-1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Eric P; Bagheri, Shahrokh; Bell, R Bryan; Bobek, Sam; Dierks, Eric J

    2007-10-01

    The decision to perform a tracheostomy on patients with maxillofacial trauma is complex. There is little data exploring the role of tracheostomy in facial fracture management. We sought to profile the utilization of tracheostomy in the context of maxillofacial trauma at our institution by comparing patients who required tracheostomy with and without facial fractures versus those with facial fractures not requiring tracheostomy. All patients admitted to the Trauma Service at Legacy Emanuel Hospital and Health Center (LEHHC), Portland, OR, from 1993 to 2003 that sustained facial fractures or underwent tracheostomy were identified and data were retrospectively reviewed using patient charts and the trauma registry. Variables such as age, gender, death, injury severity score (ISS), facial injury severity score (FISS), Glasgow coma score (GCS), intensive care days (ICU), hospital length of stay (LOS), facial fracture profile, and oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) operative intervention were tabulated and analyzed. Data were divided into 3 groups for comparison: group 1 (ffxT) consisted of patients who underwent a tracheostomy procedure and repair of their facial fracture during the SAME operation by the OMFS department (N = 125); group 2 (ffxNT) were those patients who had repair of their facial fractures by OMFS and did not require a tracheostomy (N = 224); and group 3 (NffxT) were patients who did not have facial fractures but received a tracheostomy during their hospitalization (N = 259). Ten-year data were used to analyze the ffxT and 5-year data were used to analyze the ffxNT and NffxT. Analysis of variance and chi2 testing was used for statistical analysis. A total of 18,187 patients were admitted to the trauma LEHHC Trauma Service during the study period, of which 1,079 (5.9%) patients sustained facial fractures and 788 (4.3%) required a tracheostomy. One hundred twenty-five patients (0.69% of total; 11.6% of facial fracture) received a tracheostomy at the

  13. Understanding the risk factors of trauma center closures: do financial pressure and community characteristics matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Chu; Hsia, Renee Y; Kuzma, Kristen

    2009-09-01

    We analyze whether hazard rates of shutting down trauma centers are higher due to financial pressures or in areas with vulnerable populations (such as minorities or the poor). This is a retrospective study of all hospitals with trauma center services in urban areas in the continental US between 1990 and 2005, identified from the American Hospital Association Annual Surveys. These data were linked with Medicare cost reports, and supplemented with other sources, including the Area Resource File. We analyze the hazard rates of trauma center closures among several dimensions of risk factors using discrete-time proportional hazard models. The number of trauma center closures increased from 1990 to 2005, with a total of 339 during this period. The hazard rate of closing trauma centers in hospitals with a negative profit margin is 1.38 times higher than those hospitals without the negative profit margin (P lower hazard of shutting down trauma centers (ratio: 0.58, P penetration face a higher hazard of trauma center closure (ratio: 2.06, P < 0.01). Finally, hospitals in areas with higher shares of minorities face a higher risk of trauma center closure (ratio: 1.69, P < 0.01). Medicaid load and uninsured populations, however, are not risk factors for higher rates of closure after we control for other financial and community characteristics. Our findings give an indication on how the current proposals to cut public spending could exacerbate the trauma closure particularly among areas with high shares of minorities. In addition, given the negative effect of health maintenance organizations on trauma center survival, the growth of Medicaid managed care population should be monitored. Finally, high shares of Medicaid or uninsurance by themselves are not independent risk factors for higher closure as long as financial pressures are mitigated. Targeted policy interventions and further research on the causes, are needed to address these systems-level disparities.

  14. A Statewide Collaboration: Ohio Level III Trauma Centers' Approach to the Development of a Benchmarking System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Carrie L; Simon, Diane; Kilgore, Jane

    The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma revised the Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient to include the criteria for trauma centers to participate in a risk-adjusted benchmarking system. Trauma Quality Improvement Program is currently the risk-adjusted benchmarking program sponsored by the American College of Surgeons, which will be required of all trauma centers to participate in early 2017. Prior to this, there were no risk-adjusted programs for Level III verified trauma centers. The Ohio Society of Trauma Nurse Leaders is a collaborative group made up of trauma program managers, coordinators, and other trauma leaders who meet 6 times a year. Within this group, a Level III Subcommittee was formed initially to provide a place for the Level III centers to discuss issues specific to the Level III centers. When the new requirement regarding risk-adjustment became official, the subcommittee agreed to begin reporting simple data points with the idea to risk adjust in the future.

  15. Measuring trauma center injury prevention activity: an assessment and reporting tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sise, Michael J; Sise, Carol Beth

    2006-02-01

    To develop an assessment and reporting tool for a trauma center's community partnership strategy to deliver injury prevention programs in a large metropolitan area. The tool was designed to track prevention activity and serve as a reporting format for the parent health system, county designating agency, and the American College of Surgeons' Trauma Center Verification Process. The tool collected data including trauma center paid and volunteer personnel time, equipment, resource, and financial costs, community group and public agency contributions, number of community members receiving prevention material or presentations, impact on public policy, and print and broadcast media coverage. These measurements were incorporated in a reporting grid format. Six youth injury prevention programs were evaluated over a recent 2-year interval to demonstrate the tool's usefulness. Of six programs, three focused on motor vehicle injuries, one on teen suicide, one on firearm injuries, and one on drug and alcohol abuse. Trauma Center personnel asset allocation included 3% full-time equivalent by the Trauma Medical Director, 30% by the Injury Prevention and Community Outreach Coordinator, and 473 person hours (both work and volunteer) by physicians, nurses, and other personnel. Trauma Center equipment and fixed asset expenses totaled $3,950 and monetary contribution totaled $4,430. Community groups and public agencies contributed 20,400 person hours with estimated in-kind costs exceeding $750,000. Five of the six programs continued during the 2-year period. A gun-lock giveaway program was suspended because of a product recall. A total of over 29,000 youth received prevention material and presentations. Four public policy initiatives and 18 Trauma Center media stories with over 50 mentions and 37 new community partnerships resulted. The reports generated were easily incorporated in the trauma center's reports to local and national organizations and agencies. This assessment tool

  16. Paediatric Blunt Liver Trauma in a Dutch Level 1 Trauma Center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nellensteijn, D.; Porte, R. J.; van Zuuren, W.; ten Duis, H. J.; Hulscher, J. B. F.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Paediatric blunt hepatic trauma treatment is changing from operative treatment (OT) to non-operative treatment (NOT). In 2000 the American Pediatric Surgical Association has published guidelines for NOT of these injuries. Little is known about the treatment of paediatric liver trauma

  17. Variation in treatment of blunt splenic injury in Dutch academic trauma centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, Dominique C.; Luitse, Jan S. K.; de Rooij, Philippe P.; Leenen, Loek P. H.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Bloemers, Frank W.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of splenectomy after trauma is institutionally dependent and varies from 18% to as much as 40%. This is important because variation in management influences splenic salvage. The aim of this study was to investigate whether differences exist between Dutch level 1 trauma centers with

  18. Cost Benefit Analysis of Providing Level II Trauma Care at William Beaumont Army Medical Center (WBAMC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerepka, Peter

    2002-01-01

    .... During the period from 1 October 2000 to 30 September 2001, WBAMC, a designated Level II trauma center by the American College of Surgeons, provided care for 410 patients of which 181 were civilian emergencies...

  19. Drug abuse in hospitalized trauma patients in a university trauma care center: an explorative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Soroush

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug abuse has been known as a growing contributing factor to all types of trauma in the world. The goal of this article is to provide insight into demographic and substance use factors associated with trauma and to determine the prevalence of drug abuse in trauma patients. Methods: Evidence of substance abuse was assessed in trauma patients presenting to Sina trauma hospital over a 3-month period. They were interviewed and provided urine samples to detect the presence of drug/metabolites of opium, morphine, cannabis and heroin by “Morphine Check” kits. Demographic data, mechanisms of injury, history of smoking and drug abuse were recorded. Results: A total of 358 patients with a mean age of 28.4 years were studied. The Patients were predominantly male (94.7%. There was a history of smoking in 136 cases (38%. 58 cases (16.2% reported to abuse drugs (91.5% opium. The commonest route of administration was smoke inhalation (37.2%. Screening by Morphine Check test revealed 95 samples to be positive (26.5%. The preponderance of test-positive cases was among young people (of 20-30 years of age with a history of smoking. Victims of violence and those with penetrating injuries also showed a higher percentage of positive screens (P=0.038 and P<0.001, respectively. Conclusion: These results suggest that drug abuse is a contributing factor to trauma especially in violent injuries and among the young. Regarding the considerable prevalence of drug abuse among trauma patients, it’s highly recommended that all trauma patients be screened for illicit drugs

  20. Role of ERCP in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma: a case series at a level one pediatric trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Erin M; Haakinson, Danielle J; McOmber, Mark; Notrica, David M

    2015-02-01

    There is no consensus regarding the appropriate use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in pediatric trauma. We report our experience with ERCP for management of pediatric pancreatic and biliary injury following blunt abdominal trauma. A retrospective chart review was performed for pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma from July 2008 through December 2012 at our pediatric trauma center. For patients who underwent ERCP, demographics, injury characteristics, diagnostic details, procedures performed, length of stay, total parenteral nutrition use, and complications were reviewed. There were 532 patients identified: 115 hepatic injuries, 25 pancreatic injuries and one gall bladder injury. Nine patients (mean age 7.8 years) underwent ERCP. Seven (78%) had pancreatic injuries, while two (22%) had bilateral hepatic duct injuries. The median time to diagnosis was one day (range, 0-12). Diagnostic ERCP only was performed in three patients, two of which proceeded to distal pancreatectomy. Five patients had stents placed (two biliary and three pancreatic) and four sphincterotomies were performed. Despite pancreatic stenting, one patient required distal pancreatectomy for persistent leak. Median length of stay was 11 days. Pediatric pancreatic and biliary ductal injuries following blunt abdominal trauma are uncommon. ERCP can safely provide definitive treatment for some patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Association Between Real-time Electronic Injury Surveillance Applications and Clinical Documentation and Data Acquisition in a South African Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargaran, Eiman; Spence, Richard; Adolph, Lauren; Nicol, Andrew; Schuurman, Nadine; Navsaria, Pradeep; Ramsey, Damon; Hameed, S Morad

    2018-03-14

    Collection and analysis of up-to-date and accurate injury surveillance data are a key step in the maturation of trauma systems. Trauma registries have proven to be difficult to establish in low- and middle-income countries owing to the burden of trauma volume, cost, and complexity. To determine whether an electronic trauma health record (eTHR) used by physicians can serve as simultaneous clinical documentation and data acquisition tools. This 2-part quality improvement study included (1) preimplementation and postimplementation eTHR study with assessments of satisfaction by 41 trauma physicians, time to completion, and quality of data collected comparing paper and electronic charting; and (2) prospective ecologic study describing the burden of trauma seen at a Level I trauma center, using real-time data collected by the eTHR on consecutive patients during a 12-month study period. The study was conducted from October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2011, at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. Data analysis was performed from October 15, 2011, to January 15, 2013. The primary outcome of part 1 was data field competition rates of pertinent trauma registry items obtained through electronic or paper documentation. The main measures of part 2 were to identify risk factors to trauma in Cape Town and quality indicators recommended for trauma system evaluation at Groote Schuur Hospital. The 41 physicians included in the study found the electronic patient documentation to be more efficient and preferable. A total of 11 612 trauma presentations were accurately documented and promptly analyzed. Fields relevant to injury surveillance in the eTHR (n = 11 612) had statistically significant higher completion rates compared with paper records (n = 9236) (for all comparisons, P Center (654 [9.0%]), and New Somerset Hospital (400 [5.5%]). Accurate capture and simultaneous analysis of trauma data in low-resource trauma settings are feasible through the integration

  2. Rehabilitation needs of persons discharged from an African trauma center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asare Christian

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available f these injuries and 14% were related to violence. Eleven subjects had disability measured using L.I.F.E and all were classified as having major disabilities. Only 14 patients (17% received any rehabilitation therapy which consisted of only physical therapy provided at a frequency of once a day for less than one week duration. CONCLUSION: This study found that most persons admitted to a sophisticated trauma unit in Ghana are discharged without adequate rehabilitation services, and that the level of disability experienced by these people can be measured, even while they are still sick and in the hospital, using L.I.F.E. The implications are clear: African trauma systems must measure the long term outcomes from their treatments and provide the inpatient medical rehabilitation services that are a standard of care for trauma victims elsewhere in the world.

  3. Ventilator-associated pneumonia rates at major trauma centers compared with a national benchmark: a multi-institutional study of the AAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michetti, Christopher P; Fakhry, Samir M; Ferguson, Pamela L; Cook, Alan; Moore, Forrest O; Gross, Ronald

    2012-05-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rates reported by the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) are used as a benchmark and quality measure, yet different rates are reported from many trauma centers. This multi-institutional study was undertaken to elucidate VAP rates at major trauma centers. VAP rate/1,000 ventilator days, diagnostic methods, institutional, and aggregate patient data were collected retrospectively from a convenience sample of trauma centers for 2008 and 2009 and analyzed with descriptive statistics. At 47 participating Level I and II centers, the pooled mean VAP rate was 17.2 versus 8.1 for NHSN (2006-2008). Hospitals' rates were highly variable (range, 1.8-57.6), with 72.3% being above NHSN's mean. Rates differed based on who determined the rate (trauma service, 27.5; infection control or quality or epidemiology, 11.9; or collaborative effort, 19.9) and the frequency with which VAP was excluded based on aspiration or diagnosis before hospital day 5. In 2008 and 2009, blunt trauma patients had higher VAP rates (17.3 and 17.6, respectively) than penetrating patients (11.0 and 10.9, respectively). More centers used a clinical diagnostic strategy (57%) than a bacteriologic strategy (43%). Patients with VAP had a mean Injury Severity Score of 28.7, mean Intensive Care Unit length of stay of 20.8 days, and a 12.2% mortality rate. 50.5% of VAP patients had a traumatic brain injury. VAP rates at major trauma centers are markedly higher than those reported by NHSN and vary significantly among centers. Available data are insufficient to set benchmarks, because it is questionable whether any one data set is truly representative of most trauma centers. Application of a single benchmark to all centers may be inappropriate, and reliable diagnostic and reporting standards are needed. Prospective analysis of a larger data set is warranted, with attention to injury severity, risk factors specific to trauma patients, diagnostic method used, VAP definitions

  4. Trauma Severity at Level 2 Trauma Center – Attainability of Retrospective Documentation on Severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebsgaard, Stine; Zwisler, Stine Thorhauge; Lauritsen, Jens M

    2015-01-01

    -MT patients were excluded, giving 221 adult MT cases for analysis. Forty-one patients (19%, CI: 14-24) had mAIS ≥ 3. Percentages varied with year from 0-29% with no up- or downwards trend throughout the decade. Proportion of mAIS ≥ 3 in the years before implementing the MECU in Svendborg was 17.1% (CI: 10...... month. Based on clinical record reviews and radiology findings, we decided if the patient was Multi Trauma (MT) defined as received by trauma response team and/or CT trauma scanned. Diagnoses were evaluated and maximum Abbreviated Injury Score (mAIS) was assigned dividing patients in severe injured...... with mAIS ≥ 3 and less injured with mAIS

  5. Blunt traumatic injury during pregnancy: a descriptive analysis from a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Menyar, Ayman; Sathian, Brijesh; Mekkodathil, Ahammed; Thomas, Sam; Mollazehi, Monira; Al-Sulaiti, Maryam; Abdelrahman, Husham

    2018-03-27

    The precise incidence of trauma in pregnancy is not well-known, but trauma is estimated to complicate nearly 1 in 12 pregnancies and it is the leading non-obstetrical cause of maternal death. A retrospective study of all pregnant women presented to national level 1 trauma center from July 2013 to June 2015 was conducted. Descriptive and inferential statistics applied for data analysis. Across the study period, a total of 95 pregnant women were presented to the trauma center. The average incidence rate of traumatic injuries was 250 per 1000 women of childbearing age presented to the Hamad Trauma Center. The mean age of patients was 30.4 ± SD 5.6 years, with age ranging from 20 to 42 years. The mean gestational age at the time of injury was 24.7 ± 8.7 weeks which ranged from 5 to 37 weeks. The majority (47.7%) was in the third trimester of the pregnancy. In addition, the large majority of injuries was due to MVCs (74.7%) followed by falls (15.8%). Trauma during pregnancy is not an uncommon event particularly in the traffic-related crashes. As it is a complex condition for trauma surgeons and obstetrician, an appropriate management protocol and multidisciplinary team are needed to improve the outcome and save lives of both the mother and fetus.

  6. Lessons from a large trauma center: impact of blunt chest trauma in polytrauma patients-still a relevant problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysou, Konstantina; Halat, Gabriel; Hoksch, Beatrix; Schmid, Ralph A; Kocher, Gregor J

    2017-04-20

    Thoracic trauma is the third most common cause of death after abdominal injury and head trauma in polytrauma patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate epidemiological data, treatment and outcome of polytrauma patients with blunt chest trauma in order to help improve management, prevent complications and decrease polytrauma patients' mortality. In this retrospective study we included all polytrauma patients with blunt chest trauma admitted to our tertiary care center emergency department for a 2-year period, from June 2012 until May 2014. Data collection included details of treatment and outcome. Patients with chest trauma and Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥18 and Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) >2 in more than one body region were included. A total of 110 polytrauma patients with blunt chest injury were evaluated. 82 of them were males and median age was 48.5 years. Car accidents, falls from a height and motorbike accidents were the most common causes (>75%) for blunt chest trauma. Rib fractures, pneumothorax and pulmonary contusion were the most common chest injuries. Most patients (64.5%) sustained a serious chest injury (AIS thorax 3), 19.1% a severe chest injury (AIS thorax 4) and 15.5% a moderate chest injury (AIS thorax 2). 90% of patients with blunt chest trauma were treated conservatively. Chest tube insertion was indicated in 54.5% of patients. The need for chest tube was significantly higher among the AIS thorax 4 group in comparison to the AIS groups 3 and 2 (p < 0.001). Also, admission to the ICU was directly related to the severity of the AIS thorax (p < 0.001). The severity of chest trauma did not correlate with ICU length of stay, intubation days, complications or mortality. Although 84.5% of patients suffered from serious or even severe chest injury, neither in the conservative nor in the surgically treated group a significant impact of injury severity on ICU stay, intubation days, complications or mortality was observed. AIS

  7. Imaging algorithms and CT protocols in trauma patients: survey of Swiss emergency centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinzpeter, R.; Alkadhi, Hatem; Boehm, T.; Boll, D.; Constantin, C.; Del Grande, F.; Fretz, V.; Leschka, S.; Ohletz, T.; Broennimann, M.; Schmidt, S.; Treumann, T.; Poletti, P.A.

    2017-01-01

    To identify imaging algorithms and indications, CT protocols, and radiation doses in polytrauma patients in Swiss trauma centres. An online survey with multiple choice questions and free-text responses was sent to authorized level-I trauma centres in Switzerland. All centres responded and indicated that they have internal standardized imaging algorithms for polytrauma patients. Nine of 12 centres (75 %) perform whole-body CT (WBCT) after focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) and conventional radiography; 3/12 (25 %) use WBCT for initial imaging. Indications for WBCT were similar across centres being based on trauma mechanisms, vital signs, and presence of multiple injuries. Seven of 12 centres (58 %) perform an arterial and venous phase of the abdomen in split-bolus technique. Six of 12 centres (50 %) use multiphase protocols of the head (n = 3) and abdomen (n = 4), whereas 6/12 (50 %) use single-phase protocols for WBCT. Arm position was on the patient's body during scanning (3/12, 25 %), alongside the body (2/12, 17 %), above the head (2/12, 17 %), or was changed during scanning (5/12, 42 %). Radiation doses showed large variations across centres ranging from 1268-3988 mGy*cm (DLP) per WBCT. Imaging algorithms in polytrauma patients are standardized within, but vary across Swiss trauma centres, similar to the individual WBCT protocols, resulting in large variations in associated radiation doses. (orig.)

  8. Imaging algorithms and CT protocols in trauma patients: survey of Swiss emergency centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinzpeter, R.; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Boehm, T. [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Department of Radiology, Chur (Switzerland); Boll, D. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Constantin, C. [Spital Wallis, Department of Radiology, Visp (Switzerland); Del Grande, F. [Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Department of Radiology, Lugano (Switzerland); Fretz, V. [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Winterthur (Switzerland); Leschka, S. [Kantonsspital St Gallen, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Gallen (Switzerland); Ohletz, T. [Kantonsspital Aarau, Department of Radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); Broennimann, M. [University Hospital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Schmidt, S. [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Treumann, T. [Luzerner Kantonsspital, Institute of Radiology, Luzern 16 (Switzerland); Poletti, P.A. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Geneve (Switzerland)

    2017-05-15

    To identify imaging algorithms and indications, CT protocols, and radiation doses in polytrauma patients in Swiss trauma centres. An online survey with multiple choice questions and free-text responses was sent to authorized level-I trauma centres in Switzerland. All centres responded and indicated that they have internal standardized imaging algorithms for polytrauma patients. Nine of 12 centres (75 %) perform whole-body CT (WBCT) after focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) and conventional radiography; 3/12 (25 %) use WBCT for initial imaging. Indications for WBCT were similar across centres being based on trauma mechanisms, vital signs, and presence of multiple injuries. Seven of 12 centres (58 %) perform an arterial and venous phase of the abdomen in split-bolus technique. Six of 12 centres (50 %) use multiphase protocols of the head (n = 3) and abdomen (n = 4), whereas 6/12 (50 %) use single-phase protocols for WBCT. Arm position was on the patient's body during scanning (3/12, 25 %), alongside the body (2/12, 17 %), above the head (2/12, 17 %), or was changed during scanning (5/12, 42 %). Radiation doses showed large variations across centres ranging from 1268-3988 mGy*cm (DLP) per WBCT. Imaging algorithms in polytrauma patients are standardized within, but vary across Swiss trauma centres, similar to the individual WBCT protocols, resulting in large variations in associated radiation doses. (orig.)

  9. Chronic Childhood Trauma, Mental Health, Academic Achievement, and School-Based Health Center Mental Health Services

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, S; Chapman, S; Spetz, J; Brindis, CD

    2017-01-01

    Children and adolescents exposed to chronic trauma have a greater risk for mental health disorders and school failure. Children and adolescents of minority racial/ethnic groups and those living in poverty are at greater risk of exposure to trauma and less likely to have access to mental health services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) may be one strategy to decrease health disparities.Empirical studies between 2003 and 2013 of US pediatric populations and of US SBHCs were included if rese...

  10. Comparison of outcomes in severely injured patients between a South Korean trauma center and matched patients treated in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyoungwon; Matsumoto, Shokei; Smith, Alan; Hwang, Kyungjin; Lee, John Cook-Jong; Coimbra, Raul

    2018-06-05

    The South Korean government recently developed a master plan for establishing a national trauma system based on the implementation of regional trauma centers. We aimed to compare outcomes between severely injured patients treated at a recently established South Korean trauma center and matched patients treated in American level-1 trauma centers. Two cohorts were selected from an institutional trauma database at Ajou University Medical Center (AUMC) and the American National Trauma Data Bank. Adult patients with an Injury Severity Score of ≥9 were included. Patients were matched based on covariates that affect mortality, using 1:1 propensity score matching. We compared outcomes between the two datasets and performed survival analyses. We created 1,451 and 2,103 matched pairs for the pre-trauma center and post-trauma center periods, respectively. The in-hospital mortality rate was higher in the institutional trauma database pre-trauma center period compared with the American National Trauma Data Bank (11.6% versus 8.1%, P<.001). However, the mortality rate decreased in the institutional trauma database post-trauma center period and was similar to that in the American National Trauma Data Bank (6.9% versus 6.8%, P=.903). Being treated at Ajou University Medical Center Trauma Center was significantly associated with higher mortality during the pre-trauma center period (OR: 1.842, 95% CI: 1.336-2.540; P<.001), although no significant association was observed during the post-trauma center period (OR: 1.102, 95% CI: 0.827-1.468; P=.509). The mortality rate improved after a trauma center was established in a South Korean hospital and is similar to that from matched cases treated at American level-1 trauma centers. Thus, creating trauma centers and a regional trauma system may improve outcomes in major trauma cases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Outcome differences in adolescent blunt severe polytrauma patients managed at pediatric versus adult trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Amelia T; Gross, Brian W; Cook, Alan D; Rinehart, Cole D; Lynch, Caitlin A; Bradburn, Eric H; Heinle, Colin C; Jammula, Shreya; Rogers, Frederick B

    2017-12-01

    Previous research suggests adolescent trauma patients can be managed equally effectively at pediatric and adult trauma centers. We sought to determine whether this association would be upheld for adolescent severe polytrauma patients. We hypothesized that no difference in adjusted outcomes would be observed between pediatric trauma centers (PTCs) and adult trauma centers (ATCs) for this population. All severely injured adolescent (aged 12-17 years) polytrauma patients were extracted from the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcomes Study database from 2003 to 2015. Polytrauma was defined as an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score ≥3 for two or more AIS-defined body regions. Dead on arrival, transfer, and penetrating trauma patients were excluded from analysis. ATC were defined as adult-only centers, whereas standalone pediatric hospitals and adult centers with pediatric affiliation were considered PTC. Multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression models assessed the adjusted impact of center type on mortality and total complications while controlling for age, shock index, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale motor score, trauma center level, case volume, and injury year. A generalized linear mixed model characterized functional status at discharge (FSD) while controlling for the same variables. A total of 1,606 patients met inclusion criteria (PTC: 868 [54.1%]; ATC: 738 [45.9%]), 139 (8.66%) of which died in-hospital. No significant difference in mortality (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.10, 95% CI 0.54-2.24; p = 0.794; area under the receiver operating characteristic: 0.89) was observed between designations in adjusted analysis; however, FSD (AOR: 0.38, 95% CI 0.15-0.97; p = 0.043) was found to be lower and total complication trends higher (AOR: 1.78, 95% CI 0.98-3.32; p = 0.058) at PTC for adolescent polytrauma patients. Contrary to existing literature on adolescent trauma patients, our results suggest patients aged 12-17 presenting with polytrauma may experience

  12. National Trauma Institute: A National Coordinating Center for Trauma Research Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Study (Version 5) that is posted on YouTube : https://youtu.be/54-Z6fiJpPY This video contains study design, procedures, inclusion/exclusion criteria...Doucet J et al. “Protocol Video USA-IVC Study (Version 5)” posted on YouTube : https://youtu.be/54-Z6fiJpPY This video contains study design...IH. Testosterone: the culprit for producing splenocyte immune depression after trauma hem- orrhage. Am J Physiol. 1998;274(6 Pt 1):C1530Y1536. 6

  13. Primary repair for pediatric colonic injury: Are there differences among adult and pediatric trauma centers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad; Jehan, Faisal; O'Keeffe, Terence; Pandit, Viraj; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Tang, Andrew; Gries, Lynn; Joseph, Bellal

    2017-12-01

    Management of colonic injuries (colostomy [CO] versus primary anastomosis [PA]) among pediatric patients remains controversial. The aim of this study was to assess outcomes in pediatric trauma patient with colonic injury undergoing operative intervention. The National Trauma Data Bank (2011-2012) was queried including patients with isolated colonic injury undergoing exploratory laparotomy with PA or CO with age ≤18 y. Missing value analysis was performed. Patients were stratified into two groups: PA and CO. Outcome measures were mortality, in-hospital complications, and hospital length of stay. Multivariate regression analysis was performed. A total of 1151 patients included. Mean ± standard deviation age was 11.61 ± 2.8 y, and median [IQR] Injury Severity Score was 12 [8-16]; 39% (n = 449) of the patients had CO, and 35.6% (n = 410) were managed in pediatric trauma centers (PC). Patients with CO had a higher Injury Severity Score (P trauma centers (AC). Moreover, there was no difference in mortality between the AC and the PC (P = 0.79). Our data demonstrate no difference in mortality in pediatric trauma patients with colonic injury who undergo primary repair or CO. However, adult trauma centers had lower rates of CO performed as compared to a similar cohort of patients managed in pediatric trauma centers. Further assessment of the reasons underlying such differences will help improve patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Saint Louis Center for Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills: A Collaborative Air Force-Civilian Trauma Skills Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jason W. Grimm , Karen Johnson 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 5 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Jason Grimm a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U 19b... Grimm Karen Johns For correspo Vista at Gra J Emerg Nu 0099-1767 Published b http://dx.do ■ ■ • ■SAINT LOUIS CENTER FOR SUSTAINMENT OF TRAUMA AND

  15. The implications of alcohol intoxication and the Uniform Policy Provision Law on trauma centers; a national trauma data bank analysis of minimally injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Terence; Shafi, Shahid; Sperry, Jason L; Gentilello, Larry M

    2009-02-01

    Alcohol intoxication may confound the initial assessment of trauma patients, resulting in increased use of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, thereby increasing hospital costs. The Uniform Policy Provision Law (UPPL) exists in many states and allows insurance companies to deny payment for medical treatment for alcohol-related injuries. If intoxication increases resource utilization, these denials compound the financial burden of alcohol use on trauma centers. We hypothesized that patients injured while under the influence of alcohol require more diagnostic tests, procedures, and hospital admissions, leading to higher hospital charges. The National Trauma Databank (2000-2004) was analyzed to identify adult trauma patients (age > or = 16 years) who were discharged alive, had a length of stay laws that penalize trauma centers for identifying intoxicated patients should be repealed in states where they exist.

  16. The epidemiological profile of candidemia at an Indian trauma care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhor Tak

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Candidemia is a significant cause of mortality in trauma patients in our center, with C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis being the predominant pathogens. Resistance to antifungal drugs is a matter of concern. Better hospital infection control practices and good antibiotic stewardship policies could possibly help in reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with candidemia.

  17. Injury patterns of child abuse: Experience of two Level 1 pediatric trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yangyang R; DeMello, Annalyn S; Greeley, Christopher S; Cox, Charles S; Naik-Mathuria, Bindi J; Wesson, David E

    2018-05-01

    This study examines non-accidental trauma (NAT) fatalities as a percentage of all injury fatalities and identifies injury patterns in NAT admissions to two level 1 pediatric trauma centers. We reviewed all children (<5years old) treated for NAT from 2011 to 2015. Patient demographics, injury sites, and survival were obtained from both institutional trauma registries. Of 4623 trauma admissions, 557 (12%) were due to NAT. However, 43 (46%) of 93 overall trauma fatalities were due to NAT. Head injuries were the most common injuries sustained (60%) and led to the greatest increased risk of death (RR 5.1, 95% CI 2.0-12.7). Less common injuries that increased the risk of death were facial injuries (14%, RR 2.9, 95% CI 1.6-5.3), abdominal injuries (8%, RR 2.8, 95% CI 1.4-5.6), and spinal injuries (3%, RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.8-8.8). Although 76% of head injuries occurred in infants <1year, children ages 1-4years old with head injuries had a significantly higher case fatality rate (27% vs. 6%, p<0.001). Child abuse accounts for a large proportion of trauma fatalities in children under 5years of age. Intracranial injuries are common in child abuse and increase the risk of death substantially. Preventing NAT in infants and young children should be a public health priority. Retrospective Review. II. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Variation in treatment of blunt splenic injury in Dutch academic trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthof, Dominique C; Luitse, Jan S K; de Rooij, Philippe P; Leenen, Loek P H; Wendt, Klaus W; Bloemers, Frank W; Goslings, J Carel

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of splenectomy after trauma is institutionally dependent and varies from 18% to as much as 40%. This is important because variation in management influences splenic salvage. The aim of this study was to investigate whether differences exist between Dutch level 1 trauma centers with respect to the treatment of these injuries, and if variation in treatment was related to splenic salvage, spleen-related reinterventions, and mortality. Consecutive adult patients who were admitted between January 2009 and December 2012 to five academic level 1 trauma centers were identified. Multinomial logistic regression was used to measure the influence of hospital on treatment strategy, controlling for hemodynamic instability on admission, high grade (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma 3-5) splenic injury, and injury severity score. Binary logistic regression was used to quantify differences among hospitals in splenic salvage rate. A total of 253 patients were included: 149 (59%) were observed, 57 (23%) were treated with splenic artery embolization and 47 (19%) were operated. The observation rate was comparable in all hospitals. Splenic artery embolization and surgery rates varied from 9%-32% and 8%-28%, respectively. After adjustment, the odds of operative management were significantly higher in one hospital compared with the reference hospital (adjusted odds ratio 4.98 [1.02-24.44]). The odds of splenic salvage were significantly lower in another hospital compared with the reference hospital (adjusted odds ratio 0.20 [0.03-1.32]). Although observation rates were comparable among the academic trauma centers, embolization and surgery rates varied. A nearly 5-fold increase in the odds of operative management was observed in one hospital, and another hospital had significantly lower odds of splenic salvage. The development of a national guideline is recommended to minimalize splenectomy after trauma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    trauma and on most vascular injuries. South Africa is one of the few .... scan of the brain and abdomen showed a sliver of left subdural and subarachnoid .... and especially on RT. In the event of a life-threatening condition, the rapid response ...

  20. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... However, the physical and financial resources to manage this massive burden of disease are inadequate. This is especially the case in terms of access to critical care facilities. The development of an electronic trauma registry at our institution has allowed us to capture data in real time on all patients and.

  1. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... unit in Durban, and to correlate it with injury severity, length of hospital stay ... and via a password protected mobile application program within 6 ..... usage and costs performed in larger numbers on major trauma patients will ...

  2. Link for Injured Kids: A Patient-Centered Program of Psychological First Aid After Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Marizen; Toussaint, Maisha; Woods-Jaeger, Briana; Harland, Karisa; Wetjen, Kristel; Wilgenbusch, Tammy; Pitcher, Graeme; Jennissen, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Injury, the most common type of pediatric trauma, can lead to a number of adverse psychosocial outcomes, including posttraumatic stress disorder. Currently, few evidence-based parent programs exist to support children hospitalized after a traumatic injury. Using methods in evaluation and intervention research, we completed a formative research study to develop a new program of psychological first aid, Link for Injured Kids, aimed to educate parents in supporting their children after a severe traumatic injury. Using qualitative methods, we held focus groups with parents and pediatric trauma providers of children hospitalized at a Level I Children's Hospital because of an injury in 2012. We asked focus group participants to describe reactions to trauma and review drafts of our intervention materials. Health professionals and caregivers reported a broad spectrum of emotional responses by their children or patients; however, difficulties were experienced during recovery at home and upon returning to school. All parents and health professionals recommended that interventions be offered to parents either in the emergency department or close to discharge among admissions. Results from this study strongly indicate a need for posttrauma interventions, particularly in rural settings, to support families of children to address the psychosocial outcomes in the aftermath of an injury. Findings presented here describe the process of intervention development that responds to the needs of an affected population.

  3. Barriers to implementing the World Health Organization's Trauma Care Checklist: A Canadian single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Brodie; Zakirova, Rimma; Bridge, Jennifer; Nathens, Avery B

    2014-11-01

    Management of trauma patients is difficult because of their complexity and acuity. In an effort to improve patient care and reduce morbidity and mortality, the World Health Organization developed a trauma care checklist. Local stakeholder input led to a modified 16-item version that was subsequently piloted. Our study highlights the barriers and challenges associated with implementing this checklist at our hospital. The checklist was piloted over a 6-month period at St. Michael's Hospital, a Level 1 trauma center in Toronto, Canada. At the end of the pilot phase, individual, semistructured interviews were held with trauma team leaders and nursing staff regarding their experiences with the checklist. Axial coding was used to create a typology of attitudes and barriers toward the checklist, and then, vertical coding was used to further explore each identified barrier. Checklist compliance was assessed for the first 7 months. Checklist compliance throughout the pilot phase was 78%. Eight key barriers to implementing the checklist were identified as follows: perceived lack of time for the use of the checklist in critically ill patients, unclear roles, no memory trigger, no one to enforce completion, not understanding its importance or purpose, difficulty finding physicians at the end of resuscitation, staff/trainee changes, and professional hierarchy. The World Health Organization Trauma Care Checklist was a well-received tool; however, consideration of barriers to the implementation and staff adoption must be done for successful integration, with special attention to its use in critically ill patients. Therapeutic/care management, level V.

  4. The effectiveness of a specialized trauma course in the knowledge base and level of job satisfaction in emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kate; Swinyer, Michelle; Bard, Michael; Sparrow, Vicki; Deegan, Jennifer; Small, Karen; Janssen, Robert; Bailey, Brian; Toschlog, Eric; Sagraves, Scott; Goettler, Claudia; Rotondo, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the level of job satisfaction of the emergency department nurses that care for trauma patients. The hospital is a Level I trauma center and tertiary care center that provides multiple services to more than 1.2 million people in 29 counties. The Trauma Service and the Emergency Department (ED) must define and maintain the same expectations. The level of job satisfaction of the emergency department nurses will define the success of safe and effective patient care in a Level I Trauma Center.

  5. Accuracy of Perceived Estimated Travel Time by EMS to a Trauma Center in San Bernardino County, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Neeki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mobilization of trauma resources has the potential to cause ripple effects throughout hospital operations. One major factor affecting efficient utilization of trauma resources is a discrepancy between the prehospital estimated time of arrival (ETA as communicated by emergency medical services (EMS personnel and their actual time of arrival (TOA. The current study aimed to assess the accuracy of the perceived prehospital estimated arrival time by EMS personnel in comparison to their actual arrival time at a Level II trauma center in San Bernardino County, California. Methods: This retrospective study included traumas classified as alerts or activations that were transported to Arrowhead Regional Medical Center in 2013. We obtained estimated arrival time and actual arrival time for each transport from the Surgery Department Trauma Registry. The difference between the median of ETA and actual TOA by EMS crews to the trauma center was calculated for these transports. Additional variables assessed included time of day and month during which the transport took place. Results: A total of 2,454 patients classified as traumas were identified in the Surgery Department Trauma Registry. After exclusion of trauma consults, walk-ins, handoffs between agencies, downgraded traumas, traumas missing information, and traumas transported by agencies other than American Medical Response, Ontario Fire, Rialto Fire or San Bernardino County Fire, we included a final sample size of 555 alert and activation classified traumas in the final analysis. When combining all transports by the included EMS agencies, the median of the ETA was 10 minutes and the median of the actual TOA was 22 minutes (median of difference=9 minutes, p<0.0001. Furthermore, when comparing the difference between trauma alerts and activations, trauma activations demonstrated an equal or larger difference in the median of the estimated and actual time of arrival (p<0.0001. We also found

  6. Four years prospective study of the maxillofacial trauma at a tertiary center in Western Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Khadka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was conducted to find the epidemiological characteristics of maxillofacial trauma in the Western region of Nepal. Materials and Methods: All the trauma patients attending the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial surgery in 4 years period at a tertiary center in Western Nepal were included in the study. The incidence, prevalence, age and sex distribution, etiologies and types as well as seasonal and daily variation of maxillofacial trauma were studied. Results: Maxillofacial trauma with male (71.55% predominance was seen. Road traffic accidents (RTA, 46.5% were the most common cause, and 41.65% of fracture cases due to RTA were under the influence of alcohol. Accidents were more common on the rural roads (38.9%, and majorities (43.3% were due to motorcycle accidents. They were more common on Friday (36.7% and in winter seasons (51.2%. The mandible fractures (65.85% were more common than midface fractures (53.58% and 19.44% of the fractures were combined fractures. Parasymphysis in mandible (32.16% and zygoma (39.09% in midface were the most common type of fracture. Conclusion: The increased incidence of maxillofacial trauma following RTA under the influence of alcohol noted in this study reveals the need for formulating preventive measures in the Western region of Nepal. Need to aware people to avoid drink and drive proper traffic management, prevention of carrying excessive passengers, especially on the rooftop of vehicles on the highway and disposal of out of date vehicles and timely maintenance of faulty roads is a must.

  7. Morbidity associated with golf-related injuries among children: findings from a pediatric trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Melissa A; Mertz, Kristen J; Gaines, Barbara; Zuckerbraun, Noel S

    2011-01-01

    To describe injuries due to golf-related activities among pediatric patients requiring hospital admission. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all sports-related injuries from 2000 to 2006 using a level 1 trauma center database. Of 1005 children admitted with sports-related injuries, 60 (6%) had golf-related injuries. The mean injury severity score was significantly higher for golf-related injuries (11.0) than that for all other sports-related injuries (6.8). Most golf-related injuries occurred in children younger than 12 years (80%), at home (48%), and by a strike from a club (57%) and resulted in trauma to the head or neck (68%). Golf-related injuries, although an infrequent cause of sports-related injuries, have the potential to result in severe injuries, especially in younger children. Preventive efforts should target use of golf clubs by younger children in the home setting.

  8. Epidemiology of livestock-related injuries in a major trauma center in Kashan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadzadeh Mahdi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Livestock-related injuries are one of the important factors causing morbidity and mor-tality in patients admitted to hospital. Treatment of these patients is still a major problem in health care system. The aim of current study was to assess the epidemiology of livestock-related injuries in a major trauma center in Iran from 2006 to 2011. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with live-stock-related injuries who were consecutively admitted to the trauma center in Kashan, Iran between 2006 and 2011 were evaluated. The data collected included patient’s demographics, place and nature of accident, damaged organ, educational level, transport and outcome. Data were ex-pressed as mean±standard deviation. Results: A total of 129 patients were included in this study, accounting for 0.3% of all trauma admission (40 273 cases. The mean age was (55.27±14.45 years. Men were affected four times more than women. Falling down from livestock is the main mechanism of trauma in all groups. Upper and lower extremities were most frequently injured (n=72, followed by the head, neck and spine (n=33 for each. There was one death resulting from livestock-related injury in this study. Conclusion: Despite the low incidence, livestock-re-lated injuries can damage major organs of human body and therefore appropriate training program to increase the safety awareness in home and outdoor is very important. Key words: Epidemiology; Livestock; Iran; Wounds and injuries

  9. The impact of short prehospital times on trauma center performance benchmarking: An ecologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, James P; Mann, N Clay; Hoeft, Christopher J; Buick, Jason; Karanicolas, Paul; Rizoli, Sandro; Hunt, John P; Nathens, Avery B

    2016-04-01

    Emergency medical service (EMS) prehospital times vary between regions, yet the impact of local prehospital times on trauma center (TC) performance is unknown. To inform external benchmarking efforts, we explored the impact of EMS prehospital times on the risk-adjusted rate of emergency department (ED) death and overall hospital mortality at urban TCs across the United States. We used a novel ecologic study design, linking EMS data from the National EMS Information System to TCs participating in the American College of Surgeons' Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) by destination zip code. This approach provided EMS times for populations of injured patients transported to TQIP centers. We defined the exposure of interest as the 90th percentile total prehospital time (PHT) for each TC. TCs were then stratified by PHT quartile. Analyses were limited to adult patients with severe blunt or penetrating trauma, transported directly by land to urban TQIP centers. Random-intercept multilevel modeling was used to evaluate the risk-adjusted relationship between PHT quartile and the outcomes of ED death and overall hospital mortality. During the study period, 119,740 patients met inclusion criteria at 113 TCs. ED death occurred in 1% of patients, and overall mortality was 7.2%. Across all centers, the median PHT was 61 minutes (interquartile range, 53-71 minutes). After risk adjustment, TCs in regions with the shortest quartile of PHTs (<53 minutes) had significantly greater odds of ED death compared with those with the longest PHTs (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-2.78). However, there was no association between PHT and overall TC mortality. At urban TCs, local EMS prehospital times are a significant predictor of ED death. However, no relationship exists between prehospital time and overall TC risk-adjusted mortality. Therefore, there is no evidence for the inclusion of EMS prehospital time in external benchmarking analyses.

  10. The impact of specialist trauma service on major trauma mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ting Hway; Lumsdaine, William; Hardy, Benjamin M; Lee, Keegan; Balogh, Zsolt J

    2013-03-01

    Trauma services throughout the world have had positive effects on trauma-related mortality. Australian trauma services are generally more consultative in nature rather than the North American model of full trauma admission service. We hypothesized that the introduction of a consultative specialist trauma service in a Level I Australian trauma center would reduce mortality of the severely injured. A 10-year retrospective study (January 1, 2002-December 31, 2011) was performed on all trauma patients admitted with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15. Patients were identified from the trauma registry, and data for age, sex, mechanism of injury, ISS, survival to discharge, and length of stay were collected. Mortality was examined for patients with severe injury (ISS > 15) and patients with critical injury (ISS > 24) and compared for the three periods: 2002-2004 (without trauma specialist), 2005-2007 (with trauma specialist), and 2008-2011 (with specialist trauma service). A total of 3,869 severely injured (ISS > 15) trauma patients were identified during the 10-year period. Of these, 2,826 (73%) were male, 1,513 (39%) were critically injured (ISS > 24), and more than 97% (3,754) were the victim of blunt trauma. Overall mortality decreased from 12.4% to 9.3% (relative risk, 0.75) from period one to period three and from 25.4% to 20.3% (relative risk, 0.80) for patients with critical injury. A 0.46% per year decrease (p = 0.018) in mortality was detected (odds ratio, 0.63; p 24), the trend was (0.61% per year; odds ratio, 0.68; p = 0.039). The introduction of a specialist trauma service decreased the mortality of patients with severe injury, the model of care should be considered to implement state- and nationwide in Australia. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  11. The first 5 years since trauma center designation in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Gilberto Ka Kit; Chang, Annice; Cheung, F C; Ho, H F; Ho, Wendy; Hui, S M; Kam, C W; Lai, Albert; Lam, K W; Leung, M; Liu, S H; Lo, C B; Mok, Francis; Rainer, Timothy H; Shen, W Y; So, F L; Wong, Gordon; Wu, Amy; Yeung, Janice; Yuen, W K

    2011-05-01

    In 1994, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) introduced plans to implement a trauma system based on the recommendations outlined by Professor Donald Trunkey in his report to the local Hospital Authority. Five government-subsidized public hospitals were subsequently designated as trauma centers in 2003. This article reviews the initial experience in these five centers. Prospective trauma registries from January 2004 to December 2008 were reviewed. Primary clinical outcome measures were hospital mortality. The Trauma and Injury Severity Score methodology was used for benchmarking with the Major Trauma Outcome Study (MTOS) database. The majority (83.3%) of the 10,462 patients suffered from blunt trauma. Severe injury, defined as Injury Severity Score>15, occurred in 29.7% of patients. The leading causes of trauma were motor vehicle collisions and falls, with crude hospital mortality rates of 6.9% and 10.7%, respectively. The M-statistic was 0.95, indicating comparable case-mix with the MTOS. The worst outcome occurred in the first year. Significant improvement was seen in patients with penetrating injuries. By 2008, these patients had significantly higher survival rates than expected (Z-statistic=0.85). Although the overall mortality rates for blunt trauma were higher than expected, the difference was no longer statistically significant from the second year onward. The case-mix of trauma patients in the HKSAR is comparable with that of the MTOS. A young trauma system relatively unburdened by dissimilar reimbursement and patient access issues may achieve significant improvement and satisfactory patient outcomes. Our findings may serve as a useful benchmark for HK and other Southeast Asian cities and trauma systems to establish local coefficients for future evaluations.

  12. Is case triaging a useful tool for emergency surgeries? A review of 106 trauma surgery cases at a level 1 trauma center in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sharfuddin; Nicol, Andrew John; Moydien, Mahammed Riyaad; Navsaria, Pradeep Harkison; Montoya-Pelaez, Luis Felipe

    2018-01-01

    The optimal timing for emergency surgical interventions and implementation of protocols for trauma surgery is insufficient in the literature. The Groote Schuur emergency surgery triage (GSEST) system, based on Cape Triaging Score (CTS), is followed at Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH) for triaging emergency surgical cases including trauma cases. The study aimed to look at the effect of delay in surgery after scheduling based on the GSEST system has an impact on outcome in terms of postoperative complications and death. Prospective audit of patients presenting to GSH trauma center following penetrating or blunt chest, abdominal, neck and peripheral vascular trauma who underwent surgery over a 4-month period was performed. Post-operative complications were graded according to Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications. One-hundred six patients underwent surgery during the study period. One-hundred two (96.2%) cases were related to penetrating trauma. Stab wounds comprised 71 (67%) and gunshot wounds (GSW) 31 (29.2%) cases. Of the 106 cases, 6, 47, 40, and 13 patients were booked as red, orange, yellow, and green, respectively. The median delay for green, yellow, and orange cases was within the expected time. The red patients took unexpectedly longer (median delay 48 min, IQR 35-60 min). Thirty-one (29.3%) patients developed postoperative complications. Among the booked red, orange, yellow, and green cases, postoperative complications developed in 3, 18, 9, and 1 cases, respectively. Only two (1.9%) postoperative deaths were documented during the study period. There was no statistically significant association between operative triage and post-operative complications ( p  = 0.074). Surgical case categorization has been shown to be useful in prioritizing emergency trauma surgical cases in a resource constraint high-volume trauma center.

