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Sample records for level metapelitic rocks

  1. Petrogenesis and Tectonic Implications of Paleoproterozoic Metapelitic Rocks in the Archean Kongling Complex from the Northern Yangtze Craton, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Zheng, J.; Wang, W.; Xiong, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The Archean Kongling Complex in the northern Yangtze Craton is an ideal target to investigate the Precambrian accretion and evolution of continental crust in South China. This study aims to unravel the crustal evolution and tectonic setting of the Yangtze Craton during the Paleoproterozoic time, using integrated studies of petrography, zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopes and whole-rock geochemistry of Paleoproterozoic metapelitic rocks in the Kongling Complex. These rocks contain garnet, sillimanite, biotite, plagioclase, minor graphite and ilmenite. Zircons from the samples show nebulous sector-zoning and rim-core structure, suggesting both metamorphic origin and detrital origin with metamorphic overprints. The metamorphic zircons and metamorphic overprints have concordant 207Pb/206Pb age at ~2.0 Ga, while detrital grains yield three distinct concordant-age populations of >2.5 Ga, 2.4-2.2 Ga and 2.2-2.1 Ga. The age patterns indicate that the depositional age of the metasedimentary rocks was 2.1-2.0 Ga. Those 2.2-2.1 Ga detrital zircons with variable ɛHf(t) values (-7.28 to 2.97) suggest the addition of juvenile materials from depleted mantle to the crust during 2.2-2.1 Ga. The 2.4-2.2 Ga zircons have Hf model ages (TDM2) of ~2.6-3.5 Ga and >2.5 Ga zircons have TDM2 ages varying from 2.9 Ga to 3.3 Ga. The new data suggest that the Kongling Complex was originally a Paleoarchean (old up to 3.5 Ga) continental nucleus, which experienced multiple episodes of growth and reworking events at 3.3-3.2 Ga, 2.9 Ga, 2.7-2.6 Ga, 2.4-2.2 Ga and 2.2-2.1 Ga. In combination with available data, the new results in this study suggest a continent-arc-continent evolution model to explain the tectonic evolution of the Yangtze Craton during the Paleoproterozoic time: the western margin of Yangtze Craton was originally an individual continent, which underwent a reworking event during 2.4-2.2 Ga and a crust growth event caused by continent-arc collision during 2.2-2.1 Ga; it subsequently collided

  2. Petrology of HP/LT metapelitic rocks of an accretionary wedge, the Central Pontides, Turkey: evidence for tectonic stacking and syn-subduction exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygül, Mesut; Okay, Aral; Oberhänsli, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Cretaceous HP/LT chloritoid-bearing metapelitic rocks crop out widely in the central part of the Pontides, northern Turkey. They are associated with eclogite to blueschist-facies metabasites and represent deep levels of an underplated subduction-accretion complex, which is tectonically overlain by low-grade HP phyllite/metasandstone intercalation along an extensional shear zone. Close to the shear zone, the footwall micaschists consist of quartz, phengite, paragonite, chlorite, rutile with syn-kinematic albite porphyroblast formed by pervasive shearing during exhumation. This type of micaschists is tourmaline-bearing and their retrograde nature suggests high-fluid flux along shear zones. Peak metamorphic assemblages are partly preserved in the chloritoid-micaschist farther away from the shear zone. Three peak metamorphic assemblages are identified and their PT conditions are constrained by pseudosections produced by Theriak-Domino and by Raman spectra of carbonaceous material: 1) garnet-chloritoid-glaucophane with lawsonite pseudomorphs (P: 17.5 ± 1 Kbar, T: 390-450 °C) 2) chloritoid with glaucophane pseudomorphs (P: 16-18 Kbar, T: 475 ± 40 °C) and 3) relatively high-Mg chloritoid (17%) with jadeite pseudomorphs (22-25 Kbar; T: 440 ± 30 °C) in addition to phengite, paragonite, quartz, chlorite, rutile. The last mineral assemblage is interpreted as transformation of the chloritoid + glaucophane assemblage to chloritoid + jadeite paragenesis with increasing pressure. Absence of tourmaline suggests that the chloritoid-micaschist did not interact with B-rich fluids during zero strain exhumation. Peak metamorphic assemblages and PT estimates suggest tectonic stacking within wedge with different depths of burial. 40Ar/39Ar phengite age of a pervasively sheared footwall micaschist is constrained to 100.6 ± 1.3 Ma and that of a chloritoid-micaschist is constrained to 91.8 ± 1.8 Ma suggesting exhumation during on-going subduction. Coupling and exhumation of the

  3. Simulating the metamorphic evolution of rocks in the laboratory: experimental modelling of orogenic metamorphism of metapelites using a piston cylinder apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropper, Peter; Mair, Philipp

    2017-04-01

    Metamorphic rocks contain a more or less complex mineral assemblage reflecting their metamorphic evolution. If the complex mineral assemblage is of multi-stage origin how do we know which mineral grew at which stage during the P-T evolution? To answer this question one needs to put constraints on the geological evolution of a given rock. The metamorphic evolution of a rock can be deciphered using three approaches: 1.) the practical geothermobarometric approach (inverse modelling), 2.) the theoretical pseudosection approach (forward modelling) and 3.) the experimental approach. Whereas with the first two approaches it is possible to constrain several stages of the P-T-X evolution but how do we know what assemblage is actually present at the desired P-T conditions? This question leads to the experimental approach, which allows a detailed mineralogical investigation of a given rock at distinct P-T conditions. Therefore, experimental investigations should be viewed as a forward modelling technique, which allow putting additional constraints on the evolution of a rock under defined P and T conditions and hence represents a snap-shot of a P-T point of the evolution of a given rock! For this purpose, simple experiments using natural rocks as starting materials can easily be conducted. The disadvantage of this method lies in the complex chemical composition of natural rocks and the deviation from chemical end-member systems. Therefore these experiments need to be evaluated not only 1.) in terms of their ability to reproduce the natural observations but also 2.) in their ability to reproduce theoretical calculations. In this study experimental investigations of orogenic metamorphism of metapelites (quartzphyllites with Grt1 + Ms1 + Ch1 + Bt1 + Rt) was investigated. Four different P-T conditions were chosen to represent an orogenic clockwise P-T loop: 400°C, 0.8 GPa, 600°C, 1.2 GPa, 700°C, 1 GPa and 500°C, 0.4 GPa. Two experiments with a duration of 16 and 33 days were

  4. Unraveling eclogite-facies fluid-rock interaction using thermodynamic modelling and whole-rock experiments: the in-situ eclogitization of metapelites from Val Savenca (Sesia Zone, Western Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentsch, Marie; Tropper, Peter