  13. A patient education tool for nonoperative management of blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, Julie Marie

    2007-01-01

    Blunt trauma is the primary mechanism of injury seen at Charleston Area Medical Center, a rural level I trauma center. Blunt abdominal trauma occurs as a result of various mechanisms. It can be safely managed nonoperatively and is considered to be the standard of care in hemodynamically stable patients. Appropriate patient education before discharge will enable patients to identify complications early and seek appropriate medical care.

  14. An unusual case of foreign body pulmonary embolus: case report and review of penetrating trauma at a pediatric trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomer, Laura A; Watkins, Daniel J; O'Donovan, Julie; Kenney, Brian D; Yates, Andrew R; Besner, Gail E

    2015-03-01

    Penetrating thoracic trauma is relatively rare in the pediatric population. Embolization of foreign bodies from penetrating trauma is very uncommon. We present a case of a 6-year-old boy with a penetrating foreign body from a projectile dislodged from a lawn mower. Imaging demonstrated a foreign body that embolized to the left pulmonary artery, which was successfully treated non-operatively. We reviewed the penetrating thoracic trauma patients in the trauma registry at our institution between 1/1/03 and 12/31/12. Data collected included demographic data, procedures performed, complications and outcome. Sixty-five patients were identified with a diagnosis of penetrating thoracic trauma. Fourteen of the patients had low velocity penetrating trauma and 51 had high velocity injuries. Patients with high velocity injuries were more likely to be older and less likely to be Caucasian. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with low vs. high velocity injuries regarding severity scores or length of stay. There were no statistically significant differences in procedures required between patients with low and high velocity injuries. Penetrating thoracic trauma is rare in children. The case presented here represents the only report of cardiac foreign body embolus we could identify in a pediatric patient.

  15. Incongruence between trauma center social workers' beliefs about substance use interventions and intentions to intervene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Dana; Hawk, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This study explored trauma centers social workers' beliefs regarding four evidence-based interventions for patients presenting with substance abuse issues. Previous research has indicated that health care providers' beliefs have prevented them from implementing non-abstinence based interventions. Study results indicated that the majority of social workers believed in the 12-step approach and were least comfortable with the harm reduction approach. However, results showed that in some cases, social workers may have negative personal beliefs regarding non-abstinence based interventions, but do not let their personal beliefs get in the way of utilizing these interventions if they are viewed as appropriate for the client's situation.

  16. Management of pediatric blunt splenic injury at a rural trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Julio J; Patel, Nirav Y; Mathiason, Michelle A; Schroeppel, Thomas J; D'huyvetter, Cecile J; Cogbill, Thomas H

    2012-10-01

    Patterns for nonoperative management of pediatric blunt splenic injuries (BSIs) vary significantly within and between institutions. The indications for repeated imaging, duration of activity restrictions, as well as the impact of volume and type of trauma center (pediatric vs. adult) on outcomes remain unclear. A retrospective review of all patients younger than 16 years with BSI managed at a rural American College of Surgeons-verified adult Level II trauma center from January 1995 to December 2008 was completed. Patients were identified from the trauma registry by DRG International Classification of Diseases-9th Rev. (865.00-865.09) and management codes (41.5, 41.43, and 41.95). Variables reviewed included demographics, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score, grade of splenic injury, degree of hemoperitoneum, presence of arterial phase contrast blush on computed tomography at admission, admission and nadir hemoglobin level, blood transfused, length of stay, disposition, outpatient clinical and radiographic follow-up, interval of return to unrestricted activity, and clinical outcomes. During the 13-year study period, 38 children with BSI were identified. Thirty-seven (97%) were successfully managed nonoperatively. Median grade of splenic injury was 3 (range, 1-5); 73% had moderate-to-large hemoperitoneum. Median Injury Severity Score was 10 (range, 4-34). Three patients with isolated contrast blush on initial computed tomography were successfully managed nonoperatively with no angiographic intervention. One patient failed nonoperative management and underwent successful splenorrhaphy. All patients were discharged home. Thirty-day mortality was zero. Median follow-up duration was 5.5 years, with no late complications identified. Of the patients successfully managed nonoperatively, 92% had their follow-up at our institution; 74% underwent subsequent imaging, and none resulted in intervention or alteration of management plan. Pediatric BSI can be managed in adult

  17. The epidemiological profile of candidemia at an Indian trauma care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Vibhor; Mathur, Purva; Varghese, Prince; Gunjiyal, Jacinta; Xess, Immaculata; Misra, Mahesh C

    2014-07-01

    Candida spp. is a common cause of bloodstream infections. Candidemia is a potentially fatal infection that needs urgent intervention to salvage the patients. Trauma patients are relatively young individuals with very few comorbidities, and the epidemiology of candidemia is relatively unknown in this vulnerable and growing population. In this study, we report the epidemiology of candidemia in a tertiary care Trauma Center of India. The study was conducted from January 2009 to July 2012. All patients from whose blood samples a Candida spp. was recovered were included in this study. A detailed history and follow up of the patients was done. The isolates of Candida were identified to the species level. The speciation was done by conventional methods, including morphology on Corn Meal Agar, color development on Triphenyl Tetrazolium Chloride Agar and CHROMagar, and germ tube tests. The VITEK 2 YST ID colorometric card, a fully automated identification system was also used. Antifungal susceptibility was performed using the VITEK 2 system. A total of 212 isolates of the Candida species were recovered from blood samples of 157 patients over the study period. Candida tropicalis, 82 (39%), was the most common, followed by C. parapsilosis, 43 (20%), C. albicans, 29 (14%), C. glabrata, 24 (11%), C. rugosa, 20 (9%), C. hemulonii,; 6 (3%), C. guilliermondii, 4 (2%), C. famata, 3 (1.5%), and C. lusitaniae 1 (0.5%). Out of all the candidemia patients, 68 (43%) had a fatal outcome. Fluconazole and Amphotericin B resistance was seen in seven (3.3%) and seven (3.3%) of the isolates, respectively. Candidemia is a significant cause of mortality in trauma patients in our center, with C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis being the predominant pathogens. Resistance to antifungal drugs is a matter of concern. Better hospital infection control practices and good antibiotic stewardship policies could possibly help in reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with candidemia.

  18. The effect of perceived person-job fit on employee attitudes toward change in trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatzick, Christopher D; Zatzick, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Employee attitudes toward change are critical for health care organizations implementing new procedures and practices. When employees are more positive about the change, they are likely to behave in ways that support the change, whereas when employees are negative about the change, they will resist the changes. This study examined how perceived person-job (demands-abilities) fit influences attitudes toward change after an externally mandated change. Specifically, we propose that perceived person-job fit moderates the negative relationship between individual job impact and attitudes toward change. We examined this issue in a sample of Level 1 trauma centers facing a regulatory mandate to develop an alcohol screening and brief intervention program. A survey of 200 providers within 20 trauma centers assessed perceived person-job fit, individual job impact, and attitudes toward change approximately 1 year after the mandate was enacted. Providers who perceived a better fit between their abilities and the new job demands were more positive about the change. Further, the impact of the alcohol screening and brief intervention program on attitudes toward change was mitigated by perceived fit, where the relationship between job impact and change attitudes was more negative for providers who perceived a worse fit as compared with those who perceived a better fit. Successful implementation of changes to work processes and procedures requires provider support of the change. Management can enhance this support by improving perceived person-job fit through ongoing training sessions that enhance providers' abilities to implement the new procedures.

  19. Blunt hepatic and splenic trauma. A single Center experience using a multidisciplinary protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscelli, Paolo; Buccoliero, Farncesco; Mazzocato, Susanna; Belfiori, Giulio; Rabuini, Claudio; Sperti, Pierluigi; Rimini, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to describe more than 10 years experience of a single Trauma Center about non operative management of abdominal organ injuries in hemodynamically stable patients MATERIAL OF STUDY: Between January 2001 and December 2014 ,732 consecutive patients were admitted with blunt abdominal trauma, involving liver and/or spleen and/or kidney, at the Bufalini Cesena Hospital .Management of patients included a specific institutional developed protocol :hemodynamic stability was evaluated in shock room according to the patients response to fluid challenge and the patients were classified into three categories A,B,and C. Form 732 Trauma, 356(48.6%) of patients were submitted to a surgical procedure, all the other patient 376(51.4%) underwent an non operative management .Overall mortality was 9.8% (72), mortality in the surgery group was 15.4% eheras in the non operative group was 4.5%; the relative risk of mortality, measured by the odds ratio waith a 95% confidence interval, was 3.417(2.023-5.772) for rhe surgery group; patient over 40 years old has a statistically significant higher mortality. In our series the overall mortality rate of non operative management group was 4.5%, instead in unstable patients, the surgery group, the mortality was 15.3%; the overall mortality mortality rate after the application of our protocol is 9.8%, Although surgery continues to be the standard for hemodically unstable patients with blunt hepatic and splenic trauma. In our experience AAST Organ Injury Scale was useless for the therapeutic decision making process after the CT scan if a source of bleeding was detected and immediate angiography was performed in order to control and solve it. In our experience the AAST Organ Injury Scale was useless for the therapeutic decision making process, The results suggest that the only criteria of choice for therapeutici strategy was the hemodynamic stability, Nonoperative managem,ent can be applied only following

  20. Length of stay and medical stability for spinal cord-injured patients on admission to an inpatient rehabilitation hospital: a comparison between a model SCI trauma center and non-SCI trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploumis, A; Kolli, S; Patrick, M; Owens, M; Beris, A; Marino, R J

    2011-03-01

    Retrospective database review. To compare lengths of stay (LOS), pressure ulcers and readmissions to the acute care hospital of patients admitted to the inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) from a model spinal cord injury (SCI) trauma center or from a non-SCI acute hospital. Only sparse data exist comparing the status of patients admitted to IRF from a model SCI trauma center or from a non-SCI acute hospital. Acute care, IRF and total LOS were compared between patients transferred to IRF from the SCI center (n=78) and from non-SCI centers (n=131). The percentages of pressure ulcers on admission to IRF and transfer back to acute care were also compared. Patients admitted to IRF from the SCI trauma center (SCI TC) had significantly shorter (P=0.01) acute care LOS and total LOS compared with patients admitted from non-SCI TCs. By neurological category, acute-care LOS was less for all groups admitted from the SCI center, but statistically significant only for tetraplegia. There was no significant difference in the incidence of readmissions to acute care from IRF. More patients from non-SCI centers (34%) than SCI centers (12%) had pressure ulcers (PSCI TCs before transfer to IRF can significantly lower acute-care LOS or total LOS and incidence of pressure ulcers compared with non-SCI TCs. Patients admitted to IRF from SCI TCs are no more likely to be sent back to an acute hospital than those from non-SCI TCs.

  1. Emergence of delayed posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms related to sexual trauma: patient-centered and trauma-cognizant management by physical therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Kim; Kubo Slowik, Amy

    2012-02-01

    Sexual violence has been identified as one of the most common predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This case report describes the emergence of delayed PTSD symptoms, disclosure of history of sexual trauma, and the influence of re-experiencing, avoidance, and hyperarousal symptoms on physical therapy treatment. A 60-year-old woman was seen for treatment of low back pain. of a discord between fear of falling and no balance impairments led to disclosure of sexual assault by a physician at 19 years of age. The patient's PTSD symptoms emerged after 10 weeks of physical therapy. The physical therapists monitored somatic responses and body language closely and modified and planned treatment techniques to avoid PTSD triggers and limit hyperarousal. Collaborative communication approaches included reinforcement of cognitive-behavioral strategies introduced by her psychotherapists. Trauma-cognizant approaches supported the patient's efforts to manage PTSD symptoms sufficiently to tolerate physical therapy and participate in a back care class. Nonlinear psychological healing is illustrated. Symptoms of PTSD may emerge during physical therapy treatment, and patient-sensitive responses to disclosure are important. The trauma-cognizant approach (2-way communication, patient-centered management, and integration of psychological elements into clinical decision making) helped identify and respond to triggers. The physical therapists reinforced cognitive-behavioral strategies introduced by psychotherapists to manage PTSD symptoms. Patient-centered care with further refinement to a trauma-cognizant approach may play an important role in assisting patients with PTSD or a history of sexual trauma to manage symptoms while addressing rehabilitation needs.

  2. Value of diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy for patients with blunt abdominal trauma: A 10-year medical center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Heng-Fu; Chen, Ying-Da; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2018-01-01

    Laparoscopy has been used for the diagnosis and treatment for hemodynamically stable patients with penetrating abdominal trauma. This study evaluated whether diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy can be used as effectively in select patients with blunt abdominal trauma. All hemodynamically stable patients undergoing operations for blunt abdominal trauma over a 10-year period (2006-2015) at a tertiary medical center were included. Patients undergoing laparotomy were categorized as group A. Patients who underwent laparoscopy were categorized as group B. The clinical outcomes of the 2 groups were compared. There were 139 patients in group A and 126 patients in group B. Group A patients were more severely injured (mean injury severity score of 23.3 vs. 18.9, P .05). Laparoscopy is a feasible and safe tool for the diagnosis and treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma who require surgery.

  3. Using Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS)-based analysis in the development of regional risk adjustment tools to trend quality in a voluntary trauma system: the experience of the Trauma Foundation of Northeast Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, C; Barnoski, A; Tinnell, C; Fallon, W

    2000-04-01

    Presently, no trauma system exists in Ohio. Since 1993, all hospitals in Cuyahoga County (CUY), northeast Ohio (n = 22) provide data to a trauma registry. In return, each received hospital-specific data, comparison data by trauma care level and a county-wide aggregate summary. This report describes the results of this approach in our region. All cases were entered by paper abstract or electronic download. Interrater reliability audits and z score analysis was performed by using the Major Trauma Outcome Study and the CUY 1994 baseline groups. Risk adjustment of mortality data was performed using statistical modeling and logistic regression (Trauma and Injury Severity Score, Major Trauma Outcome Study, CUY). Trauma severity measures were defined. In 1995, 3,375 patients were entered. Two hundred ninety-one died (8.6%). Severity measures differed by level of trauma care, indicating differences in case mix. Probability of survival was lowest in the Level I centers, highest in the acute care hospitals. Outcomes z scores demonstrated survival differences for all levels. In a functioning trauma system, the most severely injured patients should be cared for at the trauma centers. A low volume at acute care hospitals is desirable. By using Trauma and Injury Severity Score with community-specific constants, NE Ohio is accomplishing these goals. The Level I performance data are an interesting finding compared with the data from the Level II centers in the region

  4. Clinical characteristics of dental emergencies and prevalence of dental trauma at a university hospital emergency center in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kyun; Choi, Yong-Hoon

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinical characteristics of dental emergency patients who visited a university hospital emergency center and to evaluate the incidence of dental trauma. A retrospective chart review of patients with dental complaints and who visited the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH) emergency center in Gyeonggi-do, Korea, from January 2009 to December 2009 was conducted. Information regarding age, gender, the time, day, and month of presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and follow up was collected and analyzed. One thousand four hundred twenty-five patients with dental problems visited the SNUBH emergency center. Dental patients accounted for 1.47% of the total 96,708 patients at the emergency center. The male-to-female ratio was 1.68:1, with a considerably larger number of male patients (62.7%). The age distribution peak was at 0-9 years (27.5%), followed by patients in their forties (14.1%). The number of patients visiting the dental emergency center peaked in May (14.2%), on Sundays (22.4%), and between 2100 and 2400 h (20.8%). The patients' chief complaints were as follows: dental trauma, dental infection, oral bleeding, and temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). The prevalence of dental trauma was 66%. The reasons for dental emergency visits included the following: dental trauma, dental infection, oral bleeding, and TMD, with 66% of the patients requiring management of dental trauma. It is important that dentists make a prompt, accurate diagnosis and initiate effective treatment in case of dental emergencies, especially dental trauma. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Geriatric Trauma Patients With Cervical Spine Fractures due to Ground Level Fall: Five Years Experience in a Level One Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Coppola, Marco; Robinson, Richard D; Scribner, James T; Vithalani, Veer; de Moor, Carrie E; Gandhi, Raj R; Burton, Mandy; Delaney, Kathleen A

    2013-04-01

    It has been found that significantly different clinical outcomes occur in trauma patients with different mechanisms of injury. Ground level falls (GLF) are usually considered "minor trauma" with less injury occurred in general. However, it is not uncommon that geriatric trauma patients sustain cervical spine (C-spine) fractures with other associated injuries due to GLF or less. The aim of this study is to determine the injury patterns and the roles of clinical risk factors in these geriatric trauma patients. Data were reviewed from the institutional trauma registry of our local level 1 trauma center. All patients had sustained C-spine fracture(s). Basic clinical characteristics, the distribution of C-spine fracture(s), and mechanism of injury in geriatric patients (65 years or older) were compared with those less than 65 years old. Furthermore, different clinical variables including age, gender, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), blood alcohol level, and co-existing injuries were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression in geriatric trauma patients due to GLF and internally validated by random bootstrapping technique. From 2006 - 2010, a total of 12,805 trauma patients were included in trauma registry, of which 726 (5.67%) had sustained C-spine fracture(s). Among all C-spine fracture patients, 19.15% (139/726) were geriatric patients. Of these geriatric patients 27.34% (38/139) and 53.96% (75/139) had C1 and C2 fractures compared with 13.63% (80/587) and 21.98% (129/587) in young trauma patients (P geriatric trauma patients 13.67% (19/139) and 18.71% (26/139) had C6 and C7 fractures compared with 32.03% (188/587) and 41.40% (243/587) in younger ones separately (P geriatric patients had sustained C-spine fractures due to GLF with more upper C-spine fractures (C1 and C2). Only 3.2% of those had positive blood alcohol levels compared with 52.9% of younger patients (P geriatric patients due to GLF had intracranial pathology (ICP) which was one of the most common co

  6. Effect of the Uniform Accident and Sickness Policy Provision Law on alcohol screening and intervention in trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilello, Larry M; Donato, Anthony; Nolan, Susan; Mackin, Robert E; Liebich, Franesa; Hoyt, David B; LaBrie, Richard A

    2005-09-01

    Alcohol screening and intervention in trauma centers are widely recommended. The Uniform Accident and Sickness Policy Provision Law (UPPL) exists in most states, and allows insurers to refuse payment for treatment of injuries in patients with a positive alcohol or drug test. This article analyzed the UPPL's impact on screening and reimbursement, measured the knowledge of legislators about substance use problems in trauma centers, and determined their opinions about substance use-related exclusions in insurance contracts for trauma care. A nationwide survey of members of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma was conducted. A separate survey of legislators who are members of the Senate, House, or Assembly and serve in some leadership role on committees responsible for insurance in their state was also performed. Ninety-eight trauma surgeon and 56 legislator questionnaires were analyzed. Surgeons' familiarity with the UPPL was limited; only 13% believed they practiced in a UPPL state, but 70% actually did. Despite lack of knowledge of the statute, 24% reported an alcohol- or drug-related insurance denial in the past 6 months. This appeared to affect screening practices; the majority of surgeons (51.5%) do not routinely measure blood alcohol concentration, even though over 91% believe blood alcohol concentration testing is important. Most (82%) indicated that if there were no insurance barriers, they would be willing to establish a brief alcohol intervention program in their center. Legislators were aware of the impact of substance use on trauma centers. They overwhelmingly agreed (89%) that alcohol problems are treatable, and 80% believed it is a good idea to offer counseling in trauma centers. As with surgeons, the majority (53%) were not sure whether the UPPL existed in their state, but they favored prohibiting alcohol-related exclusions by a 2:1 ratio, with strong bipartisan support. The study documents strong support for screening and intervention

  7. Retrospective Review of Air Transportation Use for Upper Extremity Amputations at a Level-1 Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, W Jeffrey; To, Philip; Watson, Jeffry T; Brywczynski, Jeremy; Lee, Donald H

    2016-08-01

    Air transportation to tertiary care centers of patients with upper extremity amputations has been utilized in hopes of reducing the time to potential replantation; however, this mode of transportation is expensive and not all patients will undergo replantation. The purpose of this study is to review the appropriateness and cost of air transportation in upper extremity amputations. Consecutive patients transported by aircraft with upper extremity amputations in a 7-year period at a level-1 trauma center were retrospectively reviewed. The distance traveled was recorded, along with the times of the injury, referral, transportation duration, arrival, and start of the operation. The results of the transfer were defined as replantation or revision amputation. Overall, 47 patients were identified with 43 patients going to the operating room, but only 14 patients (30%) undergoing replantation. Patients arrived at the tertiary hand surgery center with a mean time of 182.3 minutes following the injury, which includes 105.2 minutes of transportation time. The average distance traveled was 105.4 miles (range, 22-353 miles). The time before surgery of those who underwent replantation was 154.6 minutes. The average cost of transportation was $20,482. Air transportation for isolated upper extremity amputations is costly and is not usually the determining factor for replantation. The type of injury and patients' expectations often dictate the outcome, and these may be better determined at the time of referral with use of telecommunication photos, discussion with a hand surgeon, and patient counseling. III.

  8. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) reduce costs in the management of isolated splenic injuries at pediatric trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Ivan M; Zurakowski, David; Chen, Qiaoli; Mooney, David P

    2013-02-01

    The American Pediatric Surgical Association Trauma Committee proposed the use of a clinical practice guideline (CPG) for the non-operative management of isolated splenic injuries in 1998. An analysis was conducted to determine the financial impact of CPGs on the management of these injuries. The Pediatric Health Information System database, which contains data from 44 children's hospitals, was used to identify children who sustained a graded isolated splenic injury between June 2005 and June 2010. Demographics, length of stay (LOS), readmission rates, and laboratory, imaging, procedural, and total cost data were determined for all hospitals verified as a pediatric trauma center by the American College of Surgeons and/or designated by their local authority. Comparisons were made between facilities self-identifying as having a splenic injury management CPG and those without a CPG. Children (1,154) with isolated splenic injuries (grades 1-4) were cared for in 26 pediatric trauma centers: 20 with a CPG and 6 without (non-CPG). Median costs were significantly lower at CPG than non-CPG centers for imaging (US $163 vs. US $641, P splenic injuries at a pediatric trauma center results in significantly reduced imaging, laboratory, and total hospital costs independent of patient age, gender, grade, and LOS.

  9. Evaluation of effectiveness of sojourn in a health center of miners with cardiovascular pathology and residual manifestation of craniocerebral trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydova, N.N.; Nirenburg, K.G.; Kokorina, N.P.; Dyatlova, L.A.; Anikin, B.S.; Pokhlenko, V.B.; Belyaeva, N.G. (Meditsinskii Institut, Kemerovo (USSR))

    1989-02-01

    Evaluates effectiveness of the sojourn in a health center using standard methods of treatment and diet therapy of underground miners of the Kuzbass with early forms of arterial hypertension and manifestations of craniocerebral trauma. Miners were divided into three groups: (1) with hypertension; (2) with neuro-circulatory dystonia; and (3) with craniocerebral trauma. During 24 days at health center, groups 1 and 2 received sedatives, hypertensive medicines and physiotherapy, group 3 biostimulators and dehydrogenating preparations. Changes in conditions of patients were observed. Using the mathematical approach of Markov chains and the method of discrimination of samples to evaluate changes in arterial pressure, stroke volume of blood, pulse, latent period of visual-motor reactions, stability of understanding, and other tests of physiologic status of miners before and after treatment, investigators concluded that a stay in a health center is effective for miners suffering from cardiovascular pathology and mild cerebrocranil trauma under 40 years of age and with an underground work period of less than 10 years. For underground miners suffering cardiovascular pathology and cerebral trauma over 40 years of age and more than 10 years working underground, treatment in a health center at least twice a year is necessary. 5 refs.

  10. Epidemiological and occupational profile of eye trauma at a referral center in Espírito Santo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquele Milanez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To draw an epidemiological and occupational profile of eye trauma at a Brazilian referral center, make comparisons with the literature and provide subsidies for the adoption of adequate prevention and enforcement measures. Methods: Descriptive and prospective epidemiological study using a standardized questionnaire to collect data from 60 patients presenting with eye trauma at an ophthalmology service (HUCAM between 1 april 2013 and 1 october 2013. Results: The male gender was predominant (80%. Ages ranged from 8 to 60 years. Most accidents (56.7% occurred in the workplace, followed by the home (28.3%. Most injuries were closed, predominantly contusions, followed by foreign body on the external eye. Importantly, 82.9% of the victims of work-related trauma wore no eye protection at the time of the accident. Conclusions: Eye trauma in the workplace and elsewhere is an important problem of public health as it affects primarily the economically active population and may have serious consequences. A considerable proportion of eye trauma is easily avoidable by using personal protective equipment. To minimize the incidence of eye trauma, more attention should be given to instruction in and enforcement of the use of such equipment, supported by frequent prevention campaigns.

  11. Technical and financial feasibility of an inferior vena cava filter retrieval program at a level one trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Leake, Samuel S; Sola, Cristina N; Sandhu, Harleen K; Albarado, Rondel; Holcomb, John B; Miller, Charles C; Safi, Hazim J; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Considering new guidelines for retrievable inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs), we examine our initial experience after establishing a comprehensive filter removal program in our level 1 trauma center. We evaluated the technical and financial feasibility of this program and barriers to IVCF retrieval, including insurance status and costs, in trauma patients. Trauma patients receiving IVCFs from May 2011 to 2013 were consented and prospectively enrolled in the study program. Retrieval rates were assessed for the years before study initiation. Primary outcome was IVCF retrieval. Hospital financial data for retrieval were examined and univariate analysis performed. Hospital cost-to-charge and payment-to-charge ratios were assessed. Before study initiation from April 2009 to 2011, 66 IVCFs were placed in trauma patients with only 2 retrievals in 2 years. During the study period, 247 trauma patients had IVCF placement of which 111 (45%) were enrolled. The main reason for nonenrollment was lack of referral by the implanting team. Retrieval was attempted in 100 outpatients with success in 85 (85%). Patients enrolled in the program were more likely to have their filters removed (73% vs. 18%; odds ratio, 12.6; 95% confidence interval, 6.6-24.3; P financially feasible without loss to the health care system even in regions with high rates of uninsured. A major barrier to successful filter retrieval was lack of patient referral into the program by implanting physicians. Hospital administration and physician outreach are important determinants of successful IVCF retrieval in trauma patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Injuries sustained during contact with law enforcement: An analysis from US trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Morgan; Inaba, Kenji; Cho, Jayun; Tatum, James M; Barmparas, Galinos; Strumwasser, Aaron; Grabo, Daniel; Bir, Cynthia; Eastman, Alexander; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2017-12-01

    Injuries sustained by civilians from interaction with police are a polarizing contemporary sociopolitical issue. Few comprehensive studies have been published using national hospital-based data. The aim of this study was to examine the epidemiology of these injuries to better understand this mechanism of injury. Patients entered into the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) (January 2007 to December 2012) with E-codes E970.0 to E976.0 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification), identifying injuries associated with law enforcement in the course of legal action, were enrolled. Patients' demographics, injury characteristics, procedures, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. Patients injured by other civilians (E960.0-E968.0) were used for comparison. Of 4,146,428 patients in the NTDB, 7,203 (0.17%) were injured during interaction with police. The numbers of patients in consecutive study years were 858, 1,103, 1,148, 1,274, 1,316, and 1,504. The incidence of these injuries was stable over time (0.17-0.18%) (p = 0.129). Patients had a median age of 31 years (range, 0-108), and 94.3% were male. Median injury severity score was 9 (interquartile range [IQR], 4-17). The most common mechanism of injury was gunshot wound (44%).Patients were white, 43%; black, 30%; Hispanic, 17%; Asian, 1%; and Other, 9%. As a proportion of the total race-specific NTDB trauma population, there was an average of 1.13 white patients, 2.71 Hispanic patients, and 3.83 black patients per 1,000. Mechanism, injury severity score, and outcomes did not vary by race. Compared to patients injured by civilians, patients injured by police are more likely to be white (43% vs 25%, p < 0.001) and injured by gunshot wounds (44% vs 32%, p < 0.001). Based on data from trauma centers across the United States, the rate of injuries sustained during interactions with police has been stable over time. Gunshot wounds are the most common mechanism of injury. Proportionally, black

  13. The Clinical and Economic Impact of Generic Locking Plate Utilization at a Level II Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcphillamy, Austin; Gurnea, Taylor P; Moody, Alastair E; Kurnik, Christopher G; Lu, Minggen

    2016-12-01

    In today's climate of cost containment and fiscal responsibility, generic implant alternatives represent an interesting area of untapped resources. As patents have expired on many commonly used trauma implants, generic alternatives have recently become available from a variety of sources. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical and economic impact of a cost containment program using high quality, generic orthopaedic locking plates. The implants available for study were anatomically precontoured plates for the clavicle, proximal humerus, distal radius, proximal tibia, distal tibia, and distal fibula. Retrospective review. Level II Trauma center. 828 adult patients with operatively managed clavicle, proximal humerus, distal radius, proximal tibia, tibial pilon, and ankle fractures. Operative treatment with conventional or generic implants. The 414 patients treated with generic implants were compared with 414 patients treated with conventional implants. There were no significant differences in age, sex, presence of diabetes, smoking history or fracture type between the generic and conventional groups. No difference in operative time, estimated blood loss or intraoperative complication rate was observed. No increase in postoperative infection rate, hardware failure, hardware loosening, malunion, nonunion or need for hardware removal was noted. Overall, our hospital realized a 56% reduction in implant costs, an average savings of $1197 per case, and a total savings of $458,080 for the study period. Use of generic orthopaedic implants has been successful at our institution, providing equivalent clinical outcomes while significantly reducing implant expenditures. Based on our data, the use of generic implants has the potential to markedly reduce operative costs as long as quality products are used. Therapeutic Level III.

  14. Trauma centers with higher rates of angiography have a lesser incidence of splenectomy in the management of blunt splenic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capecci, Louis M; Jeremitsky, Elan; Smith, R Stephen; Philp, Frances

    2015-10-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) for blunt splenic injury (BSI) is well-established. Angiography (ANGIO) has been shown to improve success rates with NOM. Protocols for NOM are not standardized and vary widely between centers. We hypothesized that trauma centers that performed ANGIO at a greater rate would demonstrate decreased rates of splenectomy compared with trauma centers that used ANGIO less frequently. A large, multicenter, statewide database (Pennsylvania Trauma Systems Foundation) from 2007 to 2011 was used to generate the study cohort of patients with BSI (age ≥ 13). The cohort was divided into 2 populations based on admission to centers with high (≥13%) or low (Splenectomy rates were then compared between the 2 groups, and multivariable logistic regression for predictors of splenectomy (failed NOM) were also performed. The overall rate of splenectomy in the entire cohort was 21.0% (1,120 of 5,333 BSI patients). The high ANGIO group had a lesser rate of splenectoy compared with the low ANGIO group (19% vs 24%; P splenectomy compared with low ANGIO centers (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% CI 0.58-0.80; P splenectomy rates compared with centers with lesser rate of ANGIO. Inclusion of angiographic protocols for NOM of BSI should be considered strongly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. General surgery residents improve efficiency but not outcome of trauma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Patrick J; Hawkes, Allison; Madayag, Robert; Seale, Fred; Maines, Charles

    2003-07-01

    Current American College of Surgeons Level I trauma center verification requires the presence of a residency program in which trauma care is an integral part of the training. The rationale for this requirement remains unclear, with no scientific evidence that resident participation improves the quality of trauma care. The purpose of this study was to determine whether quality or efficiency of trauma care is influenced by general surgery residents. Our urban Level I trauma center has traditionally used 24-hour in-house postgraduate year-4 general surgery residents in conjunction with at-home trauma attending backup to provide trauma care. As of July 1, 2000, general surgery residents no longer participated in trauma patient care, leaving sole responsibility to an in-house trauma attending. Data regarding patient outcome and resource use with and without surgery resident participation were tabulated and analyzed. Continuous data were compared using Student's t test if normally distributed and the Mann-Whitney U test if nonparametric. Categorical data were compared using chi2 analysis or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. During the 5-month period with resident participation, 555 trauma patients were admitted. In the identical time period without residents, 516 trauma patients were admitted. During the period without housestaff, patients were older and more severely injured. Mechanism was not different during the two time periods. Mortality was not affected; however, time in the emergency department and hospital lengths of stay were significantly shorter with residents. Multiple regression confirmed these findings while controlling for age, mechanism, and Injury Severity Score. Although resident participation in trauma care at a Level I trauma center does not affect outcome, it does significantly improve the efficiency of trauma care delivery.

  16. Patient Perceptions of the Use of Medical Marijuana in the Treatment of Pain After Musculoskeletal Trauma: A Survey of Patients at 2 Trauma Centers in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Marilyn; McTague, Michael F; Lucas, Robert C; Harris, Mitchel B; Vrahas, Mark S; Weaver, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate musculoskeletal trauma patients' beliefs regarding the usefulness of marijuana as a valid medical treatment for postinjury and postoperative pain and anxiety. Prospective survey. Two academic Level 1 trauma centers. Five hundred patients in an orthopedic outpatient clinic. Survey. (1) Do patients believe that marijuana can be used as medicine? (2) Do patients believe that marijuana can help treat postinjury pain? (3) Are patients comfortable speaking with their health care providers about medical marijuana? The majority of patients felt that marijuana could be used to treat pain (78%, 390) and anxiety (62%, 309). Most patients (60%, 302) had used marijuana at least once previously, whereas only 14% reported using marijuana after their injury. Of those who used marijuana during their recovery, 90% (63/70) believed that it reduced symptoms of pain, and 81% (57/70) believed that it reduced the amount of opioid pain medication they used. The majority of patients in this study believed that medical marijuana is a valid treatment and that it does have a role in reducing postinjury and postoperative pain. Those patients who used marijuana during their recovery felt that it alleviated symptoms of pain and reduced their opioid intake. Our results help inform clinicians regarding the perceptions of patients with trauma regarding the usefulness of marijuana in treating pain and support further study into the utility of medical marijuana in this population.

  17. Firework injuries at a major trauma and burn center: A five-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Zhao, Ran; Du, Wei-Li; Ning, Fang-Gang; Zhang, Guo-An

    2014-03-01

    In China, fireworks are an integral part of the celebration of the annual Spring Festival, but the number of injuries associated with their private use seen in emergency rooms increases dramatically. To raise awareness and help guide future prevention practices in this city, we investigated the epidemiology of firework-related injuries presented at our trauma and burn center in Beijing during the Spring Festivals of 2007-2011. Patients were interviewed using a pre-coded questionnaire to elicit information regarding age, gender, causes, injured body part, type of injury, diagnosis, and disposition. From 2007 to 2011, during the Spring Festivals 734 patients with fire-work related injuries were seen at our trauma and burn center in Beijing, the median patients of the five year were 140(136-150). The mean age of the patients was 26±15.3 years (range, 1-95 years). Of the 734 patients, the highest proportion of injuries were the 5-14 year-old age group The majority of the patients were male (87.9%), the overall male:female ratio was 7.41:1, and males were predominant in all age groups. For all 5 years, the incidence of firework-related injuries during the Spring Festival Holidays peaked specifically on the first, fifth, and last days, respectively. Injuries were mainly due to improper handling (415/610, 68.0%) or setting off illegal fireworks (195/610, 32.0%). The most frequently injured body parts were the hands and fingers (32.0%), head or face except eyes (28.3%), and trunk (22.4%). Burns were the most common type of injury (65.7%), most of the burned patients (437/453) were between 1% and 10%, and the most common region burned were hands and fingers (218/754). Contusions or lacerations were the second common type of injury (34.3%). Most of the patients (642, 87.5%) were treated and released, while 37 (5%) were treated and transferred, and 55 (7.5%) were admitted for advanced treatment. The private use of fireworks during the Spring Festival Holidays is associated

  18. A trauma network with centralized and local health care structures: Evaluating the effectiveness of the first certified Trauma Network of the German Society of Trauma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstberger, Antonio; Koller, Michael; Zeman, Florian; Kerschbaum, Maximilian; Hilber, Franz; Diepold, Eva; Loss, Julika; Herbst, Tanja; Nerlich, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Trauma is a global burden of disease and one of the main causes of death worldwide. Therefore, many countries around the world have implemented a wide range of different initiatives to minimize mortality rates after trauma. One of these initiatives is the bundling of treatment expertise in trauma centers and the establishment of trauma networks. Germany has a decentralized system of trauma care medical centers. Severely injured patients ought to receive adequate treatment in both level I and level II centers. This study investigated the effectiveness of a decentralized network and the question whether level I and level II centers have comparable patient outcome. In 2009, the first trauma network DGU® in Germany was certified in the rural area of Eastern Bavaria. All patients admitted to the 25 participating hospitals were prospectively included in this network in the framework of a study sponsored by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research between March 2012 and February 2014. 2 hospitals were level I centers (maximal care centers), 8 hospitals were level II centers, and 15 hospitals were level III centers. The criterion for study inclusion was an injury severity score (ISS) ≥ 16 for patients´ primarily admitted to a level I or a level II center. Exclusion criteria were transferal to another hospital within 48 h, an unknown revised injury severity classification II score (RISC II), or primary admittance to a level III center (n = 52). 875 patients were included in the study. Univariate analyses were used regarding the preclinical and clinical parameters, the primary endpoint mortality rate, and the secondary endpoints length of stay, organ failure, and neurological outcome (GOS). The primary endpoint was additionally evaluated by means of multivariable analysis. Indices for injury severity (GCS, AISHead, ISS, and NISS) as well as the predicted probability of death (RISC II) were higher in level I centers than in level II centers. No significant

  19. Acute cervical spine injuries: prospective MR imaging assessment at a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, R W; Benedetti, P F; Drake, C M; Ivanovic, M; Levine, R A; Beatty, C S; Nemzek, W R; McFall, R A; Ontell, F K; Bishop, D M; Poirier, V C; Chong, B W

    1999-10-01

    To determine the weighted average sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the prospective detection of acute neck injury and to compare these findings with those of a comprehensive conventional radiographic assessment. Conventional radiography and MR imaging were performed in 199 patients presenting to a level 1 trauma center with suspected cervical spine injury. Weighted sensitivities and specificities were calculated, and a weighted average across eight vertebral levels from C1 to T1 was formed. Fourteen parameters indicative of acute injury were tabulated. Fifty-eight patients had 172 acute cervical injuries. MR imaging depicted 136 (79%) acute abnormalities and conventional radiography depicted 39 (23%). For assessment of acute fractures, MR images (weighted average sensitivity, 43%; CI: 21%, 66%) were comparable to conventional radiographs (weighted average sensitivity, 48%; CI: 30%, 65%). MR imaging was superior to conventional radiography in the evaluation of pre- or paravertebral hemorrhage or edema, anterior or posterior longitudinal ligament injury, traumatic disk herniation, cord edema, and cord compression. Cord injuries were associated with cervical spine spondylosis (P < .05), acute fracture (P < .001), and canal stenosis (P < .001). MR imaging is more accurate than radiography in the detection of a wide spectrum of neck injuries, and further study is warranted of its potential effect on medical decision making, clinical outcome, and cost-effectiveness.

  20. Variation in treatment of blunt splenic injury in Dutch academic trauma centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, D.C.; Luitse, J.S.K.; de Rooij, P.P.; Leenen, L.P.H.; Wendt, K.W.; Bloemers, F.W.; Goslings, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of splenectomy after trauma is institutionally dependent and varies from 18% to as much as 40%. This is important because variation in management influences splenic salvage. The aim of this study was to investigate whether differences exist between Dutch level 1 trauma

  1. Chronic Childhood Trauma, Mental Health, Academic Achievement, and School-Based Health Center Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Satu; Chapman, Susan; Spetz, Joanne; Brindis, Claire D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Children and adolescents exposed to chronic trauma have a greater risk for mental health disorders and school failure. Children and adolescents of minority racial/ethnic groups and those living in poverty are at greater risk of exposure to trauma and less likely to have access to mental health services. School-based health centers…

  2. Emergency department thoracotomy for penetrating injuries of the heart and great vessels: an appraisal of 283 consecutive cases from two urban trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamon, Mark J; Shiroff, Adam M; Franco, Michael; Stawicki, S Peter; Molina, Ezequiel J; Gaughan, John P; Reilly, Patrick M; Schwab, C William; Pryor, John P; Goldberg, Amy J

    2009-12-01

    Historically, patients with penetrating cardiac injuries have enjoyed the best survival after emergency department thoracotomy (EDT), but further examination of these series reveals a preponderance of cardiac stab wound (SW) survivors with only sporadic cardiac gunshot wound (GSW) survivors. Our primary study objective was to determine which patients requiring EDT for penetrating cardiac or great vessel (CGV) injury are salvageable. All patients who underwent EDT for penetrating CGV injuries in two urban, level I trauma centers during 2000 to 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. Demographics, injury (mechanism, anatomic injury), prehospital care, and physiology (signs of life [SOL], vital signs, and cardiac rhythm) were analyzed with respect to hospital survival. The study population (n = 283) comprised young (mean age, 27.1 years +/- 10.1 years) men (96.1%) injured by gunshot (GSW, 88.3%) or SWs (11.7%). Patients were compared by injury mechanism and number of CGV wounds with respect to survival (SW, 24.2%; GSW, 2.8%; p cumulative impact of penetrating injury mechanism, ED SOL, and number of CGV wounds was analyzed together, we established that those sustaining multiple CGV GSWs (regardless of ED SOL) were nearly unsalvageable. These results indicate that when multiple CGV GSWs are encountered after EDT, further resuscitative efforts may be terminated without limiting the opportunity for survival.

  3. Trauma center maturity measured by an analysis of preventable and potentially preventable deaths: there is always something to be learned….

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shokei; Jung, Kyoungwon; Smith, Alan; Coimbra, Raul

    2018-06-23

    To establish the preventable and potentially preventable death rates in a mature trauma center and to identify the causes of death and highlight the lessons learned from these cases. We analyzed data from a Level-1 Trauma Center Registry, collected over a 15-year period. Data on demographics, timing of death, and potential errors were collected. Deaths were judged as preventable (PD), potentially preventable (PPD), or non-preventable (NPD), following a strict external peer-review process. During the 15-year period, there were 874 deaths, 15 (1.7%) and 6 (0.7%) of which were considered PPDs and PDs, respectively. Patients in the PD and PPD groups were not sicker and had less severe head injury than those in the NPD group. The time-death distribution differed according to preventability. We identified 21 errors in the PD and PPD groups, but only 61 (7.3%) errors in the NPD group (n = 853). Errors in judgement accounted for the majority and for 90.5% of the PD and PPD group errors. Although the numbers of PDs and PPDs were low, denoting maturity of our trauma center, there are important lessons to be learned about how errors in judgment led to deaths that could have been prevented.

  4. Liver transplantation for severe hepatic trauma: Experience from a single center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Spiros G Delis; Andreas Bakoyiannis; Gennaro Selvaggi; Debbie Weppler; David Levi; Andreas G Tzakis

    2009-01-01

    Liver transplantation has been reported in the literature as an extreme intervention in cases of severe and complicated hepatic trauma. The main indications for liver transplant in such cases were uncontrollable bleeding and postoperative hepatic insufficiency. We here describe four cases of orthotopic liver transplantation after penetrating or blunt liver trauma. The indications were liver failure, extended liver necrosis, liver gangrene and multiple episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension, respectively. One patient died due to postoperative cerebral edema. The other three patients recovered well and remain on immunosuppression. Liver transplantation should be considered as a saving procedure in severe hepatic trauma, when all other treatment modalities fail.

  5. Association Between Helicopter vs Ground Emergency Medical Services and Survival for Adults With Major Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvagno, Samuel M.; Haut, Elliott R.; Zafar, S. Nabeel; Millin, Michael G.; Efron, David T.; Koenig, George J.; Baker, Susan P.; Bowman, Stephen M.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Haider, Adil H.

    2012-01-01

    Context Helicopter emergency medical services and their possible effect on outcomes for traumatically injured patients remain a subject of debate. Because helicopter services are a limited and expensive resource, a methodologically rigorous investigation of its effectiveness compared with ground emergency medical services is warranted. Objective To assess the association between the use of helicopter vs ground services and survival among adults with serious traumatic injuries. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective cohort study involving 223 475 patients older than 15 years, having an injury severity score higher than 15, and sustaining blunt or penetrating trauma that required transport to US level I or II trauma centers and whose data were recorded in the 2007–2009 versions of the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank. Interventions Transport by helicopter or ground emergency services to level I or level II trauma centers. Main Outcome Measures Survival to hospital discharge and discharge disposition. Results A total of 61 909 patients were transported by helicopter and 161 566 patients were transported by ground. Overall, 7813 patients (12.6%) transported by helicopter died compared with 17 775 patients (11%) transported by ground services. Before propensity score matching, patients transported by helicopter to level I and level II trauma centers had higher Injury Severity Scores. In the propensity score–matched multivariable regression model, for patients transported to level I trauma centers, helicopter transport was associated with an improved odds of survival compared with ground transport (odds ratio [OR], 1.16; 95% CI, 1.14–1.17; P<.001; absolute risk reduction [ARR], 1.5%). For patients transported to level II trauma centers, helicopter transport was associated with an improved odds of survival (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.13–1.17; P < .001; ARR, 1.4%). A greater proportion (18.2%) of those transported to level I trauma centers

  6. Data capture and communication during transfers to definitive care in an inclusive trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Nori L; Garraway, Naisan; Bell, Nathaniel; Lakha, Nasira; Hameed, S Morad

    2017-05-01

    Background trauma survivors in rural areas transferred to urban centers have higher mortality than trauma patients admitted directly to urban centers. Transfer data in trauma registries is important for injury control. Prehospital and early physiologic data may reflect processes of pre-hospital care. British Columbia currently has no standardized process for trauma patient data transfer. We performed a retrospective data analysis for major trauma patients (ISS>15) transferred to a Level I trauma center over a 1year period (n=243). Completion rates of paramedic form and ATLS primary survey variables were extracted. Nominal and interval descriptives were calculated. Documentation rates were considered deficient at system-wide information transfer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Emergency thoracotomy: Experience of one year in a large tertiary trauma center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa Abdelghany

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: ET procedure is an important tool in management of selected trauma patients. Rapid assessment, multidisciplinary approach, good resuscitation and prompt surgical intervention reduce the mortality and improve the outcome.

  8. Decreasing prevalence and seasonal variation of gunshot trauma in raptors admitted to the wildlife center of Virginia: 1993-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jean; Lickey, Adrienne; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2005-09-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to identify the epidemiologic factors associated with gunshot injuries in raptors presented to the Wildlife Center of Virginia from 1993 to 2002. Of the 3,156 raptors admitted, 118 raptors (3.7%), representing 15 species, were admitted with gunshot trauma as the primary cause of morbidity and mortality. The majority of cases consisted of four species: red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis; 47%), red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus; 14%), turkey vulture (Cathartes aura; 10%), and bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus; 8%). For species with greater than 40 admissions during the study period, the proportion of gunshot trauma of all causes of morbidity and mortality ranged from raptors with gunshot trauma were admitted during the fall and winter months (75%) compared with the spring and summer (25%). A significant decrease in the absolute number of gunshot cases per year was observed over the time period studied. The population-level effect of gunshot trauma is unknown for these species; however, it appears to be minor compared with other causes of morbidity and mortality.

  9. Outcomes of endovascular management of acute thoracic aortic emergencies in an academic level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Angela B; Branco, Bernardino C; Goshima, Kay R; Hughes, John D; Mills, Joseph L

    2014-12-01

    Thoracic aortic emergencies account for 10% of thoracic-related admissions in the United States and remain associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Open repair has declined owing to the emergence of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), but data on emergency TEVAR use for acute aortic pathology remain limited. We therefore reviewed our experience. We retrospectively evaluated emergency descending thoracic aortic endovascular interventions performed at a single academic level 1 trauma center between January 2005 and August 2013 including all cases of traumatic aortic injury, ruptured descending thoracic aneurysm, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, aortoenteric fistula, and acute complicated type B dissection. Demographics, clinical data, and outcomes were extracted. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for death. During the study period, 51 patients underwent TEVAR; 22 cases (43.1%) were performed emergently (11 patients [50.0%] traumatic aortic injury; 4 [18.2%] ruptured descending thoracic aneurysm; 4 [18.2%] complicated type B dissection; 2 [9.1%] penetrating aortic ulcer; and 1 [4.5%] aortoenteric fistula). Overall, 72.7% (n = 16) were male with a mean age of 54.8 ± 15.9 years. Nineteen patients (86.4%) required only a single TEVAR procedure, whereas 2 (9.1%) required additional endovascular therapy, and 1 (4.5%) open thoracotomy. Four traumatic aortic injury patients required exploratory laparotomy for concomitant intra-abdominal injuries. During a mean hospital length of stay of 18.9 days (range, 1 to 76 days), 3 patients (13.6%) developed major complications. In-hospital mortality was 27.2%, consisting of 6 deaths from traumatic brain injury (1); exsanguination in the operating room before repair could be achieved (2); bowel ischemia (1) and multisystem organ failure (1); and family withdrawal of care (1). A stepwise logistic regression model identified 24-hour packed red blood cell requirements ≥4

  10. Experience of two trauma-centers with pancreatic injuries requiring immediate surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaïssi, Mehdi; Sielezneff, Igor; Chaix, Jean Baptiste; Mardion, Remi Bon; Pirrò, Nicolas; Berdah, Stéphane; Emungania, Olivier; Consentino, Bernard; Cresti, Silvia; Dahan, Laetitia; Orsoni, Pierre; Moutardier, Vincent; Brunet, C; Sastre, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic injury from blunt trauma is infrequent. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a simplified approach of management of pancreatic trauma injuries requiring immediate surgery consisting of either drainage in complex situation or pancreatectomy in the other cases. From January 1986 to December 2006, 40 pancreatic traumas requiring immediate surgery were performed. Mechanism of trauma, clinical and laboratories findings were noted upon admission, classification of pancreatic injury according to Lucas' classification were considered. Fifteen (100%) drainages were performed for stage I (n=15), 60% splenopancreatectomies and 40% drainage was achieved for stage II (n=18), 3 Pancreaticoduonectomies and 2 exclusion of duodenum with drainage and 2 packing were performed for stage IV (n=7). There were 30 men and 10 women with mean age of 29+/-13 years (15-65). Thirty-eight patients had multiple trauma. Overall, mortality and global morbidity rate were 17% and 65% respectively, and the rates increased with Lucas' pancreatic trauma stage. Distal pancreatectomy is indicated for distal injuries with duct involvement, and complex procedures such as pancreaticoduodenectomy should be performed in hemodynamically stable patients.

  11. eFAST for Pneumothorax: Real-Life Application in an Urban Level 1 Center by Trauma Team Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximus, Steven; Figueroa, Cesar; Whealon, Matthew; Pham, Jacqueline; Kuncir, Eric; Barrios, Cristobal

    2018-02-01

    The focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) examination has become the standard of care for rapid evaluation of trauma patients. Extended FAST (eFAST) is the use of ultrasonography for the detection of pneumothorax (PTX). The exact sensitivity and specificity of eFAST detecting traumatic PTX during practical "real-life" application is yet to be investigated. This is a retrospective review of all trauma patients with a diagnosis of PTX, who were treated at a large level 1 urban trauma center from March 2013 through July 2014. Charts were reviewed for results of imaging, which included eFAST, chest X-ray, and CT scan. The requirement of tube thoracostomy and mechanism of injury were also analyzed. A total of 369 patients with a diagnosis of PTX were identified. A total of 69 patients were excluded, as eFAST was either not performed or not documented, leaving 300 patients identified with PTX. A total of 113 patients had clinically significant PTX (37.6%), requiring immediate tube thoracostomy placement. eFAST yielded a positive diagnosis of PTX in 19 patients (16.8%), and all were clinically significant, requiring tube thoracostomy. Chest X-ray detected clinically significant PTX in 105 patients (92.9%). The literature on the utility of eFAST for PTX in trauma is variable. Our data show that although specific for clinically significant traumatic PTX, it has poor sensitivity when performed by clinicians with variable levels of ultrasound training. We conclude that CT is still the gold standard in detecting PTX, and clinicians performing eFAST should have adequate training.

  12. Emergency radiology and mass casualty incidents-report of a mass casualty incident at a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, Ferdia; Linnau, Ken; Mitchell, Steve; Roberge, Eric; Nguyen, Quynh; Robinson, Jeffrey; Lehnert, Bruce; Gross, Joel

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this article are to describe the events of a recent mass casualty incident (MCI) at our level 1 trauma center and to describe the radiology response to the event. We also describe the findings and recommendations of our radiology department after-action review. An MCI activation was triggered after an amphibious military vehicle, repurposed for tourist activities, carrying 37 passengers, collided with a charter bus carrying 45 passengers on a busy highway bridge in Seattle, WA, USA. There were 4 deaths at the scene, and 51 patients were transferred to local hospitals following prehospital scene triage. Nineteen patients were transferred to our level 1 trauma center. Eighteen casualties arrived within 72 min. Sixteen arrived within 1 h of the first patient arrival, and 1 casualty was transferred 3 h later having initially been assessed at another hospital. Eighteen casualties (94.7 %) underwent diagnostic imaging in the emergency department. Of these 18 casualties, 15 had a trauma series (portable chest x-ray and x-ray of pelvis). Whole-body trauma computed tomography scans (WBCT) were performed on 15 casualties (78.9 %), 12 were immediate and performed during the initial active phase of the MCI, and 3 WBCTs were delayed. The initial 12 WBCTs were completed in 101 min. The mean number of radiographic studies performed per patient was 3 (range 1-8), and the total number of injuries detected was 88. The surge in imaging requirements during an MCI can be significant and exceed normal operating capacity. This report of our radiology experience during a recent MCI and subsequent after-action review serves to provide an example of how radiology capacity and workflow functioned during an MCI, in order to provide emergency radiologists and response planners with practical recommendations for implementation in the event of a future MCI.

  13. Variation in treatment of blunt splenic injury in Dutch academic trauma centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Olthof; J.S.K. Luitse; P.P. de Rooij (Philippe); L.P.H. Leenen (Luke); K.W. Wendt (Klaus); F.W. Bloemers (Frank)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground The incidence of splenectomy after trauma is institutionally dependent and varies from 18% to as much as 40%. This is important because variation in management influences splenic salvage. The aim of this study was to investigate whether differences exist between Dutch level 1

  14. Scarf-related injuries at a major trauma center in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritish Singh

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Scarf-related injuries constitute a sizable proportion of trauma, with varying degrees of severity. Devastating consequences in significant proportion of cases dictate the call for a prevention plan comprising both educational and legislative measures. Urgent preventive measures targeting scarf-related injuries will help reduce mortality and morbidity.

  15. Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maas, Andrew I R; Menon, David K; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2015-01-01

    in process and clinical care. Results will be integrated with living systematic reviews in a process of knowledge transfer. The study initiation was from October to December 2014, and the recruitment period was for 18 to 24 months. EXPECTED OUTCOMES: Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research...

  16. Acute care nurse practitioners in trauma care: results of a role survey and implications for the future of health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffsinger, Dana L

    2014-01-01

    The role of acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) in trauma care has evolved over time. A survey was performed with the aim of describing the role across the United States. There were 68 respondents who depicted the typical trauma ACNP as being a 42-year-old woman who works full-time at a level I American College of Surgeons verified trauma center. Trauma ACNPs typically practice with 80% of their time for clinical care and are based on a trauma and acute care surgery service. They are acute care certified and hold several advanced certifications to supplement their nursing license.

  17. Does repeat Hb measurement within 2 hours after a normal initial Hb in stable trauma patients add value to trauma evaluation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierink, Joanne C.; Joosse, Pieter; de Castro, Steve M. M.; Schep, Niels W. L.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2014-01-01

    In our level I trauma center, it is considered common practice to repeat blood haemoglobin measurements in patients within 2 h after admission. However, the rationale behind this procedure is elusive and can be considered labour-intensive, especially in patients in whom haemorrhaging is not to be

  18. Urgent thoracotomy for penetrating chest trauma: analysis of 158 patients of a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onat, Serdar; Ulku, Refik; Avci, Alper; Ates, Gungor; Ozcelik, Cemal

    2011-09-01

    Penetrating injuries to the chest present a frequent and challenging problem, but the majority of these injuries can be managed non-\\operatively. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of penetrating chest trauma and the ultimate techniques used for operative management, as well as the diagnosis, complications, morbidity and mortality. A retrospective 9-year review of patients who underwent an operative procedure following penetrating chest trauma was performed. The mechanism of injury, gender, age, physiological and outcome parameters, including injury severity score (ISS), chest abbreviated injury scale (AIS) score, lung injury scale score, concomitant injuries, time from admission to operating room, transfusion requirement, indications for thoracotomy, intra-operative findings, operative procedures, length of hospital stay (LOS) and rate of mortality were recorded. A total of 1123 patients who were admitted with penetrating thoracic trauma were investigated. Of these, 158 patients (93 stabbings, 65 gunshots) underwent a thoracotomy within 24 h after the penetrating trauma. There were 146 (92.4%) male and 12 (7.6%) female patients, and their mean age was 25.72 9.33 (range, 15–54) years. The mean LOS was 10.65 8.30 (range, 5–65) days. Patients admitted after a gunshot had a significantly longer LOS than those admitted with a stab wound (gunshot, 13.53 9.92 days; stab wound, 8.76 6.42 days, p chest AIS score (p chest requiring a thoracotomy are uncommon, and lung-sparing techniques have become the most frequently used procedures for lung injuries. The presence of associated abdominal injuries increased the mortality five-fold. Factors that affected mortality were ISS, chest AIS score, SBP, ongoing chest output, blood transfusion volume, diaphragmatic injury and associated abdominal injury.

  19. Functional survival after acute care for severe head injury at a designated trauma center in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taw, Benedict B T; Lam, Alan C S; Ho, Faith L Y; Hung, K N; Lui, W M; Leung, Gilberto K K

    2012-07-01

    Severe head injury is known to be a major cause of early mortalities and morbidities. Patients' long-term outcome after acute care, however, has not been widely studied. We aim to review the outcome of severely head-injured patients after discharge from acute care at a designated trauma center in Hong Kong. This is a retrospective study of prospectively collected data of patients admitted with severe head injuries between 2004 and 2008. Patients' functional status post-discharge was assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Score (GOSE). Of a total of 1565 trauma patients, 116 had severe head injuries and 41 of them survived acute hospital care. Upon the last follow-up, 23 (56.1%) of the acute-care survivors had improvements in their GOSE, six (11.8%) experienced deteriorations, and 12 (23.5%) did not exhibit any change. The greatest improvement was observed in patients with GOSE of 5 and 6 upon discharge, but two of the 16 patients with GOSE 2 or 3 also had a good recovery. On logistic regression analysis, old age and prolonged acute hospital stay were found to be independent predictors of poor functional outcome after a mean follow-up duration of 42 months. Multidisciplinary neurorehabilitation service is an important component of comprehensive trauma care. Despite significant early mortalities, a proportion of severely head-injured patients who survive acute care may achieve good long-term functional recovery. Copyright © 2012, Asian Surgical Association. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC. All rights reserved.

  20. CRISIS UNDER THE RADAR: ILLICIT AMPHETAMINE USE IS REACHING EPIDEMIC PROPORTIONS AND CONTRIBUTING TO RESOURCE OVER-UTILIZATION AT A LEVEL 1 TRAUMA CENTER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemma, Vincent A; Chapple, Kristina A; Goslar, Pamela W; Israr, Sharjeel; Petersen, Scott R; Weinberg, Jordan A

    2018-05-21

    Trauma centers reported illicit amphetamine use in approximately 10% of trauma admissions in the previous decade. From experience at a trauma center located in a southwestern metropolis, our perception is that illicit amphetamine use is on the rise, and that these patients utilize in-hospital resources beyond what would be expected for their injuries. The purpose of this study was to document the incidence of illicit amphetamine use among our trauma patients and to evaluate its impact on resource utilization. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using 7 consecutive years of data (starting July 2010) from our institution's trauma registry. Toxicology screenings were used to categorize patients into one of three groups: illicit amphetamine, other drugs, or drug free. Adjusted linear and logistic regression models were used to predict hospital cost, length of stay, ICU admission and ventilation between drug groups. Models were conducted with combined injury severity (ISS) and then repeated for ISS <9, ISS 9-15 and ISS 16 and above. 8,589 patients were categorized into the following three toxicology groups: 1255 (14.6%) illicit amphetamine, 2214 (25.8%) other drugs, and 5120 (59.6%) drug free. Illicit amphetamine use increased threefold over the course of the study (from 7.85% to 25.0% of annual trauma admissions). Adjusted linear models demonstrated that illicit amphetamine among patients with ISS<9 was associated with 4.6% increase in hospital cost (P=.019) and 7.4% increase in LOS (P=.043). Logistic models revealed significantly increased odds of ventilation across all ISS groups and increased odds of ICU admission when all ISS groups were combined (P=.001) and within the ISS<9 group (P=.002). Hospital resource utilization of amphetamine patients with minor injuries is significant. Trauma centers with similar epidemic growth in proportion of amphetamine patients face a potentially significant resource strain relative to other centers. Prognostic and

  1. Geriatric-specific triage criteria are more sensitive than standard adult criteria in identifying need for trauma center care in injured older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichwan, Brian; Darbha, Subrahmanyam; Shah, Manish N; Thompson, Laura; Evans, David C; Boulger, Creagh T; Caterino, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the sensitivity of Ohio's 2009 emergency medical services (EMS) geriatric trauma triage criteria compared with the previous adult triage criteria in identifying need for trauma center care among older adults. We studied a retrospective cohort of injured patients aged 16 years or older in the 2006 to 2011 Ohio Trauma Registry. Patients aged 70 years or older were considered geriatric. We identified whether each patient met the geriatric and the adult triage criteria. The outcome measure was need for trauma center care, defined by surrogate markers: Injury Severity Score greater than 15, operating room in fewer than 48 hours, any ICU stay, and inhospital mortality. We calculated sensitivity and specificity of both triage criteria for both age groups. We included 101,577 patients; 33,379 (33%) were geriatric. Overall, 57% of patients met adult criteria and 68% met geriatric criteria. Using Injury Severity Score, for older adults geriatric criteria were more sensitive for need for trauma center care (93%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 92% to 93%) than adult criteria (61%; 95% CI 60% to 62%). Geriatric criteria decreased specificity in older adults from 61% (95% CI 61% to 62%) to 49% (95% CI 48% to 49%). Geriatric criteria in older adults (93% sensitivity, 49% specificity) performed similarly to the adult criteria in younger adults (sensitivity 87% and specificity 44%). Similar patterns were observed for other outcomes. Standard adult EMS triage guidelines provide poor sensitivity in older adults. Ohio's geriatric trauma triage guidelines significantly improve sensitivity in identifying Injury Severity Score and other surrogate markers of the need for trauma center care, with modest decreases in specificity for older adults. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Predictors of Intrathoracic Injury after Blunt Torso Trauma in Children Presenting to an Emergency Department as Trauma Activations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Caitlin; Mironova, Irina; Lehman, Erik; Olympia, Robert P

    2017-06-01

    Thoracic injuries are a major cause of death associated with blunt trauma in children. Screening for injury with chest x-ray study, compared with chest computed tomography (CT) scan, has been controversial, weighing the benefits of specificity with the detriment of radiation exposure. To identify predictors of thoracic injury in children presenting as trauma activations to a Level I trauma center after blunt torso trauma, and to compare these predictors with those previously reported in the literature. We performed a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients (trauma center between June 2010 and June 2013 as a trauma activation after sustaining a blunt torso trauma and who received diagnostic imaging of the chest as part of their initial evaluation. Data analysis was performed on 166 patients. There were 33 patients (20%) with 45 abnormalities detected on diagnostic imaging of the chest, with the most common abnormalities being lung contusion (36%), pneumothorax (22%), and rib fracture (13%). Statistically significant predictors of abnormal diagnostic imaging of the chest included Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS) trauma include GCS < 15, hypoxia, syncope/dizziness, cervical spine tenderness, thoraco-lumbar-sacral spine tenderness, and abdominal/pelvic tenderness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Splenic Artery Embolization in Blunt Trauma: A Single-Center Retrospective Comparison of the Use of Gelatin Sponge Versus Coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasuli, Pasteur; Moosavi, Bardia; French, Gordon J; Petrcich, William; Hammond, Ian

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of gelatin sponge with that of coils for splenic artery embolization in the treatment of blunt splenic injury. A single-center retrospective review was performed with the records of 63 patients (45 men, 18 women; mean age, 45.5 years; range, 16-84 years) with blunt splenic injury treated at a tertiary care trauma center by splenic artery embolization with gelatin sponge (n = 30 patients) or metallic coils (n = 33 patients) between 2005 and 2014. The two groups had comparable median American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grades of IV and comparable angiographic appearances regarding active extravasation and pseudoaneurysm formation at preembolization splenic arteriography (p = 0.32). Clinical outcomes and procedure-related outcomes were evaluated. The success rates were similar in the two groups: splenic artery embolization failed in 6.6% (2/30) of patients in the gelatin sponge group and 12.1% (4/33) in the coil embolization group (p = 0.45; 95% CI, -30.1% to 19.2%). Major complications occurred in six patients (20.0%) in the gelatin sponge group and in six patients (18.1%) in the coil group (p = 0.85; 95% CI, -23.0% to 26.6%). Minor complications occurred in three patients (10.0%) in the gelatin sponge group and seven patients (21.2%) in the coil group (p = 0.21; 95% CI, -35.4% to 14.0%). Procedure time was significantly shorter in the gelatin sponge group (median, 32 minutes; interquartile range, 18-48 minutes) than in the coil group (median, 53 minutes; interquartile range, 30-76 minutes) (p = 0.01). Splenic artery embolization with gelatin sponge appears to be as effective and as safe as coil embolization and can be completed in a shorter time.

  4. Variability in interhospital trauma data coding and scoring: A challenge to the accuracy of aggregated trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabian, Sandra S; Marcus, Michael; Captain, Kevin; Pomphrey, Michelle; Breeze, Janis; Wolfe, Jennefer; Bugaev, Nikolay; Rabinovici, Reuven

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of data aggregated in state and national trauma registries provide the platform for clinical, research, development, and quality improvement efforts in trauma systems. However, the interhospital variability and accuracy in data abstraction and coding have not yet been directly evaluated. This multi-institutional, Web-based, anonymous study examines interhospital variability and accuracy in data coding and scoring by registrars. Eighty-two American College of Surgeons (ACS)/state-verified Level I and II trauma centers were invited to determine different data elements including diagnostic, procedure, and Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) coding as well as selected National Trauma Data Bank definitions for the same fictitious case. Variability and accuracy in data entries were assessed by the maximal percent agreement among the registrars for the tested data elements, and 95% confidence intervals were computed to compare this level of agreement to the ideal value of 100%. Variability and accuracy in all elements were compared (χ testing) based on Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) membership, level of trauma center, ACS verification, and registrar's certifications. Fifty registrars (61%) completed the survey. The overall accuracy for all tested elements was 64%. Variability was noted in all examined parameters except for the place of occurrence code in all groups and the lower extremity AIS code in Level II trauma centers and in the Certified Specialist in Trauma Registry- and Certified Abbreviated Injury Scale Specialist-certified registrar groups. No differences in variability were noted when groups were compared based on TQIP membership, level of center, ACS verification, and registrar's certifications, except for prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), where TQIP respondents agreed more than non-TQIP centers (p = 0.004). There is variability and inaccuracy in interhospital data coding and scoring of injury information. This finding casts doubt on the

  5. Inclusion of Highest Glasgow Coma Scale Motor Component Score in Mortality Risk Adjustment for Benchmarking of Trauma Center Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, David; Byrne, James P; Alali, Aziz S; Xiong, Wei; Hoeft, Chris; Neal, Melanie; Subacius, Harris; Nathens, Avery B

    2017-12-01

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is the most widely used measure of traumatic brain injury (TBI) severity. Currently, the arrival GCS motor component (mGCS) score is used in risk-adjustment models for external benchmarking of mortality. However, there is evidence that the highest mGCS score in the first 24 hours after injury might be a better predictor of death. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of including the highest mGCS score on the performance of risk-adjustment models and subsequent external benchmarking results. Data were derived from the Trauma Quality Improvement Program analytic dataset (January 2014 through March 2015) and were limited to the severe TBI cohort (16 years or older, isolated head injury, GCS ≤8). Risk-adjustment models were created that varied in the mGCS covariates only (initial score, highest score, or both initial and highest mGCS scores). Model performance and fit, as well as external benchmarking results, were compared. There were 6,553 patients with severe TBI across 231 trauma centers included. Initial and highest mGCS scores were different in 47% of patients (n = 3,097). Model performance and fit improved when both initial and highest mGCS scores were included, as evidenced by improved C-statistic, Akaike Information Criterion, and adjusted R-squared values. Three-quarters of centers changed their adjusted odds ratio decile, 2.6% of centers changed outlier status, and 45% of centers exhibited a ≥0.5-SD change in the odds ratio of death after including highest mGCS score in the model. This study supports the concept that additional clinical information has the potential to not only improve the performance of current risk-adjustment models, but can also have a meaningful impact on external benchmarking strategies. Highest mGCS score is a good potential candidate for inclusion in additional models. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adult sports-related traumatic brain injury in United States trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ethan A; Yue, John K; Burke, John F; Chan, Andrew K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berger, Mitchel S; Manley, Geoffrey T; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important public health concern estimated to affect 300,000 to 3.8 million people annually in the United States. Although injuries to professional athletes dominate the media, this group represents only a small proportion of the overall population. Here, the authors characterize the demographics of sports-related TBI in adults from a community-based trauma population and identify predictors of prolonged hospitalization and increased morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS Utilizing the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB), the authors retrospectively analyzed sports-related TBI data from adults (age ≥ 18 years) across 5 sporting categories-fall or interpersonal contact (FIC), roller sports, skiing/snowboarding, equestrian sports, and aquatic sports. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify predictors of prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS), medical complications, inpatient mortality rates, and hospital discharge disposition. Statistical significance was assessed at α sports-related TBIs were documented in the NTDB, which represented 18,310 incidents nationally. Equestrian sports were the greatest contributors to sports-related TBI (45.2%). Mild TBI represented nearly 86% of injuries overall. Mean (± SEM) LOSs in the hospital or intensive care unit (ICU) were 4.25 ± 0.09 days and 1.60 ± 0.06 days, respectively. The mortality rate was 3.0% across all patients, but was statistically higher in TBI from roller sports (4.1%) and aquatic sports (7.7%). Age, hypotension on admission to the emergency department (ED), and the severity of head and extracranial injuries were statistically significant predictors of prolonged hospital and ICU LOSs, medical complications, failure to discharge to home, and death. Traumatic brain injury during aquatic sports was similarly associated with prolonged ICU and hospital LOSs, medical complications, and failure to be discharged to

  7. Pediatric sports-related traumatic brain injury in United States trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, John K; Winkler, Ethan A; Burke, John F; Chan, Andrew K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berger, Mitchel S; Manley, Geoffrey T; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children is a significant public health concern estimated to result in over 500,000 emergency department (ED) visits and more than 60,000 hospitalizations in the United States annually. Sports activities are one important mechanism leading to pediatric TBI. In this study, the authors characterize the demographics of sports-related TBI in the pediatric population and identify predictors of prolonged hospitalization and of increased morbidity and mortality rates. METHODS Utilizing the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB), the authors retrospectively analyzed sports-related TBI data from children (age 0-17 years) across 5 sports categories: fall or interpersonal contact (FIC), roller sports, skiing/snowboarding, equestrian sports, and aquatic sports. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify predictors of prolonged length of stay (LOS) in the hospital or intensive care unit (ICU), medical complications, inpatient mortality rates, and hospital discharge disposition. Statistical significance was assessed at α sports-related TBIs were recorded in the NTDB, and these injuries represented 11,614 incidents nationally after sample weighting. Fall or interpersonal contact events were the greatest contributors to sports-related TBI (47.4%). Mild TBI represented 87.1% of the injuries overall. Mean (± SEM) LOSs in the hospital and ICU were 2.68 ± 0.07 days and 2.73 ± 0.12 days, respectively. The overall mortality rate was 0.8%, and the prevalence of medical complications was 2.1% across all patients. Severities of head and extracranial injuries were significant predictors of prolonged hospital and ICU LOSs, medical complications, failure to discharge to home, and death. Hypotension on admission to the ED was a significant predictor of failure to discharge to home (OR 0.05, 95% CI 0.03-0.07, p sports was independently associated with prolonged hospital LOS compared with FIC events (mean increase

  8. Disseminated intravascular coagulation or acute coagulopathy of trauma shock early after trauma? A prospective observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Per Ingemar; Sorensen, Anne Marie; Perner, Anders

    2011-01-01

    the prevalence of overt DIC and ACoTS in trauma patients and characterized these conditions based on their biomarker profiles. METHODS: Observational study at a single Level I Trauma Centre. Inclusion of 80 adult trauma patients ([greater than or equal to]18 years) who met criteria for full trauma team...

  9. Pectus excavatum in blunt chest trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liodakis Emmanouil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Blunt cardiac rupture is an exceedingly rare injury. Case presentation We report a case of blunt cardiac trauma in a 43-year-old Caucasian German mother with pectus excavatum who presented after a car accident in which she had been sitting in the front seat holding her two-year-old boy in her arms. The mother was awake and alert during the initial two hours after the accident but then proceeded to hemodynamically collapse. The child did not sustain any severe injuries. Intraoperatively, a combined one-cm laceration of the left atrium and right ventricle was found. Conclusion Patients with pectus excavatum have an increased risk for cardiac rupture after blunt chest trauma because of compression between the sternum and spine. Therefore, patients with pectus excavatum and blunt chest trauma should be admitted to a Level I Trauma Center with a high degree of suspicion.

  10. Twenty-years of splenic preservation at a level 1 pediatric trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairdain, Sigrid; Litman, Heather J; Troy, Michael; McMahon, Maria; Almodovar, Heidi; Zurakowski, David; Mooney, David P

    2015-05-01

    Splenic preservation is the standard of care for hemodynamically stable children with splenic injuries. We report a 20-year single-institutional series of children with splenic injuries managed without a splenectomy. Children evaluated and treated for blunt splenic injury at Boston Children's Hospital from 1994 to 2014 were extracted from the trauma registry. Demographics, clinical characteristics, complications, and outcomes were reviewed. Three time-periods were evaluated based upon the development and modification of splenic injury clinical pathway guidelines (CPGs). Survival was defined as being discharged from the hospital alive. 502 suffered isolated splenic injuries. The median AAST grade of splenic injury increased across the three CPG time periods (psplenic-injury related mortalities occurred. Hospital length of stay decreased significantly secondary to splenic injury CPGs (psplenic injury, no patient died or underwent splenectomy. Hospital length of stay decreased across time, despite an increase in the severity of splenic injuries encountered. Splenectomy has become so unusual in the management of hemodynamically stable children with a splenic injury that it may no longer be a legitimate outcome marker. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Propofol Infusion Syndrome: A Retrospective Analysis at a Level 1 Trauma Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Diaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS, a rare, often fatal, condition of unknown etiology, is defined by development of lipemic serum, metabolic acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, hepatomegaly, cardiac arrhythmias, and acute renal failure. Methods. To identify risk factors for and biomarkers of PRIS, a retrospective chart review of all possible PRIS cases during a 1-year period was conducted at a level 1 trauma hospital in ICU patients over 18 years of age receiving continuous propofol infusions for ≥3 days. Additional study inclusion criteria included vasopressor support and monitoring of serum triglycerides and creatinine. Results. Seventy-two patients, 61 males (84.7% and 11 females (15.3%, satisfied study inclusion criteria; and of these, 3 males met the study definition for PRIS, with 1 case fatality. PRIS incidence was 4.1% with a case-fatality rate of 33%. The mean duration of propofol infusion was 6.96 days. A positive linear correlation was observed between increasing triglyceride levels and infusion duration, but no correlation was observed between increasing creatinine levels and infusion duration. Conclusions. Risk factors for PRIS were confirmed as high dose infusions over prolonged periods. Increasing triglyceride levels may serve as reliable biomarkers of impending PRIS, if confirmed in future investigations with larger sample sizes.

  12. Cost analysis of a disaster facility at an apex tertiary care trauma center of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For the Commonwealth Games 2010, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC of India had been directed by the Director General Health Services and Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, to set up a specialized unit for the definitive management of the injured/unwell athletes, officials, and related personnel coming for the Commonwealth Games in October 2010. The facility included a 20-bedded fully equipped ward, six ICU beds with ventilator capacity, one very very important person observation area, one perioperative management cubicle, and one fully modular and integrated operating room. Objective: The objective of this study was to calculate the cost of disaster facility at JPNATC, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. Methodology: Traditional (average or gross costing methodology was used to arrive at the cost for the provisioning of these services by this facility. Results: The annual cost of providing services at disaster facility at JPNATC, New Delhi, was calculated to be INR 61,007,334.08 (US$ 983,989.258 while the per hour cost was calculated to be INR 7061.03 of the total cost toward the provisioning of services by disaster facility where 26% was the capital cost and 74% was the operating cost. Human resource caters to maximum chunk of the expenditures (47%. Conclusion: The results of this costing study will help in the future planning of resource allocation within the financial constraints (US$ 1 = INR 62 in the year 2013.

  13. Cost analysis of a disaster facility at an apex tertiary care trauma center of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sheetal; Gupta, Shakti; Daga, Anoop; Siddharth, Vijaydeep; Wundavalli, LaxmiTej

    2016-01-01

    For the Commonwealth Games 2010, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC) of India had been directed by the Director General Health Services and Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, to set up a specialized unit for the definitive management of the injured/unwell athletes, officials, and related personnel coming for the Commonwealth Games in October 2010. The facility included a 20-bedded fully equipped ward, six ICU beds with ventilator capacity, one very very important person observation area, one perioperative management cubicle, and one fully modular and integrated operating room. The objective of this study was to calculate the cost of disaster facility at JPNATC, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. Traditional (average or gross) costing methodology was used to arrive at the cost for the provisioning of these services by this facility. The annual cost of providing services at disaster facility at JPNATC, New Delhi, was calculated to be INR 61,007,334.08 (US$ 983,989.258) while the per hour cost was calculated to be INR 7061.03 of the total cost toward the provisioning of services by disaster facility where 26% was the capital cost and 74% was the operating cost. Human resource caters to maximum chunk of the expenditures (47%). The results of this costing study will help in the future planning of resource allocation within the financial constraints (US$ 1 = INR 62 in the year 2013).

  14. How formative courses about damage control surgery and non-operative management improved outcome and survival in unstable politrauma patients in a Mountain Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanova, Giovanni; Buccelletti, Francesco; Berletti, Riccardo; Cavana, Marco; Folgheraiter, Giorgio; Groppo, Francesca; Marchetti, Chiara; Marzano, Amelia; Massè, Alessandro; Musetti, Antonio; Pelanda, Tina; Ricci, Nicola; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Papadia, Damiano; Ramponi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study is to analyze how the starting of Course of Trauma in our hospital improved survival and organization in management of polytraumatized patients. We analysed all major trauma patients (Injury Severity Score (Injury Severity Score (ISS)> 15) treated at Emergency Department of the Santa Chiara Hospital between January 2011 and December 2014. The training courses (TC) were named "management of polytrauma" (MP) and "clinical cases discussion" (CCD), and started in November 2013. We divided the patients between two groups: before November 2013 (pre-TC group) and after November 2013 (post-TC group). MTG's courses (EMC accredited), CCD and MP courses started in November 2013. The target of these courses was the multidisciplinary management of polytrauma patient; the courses were addressed to general surgeons, anaesthesiologists, radiologists, orthopaedics and emergency physicians. Respectively 110 and 78 doctors were formed in CCD's and MP's courses. Patients directly transported to our trauma centre rose from 67.5% to 83% (pOperative Management, Trauma Course, Trauma Team, Trauma Center.

  15. Social capital in a regional inter-hospital network among trauma centers (trauma network): results of a qualitative study in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss, Julika; Weigl, Johannes; Ernstberger, Antonio; Nerlich, Michael; Koller, Michael; Curbach, Janina

    2018-02-26

    As inter-hospital alliances have become increasingly popular in the healthcare sector, it is important to understand the challenges and benefits that the interaction between representatives of different hospitals entail. A prominent example of inter-hospital alliances are certified 'trauma networks', which consist of 5-30 trauma departments in a given region. Trauma networks are designed to improve trauma care by providing a coordinated response to injury, and have developed across the USA and multiple European countries since the 1960s. Their members need to interact regularly, e.g. develop joint protocols for patient transfer, or discuss patient safety. Social capital is a concept focusing on the development and benefits of relations and interactions within a network. The aim of our study was to explore how social capital is generated and used in a regional German trauma network. In this qualitative study, we performed semi-standardized face-to-face interviews with 23 senior trauma surgeons (2013-14). They were the official representatives of 23 out of 26 member hospitals of the Trauma Network Eastern Bavaria. The interviews covered the structure and functioning of the network, climate and reciprocity within the network, the development of social identity, and different resources and benefits derived from the network (e.g. facilitation of interactions, advocacy, work satisfaction). Transcripts were coded using thematic content analysis. According to the interviews, the studied trauma network became a group of surgeons with substantial bonding social capital. The surgeons perceived that the network's culture of interaction was flat, and they identified with the network due to a climate of mutual respect. They felt that the inclusive leadership helped establish a norm of reciprocity. Among the interviewed surgeons, the gain of technical information was seen as less important than the exchange of information on political aspects. The perceived resources derived from

  16. Disaster preparedness in an Australian urban trauma center: staff knowledge and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Ellen; Samrasinghe, Iromi

    2012-10-01

    A substantial barrier to improving disaster preparedness in Australia is a lack of prescriptive national guidelines based on individual hospital capabilities. A recent literature review revealed that only one Australian hospital has published data regarding its current preparedness level. To establish baseline levels of disaster knowledge, preparedness, and willingness to respond to a disaster among one hospital's staff, and thus enable the implementation of national disaster preparedness guidelines based on realistic capabilities of individual hospitals. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to individuals and departments that play key roles in the hospital's external disaster response. Questions concerned prior education and experience specific to disasters, general preparedness knowledge, perceived preparedness of themselves and their department, and willingness to respond to a disaster from a conventional and/or chemical, biological, or radiological incident. Responses were received from 140 individuals representing nine hospital departments. Eighty-three participants (59.3%) had previously received disaster education; 53 (37.9%) had attended a disaster simulation drill, and 18 (12.9%) had responded to an actual disaster. The average disaster preparedness knowledge score was 3.57 out of 10. The majority of respondents rated themselves as "not really" prepared and were "unsure" of their respective departments' level of preparedness. Most respondents indicated a willingness to participate in both a conventional incident involving burns and/or physical trauma, and an incident involving chemical, biological or radiological (CBR) weapons. Australian hospital staff are under-prepared to respond to a disaster because of a lack of education, insufficient simulation exercises, and limited disaster experience. The absence of specific national standards and guidelines through which individual hospitals can develop their capabilities further compounds the poverty in

  17. [Geriatric Trauma Center DGU®: Evaluation of clinical and economic parameters : A pilot study in a german university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobe, M; Böttcher, B; Coburn, M; Friess, T; Bollheimer, L C; Heppner, H J; Werner, C J; Bach, J-P; Wollgarten, M; Poßelt, S; Bliemel, C; Bücking, B

    2018-04-19

    Previous studies on orthogeriatric models of care suggest that there is substantial variability in how geriatric care is integrated in the patient management and the necessary intensity of geriatric involvement is questionable. The aim of the current prospective cohort study was the clinical and economic evaluation of fragility fracture treatment pathways before and after the implementation of a geriatric trauma center in conformity with the guidelines of the German Trauma Society (DGU). A comparison of three different treatment models (6 months each) was performed: A: Standard treatment in Orthopaedic Trauma; B: Special care pathways with improvement of the quality management system and implementation of standard operating procedures; C: Interdisciplinary treatment with care pathways and collaboration with geriatricians (ward round model). In the 151 examined patients (m/w 47/104; 83.5 (70-100) years; A: n = 64, B: n = 44, C: n = 43) pathways with orthogeriatric comanagement (C) improved frequency of postoperative mobilization (p = 0.021), frequency of osteoporosis prophylaxis (p = 0.001) and the discharge procedure (p = 0.024). In comparison to standard treatment (A), orthogeriatric comanagement (C) was associated with lower rates of mortality (9% vs. 2%; p = 0.147) and cardio-respiratory complications (39% vs. 28%; p = 0.235) by trend. In this context, there were low rates of myocardial infarction (6% vs. 0%), dehydration (6% vs. 0%), cardiac dysrhythmia (8% vs. 0%), pulmonary decompensation (28% vs. 16%), electrolyt dysbalance (34% vs. 19%) and pulmonary edema (11% vs. 2%). Duration of stay in an intensive care unit was 29 h (A) and 18 h (C) respectively (p = 0.205), with consecutive reduction in costs. A sole establishment of a special care pathway for older hip fracture patients (B) showed a lower rate of myocardial infarction (A: 11%, B: 0%, C: 0%; p = 0.035). There was a clear tendency to a better overall

  18. Quality in trauma care: improving the discharge procedure of patients by means of Lean Six Sigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, Gerard C; Trip, Albert; Ahaus, Kees T B; Does, Ronald J M M; Wendt, Klaus W

    2010-09-01

    The University Medical Center Groningen is a level I trauma center in the northern part of the Netherlands. Sixty-three percent of all the patients admitted at the Trauma Nursing Department (TND) are acute patients who are admitted directly after trauma. In 2006 and 2007, the University Medical Center Groningen was not always capable of admitting all trauma patients to the TND due to the relatively high-bed occupation. Therefore, the reduction of the average length of stay (LOS) formed the objective of the project described in this study. We used the process-focused method of Lean Six Sigma to reduce hospital stay by improving the discharge procedure of patients in the care processes and eliminating waste and waiting time. We used the "Dutch Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol" to identify the possible causes of inappropriate hospital stay. The average LOS of trauma patients at the TND at the beginning of the project was 10.4 days. Thirty percent of the LOS was unnecessary. The main causes of the inappropriate hospital stay were delays in several areas. The implementation of the improvement plan reduced almost 50% of the inappropriate hospital stay, enabling the trauma center to admit almost all trauma patients to the TND. After the implementation of the improvements, the average LOS was 8.5 days. Our study shows that Lean Six Sigma is an effective method to reduce inappropriate hospital stay, thereby improving the quality and financial efficiency of trauma care.

  19. Outcomes of road traffic injuries before and after the implementation of a camera ticketing system: a retrospective study from a large trauma center in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghnam, Suliman; Alkelya, Muhamad; Alfraidy, Moath; Al-Bedah, Khalid; Albabtain, Ibrahim Tawfiq; Alshenqeety, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are the third leading cause of death in Saudi Arabia. Because speed is a major risk factor for severe crash-related injuries, a camera ticketing system was implemented countrywide in mid-2010 by the traffic police in an effort to improve traffic safety. There are no published studies on the effects of the system in Saudi Arabia. To examine injury severity and associated mortality at a large trauma center before and after the implementation of the ticketing system. Retrospective, analytical. Trauma center of a tertiary care center in Riyadh. The study included all trauma registry patients seen in the emergency department for a crash-related injury (automobile occupants, pedestrians, or motorcyclists) between January 2005 and December 2014. Associations with outcome measures were assessed by univariate and multivariate methods. Injury severity score (ISS), Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and mortality. The study included all trauma registry patients seen in the emergency department for a crash-related injury. All health outcomes improved in the period following implementation of the ticketing system. Following implementation, ISS scores decreased (-3.1, 95% CI -4.6, -1.6) and GCS increased (0.47, 95% CI 0.08, 0.87) after adjusting for other covariates. The odds of death were 46% lower following implementation than before implementation. When the data were log-transformed to account for skewed data distributions, the results remained statistically significant. This study suggests positive health implications following the implementation of the camera ticketing system. Further investment in public health interventions is warranted to reduce preventable RTIs. The study findings represent a trauma center at a single hospital in Riyadh, which may not generalize to the Saudi population.

  20. Probabilistic Matching of Deidentified Data From a Trauma Registry and a Traumatic Brain Injury Model System Center: A Follow-up Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj G; Wang, Zhensheng; Kesinger, Matthew R; Newman, Mark; Huynh, Toan T; Niemeier, Janet P; Sperry, Jason L; Wagner, Amy K

    2018-04-01

    In a previous study, individuals from a single Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems and trauma center were matched using a novel probabilistic matching algorithm. The Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems is a multicenter prospective cohort study containing more than 14,000 participants with traumatic brain injury, following them from inpatient rehabilitation to the community over the remainder of their lifetime. The National Trauma Databank is the largest aggregation of trauma data in the United States, including more than 6 million records. Linking these two databases offers a broad range of opportunities to explore research questions not otherwise possible. Our objective was to refine and validate the previous protocol at another independent center. An algorithm generation and validation data set were created, and potential matches were blocked by age, sex, and year of injury; total probabilistic weight was calculated based on of 12 common data fields. Validity metrics were calculated using a minimum probabilistic weight of 3. The positive predictive value was 98.2% and 97.4% and sensitivity was 74.1% and 76.3%, in the algorithm generation and validation set, respectively. These metrics were similar to the previous study. Future work will apply the refined probabilistic matching algorithm to the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems and the National Trauma Databank to generate a merged data set for clinical traumatic brain injury research use.

  1. Alternate site surge capacity in times of public health disaster maintains trauma center and emergency department integrity: Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Alexander L; Rinnert, Kathy J; Nemeth, Ira R; Fowler, Raymond L; Minei, Joseph P

    2007-08-01

    Hospital surge capacity has been advocated to accommodate large increases in demand for healthcare; however, existing urban trauma centers and emergency departments (TC/EDs) face barriers to providing timely care even at baseline patient volumes. The purpose of this study is to describe how alternate-site medical surge capacity absorbed large patient volumes while minimizing impact on routine TC/ED operations immediately after Hurricane Katrina. From September 1 to 16, 2005, an alternate site for medical care was established. Using an off-site space, the Dallas Convention Center Medical Unit (DCCMU) was established to meet the increased demand for care. Data were collected and compared with TC/ED patient volumes to assess impact on existing facilities. During the study period, 23,231 persons displaced by Hurricane Katrina were registered to receive evacuee services in the City of Dallas, Texas. From those displaced, 10,367 visits for emergent or urgent healthcare were seen at the DCCMU. The mean number of daily visits (mean +/- SD) to the DCCMU was 619 +/- 301 visits with a peak on day 3 (n = 1,125). No patients died, 3.2% (n = 257) were observed in the DCCMU, and only 2.9% (n = 236) required transport to a TC/ED. During the same period, the mean number of TC/ED visits at the region's primary provider of indigent care (Hospital 1) was 346 +/- 36 visits. Using historical data from Hospital 1 during the same period of time (341 +/- 41), there was no significant difference in the mean number of TC/ED visits from the previous year (p = 0.26). Alternate-site medical surge capacity provides for safe and effective delivery of care to a large influx of patients seeking urgent and emergent care. This protects the integrity of existing public hospital TC/ED infrastructure and ongoing operations.

  2. Trauma-Focused Smoking Cessation for Smokers Exposed to the World Trade Center Disaster: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Adam; Friedberg, Fred; Li, Xiaotong; Zvolensky, Michael J; Bromet, Evelyn J; Mahaffey, Brittain L; Vujanovic, Anka A; Luft, Benjamin J; Kotov, Roman

    2017-08-01

    The main objective was to evaluate the efficacy of an 8-session, group-based comprehensive smoking cessation and trauma management (CSC-T) treatment among daily smokers (≥5 cigarettes/day) exposed to the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster with elevated WTC-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Participants (N = 90) were randomly assigned to CSC-T (N = 44; 63.6% white; 27.3% female; mean age = 51.32 ± 7.87) or comprehensive smoking cessation (CSC) alone (N = 46; 71.7% white; 28.3% female; mean age = 48.74 ± 10.66), which was comparable in length and time. Assessments included a diagnostic clinical interview and self-report measures of PTSD and respiratory symptoms, and smoking behavior, and biologically confirmed smoking abstinence. Evaluations occurred at a baseline visit, each treatment session, and at 1-, 2-, 4-, 12-, and 26-weeks post-treatment. The two treatments did not differ in regard to PTSD symptom improvement. After quit day (week 6), the two groups had similar 7-day (~15%) and 6-month (~20%) abstinence rates as well as average number of cigarettes smoked, and PTSD and respiratory symptoms. It is possible that the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy skills specific to quitting smoking, group-based support, and degree of therapist contact, that were available in both treatments may have played a role in equalizing the abstinence rates between the two conditions. Although the current study found no evidence that the CSC-T was superior to the CSC alone treatment, the abstinence rates observed were high relative to previous trials of smokers with diagnosed PTSD. Further development of smoking cessation programs tailored to the needs of smokers with PTSD symptoms continues to be needed. This study suggests that a CSC program aids in smoking abstinence for smokers with PTSD symptoms and that incorporating trauma management skills, may not add additional benefits for abstinence and PTSD and respiratory symptom relief. Further work is needed to

  3. Geriatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sasha D; Holcomb, John B

    2015-12-01

    The landscape of trauma is changing due to an aging population. Geriatric patients represent an increasing number and proportion of trauma admissions and deaths. This review explores recent literature on geriatric trauma, including triage criteria, assessment of frailty, fall-related injury, treatment of head injury complicated by coagulopathy, goals of care, and the need for ongoing education of all surgeons in the care of the elderly. Early identification of high-risk geriatric patients is imperative to initiate early resuscitative efforts. Geriatric patients are typically undertriaged because of their baseline frailty being underappreciated; however, centers that see more geriatric patients do better. Rapid reversal of anticoagulation is important in preventing progression of brain injury. Anticipation of difficult disposition necessitates early involvement of physical therapy for rehabilitation and case management for appropriate placement. Optimal care of geriatric trauma patients will be based on the well established tenets of trauma resuscitation and injury repair, but with distinct elements that address the physiological and anatomical challenges presented by geriatric patients.

  4. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordany, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  5. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  6. Does a single specialty intensive care unit make better business sense than a multi-specialty intensive care unit? A costing study in a trauma center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, Vishwanathan; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Though intensive care units (ICUs) only account for 10% of hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. To evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multi-specialty and neurosurgery ICU in an apex trauma care facility in India. The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203 bedded level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India from May, 2012 to June 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Fisher's two-tailed t-test. Total cost/bed/day for the multi-specialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU was Rs. 14,306.7/-, manpower constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist healthcare decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multi-specialty ICUs are more expensive, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that need to be designed.