    2015-04-01

    A common feature of HP and UHP terranes is the subduction of crustal rocks to great depths. Previous investigations have shown that this process is triggered by fluids present during an eclogite-facies metamorphic overprint. An examples is exposed in the metapelites at Val Savenca in the Sesia-Lanzo Zone, Italy where Alpine eclogite-facies metamorphism and fluid flow led to partial transformation of Variscan amphibolite-eclogite facies metapelites (garnet + biotite + sillimanite + K-feldspar + plagioclase + quartz) to zoisite ± jadeite + kyanite + phengite + quartz. This transformation took place under P-T conditions of 1.7 - 2.1 GPa at 600°C and low a(H2O) of 0.3-0.6. The replacement of plagioclase by jadeite + zoisite + kyanite + quartz takes place also along former fractures. Biotite is replaced by the assemblage phengite + omphacite ± kyanite adjacent to former plagioclase, otherwise by phengite + rutile/titanite. Garnet and clinopyroxene show variable compositions depending in which micro-domain (plagioclase or biotite) they grew. The extreme development of microdomains can best be studied by thermodynamic pseudosection modelling of individual microdomains using stoichiometric mixtures of protolith minerals from this domain and the program DOMINO (De Capitani & Petrakakis, 2010). The aim of these calculations was: 1.) to reproduce the observed mineral assemblage and 2.) to provide constraints on the amount of fluid present in the transformation. The results so far indicate that the amount of fluid was very low, otherwise paragonite would have formed instead of jadeite and reproduction of the observed mineral assemblage has only been partly successful so far since biotite is still stable in the calculations. In addition to understand the role of fluids in the mineralogical and textural transformation piston-cylinder experiments with a fresh, natural orthogneiss granulite from the Moldanubic Unit in upper Austria with the assemblage garnet + biotite + K

  5. Evolution of sedimentary rock formation of a rock association level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, V. G.

    2017-07-01

    The evolution of sedimentary rock formation of a highly organized level (paragenetic rock associations) is more complex than that of a poorly organized level (rocks). Subjacent rock associations are established for the entire geological evolution of the Earth: they varied in time and were obsolescent or, in contrast, nascent and momentary. A certain cyclicity of evolution is identified along with directed changes.

  6. Petrogenesis of tourmaline rocks associated with Fe-carbonate graphite metapelite, metabasite and strata-bound polymetallic sulphide mineralisation, Peloritani Mountains, Sicily, Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferla, Paolo; Meli, Carmelina

    2007-12-01

    Tourmalinite and tourmaline-rich rocks associated with Fe-carbonate-graphite phyllite, strata-bound polymetallic sulphide deposits, metabasite and marble were studied, for information on the mechanism of tourmaline formation in the pre-Hercynian low-grade metamorphic sequence of the Mandanici Unit in the Peloritani Mountains of Sicily, southern Italy. The major and trace element compositions of the tourmaline rocks suggest the existence of a sedimentary protolith with pre-metamorphic black shale and bedded chert. Boron was interpreted to be accumulated in a restricted sedimentary basin, between platform carbonate formations, with abundant organic matter and Fe-Al-Ti-rich laterite-bauxite soil-derived clastic supply, under a continental volcano-tectonic extensional regime accompanied by a local convective hydrothermal system along faults. Petrographic, crystal-chemical and δ11B isotopic data are compatible with a model of marine sediment dewatering at temperatures below 200 °C, which caused the removal of boron from clay. Metamorphism led to the development of tourmaline in an Al-Ti-rich environment, in equilibrium with other minerals such as ilmenite, albite and muscovite. The upper temperature of metamorphism (almost 375 °C), estimated on the basis of δ11B, fits geothermometric results from Δ 13C carbonate-graphite on associated rocks. The estimated value of δ11B in the tourmalinite protolith, - 7.5‰ , is also compatible with continental-derived Al-rich sediments.

  7. Rhyolites contaminated with metapelite and gabbro, Lipari, Aeolian Islands, Italy: products of lower crustal fusion or of assimilation plus fractional crystallization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Daniel S.

    1987-12-01

    Pleistocene lavas from Monte S. Angelo and Chiesa Vecchia volcanoes on Lipari contain two suites of inclusions. A metapelitic suite consists of gneisses and granulites with combinations of cordierite, garnet, corundum, hercynite, andalusite, sillimanite, orthopyroxene, ilmenite, magnetite, biotite, plagioclase, and quartz. A gabbroic suite has cumulus texture and contains plagioclase, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and magnetite. All megacryst phases in the lavas appear to be derived from rock fragments, with the exception of euhedral strongly zoned calcic plagioclase, and none has grown by homogeneous nucleation from liquid represented by the groundmass, which is peraluminous rhyolite (>70 wt% SiO2, >6 wt% K2O). Ground-mass microcrysts were nearly all derived from disaggregated metapelites; overgrowths of alkali feldspar on plagioclase and of orthopyroxene on clinopyroxene, and quartz intergrown with alkali feldspar, are the only phases that grew from the rhyolitic liquid. Euhedral cordierite, hercynite, and plagioclase at the margins of some rock fragments grew by reaction of metapelite with liquid. For grains in contact within metapelite inclusions, geothermometers and geobarometers yield estimates of equilibration conditions in the range of 800±100° C and 5±1 kbar. Compositions of phases in the same thin section, but not in the same inclusion, yield broadly erratic P and T estimates indicating disequilibrium among metapelite inclusions. Pyroxene thermometry in the gabbro suite indicates a crystallization temperature of 1020±50° C and a lack of subsequent thermal equilibration with the rhyolitic liquid. The metapelite suite may partly be restite, but much is xenolithic, derived from a vertical interval of perhaps several kilometers, and may have undergone a much earlier episode of melting. The gabbro fragments are accidental xenoliths incorporated as the magma rose. Contaminants (metapelite and gabbro) account for 50 vol.% of the lavas, and cause them to be

  8. Geochemistry, provenance, and metamorphic evolution of Gabal Samra Neoproterozoic metapelites, Sinai, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Enen, Mahrous M.