  7. Does hemopericardium after chest trauma mandate sternotomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, Chad M; Namias, Nicholas; Van Haren, Robert M; Guarch, Gerardo A; Ginzburg, Enrique; Salerno, Tomas A; Schulman, Carl I; Livingstone, Alan S; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2012-06-01

    Recently, three patients with hemopericardium after severe chest trauma were successfully managed nonoperatively at our institution. This prompted the question whether these were rare or common events. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with similar injuries to test the hypothesis that trauma-induced hemopericardium mandates sternotomy. Records were retrospectively reviewed for all patients at a Level I trauma center (December 1996 to November 2011) who sustained chest trauma with pericardial window (PCW, n = 377) and/or median sternotomy (n = 110). Fifty-five (15%) patients with positive PCW proceeded to sternotomy. Penetrating injury was the dominant mechanism (n = 49, 89%). Nineteen (35%) were hypotensive on arrival or during initial resuscitation. Most received surgeon-performed focused cardiac ultrasound examinations (n = 43, 78%) with positive results (n = 25, 58%). Ventricular injuries were most common, with equivalent numbers occurring on the right (n = 16, 29%) and left (n = 15, 27%). Six (11%) with positive PCW had isolated pericardial lacerations, but 21 (38%) had no repairable cardiac or great vessel injury. Those with therapeutic versus nontherapeutic sternotomies were similar with respect to age, mechanisms of injury, injury severity scores, presenting laboratory values, resuscitation fluids, and vital signs. Multiple logistic regression revealed that penetrating trauma (odds ratio: 13.3) and hemodynamic instability (odds ratio: 7.8) were independent predictors of therapeutic sternotomy. Hemopericardium per se may be overly sensitive for diagnosing cardiac or great vessel injuries after chest trauma. Some stable blunt or penetrating trauma patients without continuing intrapericardial bleeding had nontherapeutic sternotomies, suggesting that this intervention could be avoided in selected cases. Therapeutic study, level III. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  8. The relationship between processes and outcomes for injured older adults: a study of a statewide trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillant, N N; Earl-Royal, E; Pascual, J L; Allen, S R; Kim, P K; Delgado, M K; Carr, B G; Wiebe, D; Holena, D N

    2017-02-01

    Age is a risk factor for death, adverse outcomes, and health care use following trauma. The American College of Surgeons' Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) has published "best practices" of geriatric trauma care; adoption of these guidelines is unknown. We sought to determine which evidence-based geriatric protocols, including TQIP guidelines, were correlated with decreased mortality in Pennsylvania's trauma centers. PA's level I and II trauma centers self-reported adoption of geriatric protocols. Survey data were merged with risk-adjusted mortality data for patients ≥65 from a statewide database, the Pennsylvania Trauma Systems Foundation (PTSF), to compare mortality outlier status and processes of care. Exposures of interest were center-specific processes of care; outcome of interest was PTSF mortality outlier status. 26 of 27 eligible trauma centers participated. There was wide variation in care processes. Four trauma centers were low outliers; three centers were high outliers for risk-adjusted mortality rates in adults ≥65. Results remained consistent when accounting for center volume. The only process associated with mortality outlier status was age-specific solid organ injury protocols (p = 0.04). There was no cumulative effect of multiple evidence-based processes on mortality rate (p = 0.50). We did not see a link between adoption of geriatric best-practices trauma guidelines and reduced mortality at PA trauma centers. The increased susceptibility of elderly to adverse consequences of injury, combined with the rapid growth rate of this demographic, emphasizes the importance of identifying interventions tailored to this population. III. Descriptive.

  9. Prevalence of alcohol among nonfatally injured road accident casualties in two level III trauma centers in northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsere-Derry, James; Palk, Gavan; King, Mark

    2018-02-17

    Alcohol use is pervasive among motorists on the road in Ghana; however, we do not know the extent to which this behavior is implicated in road accidents in this country. The main objective of this research was to establish the prevalence of alcohol in the blood of nonfatally injured casualties in the emergency departments (EDs) in northern Ghana. Participants were injured road traffic crash victims, namely, pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists, and drivers seeking treatment at an ED. The study sites were 2 level III trauma centers located in Wa and Bolgatanga. Participants were screened for alcohol followed by breath tests for positive participants using breathalyzers. Two hundred and sixty-two accident victims visited EDs, 58% of whom were in Wa. Among the victims, 41% were hospitalized and 57% experienced slight injuries. The vast majority (76%) of the casualties were motorcyclists, 13% were pedestrians, 8% were cyclists, and 2% were drivers. Casualties who had detectable alcohol in their blood were predominantly vulnerable road users. In all, 34% of participants had detectable blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) and the mean BAC for all casualties who tested positive and could give definitive BACs was 0.2265 (226 mg/dl). The prevalence of alcohol use was 53% among cyclists, 34% among motorcyclists, 21% among pedestrians, and 17% among drivers. Male casualties were more likely to test positive for alcohol than females. In addition, the prevalence of alcohol was significantly higher among injured casualties in Bolgatanga compared to Wa. There was a high prevalence of alcohol use among nonfatally injured casualties in northern Ghana and injury severity increased with BAC. AUDIT screening in the hospital, alcohol consumption guideline, road safety education with an emphasis on minimizing or eliminating alcohol consumption, and enhanced enforcement of the BAC limit among motorists are recommended.

  10. Functional survival after acute care for severe head injury at a designated trauma center in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict B.T. Taw

    2012-07-01

    Conclusion: Multidisciplinary neurorehabilitation service is an important component of comprehensive trauma care. Despite significant early mortalities, a proportion of severely head-injured patients who survive acute care may achieve good long-term functional recovery.

  11. Pediatric Lower Extremity Lawn Mower Injuries and Reconstruction: Retrospective 10-Year Review at a Level 1 Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Leslie G; Crantford, John C; Thompson, James T; Tannan, Shruti C

    2017-11-01

    From 2004 to 2013, there were 9341 lawn mower injuries in children under 20 years old. The incidence of lawn mower injuries in children has not decreased since 1990 despite implementation of various different prevention strategies. In this report, the authors review the results of pediatric lawn mower-related lower-extremity injuries treated at a tertiary care referral center as well as review the overall literature. A retrospective review was performed at a level 1 trauma center over a 10-year period (2005-2015). Patients younger than 18 years who presented to the emergency room with lower extremity lawn mower injuries were included. Of the 27 patients with lower-extremity lawn mower injuries during this period, the mean age at injury was 5.5 years and Injury Severity Score was 7.2. Most (85%) patients were boys and the predominant type of mower causing injury was a riding lawn mower (96%). Injury occurred in patients who were bystanders in 78%, passengers in 11%, and operators in 11%. Mean length of stay was 12.2 days, and mean time to reconstruction was 7.9 days. Mean number of surgical procedures per patient was 4.1. Amputations occurred in 15 (56%) cases with the most common level of amputation being distal to the metatarsophalangeal joint (67%). Reconstructive procedures ranged from direct closure (41%) to free tissue transfer (7%). Major complications included infection (7%), wound dehiscence (11%), and delayed wound healing (15%). Mean follow up was 23.6 months and 100% of the patients were ambulatory after injury. The subgroup of patients with the most severe injuries, highest number of amputations, and need for overall surgical procedures were patients aged 2 to 5 years. A review of the literature also showed consistent findings. This study demonstrates the danger and morbidity that lawn mowers present to the pediatric population, particularly children aged 2 to 5 years. Every rung of the so-called reconstructive ladder is used in caring for these

  12. KOMUNIKASI TERAPEUTIK DALAM KONSELING (Studi Deskriptif Kualitatif Tahapan Komunikasi Terapeutik dalam Pemulihan Trauma Korban Kekerasan Terhadap Istri di Rifka Annisa Women’s Crisis Center Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etik Anjar Fitriarti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Violence against wives that occured in Indonesia until now there are still many happened. This resulted in various issues such as the trauma of the victims (clients.This client usually ask for help in social institutions such as Rifka Annisa Women’s Crisis Center as Non Govermental Organization (NGO that protect, help and the empower women being a victim of violence. Rifka Annisa Women’s Crisis Center give counseling for the client to raise awareness and recovery client’s trauma. Researchers found communication therapeutic happened in counseling because in counseling happened communication that aims to relieve trauma felt by clients. Researchers analyzed use the theory of therapeutic communication and also put it to the theory of 5 stages of grief to know the psychological clients at each stage of the counseling there are denial, anger, offering, sorrow and acceptance. This research uses the method descriptive qualitative. Informants of research are counselors of psychology which were selected purposively sampling. Data is collected through in-depth interviews, observation the field and documentation.This research result indicates therapy communication is done by counselor in counseling that happened 4 steps there are pre interaction, the orientation, the work and the termination. In addition at every step of therapeutic communication was stages of recovery grief.

  13. Autologous blood transfusion during emergency trauma operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carlos V R; Foulkrod, Kelli H; Sadler, Holli T; Richards, E Kalem; Biggan, Dennis P; Czysz, Clea; Manuel, Tony

    2010-07-01

    Intraoperative cell salvage (CS) of shed blood during emergency surgical procedures provides an effective and cost-efficient resuscitation alternative to allogeneic blood transfusion, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Retrospective matched cohort study. Level I trauma center. All adult trauma patients who underwent an emergency operation and received CS as part of their intraoperative resuscitation. The CS group was matched to a no-CS group for age, sex, Injury Severity Score, mechanism of injury, and operation performed. Amount and cost of allogeneic transfusion of packed red blood cells and plasma. The 47 patients in the CS group were similar to the 47 in the no-CS group for all matched variables. Patients in the CS group received an average of 819 mL of autologous CS blood. The CS group received fewer intraoperative (2 vs 4 U; P = .002) and total (4 vs 8 U; P blood cells. The CS group also received fewer total units of plasma (3 vs 5 U; P = .03). The cost of blood product transfusion (including the total cost of CS) was less in the CS group ($1616 vs $2584 per patient; P = .004). Intraoperative CS provides an effective and cost-efficient resuscitation strategy as an alternative to allogeneic blood transfusion in trauma patients undergoing emergency operative procedures.

  14. Barriers to compliance with evidence-based care in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Nadine; Barnes, Sunni; Fleming, Neil; Kudyakov, Rustam; Ballard, David; Gentilello, Larry M; Shafi, Shahid

    2012-03-01

    We have preciously demonstrated that trauma patients receive less than two-thirds of the care recommended by evidence-based medicine. The purpose of this study was to identify patients least likely to receive optimal care. Records of a random sample of 774 patients admitted to a Level I trauma center (2006-2008) with moderate to severe injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3) were reviewed for compliance with 25 trauma-specific processes of care (T-POC) endorsed by Advanced Trauma Life Support, Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the Brain Trauma Foundation, Surgical Care Improvement Project, and the Glue Grant Consortium based on evidence or consensus. These encompassed all aspects of trauma care, including initial evaluation, resuscitation, operative care, critical care, rehabilitation, and injury prevention. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify patients likely to receive recommended care. Study patients were eligible for a total of 2,603 T-POC, of which only 1,515 (58%) were provided to the patient. Compliance was highest for T-POC involving resuscitation (83%) and was lowest for neurosurgical interventions (17%). Increasing severity of head injuries was associated with lower compliance, while intensive care unit stay was associated with higher compliance. There was no relationship between compliance and patient demographics, socioeconomic status, overall injury severity, or daily volume of trauma admissions. Little over half of recommended care was delivered to trauma patients with moderate to severe injuries. Patients with increasing severity of traumatic brain injuries were least likely to receive optimal care. However, differences among patient subgroups are small in relation to the overall gap between observed and recommended care. II.

  15. Surgical resident perceptions of trauma surgery as a specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzikadic, Lejla; Burke, Peter A; Esposito, Thomas J; Agarwal, Suresh

    2010-05-01

    Presenting the opinions of surgical residents about the appeal of trauma surgery as a specialty may influence current reform. Survey study. Academic research. General surgery residents (postgraduate years 1-5 and recent graduates) registered with the American College of Surgeons. A 22-item survey. Career plans and perceptions about trauma surgery as a specialty. Of 6006 mailed surveys, we had a 20.1% response rate. Midlevel residents comprised most of the respondents, and most were undecided about their career choice or planned to enter general surgical private practice. The typical residency programs represented were academic (81.7%), urban (90.6%), and level I trauma centers (78.7%), and included more than 6 months of trauma experience (77.6%). Most respondents (70.6%) thought that trauma surgery was unappealing. The most important deterrents to entering the field were lifestyle, poor reimbursement, and limited operating room exposure, while increased surgical critical care was not seen as a restriction. When questioned about the future of trauma surgery, they believed that trauma surgeons should perform elective (86.8%) and nontrauma emergency (91.5%) cases and would benefit from active association with an outpatient clinic (76.0%). Intellectual challenge and exciting nature of the field were listed as the most appealing aspects, and ideal practice characteristics included guaranteed salary and time away from work. As demand for trauma surgeons increases, resident interest has dwindled. As a specialty, trauma surgery must undergo changes that reflect the needs of the incoming generation. We present a sampling of current surgical resident opinion and offer these data to assist the changing discipline and the evolving field of acute care surgery.

  16. CT of laryngotracheal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupetin, A.R.; Daffner, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates the usefulness of CT for the diagnosis of traumatic laryngotracheal abnormalities. The authors retrospectively evaluated the neck CT studies of 50 patients (36 males, 14 females; age range, 16-75 years) who presented to a level I trauma center after suffering a blunt or penetrating laryngotracheal injury. CT results were correlated with endoscopic or surgical findings in 43 cases. Three groups emerge. CT positive: hyloid bone or laryngotracheal cartilage injury; CT positive: soft-tissue injury only; and CT negative. In group 1, CT demonstrated all bony or cartilaginous injuries proved at surgery or suggested at endoscopy. CT failed to demonstrate laryngotracheal separation in 1 case. In group 2, CT demonstrated all soft-tissue injuries suggested at endoscopy. In group 3, CT findings agreed with those of endoscopy in 7 cases, but minor soft-tissue findings seen at endoscopy were missed in 3 cases. Seven patients were studied only with CT. Ct is an accurate technique for detecting bony or cartilaginous laryngotracheal traumatic abnormalities. However, laryngotracheal separation and minor soft-tissue injuries can be missed

  17. Does a single specialty intensive care unit make better business sense than a multi-specialty intensive care unit? A costing study in a trauma center in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, Vishwanathan; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Context: Though intensive care units (ICUs) only account for 10% of hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: To evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multi-specialty and neurosurgery ICU in an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203 bedded level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India from May, 2012 to June 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Fisher's two-tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multi-specialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU was Rs. 14,306.7/-, manpower constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist healthcare decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multi-specialty ICUs are more expensive, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that need to be designed. PMID:25829909

  18. Does a single specialty intensive care unit make better business sense than a multi-specialty intensive care unit? A costing study in a trauma center in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmeshwar Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Though intensive care units (ICUs only account for 10% of hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: To evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multi-specialty and neurosurgery ICU in an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203 bedded level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India from May, 2012 to June 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Fisher′s two-tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multi-specialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU was Rs. 14,306.7/-, manpower constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist healthcare decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multi-specialty ICUs are more expensive, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that need to be designed.

  19. [Trauma registry and injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, S C

    2001-10-01

    The trauma registry network constitutes an essential database in every injury prevention system. In order to rationally estimate the extent of injury in general, and injuries from traffic accidents in particular, the trauma registry systems should contain the most comprehensive and broad database possible, in line with the operational definitions. Ideally, the base of the injury pyramid should also include mild injuries and even "near-misses". The Israeli National Trauma Registry has come a long way in the last few years. The eventual inclusion of all trauma centers in Israel will enable the establishment of a firm base for the allocation of resources by decision-makers.

  20. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma in the clinical evaluation of children with blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ishay, Offir; Daoud, Mai; Peled, Zvi; Brauner, Eran; Bahouth, Hany; Kluger, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    In pediatric care, the role of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) remains ill defined. The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of FAST for detecting free peritoneal fluid in children. The trauma registry of a single level I pediatric trauma center was queried for the results of FAST examination of consecutive pediatric (blunt trauma patients over a period of 36 months, from January 2010 to December 2012. Demographics, type of injuries, FAST results, computerized tomography (CT) results, and operative findings were reviewed. During the study period, 543 injured pediatric patients (mean age 8.2 ± 5 years) underwent FAST examinations. In 95 (17.5 %) FAST was positive for free peritoneal fluid. CT examination was performed in 219 (40.3 %) children. Positive FAST examination was confirmed by CT scan in 61/73 (83.6 %). CT detected intra-peritoneal fluid in 62/448 (13.8 %) of the patients with negative FAST results. These findings correspond to a sensitivity of 50 %, specificity of 88 %, positive predictive value (PPV) of 84 %, and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 58 %. In patients who had negative FAST results and no CT examination (302), no missed abdominal injury was detected on clinical ground. FAST examination in the young age group (tool to discriminate injured children in need of further imaging evaluation.

  1. Early predictors of health-related quality of life outcomes in polytrauma patients with spine injuries: a level 1 trauma center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, J W; Chan, C H P; Gruen, R L; Fitzgerald, M C B; Liew, S M; Cameron, P A; Rosenfeld, J V

    2014-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective review on clinical-quality trauma registry prospective data. Objective To identify early predictors of suboptimal health status in polytrauma patients with spine injuries. Methods A retrospective review on a prospective cohort was performed on spine-injured polytrauma patients with successful discharge from May 2009 to January 2011. The Short Form 12-Questionnaire Health Survey (SF-12) was used in the health status assessment of these patients. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were applied to investigate the effects of the Injury Severity Score, age, blood sugar level, vital signs, brain trauma severity, comorbidities, coagulation profile, spine trauma-related neurologic status, and spine injury characteristics of the patients. Results The SF-12 had a 52.3% completion rate from 915 patients. The patients who completed the SF-12 were younger, and there were fewer patients with severe spinal cord injuries (American Spinal Injury Association classifications A, B, and C). Other comparison parameters were satisfactorily matched. Multivariate logistic regression revealed five early predictive factors with statistical significance (p ≤ 0.05). They were (1) tachycardia (odds ratio [OR] = 1.88; confidence interval [CI] = 1.11 to 3.19), (2) hyperglycemia (OR = 2.65; CI = 1.51 to 4.65), (3) multiple chronic comorbidities (OR = 2.98; CI = 1.68 to 5.26), and (4) thoracic spine injuries (OR = 1.54; CI = 1.01 to 2.37). There were no independent early predictive factors identified for suboptimal mental health-related qualify of life outcomes. Conclusion Early independent risk factors predictive of suboptimal physical health status identified in a level 1 trauma center in polytrauma patients with spine injuries were tachycardia, hyperglycemia, multiple chronic medical comorbidities, and thoracic spine injuries. Early spine trauma risk factors were shown not to predict suboptimal mental

  2. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathachai Kaewlai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4 in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7, eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P<0.001.

  3. Dementia as a predictor of mortality in adult trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Benjamin C; Brungardt, Joseph; Reyes, Jared; Helmer, Stephen D; Haan, James M

    2018-01-01

    The specific contribution of dementia towards mortality in trauma patients is not well defined. The purpose of the study was to evaluate dementia as a predictor of mortality in trauma patients when compared to case-matched controls. A 5-year retrospective review was conducted of adult trauma patients with a diagnosis of dementia at an American College of Surgeons-verified level I trauma center. Patients with dementia were matched with non-dementia patients and compared on mortality, ICU length of stay, and hospital length of stay. A total of 195 patients with dementia were matched to non-dementia controls. Comorbidities and complications (11.8% vs 12.4%) were comparable between both groups. Dementia patients spent fewer days on the ventilator (1 vs 4.5, P = 0.031). The length of ICU stay (2 days), hospital length of stay (3 days), and mortality (5.1%) were the same for both groups (P > 0.05). Dementia does not appear to increase the risk of mortality in trauma patients. Further studies should examine post-discharge outcomes in dementia patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Goodman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13% following blunt injury and 20 (87% after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury.

  5. Venous trauma in the Lebanon War--2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitecki, Samy S; Karram, Tony; Hoffman, Aaron; Bass, Arie

    2007-10-01

    Reports on venous trauma are relatively sparse. Severe venous trauma is manifested by hemorrhage, not ischemia. Bleeding may be internal or external and rarely may lead to hypovolemic shock. Repair of major extremity veins has been a subject of controversy and the current teaching is to avoid venous repair in an unstable or multi-trauma patient. The aim of the current paper is to present our recent experience in major venous trauma during the Lebanon conflict, means of diagnosis and treatment in a level I trauma center. All cases of major venous trauma, either isolated or combined with arterial injury, admitted to the emergency room during the 33-day conflict were reviewed. Out of 511 wounded soldiers and civilians who were admitted to our service over this period, 12 (2.3%) sustained a penetrating venous injury either isolated (5) or combined with arterial injury (7). All injuries were secondary to high velocity penetrating missiles or from multiple pellets stored in long-range missiles. All injuries were accompanied by additional insult to soft tissue, bone and viscera. The mean injury severity score was 15. Severe external bleeding was the presenting symptom in three cases of isolated venous injury (jugular, popliteal and femoral). The diagnosis of a major venous injury was made by a CTA scan in five cases, angiography in one and during surgical exploration in six cases. All injured veins were repaired: three by venous interposition grafts, four by end to end anastomosis, three by lateral suture and two by endovascular techniques. None of the injuries was treated by ligation of a major named vein. Immediate postoperative course was uneventful in all patients and the 30-day follow-up (by clinical assessment and duplex scan) has demonstrated a patent repair with no evidence of thrombosis. Without contradicting the wisdom of ligating major veins in the setup of multi-trauma or an unstable patient, our experience indicates that a routine repair of venous trauma can

  6. CT incidence of Morel-Lavallee lesions in patients with pelvic fractures: a 4-year experience at a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Nicholas M; Cai, Chunyan

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the incidence and location of Morel-Lavallee lesions (MLLs) on pelvic CTs performed in evaluation of pelvic fractures and determine if correlation exists between MLLs and mechanism of injury or pelvic ring injury pattern. A retrospective review was performed of pelvic CTs on 1493 consecutive patients presenting with pelvic fractures at our level 1 trauma center. MLLs occurred in 182 of 1493 patients presenting with pelvic fractures. Statistical significance in MLL incidence was found across mechanism of injuries with MLLs being seen most frequently in MCC/ATV accidents and crush injuries. A little over half of MLLs occurred over the lateral thigh with almost all other MLLs occurring over the posterior (flank or lumbar) region. MLLs were much more common in vertical shear and spinopelvic dissociation pelvic ring fracture patterns compared to lateral compression and AP compression patterns. In lateral compression injuries, MLLs most commonly occurred over the thigh. In all other pelvic ring injury patterns, MLLs were predominately posterior. MLL's are not as rare as previously believed. The lateral thigh and lumbar/flank regions should be closely inspected on pelvic trauma patients to identify MLLs, particularly in patients with a spinopelvic dissociation injury pattern.

  7. Spinopelvic dissociation: multidetector computed tomographic evaluation of fracture patterns and associated injuries at a single level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pushpender; Barnwell, Jonathan C; Lenchik, Leon; Wuertzer, Scott D; Miller, Anna N

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) fracture patterns and associated injuries in patients with spinopelvic dissociation (SPD). Our institutional trauma registry database was reviewed from Jan. 1, 2006, to Sept. 30, 2012, specifically evaluating patients with sacral fractures. MDCT scans of patients with sacral fractures were reviewed to determine the presence of SPD. SPD cases were characterized into the following fracture patterns: U-shaped, Y-shaped, T-shaped, H-shaped, and burst. The following MDCT features were recorded: level of the horizontal fracture, location of vertical fracture, kyphosis between major fracture fragments, displacement of fracture fragment, narrowing of central spinal canal, narrowing of neural foramina, and extension into sacroiliac joints. Quantitative evaluation of the sacral fractures was performed in accordance with the consensus statement by the Spine Trauma Study Group. Medical records were reviewed to determine associated pelvic and non-pelvic fractures, bladder and bowel injuries, nerve injuries, and type of surgical intervention. Twenty-one patients had SPD, of whom 13 were men and eight were women. Mean age was 41.8 years (range 18.8 to 87.7). Five fractures (24 %) were U-shaped, six (29 %) H-shaped, four (19 %) Y-shaped, and six (29 %) burst. Nine patients (43 %) had central canal narrowing, and 19 (90 %) had neural foramina narrowing. Eleven patients (52 %) had kyphotic angulation between major fracture fragments, and seven patients (33 %) had either anterior (24 %) or posterior (10 %) displacement of the proximal fracture fragment. Fourteen patients (67 %) had associated pelvic fractures, and 20 (95 %) had associated non-pelvic fractures. Two patients (10 %) had associated urethral injuries, and one (5 %) had an associated colon injury. Seven patients (33 %) had associated nerve injuries. Six patients (29 %) had surgical fixation while 15 (71 %) were

  8. Assessing the academic and professional needs of trauma nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laurie N; Wainwright, Gail A; Stehly, Christy D; Stoltzfus, Jill; Hoff, William S

    2013-01-01

    Because of multiple changes in the health care environment, the use of services of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) in trauma and critical care has expanded. Appropriate training and ongoing professional development for these providers are essential to optimize clinical outcomes. This study offers a baseline assessment of the academic and professional needs of the contemporary trauma PAs/NPs in the United States. A 14-question electronic survey, using SurveyMonkey, was distributed to PAs/NPs at trauma centers identified through the American College of Surgeons Web site and other online resources. Demographic questions included trauma center level, provider type, level of education, and professional affiliations. Likert scale questions were incorporated to assess level of mentorship, comfort level with training, and individual perceived needs for academic and professional development. There were 120 survey respondents: 60 NPs and 60 PAs. Sixty-two respondents (52%) worked at level I trauma centers and 95 (79%) were hospital-employed. Nearly half (49%) reported working in trauma centers for 3 years or less. One hundred nineteen respondents (99%) acknowledged the importance of trauma-specific education; 98 (82%) were required by their institution to obtain such training. Thirty-five respondents (32%) reported receiving $1000 per year or less as a continuing medical education benefit. Insufficient mentorship, professional development, and academic development were identified by 22 (18%), 16 (13%), and 30 (25%) respondents, respectively. Opportunities to network with trauma PAs/NPs outside their home institution were identified as insufficient by 79 (66%). While PAs/NPs in trauma centers recognize the importance of continued contemporary trauma care and evidence-based practices, attending trauma-related education is not universally required by their employers. Financial restrictions may pose an additional impediment to academic development

  9. Trauma patients meeting both Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's definitions for ventilator-associated pneumonia had worse outcomes than those meeting only one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Duraid; Griffin, Russell; Swain, Thomas; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Camins, Bernard

    2017-08-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) replaced its old definition for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) with the ventilator-associated events algorithm in 2013. We sought to compare the outcome of trauma patients meeting the definitions for VAP in the two modules. Trauma patients with blunt or penetrating injuries and with at least 2 d of ventilator support were identified from the trauma registry from 2013 to 2014. VAP was determined using two methods: (1) VAP as defined by the "old," clinically based NHSN definition and (2) possible VAP as defined by the updated "new" NHSN definition. Cohen's kappa statistic was determined to compare the two definitions for VAP. To compare demographic and clinical outcomes, the chi-square and Student's t-tests were used for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. From 2013 to 2014, there were 1165 trauma patients admitted who had at least 2 d of ventilator support. Seventy-eight patients (6.6%) met the "new" NHSN definition for possible VAP, 361 patients (30.9%) met the "old" definition of VAP, and 68 patients (5.8%) met both definitions. The kappa statistic between VAP as defined by the "new" and "old" definitions was 0.22 (95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.27). There were no differences in age, gender, race, or injury severity score when comparing patients who met the different definitions. Those satisfying both definitions had longer ventilator support days (P = 0.0009), intensive care unit length of stay (LOS; P = 0.0003), and hospital LOS (P = 0.0344) when compared with those meeting only one definition. There was no difference in mortality for those meeting both and those meeting the old definition for VAP; patients meeting both definitions had higher respiratory rate at arrival (P = 0.0178). There was no difference in mortality between patients meeting the "old" and "new" NHSN definitions for VAP; those who met "both" definitions had longer

  10. FLOATING ELBOW IN CHILDREN: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF 31 CASES ATTENDED IN A REFERENCE CENTER FOR PEDIATRIC TRAUMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malheiros, Dorotea Starling; Bárbara, Gustavo Henrique Silva; Mafalda, Leandro Gonçalves; Madureira, João Lopo; Braga, Gilberto Ferreira; Terra, Dalton Lopes

    2011-01-01

    To conduct a descriptive analysis on 31 cases of children with floating elbow who were attended at our clinic between 1994 and 2009, and to review the literature relating to this topic. Data were obtained through examining the medical records. The following variables were used: age, gender, side, mechanism, type of fracture, classification, treatment and complications. Twenty-four patients (77.4%) were male and seven (22.6%) were female. The mean age was 8.5 (± 3.2) years, ranging from one to 14 years. The left side was predominantly affected (67.7%). The commonest injury mechanism was a fall from a height (74.2%). All the supracondylar fractures were Gartland type III. Distal radius fractures alone, of Salter-Harris type II, were diagnosed in 22 patients (71%). Open fractures occurred in 22 cases (71%). Closed reduction and application of a plaster cast for a closed fracture of the distal radius was performed in two patients (6.45%). Simultaneous conservative treatment for two fractures was not used. Sixteen supracondylar fractures (54.8%) were fixed using crossed wires, at 90° to each other, and in 14 cases (45.16%), an intramedullary wire was used together with another wire introduced through the lateral epicondyle at 45°. The following complications were observed: deformed consolidation (10%), nerve injuries (6%), compartment syndrome (3%) and pin path infection (16%). This is an uncommon injury that in most cases results from high-energy trauma. Surgical treatment for both fractures is recommended by most authors. Ulnar nerve injuries were correlated with the fixation method, but no neurological injuries were triggered by the initial trauma.

  11. The Trauma Time-Out: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Protocol-Based Information Dissemination in the Traumatically Injured Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Heather R; Fitzgerald, Michael; Howard, Brett; Jarrard, Joey; Vaughn, Danny

    Procedural time-outs are widely accepted safety standards that are protocolized in nearly all hospital systems. The trauma time-out, however, has been largely unstudied in the existing literature and does not have a standard protocol outlined by any of the major trauma surgery organizations. The goal of this study was to evaluate our institution's use of the trauma time-out and assess how trauma team members viewed its effectiveness. A multiple-answer survey was sent to trauma team members at a Level I trauma center. Questions included items directed at background, experience, opinions, and write-in responses. Most responders were experienced trauma team members who regularly participated in trauma codes. All respondents noted the total time required to complete the time-out was less than 5 min, with the majority saying it took less than 1 min. Seventy-five percent agreed that trauma time-outs should continue, with 92% noting that it improved understanding of patient presentation and prehospital evaluation. Seventy-seven percent said it improved understanding of other team member's roles, and 75% stated it improved patient care. Subgroups of physicians and nurses were statistically similar; yet, physicians did note that it improved their understanding of the team member's function more frequently than nurses. The trauma time-out can be an excellent tool to improve patient care and team understanding of the incoming trauma patient. Although used widely at multiple levels of trauma institutions, development of a documented protocol can be the next step in creating a unified safety standard.

  12. Pre-hospital transport times and survival for Hypotensive patients with penetrating thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Swaroop

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achieving definitive care within the "Golden Hour" by minimizing response times is a consistent goal of regional trauma systems . This study hypothesizes that in urban Level I Trauma Centers, shorter pre-hospital times would predict outcomes in penetrating thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed using a statewide trauma registry for the years 1999-2003 . Total pre-hospital times were measured for urban victims of penetrating thoracic trauma. Crude and adjusted mortality rates were compared by pre-hospital time using STATA statistical software. Results: During the study period, 908 patients presented to the hospital after penetrating thoracic trauma, with 79% surviving . Patients with higher injury severity scores (ISS were transported more quickly. Injury severity scores (ISS ≥16 and emergency department (ED hypotension (systolic blood pressure, SBP <90 strongly predicted mortality (P < 0.05 for each . In a logistic regression model including age, race, and ISS, longer transport times for hypotensive patients were associated with higher mortality rates (all P values <0.05. This was seen most significantly when comparing patient transport times 0-15 min and 46-60 min (P < 0.001. Conclusion: In victims of penetrating thoracic trauma, more severely injured patients arrive at urban trauma centers sooner . Mortality is strongly predicted by injury severity, although shorter pre-hospital times are associated with improved survival . These results suggest that careful planning to optimize transport time-encompassing hospital capacity and existing resources, traffic patterns, and trauma incident densities may be beneficial in areas with a high burden of penetrating trauma.

  13. Dissecting delays in trauma care using corporate lean six sigma methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Jennifer K; Klein, Jorie; Frankel, Heidi L; Friese, Randall S; Shafi, Shahid

    2008-11-01

    The Institute of Medicine has identified trauma center overcrowding as a crisis. We applied corporate Lean Six Sigma methodology to reduce overcrowding by quantifying patient dwell times in trauma resuscitation units (TRU) and to identify opportunities for reducing them. TRU dwell time of all patients treated at a Level I trauma center were measured prospectively during a 3-month period (n = 1,184). Delays were defined as TRU dwell time >6 hours. Using personnel trained in corporate Lean Six Sigma methodology, we created a detailed process map of patient flow through our TRU and measured time spent at each step prospectively during a 24/7 week-long time study (n = 43). Patients with TRU dwell time below the median (3 hours) were compared with those with longer dwell times to identify opportunities for improvement. TRU delays occurred in 183 of 1,184 trauma patients (15%), and peaked on days with >15 patients or with presence of five simultaneous patients. However, 135 delays (74%) occurred on days when Six Sigma mapping identified four processes that were related to TRU delays. Reduction of TRU dwell time by 1 hour per patient using interventions targeting these specific processes has the potential to improve our TRU capacity to care for more patients. Application of corporate Lean Six Sigma methodology identified opportunities for reducing dwell times in our TRU. Such endeavors are vital to maximize operational efficiency and decrease overcrowding in busy trauma centers working at capacity.

  14. [Dento-alveolar trauma in odonto-stomatologic consultation in a health center in Yaoundé, Cameroon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengondo, M C; Toham, K A; Mbe Emane, G; Bengono, G

    2007-06-01

    Dento-alveolar traumatisms result from accidents concerning the oral region, and involve all sex and age groups. They have many causes. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the epidemiological profile of dento-alveolar traumatisms, considering their repartition according to age, sex, aetiologies and the more involved teeth. They represented 56.88% of maxillo-facial traumatisms seen all along the period of study. Male were more affected (72.48%) than female (27.52%). The traumatisms were more frequent between 16 and 28 years old (56.45%). With 45.16% of cases, sports were the main aetiology of these traumatisms. Teeth luxations (61.29%) and crown fracture (46.77%) were the more frequent types of traumatisms. The upper incisors were more affected. Dento-alveolar traumas are frequent and their severity depends of the traumatic agent and dento-alveolar morphology. The results of this study are comparable with those of the researches in this area all over world.

  15. Maxillofacial trauma in Tamil Nadu children and adolescents: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramraj Jayabalan Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this retrospective study is to describe the incidence, aetiology, complexity and surgical indications of maxillofacial injuries in children and adolescents population of Tamil Nadu state of india during period of 4 years. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was conducted among 500 children and adolescents patients of age group 6 years to 16 years suffered or suffering with maxillofacial and skull fractures presenting to ten Level I trauma centers over a 4 year period.The data collected for this study included age, gender, etiology, associated maxillofacial trauma, anatomic site of fracture and treatment. Results and Conclusion: In our study the most common cause of trauma was traffic 35%, followed by falls 24% and sports 22%. Mandible was commenest bone prone to fracture, followed by maxilla and nasal bone. Mandible fractures accounted for 72% of all maxillofacial fractures.

  16. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    interest in developing an appropriate and sustainable trauma system in South ... trauma evolved with the social instability which accompanied political change in the ... increased use of military style assault weapons resulted in severe injuries ...

  17. The Epidemiology of Emergency Department Trauma Discharges in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaggio, Charles J; Avraham, Jacob B; Lee, David C; Frangos, Spiros G; Wall, Stephen P

    2017-10-01

    Injury-related morbidity and mortality is an important emergency medicine and public health challenge in the United States. Here we describe the epidemiology of traumatic injury presenting to U.S. emergency departments (EDs), define changes in types and causes of injury among the elderly and the young, characterize the role of trauma centers and teaching hospitals in providing emergency trauma care, and estimate the overall economic burden of treating such injuries. We conducted a secondary retrospective, repeated cross-sectional study of the Nationwide Emergency Department Data Sample (NEDS), the largest all-payer ED survey database in the United States. Main outcomes and measures were survey-adjusted counts, proportions, means, and rates with associated standard errors (SEs) and 95% confidence intervals. We plotted annual age-stratified ED discharge rates for traumatic injury and present tables of proportions of common injuries and external causes. We modeled the association of Level I or II trauma center care with injury fatality using a multivariable survey-adjusted logistic regression analysis that controlled for age, sex, injury severity, comorbid diagnoses, and teaching hospital status. There were 181,194,431 (SE = 4,234) traumatic injury discharges from U.S. EDs between 2006 and 2012. There was a mean year-to-year decrease of 143 (95% CI = -184.3 to -68.5) visits per 100,000 U.S. population during the study period. The all-age, all-cause case-fatality rate for traumatic injuries across U.S. EDs during the study period was 0.17% (SE = 0.001%). The case-fatality rate for the most severely injured averaged 4.8% (SE = 0.001%), and severely injured patients were nearly four times as likely to be seen in Level I or II trauma centers (relative risk = 3.9 [95% CI = 3.7 to 4.1]). The unadjusted risk ratio, based on group counts, for the association of Level I or II trauma centers with mortality was risk ratio = 4.9 (95% CI = 4.5 to 5.3); however, after sex, age

  18. Operation CeaseFire-New Orleans: an infectious disease model for addressing community recidivism from penetrating trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Erin; Duchesne, Juan C; Sarlati, Siavash; O'Neal, Michael; Johnson, Kelly; Avegno, Jennifer

    2014-07-01

    CeaseFire, using an infectious disease approach, addresses violence by partnering hospital resources with the community by providing violence interruption and community-based services for an area roughly composed of a single city zip code (70113). Community-based violence interrupters start in the trauma center from the moment penetrating trauma occurs, through hospital stay, and in the community after release. This study interprets statistics from this pilot program, begun May 2012. We hypothesize a decrease in penetrating trauma rates in the target area compared with others after program implementation. This was a 3-year prospective data collection of trauma registry from May 2010 to May 2013. All intentional, target area, penetrating trauma treated at our Level I trauma center received immediate activation of CeaseFire personnel. Incidences of violent trauma and rates of change, by zip code, were compared with the same period for 2 years before implementation. During this period, the yearly incidence of penetrating trauma in Orleans Parish increased. Four of the highest rates were found in adjacent zip codes: 70112, 70113, 70119, and 70125. Average rates per 100,000 were 722.7, 523.6, 286.4, and 248, respectively. These areas represent four of the six zip codes citywide that saw year-to-year increases in violent trauma during this period. Zip 70113 saw a lower rate of rise in trauma compared with 70112 and a higher but comparable rise compared with that of 70119 and 70125. Hospital-based intervention programs that partner with culturally appropriate personnel and resources outside the institution walls have potential to have meaningful impact over the long term. While few conclusions of the effect of such a program can be drawn in a 12-month period, we anticipate long-term changes in the numbers of penetrating injuries in the target area and in the rest of the city as this program expands. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  19. Frequency of fall-related injuries of female patients referred to the trauma center in the city of Kashan from years 2005 to 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyah Mansour

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Falls are one of the life events leading to injury and in serious cases cause high morbidity and mortality. This research was conducted to determine the fall incidence among female population of Kashan city from the years 2005 to 2008. Methods: This was a retrospective research using existing data from the data bank of trauma center of Kashan University of Medical Sciences. Records of all the female patients treated at local hospitals with complete hospitalisation kept at the center were examined for 4 con-secutive years from 2005 to 2008. Results: A total of 2 094 female patients’ records were examined. A significantly higher incidence of injuy occurred in 2008 compared to 2005 (P<0.0001. In addition, the highest frequency of injury occurred in age group above 65 years (31.9% and in group with elementary education level (42.8%. Conclusion: The results showed that fall incidences occurred in the old age group above 65 years. Fall injuries at this age may cause disability. Therefore, preventive mea-sures should be taken, such as increasing the awareness of the aging population about the seriousness of fall incidence and encouraging the aged individuals to get involved in fitness program to remain physical fit and healthy. Key words: Accidental falls; Wounds and injuries; Female

  20. Use of a Novel Accounting and Grouping Method for Major Trunk Injury-Analysis of Data from a Statewide Trauma Financial Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Kyla D; Mabry, Charles D; Kalkwarf, Kyle J; Betzold, Richard D; Spencer, Horace J; Spinks, Kara M; Porter, Austin; Karim, Saleema; Robertson, Ronald D; Sutherland, Michael J; Maxson, Robert T

    2016-09-01

    Major trunk trauma is common and costly, but comparisons of costs between trauma centers (TCs) are rare. Understanding cost is essential to improve quality, manage trauma service lines, and to facilitate institutional commitment for trauma. We have used results of a statewide trauma financial survey of Levels I to IV TC to develop a useful grouping method for costs and clinical characteristics of major trunk trauma. The trauma financial survey collected billing and clinical data on 75 per cent of the state trauma registry patients for fiscal year 2012. Cost was calculated by separately accounting for embedded costs of trauma response and verification, and then adjusting reasonable costs from the Medicare cost report for each TC. The cost-to-charge ratios were then recalculated and used to determine uniform cost estimates for each patient. From the 13,215 patients submitted for the survey, we selected 1,094 patients with major trunk trauma: lengths of stay ≥ 48 hours and a maximum injury of AIS ≥3 for either thorax or abdominal trauma. These patients were then divided into three Injury Severity Score (ISS) groups of 9 to 15, 16 to 24, or 25+ to stratify patients into similar injury groups for analysis of cost and cost drivers. For abdominal injury, average total cost for patients with ISS 9 to 15 was $17,429. Total cost and cost per day increased with severity of injury, with $51,585 being the total cost for those with ISS 25. Similar trends existed for thoracic injury. Use of the Medicare cost report and cost-to-charge ratios to compute uniform costs with an innovative grouping method applied to data collected across a statewide trauma system provides unique information regarding cost and outcomes, which affects quality improvement, trauma service line management, and decisions on TC participation.

  1. Diversity in clinical management and protocols for the treatment of major bleeding trauma patients across European level I Trauma Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, Nadine; Driessen, Arne; Fröhlich, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    according to clinical assessment in combination with laboratory signs of achieved haemostasis. The severity of coagulopathy and shock is mostly assessed via standard coagulation tests and partially used extended viscoelastic tests. All centres have implemented the immediate use of tranexamic acid. Initial...

  2. Nonoperative treatment of splenic trauma: usefulness of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resende, Vivian; Tavares Junior, Wilson Campos; Vieira, Jose Nelson Mendes; Drumond, Domingos Andre Fernandes

    2005-01-01

    Objective: to report the results of use of conservative treatment in patients with splenic trauma and to emphasize the usefulness of computed tomography in these cases. Material and method: sixty-nine cases of pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma seen from from January 2001 to June 2004 at the level I trauma center were retrospectively studied. Forty-four of these patients were submitted to nonoperative treatment and the clinical follow-up was performed by computerized tomography. All patients had been diagnosed with splenic injury by computerized tomography.Results: the causes of the injuries were motor vehicle accident in 12 (27.2%) patients, bicycle accident in nine (20.4%) patients, and falls in 23 (52.2%) patients. Two (3.7%) patients died from associated injuries. The mean duration of hospital stay was six days. The mean age of the patients was nine years. Conclusion: conservative treatment for blunt splenic trauma is performed with the aim of reducing costs and risks for the patients, and computerized tomography should be routinely used. No posterior complications were observed in this approach. (author)

  3. Infectious complications following duodenal and/or pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyburski, J G; Dente, C J; Wilson, R F; Shanti, C; Steffes, C P; Carlin, A

    2001-03-01

    Patients with pancreatic and/or duodenal trauma often have a high incidence of infectious complications. In this study we attempted to find the most important risk factors for these infections. A retrospective review of the records of 167 patients seen over 7 years (1989 through 1996) at an urban Level I trauma center for injury to the duodenum and/or pancreas was performed. Fifty-nine patients (35%) had isolated injury to the duodenum (13 blunt, 46 penetrating), 81 (49%) had isolated pancreatic trauma (18 blunt, 63 penetrating), and 27 (16%) had combined injuries (two blunt, 25 penetrating). The overall mortality rate was 21 per cent and the infectious morbidity rate was 40 per cent. The majority of patients had primary repair and/or drainage as treatment of their injuries. Patients with pancreatic injuries (alone or combined with a duodenal injury) had a much higher infection rate than duodenal injuries. The patients with duodenal injuries had significantly lower penetrating abdominal trauma indices, number of intra-abdominal organ injuries, and incidence of hypothermia. On multivariate analysis independent factors associated with infections included hypothermia and the presence of a pancreatic injury. Although injuries to the pancreas and duodenum often coexist it is the pancreatic injury that contributes most to the infectious morbidity.

  4. Nonoperative treatment of splenic trauma: usefulness of computed tomography; Tratamento conservador do trauma esplenico: utilidade da tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resende, Vivian [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Tavares Junior, Wilson Campos; Vieira, Jose Nelson Mendes [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: wilsontavaresjrmd@yahoo.fr; Drumond, Domingos Andre Fernandes [Hospital Joao XXIII, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Setor de Clinica Cirurgica

    2005-04-15

    Objective: to report the results of use of conservative treatment in patients with splenic trauma and to emphasize the usefulness of computed tomography in these cases. Material and method: sixty-nine cases of pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma seen from from January 2001 to June 2004 at the level I trauma center were retrospectively studied. Forty-four of these patients were submitted to nonoperative treatment and the clinical follow-up was performed by computerized tomography. All patients had been diagnosed with splenic injury by computerized tomography.Results: the causes of the injuries were motor vehicle accident in 12 (27.2%) patients, bicycle accident in nine (20.4%) patients, and falls in 23 (52.2%) patients. Two (3.7%) patients died from associated injuries. The mean duration of hospital stay was six days. The mean age of the patients was nine years. Conclusion: conservative treatment for blunt splenic trauma is performed with the aim of reducing costs and risks for the patients, and computerized tomography should be routinely used. No posterior complications were observed in this approach. (author)

  5. Study of Effectiveness of Human Factors Engineering Interference in Cumulative Trauma Disorders Rate Decreasing in the Tehran South Health Center 2005-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Noorisepehr

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Up to now accomplished many investigations about cumulative trauma disorders (CTD accession. For the most part sitting pattern and unsuitable task posture has been specified reason of these complications. In the publicized stats from a foreign source ambit of 44 percent of people who worked with computer has been afflict to the CTD's. The aim of this paper is to find and measurement of CTD and ergonomic intervention and investigation rate of this intervention's effect in the Tehran south health center. This center use paperless system. Methods: In this research Nordic questionnaire distribute between 68 persons of the center to determine CTD's. By technical expert inspection specified reason of complications. Observantly to state methods reason which create more severity and frequency CTD's has been recognized and interference with human factors engineering. For the more efficiency of interference Anthropometry has been used for all of Work stations and for any person designed a significant posture. Results: results that obtained before interference indicate that were CTD's complications at more of employees which 90 percent of them suffered of up spine pain. Also 27.4 percent of them had shoulder pain and 20.4 percent had neck pain. After the interference these measures decreased. And complaint of employee decreased 40.8 percent to up spine pain. Also for the shoulder pain it reached to 22 and neck pain 17.6 percent. With state test identified that there are significant difference between CTD after and before of intervention (p<0.005. Conclusion: Being unsuitable task posture is main cause of CTD's in the Work stations. We can prevent to increasing these complications in the work place by simple approach like adjustment in the desk and chair height, correct performance working training and doing simple exercise.

  6. Severity-Adjusted Mortality in Trauma Patients Transported by Police

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, Roger A.; Salhi, Rama A.; Holena, Daniel N.; Powell, Elizabeth; Branas, Charles C.; Carr, Brendan G.

    2018-01-01

    Study objective Two decades ago, Philadelphia began allowing police transport of patients with penetrating trauma. We conduct a large, multiyear, citywide analysis of this policy. We examine the association between mode of out-of-hospital transport (police department versus emergency medical services [EMS]) and mortality among patients with penetrating trauma in Philadelphia. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of trauma registry data. Patients who sustained any proximal penetrating trauma and presented to any Level I or II trauma center in Philadelphia between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2007, were included. Analyses were conducted with logistic regression models and were adjusted for injury severity with the Trauma and Injury Severity Score and for case mix with a modified Charlson index. Results Four thousand one hundred twenty-two subjects were identified. Overall mortality was 27.4%. In unadjusted analyses, patients transported by police were more likely to die than patients transported by ambulance (29.8% versus 26.5%; OR 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00 to 1.39). In adjusted models, no significant difference was observed in overall mortality between the police department and EMS groups (odds ratio [OR] 0.78; 95% CI 0.61 to 1.01). In subgroup analysis, patients with severe injury (Injury Severity Score >15) (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.59 to 0.90), patients with gunshot wounds (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.53 to 0.94), and patients with stab wounds (OR 0.19; 95% CI 0.08 to 0.45) were more likely to survive if transported by police. Conclusion We found no significant overall difference in adjusted mortality between patients transported by the police department compared with EMS but found increased adjusted survival among 3 key subgroups of patients transported by police. This practice may augment traditional care. PMID:24387925

  7. The use of laparoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of blunt and penetrating abdominal injuries: 10-year experience at a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremy J; Garwe, Tabitha; Raines, Alexander R; Thurman, Joseph B; Carter, Sandra; Bender, Jeffrey S; Albrecht, Roxie M

    2013-03-01

    Diagnostic laparoscopy (DL) has decreased the rate of nontherapeutic laparotomy for patients suffering from penetrating injuries. We evaluated whether DL similarly lowers the rate of nontherapeutic laparotomy for patients with blunt injuries. All patients undergoing DL over a 10-year period (ie, 2001-2010) in a single level 1 trauma center were classified by the mechanism of injury. Demographic and perioperative data were compared using the Student t and Fisher exact tests. There were 131 patients included, 22 of whom sustained blunt injuries. Patients suffering from blunt injuries were more severely injured (Injury Severity Score 18.0 vs 7.3, P = .0001). The most common indication for DL after blunt injury was a computed tomographic scan concerning for bowel injury (59.1%). The rate of nontherapeutic laparotomy for patients sustaining penetrating vs blunt injury was 1.8% and nil, respectively. DL, when coupled with computed tomographic findings, is an effective tool for the initial management of patients with blunt injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Trauma care system in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zargar Moussa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: The high burden of injuries in Iran necessitates the establishment of a comprehensive trauma care system. The purpose of this paper is to de- scribe the current status of trauma system regarding the components and function. Methods: The current status of trauma system in all components of a trauma system was described through ex- pert panels and semi-structured interviews with trauma spe- cialists and policy makers. Results: Currently, various organizations are involved in prevention, management and rehabilitation of injuries, but an integrative system approach to trauma is rather deficient. There has been ongoing progress in areas of pub- lic education through media, traffic regulation reinforcement, hospital care and prehospital services. Meanwhile, there are gaps regarding financing, legislations and education of high risk groups. The issues on education and training stan- dards of the front line medical team and continuing educa- tion and evaluation are yet to be addressed. Trauma regis- try has been piloted in some provinces, but as it needs the well-developed infrastructure (regarding staff, maintenance, financial resources, it is not yet established in our system of trauma care. Conclusions: It seems that one of the problems with trauma care in Iran is lack of coordination among trauma system organizations. Although the clinical management of trauma patients has improved in our country in the recent decade, decreasing the burden of injuries necessitates an organized approach to prevention and management of trauma in the context of a trauma system. Key words: Emergency medical services; Trauma centers; Wounds and injuries

  9. Is paediatric trauma severity overestimated at triage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DO, H Q; Hesselfeldt, R; Steinmetz, J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe paediatric trauma is rare, and pre-hospital and local hospital personnel experience with injured children is often limited. We hypothesised that a higher proportion of paediatric trauma victims were taken to the regional trauma centre (TC). METHODS: This is an observational...... follow-up study that involves one level I TC and seven local hospitals. We included paediatric (trauma patients with a driving distance to the TC > 30 minutes. The primary end-point was the proportion of trauma patients arriving in the TC. RESULTS: We included 1934...... trauma patients, 238 children and 1696 adults. A total of 33/238 children (13.9%) vs. 304/1696 adults (17.9%) were transported to the TC post-injury (P = 0.14). Among these, children were significantly less injured than adults [median Injury Severity Score (ISS) 9 vs. 14, P 

  10. Facial trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxillofacial injury; Midface trauma; Facial injury; LeFort injuries ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in detection of blunt abdominal trauma and comparison of early and late ultrasonography 24 hours after trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyzi, Ali; Rad, Masoud Pezeshki; Ahanchi, Navid; Firoozabadi, Jalil

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advantages of ultrasound scan, its use as a screening tool in blunt abdominal trauma is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of early and late ultrasound in patients with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). In this study which was performed in a level I trauma center, firstly, 2418 patients with BAT had ultrasound (US) examination by two trauma expert radiologists. Results were compared with the best available gold standards such as laparotomy, CT, repeated ultrasound or clinical course follow-up. Then, 400 patients with BAT were examined by a trained residency student. In the first phase, sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value and accuracy of ultrasound were 97%, 98.1%, 99.7%, 83% and 98% respectively. In the second phase, they were 97.3%, 97.2%, 97.7%, 96.8% and 97.3% for the early and 98.5%, 97.6%, 98.5%, 97.5% and 98% for the late ultrasound respectively. Results obtained from this study indicate that negative ultrasound findings associated with negative clinical observation virtually exclude abdominal injury, and confirmation by performing other tests is unnecessary. High sensitivity and negative predictive value is achieved if ultrasound is performed by expert trauma radiologist.

  12. Improving teamwork and communication in trauma care through in situ simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel; Crandall, Cameron; Washington, Charles; McLaughlin, Steven

    2012-05-01

    Teamwork and communication often play a role in adverse clinical events. Due to the multidisciplinary and time-sensitive nature of trauma care, the effects of teamwork and communication can be especially pronounced in the treatment of the acutely injured patient. Our hypothesis was that an in situ trauma simulation (ISTS) program (simulating traumas in the trauma bay with all members of the trauma team) could be implemented in an emergency department (ED) and that this would improve teamwork and communication measured in the clinical setting. This was an observational study of the effect of an ISTS program on teamwork and communication during trauma care. The authors observed a convenience sample of 39 trauma activations. Cases were selected by their presenting to the resuscitation bay of a Level I trauma center between 09:00 and 16:00, Monday through Thursday, during the study period. Teamwork and communication were measured using the previously validated Clinical Teamwork Scale (CTS). The observers were three Trauma Nursing Core Course certified RNs trained on the CTS by observing simulated and actual trauma cases and following each of these cases with a discussion of appropriate CTS scores with two certified Advanced Trauma Life Support instructors/emergency physicians. Cases observed for measurement were scored in four phases: 1) preintervention phase (baseline); 2) didactic-only intervention, the phase following a lecture series on teamwork and communication in trauma care; 3) ISTS phase, real trauma cases scored during period when weekly ISTSs were performed; and 4) potential decay phase, observations following the discontinuation of the ISTSs. Multirater agreement was assessed with Krippendorf's alpha coefficient; agreement was excellent (mean agreement = 0.92). Nonparametric procedures (Kruskal-Wallis) were used to test the hypothesis that the scores observed during the various phases were different and to compare each individual phase to baseline scores

  13. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    services (EMS) response times and advanced prehospital care increase the number of critically injured patients surviving sufficiently long to reach a hospital “in extremis.” Both scenarios provide challenges in the management of traumatized patients. This article addresses the management of severely......Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  14. [Analysis of the pediatric trauma score in patients wounded with shrapnel; the effect of explosives with high kinetic energy: results of the first intervention center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taş, Hüseyin; Mesci, Ayhan; Demirbağ, Suzi; Eryılmaz, Mehmet; Yiğit, Taner; Peker, Yusuf

    2013-03-01

    We aimed to assess the pediatric trauma score analysis in pediatric trauma cases due to shrapnel effect of explosives material with high kinetic energy. The data of 17 pediatric injuries were reviewed retrospectively between February 2002 and August 2005. The information about age, gender, trauma-hospital interval, trauma mechanism, the injured organs, pediatric Glasgow coma score (PGCS), pediatric trauma score (PTS), hemodynamic parameters, blood transfusion, interventions and length of hospital stay (LHS) were investigated. While all patients suffered from trauma to the extremities, only four patients had traumatic lower-limb amputation. Transportation time was 1 hour in 65% of cases. While PTS was found as 8 (p=0.007). Morbidity rates of PTS 8 cases were 29.4% and 5.9%, respectively (p=0.026). While LHS was 22.8 days in PTS LHS was found to be only 4 days in PTS >8 cases. This difference was found to be statistically significant (p=0.001). PTS is very efficient and a time-saving procedure to assess the severity of trauma caused by the shrapnel effect. The median heart rate, morbidity, and LHS increased significantly in patients with PTS <=8.

  15. Factors associated with children and teenagers’ trauma of victims treated at a referral center in Southern BrazilFatores associados a crianças e adolescentes vítimas de trauma atendidas em um centro de referência no sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Viegas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Physical trauma is one of the most common causes of death and disability in children's development and adolescents. By consequence, pediatric trauma is a topic that needs further studies. OBJECTIVE: The identification of factors associated with child and adolescent victims of trauma treated at a referral center in Southern Brazil relating to trauma in children and adolescents from birth to age 14 years treated in a hospital emergency room. METHODS: A retrospective study using secondary data from a hospital service, performed the analysis of associated factors among 375 children and adolescents (range 0-14 years admitted to the emergency room for any kind of physical trauma and the variables described about the traumas. The period was June 14 to December 14, 2013. RESULTS: Most patients were male (65.1%, white (89.1%; they were attended nightly (45.9% and belonging to the age group 10-14 years (40.3%, head and neck prevailed in number occurrences with 33.6% of cases, followed by the upper and lower limbs 27.7% and 26.9%, respectively. Falls represented 45.6% of cases, followed by exposure to inanimate mechanical forces (12% and exposure to animated mechanical forces (5.9%. The neurosurgery service was the most referenced for younger age groups, while for the older groups were the maxillofacial services (p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: This study showed results that draw the community’s attention not only academic, but also to call the attention of caregivers to work with constant prevention alternatives to the monitoring of the course of children’s development.

  16. Risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality in elderly patients admitted to a regional trauma center after sustaining a fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena, L J; Kang, A; Munnangi, S; Jordan, A; Nweze, I C; Sasthakonar, V; Boutin, A; George Angus, L D

    2017-06-01

    Falls are a significant cause of mortality in the elderly patients. Despite this, the literature on in-hospital mortality related to elderly falls remains sparse. Our study aims to determine the risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality in elderly patients admitted to a regional trauma center after sustaining a fall. All elderly case records with fall-related injuries between 2003 and 2013 were retrospectively analyzed for demographic characteristics, injury severities, comorbidity factors and clinical outcomes. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality. In total, 1026 elderly patients with fall-related injuries were included in the study. The average age of patients was 80.94 ± 8.16 years. Seventy seven percent of the patients had at least one comorbid condition. Majority of the falls occurred at home. More than half of the patients fell from ground level. Overall, the in-hospital mortality rate was 16 %. Head injury constituted the most common injury sustained in patients who died (77 %). In addition to age, ISS, GCS, ICU admission and anemia were significantly (P fall patients. Ground-level falls in the elderly can be devastating and carry a significant mortality rate. Elderly patients with anemia were two times more likely to die in the hospital after sustaining a fall in our study population. Increased focus on anemia which is often underappreciated in elderly fall patients can be beneficial in improving outcomes and reducing in-hospital mortality.

  17. Trauma patients who present in a delayed fashion: a unique and challenging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Mary J; Nunez, Hector; Monaghan, Sean F; Heffernan, Daithi S; Adams, Charles A; Lueckel, Stephanie N; Stephen, Andrew H

    2017-02-01

    A proportion of trauma patients present for evaluation in a delayed fashion after injury, likely due to a variety of medical and nonmedical reasons. There has been little investigation into the characteristics and outcomes of trauma patients who present delayed. We hypothesize that trauma patients who present in a delayed fashion are a unique population at risk of increased trauma-related complications. This was a retrospective review from 2010-2015 at a Level I trauma center. Patients were termed delayed if they presented >24 hours after injury. Patients admitted within 24 hours of their injury were the comparison group. Charts were reviewed for demographics, mechanism, comorbidities, complications and outcomes. A subgroup analysis was done on patients who suffered falls. During the 5-y period, 11,705 patients were admitted. A total of 588 patients (5%) presented >24 h after their injury. Patients in the delayed group were older (65 versus 55 y, P fashion have unique characteristics and are more likely to suffer negative outcomes including substance withdrawal. Future goals will include exploring strategies for early intervention, such as automatic withdrawal monitoring and social work referral for all patients who present in a delayed fashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Does trauma team activation associate with the time to CT scan for those suspected of serious head injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rados, Alma; Tiruta, Corina; Xiao, Zhengwen; Kortbeek, John B; Tourigny, Paul; Ball, Chad G; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W

    2013-11-18

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) constitutes the leading cause of posttraumatic mortality. Practically, the major interventions required to treat TBI predicate expedited transfer to CT after excluding other immediately life-threatening conditions. At our center, trauma responses variably consist of either full trauma activation (FTA) including an attending trauma surgeon or a non-trauma team response (NTTR). We sought to explore whether FTAs expedited the time to CT head (TTCTH). Retrospective review of augmented demographics of 88 serious head injuries identified from a Regional Trauma Registry within one year at a level I trauma center. The inclusion criteria consisted of a diagnosis of head injury recorded as intubated or GCS FTA (median 50 vs. 26 minutes, p FTA). Without FTA, most delays (69%) were for emergency intubation. TTCTH after securing the airway was longer for NTTR group (median 38 vs. 26 minutes, p =0.0013). Even with no requirements for ED interventions, TTCTH for FTA was less than half versus NTTR (25 vs. 61 minutes, p =0.0013). Multivariate regression analysis indicated age and FTA with an attending surgeon as significant predictors of TTCTH, although the majority of variability in TTCTH was not explained by these two variables (R² = 0.33). Full trauma activations involving attending trauma surgeons were quicker at transferring serious head injury patients to CT. Patients with FTA were younger and more seriously injured. Discerning the reasons for delays to CT should be used to refine protocols aimed at minimizing unnecessary delays and enhancing workforce efficiency and clinical outcome.

  19. Trauma Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Y. Kong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available “Major Trauma. Dr. Kong, please come to the Trauma Unit immediately. Dr. Kong, please come to the Trauma Unit immediately.” Even though I have been working at Edendale Hospital as a trauma registrar for over a year, whenever I hear this announcement over the hospital intercom system, my heart beats just a little faster than normal. When I first arrived at Edendale my colleagues told me that the adrenaline rush I would experience after being called out to attend a new emergency would decrease over time, and indeed they were right. However, it is also true to say that on some occasions more than others, it is still felt more strongly than ever.

  20. Tailbone trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    For tailbone trauma when no spinal cord injury is suspected: Relieve pressure on the tailbone by sitting on an inflatable rubber ring or cushions. Take acetaminophen for pain. Take a stool softener to avoid constipation. If you suspect injury ...

  1. Paediatric trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trauma Unit, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town ... projects, educational initiatives and advocacy roles on child safety initiatives regarding child injuries as well as child abuse. ... The development of the total body digital.

  2. Facial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, N; Lemkens, P; Leach, R; Gemels B; Schepers, S; Lemmens, W

    Facial trauma. Patients with facial trauma must be assessed in a systematic way so as to avoid missing any injury. Severe and disfiguring facial injuries can be distracting. However, clinicians must first focus on the basics of trauma care, following the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) system of care. Maxillofacial trauma occurs in a significant number of severely injured patients. Life- and sight-threatening injuries must be excluded during the primary and secondary surveys. Special attention must be paid to sight-threatening injuries in stabilized patients through early referral to an appropriate specialist or the early initiation of emergency care treatment. The gold standard for the radiographic evaluation of facial injuries is computed tomography (CT) imaging. Nasal fractures are the most frequent isolated facial fractures. Isolated nasal fractures are principally diagnosed through history and clinical examination. Closed reduction is the most frequently performed treatment for isolated nasal fractures, with a fractured nasal septum as a predictor of failure. Ear, nose and throat surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons and ophthalmologists must all develop an adequate treatment plan for patients with complex maxillofacial trauma.

  3. Pre-hospital transfusion of plasma in hemorrhaging trauma patients independently improves hemostatic competence and acidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Hanne Herborg; Rahbar, Elaheh; Baer, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    hypothesized that pre-hospital plasma would improve hemostatic function as evaluated by rapid thrombelastography (rTEG). METHODS: We conducted a prospective observational study recruiting 257 trauma patients admitted to a Level I trauma center having received either blood products pre-hospital or in......BACKGROUND: The early use of blood products has been associated with improved patient outcomes following severe hemorrhage or traumatic injury. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-hospital blood products (i.e. plasma and/or RBCs) on admission hemostatic properties and patient outcomes. We......-hospital within 6 hours of admission. Clinical data on patient demographics, blood biochemistry, injury severity score and mortality were collected. Admission rTEG was conducted to characterize the coagulation profile and hemostatic function. RESULTS: 75 patients received pre-hospital plasma and/or RBCs (PH group...

  4. Comparing the responsiveness of functional outcome assessment measures for trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Owen D; Gabbe, Belinda J; Sutherland, Ann M; Wolfe, Rory; Forbes, Andrew B; Cameron, Peter A

    2011-07-01

    Measuring long-term disability and functional outcomes after major trauma is not standardized across trauma registries. An ideal measure would be responsive to change but not have significant ceiling effects. The aim of this study was to compare the responsiveness of the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), GOS-Extended (GOSE), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and modified FIM in major trauma patients, with and without significant head injuries. Patients admitted to two adult Level I trauma centers in Victoria, Australia, who survived to discharge from hospital, were aged 15 years to 80 years with a blunt mechanism of injury, and had an estimated Injury Severity Score >15 on admission, were recruited for this prospective study. The instruments were administered at baseline (hospital discharge) and by telephone interview 6 months after injury. Measures of responsiveness, including effect sizes, were calculated. Bootstrapping techniques, and floor and ceiling effects, were used to compare the measures. Two hundred forty-three patients participated, of which 234 patients (96%) completed the study. The GOSE and GOS were the most responsive instruments in this major trauma population with effect sizes of 5.3 and 4.4, respectively. The GOSE had the lowest ceiling effect (17%). The GOSE was the instrument with greatest responsiveness and the lowest ceiling effect in a major trauma population with and without significant head injuries and is recommended for use by trauma registries for monitoring functional outcomes and benchmarking care. The results of this study do not support the use of the modified FIM for this purpose.

  5. Amygdala Reactivity and Anterior Cingulate Habituation Predict Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Maintenance After Acute Civilian Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jennifer S; Kim, Ye Ji; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Reddy, Renuka; Ely, Timothy D; Nemeroff, Charles B; Hudak, Lauren A; Jovanovic, Tanja; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Ressler, Kerry J

    2017-06-15

    Studies suggest that exaggerated amygdala reactivity is a vulnerability factor for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, our understanding is limited by a paucity of prospective, longitudinal studies. Recent studies in healthy samples indicate that, relative to reactivity, habituation is a more reliable biomarker of individual differences in amygdala function. We investigated reactivity of the amygdala and cortical areas to repeated threat presentations in a prospective study of PTSD. Participants were recruited from the emergency department of a large level I trauma center within 24 hours of trauma. PTSD symptoms were assessed at baseline and approximately 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after trauma. Growth curve modeling was used to estimate symptom recovery trajectories. Thirty-one individuals participated in functional magnetic resonance imaging around the 1-month assessment, passively viewing fearful and neutral face stimuli. Reactivity (fearful > neutral) and habituation to fearful faces was examined. Amygdala reactivity, but not habituation, 5 to 12 weeks after trauma was positively associated with the PTSD symptom intercept and predicted symptoms at 12 months after trauma. Habituation in the ventral anterior cingulate cortex was positively associated with the slope of PTSD symptoms, such that decreases in ventral anterior cingulate cortex activation over repeated presentations of fearful stimuli predicted increasing symptoms. Findings point to neural signatures of risk for maintaining PTSD symptoms after trauma exposure. Specifically, chronic symptoms were predicted by amygdala hyperreactivity, and poor recovery was predicted by a failure to maintain ventral anterior cingulate cortex activation in response to fearful stimuli. The importance of identifying patients at risk after trauma exposure is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Provider perceptions concerning use of chest x-ray studies in adult blunt trauma assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Georgina; Perez, Daniel; Fortman, Jonathan; Kea, Bory; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    Although they infrequently lead to management changing diagnoses, chest x-rays (CXRs) are the most commonly ordered imaging study in blunt trauma evaluation. To determine: 1) the reasons physicians order chest X-ray studies (CXRs) in blunt trauma assessments; 2) what injuries they expect CXRs to reveal; and 3) whether physicians can accurately predict low likelihood of injury on CXR. At a Level I Trauma Center, we asked resident and attending physicians treating adult blunt trauma patients: 1) the primary reason(s) for getting CXRs; 2) what, if any, significant intrathoracic injuries (SITI) they expected CXRs to reveal; and 3) the likelihood of these injuries. An expert panel defined SITI as two or more rib fractures, sternal fracture, pulmonary contusion, pneumothorax, hemothorax, or aortic injury on official CXR readings. There were 484 patient encounters analyzed--65% of participating physicians were residents and 35% were attendings; 16 (3.3%) patients had SITI. The most common reasons for ordering CXRs were: "enough concern for significant injury" (62.9%) and belief that CXR is a "standard part of trauma work-up" (24.8%). Residents were more likely than attendings to cite "standard trauma work-up" (mean difference = 13.5%, p = 0.003). When physicians estimated a 25% likelihood, 9.1% (95% CI 3.0-20.0%) had SITI. Physicians order CXRs in blunt trauma patients because they expect to find injuries and believe that CXRs are part of a "standard" work-up. Providers commonly do not expect CXRs to reveal SITI. When providers estimated low likelihood of SITI, the rate of SITI was very low. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. [Chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct to Operating Room Trauma Resuscitation Decreases Mortality Among Severely Injured Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieck, Minna M; Cunningham, Aaron J; Behrens, Brandon; Ohm, Erika T; Maxwell, Bryan G; Hamilton, Nicholas A; Adams, M Christopher; Cole, Frederick J; Jafri, Mubeen A

    2018-03-16

    Expediting evaluation and intervention for severely injured patients has remained a mainstay of advanced trauma care. One technique, direct to operating room (DOR) resuscitation, for selective adult patients has demonstrated decreased mortality. We sought to investigate the application of this protocol in children. All DOR pediatric patients from 2009-2016 at a pediatric Level I Trauma Center were identified. DOR criteria included penetrating injury, chest injuries, amputations, significant blood loss, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and surgeon discretion. Demographics, injury patterns, interventions, and outcomes were analyzed. Observed mortality was compared to expected mortality, calculated using Trauma Injury Severity Score (TRISS) methodology, with two-tailed t-tests and a p-value 15, 33% had GCS≤8, and 9% were hypotensive. The most commonly injured body regions were external (66%), head (34%), chest (30%), and abdomen (27%). Sixty-seven patients (82%) required emergent procedural intervention, most commonly wound exploration/repair (35%), central venous access (22%), tube thoracostomy (19%) and laparotomy (18%). Predictors of intervention were ISS>15 (odds ratio=14, p=0.013) and GCS<9 (odds ratio=8.5, p=0.044). The survival rate to discharge for DOR patients was 84% compared with an expected survival of 79% (TRISS) (p=0.4). The greatest improvement relative to expected mortality was seen in the subgroup with penetrating trauma (84.5% vs. 74.4%, p=0.002). A selective policy of resuscitating the most severely injured children in the operating room can decrease mortality. Patients suffering penetrating trauma with the highest ISS and diminished GCS have the greatest benefit. Trauma centers with appropriate resources should evaluate implementing similar policies. Level II. Diagnostic tests or criteria.

  9. Benchmarking of trauma care worldwide: the potential value of an International Trauma Data Bank (ITDB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adil H; Hashmi, Zain G; Gupta, Sonia; Zafar, Syed Nabeel; David, Jean-Stephane; Efron, David T; Stevens, Kent A; Zafar, Hasnain; Schneider, Eric B; Voiglio, Eric; Coimbra, Raul; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-08-01

    National trauma registries have helped improve patient outcomes across the world. Recently, the idea of an International Trauma Data Bank (ITDB) has been suggested to establish global comparative assessments of trauma outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine whether global trauma data could be combined to perform international outcomes benchmarking. We used observed/expected (O/E) mortality ratios to compare two trauma centers [European high-income country (HIC) and Asian lower-middle income country (LMIC)] with centers in the North American National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB). Patients (≥16 years) with blunt/penetrating injuries were included. Multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for known predictors of trauma mortality, was performed. Estimates were used to predict the expected deaths at each center and to calculate O/E mortality ratios for benchmarking. A total of 375,433 patients from 301 centers were included from the NTDB (2002-2010). The LMIC trauma center had 806 patients (2002-2010), whereas the HIC reported 1,003 patients (2002-2004). The most important known predictors of trauma mortality were adequately recorded in all datasets. Mortality benchmarking revealed that the HIC center performed similarly to the NTDB centers [O/E = 1.11 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92-1.35)], whereas the LMIC center showed significantly worse survival [O/E = 1.52 (1.23-1.88)]. Subset analyses of patients with blunt or penetrating injury showed similar results. Using only a few key covariates, aggregated global trauma data can be used to adequately perform international trauma center benchmarking. The creation of the ITDB is feasible and recommended as it may be a pivotal step towards improving global trauma outcomes.

  10. Gender differences among recidivist trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Rita O; Cureton, Elizabeth L; Dozier, Kristopher C; Victorino, Gregory P

    2011-01-01

    Gender differences among trauma recidivist patients are not well-understood. We hypothesized that males are more likely to be repeatedly involved in the trauma system and have a shorter time to recurrence between repeat episodes of injury compared with females. A retrospective analysis of trauma patients treated at an urban university-based trauma center was performed. Variables including gender, race, insurance status, age, mechanism of injury, outcomes, and injury secondary to domestic violence were compared. Differences were compared using χ(2) tests and log-rank (Mantel-Cox) Kaplan-Meier cumulative event curves. We identified 689 trauma recidivist patients (4.0% of all trauma visits) over a 10-y period. Compared to single-visit patients, recidivist patients were more likely to be male (87% versus 73%), uninsured (78% versus 66%), and have injuries secondary to assaults (54% versus 37%) (P trauma visit was shorter for females compared with males (23 ± 2.5 versus 30 ± 1.2 mo, P trauma than were male recidivists (69% versus 43%, P trauma patients have a much shorter time to recurrence for a second traumatic injury than do males. Female recidivists have a high likelihood of assault-associated injuries and domestic violence. Trauma centers should screen for domestic violence among trauma patients to aid in preventing further repeat episodes of injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, R; Bhattacharya, S

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic trauma occurs in approximately 4% of all patients sustaining abdominal injuries. The pancreas has an intimate relationship with the major upper abdominal vessels, and there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with severe pancreatic injury. Immediate resuscitation and investigations are essential to delineate the nature of the injury, and to plan further management. If main pancreatic duct injuries are identified, specialised input from a tertiary hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) team is advised. A comprehensive online literature search was performed using PubMed. Relevant articles from international journals were selected. The search terms used were: 'pancreatic trauma', 'pancreatic duct injury', 'radiology AND pancreas injury', 'diagnosis of pancreatic trauma', and 'management AND surgery'. Articles that were not published in English were excluded. All articles used were selected on relevance to this review and read by both authors. Pancreatic trauma is rare and associated with injury to other upper abdominal viscera. Patients present with non-specific abdominal findings and serum amylase is of little use in diagnosis. Computed tomography is effective in diagnosing pancreatic injury but not duct disruption, which is most easily seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography or operative pancreatography. If pancreatic injury is suspected, inspection of the entire pancreas and duodenum is required to ensure full evaluation at laparotomy. The operative management of pancreatic injury depends on the grade of injury found at laparotomy. The most important prognostic factor is main duct disruption and, if found, reconstructive options should be determined by an experienced HPB surgeon. The diagnosis of pancreatic trauma requires a high index of suspicion and detailed imaging studies. Grading pancreatic injury is important to guide operative management. The most important prognostic factor is pancreatic duct disruption and in these cases

  12. Splenic Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Diaz, Fabio F; Buitrago Mejia, Francisco; Ulloa Guerrero, Luis Heber

    2001-01-01

    The spleen is the organ that is injured during the closed trauma with more frequency and it is the cause more common of foregone death in the patients with wounded abdominal. At the present time the complications of the splenic trauma are related with their severity, associate wounds, diagnostic fail or inadequate treatments. The lesions that are diagnosed in early form are managed quick and satisfactorily, but the forgotten wounds or the diagnoses and late treatments take for themselves high rates of morbid-mortality. The paper includes their phyto pathology, diagnoses, classification and treatment

  13. Ballistic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathi Devi Munishwar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gunshot injuries are rather serious but uncommon type of trauma in India. Radiologists can contribute substantially in the evaluation and treatment of patients with gunshot wounds. Foreign bodies that enter a patient as a result of trauma are contaminated and produce a range of symptoms. Oral and maxillofacial gunshot injuries are usually fatal due to close proximity with vital structures. Here, we report a case in which radiographic evidence of foreign bodies in the right orofacial region exposed a history of a gunshot injury. The patient did not have any major complaints except for reduced mouth opening. These foreign bodies were clinically silent for approximately 12 years.

  14. Thoracic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Bradley M; Bellister, Seth A; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Management of chest trauma is integral to patient outcomes owing to the vital structures held within the thoracic cavity. Understanding traumatic chest injuries and appropriate management plays a pivotal role in the overall well-being of both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. Whether the injury includes rib fractures, associated pulmonary injuries, or tracheobronchial tree injuries, every facet of management may impact the short- and long-term outcomes, including mortality. This article elucidates the workup and management of the thoracic cage, pulmonary and tracheobronchial injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Helicopter overtriage in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Maria; Goldstein, Seth D; Salazar, Jose; Aboagye, Jonathan; Stewart, Dylan; Efron, David; Abdullah, Fizan; Haut, Elliot R

    2014-11-01

    Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) have been designed to provide faster access to trauma center care in cases of life-threatening injury. However, the ideal recipient population is not fully characterized, and indications for helicopter transport in pediatric trauma vary dramatically by county, state, and region. Overtriage, or unnecessary utilization, can lead to additional patient risk and expense. In this study we perform a nationwide descriptive analysis of HEMS for pediatric trauma and assess the incidence of overtriage in this group. We reviewed records from the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank (2008-11) and included patients less than 16 years of age who were transferred from the scene of injury to a trauma center via HEMS. Overtriage was defined as patients meeting all of the following criteria: Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) equal to 15, absence of hypotension, an Injury Severity Score (ISS) less than 9, no need for procedure or critical care, and a hospital length of stay of less than 24 hours. A total of 19,725 patients were identified with a mean age of 10.5 years. The majority of injuries were blunt (95.6%) and resulted from motor vehicle crashes (48%) and falls (15%). HEMS transported patients were predominately normotensive (96%), had a GCS of 15 (67%), and presented with minor injuries (ISS<9, 41%). Overall, 28 % of patients stayed in the hospital for less than 24 hours, and the incidence of overtriage was 17%. Helicopter overtriage is prevalent among pediatric trauma patients nationwide. The ideal model to predict need for HEMS must consider clinical outcomes in the context of judicious resource utilization. The development of guidelines for HEMS use in pediatric trauma could potentially limit unnecessary transfers while still identifying children who require trauma center care in a timely fashion. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Trauma Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bodil Maria

    There are two main trends in psychological approaches to human suffering related to what we term trauma. Although they have their respective limitations both approaches may help us explore and alleviate human suffering. One trend, primarily using concepts like traumatic events and traumatisation ...

  17. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, Kansas River Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Upper Kansas River Watershed Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period as part of a...

  18. Repeated CT scans in trauma transfers: An analysis of indications, radiation dose exposure, and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinzpeter, Ricarda; Sprengel, Kai; Wanner, Guido A.; Mildenberger, Peter; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Repetition of CT in trauma patients occurs relatively often. • Repetition of CT is mainly caused by inadequate image data transfer. • Potentially preventable CT examinations add radiation dose to patients. • Repeated CT is associated with excess costs to the health care system. - Abstract: Objectives: To identify the number of CT scans repeated in acute trauma patients receiving imaging before being referred to a trauma center, to define indications, and to assess radiation doses and costs of repeated CT. Methods: This retrospective study included all adult trauma patients transferred from other hospitals to a Level-I trauma center during 2014. Indications for repeated CT scans were categorized into: inadequate CT image data transfer, poor image quality, repetition of head CT after head injury together with completion to whole-body CT (WBCT), and follow-up of injury known from previous CT. Radiation doses from repeated CT were determined; costs were calculated using a nation-wide fee schedule. Results: Within one year, 85/298 (28.5%) trauma patients were transferred from another hospital because of severe head injury (n = 45,53%) and major body trauma (n = 23;27%) not manageable in the referring hospital, repatriation from a foreign country (n = 14;16.5%), and no ICU-capacity (n = 3;3.5%). Of these 85 patients, 74 (87%) had repeated CT in our center because of inadequate CT data transfer (n = 29;39%), repetition of head CT with completion to WBCT (n = 24;32.5%), and follow-up of known injury (n = 21;28.5%). None occurred because of poor image quality. Cumulative dose length product (DLP) and annual costs of potential preventable, repeated CT (inadequate data transfer) was 631mSv (81′304mGy*cm) and 35′233€, respectively. Conclusion: A considerable number of transferred trauma patients undergo potentially preventable, repeated CT, adding radiation dose to patients and costs to the health care system.

  19. Repeated CT scans in trauma transfers: An analysis of indications, radiation dose exposure, and costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinzpeter, Ricarda, E-mail: Ricarda.Hinzpeter@usz.ch [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Raemistr. 100, Zurich CH-8091 (Switzerland); Sprengel, Kai, E-mail: Kai.Sprengel@usz.ch [Division of Trauma Surgery, Department of Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Raemistr. 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Wanner, Guido A., E-mail: Guido.Wanner@sbk-vs.de [Division of Trauma Surgery, Department of Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Raemistr. 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Department of General Surgery, Schwarzwald-Baar Klinikum, University of Freiburg, Klinikstr. 11, D-78052 Villingen-Schwenningen (Germany); Mildenberger, Peter, E-mail: peter.mildenberger@unimedizin-mainz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Alkadhi, Hatem, E-mail: hatem.alkadhi@usz.ch [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Raemistr. 100, Zurich CH-8091 (Switzerland)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Repetition of CT in trauma patients occurs relatively often. • Repetition of CT is mainly caused by inadequate image data transfer. • Potentially preventable CT examinations add radiation dose to patients. • Repeated CT is associated with excess costs to the health care system. - Abstract: Objectives: To identify the number of CT scans repeated in acute trauma patients receiving imaging before being referred to a trauma center, to define indications, and to assess radiation doses and costs of repeated CT. Methods: This retrospective study included all adult trauma patients transferred from other hospitals to a Level-I trauma center during 2014. Indications for repeated CT scans were categorized into: inadequate CT image data transfer, poor image quality, repetition of head CT after head injury together with completion to whole-body CT (WBCT), and follow-up of injury known from previous CT. Radiation doses from repeated CT were determined; costs were calculated using a nation-wide fee schedule. Results: Within one year, 85/298 (28.5%) trauma patients were transferred from another hospital because of severe head injury (n = 45,53%) and major body trauma (n = 23;27%) not manageable in the referring hospital, repatriation from a foreign country (n = 14;16.5%), and no ICU-capacity (n = 3;3.5%). Of these 85 patients, 74 (87%) had repeated CT in our center because of inadequate CT data transfer (n = 29;39%), repetition of head CT with completion to WBCT (n = 24;32.5%), and follow-up of known injury (n = 21;28.5%). None occurred because of poor image quality. Cumulative dose length product (DLP) and annual costs of potential preventable, repeated CT (inadequate data transfer) was 631mSv (81′304mGy*cm) and 35′233€, respectively. Conclusion: A considerable number of transferred trauma patients undergo potentially preventable, repeated CT, adding radiation dose to patients and costs to the health care system.

  20. Factors Associated with Complications in Older Adults with Isolated Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfipour, Shahram

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of adverse events in elderly trauma patients with isolated blunt thoracic trauma, and to identify variables associated with these adverse events.METHODS: We performed a chart review of 160 trauma patients age 65 and older with significant blunt thoracic trauma, drawn from an American College of Surgeons Level I Trauma Center registry. Patients with serious injury to other body areas were excluded to prevent confounding the cause of adverse events. Adverse events were defined as acute respiratory distress syndrome or pneumonia, unanticipated intubation, transfer to the intensive care unit for hypoxemia, or death. Data collected included history, physical examination, radiographic findings, length of hospital stay, and clinical outcomes.RESULTS: Ninety-nine patients had isolated chest injury, while 61 others had other organ systems injured and were excluded. Sixteen patients developed adverse events [16.2% 95% confidence interval (CI 9.5-24.9%], including two deaths. Adverse events were experienced by 19.2%, 6.1%, and 28.6% of those patients 65-74, 75-84, and >/=85 years old, respectively. The mean length of stay was 14.6 days in patients with an adverse event and 5.8 days in patients without. Post hoc analysis revealed that all 16 patients with an adverse event had one or more of the following: age >/=85, initial systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg, hemothorax, pneumothorax, three or more unilateral rib fractures, or pulmonary contusion (sensitivity 100%, CI 79.4-100%; specificity 38.6%, CI 28.1-49.9%.CONCLUSION: Adverse events from isolated thoracic trauma in elderly patients complicate 16% of our sample. These criteria were 100% sensitive and 38.5% specific for these adverse events. This study is a first step to identifying variables that might aid in identifying patients at high risk for serious adverse events.

  1. Subway-Related Trauma: An Urban Public Health Issue with a High Case-Fatality Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodier, Simon G; DiMaggio, Charles J; Wall, Stephen; Sim, Vasiliy; Frangos, Spiros G; Ayoung-Chee, Patricia; Bukur, Marko; Tandon, Manish; Todd, S Rob; Marshall, Gary T

    2018-05-09

    Between 1990 and 2003, there were 668 subway-related fatalities in New York City. However, subway-related trauma remains an understudied area of injury-related morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to characterize the injuries and events leading up to the injuries of all patients admitted after subway-related trauma. We conducted a retrospective case series of subway-related trauma at a Level I trauma center from 2001 to 2016. Descriptive epidemiology of patient demographics, incident details, injuries, and outcomes were analyzed. Over 15 years, 254 patients were admitted for subway-related trauma. The mean (standard error of the mean) age was 41 (1.0) years, 80% were male (95% confidence interval [CI] 74-84%) and median Injury Severity Score was 14 (interquartile range [IQR] 5-24). The overall case-fatality rate was 10% (95% CI 7-15%). The most common injuries were long-bone fractures, intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic amputations. Median length of stay was 6 days (IQR 1-18 days). Thirty-seven percent of patients required surgical intervention. At the time of injury, 55% of patients (95% CI 49-61%) had a positive urine drug or alcohol screen, 16% (95% CI 12-21%) were attempting suicide, and 39% (95% CI 33-45%) had a history of psychiatric illness. Subway-related trauma is associated with a high case-fatality rate. Alcohol or drug intoxication and psychiatric illness can increase the risk of this type of injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Utility of esophageal gastroduodenoscopy at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scalea Thomas M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The utility of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD performed at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is unclear. We examined whether EGD at time of PEG yielded clinically useful information important in patient care. We also reviewed the outcome and complication rates of EGD-PEG performed by trauma surgeons. Methods Retrospective review of all trauma patients undergoing EGD with PEG at a level I trauma center from 1/01–6/03. Results 210 patients underwent combined EGD with PEG by the trauma team. A total of 37% of patients had unsuspected upper gastrointestinal lesions seen on EGD. Of these, 35% had traumatic brain injury, 10% suffered multisystem injury, and 47% had spinal cord injury. These included 15 esophageal, 61 gastric, and six duodenal lesions, mucosal or hemorrhagic findings on EGD. This finding led to a change in therapy in 90% of patients; either resumption/continuation of H2 -blockers or conversion to proton-pump inhibitors. One patient suffered an upper gastrointestinal bleed while on H2-blocker. It was treated endoscopically. Complication rates were low. There were no iatrogenic visceral perforations seen. Three PEGs were inadvertently removed by the patient (1.5%; one was replaced with a Foley, one replaced endoscopically, and one patient underwent gastric repair and open jejunostomy tube. One PEG leak was repaired during exploration for unrelated hemorrhage. Six patients had significant site infections (3%; four treated with local drainage and antibiotics, one requiring operative debridement and later closure, and one with antibiotics alone. Conclusion EGD at the time of PEG may add clinically useful data in the management of trauma patients. Only one patient treated with acid suppression therapy for EGD diagnosed lesions suffered delayed gastrointestinal bleeding. Trauma surgeons can perform EGD and PEG with acceptable outcomes and complication rates.

  3. Management of the geriatric trauma patient at risk of death: therapy withdrawal decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunkey, D D; Cahn, R M; Lenfesty, B; Mullins, R

    2000-01-01

    The management of geriatric injured patients admitted to a trauma center includes the selective decision to provide comfort care only, including withdrawal of therapy, and a choice to not use full application of standard therapies. The decision makers in this process include multiple individuals in addition to the patient. Retrospective review of documentation by 2 blinded reviewers of the cohort of patients over a recent 5-year period (1993-1997). Trauma service of a level I trauma center. A convenience sample of patients aged 65 years and older who died, and whose medical record was available for review. Patients were categorized as having withdrawal of therapy, and documentation in the medical record of who made the assessment decisions and recommendations, and to what extent the processes of care were documented. Among 87 geriatric trauma patients who died, 47 had documentation interpreted as indicating a decision was made to withdraw therapy. In only a few circumstances was the patient capable of actively participating in these decisions. The other individuals involved in recommendations for withdrawal of therapy were, in order of prevalence, the treating trauma surgeon, family members (as proxy reporting the patient's preferences), or a second physician. Documentation regarding the end-of-life decisions was often fragmentary, and in some cases ambiguous. Copies of legal advance directives were rarely available in the medical record, and ethics committee participation was used only once. Withdrawal of therapy is a common event in the terminal care of geriatric injured patients. The process for reaching a decision regarding withdrawal of therapy is complex because in most circumstances patients' injuries preclude their full participation. Standards for documentation of essential information, including patients' preferences and decision-making ability, should be developed to improve the process and assist with recording these complicated decisions that often

  4. Abdominal compartment syndrome in trauma patients: New insights for predicting outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha W Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS is associated with high morbidity and mortality among trauma patients. Several clinical and laboratory findings have been suggested as markers for ACS, and these may point to different types of ACS and complications. Aims: This study aims to identify the strength of association of clinical and laboratory variables with specific adverse outcomes in trauma patients with ACS. Settings and Design: A 5-year retrospective chart review was conducted at three Level I Trauma Centers in the City of Chicago, IL, USA. Subjects and Methods:A complete set of demographic, pre-, intra- and post-operative variables were collected from 28 patient charts. Statistical Analysis:Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to determine the strength of association between 29 studied variables and eight end outcomes. Results: Thirty-day mortality was associated strongly with the finding of an initial intra-abdominal pressure >20 mmHg and moderately with blunt injury mechanism. A lactic acid >5 mmol/L on admission was moderately associated with increased blood transfusion requirements and with acute renal failure during the hospitalization. Developing ACS within 48 h of admission was moderately associated with increased length of stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU, more ventilator days, and longer hospital stay. Initial operative intervention lasting more than 2 h was moderately associated with risk of developing multi-organ failure. Hemoglobin level 7 days were moderately associated with a disposition to long-term support facility. Conclusions: Clinical and lab variables can predict specific adverse outcomes in trauma patients with ACS. These findings may be used to guide patient management, improve resource utilization, and build capacity within trauma centers.

  5. [Pancreatic trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvieux, C; Guillon, F; Létoublon, Ch; Oughriss, M

    2003-10-01

    Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma has always been challenging because of the lack of correlation between the initial clinical symptomatology, radiologic and laboratory findings, and the severity of the injury. Thanks to the improved performance of spiral CT scanning and magnetic resonance pancreatography, it is now often possible to make an early diagnosis of pancreatic contusion, to localize the site of the injury, and (most importantly) to identify injury to the main pancreatic duct which has major implications for the management of the case. When the trauma victim is unstable, radiologic work-up may be impossible and urgent laparotomy is required. Control of hemorrhage is the primary concern here and a damage control approach with packing may be appropriate; if the pancreatic head has been destroyed, a pancreaticoduodenectomy with delayed reconstruction may be required. If the trauma victim is stable, the treatment strategy will be governed by a variety of parameters--age, clinical condition, associated local anatomic findings (pancreatitis, injury to the duodenum or biliary tract), involvement of the pancreatic duct, and localization of the injury within the gland (to right or left of the mesenteric vessels).

  6. Universal Screening for Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence in Trauma Patients - What About the Men? An EAST Multicenter Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrison, Tanya L; Rattan, Rishi; Milian Valdés, Davel; Ruiz, Xiomara; Gelbard, Rondi; Cline, John; Turay, David; Luo-Owen, Xian; Namias, Nicholas; George, Jessica; Yeh, Dante; Pust, Daniel; Williams, Brian H

    2018-02-14

    A recent EAST-supported, multicenter trial demonstrated a similar rate of intimate partner and sexual violence (IPSV) between male and female trauma patients, regardless of mechanism. Our objective was to perform a subgroup analysis of our affected male cohort as this remains an understudied group in the trauma literature. We conducted a recent EAST-supported, cross-sectional, multicenter trial over one year (03/15-04/16) involving four Level I trauma centers throughout the United States. We performed universal screening of adult trauma patients using the validated HITS (Hurt, Insult, Threaten, Scream) and SAVE (sexual violence) screening surveys. Risk factors for male patients were identified. Chi-squared test compared categorical variables with significance at p<0.05. Parametric data is presented as mean +/-standard deviation. A total of 2,034 trauma patients were screened, of which 1,281 (63%) were men. Of this cohort, 119 men (9.3%) screened positive for intimate partner violence, 14.1% for IPSV and 6.5% for sexual violence. On categorical analysis of the HITS screen, the proportion of men that were physically hurt was 4.8% compared to 4.3% for women (p = 0.896). A total of 4.8% of men screened positive for both intimate partner and sexual violence. The total proportion of men who presented with any history of intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both (IPSV) was 15.8%. More men affected by penetrating trauma screened positive for IPSV (p < 0.00001). IPSV positivity in men was associated with mental illness, substance abuse, and trauma recidivism. One out of every twenty men that present to trauma centers is a survivor of both intimate partner and sexual violence, with one out of every six men experiencing some form of violence. Men are at similar risk for physical abuse as women when this intimate partner violence occurs. IPSV is associated with penetrating trauma in men. Support programs for this population may potentially impact associated mental

  7. The role of the neonatal nurse practitioner in the community hospital level I nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) have played a significant role in providing medical coverage to many of the country's Level III neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Extensive education and experience are required for a nurse practitioner (NP) to become competent in caring for these critically ill newborns. The NNP can take this competence and experience and expand her role out into the community Level I nurseries. Clinical care of the infants and close communication with parents, pediatricians, and the area tertiary center provide a community service with the goal of keeping parents and babies together in the community hospital without compromising the health of the baby. The NNP service, with 24-hour nursery and delivery coverage, supports an ongoing obstetric service to the community hospital. The NNP's experience enables her to provide a neonatal service that encompasses a multitude of advanced practice nursing roles.

  8. Comparison of endoscopic-assisted and temporary keratoprosthesis-assisted vitrectomy in combat ocular trauma: experience at a tertiary eye center in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyildiz, Onder; Hakan Durukan, Ali

    2018-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to compare the functional and anatomical results of endoscopic-assisted and temporary keratoprosthesis (TKP)-assisted vitrectomy in patients with combat ocular trauma (COT). Methods The medical records of 14 severely injured eyes of 12 patients who underwent endoscopy or TKP implantation in combination with vitreoretinal surgery from 2007 to 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. The patients' ocular history and functional and anatomic anterior and posterior segment results were analyzed. Results Eight eyes (57%) underwent TKP-assisted vitrectomy and six eyes (43%) underwent endoscopic vitrectomy. The most common cause of COT was detonation of improvised explosive devices (72%), and the most common type of injury was an intraocular foreign body (50%). The median time from trauma to surgery and the median surgical time were significantly shorter in the endoscopy than TKP group. The postoperative functional and anatomical results were not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusions TKP-assisted vitrectomy should be performed in eyes requiring extensive bimanual surgery. In such cases, a corneal graft must be preserved for the TKP at the end of the surgery. Endoscopy shortens the surgical time and can reduce the complication rate.