    2011-02-01

    Metapelites are exposed at Wadi Ba'ba, east of Abu Zenima city; represent the northwestern extension of the Fieran-Solaf Metamorphic Complex, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. The metapelites are characterized by qtz + pl (An 24-28) + bt + grt ± crd ± sil mineral assemblage, indicating upper amphibolite facies with peak metamorphic conditions of 700 °C and pressures of 7 kbar, as determined by conventional geothermobarometeric methods. This resulted in incipient migmatization, forms patches of leucosomes and melanosomes. Geochemical investigation indicates that the precursor sediments of the metapelites had been deposited as immature Fe-rich shales from source materials of dominantly intermediate composition. Source area exhibited weak to moderate chemical weathering in a tectonically active continental marginal basin within a continental-arc system. A strong shallow-dipping foliation, characterizing the metapelites, was folded around an open antiform with sub-horizontal south plunging hinge. Phase equilibria calculations in the KFMASH system indicate that the peak metamorphic conditions formed at 730-750 °C and 6.8-7.9 kbar. This was followed by a retrogression formed at 770-785 °C and 3.9-4.5 kbar. Hence, this implies an isothermal decompression and rapid exhumation of the metapelites from depth (25-29 km) in the lower crustal level at peak conditions, continuous to include shallow to middle crustal level (14-17 km), at overprint retrograde conditions. Subsequent isobaric cooling took place at 720-750 °C and 3.6-4.5 kbar. The resulting isothermal decompression followed by isobaric cooling clockwise P-T path of the metapelites is more likely, in which the high-temperatures attained maximum conditions during isothermal decompression were enhanced by heat flux, due to the presence of an active magmatic arc that formed on top of subducting young lithosphere. This is supported by a moderate geothermal gradient of 27-43 °C/km and dating compatibility of the Sinai

  9. Discovery of Ordovician–Silurian metamorphic monazite in garnet metapelites of the Alpine External Aiguilles Rouges Massif

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Bernhard; Raumer, Jürgen F. von

    2011-01-01

    The pre-Mesozoic, mainly Variscan metamorphic basement of the Col de Bérard area (Aiguilles Rouges Massif, External domain) consists of paragneisses and micaschists together with various orthogneisses and metabasites. Monazite in metapelites was analysed by the electron microprobe (EMPA-CHIME) age dating method. The monazites in garnet micaschists are dominantly of Variscan age (330–300 Ma). Garnet in these rocks displays well developed growth zonations in Fe–Mg–Ca–Mn and crystallized at maxi...

  10. Thermal structure of the Filali metapelitic series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, F.; Goffé, B.; Saddiqi, O.; Bouybaouène, M. L.; Beyssac, O.

    2003-04-01

    The metapelitic series of the Filali unit and the Beni Bousera peridotite Massif represent the lowermost metamorphic complexes in the inner part of the Rif chain (Northern Morocco). The Filali unit is composed from base to top by : granulites, gneisses and micaschists overlying the Beni Bousera massif. This unit forms a dome structure over the ultramafic massif, and the foliation is rather concordant in micaschists, gneisses and granulites, with a gradual increase of metamorphic grade towards the peridotite massif. We present here new temperature estimates in the micaschists and gneisses of the Filali unit and in the overlying units, using new geothermometer based on Raman spectrometry study of carbonaceous material (Beyssac et al., 2002). This allows us to estimate the maximum temperature, in the range of 330-650^oC, reached during metamorphism for this series. We present a high resolution map of the peak temperatures, and the pattern of isotherms around the Beni Bousera peridotite massif, in relation with the structure of this complex of nappes. We discuss relations between the thermal structure and the deformation history, highlighting the relation between the increase of temperature and the tectonic transport of the nappes over the peridotites. We then discuss the tectonic implications for the Betico-Rifan Belt, focusing on the Ronda-Beni Bousera peridotites emplacement scenarios. O. Beyssac, B. Goffé, C. Chopin and J.N. Rouzaud (2002) - Raman spectra of carbonaceous material in metasediments : a new geothermometer. - Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 20, 859-871.

  11. Thermodynamic testing of experimental hornfels formation in metapelites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropper, Peter

    2016-04-01

    This study represents a comparison between thermodynamic calculations (pseudosections) and the results of the experimental investigations on low-P/high-T metapelite hornfels formation from the Southalpine domain by Tropper et al. (2016, in preparation). Pseudosection calculations were undertaken in the system KNCFMTiASH using the program THERIAK-DOMINO (De Capitani & Petrakakis 2010) with an updated version of the internally consistent data set of Holland & Powell (1998, data set tcdb55), and extended a-X models concerning the melt phase after White et al. (2001, 2007). The hornfels experiments were conducted in a hydrothermal apparatus at a pressure of 0.3 GPa over a temperature range between 550°C to 780°C in order to experimentally simulate hornfels formation and compare it to metapelitic hornfelses from Franzensfeste/Fortezza (Wyhlidal et al., 2012) and Klausen/Chiusa (Zöll, 2014) in the Southalpine domain in northern South-Tyrol. As starting materials two natural Brixen quartzphyllite samples were used. One sample W shows a low content of Na2O (0.59 wt.%) and the other sample SP5 has a higher content of Na2O (1.72 wt.%) in its bulk rock composition. The agreement between the calculated and the observed mineral assemblages in the experimental series W is satisfactory since the claculations yield much more plagioclase as is actually present and predict an earlier formation of aluminium silicates (580°C instead of 730°C). Similarly in the SP5 experiments, plagioclase is calculated to be stable in much more experiments as has been observed and the predicted formation of andalusite has also not been observed. In both experiments the calculated formation of cordierite is >650°C which is clearly higher than observed in the experiments. On the other hand temperature of melt formation at 680°C agrees very well with the textural observations in both experimental series. It is also noteworthy that muscovite is more stable in both sets of experiments than in the

  12. Provenance of Precambrian Fe- and Al-rich Metapelites in the Yenisey Ridge and Kuznetsk Alatau, Siberia: Geochemical Signatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Igor I. LIKHANOV; Vladimir V. REVERDATTO

    2007-01-01

    Major, trace and rare earth element contents of Fe- and Al-rich metapelites from the Korda (Yenisey Ridge) and Amar (Kuznetsk Alatau) formations were determined to examine the nature, origin and evolution of their protoliths. Results indicate that these rocks are the redeposited and metamorphosed products of Precambrian kaolinitic weathering crusts, while the geochemical distinctions between the studied metapelites are determined by different weathering conditions in the source area and tectonic settings. The protolith of the Korda Formation metapelites was produced by erosion products of the post-Archean granitoid rocks, which accumulated under humid climate conditions in shallow-water basins along the continental margin. The geochemical characteristics of the deeper primary deposits of the Amar Formation suggest that volcanogenic material of mafic composition derived from an island-arc environment had a major role in supplying the erosion zone.These results agree with lithofacies data and with the geodynamic reconstruction of the evolution of the Yenisey Ridge and Kuznetsk Alatau during the Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic, respectively.It was shown that REEs had limited mobility during contact metamorphism. The coherent mobility of REEs during collisional metamorphism may be attributed both to mineral reactions responsible for modal changes and to local chemical heterogeneity inherited from the initial protolith.