  9. Structure, Process, and Culture of Intensive Care Units Treating Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Survey of Centers Participating in the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Aziz S; McCredie, Victoria A; Mainprize, Todd G; Gomez, David; Nathens, Avery B

    2017-10-01

    Outcome after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) differs substantially between hospitals. Explaining this variation begins with understanding the differences in structures and processes of care, particularly at intensive care units (ICUs) where acute TBI care takes place. We invited trauma medical directors (TMDs) from 187 centers participating in the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program (ACS TQIP) to complete a survey. The survey domains included ICU model, type, availability of specialized units, staff, training programs, standard protocols and order sets, approach to withdrawal of life support, and perceived level of neurosurgeons' engagement in the ICU management of TBI. One hundred forty-two TMDs (76%) completed the survey. Severe TBI patients are admitted to dedicated neurocritical care units in 52 hospitals (37%), trauma ICUs in 44 hospitals (31%), general ICUs in 34 hospitals (24%), and surgical ICUs in 11 hospitals (8%). Fifty-seven percent are closed units. Board-certified intensivists directed 89% of ICUs, whereas 17% were led by neurointensivists. Sixty percent of ICU directors were general surgeons. Thirty-nine percent of hospitals had critical care fellowships and 11% had neurocritical care fellowships. Fifty-nine percent of ICUs had standard order sets and 61% had standard protocols specific for TBI, with the most common protocol relating to intracranial pressure management (53%). Only 43% of TMDs were satisfied with the current level of neurosurgeons' engagement in the ICU management of TBI; 46% believed that neurosurgeons should be more engaged; 11% believed they should be less engaged. In the largest survey of North American ICUs caring for TBI patients, there is substantial variation in the current approaches to ICU care for TBI, highlighting multiple opportunities for comparative effectiveness research.

  10. Early fever after trauma: Does it matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Holly E; Rowell, Susan; Morris, Cynthia; Lin, Amber L; Schreiber, Martin A

    2018-01-01

    Fever is strongly associated with poor outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We hypothesized that early fever is a direct result of brain injury and thus would be more common in TBI than in patients without brain injury and associated with inflammation. We prospectively enrolled patients with major trauma with and without TBI from a busy Level I trauma center intensive care unit (ICU). Patients were assigned to one of four groups based on their presenting Head Abbreviated Injury Severity Scale scores: multiple injuries: head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score greater than 2, one other region greater than 2; isolated head: head AIS score greater than 2, all other regions less than 3; isolated body: one region greater than 2, excluding head/face; minor injury: no region with AIS greater than 2. Early fever was defined as at least one recorded temperature greater than 38.3°C in the first 48 hours after admission. Outcome measures included neurologic deterioration, length of stay in the ICU, hospital mortality, discharge Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended, and plasma levels of seven key cytokines at admission and 24 hours (exploratory). Two hundred sixty-eight patients were enrolled, including subjects with multiple injuries (n = 59), isolated head (n = 97), isolated body (n = 100), and minor trauma (n = 12). The incidence of fever was similar in all groups irrespective of injury (11-24%). In all groups, there was a significant association between the presence of early fever and death in the hospital (6-18% vs. 0-3%), as well as longer median ICU stays (3-7 days vs. 2-3 days). Fever was significantly associated with elevated IL-6 at admission (50.7 pg/dL vs. 16.9 pg/dL, p = 0.0067) and at 24 hours (83.1 pg/dL vs. 17.1 pg/dL, p = 0.0025) in the isolated head injury group. Contrary to our hypothesis, early fever was not more common in patients with brain injury, though fever was associated with longer ICU stays and death in all groups. Additionally, fever was

  11. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicky, S.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Capasso, P.; Denys, A.

    2000-01-01

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  12. Urethral trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, B.M.; Hricak, H.; Dixon, C.; McAninch, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the role of MR imaging in posterior urethral trauma. Fifteen patients with posttraumatic membranous urethral strictures underwent prospective MR imaging with a 1.5-T unit before open urethroplasty. All patients had transaxial T1-weighted (500/20) and T2-weighted (2,500/70) spin-echo images and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images (matrix, 192 x 256; section thickness, 4 mm with 20% gap). Conventional retrograde and cystourethrography were performed preoperatively. Compared with conventional studies, MR imaging defined the length and location of the urethral injury and provided additional information regarding the direction and degree of prostatic and urethral dislocation

  13. Images in kidney trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Jose Luis; Rodriguez, Sonia Pilar; Manzano, Ana Cristina

    2007-01-01

    A case of a 3 years old female patient, who suffered blunt lumbar trauma (horse kick) with secondary kidney trauma, is reported. Imaging findings are described. Renal trauma classification and imaging findings are reviewed

  14. Transcatheter Treatment of Liver Laceration from Blunt Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Hardy, Andrew Hal; Phan, Ho; Khanna, Pavan; Nolan, Timothy; Dong, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Blunt hepatic trauma is a fairly common pathology seen in trauma centers. We describe a pediatric patient who suffered blunt hepatic trauma that was managed successfully with a combination of exploratory laparotomy and liver packing, followed by hepatic artery embolization by interventional radiology (IR) after he continued to have significant arterial extravasation. Also discussed are trends in overall blunt hepatic trauma management and the technique of IR management.

  15. Trauma facilities in Denmark - a nationwide cross-sectional benchmark study of facilities and trauma care organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C; Frederiksen, Christian A; Laursen, Christian B; Sloth, Erik; Mølgaard, Ole; Knudsen, Lars; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2018-03-27

    Trauma is a leading cause of death among adults aged facilities and the use multidisciplinary trauma teams. Because knowledge is sparse on the existing distribution of trauma facilities and the organisation of trauma care in Denmark, the aim of this study was to identify all Danish facilities that care for traumatized patients and to investigate the diversity in organization of trauma management. We conducted a systematic observational cross-sectional study. First, all hospitals in Denmark were identified via online services and clarifying phone calls to each facility. Second, all trauma care manuals on all facilities that receive traumatized patients were gathered. Third, anesthesiologists and orthopedic surgeons on call at all trauma facilities were contacted via telephone for structured interviews. A total of 22 facilities in Denmark were found to receive traumatized patients. All facilities used a trauma care manual and all had a multidisciplinary trauma team. The study found three different trauma team activation criteria and nine different compositions of teams who participate in trauma care. Training was heterogeneous and, beyond the major trauma centers, databases were only maintained in a few facilities. The study established an inventory of the existing Danish facilities that receive traumatized patients. The trauma team activation criteria and the trauma teams were heterogeneous in both size and composition. A national database for traumatized patients, research on nationwide trauma team activation criteria, and team composition guidelines are all called for.

  16. Costs and Length of Stay for the Acute Care of Patients with Motor-Complete Spinal Cord Injury Following Cervical Trauma: The Impact of Early Transfer to Specialized Acute SCI Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Denis, Andréane; Ehrmann Feldman, Debbie; Thompson, Cynthia; Bourassa-Moreau, Étienne; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-07-01

    Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) centers aim to optimize outcome following SCI. However, there is no timeframe to transfer patients from regional to SCI centers in order to promote cost-efficiency of acute care. Our objective was to compare costs and length of stay (LOS) following early and late transfer to the SCI center. A retrospective cohort study involving 116 individuals was conducted. Group 1 (n = 87) was managed in an SCI center promptly after the trauma, whereas group 2 (n = 29) was transferred to the SCI center only after surgery. Direct comparison and multivariate linear regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between costs, LOS, and timing to transfer to the SCI center. Length of stay was significantly longer for group 2 (median, 93.0 days) as compared with group 1 (median, 40.0 days; P SCI center was the main predictive factor of longer LOS and increased costs. Early admission to the SCI center was associated with shorter LOS and lower costs for patients sustaining tetraplegia. Early referral to an SCI center before surgery could lower the financial burden for the health care system. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Determine the optimal timing for transfer of individuals with cervical traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in order to decrease acute care resource utilization; (2) Determine benefits of a complete perioperative management in a specialized SCI center; and (3) Identify factors that may influence resource utilization for acute care following motor-complete tetraplegia. Advanced ACCREDITATION: The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.The Association of Academic Physiatrists designates this activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

  17. Microbiological and functional outcomes after open extremity fractures sustained overseas: The experience of a UK level I trauma centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ardehali

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: Patients with open extremity fractures transferred from overseas present the unique challenge of poly-microbial infection in addition to extensive traumatic wounds. Favourable outcomes can be achieved despite positive microbiological findings on tissue culture with adequate antimicrobial therapy. The decision to salvage the limb and the complexity of reconstruction used should be based on the chance of achieving meaningful functional recovery, mainly determined by the extent of bony injury. The complexity of reconstruction was based on the predicted long-term functionality of the salvaged limb.

  18. Adherence to the guidelines of paediatric cervical spine clearance in a level I trauma centre: A single centre experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaar, Annelie; Fockens, M. Matthijs; van Rijn, Rick R.; Maas, Mario; Goslings, J. Carel; Bakx, Roel; Streekstra, Geert J.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; Schep, Niels W. L.

    2016-01-01

    International guidelines define if and what type of radiography is advised in children to clear the cervical spine (C-spine). However, adherence to these guidelines has never been evaluated in a paediatric population. Therefore, we wanted to assess the adherence to the guidelines for C-spine

  19. Distribution of specialized care centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry E; Yealy, Donald M

    2012-11-01

    As a recommended strategy for optimally managing critical illness, regionalization of care involves matching the needs of the target population with available hospital resources. The national supply and characteristics of hospitals providing specialized critical care services is currently unknown. We seek to characterize the current distribution of specialized care centers in the United States. Using public data linked with the American Hospital Association directory and US Census, we identified US general acute hospitals providing specialized care for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) (≥40 annual primary percutaneous coronary interventions reported in Medicare Hospital Compare), stroke (The Joint Commission certified stroke centers), trauma (American College of Surgeons or state-designated, adult or pediatric, level I or II), and pediatric critical care (presence of a pediatric ICU) services. We determined the characteristics and state-level distribution and density of specialized care centers (centers per state and centers per state population). Among 4,931 acute care hospitals in the United States, 1,325 (26.9%) provided one of the 4 defined specialized care services, including 574 STEMI, 763 stroke, 508 trauma, and 457 pediatric critical care centers. Approximately half of the 1,325 hospitals provided 2 or more specialized services, and one fifth provided 3 or 4 specialized services. There was variation in the number of each type of specialized care center in each state: STEMI median 7 interquartile range (IQR 2 to 14), stroke 8 (IQR 3 to 17), trauma 6 (IQR 3 to 11), pediatric specialized care 6 (IQR 3 to 11). Similarly, there was variation in the number of each type of specialized care center per population: STEMI median 1 center per 585,135 persons (IQR 418,729 to 696,143), stroke 1 center per 412,188 persons (IQR 321,604 to 572,387), trauma 1 center per 610,589 persons (IQR 406,192 to 917,588), and pediatric critical care 1 center per 665

  20. The effect of hospital care on early survival after penetrating trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David E; Doolittle, Peter C; Winchell, Robert J; Betensky, Rebecca A

    2014-12-01

    The effectiveness of emergency medical interventions can be best evaluated using time-to-event statistical methods with time-varying covariates (TVC), but this approach is complicated by uncertainty about the actual times of death. We therefore sought to evaluate the effect of hospital intervention on mortality after penetrating trauma using a method that allowed for interval censoring of the precise times of death. Data on persons with penetrating trauma due to interpersonal assault were combined from the 2008 to 2010 National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) and the 2004 to 2010 National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS). Cox and Weibull proportional hazards models for survival time (t SURV ) were estimated, with TVC assumed to have constant effects for specified time intervals following hospital arrival. The Weibull model was repeated with t SURV interval-censored to reflect uncertainty about the precise times of death, using an imputation method to accommodate interval censoring along with TVC. All models showed that mortality was increased by older age, female sex, firearm mechanism, and injuries involving the head/neck or trunk. Uncensored models showed a paradoxical increase in mortality associated with the first hour in a hospital. The interval-censored model showed that mortality was markedly reduced after admission to a hospital, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.68 (95% CI 0.63, 0.73) during the first 30 min declining to a HR of 0.01 after 120 min. Admission to a verified level I trauma center (compared to other hospitals in the NTDB) was associated with a further reduction in mortality, with a HR of 0.93 (95% CI 0.82, 0.97). Time-to-event models with TVC and interval censoring can be used to estimate the effect of hospital care on early mortality after penetrating trauma or other acute medical conditions and could potentially be used for interhospital comparisons.

  1. Is Whole-Body Computed Tomography the Standard Work-up for Severely-Injured Children? Results of a Survey among German Trauma Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, J; Reising, K; Kuminack, K; Südkamp, N P; Strohm, P C

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body computed tomography is accepted as the standard procedure in the primary diagnostic of polytraumatised adults in the emergency room. Up to now there is still controversial discussion about the same algorithm in the primary diagnostic of children. The aim of this study was to survey the participation of German trauma-centres in the care of polytraumatised children and the hospital dependant use of whole-body computed tomography for initial patient work-up. A questionnaire was mailed to every Department of Traumatology registered in the DGU (German Trauma Society) databank. We received 60,32% of the initially sent questionnaires and after applying exclusion criteria 269 (53,91%) were applicable to statistical analysis. In the three-tiered German hospital system no statistical difference was seen in the general participation of children polytrauma care between hospitals of different tiers (p = 0.315). Even at the lowest hospital level 69,47% of hospitals stated to participate in polytrauma care for children, at the intermediate and highest level hospitals 91,89% and 95,24% stated to be involved in children polytrauma care, respectively. Children suspicious of multiple injuries or polytrauma received significantly fewer primary whole-body CTs in lowest level compared to intermediate level hospitals (36,07% vs. 56,57%; p = 0.015) and lowest level compared to highest level hospitals (36,07% vs. 68,42%; p = 0.001). Comparing the use of whole-body CT in intermediate to highest level hospitals a not significant increase in its use could be seen in highest level hospitals (56,57% vs. 68,42%; p = 0.174). According to our survey, taking care of polytraumatised children in Germany is not limited to specialised hospitals or a defined hospital level-of-care. Additionally, there is no established radiologic standard in work-up of the polytraumatised child. However, in higher hospital care -levels a higher percentage of hospitals employs whole-body CTs for primary

  2. [Optimized resource mobilization and quality of treatment of severely injured patients through a structured trauma room alarm system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spering, C; Roessler, M; Kurlemann, T; Dresing, K; Stürmer, K M; Lehmann, W; Sehmisch, S

    2017-12-12

    The treatment of severely injured patients in the trauma resuscitation unit (TRU) requires an interdisciplinary and highly professional trauma team approach. The complete team needs to be waiting for the patient in the TRU on arrival. Treating severely injured patients in the TRU, the trauma team connects the initial preclinical emergency stabilization with the subsequent sophisticated treatment. Thus, the trauma team depends on concise information from the emergency personnel at the scene to provide its leader with further information as well as an accurate alarm including all departments necessary to stabilize the patient in the TRU. Aiming at an accurate and most efficient trauma team alarm, this study was designed to provide and analyze an alarm system which mobilizes the trauma team in a stepwise fashion depending on the pattern of injuries and the threat to life. The trauma team alarm system was analyzed in a prospective data acquisition at a level I trauma center over a period of 12 months. Evaluation followed the acquisition phase and provided comparison to the status prior to the establishment of the alarm system. All items underwent statistical testing using t‑tests (p  0.01). The duration from arrival of the patient in the TRU to the initial multislice computed tomography (CT) scan was reduced by 6 min while the total period of treatment in the TRU was reduced by 17 min. After the alarm system to gradually mobilize the trauma team was put into action, team members left the TRU if unneeded prior to finishing the initial treatment in only 4% of the cases. The patient fatality rate was 8.8% (injury severity score, ISS = 23 points) after establishment of the alarm system compared to 12.9% (ISS = 25 points) before. The implementation of an accurate and patient status-based alarm system to mobilize the trauma team can improve the quality of treatment while the duration of treatment of the severely injured patients in the TRU can be decreased. It

  3. Head Trauma: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Head trauma: First aid Head trauma: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Most head trauma involves injuries that are minor and don't require ... 21, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-head-trauma/basics/ART-20056626 . Mayo ...

  4. Improving geriatric trauma outcomes: A small step toward a big problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Peter M; Storey, Annika C; Bell, Teresa; Bayt, Demetria; Hockaday, Melissa S; Zarzaur, Ben L; Feliciano, David V; Rozycki, Grace S

    2016-07-01

    Because of the unique physiology and comorbidities of injured geriatric patients, specific interventions are needed to improve outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a change in triage criteria for injured geriatric patients evaluated at an American College of Surgeons Level I trauma center. As of October 1, 2013, all injured patients 70 years or older were mandated to have the highest-level trauma activation upon emergency department (ED) arrival regardless of physiology or mechanism of injury. Patients admitted before that date were designated as PRE; those admitted after were designated as POST. The study period was from October 1, 2011, through April 30, 2015. Data collected included demographics, mechanism of injury, hypotension on admission, comorbidities, Injury Severity Score (ISS), ED length of stay (LOS), complications, and mortality. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were used to compare outcomes between the study groups (p analysis, increasing age, higher ISS, and hypotension were associated with higher mortality. POST patients were more likely to have an ED LOS of 2 hours or shorter (odds ratio, 1.614; 95% confidence interval, 1.088-2.394) after controlling for hypotension, ISS, and comorbidities. POST mortality significantly decreased (odds ratio, 0.689; 95% confidence interval, 0.484-0.979). Based on age alone, the focused intervention of a higher level of trauma activation decreased ED LOS and mortality in injured geriatric patients. Therapeutic/care management study, level IV.

  5. Importance of designated thoracic trauma surgeons in the management of traumatic aortic transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrink, M H; Rodriguez, E; England, G J; McKeown, P P; Hurst, J M; Rosemurgy, A S

    1994-04-01

    The medical literature is replete with reports on traumatic aortic transection. These reports have delineated many factors regarding the morbidity and high mortality of this ominous injury. Most reports are reviews of the collective experience of a single institution over a period of years. It is likely that many authors writing on the subject of traumatic aortic transection have no experience with operative repair of the lesion. There has been debate about the various techniques of primary repair versus graft insertion, as well as the question of whether cardiopulmonary bypass is superior to the "clamp and sew" methods. No studies have directly examined the skills of individual surgeons with respect to outcome. We present the results of a study from a university-affiliated level I trauma center in which the outcomes from various groups of surgeons were compared over a 5-year period. The information in this study strongly suggests that designated thoracic trauma surgeons who are promptly available and have dedicated interests in trauma patients achieve better results.

  6. Supine position and nonmodifiable risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michetti, Christopher P; Prentice, Heather A; Rodriguez, Jennifer; Newcomb, Anna

    2017-02-01

    We studied trauma-specific conditions precluding semiupright positioning and other nonmodifiable risk factors for their influence on ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). We performed a retrospective study at a Level I trauma center from 2008 to 2012 on ICU patients aged ≥15, who were intubated for more than 2 days. Using backward logistic regression, a composite of 4 factors (open abdomen, acute spinal cord injury, spine fracture, spine surgery) that preclude semiupright positioning (supine composite) and other variables were analyzed. In total, 77 of 374 (21%) patients had VAP. Abbreviated Injury Score head/neck greater than 2 (odds ratio [OR] 2.79, P = .006), esophageal obturator airway (OR 4.25, P = .015), red cell/plasma transfusion in the first 2 intensive care unit days (OR 2.59, P = .003), and 11 or more ventilator days (OR 17.38, P VAP risk factors, whereas supine composite, scene vs emergency department airway intervention, brain injury, and coma were not. Factors that may temporarily preclude semiupright positioning in intubated trauma patients were not associated with a higher risk for VAP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Blunt splenic injuries in the adolescent trauma population: the role of angiography and embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayglothling, Julie A; Haan, James M; Scalea, Thomas M

    2011-07-01

    Splenic artery embolization (SAE) improves non-operative splenic salvage rates in adults, but its utility and safety in the pediatric population is less well defined. Because adolescent trauma patients are often triaged to adult trauma centers, we were interested in evaluating SAE in this particular population. We hypothesize that angiography and embolization is a safe and effective adjunct to non-operative management in the adolescent population. A retrospective review of all patients aged 13-17 years admitted to our Level I Trauma Center with blunt splenic injury from 1997-2005 was performed. We reviewed patient demographics, operative reports, admission, and follow-up abdominal computed tomography (ACT) results, angiographic reports, and patient outcomes. A total of 97 patients were reviewed. Eighteen patients underwent immediate surgery, and 79 of the remaining patients had planned non-operative management. Of those participating in non-operative management, 35/79 (44%) were initially observed and 44/79 (56%) underwent initial angiography, 23/44 having embolization. Patients in the embolization group had an overall high grade of injury (American Association for the Surgery of Trauma mean grade 3.3, SD 0.6). The overall splenic salvage rate was 96% (76/79) in the non-operative management group; 100% splenic salvage was seen in the observational group; 100% salvage was also seen in patients with negative angiography, and 87% salvage (20/23) in the splenic artery embolization group. Splenic artery embolization may be a valuable adjunct in adolescent blunt splenic injury, especially in higher grade injuries or with evidence of splenic vascular injury on ACT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Work-related injuries in a state trauma registry: relationship between industry and drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Terry L; Slavova, Svetla; Bernard, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    Work-related injuries exert a great financial and economic burden on the US population. The study objectives were to identify the industries and occupations associated with worker injuries and to determine the predictors for injured worker drug screening in trauma centers. Work-related injury cases were selected using three criteria (expected payer source of workers' compensation, industry-related e-codes, and work-related indicator) from the Kentucky Trauma Registry data set for years 2008 to 2012. Descriptive analyses and multiple logistic regression were performed on the work-related injury cases. The "other services" and construction industry sectors accounted for the highest number of work-related cases. Drugs were detected in 55% of all drug-screened work-related trauma cases. Higher percentages of injured workers tested positive for drugs in the natural resources and mining, transportation and public utilities, and construction industries. In comparison, higher percentages of injured workers in the other services as well as transportation and public utilities industries were drug screened. Treatment at Level I trauma centers and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores indicating a coma or severe brain injury were both significant independent predictors for being screened for drugs; industry was not a significant predictor for being drug screened. The injured worker was more likely to be drug screened if the worker had a greater than mild injury, regardless of whether the worker was an interfacility transfer. These findings indicate that there may be elevated drug use or abuse in natural resources and mining, transportation and public utilities, as well as construction industry workers; improved identification of the specific drug types in positive drug screen results of injured workers is needed to better target prevention efforts. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  9. Variation in Structure and Process of Care in Traumatic Brain Injury: Provider Profiles of European Neurotrauma Centers Participating in the CENTER-TBI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryse C Cnossen

    Full Text Available The strength of evidence underpinning care and treatment recommendations in traumatic brain injury (TBI is low. Comparative effectiveness research (CER has been proposed as a framework to provide evidence for optimal care for TBI patients. The first step in CER is to map the existing variation. The aim of current study is to quantify variation in general structural and process characteristics among centers participating in the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI study.We designed a set of 11 provider profiling questionnaires with 321 questions about various aspects of TBI care, chosen based on literature and expert opinion. After pilot testing, questionnaires were disseminated to 71 centers from 20 countries participating in the CENTER-TBI study. Reliability of questionnaires was estimated by calculating a concordance rate among 5% duplicate questions.All 71 centers completed the questionnaires. Median concordance rate among duplicate questions was 0.85. The majority of centers were academic hospitals (n = 65, 92%, designated as a level I trauma center (n = 48, 68% and situated in an urban location (n = 70, 99%. The availability of facilities for neuro-trauma care varied across centers; e.g. 40 (57% had a dedicated neuro-intensive care unit (ICU, 36 (51% had an in-hospital rehabilitation unit and the organization of the ICU was closed in 64% (n = 45 of the centers. In addition, we found wide variation in processes of care, such as the ICU admission policy and intracranial pressure monitoring policy among centers.Even among high-volume, specialized neurotrauma centers there is substantial variation in structures and processes of TBI care. This variation provides an opportunity to study effectiveness of specific aspects of TBI care and to identify best practices with CER approaches.

  10. Occult Pneumothoraces in Acute Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Berryman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many traumatic pneumothoraces (PTX are not seen on initial chest radiograph (CR(occult PTX but are detected only on computed tomography (CT. Although CR remains the first toolfor detecting PTX, most trauma patients with significant thoracoabdominal injuries will receive both CTand CR. The primary objective of this study was to retrospectively determine the effectiveness of CR fordetecting PTX in trauma patients. Our hypotheses were that CR is a sensitive indicator of PTX on CT,that chest pain and shortness of breath are good predictors of PTX on CR, and that we could determineother predictors of PTX on CR.Methods: All trauma patients presenting to our Level I trauma center with a CT-diagnosed PTX over a2-year period who had both a CR and a chest CT were included. The CT reading was considered thegold standard for PTX diagnosis. Electronic medical records were searched using key words fordiagnoses, symptoms, demographics, and radiologic results. We recorded the official radiologistreadings for both CR and CT (positive or negative and the size of the PTX on CT (large, moderate,small, or tiny. The outcome variable was dichotomized based on presence or absence of PTXdetected on CR. Descriptive statistics and v2 tests were used for univariate analysis. A regressionanalysis was performed to determine characteristics predictive of a PTX on CR, and 1 variable wasadded to the model for every 10 positive CRs. With equal-size groups, this study has the power of 80%to detect a 10% absolute difference in single predictors of PTX on CR with 45 subjects in each group.Results: There were 134 CT-documented PTXs included in the study. Mean age was 42, and 74%were men. For 66 (49% patients, PTX was detected on CR (sensitivity¼50%. The CR detected 30%of small PTX, 35% of moderate PTX, and 33% of large PTX. Comparing patients with and without PTXon CR, there were no significant differences in shortness of breath or chest pain. There no

  11. Occult pneumothoraces in acute trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Amy A; McIntyre, William A; Weiss, Steven J; Berryman, Chad

    2012-11-01

    Many traumatic pneumothoraces (PTX) are not seen on initial chest radiograph (CR) (occult PTX) but are detected only on computed tomography (CT). Although CR remains the first tool for detecting PTX, most trauma patients with significant thoracoabdominal injuries will receive both CT and CR. The primary objective of this study was to retrospectively determine the effectiveness of CR for detecting PTX in trauma patients. Our hypotheses were that CR is a sensitive indicator of PTX on CT, that chest pain and shortness of breath are good predictors of PTX on CR, and that we could determine other predictors of PTX on CR. All trauma patients presenting to our Level I trauma center with a CT-diagnosed PTX over a 2-year period who had both a CR and a chest CT were included. The CT reading was considered the gold standard for PTX diagnosis. Electronic medical records were searched using key words for diagnoses, symptoms, demographics, and radiologic results. We recorded the official radiologist readings for both CR and CT (positive or negative) and the size of the PTX on CT (large, moderate, small, or tiny). The outcome variable was dichotomized based on presence or absence of PTX detected on CR. Descriptive statistics and χ(2) tests were used for univariate analysis. A regression analysis was performed to determine characteristics predictive of a PTX on CR, and 1 variable was added to the model for every 10 positive CRs. With equal-size groups, this study has the power of 80% to detect a 10% absolute difference in single predictors of PTX on CR with 45 subjects in each group. There were 134 CT-documented PTXs included in the study. Mean age was 42, and 74% were men. For 66 (49%) patients, PTX was detected on CR (sensitivity = 50%). The CR detected 30% of small PTX, 35% of moderate PTX, and 33% of large PTX. Comparing patients with and without PTX on CR, there were no significant differences in shortness of breath or chest pain. There no relationships between PTX detected

  12. Prevalence of Domestic Violence Among Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Khalil, Mazhar; Zangbar, Bardiya; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Orouji, Tahereh; Pandit, Viraj; O'Keeffe, Terence; Tang, Andrew; Gries, Lynn; Friese, Randall S; Rhee, Peter; Davis, James W

    2015-12-01

    Domestic violence is an extremely underreported crime and a growing social problem in the United States. However, the true burden of the problem remains unknown. To assess the reported prevalence of domestic violence among trauma patients. A 6-year (2007-2012) retrospective analysis of the prospectively maintained National Trauma Data Bank. Trauma patients who experienced domestic violence and who presented to trauma centers participating in the National Trauma Data Bank were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis codes (995.80-995.85, 995.50, 995.52-995.55, and 995.59) and E codes (E967.0-E967.9). Patients were stratified by age into 3 groups: children (≤18 years), adults (19-54 years), and elderly patients (≥55 years). Trend analysis was performed on April 10, 2014, to assess the reported prevalence of domestic violence over the years. Trauma patients presenting to trauma centers participating in the National Trauma Data Bank. To assess the reported prevalence of domestic violence among trauma patients. A total of 16 575 trauma patients who experienced domestic violence were included. Of these trauma patients, 10 224 (61.7%) were children, 5503 (33.2%) were adults, and 848 (5.1%) were elderly patients. The mean (SD) age was 15.9 (20.6), the mean (SD) Injury Severity Score was 10.9 (9.6), and 8397 (50.7%) were male patients. Head injuries (46.8% of patients) and extremity fractures (31.2% of patients) were the most common injuries. A total of 12 515 patients (75.1%) were discharged home, and the overall mortality rate was 5.9% (n = 980). The overall reported prevalence of domestic violence among trauma patients was 5.7 cases per 1000 trauma center discharges. The prevalence of domestic violence increased among children (14.0 cases per 1000 trauma center discharges in 2007 to 18.5 case per 1000 trauma center discharges in 2012; P = .001) and adults (3.2 cases per 1000 discharges in 2007 to 4.5 cases per

  13. Structure, Process, and Culture Differences of Pediatric Trauma Centers Participating in an International Comparative Effectiveness Study of Children with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Gitte Y; Schober, Michelle; Fabio, Anthony; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Grant, Mary Jo C; Shafi, Nadeem; Bennett, Tellen D; Hirtz, Deborah; Bell, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important worldwide cause of death and disability for children. The Approaches and Decisions for Acute Pediatric TBI (ADAPT) Trial is an observational, cohort study to compare the effectiveness of six aspects of TBI care. Understanding the differences between clinical sites-including their structure, clinical processes, and culture differences-will be necessary to assess differences in outcome from the study and can inform the overall community regarding differences across academic centers. We developed a survey and queried ADAPT site principal investigators with a focus on six domains: (i) hospital, (ii) pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), (iii) medical staff characteristics, (iv) quality of care, (v) medication safety, and (vi) safety culture. Summary statistics were used to describe differences between centers. ADAPT clinical sites that enrolled a subject within the first year (32 US-based, 11 international) were studied. A wide variation in site characteristics was observed in hospital and ICU characteristics, including an almost sevenfold range in ICU size (8-55 beds) and more than fivefold range of overall ICU admissions (537-2623). Nursing staffing (predominantly 1:1 or 1:2) and the presence of pharmacists within the ICU (79 %) were less variable, and most sites "strongly agreed" or "agreed" that Neurosurgery and Critical Care teams worked well together (81.4 %). However, a minority of sites (46 %) used an explicit protocol for treatment of children with severe TBI care. We found a variety of inter-center structure, process, and culture differences. These intrinsic differences between sites may begin to explain why interventional studies have failed to prove efficacy of experimental therapies. Understanding these differences may be an important factor in analyzing future ADAPT trial results and in determining best practices for pediatric severe TBI.

  14. The definition of polytrauma: variable interrater versus intrarater agreement--a prospective international study among trauma surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Nerida E; Enninghorst, Natalie; Sisak, Krisztian; Balogh, Zsolt J

    2013-03-01

    The international trauma community has recognized the lack of a validated consensus definition of "polytrauma." We hypothesized that using a subjective definition, trauma surgeons will not have substantial agreement; thus, an objective definition is needed. A prospective observational study was conducted between December 2010 and June 2011 (John Hunter Hospital, Level I trauma center). Inclusion criteria were all trauma call patients with subsequent intensive care unit admission. The study was composed of four stages as follows: (1) four trauma surgeons assessed patients until 24 hours, then coded as either "yes" or "no" for polytrauma, and results compared for agreement; (2) eight trauma surgeons representing the United States, Germany, and the Netherlands graded the same prospectively assessed patients and coded as either "yes" or "no" for polytrauma; (3) 12 months later, the original four trauma surgeons repeated assessment via data sheets to test intrarater variability; and (4) individual subjective definitions were compared with three anatomic scores, namely, (a) Injury Severity Score (ISS) of greater than 15, (b) ISS of greater 17, and (c) Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of greater than 2 in at least two ISS body regions. A total of 52 trauma patients were included. Results for each stage were as follows: (1) κ score of 0.50, moderate agreement; (2) κ score of 0.41, moderate agreement; (3) Rater 1 had moderate intrarater agreement (κ score, 0.59), while Raters 2, 3, 4 had substantial intrarater agreement (κ scores, 0.75, 0.66, and 0.71, respectively); and (4) none had most agreement with ISS of greater than 15 (κ score, 0.16), while both definitions ISS greater than 17 and Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of greater than 2 in at least two ISS body regions had on average fair agreement (κ scores, 0.27 and 0.39, respectively). Based on subjective assessments, trauma surgeons do not agree on the definition of polytrauma, with the subjective

  15. Nonoperative management of blunt splenic injury in adults: there is (still) a long way to go. The results of the Bologna-Maggiore Hospital trauma center experience and development of a clinical algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugnoli, Gregorio; Bianchi, Elisa; Biscardi, Andrea; Coniglio, Carlo; Isceri, Salvatore; Simonetti, Luigi; Gordini, Giovanni; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2015-10-01

    Non-operative management (NOM) of hemodynamically stable patients with blunt splenic injury (BSI) is the standard of care, although it is associated with a potential risk of failure. Hemodynamically unstable patients should always undergo immediate surgery and avoid unnecessary CT scans. Angioembolization might help to increase the NOM rates, as well as NOM success rates. The aim of this study was to review and critically analyze the data from BSI cases managed at the Maggiore Hospital Trauma Center during the past 5 years, with a focus on NOM, its success rates and outcomes. A further aim was to develop a proposed clinical practical algorithm for the management of BSI derived from Clinical Audit experience. During the period between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013 we managed 293 patients with splenic lesions at the Trauma Center of Maggiore Hospital of Bologna. The data analyzed included the demographics, clinical parameters and characteristics, diagnostic and therapeutic data, as well as the outcomes and follow-up data. A retrospective evaluation of the clinical outcomes through a clinical audit has been used to design a practical clinical algorithm. During the five-year period, 293 patients with BSI were admitted, 77 of whom underwent immediate surgical management. The majority (216) of the patients was initially managed non-operatively and 207 of these patients experienced a successful NOM, with an overall rate of successful NOM of 70 % among all BSI cases. The success rate of NOM was 95.8 % in this series. All patients presenting with stable hemodynamics underwent an immediate CT-scan; angiography with embolization was performed in 54 cases for active contrast extravasation or in cases with grade V lesions even in absence of active bleeding. Proximal embolization was preferentially used for high-grade injuries. After a critical review of the cases treated during the past 5 years during a monthly clinical audit meeting, a clinical algorithm has been

  16. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD Consultation For Specific Providers VA Providers and Staff Disaster Responders Medical Doctors Community Providers and Clergy ... Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search ...

  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD Screens Trauma Exposure Measures Assessment Request Form List of All Measures Treatment Treatment Overview Early Intervention ... and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s ...

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research ... Search Tips Modify Your Search How to Obtain Articles Alerts User Guide Purpose and Scope Find Assessment ...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search ...

  20. Pre-hospital intubation factors and pneumonia in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Heather L; Warner, Keir; Bulger, Eileen M; Sharar, Sam R; Maier, Ronald V; Cuschieri, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    We reported similar rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) previously in trauma patients intubated either in a pre-hospital (PH) venue or the emergency department. A subset of PH intubations with continuous quality assessment was re-examined to identify the intubation factors associated with VAP. The subgroup was derived from an existing data set of consecutive adult trauma patients intubated prior to Level I trauma center admission July 2007-July 2008. Intubation details recorded included bag-valve mask ventilation (BVM) and the presence of material in the airway. The diagnosis of VAP was made preferentially by quantitative bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cultures (≥ 10⁴ colony-forming units indicating infection). Baseline data, injury characteristics, and circumstances of intubation of patients with and without VAP were compared by univariable analysis. Detailed data were available for 197 patients; 32 (16.2%) developed VAP, on average 6.0±0.7 days after admission. Baseline characteristics were similar in the groups, but diabetes mellitus was more common in the VAP group (4 [12.5%] vs. 5 [3.0%]; p=0.02). There was a higher rate of blunt injury in the VAP patients (28 [87.5%] vs. 106 [64.2%]; p=0.01) and higher injury severity scores (33.1±2.8 vs. 23.0±1.0; p=0.0002) and chest Abbreviated Injury Scores (2.6±0.3 vs. 1.5±0.1; p=0.002). Lower Glasgow Coma Scale scores (7.9±0.9 vs. 9.9±0.4; p=0.04) and greater use of BVM (18 [56.3%] vs. 56 [34.0%]; p=0.02) were observed in patients who developed VAP. Among aspirations, 10 (31.3%) of patients with emesis developed VAP compared with only 4 (12.5%) with blood in the airway (p=0.003). Aspiration, along with depressed consciousness and greater injury severity, may predispose trauma patients to VAP. Prospective studies should focus on the quality and timing of aspiration relative to intubation to determine if novel interventions can prevent aspiration or decrease the risk of VAP after aspiration.

  1. A Civilian/Military Trauma Institute: National Trauma Coordinating Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    acquired pneumonia : impact on mortality and cost. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2009;35:414–421. 24. Sucher JF, Moore FA, Todd SR, Sailors RM, McKinley...emergency research using a 5-point Likert scale during a community consultation. Higher total scores reflected a more positive attitude regarding EFIC...rights reserved.) LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Epidemiologic/ prognostic study, level III. KEY WORDS: Community consultation; exception from informed consent

  2. Trauma facilities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2018-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of death among adults aged challenge. Evidence supports the centralization of trauma facilities and the use multidisciplinary trauma teams. Because knowledge is sparse on the existing distribution of trauma facilities...... and the organisation of trauma care in Denmark, the aim of this study was to identify all Danish facilities that care for traumatized patients and to investigate the diversity in organization of trauma management. Methods: We conducted a systematic observational cross-sectional study. First, all hospitals in Denmark...... were identified via online services and clarifying phone calls to each facility. Second, all trauma care manuals on all facilities that receive traumatized patients were gathered. Third, anesthesiologists and orthopedic surgeons on call at all trauma facilities were contacted via telephone...

  3. Cumulative radiation dose caused by radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Patrick K; Gracias, Vicente H; Maidment, Andrew D A; O'Shea, Michael; Reilly, Patrick M; Schwab, C William

    2004-09-01

    Critically ill trauma patients undergo many radiologic studies, but the cumulative radiation dose is unknown. The purpose of this study was to estimate the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation resulting from radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients. The study group was composed of trauma patients at an urban Level I trauma center with surgical intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) greater than 30 days. The radiology records were reviewed. A typical effective dose per study for each type of plain film radiograph, computed tomographic scan, fluoroscopic study, and nuclear medicine study was used to calculate CED. Forty-six patients met criteria. The mean surgical intensive care unit and hospital LOS were 42.7 +/- 14.0 and 59.5 +/- 28.5 days, respectively. The mean Injury Severity Score was 32.2 +/- 15.0. The mean number of studies per patient was 70.1 +/- 29.0 plain film radiographs, 7.8 +/- 4.1 computed tomographic scans, 2.5 +/- 2.6 fluoroscopic studies, and 0.065 +/- 0.33 nuclear medicine study. The mean CED was 106 +/- 59 mSv per patient (range, 11-289 mSv; median, 104 mSv). Among age, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, and LOS, there was no statistically significant predictor of high CED. The mean CED in the study group was 30 times higher than the average yearly radiation dose from all sources for individuals in the United States. The theoretical additional morbidity attributable to radiologic studies was 0.78%. From a radiobiologic perspective, risk-to-benefit ratios of radiologic studies are favorable, given the importance of medical information obtained. Current practice patterns regarding use of radiologic studies appear to be acceptable.

  4. Accuracy of shock index versus ABC score to predict need for massive transfusion in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroll, Rebecca; Swift, David; Tatum, Danielle; Couch, Stuart; Heaney, Jiselle B; Llado-Farrulla, Monica; Zucker, Shana; Gill, Frances; Brown, Griffin; Buffin, Nicholas; Duchesne, Juan

    2018-01-01

    Various scoring systems have been developed to predict need for massive transfusion in traumatically injured patients. Assessments of Blood Consumption (ABC) score and Shock Index (SI) have been shown to be reliable predictors for Massive Transfusion Protocol (MTP) activation. However, no study has directly compared these two scoring systems to determine which is a better predictor for MTP activation. The primary objective was to determine whether ABC or SI better predicted the need for MTP in adult trauma patients with severe hemorrhage. This was a retrospective cohort study which included all injured patients who were trauma activations between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013 at an urban Level I trauma center. Patients ABC and SI were calculated for each patient. MTP was defined as need for >10 units PRBC transfusion within 24h of emergency department arrival. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) were used to evaluate scoring systems' ability to predict effective MTP utilization. A total of 645 patients had complete data for analysis. Shock Index ≥1 had sensitivity of 67.7% (95% CI 49.5%-82.6%) and specificity of 81.3% (95% CI 78.0%-84.3%) for predicting MTP, and ABC score ≥2 had sensitivity of 47.0% (95% CI 29.8%-64.9%) and specificity of 89.8% (95% CI 87.2%-92.1%). AUROC analyses showed SI to be the strongest predictor followed by ABC score with AUROC values of 0.83 and 0.74, respectively. SI had a significantly greater sensitivity (P=0.035), but a significantly weaker specificity (PABC score. ABC score and Shock Index can both be used to predict need for massive transfusion in trauma patients, however SI is more sensitive and requires less technical skill than ABC score. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on radiation dose in evaluation of trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxfield, Mark W; Schuster, Kevin M; McGillicuddy, Edward A; Young, Calvin J; Ghita, Monica; Bokhari, S A Jamal; Oliva, Isabel B; Brink, James A; Davis, Kimberly A

    2012-12-01

    A recent study showed that computed tomographic (CT) scans contributed 93% of radiation exposure of 177 patients admitted to our Level I trauma center. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) is an algorithm that reduces the noise level in reconstructed images and therefore allows the use of less ionizing radiation during CT scans without significantly affecting image quality. ASIR was instituted on all CT scans performed on trauma patients in June 2009. Our objective was to determine if implementation of ASIR reduced radiation dose without compromising patient outcomes. We identified 300 patients activating the trauma system before and after the implementation of ASIR imaging. After applying inclusion criteria, 245 charts were reviewed. Baseline demographics, presenting characteristics, number of delayed diagnoses, and missed injuries were recorded. The postexamination volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose-length product (DLP) reported by the scanner for CT scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis and CT scans of the brain and cervical spine were recorded. Subjective image quality was compared between the two groups. For CT scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, the mean CTDIvol (17.1 mGy vs. 14.2 mGy; p ASIR. For CT scans of the brain and cervical spine, the mean CTDIvol (61.7 mGy vs. 49.6 mGy; p ASIR. There was no subjective difference in image quality between ASIR and non-ASIR scans. All CT scans were deemed of good or excellent image quality. There were no delayed diagnoses or missed injuries related to CT scanning identified in either group. Implementation of ASIR imaging for CT scans performed on trauma patients led to a nearly 20% reduction in ionizing radiation without compromising outcomes or image quality. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  6. An in-situ simulation-based educational outreach project for pediatric trauma care in a rural trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayouth, Lilly; Ashley, Sarah; Brady, Jackie; Lake, Bryan; Keeter, Morgan; Schiller, David; Robey, Walter C; Charles, Stephen; Beasley, Kari M; Toschlog, Eric A; Longshore, Shannon W

    2018-02-01

    Outcome disparities between urban and rural pediatric trauma patients persist, despite regionalization of trauma systems. Rural patients are initially transported to the nearest emergency department (ED), where pediatric care is infrequent. We aim to identify educational intervention targets and increase provider experience via pediatric trauma simulation. Prospective study of simulation-based pediatric trauma resuscitation was performed at three community EDs. Level one trauma center providers facilitated simulations, providing educational feedback. Provider performance comfort and skill with tasks essential to initial trauma care were assessed, comparing pre-/postsimulations. Primary outcomes were: 1) improved comfort performing skills, and 2) team performance during resuscitation. Provider comfort with the following improved (p-values education improves provider comfort and performance. Comparison of patient outcomes to evaluate improvement in pediatric trauma care is warranted. IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Variation in type and frequency of diagnostic imaging during trauma care across multiple time points by patient insurance type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Nathaniel; Repáraz, Laura; Fry, William R.; Smith, R. Stephen; Luis, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that uninsured patients receive fewer radiographic studies during trauma care, but less is known as to whether differences in care are present among other insurance groups or across different time points during hospitalization. Our objective was to examine the number of radiographic studies administered to a cohort of trauma patients over the entire hospital stay as well as during the first 24-hours of care. Patient data were obtained from an American College of Surgeons (ACS) verified Level I Trauma Center between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012. We used negative binomial regression to construct relative risk (RR) ratios for type and frequency of radiographic imaging received among persons with Medicare, Medicaid, no insurance, or government insurance plans in reference to those with commercial indemnity plans. The analysis was adjusted for patient age, sex, race/ethnicity, injury severity score, injury mechanism, comorbidities, complications, hospital length of stay, and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission. A total of 3621 records from surviving patients age > =18 years were assessed. After adjustment for potential confounders, the expected number of radiographic studies decreased by 15 % among Medicare recipients (RR 0.85, 95 % CI 0.78–0.93), 11 % among Medicaid recipients (0.89, 0.81–0.99), 10 % among the uninsured (0.90, 0.85–0.96) and 19 % among government insurance groups (0.81, 0.72–0.90), compared with the reference group. This disparity was observed during the first 24-hours of care among patients with Medicare (0.78, 0.71–0.86) and government insurance plans (0.83, 0.74–0.94). Overall, there were no differences in the number of radiographic studies among the uninsured or among Medicaid patients during the first 24-hours of care compared with the reference group, but differences were observed among the uninsured in a sub-analysis of severely injured patients (ISS > 15). Both uninsured and insured patients treated at a

  8. Artificial Intelligence Can Predict Daily Trauma Volume and Average Acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonko, David P; Dennis, Bradley M; Betzold, Richard D; Peetz, Allan B; Gunter, Oliver L; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2018-04-19

    The goal of this study was to integrate temporal and weather data in order to create an artificial neural network (ANN) to predict trauma volume, the number of emergent operative cases, and average daily acuity at a level 1 trauma center. Trauma admission data from TRACS and weather data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) was collected for all adult trauma patients from July 2013-June 2016. The ANN was constructed using temporal (time, day of week), and weather factors (daily high, active precipitation) to predict four points of daily trauma activity: number of traumas, number of penetrating traumas, average ISS, and number of immediate OR cases per day. We trained a two-layer feed-forward network with 10 sigmoid hidden neurons via the Levenberg-Marquardt backpropagation algorithm, and performed k-fold cross validation and accuracy calculations on 100 randomly generated partitions. 10,612 patients over 1,096 days were identified. The ANN accurately predicted the daily trauma distribution in terms of number of traumas, number of penetrating traumas, number of OR cases, and average daily ISS (combined training correlation coefficient r = 0.9018+/-0.002; validation r = 0.8899+/- 0.005; testing r = 0.8940+/-0.006). We were able to successfully predict trauma and emergent operative volume, and acuity using an ANN by integrating local weather and trauma admission data from a level 1 center. As an example, for June 30, 2016, it predicted 9.93 traumas (actual: 10), and a mean ISS score of 15.99 (actual: 13.12); see figure 3. This may prove useful for predicting trauma needs across the system and hospital administration when allocating limited resources. Level III STUDY TYPE: Prognostic/Epidemiological.

  9. In the absence of a central venous catheter, risk of venous thromboembolism is low in critically injured children, adolescents, and young adults: evidence from the National Trauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Sarah H; Candrilli, Sean D

    2011-05-01

    To describe the incidence and risk factors of venous thromboembolism in a large sample of critical care pediatric, adolescent, and young adult trauma patients. The National Trauma Data Bank-the largest and most complete aggregation of trauma registry data in the United States. Seven hundred eighty-four level I to level IV trauma centers. Patients ≤ 21 yrs of age who spent at least 1 day in a critical care unit during a trauma admission between 2001 and 2005. To characterize differences between patients with and without venous thromboembolism, we extracted variables regarding patient demographics, injury pattern and severity, procedures, total length of stay, and intensive care unit and ventilator days. Odds ratios for predictors of venous thromboembolism were estimated with a logistic regression model. Among the 135,032 critical care patients analyzed, venous thromboembolism was uncommon (6 per 1,000 discharges). Placement of a central venous catheter was a significant predictor of venous thromboembolism (odds ratio = 2.24; p central venous catheter were of even greater magnitude, particularly in adolescents and young adults. The risk of venous thromboembolism in critical care patients without a central venous catheter was central venous access.

  10. Computed tomography in trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented

  11. Computed tomography in trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented.

  12. Current status and future options for trauma and emergency surgery in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taviloğlu, Korhan; Ertekin, Cemalettin

    2008-01-01

    The number of trauma victims in Turkey is expected to increase as a consequence of the increasing vehicular traffic, potential for earthquakes, and risk of terrorist attacks. The Turkish Association for Trauma and Emergency Surgery monitors trauma cases, publishes a quarterly journal, organizes trauma courses and seminars for various health personnel nationwide. It is also extending efforts to improve in-hospital care by establishing trauma and emergency surgery fellowships and trauma and emergency surgery centers nationwide, which is run by General Surgeons currently. Turkey faces the same dilemma as the rest of the developed world regarding the future of trauma surgeons in the current era of nonoperative trauma management. We suggest that the field of trauma and emergency surgery be redefined to include emergency general surgery and cavitary trauma.

  13. Ultrasonography in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) protocol is considered beneficial in emergent evaluation of trauma patients with blunt or penetrating injury and has become integrated into the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocol. No guidelines exist as to the use...... of ultrasonography in trauma in Denmark. We aimed to determine the current use of ultrasonography for assessing trauma patients in Denmark. METHODS: We conducted a nation-wide cross-sectional investigation of ultrasonography usage in trauma care. The first phase consisted of an Internet-based investigation....... Twenty-one (95.5%) of the guidelines included and recommended FAST as part of trauma assessment. The recommended person to perform the examination was the radiologist in n = 11 (50.0%), the surgeon in n = 6 (27.3%), the anesthesiologist in n = 1 (4.5%), and unspecified in n = 3 (13.6%) facilities. FAST...

  14. The utility of computed tomography as a screening tool for the evaluation of pediatric blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, Troy A; Kumar, Rajiv; Koontz, Nicholas A; Scherer, L R; Applegate, Kimberly E

    2009-07-01

    There is a growing concern that computed tomography (CT) is being unnecessarily overused for the evaluation of pediatric patients. The purpose of this study was to analyze the trends and utility of chest CT use compared with chest X-ray (CXR) for the evaluation of children with blunt chest trauma. A 4-year retrospective review was performed for pediatric patients who underwent chest CT within 24 hours of sustaining blunt trauma at a Level-I trauma center. Trends in the use of CT and CXR were documented, and results of radiology reports were analyzed and compared with clinical outcomes. Three hundred thirty-three children, mean age 11 years, had chest CTs, increasing from 5.5% in 2001-2002 to 10.5% in 2004-2005 (p tool to analyze which patients may require CT evaluation. A multidisciplinary approach is warranted to develop guidelines that standardize the use of CT and thereby decreases unnecessary radiation exposure to pediatric patients.

  15. Implications of the Trauma Quality Improvement Project inclusion of nonsurvivable injuries in performance benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Jiselle Bock; Schroll, Rebecca; Turney, Jennifer; Stuke, Lance; Marr, Alan B; Greiffenstein, Patrick; Robledo, Rosemarie; Theriot, Amanda; Duchesne, Juan; Hunt, John

    2017-10-01

    The Trauma Quality Improvement Project (TQIP) uses an injury prediction model for performance benchmarking. We hypothesize that at a Level I high-volume penetrating trauma center, performance outcomes will be biased due to inclusion of patients with nonsurvivable injuries. Retrospective chart review was conducted for all patients included in the institutional TQIP analysis from 2013 to 2014 with length of stay (LOS) less than 1 day to determine survivability of the injuries. Observed (O)/expected (E) mortality ratios were calculated before and after exclusion of these patients. Completeness of data reported to TQIP was examined. Eight hundred twenty-six patients were reported to TQIP including 119 deaths. Nonsurvivable injuries accounted 90.9% of the deaths in patients with an LOS of 1 day or less. The O/E mortality ratio for all patients was 1.061, and the O/E ratio after excluding all patients with LOS less than 1 day found to have nonsurvivable injuries was 0.895. Data for key variables were missing in 63.3% of patients who died in the emergency department, 50% of those taken to the operating room and 0% of those admitted to the intensive care unit. Charts for patients who died with LOS less than 1 day were significantly more likely than those who lived to be missing crucial. This study shows TQIP inclusion of patients with nonsurvivable injuries biases outcomes at an urban trauma center. Missing data results in imputation of values, increasing inaccuracy. Further investigation is needed to determine if these findings exist at other institutions, and whether the current TQIP model needs revision to accurately identify and exclude patients with nonsurvivable injuries. Prognostic and epidemiological, level III.

  16. What is the clinical significance of chest CT when the chest x-ray result is normal in patients with blunt trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kea, Bory; Gamarallage, Ruwan; Vairamuthu, Hemamalini; Fortman, Jonathan; Lunney, Kevin; Hendey, Gregory W; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2013-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been shown to detect more injuries than plain radiography in patients with blunt trauma, but it is unclear whether these injuries are clinically significant. This study aimed to determine the proportion of patients with normal chest x-ray (CXR) result and injury seen on CT and abnormal initial CXR result and no injury on CT and to characterize the clinical significance of injuries seen on CT as determined by a trauma expert panel. Patients with blunt trauma older than 14 years who received emergency department chest imaging as part of their evaluation at 2 urban level I trauma centers were enrolled. An expert trauma panel a priori classified thoracic injuries and subsequent interventions as major, minor, or no clinical significance. Of 3639 participants, 2848 (78.3%) had CXR alone and 791 (21.7%) had CXR and chest CT. Of 589 patients who had chest CT after a normal CXR result, 483 (82.0% [95% confidence interval [CI], 78.7-84.9%]) had normal CT results, and 106 (18.0% [95% CI, 15.1%-21.3%]) had CTs diagnosing injuries-primarily rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, and incidental pneumothorax. Twelve patients had injuries classified as clinically major (2.0% [95% CI, 1.2%-3.5%]), 78 were clinically minor (13.2% [95% CI, 10.7%-16.2%]), and 16 were clinically insignificant (2.7% (95% CI, 1.7%-4.4%]). Of 202 patients with CXRs suggesting injury, 177 (87.6% [95% CI, 82.4%-91.5%]) had chest CTs confirming injury and 25 (12.4% [95% CI, 8.5%-17.6%]) had no injury on CT. Chest CT after a normal CXR result in patients with blunt trauma detects injuries, but most do not lead to changes in patient management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Post-traumatic acute kidney injury: a cross-sectional study of trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Hung; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Hsieh, Ching-Hua; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun

    2016-11-22

    The causes of post-traumatic acute kidney injury (AKI) are multifactorial, and shock associated with major trauma has been proposed to result in inadequate renal perfusion and subsequent AKI in trauma patients. This study aimed to investigate the true incidence and clinical presentation of post-traumatic AKI in hospitalized adult patients and its association with shock at a Level I trauma center. Detailed data of 78 trauma patients with AKI and 14,504 patients without AKI between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2014 were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System. Patients with direct renal trauma were excluded from this study. Two-sided Fisher's exact or Pearson's chi-square tests were used to compare categorical data, unpaired Student's t-test was used to analyze normally distributed continuous data, and Mann-Whitney's U test was used to compare non-normally distributed data. Propensity score matching with a 1:1 ratio with logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of shock on AKI. Patients with AKI presented with significantly older age, higher incidence rates of pre-existing comorbidities, higher odds of associated injures (subdural hematoma, intracerebral hematoma, intra-abdominal injury, and hepatic injury), and higher injury severity than patients without AKI. In addition, patients with AKI had a longer hospital stay (18.3 days vs. 9.8 days, respectively; P < 0.001) and intensive care unit (ICU) stay (18.8 days vs. 8.6 days, respectively; P < 0. 001), higher proportion of admission into the ICU (57.7% vs. 19.0%, respectively; P < 0.001), and a higher odds ratio (OR) of short-term mortality (OR 39.0; 95% confidence interval, 24.59-61.82; P < 0.001). However, logistic regression analysis of well-matched pairs after propensity score matching did not show a significant influence of shock on the occurrence of AKI. We believe that early and aggressive resuscitation, to avoid prolonged untreated shock, may help to prevent the occurrence

  18. Journalists and trauma: a brief overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Ted

    2004-01-01

    In the past decade, journalism experts realized what those in the fields of emergency response and management have known for much longer: That journalists could be psychologically affected by the traumatic events they covered. Although a fledging field of study, groups such as the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, based at the University of Washington, in Seattle, WA, have dedicated themselves to advocating the ethical and thorough reporting of trauma, educating working journalists about trauma and serving as a forum for journalists to discuss topics related to covering traumatic events. The three major studies conducted on the subject--focusing on print journalists, photojournalists, and war journalists--have discovered that journalists can suffer sleeplessness, flashbacks, and in most extreme cases, posttraumatic stress disorder. According to Dr. Roger Simpson, director of the Dart Center, there is much work still to be done on the subject.

  19. Management of duodenal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Guo-qing

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Duodenal trauma is uncommon but nowadays seen more and more frequently due to the increased automobile accidents and violent events. The management of duodenal trauma can be complicated, especially when massive injury to the pancreatic-duodenal-biliary complex occurs simultaneously. Even the patients receive surgeries in time, multiple postoperative complications and high mortality are common. To know and manage duodenal trauma better, we searched the recent related literature in PubMed by the keywords of duodenal trauma, therapy, diagnosis and abdomen. It shows that because the diagnosis and management are complicated and the mortality is high, duodenal trauma should be treated in time and tactfully. And application of new technology can help improve the management. In this review, we discussed the incidence, diagnosis, management, and complications as well as mortality of duodenal trauma. Key words: Duodenum; Wounds and injuries; Diagnosis; Therapeutics

  20. Open abdominal management after damage-control laparotomy for trauma: a prospective observational American Association for the Surgery of Trauma multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubose, Joseph J; Scalea, Thomas M; Holcomb, John B; Shrestha, Binod; Okoye, Obi; Inaba, Kenji; Bee, Tiffany K; Fabian, Timothy C; Whelan, James; Ivatury, Rao R

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a prospective observational multi-institutional study to examine the natural history of the open abdomen (OA) after trauma and identify risk factors for failure to achieve definitive primary fascial closure (DPC) after OA use in trauma. Adults requiring OA for trauma were enrolled during a 2-year period. Demographics, presentation, and management variables were used to compare primary fascial closure and non-primary fascial closure patients, with logistic regression used to identify independent risk factors for failure to achieve primary fascial closure. A total of 572 patients from 14 American College of Surgeons-verified Level I trauma centers were enrolled. The majority were male (79%), mean (SD) age 39 (17) years. Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 15 or greater in 85% of patients and 84% had an abdominal Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of 3 or greater. Overall mortality was 23%. Initial primary fascial closure with unaltered native fascia was achieved in 379 patients (66%). Patients surviving at least 48 hours were grouped into those achieving DPC and those who did not achieve DPC after OA use. After logistic regression, independent risk factors for failure to achieve DPC included the number of reexplorations required (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.2-1.6; p < 0.001) the development of intra-abdominal abscess/sepsis (AOR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.2-4.8; p = 0.011) bloodstream infection (AOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2-5.7; p = 0.017), acute renal failure (AOR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.2-5.7; p = 0.007), enteric fistula (AOR, 6.4; 95% CI, 1.2-32.8; p = 0.010) and ISS of greater than 15 (AOR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.9; p = 0.037). Our study identifies independent risk factors associated with failure to achieve primary fascial closure during initial hospitalization after OA use for trauma. Additional study is required to validate appropriate algorithms that optimize the opportunity to achieve primary fascial closure and outcomes in this population

  1. Feasibility and profitability of a radiology department providing trauma US as part of a trauma alert team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, L W; Simmons, S; Kozar, R; Kinback, R; Hallowell, M J; Mulhern, C

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and profitability of a radiology department providing a six-point trauma ultrasound (US) examination for abdominal or pelvic free fluid as part of a trauma alert team. The study included 191 trauma alerts, which generated 156 US examinations. A radiologist and a departmental technologist carried beepers and responded to level I and II traumas. A departmental secretary or technologist recorded when the responding technologist exited and re-entered the department and if US was performed. If performed, the US examination evaluated the four abdominal and pelvic quadrants and the suprapubic and subxiphoid regions. For 64 patients, the responding technologist recorded the times of the trauma alert, emergency room arrival, US start and finish, and return to the radiology department. Median response, wait, scan duration, and return times were 2, 8, 5, and 7 minutes, respectively. Median costs for the technician, physician, archiving, transcription, and equipment were $8.17, $30.85, $0.97, $4.80, and $41.22, respectively. Reimbursement per examination averaged $110.60. Sensitivity analyses that varied the time spent (median vs mean), US non-use rate (10%-18%), and years of depreciation (5-7 years) yielded net results ranging from a $36.60 profit to a $6.12 loss per examination. A radiology department can profitably respond to trauma alerts and provide a six-point trauma US examination for free fluid.

  2. Management of duodenal trauma

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN Guo-qing; YANG Hua

    2011-01-01

    【Abstract】Duodenal trauma is uncommon but nowadays seen more and more frequently due to the increased automobile accidents and violent events. The management of duodenal trauma can be complicated, especially when massive injury to the pancreatic-duodenal-biliary complex occurs simultaneously. Even the patients receive surgeries in time, multiple postoperative complications and high mortality are common. To know and manage duodenal trauma better, we searched the recent related literature...

  3. A National Coordinating Center for Trauma Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    subcommittee. Several existing platforms have been reviewed in-depth with online demonstrations (such as Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap), FITBIR...to maximize its ability to advertise the existence of data, promote re-use and assist in data management. It is interesting to note that: Most...just as ethics forms are normal for many now. We present two scenarios here: one when a grant starts, and the researcher is prompted to finish and

  4. Thrombelastography and rotational thromboelastometry early amplitudes in 182 trauma patients with clinical suspicion of severe injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anna Sina P; Meyer, Martin A S; Sørensen, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Viscoelastic hemostatic assays may provide means for earlier detection of trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC). METHODS: This is a prospective observational study of 182 trauma patients admitted to a Level 1 trauma center. Clinical data, thrombelastography (TEG), and rotational thromboel...

  5. About Military Sexual Trauma

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  6. About Military Sexual Trauma

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  7. About Military Sexual Trauma

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  8. About Military Sexual Trauma

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  9. The Genesis of a Trauma Performance Improvement Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidgeon, Kristopher

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to assist the trauma medical and program director with developing a performance improvement and patients safety plan (PIPS), which is a required component of a successful trauma verification process by the American College of Surgeons. This article will review trauma quality standards and will describe in detail the required elements of a successful trauma center's performance improvement plan including a written comprehensive plan that outlines the mission and vision of the PIPS Program, authority of the PIPS Program, PIPS Program Committee reporting structure to the other hospital committees, list of required PIPS multidisciplinary team members, the operational components of the utilized data management system (trauma registry), list of indicators/audit filters, levels of review, peer determinations, corrective action plan with implementation, event resolution, and reevaluation. Strategies to develop a successful trauma performance improvement plan are presented.

  10. CAIA level I an introduction to core topics in alternative investments

    CERN Document Server

    Anson, Mark J P; CAIA Association; Black, Keith H; Kazemi, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The official study text for the Level I Chartered Alternative Investment Analyst (CAIA) exam The Chartered Alternative Investment Analyst (CAIA) designation is the financial industry's first and only globally recognized program that prepares professionals to deal with the ever-growing field of alternative investments. The second edition of CAIA Level I: An Introduction to Core Topics in Alternative Investments contains comprehensive insights on the alternative investment issues a potential Level I candidate would need to know about as they prepare for the exam. The information found here will help you build a solid foundation in alternative investment markets--with coverage of everything from the characteristics of various strategies within each alternative asset class to portfolio management concepts central to alternative investments. * Uses investment analytics to examine each alternative asset class * Examines quantitative techniques used by investment professionals * Addresses the unique attributes a...

  11. A prospective analysis of urinary tract infections among elderly trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Martin D; Kuntz, Melissa M; Polites, Stephanie F; Boggust, Andy; Nelson, Heidi; Khasawneh, Mohammad A; Jenkins, Donald H; Harmsen, Scott; Ballman, Karla V; Pieper, Rembert

    2015-10-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) have been deemed "reasonably preventable" by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, thereby eliminating reimbursement. Elderly trauma patients, however, are at high risk for developing urinary tract infections (UTIs) given their extensive comorbidities, immobilization, and environmental changes in the urine, which provide the ideal environment for bacterial overgrowth. Whether these patients develop CAUTI as a complication of their hospitalization or have asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) or UTI at admission must be determined to justify the "reasonably preventable" classification. We hypothesize that a significant proportion of elderly patients will present with ASB or UTI at admission. Institutional review board permission was obtained to perform a prospective, observational clinical trial of all elderly (≥65 years) patients admitted to our Level I trauma center as a result of injury. Urinalysis (UA) and culture (UCx) were obtained at admission, 72 hours, and, if diagnosed with UTI, at 2 weeks after injury. Mean cost of UTI was calculated based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates of $862 to $1,007 per UTI. Of 201 eligible patients, 129 agreed to participate (64%). Mean (SD) age was 81 (8.6) years. All patients had a blunt mechanism of injury (76% falls), with a mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 13.8 (7.6). Of the 18 patients (14%) diagnosed with CAUTI, 14 (78%) were present at admission. In addition, there were 18 patients (14%) with ASB at admission. The most common bacterial species present at admission urine culture were Escherichia coli (24%) and Enterococcus (16%). Clinical features associated with bacteriuria at admission included a history of UTI, positive Gram stain result, abnormal microscopy, and pyuria. The estimated loss of reimbursement for 18 UTIs at admission was $15,516 to $18,126; however, given an estimated cost of $1,981 to screen all patients with UA and UCx at

  12. ACR appropriateness criteria blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jonathan H; Cox, Christian W; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Kirsch, Jacobo; Brown, Kathleen; Dyer, Debra Sue; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; Ravenel, James G; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Suh, Robert D

    2014-04-01

    Imaging is paramount in the setting of blunt trauma and is now the standard of care at any trauma center. Although anteroposterior radiography has inherent limitations, the ability to acquire a radiograph in the trauma bay with little interruption in clinical survey, monitoring, and treatment, as well as radiography's accepted role in screening for traumatic aortic injury, supports the routine use of chest radiography. Chest CT or CT angiography is the gold-standard routine imaging modality for detecting thoracic injuries caused by blunt trauma. There is disagreement on whether routine chest CT is necessary in all patients with histories of blunt trauma. Ultimately, the frequency and timing of CT chest imaging should be site specific and should depend on the local resources of the trauma center as well as patient status. Ultrasound may be beneficial in the detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pericardial hemorrhage; transesophageal echocardiography is a first-line imaging tool in the setting of suspected cardiac injury. In the blunt trauma setting, MRI and nuclear medicine likely play no role in the acute setting, although these modalities may be helpful as problem-solving tools after initial assessment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thoracic trauma in newborn foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, D.; Laverty, S.; Halley, J.; Hannigan, D.; Leveille, R.

    1999-01-01

    In a report describing life ending fractures (255 horses) from the Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, Kentucky (1993 and 1994), 32 foals had rib fractures. The purpose of our study was to examine the incidence of rib fractures in newborn foals on a Thoroughbred studfarm by physical and radiographic examination, to determine factors which may contribute to the problem and to document any clinical consequences. All foals (263) included were examined within 3 days of birth. The thoracic cage was palpated externally for abnormalities and all foals were placed in dorsal recumbency to evaluate thoracic cage symmetry. Radiographs were used to diagnose foals with thoraciccage asymmetry (TCA) and rib fracture (RF). A diagnosis of costochondral dislocation (CD) was made when no radiographic evidence of fracture was present but there was severe TCA, Fifty-five foals (20.1%) had TCA (9 RF), One to 5 ribs were fractured on 9 of 40 radiographic studies. No consequences of the thoracic trauma was detected clinically, radiographically or ultrasonographically in this group of foals or at a 2- and 4-week follow-up examination. The percentage of foals with a history of abnormal parturition was higher in the TCA foals (15%) compared to the normal foals (6.8%). There weremore primiparous dams in the TCA group than in the normal foal group. Fillies (56.6%) had a higher incidence of birth trauma than colts (43.4%), Thisstudy demonstrates that thoracic trauma is often present in newborn foals and may not always be of clinical significance. Dystocia foals and foals from primiparous mares should be considered high risk for thoracic trauma

  14. The outcome of trauma patients with do-not-resuscitate orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Schaefer, Eric W; Won, Eugene J; Armen, Scott B

    2016-02-01

    Institutional variation in outcome of patients with do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders has not been well described in the setting of trauma. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of trauma center designation on outcome of patients with DNR orders. A statewide trauma database (Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study) was used for the analysis. Characteristics of patients with DNR orders were compared between state-designated level 1 and 2 trauma centers. Inhospital mortality and major complication rates were compared using hierarchical logistic regression models that included a random effect for trauma centers. We adjusted for a number of potential confounders and allowed for nonlinearity in injury severity score and age in these models. A total of 106,291 patients (14 level 1 and 11 level 2 trauma centers) were identified in the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study database between 2007 and 2011. We included 5953 patients with DNR orders (5.6%). Although more severely injured patients with comorbid disease were made DNR in level 1 trauma centers, trauma center designation level was not a significant factor for inhospital mortality of patients with DNR orders (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-2.18; P = 0.26). Level 1 trauma centers were significantly associated with a higher rate of major complications (odds ratio, 1.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-2.75; P = 0.016). Inhospital mortality of patients with DNR orders was not significantly associated with trauma designation level after adjusting for case mix. More aggressive treatment or other unknown factors may have resulted in a significantly higher complication rate at level 1 trauma centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prospects after Major Trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, H.R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. After patients survived major trauma, their prospects, in terms of the consequences for functioning, are uncertain, which may impact severely on patient, family and society. The studies in this thesis describes the long-term outcomes of severe injured patients after major trauma. In

  16. Trauma and the truth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeter, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Witnessing horrible things may leave a person scarred for life — an effect usually referred to as psychological trauma. We do not know exactly what it does or how it worms its way into our psyche, but psychological trauma has been linked to a wide range of fear- and depression-related symptoms

  17. Radiology in chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, W.; Kloehn, I.; Wolfart, W.; Freiburg Univ.

    1979-01-01

    In chest trauma, a routine chest film, preferably in the lateral as well as the frontal projection, is the basic part of the work-up. Occasionally valuable additional methods are fluoroscopy, tomography, bronchography, contrast studies of the GI Tract and angiography and angiocardiography. In 679 chest trauma patients, traffic accidents and falls were the main reason for the trauma. There were 248 fractures; then - in order of frequency - hemopneumothorax (76), lung contusion (58), subcutaneous emphysema (33) cardiac (16) and vascular trauma (12) and damage to other organs. While 20-30% mistakes are made in diagnosing rib fractures in acute trauma, there is high accuracy in the diagnosis of the other injuries. Many cases are shown to demonstrate the value of diagnostic radiology. (orig.) [de

  18. How health service delivery guides the allocation of major trauma patients in the intensive care units of the inclusive (hub and spoke) trauma system of the Emilia Romagna Region (Italy). A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Annalisa; Gordini, Giovanni; Ventura, Chiara; Barozzi, Marco; Caspani, Maria Luisa Rita; Fabbri, Andrea; Ferrari, Anna Maria; Ferri, Enrico; Giugni, Aimone; Marino, Massimiliano; Martino, Costanza; Pizzamiglio, Mario; Ravaldini, Maurizio; Russo, Emanuele; Trabucco, Laura; Trombetti, Susanna; De Palma, Rossana

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate cross-sectional patient distribution and standardised 30-day mortality in the intensive care units (ICU) of an inclusive hub and spoke trauma system. Setting ICUs of the Integrated System for Trauma Patient Care (SIAT) of Emilia-Romagna, an Italian region with a population of approximately 4.5 million. Participants 5300 patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) >15 were admitted to the regional ICUs and recorded in the Regional Severe Trauma Registry between 2007 and 2012. Patients were classified by the Abbreviated Injury Score as follows: (1) traumatic brain injury (2) multiple injuriesand (3) extracranial lesions. The SIATs were divided into those with at least one neurosurgical level II trauma centre (TC) and those with a neurosurgical unit in the level I TC only. Results A higher proportion of patients (out of all SIAT patients) were admitted to the level I TC at the head of the SIAT with no additional neurosurgical facilities (1083/1472, 73.6%) compared with the level I TCs heading SIATs with neurosurgical level II TCs (1905/3815; 49.9%). A similar percentage of patients were admitted to level I TCs (1905/3815; 49.9%) and neurosurgical level II TCs (1702/3815, 44.6%) in the SIATs with neurosurgical level II TCs. Observed versus expected mortality (OE) was not statistically different among the three types of centre with a neurosurgical unit; however, the best mean OE values were observed in the level I TC in the SIAT with no neurosurgical unit. Conclusion The Hub and Spoke concept was fully applied in the SIAT in which neurosurgical facilities were available in the level I TC only. The performance of this system suggests that competition among level I and level II TCs in the same Trauma System reduces performance in both. The density of neurosurgical centres must be considered by public health system governors before implementing trauma systems. PMID:28965094

  19. The Trauma Research Associates Program (T-RAP) for undergraduate students: shaping future academic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmparas, Galinos; Fierro, Nicole; Lee, Debora; Sun, Beatrice J; Ley, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    Offering undergraduate students research opportunities may enhance their interest in pursuing a surgical career and lead to increased academic productivity. We characterize the benefits of participating in the Trauma Research Associates Program. A 19-point Web-based survey. Academic Level I Trauma Center. A total of 29 active and former members of the Trauma Research Associates Program. Academic activities and predictors associated with interest in a surgical career and research productivity. Surveys were completed on 26 of 29 (90%) participants. Clinical experience was the most highly ranked motivation to join the program (65%), followed by pursuing a research experience (46%). During their involvement, 73% of participants observed surgical intensive care unit rounds, 65% observed acute care surgery rounds, and 35% observed a surgical procedure in the operating room. In addition, 46% submitted at least one abstract to a surgical meeting coauthored with the Division's faculty. Furthermore, 58% reported that they enrolled in a medical school, whereas 17% pursued a full-time research job. The program influenced the interest in a surgical career in 39% of all members, and 73% reported that they would incorporate research in their medical career. Observing a surgical procedure was independently associated with development of a high interest in a surgical career (adjusted odds ratio: 6.50; 95% CI: 1.09, 38.63; p = 0.04), whereas volunteering for more than 15 hours per week predicted submission of at least 1 abstract to a surgical conference by the participant (adjusted odds ratio: 13.00; 95% CI: 1.27, 133.29; p = 0.03). Development of a structured research program for undergraduate students is beneficial to both the participants and sponsoring institution. Undergraduate exposure to academic surgery enhances interest in pursuing a surgical specialty and leads to academic productivity. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier

  20. Diversity of the definition of stable vital sign in trauma patients: results of a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Seongpyo

    2015-12-01

    Hemodynamic stability (HS) based on vital sign (VS) is thought to be the most useful criteria for successful non-operative management (NOM) of blunt spleen injury (BSI). However, a consistent definition of HS has not been established. We wanted to evaluate the definition of HS through conducting a nationwide survey and find the factors affectting diversity. The questionnaire regarding the definition of HS was sent to the department of trauma surgery and emergency medicine of level I trauma center between October 2012 and November 2012. Data was compared using analysis of variance, t-test, χ2 test and logistic regression. Among five hundred and sixty-three doctors, 507 responded (90%). Forty-eight responses were incomplete, and hence, 459 (81.5%) responses were analyzed. There was a significant diversity in the definition of HS on the subject of type of blood pressure (BP), cut off value of hypotension, measuring technique of BP, duration of hypotension, whether or not using heart rate (HR) as a determinant of HS, cut off value of hypotension when the patient has comorbidity or when the patient is a pediatric patient. 91.5% replied that they were confused defining HS and felt the need to have more objective determinants. Nevertheless, 90% of the responders were not using laboratory test to define HS. Many trauma doctors are using only VS to define HS. This is why there is a confusion regarding how to define which patient is hemodynamically stable. More objective determinants such as base deficit or lactate can be useful adjuncts.

  1. Disparities in trauma: the impact of socioeconomic factors on outcomes following traumatic hollow viscus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlitt, Melissa; Hill, J Bradford; Gunter, Oliver L; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2014-09-01

    This piece aims to examine the relationships between hollow viscus injury (HVI) and socioeconomic factors in determining outcomes. HVI has well-defined injury patterns with complex postoperative convalescence and morbidity, representing an ideal focus for identifying potential disparities among a homogeneous injury population. A retrospective review included patients admitted to a level I trauma center with HVI from 2000-2009, as identified in the Trauma Registry of the American College of Surgeons. Patients with concomitant significant solid organ or vasculature injury were excluded. US Census (2000) median household income by zip code was used as socioeconomic proxy. Demographic and injury-related variables were also included. Endpoints were mortality and outcomes associated with HVI morbidity. A total of 933 patients with HVI were identified and 256 met inclusion criteria. There were 23 deaths (9.0%), and mortality was not associated with race, gender, income, or payer source. However, lower median household income was significantly associated with longer intervals to ostomy takedown (P = 0.032). Additionally, private payers had significantly lower rates of anastomotic leak (0% [0/73] versus 7.1% [13/183], P = 0.019) and fascial dehiscence (5.5% [4/73] versus 16.9% [31/183], P = 0.016), while self-payers had significantly higher rates of abscess formation, both overall (24% [24/100] versus 10.2% [16/156], P = 0.004) and among penetrating injuries (27.4% [23/84] versus 13.6% [12/88], P = 0.036). Socioeconomic status may not impact overall mortality among trauma patients with hollow viscus injuries, but private insurance appears to be protective of morbidity related to anastomotic leak, fascial dehiscence, and abscess formation. This supports that socioeconomic disparity may exist within long-term outcomes, particularly regarding payer source. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. On-Call Communication in Orthopaedic Trauma: "A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words"--A Survey of OTA Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Cesar S; Callan, Alexandra K; Burgos, Eduardo J; Mir, Hassan R

    2015-05-01

    To quantify the effects of varying clinical communication styles (verbal and pictorial) on the ability of orthopaedic trauma surgeons in understanding an injury and formulate an initial management plan. A Research Electronic Data Capture survey was e-mailed to all OTA members. Respondents quantified (5-point Likert scale) how confident they felt understanding an injury and establishing an initial management plan based on the information provided for 5 common orthopaedic trauma scenarios. Three verbal descriptions were created for each scenario and categorized as limited, moderate, or detailed. The questions were repeated with the addition of a radiographic image and then repeated a third time including a clinical photograph. Statistical evaluation consisted of descriptive statistics and Kruskal-Wallis analyses using STATA (version 12.0). Of the 221 respondents, there were a total of 95 who completed the entire survey. Nearly all were currently taking call (92/95 = 96.8%) and the majority were fellowship trained (79/95 = 83.2%). Most practice at a level I trauma center (58/95 = 61.1%) and work with orthopaedic residents (62/95 = 65.3%). There was a significant increase in confidence scores between a limited, moderate, and detailed description in all clinical scenarios for understanding the injury and establishing an initial management plan (P 0.05). The addition of images in the form of radiographs and/or clinical photographs greatly improves the confidence of orthopaedic trauma surgeons in understanding injuries and establishing initial management plans with limited verbal information (P communicating providers.

  3. Admissions for isolated nonoperative mild head injuries: Sharing the burden among trauma surgery, neurosurgery, and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting; Mejaddam, Ali Y; Chang, Yuchiao; DeMoya, Marc A; King, David R; Yeh, Daniel D; Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Alam, Hasan B; Velmahos, George C

    2016-10-01

    Isolated nonoperative mild head injuries (INOMHI) occur with increasing frequency in an aging population. These patients often have multiple social, discharge, and rehabilitation issues, which far exceed the acute component of their care. This study was aimed to compare the outcomes of patients with INOMHI admitted to three services: trauma surgery, neurosurgery, and neurology. Retrospective case series (January 1, 2009 to August 31, 2013) at an academic Level I trauma center. According to an institutional protocol, INOMHI patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 13 to 15 were admitted on a weekly rotational basis to trauma surgery, neurosurgery, and neurology. The three populations were compared, and the primary outcomes were survival rate to discharge, neurological status at hospital discharge as measured by the Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS), and discharge disposition. Four hundred eighty-eight INOMHI patients were admitted (trauma surgery, 172; neurosurgery, 131; neurology, 185). The mean age of the study population was 65.3 years, and 58.8% of patients were male. Seventy-seven percent of patients has a GCS score of 15. Age, sex, mechanism of injury, Charlson Comorbidity Index, Injury Severity Score, Abbreviated Injury Scale in head and neck, and GCS were similar among the three groups. Patients who were admitted to trauma surgery, neurosurgery and neurology services had similar proportions of survivors (98.8% vs 95.7% vs 94.7%), and discharge disposition (home, 57.0% vs 61.6% vs 55.7%). The proportion of patients with GOS of 4 or 5 on discharge was slightly higher among patients admitted to trauma (97.7% vs 93.0% vs 92.4%). In a logistic regression model adjusting for Charlson Comorbidity Index CCI and Abbreviated Injury Scale head and neck scores, patients who were admitted to neurology or neurosurgery had significantly lower odds being discharged with GOS 4 or 5. While the trauma group had the lowest proportion of repeats of brain computed tomography (61

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search Using the PILOTS Database What is ... Advisory Boards History and Achievements Divisions and Staff Leadership Divisions Executive Behavioral Science Clinical Neurosciences Dissemination & Training ...

  5. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Coping Treatment Self-Help and Coping PTSD Research Where to Get Help for PTSD Help with ... Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search Using the PILOTS Database What ...

  6. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business Congressional ... Trauma Assessment Assessment Overview Adult Interviews Adult Self Report Child Measures Deployment Measures DSM-5 Measures PTSD ...

  7. The presence of nonthoracic distracting injuries does not affect the initial clinical examination of the cervical spine in evaluable blunt trauma patients: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Agathoklis; Plurad, David; Barmparas, Galinos; Inaba, Kenji; Lam, Lydia; Bukur, Marko; Branco, Bernardino C; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2011-09-01

    A distracting injury mandates cervical spine (c-spine) imaging in the evaluable blunt trauma patient who demonstrates no pain or tenderness over the c-spine. The purpose of this study was to examine which distracting injuries can negatively affect the sensitivity of the standard clinical examination of the c-spine. This is a prospective observational study conducted at a Level I Trauma Center from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009. After institutional review board approval, all evaluable (Glasgow Coma Scale score ≥13) blunt trauma patients older than 16 years sustaining a c-spine injury were enrolled. A distracting injury was defined as any immediately evident bony or soft tissue injury or a complaint of non-c-spine pain whether or not an actual injury was subsequently diagnosed. Information regarding the initial clinical examination and the presence of a distracting injury was collected from the senior resident or attending trauma surgeon involved in the initial management. During the study period, 101 evaluable patients sustained a c-spine injury. Distracting injuries were present in 88 patients (87.1%). The most common was rib fracture (21.6%), followed by lower extremity fracture (20.5%) and upper extremity fracture (12.5%). Only four (4.0%) patients had no pain or tenderness on the initial examination of the c-spine. All four patients had bruising and tenderness to the upper anterior chest. None of these four patients developed neurologic sequelae or required a surgical stabilization or immobilization. C-spine imaging may not be required in the evaluable blunt trauma patient despite distracting injuries in any body regions that do not involve the upper chest. Further definition of distracting injuries is mandated to avoid unnecessary utilization of resources and to reduce the imaging burden associated with the evaluation of the c-spine.

  8. A Multicenter Performance Improvement Program Uses Rural Trauma Filters for Benchmarking: An Evaluation of the Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coniglio, Ray; McGraw, Constance; Archuleta, Mike; Bentler, Heather; Keiter, Leigh; Ramstetter, Julie; Reis, Elizabeth; Romans, Cristi; Schell, Rachael; Ross, Kelli; Smith, Rachel; Townsend, Jodi; Orlando, Alessandro; Mains, Charles W

    Colorado requires Level III and IV trauma centers to conduct a formal performance improvement program (PI), but provides limited support for program development. Trauma program managers and coordinators in rural facilities rarely have experience in the development or management of a PI program. As a result, rural trauma centers often face challenges in evaluating trauma outcomes adequately. Through a multidisciplinary outreach program, our Trauma System worked with a group of rural trauma centers to identify and define seven specific PI filters based on key program elements of rural trauma centers. This retrospective observational project sought to develop and examine these PI filters so as to enhance the review and evaluation of patient care. The project included 924 trauma patients from eight Level IV and one Level III trauma centers. Seven PI filters were retrospectively collected and analyzed by quarter in 2016: prehospital managed airway for patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of less than 9; adherence to trauma team activation criteria; evidence of physician team leader presence within 20 min of activation; patient with a GCS score less than 9 in the emergency department (ED): intubated in less than 20 min; ED length of stay (LOS) less than 4 hr from patient arrival to transfer; adherence to admission criteria; documentation of GCS on arrival, discharge, or with change of status. There was a significantly increasing compliance trend toward appropriate documentation of GCS (p trend used to develop compliance thresholds, to identify areas for improvement, and create corrective action plans as necessary.

  9. Urological injuries following trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent, C.; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M.; Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N.; Fotheringham, T.

    2008-01-01

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated

  10. Urological injuries following trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.bent@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N. [Department of Urology, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Fotheringham, T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  11. Life Stories and Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongshøj, Inge Lise Lundsgaard; Bohn, Annette; Berntsen, Dorthe

    Research has shown a connection between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and integration of traumatic experiences into the life story. Furthermore, empirical evidence suggests that life story formation begins in mid to late adolescence. Following these findings, the present study investigated...... whether experiencing trauma in youth was associated with a greater risk to integrate the trauma into the life story compared to adult traumatic exposure. Life stories were collected from 115 participants recruited via Amazon Mechanical Turk. Moreover, participants filled out questionnaires regarding...... often integrate the trauma into their life story? Results will be discussed in relation to theories of development of life stories and of PTSD....

  12. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  13. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.Dental...

  14. Trauma Induced Coagulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Johansson, Per; Meyer, Martin Abild Stengaard

    2013-01-01

    It remains debated whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a different coagulopathy compared to non-TBI. This study investigated traditional coagulation tests, biomarkers of coagulopathy and endothelial damage in trauma patients with and without TBI. Blood from 80 adult trauma patients were...... sampled (median of 68 min (IQR 48-88) post-injury) upon admission to our trauma centre. Plasma/serum were retrospectively analysed for biomarkers reflecting sympathoadrenal activation (adrenaline, noradrenaline), coagulation activation/inhibition and fibrinolysis (protein C, activated protein C, tissue...

  15. CT of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    There appears to be a limited role for computed tomography in the evaluation of chest trauma. The literature contains few papers specifically addressing the use of CT in the setting of chest trauma. Another series of articles relates anecdotal experiences in this regard. This paucity of reports attests to the remarkable amount of information present on conventional chest radiographs as well as the lack of clear indications for CT in the setting of chest trauma. In this chapter traumatic lesions of various areas of the thorax are discussed. The conventional radiographic findings are briefly described and the potential or proven application of CT is addressed

  16. Platelet aggregation following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis A; Sørensen, Anne M; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate platelet function in trauma patients, as it is pivotal for hemostasis yet remains scarcely investigated in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study of platelet aggregation capacity in 213 adult trauma patients on admission to an emergency department (ED...... severity score (ISS) was 17; 14 (7%) patients received 10 or more units of red blood cells in the ED (massive transfusion); 24 (11%) patients died within 28 days of trauma: 17 due to cerebral injuries, four due to exsanguination, and three from other causes. No significant association was found between...... aggregation response and ISS. Higher TRAP values were associated with death due to cerebral injuries (P 

  17. Urological injuries following trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, C; Iyngkaran, T; Power, N; Matson, M; Hajdinjak, T; Buchholz, N; Fotheringham, T

    2008-12-01

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  18. The clinical significance of isolated loss of lordosis on cervical spine computed tomography in blunt trauma patients: a prospective evaluation of 1,007 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejaddam, Ali Y; Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Ramly, Elie P; Avery, Laura L; Yeh, Dante D; King, David R; de Moya, Marc A; Velmahos, George C

    2015-11-01

    A negative computed tomographic (CT) scan may be used to rule out cervical spine (c-spine) injury after trauma. Loss of lordosis (LOL) is frequently found as the only CT abnormality. We investigated whether LOL should preclude c-spine clearance. All adult trauma patients with isolated LOL at our Level I trauma center (February 1, 2011 to May 31, 2012) were prospectively evaluated. The primary outcome was clinically significant injury on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), flexion-extension views, and/or repeat physical examination. Of 3,333 patients (40 ± 17 years, 60% men) with a c-spine CT, 1,007 (30%) had isolated LOL. Among 841 patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15, no abnormalities were found on MRI, flexion-extension views, and/or repeat examinations, and all collars were removed. Among 166 patients with Glasgow Coma Scale less than 15, 3 (.3%) had minor abnormal MRI findings but no clinically significant injury. Isolated LOL on c-spine CT is not associated with a clinically significant injury and should not preclude c-spine clearance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Using level-I PRA for enhanced safety of the advanced neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, C.T.; Linn, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The phase-1, level-I probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor has been completed as part of the conceptual design phase of this proposed research facility. Since project inception, PRA and reliability concepts have been an integral part of the design evolutions contributing to many of the safety features in the current design. The level-I PRA has been used to evaluate the internal events core damage frequency against project goals and to identify systems important to safety and availability, and it will continue to guide and provide support to accident analysis, both severe and nonsevere. The results also reflect the risk value of defense-in-depth safety features in reducing the likelihood of core damage

  20. Trauma no idoso Trauma in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ ANTONIO GOMES DE SOUZA

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available O crescimento populacional de idosos, associado a uma forma de vida mais saudável e mais ativa, deixa este grupo de pessoas mais exposto ao risco de acidentes. Em alguns países, o trauma do idoso responde por uma elevada taxa de mortalidade, a qual se apresenta de forma desproporcionalmente maior do que a observada entre a população de adultos jovens. Tal fato acarreta um grande consumo de recursos financeiros destinados à assistência da saúde e um elevado custo social. As características fisiológicas próprias do idoso, assim como a presença freqüente de doenças associadas, faz com que estes pacientes se comportem diferentemente e de forma mais complexa do que os demais grupos etários. Estas particularidades fazem com que o atendimento ao idoso vítima de trauma se faça de forma diferenciada. A presente revisão aborda aspectos da epidemiologia, da prevenção, da fisiologia, do atendimento e da reabilitação do idoso vítima de trauma.The populational growth of the elderly, associated to a healthier and more active life, make this group of people more exposed to accidents. In some countries, trauma in the elderly is responsible for a high mortality rate, desproportionately higher than in the adults. This fact consumes a great portion of health care resources and implies in a high social cost. The distinct physiologic characteristics of the elderly and the frequent presence of associated diseases make that these patients behave diferently and in a more complex way than patients of other ages. These particularities make that health care to the elderly victims of trauma have to be different. The present revision is about aspects of epidemiology, prevention, physiology, health care and reabilitation of the elderly victims of trauma.

  1. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis methodology in a level-I PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez McLeod, J.E.; Rivera, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    This work presents a methodology for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, applicable to a probabilistic safety assessment level I. The work contents are: correct association of distributions to parameters, importance and qualification of expert opinions, generations of samples according to sample sizes, and study of the relationships among system variables and system response. A series of statistical-mathematical techniques are recommended along the development of the analysis methodology, as well different graphical visualization for the control of the study. (author) [es

  2. About Military Sexual Trauma

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    Full Text Available ... Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from ... Veterans Health Administration 2,027 views 25:30 Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History ...

  3. Trauma and Coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yılmaz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding and coagulation disorders related to trauma are pathological processes which are frequently seen and increase mortality. For the purpose, trauma patients should be protected from hypoperfusion, hypothermia, acidosis and hemodilution which may aggravate the increase in physiological responses to trauma as anticoagulation and fibrinolysis. Performing damage control surgery and resuscitation and transfusion of adequate blood and blood products in terms of amount and content as stated in protocols may increase the rate of survival. Medical treatments augmenting fibrin formation (fibrinogen, desmopressin, factor VIIa or preventing fibrin degradation (tranexamic acid have been proposed in selected cases but the efficacy of these agents in trauma patients are not proven. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9:71-6

  4. Acute coagulopathy of trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P I; Ostrowski, S R

    2010-01-01

    Acute coagulopathy of trauma predicts a poor clinical outcome. Tissue trauma activates the sympathoadrenal system resulting in high circulating levels of catecholamines that influence hemostasis dose-dependently through immediate effects on the two major compartments of hemostasis, i.......e., the circulating blood and the vascular endothelium. There appears to be a dose-dependency with regards to injury severity and the hemostatic response to trauma evaluated in whole blood by viscoelastic assays like thrombelastography (TEG), changing from normal to hypercoagulable, to hypocoagulable and finally......, is an evolutionary developed response that counterbalances the injury and catecholamine induced endothelial activation and damage. Given this, the rise in circulating catecholamines in trauma patients may favor a switch from hyper- to hypocoagulability in the blood to keep the progressively more procoagulant...

  5. About Military Sexual Trauma

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    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... Loading... Loading... Rating is available when the video has been rented. This feature is not available right ...

  6. About Military Sexual Trauma

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    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... is Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) [for posttraumatic stress disorder]? - Duration: 2:01. Veterans Health Administration 27,844 ...

  7. About Military Sexual Trauma

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    Full Text Available ... Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from ... 5:31 Get Fit for Life (8) Strength/Balance Training - Duration: 32:02. Veterans Health Administration 2, ...

  8. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from ... 5:31 Get Fit for Life (8) Strength/Balance Training - Duration: 32:02. Veterans Health Administration 2, ...

  9. Suspension Trauma / Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Suspension Trauma/Orthostatic Intolerance Safety and Health Information Bulletin SHIB 03-24-2004, updated 2011 This Safety ... the harness, the environmental conditions, and the worker's psychological state all may increase the onset and severity ...

  10. Anaesthesia for trauma patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    casualty incident, or a natural disaster. ... Exposure/environmental control: completely undress the ... E. Figure 1: Advance Trauma Life Support® management priorities ..... requiring operative intervention: the patient too sick to anesthetize.

  11. Evaluating trauma care capabilities in Mexico with the World Health Organization's Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreola-Risa, Carlos; Mock, Charles; Vega Rivera, Felipe; Romero Hicks, Eduardo; Guzmán Solana, Felipe; Porras Ramírez, Giovanni; Montiel Amoroso, Gilberto; de Boer, Melanie

    2006-02-01

    To identify affordable, sustainable methods to strengthen trauma care capabilities in Mexico, using the standards in the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care, a publication that was developed by the World Health Organization and the International Society of Surgery to provide recommendations on elements of trauma care that should be in place in the various levels of health facilities in all countries. The Guidelines publication was used as a basis for needs assessments conducted in 2003 and 2004 in three Mexican states. The states were selected to represent the range of geographic and economic conditions in the country: Oaxaca (south, lower economic status), Puebla (center, middle economic status), and Nuevo León (north, higher economic status). The sixteen facilities that were assessed included rural clinics, small hospitals, and large hospitals. Site visits incorporated direct inspection of physical resources as well as interviews with key administrative and clinical staff. Human and physical resources for trauma care were adequate in the hospitals, especially the larger ones. The survey did identify some deficiencies, such as shortages of stiff suction tips, pulse oximetry equipment, and some trauma-related medications. All of the clinics had difficulties with basic supplies for resuscitation, even though some received substantial numbers of trauma patients. In all levels of facilities there was room for improvement in administrative functions to assure quality trauma care, including trauma registries, trauma-related quality improvement programs, and uniform in-service training. This study identified several low-cost ways to strengthen trauma care in Mexico. The study also highlighted the usefulness of the recommended norms in the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care publication in providing a standardized template by which to assess trauma care capabilities in nations worldwide.