  13. Implications of micro-compositions of garnet and biotite from high-grade meta-pelites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on detailed studies on the compositional zoning of garnet and biotite in pelitic rocks from the Jingshan group of granulite facies in north Jiaodong, P-T pseudosections with isopleths of Fe/(Fe + Ms) in garnet and biotite were calculated in the KFMASH system for two representative rocks of sillimanite-garnet-cordierite-biotite gneiss (Vbi/Vs > 1 ) and sillimanite-garnet gneiss ( Vbi/Vg< 0.2) using the software THERMOCALC and the internally consistent thermodynamic dataset. With a comparison of the calculated Fe/(Fe + Mg) values in garnet and biotite in the peak P-T fields constrained by peak mineral assemblages with the measured ones,it is concluded that the coarse garnet crystals with diffusion zoning from high grade meta-pelites can preserve their peak compositions even when they have experienced a cooling event, and that biotite crystals surrounded by felsic minerals in biotite-rich rocks with Vbi/Vs> 1 can nearly preserve their peak compositions, and biotites in garnet-rich rocks with Vbi/Vg< 0.2 cannot preserve their peak compositions due to the influence of grain-boundary fluid.

  14. Microstructural vs compositional preservation and pseudomorphic replacement of muscovite in deformed metapelites from the Longmen Shan (Sichuan, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airaghi, Laura; Lanari, Pierre; de Sigoyer, Julia; Guillot, Stéphane

    2017-06-01

    Pressure-temperature-deformation (P-T-ε) paths for metamorphic rocks that experienced a complex deformation history commonly rely on the link between successive metamorphic assemblages and the different microstructures preserved at the sample scale. However, with changing P-T conditions, metamorphic minerals in a specific microstructure can chemically re-equilibrate. The direct link between deformation phases and mineral compositions for thermobarometry purposes can therefore be distorted. This study focuses on a series of garnet-biotite metapelites from the Longmen Shan (Sichuan, China) that preserve muscovite of different chemistry in distinct microstructures. To quantify the degree of re-equilibration of muscovite, a microstructural study was coupled with high-resolution chemical mapping. The chemical evolution of muscovite was modeled along a P-T loop previously constrained with phase equilibria calculations, semi-empirical and empirical thermobarometry. Results show that metapelites experienced a three-stage metamorphic history: (1) heating and burial up to 11 ± 2 kbar, 530 ± 20 °C, (2) minor decompression and heating up to 6.5 ± 1 kbar, 575 ± 10 °C and (3) decompression and cooling down to 4 ± 1 kbar, 380-450 °C. Muscovite partially re-equilibrated by pseudomorphic replacement during the three metamorphic stages, although it is mainly observed in prograde microstructures preceding the pressure peak. The main factors controlling the re-equilibration are the intensity of the deformation and the fluid availability during metamorphism. The P-T conditions of metamorphic assemblages thus reflect pulses of fluids release that enhanced mineral resorption and local replacement. Such micro-chemical behavior is probably relatively common in metapelites and questions the reliability of the P-T predictions based on relict phase chemistry, apparently preserved in microstructures that might have been affected by later re-equilibration.

  15. Behaviour of apatite during partial melting of metapelites and consequences for prograde suprasolidus monazite growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymchuk, Chris

    2017-03-01

    The suprasolidus behaviour of apatite and monazite is examined for an average metapelite composition using phase equilibria modelling coupled with solubility equations of these minerals. Both closed- and open-system scenarios are considered. Partial melting above the solidus requires apatite and monazite breakdown in order to saturate the anatectic melt in phosphorus and the light rare earth elements. In general, melt loss is predicted to increase the stability of apatite and monazite at high temperature. Most apatite is predicted to survive up to ultrahigh temperature conditions except for rocks with low bulk phosphorus concentrations. By contrast, most monazite is expected to be consumed by UHT conditions. Thorium substitution in monazite is expected to increase the stability of monazite to higher temperatures. The presence of LREE-rich apatite decreases the stability of monazite above the solidus, but the breakdown of this apatite during anatexis may generate prograde monazite at the apatite-melt interface in local pockets of melt oversaturation. However, prograde suprasolidus monazite along grain boundaries is expected to be consumed during further partial melting or during melt homogenization when an interconnected melt network develops. Anatectic melts are predicted to be saturated with respect to apatite except at UHT conditions and for rocks with low initial P2O5 bulk concentrations.

  16. Petrology, phase equilibria and monazite geochronology of granulite-facies metapelites from deep drill cores in the Ordos Block of the North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Fang; Santosh, M.; Bockmann, Kiara; Kelsey, David E.; Hand, Martin; Hu, Jianmin; Wan, Yusheng

    2016-10-01

    Among the various Precambrian crustal blocks in the North China Craton (NCC), the geology and evolution of the Ordos Block remain largely enigmatic due to paucity of outcrop. Here we investigate granulite-facies metapelites obtained from deep-penetrating drill holes in the Ordos Block and report petrology, calculated phase equilibria and in-situ monazite LA-ICP-MS geochronology. The rocks we studied are two samples of cordierite-bearing garnet-sillimanite-biotite metapelitic gneisses and one graphite-bearing, two-mica granitic gneiss. The peak metamorphic age from LA-ICP-MS dating of monazite in all three samples is in the range of 1930-1940 Ma. The (U + Pb)-Th chemical ages through EPMA dating reveals that monazite occurring as inclusions in garnet are older than those in the matrix. Calculated metamorphic phase diagrams for the cordierite-bearing metapelite suggest peak P-T conditions ca. 7-9 kbar and 775-825 °C, followed by decompression and evolution along a clockwise P-T path. Our petrologic and age data are consistent with those reported from the Khondalite Belt in the Inner Mongolia Suture Zone in the northern part of the Ordos Block, suggesting that these granulite-facies metasediments represent the largest Paleoproterozoic accretionary belt in the NCC.

  17. Reconstruction of the metamorphic evolution of the Hamadan high-grade metapelites, Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, western Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfaredi, Behzad; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Neubauer, Franz; Schulz, Bernhard; Shakerardakani, Farzaneh; Genser, Johann; Halama, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    C, suggesting that garnet growth is the result of two growth cycles. Despite textural differences, U-Th-Pb monazite geochronology revealed similar ages between 168 ± 11 Ma and 149 ± 19 Ma for schistose/hornfels rocks, which is within the same timeframe of the Alvand pluton intrusion. 40Ar-39Ar white mica age patterns yielded total gas ages ranging from 80 to 70 Ma over the entire transect. Microfabrics indicate formation of the foliation during garnet growth, which is followed subsequently by a retrogression to chlorite. Consequently, the Ar-Ar ages most likely indicate the final stage of foliation formation and accompanying cooling of the Hamadan complex to less than ca. 425 ± 25 °C (argon retention temperature in white mica). Temperature-time paths from all accessible mineral ages suggest, therefore, slow cooling and exhumation within two episodes toward the contact. Since absence or lack of plutonic rocks in the higher-grade sillimanite-bearing rocks and irregular metamorphic zones, we postulate that the Alvand batholith extends at shallow levels below the entire basement or is disturbed by shearing or a large number of smaller granitoid intrusions are hidden below the surface at mid- to upper-crustal depths. References Mahmoudi, S., Corfu, F., Masoudi, F., Mehrabi, B., Mohajjel, M., 2011. U-Pb dating and emplacement history of granitoid plutons in the northern Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Iran. J. Asian Earth Sci. 41, 238-249. Moynihan, D. P., Pattison, D. R. M., 2013. An automated method for the calculation of P-T paths from garnet zoning, with application to metapelitic schist from the Kootenay Arc, British Columbia, Canada. J. Metamorphic Geol. 31, 525-548. Shahbazi, H., Siebel,W., Pourmoafee, M., Ghorbani, M., Sepahi, A.A., Shang, C.K., Vosoughi Abedini, M., 2010. Geochemistry and U-Pb zircon geochronology of the Alvand plutonic complex in Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (Iran): new evidence for Jurassic magmatism. J. Asian Earth Sci. 9, 668-683.

  18. Predictive modelling of noise level generated during sawing of rocks by circular diamond sawblades

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Izzet Karakurt; Gokhan Aydin; Kerim Aydiner

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental and statistical study on noise level generated during of rock sawing by circular diamond sawblades. Influence of the operating variables and rock properties on the noise level are investigated and analysed. Statistical analyses are then employed and models are built for the prediction of noise levels depending on the operating variables and the rock properties. The derived models are validated through some statistical tests. It is found that increasing of peripheral speed, traverse speed and cutting depth result in an increase in noise levels. On the other hand, a decreasing trend for noise levels is initially observed with the increasing of flow rate of cooling fluid. It is also determined that there are moderate correlations between uniaxial compressive strength, density and noise levels. Furthermore, the modelling results reveal that the predictive models have high potentials as guidance for practical applications.

  19. Thermochemistry of monazite-(La) and dissakisite-(La): Implications for monazite and allanite stability in meta-pelites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janots, E. [Univ Bern, Inst Geol Sci, CH-30012 Bern (Switzerland); Janots, E.; Brunet, F.; Goffe, B. [ENS, CNRS, UMR 8538, Geol Lab, F-75005 Paris (France); Poinssot, C. [CEA Saclay, SECR, DPC, DEN, Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Burchard, M. [Ruhr Univ Bochum, Inst Geol Mineral and Geophys, D-4630 Bochum (Germany); Cemic, L. [Univ Kiel, Inst Geowissensch, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Thermochemical properties have been either measured or estimated for synthetic monazite, LaPO{sub 4}, and dissakisite, CaLaMgAl{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}OH, the Mg-equivalent of allanite. A dissakisite formation enthalpy of -6,976.5 {+-} 10.0 kJ mol{sup -1} was derived from high-temperature drop-solution measurements in lead borate at 975 K. A third-law entropy value of 104.9 {+-} 1.6 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1} was retrieved from low-temperature heat capacity (C{sub p}) measured on synthetic LaPO{sub 4} with an adiabatic calorimeter in the 30-300 K range. The C{sub p} values of lanthanum phases were measured in the 143-723 K range by differential scanning calorimetry. In this study, La(OH){sub 3} appeared as suitable for drop solution in lead borate and represents an attractive alternative to La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Pseudo-sections were calculated with the THERIAK-DOMINO software using the thermochemical data retrieved here for a simplified meta-pelitic composition (La = {sigma} REE + Y) and considering monazite and Fe-free epidotes along the dissakisite-clinozoisite join, as the only REE-bearing minerals. Calculation shows a stability window for dissakisite-clinozoisite epidotes (T between 250 and 550 degrees C and P between 1 and 16 kbar), included in a wide monazite field. The P-T extension of this stability window depends on the bulk-rock Ca-content. Assuming that synthetic LaPO{sub 4} and dissakisite-(La) are good analogues of natural monazite and allanite, these results are consistent with the REE-mineralogy sequence observed in meta-pelites, where (1) monazite is found to be stable below 250 degrees C, (2) around 250-450 degrees C, depending on the pressure, allanite forms at the expense of monazite and (3) towards amphibolite conditions, monazite reappears at the expense of allanite. (authors)

  20. Experimental study on pore pressure in rock-soil slope during reservoir water level fluctuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Yuewu; CHEN; Huixin; LIU; Qingquan; GONG; Xin; ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    A test system was developed for measuring the pore pressure in porous media, and a new model was devised for the pore pressure testing in both saturated and unsaturated rock-soil. Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine the pore pressure during water level fluctuation. The variations of transient pore pressure vs. time at different locations of the simulated rock-soil system were acquired and processed, and meanwhile the deformation and failure of the model are observed. The experiment results show that whether the porous media are saturated or not, the transient pore pressure is mainly dependent on the water level fluctuation, and coupled with the variation of the stress field.

  1. Organic maturation levels, thermal history and hydrocarbon source rock potential of the Namurian rocks of the Clare Basin, Ireland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodhue, Robbie; Clayton, Geoffrey [Trinity Coll., Dept. of Geology, Dublin (Ireland)

    1999-11-01

    Vitrinite reflectance data from two inland cored boreholes confirm high maturation levels throughout the onshore part of the Irish Clare Basin and suggest erosion of 2 to 4 km of late Carboniferous cover and elevated palaeogeothermal gradients in the Carboniferous section. The observed maturation gradients are fully consistent with the published hypothesis of a late Carboniferous/Permian 'superplume' beneath Pangaea but local vertical reversals in gradients also suggest a complex thermal regime probably involving advective heating. The uppermost Visean--lower Namurian Clare Shale is laterally extensive and up to 300 m thick. Although this unit is post-mature, TOC values of up to 15% suggest that it could have considerable hydrocarbon source rock potential in any less mature offshore parts of the basin. (Author)