  12. System care improves trauma outcome: patient care errors dominate reduced preventable death rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoburn, E; Norris, P; Flores, R; Goode, S; Rodriguez, E; Adams, V; Campbell, S; Albrink, M; Rosemurgy, A

    1993-01-01

    A review of 452 trauma deaths in Hillsborough County, Florida, in 1984 documented that 23% of non-CNS trauma deaths were preventable and occurred because of inadequate resuscitation or delay in proper surgical care. In late 1988 Hillsborough County organized a County Trauma Agency (HCTA) to coordinate trauma care among prehospital providers and state-designated trauma centers. The purpose of this study was to review county trauma deaths after the inception of the HCTA to determine the frequency of preventable deaths. 504 trauma deaths occurring between October 1989 and April 1991 were reviewed. Through committee review, 10 deaths were deemed preventable; 2 occurred outside the trauma system. Of the 10 deaths, 5 preventable deaths occurred late in severely injured patients. The preventable death rate has decreased to 7.0% with system care. The causes of preventable deaths have changed from delayed or inadequate intervention to postoperative care errors.

  13. Blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daphne J

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with a wide range of injuries, many of which are life threatening. This article is a case study demonstrating a variety of traumatic chest injuries, including pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Literature on the diagnosis and treatment was reviewed, including both theoretical and research literature, from a variety of disciplines. The role of the advance practice nurse in trauma is also discussed as it relates to assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with traumatic chest injuries.

  14. Age-associated impact on presentation and outcome for penetrating thoracic trauma in the adult and pediatric patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollberg, Nathan M; Tabachnick, Deborah; Lin, Fang-Ju; Merlotti, Gary J; Varghese, Thomas K; Arensman, Robert M; Massad, Malek G

    2014-02-01

    Studies reporting on penetrating thoracic trauma in the pediatric population have been limited by small numbers and implied differences with the adult population. Our objectives were to report on a large cohort of pediatric patients presenting with penetrating thoracic trauma and to determine age-related impacts on management and outcome through comparison with an adult cohort. A Level I trauma center registry was queried between 2006 and 2012. All patients presenting with penetrating thoracic trauma were identified. Patient demographics, injury mechanism, injury severity, admission physiology, and outcome were recorded. Patients were compared, and outcomes were analyzed based on age at presentation, with patients 17 years or younger defining our pediatric cohort. A total of 1,423 patients with penetrating thoracic trauma were admitted during the study period. Two hundred twenty patients (15.5%) were pediatric, with 205 being adolescents (13-17 years) and 15 being children (≤ 12 years). In terms of management for the pediatric population, tube thoracostomy alone was needed in 32.7% (72 of 220), whereas operative thoracic exploration was performed in 20.0% (44 of 220). Overall mortality was 13.6% (30 of 220). There was no significant difference between the pediatric and adult population with regard to injury mechanism or severity, need for therapeutic intervention, operative approach, use of emergency department thoracotomy, or outcome. Stepwise logistic regression failed to identify age as a predictor for the need for either therapeutic intervention or mortality between the two age groups as a whole. However, subgroup analysis revealed that being 12 years or younger (odds ratio, 3.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-11.4) was an independent predictor of mortality. Management of traumatic penetrating thoracic injuries in terms of the need for therapeutic intervention and operative approach was similar between the adult and pediatric populations. Mortality from

  15. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Airway management in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration.

  17. Imaging of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffmann, M.; Herold, C.J.; Fuchs, M.

    1998-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest results from transfer of kinetic energy to the human body. It may cause a wide range of mostly life-threatening injuries, including fractures of the thoracic skeleton, disintegration of the pleural space, contusion or laceration of pulmonary parenchyma and damage to the mediastinal structures. For a systematic approach it may be helpful to follow an organ-based evaluation of thoracic trauma. However, it should be borne in mind that subtle injuries may be associated with serious complications. Trauma to the chest may affect different anatomic compartments at the same time, requiring and extending diagnostic approach. Conventional radiography plays a major role in diagnosting thoracic trauma, complemented by ultrasound examination of the pleura and abdomen. It is well documented that CT scanning represents a major technological improvement for assessment of thoracic trauma. With the advent of fast helical CT scanning this method becomes more applicable for severly traumatized patients and potentially replaces other time-consuming procedures. State-of-the-art imaging of both projection and cross-sectional techniques provides useful information for immediate and appropriate treatment mandatory in patients with thoracic trauma. (orig.) [de

  18. Current trauma care system and trauma care training in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Yang Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is a life-threatening “modern disease”. The outcomes could only be optimized by cost-efficient and prompt trauma care, which embarks on the improvement of essential capacities and conceptual revolution in addition to the disruptive innovation of the trauma care system. According to experiences from the developed countries, systematic trauma care training is the cornerstone of the generalization and the improvement on the trauma care, such as the Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS. Currently, the pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMS has been one of the essential elements of infrastructure of health services in China, which is also fundamental to the trauma care system. Hereby, the China Trauma Care Training (CTCT with independent intellectual property rights has been initiated and launched by the Chinese Trauma Surgeon Association to extend the up-to-date concepts and techniques in the field of trauma care as well to reinforce the generally well-accepted standardized protocols in the practices. This article reviews the current status of the trauma care system as well as the trauma care training. Keywords: Trauma care system, Trauma care training, China

  19. Patterns of ocular trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babar, T.F.; Khan, M.T.; Marwat, M.; Shah, A.; Murad, Y.; Khan, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    To describe the patterns of ocular trauma, cause of injury and its effects on eye. A retrospective case series. Medical records of 1105 patients admitted with ocular trauma were reviewed. The details of patients regarding age, gender, literacy, cause of injury and its effects on eye were entered into specially-designed performa. Sample selection consisted of all patients with history of ocular trauma and who were admitted to hospital. Population details consisted patients who were referred to the hospital from all parts of N.W.F.P. Thus, the frequency of trauma in the hospital admissions was analysed. Ophthalmic trauma comprised 6.78% of the hospital admission. One thousand one hundred and five patients presented with eye injuries. Out of them, 21 patients suffered from trauma to both eyes. Almost 80% patients were male and 69% patients were below 30 years of age. Delayed presentation was more common and 63.61% patients presented after one week. Open globe injuries were more common (520 eyes (46.18%)) than closed globe injuries (484 eyes (42.98%)). 23.26% of open globe injuries were associated with intraocular and intra-orbital foreign bodies. Superficial non-perforating, eyelid and adnexal and burns were seen in 122 eyes (10.83%). Among the complications, lens damage and hyphema was seen in more than 50% of the patients, 16.60% eyes were infected at the time of admission and 4.88% of eyes needed enucleation or evisceration. The common causes of injury were violence in 37.37%, occupational in 24.43% and domestic accidents in 19.18%. Ophthalmic trauma is a major public health problem. Majority of the involved are male and under 30 years of age. Delayed presentation is more common. Open globe injuries are more frequent. Violence and occupational injuries are the major causes. (author)

  20. Pharmacist's impact on acute pain management during trauma resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Kayla; Hall, A Brad; Keriazes, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    The timely administration of analgesics is crucial to the comprehensive management of trauma patients. When an emergency department (ED) pharmacist participates in trauma resuscitation, the pharmacist acts as a medication resource for trauma team members and facilitates the timely administration of analgesics. This study measured the impact of a pharmacist on time to first analgesic dose administered during trauma resuscitation. All adult (>18 years) patients who presented to this level II trauma center via activation of the trauma response system between January 1, 2009, and May 31, 2013, were screened for eligibility. For inclusion, patients must have received intravenous fentanyl, morphine, or hydromorphone in the trauma bay. The time to medication administration was defined as the elapsed time from ED arrival to administration of first analgesic. There were 1328 trauma response system activations during the study period; of which 340 patients were included. The most common analgesic administered was fentanyl (62% in both groups). When a pharmacist was participating, the mean time to first analgesic administered was decreased (17 vs 21 minutes; P = .03). Among the 78% of patients with documented pain scores, the overall mean reduction in pain scores from ED arrival to ED discharge was similar between the 2 groups. There was a 2.4 point reduction with a pharmacist versus 2.7 without a pharmacist, using a 0 to 10 numeric pain rating scale. The participation of a clinical pharmacist during trauma resuscitation significantly decreased the time to first analgesic administration in trauma patients. The results of this study supplement the literature supporting the integration of clinical ED pharmacists on trauma teams.

  1. [Challenges of implementing a geriatric trauma network : A regional structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeneberg, Carsten; Hussmann, Bjoern; Wesemann, Thomas; Pientka, Ludger; Vollmar, Marie-Christin; Bienek, Christine; Steinmann, Markus; Buecking, Benjamin; Lendemans, Sven

    2018-04-01

    At present, there is a high percentage and increasing tendency of patients presenting with orthogeriatric injuries. Moreover, significant comorbidities often exist, requiring increased interdisciplinary treatment. These developments have led the German Society of Trauma Surgery, in cooperation with the German Society of Geriatrics, to establish geriatric trauma centers. As a conglomerate hospital at two locations, we are cooperating with two external geriatric clinics. In 2015, a geriatric trauma center certification in the form of a conglomerate network structure was agreed upon for the first time in Germany. For this purpose, the requirements for certification were observed. Both structure and organization were defined in a manual according to DIN EN ISO 9001:2015. Between 2008 and 2016, an increase of 70% was seen in geriatric trauma cases in our hospital, with a rise of up to 360% in specific diagnoses. The necessary standards and regulations were compiled and evaluated from our hospitals. After successful certification, improvements were necessary, followed by a planned re-audit. These were prepared by multiprofessional interdisciplinary teams and implemented at all locations. A network structure can be an alternative to classical cooperation between trauma and geriatric units in one clinic and help reduce possible staffing shortage. Due to the lack of scientific evidence, future evaluations of the geriatric trauma register should reveal whether network structures in geriatric trauma surgery lead to a valid improvement in medical care.

  2. Reduced cortical thickness in veterans exposed to early life trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, Vincent; Salat, David H; Amick, Melissa M; Leritz, Elizabeth C; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E

    2014-08-30

    Studies have shown that early life trauma may influence neural development and increase the risk of developing psychological disorders in adulthood. We used magnetic resonance imaging to examine the impact of early life trauma on the relationship between current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and cortical thickness/subcortical volumes in a sample of deployed personnel from Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom. A group of 108 service members enrolled in the Translational Research Center for Traumatic Brain Injury and Stress Disorders (TRACTS) were divided into those with interpersonal early life trauma (EL-Trauma+) and Control (without interpersonal early life trauma) groups based on the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire. PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. Cortical thickness and subcortical volumes were analyzed using the FreeSurfer image analysis package. Thickness of the paracentral and posterior cingulate regions was positively associated with PTSD severity in the EL-Trauma+ group and negatively in the Control group. In the EL-Trauma+ group, both the right amygdala and the left hippocampus were positively associated with PTSD severity. This study illustrates a possible influence of early life trauma on the vulnerability of specific brain regions to stress. Changes in neural morphometry may provide information about the emergence and maintenance of symptoms in individuals with PTSD. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. A pilot study on the randomization of inferior vena cava filter placement for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in high-risk trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekhar, Anita; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Lottenberg, Richard; Feezor, Robert J; Armen, Scott B; Liu, Huazhi; Efron, Philip A; Crowther, Mark; Ang, Darwin

    2011-08-01

    Placement of prophylactic inferior vena cava filters (pIVCFs) for the prevention of pulmonary embolism (PE) in high-risk trauma patients (HRTPs) are widely practiced despite the lack of Level I data supporting this use. We report the 2-year interim analysis of the Filters in Trauma pilot study. This is a single institution, prospective randomized controlled pilot feasibility study in a Level I trauma center. HRTPs were identified for pIVCF placement by the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma guidelines. From November 2008 to November 2010, HRTPs were enrolled and randomized to either pIVCF or no pIVCF. All patients received pharmacologic prophylaxis when safe. Primary outcomes included feasibility objectives and secondary outcomes were incidence of PE, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and death. Thirty-four of 38 enrolled patients were eligible for analysis. The baseline sociodemographic characteristics were balanced between the both groups. Results of the feasibility objectives included: time from admission to enrollment (mean, 47.4 hours ± 22.0 hours), time from enrollment to randomization (mean, 4.8 hours ± 9.1 hours), time from randomization to IVCF placement (mean, 16.9 hours ± 9.2 hours), adherence to weekly compression ultrasound within first month (IVCF group = 44.4%; non-IVCF group = 62.5%), and 1-month clinical follow-up (IVCF group = 83.3%; non-IVCF group = 100%). At 6-month follow-up, one PE in the nonfilter group and one DVT in the filter group had occurred. One non-PE-related death occurred in the filter group. Barriers to enrollment included inability to obtain informed consent due to patient refusal or no next of kin identified and delayed notification of eligibility status. Our pilot study demonstrates for the first time that a randomized controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of pIVCFs in trauma patients is feasible. This pilot data will be used to inform the design of a multicenter randomized controlled trial to determine the incidence

  4. Male genital trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disabling chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references

  5. Epidemiology of severe trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, F; García, I; Atutxa, L; Zabarte, M

    2014-12-01

    Major injury is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Among those under 35 years of age, it is the leading cause of death and disability. Traffic accidents alone are the main cause, fundamentally in low- and middle-income countries. Patients over 65 years of age are an increasingly affected group. For similar levels of injury, these patients have twice the mortality rate of young individuals, due to the existence of important comorbidities and associated treatments, and are more likely to die of medical complications late during hospital admission. No worldwide, standardized definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data on severely injured trauma patients. The most common trauma scores are the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury severity Score (TRISS). Documenting the burden of injury also requires evaluation of the impact of post-trauma impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Trauma epidemiology helps define health service and research priorities, contributes to identify disadvantaged groups, and also facilitates the elaboration of comparable measures for outcome predictions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  6. What is optimal timing for trauma team alerts? A retrospective observational study of alert timing effects on the initial management of trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillebo B

    2012-08-01

    , trauma centers, patient care team

  7. Association of low non-invasive near-infrared spectroscopic measurements during initial trauma resuscitation with future development of multiple organ dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicks, Bret A; Campons, Kevin M; Bozeman, William P

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) non-invasively monitors muscle tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). It may provide a continuous noninvasive measurement to identify occult hypoperfusion, guide resuscitation, and predict the development of multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) after severe trauma. We evaluated the correlation between initial StO2 and the development of MOD in multi-trauma patients. Patients presenting to our urban, academic, Level I Trauma Center/Emergency Department and meeting standardized trauma-team activation criteria were enrolled in this prospective trial. NIRS monitoring was initiated immediately on arrival with collection of StO2 at the thenar eminence and continued up to 24 hours for those admitted to the Trauma Intensive Care Unit (TICU). Standardized resuscitation laboratory measures and clinical evaluation tools were collected. The primary outcome was the association between initial StO2 and the development of MOD within the first 24 hours based on a MOD score of 6 or greater. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed; numeric means, multivariate regression and rank sum comparisons were utilized. Clinicians were blinded from the StO2 values. Over a 14 month period, 78 patients were enrolled. Mean age was 40.9 years (SD 18.2), 84.4% were male, 76.9% had a blunt trauma mechanism and mean injury severity score (ISS) was 18.5 (SD 12.9). Of the 78 patients, 26 (33.3%) developed MOD within the first 24 hours. The MOD patients had mean initial StO2 values of 53.3 (SD 10.3), significantly lower than those of non-MOD patients 61.1 (SD 10.0); P=0.002. The mean ISS among MOD patients was 29.9 (SD 11.5), significantly higher than that of non-MODS patients, 12.1 (SD 9.1) (P<0.0001). The mean shock index (SI) among MOD patients was 0.92 (SD 0.28), also significantly higher than that of non-MODS patients, 0.73 (SD 0.19) (P=0.0007). Lactate values were not significantly different between groups. Non-invasive, continuous StO2 near-infrared spectroscopy

  8. Community Disasters, Psychological Trauma, and Crisis Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscarino, Joseph A

    The current issue of International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience is focused on community disasters, the impact of trauma exposure, and crisis intervention. The articles incorporated include studies ranging from the World Trade Center disaster to Hurricane Sandy. These studies are related to public attitudes and beliefs about disease outbreaks, the impact of volunteerism following the World Trade Center attacks, alcohol misuse among police officers after Hurricane Katrina, posttraumatic stress disorder after Hurricane Sandy among those exposed to the Trade Center disaster, compassion fatigue and burnout among trauma workers, crisis interventions in Eastern Europe, and police officers' use of stress intervention services. While this scope is broad, it reflects the knowledge that has emerged since the Buffalo Creek and Chernobyl catastrophes, to the more recent Hurricane Katrina and Sandy disasters. Given the current threat environment, psychologists, social workers, and other providers need to be aware of these developments and be prepared to mitigate the impact of psychological trauma following community disasters, whether natural or man-made.

  9. [Trauma in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, José Antonio Gomes; Iglesias, Antonio Carlos R G

    2002-01-01

    The populational growth of the elderly, associated to a healthier and more active life, make this group of people more exposed to accidents. In some countries, trauma in the elderly is responsible for a high mortality rate, disproportionately higher than in the adults. This fact consumes a great portion of health care resources and implies in a high social cost. The distinct physiologic characteristics of the elderly and the frequent presence of associated diseases make that these patients behave differently and in a more complex way than patients of other ages. These particularities make that health care to the elderly victims of trauma have to be different. The present revision is about aspects of epidemiology, prevention, physiology, health care and rehabilitation of the elderly victims of trauma.

  10. Transfusion practices in trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Trichur Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resuscitation of a severely traumatised patient with the administration of crystalloids, or colloids along with blood products is a common transfusion practice in trauma patients. The determination of this review article is to update on current transfusion practices in trauma. A search of PubMed, Google Scholar, and bibliographies of published studies were conducted using a combination of key-words. Recent articles addressing the transfusion practises in trauma from 2000 to 2014 were identified and reviewed. Trauma induced consumption and dilution of clotting factors, acidosis and hypothermia in a severely injured patient commonly causes trauma-induced coagulopathy. Early infusion of blood products and early control of bleeding decreases trauma-induced coagulopathy. Hypothermia and dilutional coagulopathy are associated with infusion of large volumes of crystalloids. Hence, the predominant focus is on damage control resuscitation, which is a combination of permissive hypotension, haemorrhage control and haemostatic resuscitation. Massive transfusion protocols improve survival in severely injured patients. Early recognition that the patient will need massive blood transfusion will limit the use of crystalloids. Initially during resuscitation, fresh frozen plasma, packed red blood cells (PRBCs and platelets should be transfused in the ratio of 1:1:1 in severely injured patients. Fresh whole blood can be an alternative in patients who need a transfusion of 1:1:1 thawed plasma, PRBCs and platelets. Close monitoring of bleeding and point of care coagulation tests are employed, to allow goal-directed plasma, PRBCs and platelets transfusions, in order to decrease the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

  11. Sonography of scrotal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Meka Srinivasa; Arjun, Kalyanpur

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to depict the spectrum of scrotal injuries in blunt trauma. Scrotal injuries are not very common and are mostly due to blunt trauma from direct injury, sports injuries or motor vehicle accidents. To minimize complications and ensure testicular salvage, rapid and accurate diagnosis is necessary. High-resolution USG is the investigation of choice, as it is readily available, accurate and has been seen to improve outcomes. An understanding of and familiarity with the sonographic appearance of scrotal injuries on the part of the radiologist/sonographer is therefore of key importance

  12. Sonography of scrotal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meka Srinivasa Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to depict the spectrum of scrotal injuries in blunt trauma. Scrotal injuries are not very common and are mostly due to blunt trauma from direct injury, sports injuries or motor vehicle accidents. To minimize complications and ensure testicular salvage, rapid and accurate diagnosis is necessary. High-resolution USG is the investigation of choice, as it is readily available, accurate and has been seen to improve outcomes. An understanding of and familiarity with the sonographic appearance of scrotal injuries on the part of the radiologist/sonographer is therefore of key importance.

  13. Blunt cardiac trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarado, Camilo; Vargas, Fernando; Guzmán, Fernando; Zárate, Alejandro; Correa, José L.; Ramírez, Alejandro; M. Quintero, Diana; Ramírez, Erika M.

    2016-01-01

    El trauma cardiaco constituye una de las primeras causas de mortalidad en la población general. Requiere alto índice de sospecha en trauma cerrado severo, mecanismo de desaceleración y en presencia de signos indirectos como: equimosis, huella del volante o del cinturón en el tórax anterior. Las lesiones incluyen: conmoción cardiaca, ruptura cardiaca, lesión cardiaca indirecta como la trombosis coronaria aguda, lesión aórtica, lesión del pericardio y herniación cardiaca. Entre las manifestacio...

  14. Trauma cardiaco cerrado

    OpenAIRE

    Camilo Alvarado; Fernando Vargas; Fernando Guzmán; Alejandro Zárate; José L. Correa; Alejandro Ramírez; Diana M. Quintero; Erika M. Ramírez

    2016-01-01

    El trauma cardiaco constituye una de las primeras causas de mortalidad en la población general. Requiere alto índice de sospecha en trauma cerrado severo, mecanismo de desaceleración y en presencia de signos indirectos como: equimosis, huella del volante o del cinturón en el tórax anterior. Las lesiones incluyen: conmoción cardiaca, ruptura cardiaca, lesión cardiaca indirecta como la trombosis coronaria aguda, lesión aórtica, lesión del pericardio y herniación cardiaca. Entre las manifestacio...

  15. Radiology of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.

    1987-01-01

    This course provides an overview of the radiologic manifestations of trauma to the chest. The basic mechanisms of injury are discussed. The effect of trauma on the chest wall, the lung parenchyma, and the pleural space is described. Rib fractures, sternal fractures, lung contusion, lung hematoma, lung laceration, post-traumatic atelectasis, hemothorax, chylothorax, pneumothorax, and adult respiratory distress syndrome are discussed and illustrated. Injuries to the tracheobronchial tree, the aorta and brachiocephalic vessels, the esophagus, the diaphragm, and the heart are also presented. The purpose of the lecture is to familiarize the audience with common and unusual radiologic presentations of traumatic injury to the thorax

  16. Eye trauma in boxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Gustavo; Curreri, Anthony

    2009-10-01

    In boxing, along with a few other sports, trauma is inherent to the nature of the sport; therefore it is considered a high-risk sport for ocular injuries. The long-term morbidity of ocular injuries suffered by boxers is difficult to estimate due to the lack of structured long-term follow-up of these athletes. Complications of blunt ocular trauma may develop years after the athlete has retired from the ring and is no longer considered to be at risk for boxing-related injuries. This article describes the wide range of eye injuries a boxer can sustain, and their immediate and long-term clinical management.

  17. Splenic trauma: Is splenectomy redundant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Tandon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 41 year old male, serving air warrior sustained blunt abdominal trauma, CECT revealed grade III splenic injury. He was managed conservatively with good clinical outcome. Conservatism is the new approach to splenic trauma.

  18. Towards a national trauma registry for the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barka Ezedin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma is a major health problem in the United Arab Emirates (UAE as well as worldwide. Trauma registries provide large longitudinal databases for analysis and policy improvement. We aim in this paper to report on the development and evolution of a national trauma registry using a staged approach by developing a single-center registry, a two-center registry, and then a multi-center registry. The three registries were established by developing suitable data collection forms, databases, and interfaces to these databases. The first two registries collected data for a finite period of time and the third is underway. The steps taken to establish these registries depend on whether the registry is intended as a single-center or multi-center registry. Findings Several issues arose and were resolved during the development of these registries such as the relational design of the database, whether to use a standalone database management system or a web-based system, and the usability and security of the system. The inclusion of preventive medicine data elements is important in a trauma registry and the focus on road traffic collision data elements is essential in a country such as the UAE. The first two registries provided valuable data which has been analyzed and published. Conclusions The main factors leading to the successful establishment of a multi-center trauma registry are the development of a concise data entry form, development of a user-friendly secure web-based database system, the availability of a computer and Internet connection in each data collection center, funded data entry personnel well trained in extracting medical data from the medical record and entering it into the computer, and experienced personnel in trauma injuries and data analysis to continuously maintain and analyze the registry.

  19. Utility of the Military Acute Concussion Evaluation as a screening tool for mild traumatic brain injury in a civilian trauma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Melvin E; Safadjou, Saman; Farber, Benjamin; Velazco, Nerissa; Man, Jianliang; Reddy, Srinivas H; Todor, Roxanne; Teperman, Sheldon

    2015-07-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) constitutes 75% of more than 1.5 million traumatic brain injuries annually. There exists no consensus on point-of-care screening for mTBI. The Military Acute Concussion Evaluation (MACE) is a quick and easy test used by the US Army to screen for mTBI; however, its utility in civilian trauma is unclear. It has two parts: a history section and the Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC) score (0-30) previously validated in sports injury. As a performance improvement project, our institution sought to evaluate the MACE as a concussion screening tool that could be used by housestaff in a general civilian trauma population. From June 2013 to May 2014, patients 18 years to 65 years old with suspected concussion were given the MACE within 72 hours of admission to our urban Level I trauma center. Patients with a positive head computed tomography were excluded. Demographic data and MACE scores were recorded in prospect. Concussion was defined as loss of consciousness and/or posttraumatic amnesia; concussed patients were compared with those nonconcussed. Sensitivity and specificity for each respective MACE score were used to plot a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. An ROC curve area of 0.8 was set as the benchmark for a good screening test to distinguish concussion from nonconcussion. There were 84 concussions and 30 nonconcussed patients. Both groups were similar; however, the concussion group had a lower mean MACE score than the nonconcussed patients. Data analysis demonstrated the sensitivity and specificity of a range of MACE scores used to generate an ROC curve area of only 0.65. The MACE showed a lower mean score for individuals with concussion, defined by loss of consciousness and/or posttraumatic amnesia. However, the ROC curve area of 0.65 highly suggests that MACE alone would be a poor screening test for mTBI in a general civilian trauma population. Diagnostic study, level II.

  20. The role of emergency medicine physicians in trauma care in North America: evolution of a specialty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossman Michael D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of Emergency Medicine Physicians (EMP in the care of trauma patients in North America has evolved since the advent of the specialty in the late 1980's. The evolution of this role in the context of the overall demands of the specialty and accreditation requirements of North American trauma centers will be discussed. Limited available data published in the literature examining the role of EMP's in trauma care will be reviewed with respect to its implications for an expanded role for EMPs in trauma care. Two training models currently in the early stages of development have been proposed to address needs for increased manpower in trauma and the critical care of trauma patients. The available information regarding these models will be reviewed along with the implications for improving the care of trauma patients in both Europe and North America.

  1. Gênero e trauma Gender and trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucio Ary Dillon Soares

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available As conseqüências sociais e psicológicas da violência urbana sobre os parentes e amigos de pessoas vitimadas por mortes violentas (homicídio, suicídio ou acidentes são analisadas à luz das diferenças de gênero. A literatura especializada nesta área propõe que mulheres e homens vivenciam experiências traumáticas de forma peculiar. Porém, os traumas típicos são diferentes em cada gênero, deixando em aberto a questão sobre quanto das diferenças entre as respostas se devem a gênero e quanto se devem ao tipo de trauma. Testamos a hipótese de que as mulheres são mais suscetíveis à desordem de estresse pós-trauma (DEPT numa situação traumática comum, usando dados qualitativos e quantitativos. Comparamos os sintomas do trauma e as percepções sobre o significado da perda de seus entes queridos. A amostra, de 425 mulheres (62% e 265 homens (38%, foi retirada de uma lista de parentes de pessoas que sofreram morte violenta na cidade do Rio de Janeiro. Incluímos trinta relatos de parentes e amigos próximos das vítimas diretas. Os resultados revelaram que 54% das mulheres e 41% dos homens tiveram o cotidiano alterado depois da morte de um parente/amigo. Há diferenças estatisticamente significativas nos problemas de saúde e na diversão. Essa área foi a mais afetada, atingindo metade dos entrevistados. Uma variável intimamente correlacionada com os sintomas da DEPT é o contato com o corpo: controlando a extensão do contato (fez o reconhecimento do corpo; viu, mas não reconheceu e nem viu nem reconheceu. Em cada uma dessas categorias, as mulheres foram mais afetadas do que os homens. O artigo conclui que as mulheres sentem mais as perdas do que os homens, mas que parte das diferenças não são internas aos gêneros, mas externas a eles, dependendo das interações e dos contatos pessoais.The social and psychological consequences endured by friends and relatives of people victimized by violent death (homicide, suicide or

  2. Requalification of the LOFT reactor following a loss of coolant experiment (Level I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    During a Loss of Coolant Experiment (LOCE), the LOFT reactor experiences an acceleration of 10 G's and fuel cladding temperature changes at a rate of 1100 0 K/sec. These unparalleled conditions present a unique startup problem to the LOFT program: How can the integrity of the fuel be confirmed so as to minimize operation if damage has occurred. The Level I Requalification Program is designed to accomplish this. It is a progressive series of tests, designed to detect damage at the earliest possible time, and thus preclude or minimize operation if damage exists. First, fuel specialists examine the LOCE data for possible damaging conditions and the results of primary coolant sample analysis for signs of failed fuel. Second, the requalification program proceeds to a series of mechanical and physics tests

  3. About Military Sexual Trauma

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    Full Text Available ... Get YouTube Red. Working... Not now Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma ... MST. http://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/msthom... Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  4. Haemostatic resuscitation in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Jakob; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Johansson, Par I.

    2016-01-01

    of a ratio driven strategy aiming at 1 : 1 : 1, using tranexamic acid according to CRASH-2, and applying haemostatic monitoring enabling a switch to a goal-directed approach when bleeding slows. Haemostatic resuscitation is the mainstay of trauma resuscitation and is associated with improved survival...

  5. Trauma Aware & Safety Ready

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Jim

    2017-01-01

    The interwoven issues of trauma and safety have swept through college campuses over the last decade, and they've arrived at doors of admission offices, encouraging officials to think more carefully about those concerns and take a closer look at how they handle them. Experts recommend in this atmosphere that admission offices discuss these topics…

  6. Understanding Child Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help of a trained professional. When needed, a mental health professional trained in evidence-based trauma treatment can help children and families cope and move toward recovery. Ask your pediatrician, family physician, school counselor, or clergy member for a referral. Visit ...

  7. Obesity in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Cordelie E; Arbabi, Saman; Nathens, Avery B; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2017-04-01

    The implications of childhood obesity on pediatric trauma outcomes are not clearly established. Anthropomorphic data were recently added to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) Research Datasets, enabling a large, multicenter evaluation of the effect of obesity on pediatric trauma patients. Children ages 2 to 19years who required hospitalization for traumatic injury were identified in the 2013-2014 NTDB Research Datasets. Age and gender-specific body mass indices (BMI) were calculated. Outcomes included injury patterns, operative procedures, complications, and hospital utilization parameters. Data from 149,817 pediatric patients were analyzed; higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly more extremity injuries, and fewer injuries to the head, abdomen, thorax and spine (p values Obese children also had significantly longer lengths of stay and more frequent ventilator requirement. Among children admitted after trauma, increased BMI percentile is associated with increased risk of death and potentially preventable complications. These findings suggest that obese children may require different management than nonobese counterparts to prevent complications. Level III; prognosis study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging of vertebral trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daffner, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    This translation of the toolbook published in the 'US-ART' series, offers invaluable help to medical radiologists in the diagnostic imaging and evaluation of complex vertebral traumas which are on the rise, inter alia due to increasingly dangerous leisure sports. (orig./CB) [de

  9. When Trauma Hinders Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Donald A.

    2018-01-01

    Many kindergarten teachers have encountered children who enter school lacking the ability to control their behavior, but they may not understand the social and biological processes behind these children's disruptive behavior. The author reviews research into early childhood brain development to explain how trauma and chronic stress can make it…

  10. About Military Sexual Trauma

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    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... MST. http://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/msthom... Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  11. Early Childhood Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  12. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available skip to page content Attention A T users. To access the menus on this page please perform the following steps. 1. Please switch auto forms ... Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research ...

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Section Home PTSD Overview PTSD Basics Return from War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? ... Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning ...

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Section Home PTSD Overview PTSD Basics Return from War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ...

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search Using the PILOTS Database What is PILOTS? Quick Search Tips Modify ...

  16. Traumatismos oculares Ocular traumas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelen Welch Ruiz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo de tipo retrospectivo longitudinal cuyo universo estuvo constituido por 72 ojos de 72 pacientes con traumatismos oculares mecánicos que fueron hospitalizados en el Hospital Militar Central “Dr. Carlos J. Finlay” desde enero de 1999 hasta enero de 2005. Para el análisis estadístico de la información se utilizó el programa automatizado SPSS versión 11.5 en el cual también se conformó la base de datos y se realizaron los cálculos de acuerdo con el tipo de variable analizada. Se utilizaron medidas de resumen, tendencia central y asociación estadística con un nivel de significación de p A retrospective longitudinal and descriptive study was carried out in 72 eyes from 72 patients with mechanical occular traumas, who had been hospitalized in “Dr. Carlos J. Finlay” Military Hospital from December 1999 to January 2005. For the statistical data analysis, an automated program (SPSS 11.5 version was used to create the database and estimations were made according to the variable types. Summary measures, central tendency measures and statistical association with significance level equal to p < 0.05 were employed. Males prevailed (95.8%, the average age was 30.26 years with a minimum rate of 17 years and maximum rate of 82 years. The most frequent mechanisms of trauma were aggressions (23. 6% and injures from secondary projectiles (13.9%. The anterior segment traumas were more frequent (61, 1% than posterior segment traumas (6.94%. Both segments of the eyeball were affected in 39, 1% of eyes which evinced the worst visual acuity. The most common associated injures were hyphema (54, 2% and vitreous hemorrhage (16.6%. Closed trauma (contusions were more common and most of the eyes had better final visual acuity (45, 2% with vision range of 0.6-1.0 and 26.2% with vision range of 0.59-0.1. On the other hand, eyes affected by open trauma (simple wound, contusion-wound, wound with intraocular foreign body and

  17. Skeleton scintigraphy in trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, M.

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal trauma is common and presents both an opportunity and a problem in skeletal scintigraphy. The opportunity arises in the ability of skeletal scintigraphy to demonstrate abnormalities early after direct trauma. It is well recognized that the early detection of fractures in some sites cannot be reliably achieved by standard radiography, especially in the femoral neck and scaphoid bone. The problem comes in recognizing the effects of skeletal trauma when using skeletal scintigraphy for another purpose, such as the detection of metastatic disease. iatrogenic trauma to either the skeleton or soft tissues may be manifest scintigraphic ally. For example Craniotomy typically leaves a rim pattern at the surgical margin. Rib Retraction during thoracotomy can elicit periosteal reaction. Areas of the skeletal receiving curative levels of ionizing radiation (typically 4000 rads or greater) characteristically demonstrate decreased uptake within 6 months to 1 year after therapy. The generally high sensitivity of the skeletal scintigraphy seems to make it an ideal survey test in cases of suspected child abuse especially in which radiographs are unrevealing. Because of difficulties in obtaining a history of trauma from a preschool child or even eliciting a satisfactory description of the location and nature of the pain, skeletal scintigraphy provides a simple and reliable investigation in these children. Subtle trauma, such as that from stress fractures is often difficult to visualize on a plain radiograph. Skeletal scintigraphy is frequently positive at the time of clinical presentation. Skeletal scintigraphy is exquisitely sensitive to the remodeling process and typically shows abnormalities 1 to 2 weeks or more before the appearance of radiographic changes in stress fractures. The periosteal reaction can be visualized within hours of the injury. Insufficiency and fatigue fractures such as vertebral compression fracture, which is probably the most common consequence of

  18. [The Academy of Trauma Surgery (AUC). Service provider and management organization of the DGU].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, J A; Hoffmann, R

    2016-02-01

    At the beginning of this century the German Trauma Society (DGU) became extensively active with an initiative on quality promotion, development of quality assurance and transparency regarding treatment of the severely injured. A white book on "Medical care of the severely injured" was published, focusing on the requirements on structural quality and especially procedural quality. The impact of the white book was immense and a trauma network with approved trauma centers, structured and graded for their individual trauma care performance, was developed. In order to monitor and document the required quality of care, a registry was needed. Furthermore, for cooperation within the trauma networks innovative methods for digital transfer of radiological images and patient documents became necessary. Finally, the auditing criteria for trauma centers had and still have to be completed with advanced medical education and training programs. In order to realize the implementation of such a broad spectrum of economically relevant and increasingly complex activities the Academy of Trauma Surgery (AUC) was established as a subsidiary of the DGU in 2004. The AUC currently has four divisions: 1) networks and health care structures, 2) registries and research management, 3) telemedicine, 4) medical education and training, all of which serve the goal of the initiative. The AUC is a full service provider and management organization in compliance with the statutes of the DGU. According to these statutes the business operations of the AUC also cover projects for numerous groups of patients, projects for the joint society the German Society for Orthopedics and Trauma (DGOU) as well as other medical institutions. This article describes the success stories of the trauma network (TraumaNetzwerk DGU®), the TraumaRegister DGU®, the telecooperation platform TKmed®, the new and fast-growing orthogeriatric center initiative (AltersTraumaZentrum DGU®) and the division of medical education and

  19. MANAGEMENT OF LIVER TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dova Subba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM To estimate the incidence of Liver Trauma injuries and grade their severity of injury. To assess the factors responsible for morbidity and mortality after Liver Trauma. To study the postoperative complications and the management of Liver Trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present prospective study was conducted on 100 patients who were admitted to Department of General Surgery for treatment who were managed operatively or non-operatively for abdominal trauma and having liver injury forms the material of the study. This study was conducted over a span of 24 months from June 2013 to November 2015. RESULTS Maximum number of patients are in the age group of 21-30 years (46%. 85% patients (85/100 are males and 15% of patients (15/100 are females. Lapse time of injury and admission varied from 25 minutes to 66 hours and 30 minutes. 75 % of the patients (75/100 presented within 24 hours after injury. Death rate of patients who reached hospital after 24 hours of injury was higher than the patients who reached hospital within 24 hours of injury. 28% of patients (28/100 had associated bony injuries, out of which 5% of patients (5/100 expired due to primary haemorrhage of fractured femur. More than one segment was injured in many patients. Segment V is involved commonly making 55% (55/100 of patients. Next common segment involved is segment VII, making 39% (39/100. CONCLUSION Mechanism of injury is the important factor which is responsible for morbidity in liver injury. Nonoperative management proved to be safe and effective and often has been used to treat patients with liver trauma.

  20. Penetrating ureteral trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo P. Fraga

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this series is to report our experience in managing ureteral trauma, focusing on the importance of early diagnosis, correct treatment, and the impact of associated injuries on the management and morbid-mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January 1994 to December 2002, 1487 laparotomies for abdominal trauma were performed and 20 patients with ureteral lesions were identified, all of them secondary to penetrating injury. Medical charts were analyzed as well as information about trauma mechanisms, diagnostic routine, treatment and outcome. RESULTS: All patients were men. Mean age was 27 years. The mechanisms of injury were gunshot wounds in 18 cases (90% and stab wounds in two (10%. All penetrating abdominal injuries had primary indication of laparotomy, and neither excretory urography nor computed tomography were used in any case before surgery. The diagnosis of ureteric injury was made intra-operatively in 17 cases (85%. Two ureteral injuries (10% were initially missed. All patients had associated injuries. The treatment was dictated by the location, extension and time necessary to identify the injury. The overall incidence of complications was 55%. The presence of shock on admission, delayed diagnosis, Abdominal Trauma Index > 25, Injury Severity Score > 25 and colon injuries were associated to a high complication rate, however, there was no statistically significant difference. There were no mortalities in this group. CONCLUSIONS: A high index of suspicion is required for diagnosis of ureteral injuries. A thorough exploration of all retroperitoneal hematoma after penetrating trauma should be an accurate method of diagnosis; even though it failed in 10% of our cases.

  1. Imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  2. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  3. Positive and negative volume-outcome relationships in the geriatric trauma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Schaefer, Eric W; Won, Eugene J; Armen, Scott B; Indeck, Matthew C; Soybel, David I

    2014-04-01

    In trauma populations, improvements in outcome are documented in institutions with higher case volumes. However, it is not known whether improved outcomes are attributable to the case volume within specific higher-risk groups, such as the elderly, or to the case volume among all trauma patients treated by an institution. To test the hypothesis that outcomes of trauma care for geriatric patients are affected differently by the volume of geriatric cases and nongeriatric cases of an institution. This retrospective cohort study using a statewide trauma registry was set in state-designated levels 1 and 2 trauma centers in Pennsylvania. It included 39 431 eligible geriatric trauma patients (aged >65 years) in the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcomes Study. In-hospital mortality, major complications, and mortality after major complications (failure to rescue). Between 2001 and 2010, 39 431 geriatric trauma patients and 105 046 nongeriatric patients were captured in a review of outcomes in 20 state-designated levels 1 and 2 trauma centers. Larger volumes of geriatric trauma patients were significantly associated with lower odds of in-hospital mortality, major complications, and failure to rescue. In contrast, larger nongeriatric trauma volumes were significantly associated with higher odds of major complications in geriatric patients. Higher rates of in-hospital mortality, major complications, and failure to rescue were associated with lower volumes of geriatric trauma care and paradoxically with higher volumes of trauma care for younger patients. These findings offer the possibility that outcomes might be improved with differentiated pathways of care for geriatric trauma patients.

  4. Chest x-ray as a screening tool for blunt thoracic trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchar, Natalie L; Woo, Kenneth; Brennan, Maureen; Palmer, Cameron S; Zs Ee, Michael; Sweeney, Brian; Crameri, Joe

    2013-10-01

    With the increasing use of thoracic computed tomography (CT) to screen for injuries in pediatric blunt thoracic trauma (BTT), we determined whether chest x-ray (CXR) and other clinical and epidemiologic variables could be used to predict significant thoracic injuries, to inform the selective use of CT in pediatric BTT. We further queried if these were discrepant from factors associated with the decision to obtain a thoracic CT. This retrospective cohort study included cases of BTT from three Level I pediatric trauma centers between April 1999 and March 2008. Pre-CT epidemiologic, clinical, and radiologic variables associated with CT findings of any thoracic injury or a significant thoracic injury as well as the decision to obtain a thoracic CT were determined using logistic regression. Of 425 patients, 40% patients had a significant thoracic injury, 49% had nonsignificant thoracic injury, and 11% had no thoracic injury at all. Presence of hydrothorax and/or pneumothorax on CXR significantly increased the likelihood of significant chest injury visualized by CT (adjusted odds ratio 10.8; 95% confidence interval, 6.5-18), as did the presence of isolated subcutaneous emphysema (adjusted odds ratio, 19.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.3-168). Although a normal CXR finding was not statistically associated with a reduced risk of significant thoracic injury, 8 of the 9 cases with normal CXR findings and significant injuries involved occult pneumothoraces or hemothoraces not requiring intervention. Converse to features suggesting increased risk of significant injury, the decision to obtain a thoracic CT was only associated with later period in the study and obtaining a CT scan of another body region. CXR can be used to screen for significant thoracic injuries and direct the selective use of thoracic CT in pediatric BTT. Prospective studies are needed to validate these findings and develop guidelines that include CXR to define indications for thoracic CT in pediatric BTT

  5. Trauma-induced pemphigus: a case series of 36 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Fatehnejad, Mina; Rahbar, Ziba; Balighi, Kamran; Ghandi, Narges; Ghiasi, Maryam; Abedini, Robabeh; Lajevardi, Vahideh; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda

    2016-02-01

    Pemphigus is a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by intraepidermal acantholytic blisters. Isomorphic responses, or Koebner phenomenon (KP), defined as the appearance of typical lesions of a disease following trauma are rarely reported in pemphigus. Our aim was to present patients who developed new pemphigus lesions as a result of skin trauma. The medical files of pemphigus patients from the Autoimmune Bullous Diseases Research Center, who had a history of trauma before the onset or flare of their disease, between 1999 and 2013 were reviewed. Thirty-six pemphigus vulgaris (PV) patients had a history of trauma. Thirteen patients developed new-onset PV and the other 23 had previously been diagnosed with PV. Pemphigus lesions developed most often following major surgeries including abdominal, orthopedic, and chest surgeries as well as dental procedures, blunt physical trauma, and skin surgeries. Moreover, post-cataract laser surgery, burns, radiation therapy, and physiotherapy were also shown to induce pemphigus. Mean time between trauma and lesions was 4.7 weeks for recurrent PV and 15.0 weeks for new-onset PV. Unnecessary surgery and blunt trauma should be avoided in pemphigus patients. Furthermore, posttraumatic pemphigus should be suspected in poorly healing surgical wounds and confirmatory biopsies are mandatory. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Tracheobronchial injuries in blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vahid Montazeri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tracheobronchial injuries are uncommon but potentially fatal complication of blunt thoracic trauma harboring a high morbidity and mortality if not diagnosed early . A recent series gleaning cases from four major Trauma Center in Los Angeles nine cases in a seven- year period , but the incidence of these injuries has been increasing recently. This has been attributed to improvement in hospital care and advanced Trauma Centers and earlier diagnosis of such injuries. Disruption of tight main bronchus is more common, such injuries are often associated with rib or clavicular fractures. Findings: Clinical and paraclinical data gathered from records of three patients referred with tracheobronchial injuries during the recent ten years have been reviewed .These include clinical manifestations, diagnostic findings, treatment modality and clinical course. The outcome has been satisfactory in all three patients who have undergone operation 2-5 hours after sustaining the injury. We have not had any mortality. Conclusion: These results are similar to those of other series emphasizing over early diagnosis and treatment of such injuries .

  7. Effectiveness of trauma team on medical resource utilization and quality of care for patients with major trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Jung; Yen, Shu-Ting; Huang, Shih-Fang; Hsu, Su-Chen; Ying, Jeremy C; Shan, Yan-Shen

    2017-07-24

    Trauma is one of the leading causes of death in Taiwan, and its medical expenditure escalated drastically. This study aimed to explore the effectiveness of trauma team, which was established in September 2010, on medical resource utilization and quality of care among major trauma patients. This was a retrospective study, using trauma registry data bank and inpatient medical service charge databases. Study subjects were major trauma patients admitted to a medical center in Tainan during 2009 and 2013, and was divided into case group (from January, 2011 to August, 2013) and comparison group (from January, 2009 to August, 2010). Significant reductions in several items of medical resource utilization were identified after the establishment of trauma team. In the sub-group of patients who survived to discharge, examination, radiology and operation charges declined significantly. The radiation and examination charges reduced significantly in the subcategories of ISS = 16 ~ 24 and ISS > 24 respectively. However, no significant effectiveness on quality of care was identified. The establishment of trauma team is effective in containing medical resource utilization. In order to verify the effectiveness on quality of care, extended time frame and extra study subjects are needed.

  8. Trauma Tactics: Rethinking Trauma Education for Professional Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Paula; Liddil, Jessica; Eley, Scott; Winfield, Scott

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Trauma Institute (2015), trauma accounts for more than 180,000 deaths each year in the United States. Nurses play a significant role in the care of trauma patients and therefore need appropriate education and training (L. ). Although several courses exist for trauma education, many nurses have not received adequate education in trauma management (B. ; L. ). Trauma Tactics, a 2-day course that focuses on high-fidelity human patient simulation, was created to meet this educational need. This descriptive study was conducted retrospectively to assess the effectiveness of the Trauma Tactics course. Pre- and postsurveys, tests, and simulation performance were used to evaluate professional nurses who participated in Trauma Tactics over a 10-month period. Fifty-five nurses were included in the study. Pre- and postsurveys revealed an increase in overall confidence, test scores increased by an average of 2.5 points, and simulation performance scores increased by an average of 16 points. Trauma Tactics is a high-quality course that provides a valuable and impactful educational experience for nurses. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of Trauma Tactics and its impacts on quality of care and patient outcomes.

  9. Facility disparities in reporting comorbidities to the National Trauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransman, Ryan; Kent, Alistair J; Haut, Elliott R; Reema Kar, A; Sakran, Joseph V; Stevens, Kent