  2. Rock drills used in South African mines: a comparative study of noise and vibration levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.I. Phillips; P.S. Heyns; G. Nelson [National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg (South Africa). National Institute for Occupational Health

    2007-07-01

    The study compared the noise and vibration levels associated with three hand-held rock drills (pneumatic, hydraulic and electric) currently used in South African mines, and a prototype acoustically shielded self-propelled rock drill. Equivalent A-weighted sound pressure levels were recorded on a geometrical grid, using Rion NL-11 and NL-14 sound level meters. Vibration measurements were conducted on the pneumatic, hydraulic and electric drills in accordance with the ISO 5349-1 (2001) international standard on human exposure to hand-transmitted vibration, using a Brel and Kjaer UA0894 hand adaptor. PCB Piezo accelerometers were used to measure vibration in three orthogonal directions. No vibration measurements were conducted on the self-propelled drill. All four drills emitted noise exceeding 85 dB(A). The pneumatic drill reached levels of up to 114 dB(A), while the shielded self-propelled drill almost complied with the 85 dB(A) 8 h exposure limit. Vibration levels of up to 31 m s{sup -2} were recorded. These levels greatly exceed recommended and legislated levels. Significant engineering advances will need to be made in the manufacture of rock drills to impact on noise induced hearing loss and hand arm vibration syndrome. Isolating the operator from the drill, as for the self-propelled drill, addresses the problems of both vibration and noise exposure, and is a possible direction for future development.

  3. Evaluation of Rock Mass Responses Using High Resolution Water-level Tiltmeter Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. S.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.; Stetler, L. D.; Volk, J. T.; Geox^Tm

    2010-12-01

    External forces act on the surface of the earth and produce deformation across all spatial and temporal scales. This research study focuses on the deformation evaluation of the rock-mass subjected to tidal, earthquake and surface forces. The events are monitored over horizontal distances of over 100 meters with tilt measurement arrays with a resolution of 10-8 radians. These measurements are obtained from hydrostatic leveling system (HLS) arrays that have been installed in the LaFarge mine in North Aurora, IL by Fermilab. Each sensor in the array is equipped with a water-filled reservoir beneath a capacitor. The amount of water in the reservoir is calculated as a function of the measured capacitance. Individual sensors are connected in a closed system via a water and air line. As the host rock expands and contracts sensors are raised relative to another and water is displaced. The water level in each reservoir is sent to a computer in the mine and recorded. In order to measure the tilt of the rock between two points, the difference in water levels between adjacent sensors is computed. The difference between the end sensors is also calculated to determine the larger-scale tilt of the array. The tiltmeters in LaFarge mine are supported by concrete pedestals installed on the floor of the drift. In the Homestake mine the tiltmeters are placed on similar pedestals, as well as platforms made of artificial wood decking. These platforms are fixed to the wall of the drift with a rock bolt. Time and frequency domain analyses were performed on time series ranging from hours to six months to capture relevant time scales including the response to the 2010 Chile Earthquake (hour-long scale), the stages of the moon (month scale), Fox River floods (flooding week long scales and pressure dissipation month-long scales). By monitoring tiltmeter array responses to different forces, we aim at making predictions about the material properties of rock masses.

  4. Detection of Cracking Levels in Brittle Rocks by Parametric Analysis of the Acoustic Emission Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Zabihallah; Einstein, Herbert H.; Ballivy, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Determination of the cracking levels during the crack propagation is one of the key challenges in the field of fracture mechanics of rocks. Acoustic emission (AE) is a technique that has been used to detect cracks as they occur across the specimen. Parametric analysis of AE signals and correlating these parameters (e.g., hits and energy) to stress-strain plots of rocks let us detect cracking levels properly. The number of AE hits is related to the number of cracks, and the AE energy is related to magnitude of the cracking event. For a full understanding of the fracture process in brittle rocks, prismatic specimens of granite containing pre-existing flaws have been tested in uniaxial compression tests, and their cracking process was monitored with both AE and high-speed video imaging. In this paper, the characteristics of the AE parameters and the evolution of cracking sequences are analyzed for every cracking level. Based on micro- and macro-crack damage, a classification of cracking levels is introduced. This classification contains eight stages (1) crack closure, (2) linear elastic deformation, (3) micro-crack initiation (white patch initiation), (4) micro-crack growth (stable crack growth), (5) micro-crack coalescence (macro-crack initiation), (6) macro-crack growth (unstable crack growth), (7) macro-crack coalescence and (8) failure.

  5. "Sub-Surf Rocks"! An A-Level Resource Developed through an Industry-Education Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    A free internet resource called "Sub-Surf Rocks"! was launched in 2010. Its aim is to use seismic data obtained by the oil industry for enhancing the teaching of structural and economic geology at A-level (ages 16-18) in the UK. Seismic data gives a unique insight into the sub-surface and the many high-quality images coupled with…

  6. Occurrence of silicate melt, carbonate-rich melt and fluid during medium pressure anatexis of metapelitic gneisses (Oberpfalz, Bavaria) revealed by melt and fluid inclusions study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Silvio; O'Brien, Patrick; Hecht, Lutz; Wunder, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    In the last decades our understanding of partial melting processes in the lower crust profited from the investigation of fluid inclusions (Touret et al., 2009) and more recently of anatectic melt inclusions (Cesare et al., 2011) within enclaves and high-grade terranes. The latter finding allowed us to directly analyse the original anatectic melt (Ferrero et al., 2012; Bartoli et al., 2013) preserved within peritectic phases, i.e. mainly garnet, but also ilmenite and spinel, before fractionation, mixing and contamination processes took place. Furthermore, the occurrence of primary fluid inclusions (FI) and anatectic melt inclusions (MI) within enclaves allowed the characterization of the COH fluid present during anatexis under fluid+melt immiscibility conditions (Ferrero et al., 2014). Primary crystallized MI, or "nanogranites", and FI have been identified to occur as clusters in garnet from stromatic migmatites (Zeilengneise) from Oberpfalz, Eastern Bavaria (Moldanubian Zone). During the late Carboniferous, these Grt+Bt+Sill+Crd+Spl metapelitic gneisses underwent HT/MP metamorphism, followed by a HT/LP event (Tanner & Behrmann, 1995). Nanogranites, ≤20 µm in size, consist of Qtz+Bt+Wm+Ab±Ap, and show abundant nanoporosity, localized in the quartz. Fluid inclusions are smaller, generally ≤10 µm, and contain CO2+N2+CH4 plus siderite, pyrophillite and cristobalite, mineral phases not observed in the surrounding rock or as mineral inclusion in garnet. Polycrystalline inclusions containing Cc+Wm+Opx±Qz, commonly ≤10 µm in diameter, occur in the same cluster with MI and FI. Microstructural features, negative-crystal shape and the well-developed crystalline faces of calcite within inclusions suggest that they may result from the crystallization of a carbonate-rich melt. The lack of arrays of carbonate-bearing MI, verified by cathodoluminiscence investigation, supports their primary nature, i.e. they formed during garnet growth. This would suggest the occurrence

  7. Fluid-rock interaction and thermochemical evolution of the eastern Alice Springs Orogen, central Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Jan; Hand, Martin; Raimondo, Tom; Kelsey, David

    2017-04-01

    The Harts Range rift and basement complex is located in the eastern Alice Springs Orogen, central Australia. For the period 450-320 Ma, this tectonic domain is characterised by large-scale deformation of the Harts Range Group rift sequence and pervasive reworking of its underlying basement. Fluid-rock interaction is evidenced by extensive pegmatite intrusion and retrogression occurring episodically throughout this 130 Myr period, possibly coeval with prograde upper-amphibolite facies metamorphism. The orthogneiss-dominated Entia Gneiss Complex (EGC) represents basement structurally underlying the Harts Range Group, and has evidence for associated deformation and fluid ingress between 390-320 Ma. The EGC also contains metapelites at various structural levels of the mid- to lower-crust, providing a means to constrain the thermobarometric record during a period of significant rheological weakening. Despite existing studies, the source of fluid that contributed to pervasive deformation and metamorphism is unresolved. Additionally, the role of fluid in the episodic history of crustal melting, and ultimately the generation of large-scale tectonic reworking in the Harts Range Group, remains unclear. In this contribution, we integrate U-Pb monazite geochronology, geochemistry, petrography and phase equilibria forward modelling from various metapelitic rocks at different structural levels of the Entia Gneiss Complex. Preliminary data show that the timing of metamorphism coincides with pegmatite crystallisation ages. These constraints form the basis for understanding the conditions and timing at which fluid flow occurred, and the potential sources of the fluid will be constrained by stable isotope analyses (δ18O and δD). The combination of in situ geochronological data with petrographic observations linked to P - T models is vital in providing temporal constraints on the physical and thermal evolution of the reworking event.

  8. Technique for estimating the sound power level radiated by pneumatic rock drills and the evaluation of a CSIR prototype rock drill with engineering noise controls

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kovalchik, PG

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available and the radiation patterns in octave and 1/3 octave bands. Overall sound power level is also determined. This paper also reports the results obtained by using this procedure to evaluate a SECO S215 standard production drill and a CSIR Miningtek prototype rock drill...

  9. Sea Level and Paleoenvironment Control on Late Ordovician Source Rocks, Hudson Bay Basin, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Hefter, J.

    2009-05-01

    Hudson Bay Basin is one of the largest Paleozoic sedimentary basins in North America, with Southampton Island on its north margin. The lower part of the basin succession comprises approximately 180 to 300 m of Upper Ordovician strata including Bad Cache Rapids and Churchill River groups and Red Head Rapids Formation. These units mainly comprise carbonate rocks consisting of alternating fossiliferous limestone, evaporitic and reefal dolostone, and minor shale. Shale units containing extremely high TOC, and interpreted to have potential as petroleum source rocks, were found at three levels in the lower Red Head Rapids Formation on Southampton Island, and were also recognized in exploration wells from the Hudson Bay offshore area. A study of conodonts from 390 conodont-bearing samples from continuous cores and well cuttings from six exploration wells in the Hudson Bay Lowlands and offshore area (Comeault Province No. 1, Kaskattama Province No. 1, Pen Island No. 1, Walrus A-71, Polar Bear C-11 and Narwhal South O-58), and about 250 conodont-bearing samples collected from outcrops on Southampton Island allows recognition of three conodont zones in the Upper Ordovician sequence, namely (in ascendant sequence) Belodina confluens, Amorphognathus ordovicicus, and Rhipidognathus symmetricus zones. The three conodont zones suggest a cycle of sea level changes of rising, reaching the highest level, and then falling during the Late Ordovician. Three intervals of petroleum potential source rock are within the Rhipidognathus symmetricus Zone in Red Head Rapids Formation, and formed in a restricted anoxic and hypersaline condition during a period of sea level falling. This is supported by the following data: 1) The conodont Rhipidognathus symmetricus represents the shallowest Late Ordovician conodont biofacies and very shallow subtidal to intertidal and hypersaline condition. This species has the greatest richness within the three oil shale intervals to compare other parts of Red

  10. Modeling the cliff retreat response to base-level change in layered rocks, Colorado Plateau, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D.; Sheehan, C.

    2015-12-01

    The retreat of cliffs is an important mode of erosion in layered rocks of variable strength. For example, the iconic Colorado Plateau landscapes of Grand Canyon, Canyonlands, and Monument Valley owe their unique forms to this process. These landscapes are the end result of incision by trunk streams followed by cliff retreat. Local interactions between stochastic rockfall and first-order channels draining a cliff regulate the cliff retreat response to a base-level fall. However, nonlinear transport dynamics, steep slopes, and variable rock strength challenge the modeling of landscape evolution in these settings. Here, we employ structure-from-motion photogrammetry to generate high-resolution DTMs of a natural experiment site on the Colorado Plateau. The site features a simple, sandstone-over-shale stratigraphy with a continuous gradient in cliffband height and evidence for an ongoing transient response to base level fall. The terrain data inform a high-resolution (dx=5 m), 2D numerical model of cliffband erosion. The model simulates the interaction of three primary processes: fluvial erosion and sediment transport; hillslope transport of regolith, including shallow landsliding; and rockfall from resistant units. Crucially, the model allows us to modify stratigraphy arbitrarily to examine the landscape response to parameters such as thickness, spacing, and dip of resistant units. Results indicate that the contrast in fluvial erodibility sets the pattern of emergence of cliffs as a resistant layer is exhumed, while the difference in weathering rates across rock types sets the rate at which cliffs emerge. Once rockfall begins, erosion rates are modified by the thickness of the resistant layer, which sets the volume of rockfall debris reaching the channels below the cliff. The modeling highlights the need for process-based understanding of the conditions for cliff failure by rockfall and redistribution of the debris in very steep, rapidly-eroding landscapes.

  11. Metamorphic P-T conditions and CO2 influx history of medium-grade metapelites from Karakorum, Trans-Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachan, Himanshu K.; Santosh, M.; Prakash, Divya; Kharya, Aditya; Chandra Singh, P.; Rai, Santosh K.

    2016-07-01

    The medium grade metapelites of Pangong-Tso area in the trans-Himalayan region underwent sillimanite-grade metamorphism initiated during the Cretaceous, associated with the collision of the Kohistan arc and the Indian plate with Asia. This paper present results from a petrological and fluid inclusion study to understand the metamorphic P-T conditions and fluid history of these rocks. The calculated phase equilibria in the Na2O-CaO-K2O-FeO-MgO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-TiO2 (NCKFMMnASHT) system suggest P-T conditions of 8 kbar and 650 °C for the peak metamorphic event. Primary fluid inclusions occur in staurolite and garnet, whereas quartz carries mostly secondary fluid inclusions. The trapped fluids in primary inclusions show initial melting temperatures in the range of -56.9 to -56.6 °C, suggesting nearly pure CO2 composition. The secondary fluids are of mixed carbonic-aqueous nature. The re-equilibrated inclusions show annular morphology as well as necking phenomena. The CO2 isochores for the primary inclusions indicate pressures of 6.1-6.7 kbar, suggesting that the CO2-rich fluids were trapped during post-peak exhumation of the rocks, or that synmetamorphic carbonic fluids underwent density reversal during isothermal decompression. The secondary CO2-H2O fluids must have been trapped during the late exhumation stage, as their isochores define further lower pressures of 4.8 kbar. The morphology of re-equilibrated fluid inclusions and the rapid decrease in pressure are consistent with a near-isothermal decompression trajectory following the peak metamorphism. The carbonic fluids were probably derived locally from decarbonation reactions of the associated carbonate rocks during metamorphism or from a deep-seated reservoir through Karakorum fault.

  12. Interpretation of zircon coronae textures from metapelitic granulites of the Ivrea–Verbano Zone, northern Italy: two-stage decomposition of Fe–Ti oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kovaleva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report the occurrence of zircon coronae textures in metapelitic granulites of the Ivrea–Verbano Zone. Unusual zircon textures are spatially associated with Fe–Ti oxides and occur as (1 vermicular-shaped aggregates 50–200 µm long and 5–20 µm thick and as (2 zircon coronae and fine-grained chains, hundreds of micrometers long and ≤ 1 µm thick, spatially associated with the larger zircon grains. Formation of such textures is a result of zircon precipitation during cooling after peak metamorphic conditions, which involved: (1 decomposition of Zr-rich ilmenite to Zr-bearing rutile, and formation of the vermicular-shaped zircon during retrograde metamorphism and hydration; and (2 recrystallization of Zr-bearing rutile to Zr-depleted rutile intergrown with quartz, and precipitation of the submicron-thick zircon coronae during further exhumation and cooling. We also observed hat-shaped grains that are composed of preexisting zircon overgrown by zircon coronae during stage (2. Formation of vermicular zircon (1 preceded ductile and brittle deformation of the host rock, as vermicular zircon is found both plastically and cataclastically deformed. Formation of thin zircon coronae (2 was coeval with, or immediately after, brittle deformation as coronae are found to fill fractures in the host rock. The latter is evidence of local, fluid-aided mobility of Zr. This study demonstrates that metamorphic zircon can nucleate and grow as a result of hydration reactions and mineral breakdown during cooling after granulite-facies metamorphism. Zircon coronae textures indicate metamorphic reactions in the host rock and establish the direction of the reaction front.

  13. Wettability evaluation of a carbonate reservoir rock from core to pore level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Yousef, H.Y.; Lichaa, P.M.; Al-Kaabi, A.U.; Alpustun, H.

    1995-10-01

    Wettability evaluation was performed during stags of as received, cleaned, and restored states on core samples form a Saudi Arabian carbonate reservoir. The wettability behavior from the chemistry of brine-oil-carbonate rock interaction was found to be neutral to slightly oil-wet. The pore-size distribution obtained from mercury injection data indicated that about 15--20 percent of the pore volume is not accessible to asphaltene particles in the crude oil. Therefore a mixed-wettability state can exist. These results were confirmed by the evaluation of the wettability of the cores using USBM and Amott techniques. The wettability at the pore level was studied using Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy. Rock samples were examined at irreducible water and residual oil saturations during cleaned and restored states. At irreducible water saturation, both oil and brine were present in the intergranular macroporosity and intragranular macropores and micropores. At residual oil saturation,oil was found in the form of isolated globules in the cleaned case. After aging, the oil is more loosely distributed in the porosity and generally contacts the pore walls. This indicates an evolution toward oil wetness with aging. These results are in agreement with the changes of wettability indices obtained using USBM technique.

  14. Investigation of Noise Level and Penetration Rate of Pneumatic Drill vis-à-vis Rock Compressive Strength and Abrasivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivade, S. B.; Murthy, Ch. S. N.; Vardhan, H.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, detailed studies were carried out to determine the influence of rock properties on the sound level produced during pneumatic drilling. Further, investigation was also carried out on the effect of thrust, air pressure and compressive strength on penetration rate and the sound level produced. For this purpose, a fabricated pneumatic drill set up available in the institute was used. Rock properties, like compressive strength and abrasivity, of various samples collected from the field were determined in the laboratory. Drilling experiments were carried out on ten different rock samples for varying thrust and air pressure values and the corresponding A-weighted equivalent continuous sound levels were measured. It was observed that, very low thrust results in low penetration rate. Even very high thrust does not produce high penetration rate at higher operating air pressures. With increase in thrust beyond the optimum level, the penetration rate starts decreasing and causes the drill bit to `stall'. Results of the study show that penetration rate and sound level increases with increase in the thrust level. After reaching the maximum, they start decreasing despite the increase of thrust. The main purpose of the study is to develop a general prediction model and to investigate the relationships between sound level produced during drilling and physical properties such as uniaxial compressive strength and abrasivity of sedimentary rocks. The results were evaluated using the multiple regression analysis taking into account the interaction effects of predictor variables.

  15. Structural analysis and metamorphism of Palaeoproterozoic metapelites in the Seinäjoki-Ilmajoki area, western Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäkitie, H.

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The Palaeoproterozoic Svecofennian bedrock of the Seinäjoki-Ilmajoki area, western Finland, is largely composed of porphyroblastic metapelites. In the area, the regional metamorphic grade increases towards the southwest. Over a distance of 15 km, andalusite mica schists gradually grade into migmatitic garnet cordierite-sillimanite mica gneisses with a facies-series of the andalusite-sillimanite type. Five regional metamorphic zones are present: andalusite, sillimanite-muscovite, sillimanite-K-feldspar, cordierite-K-feldspar and garnet-cordierite-K-feldspar. The primary layering (S0 of the mica schists is deformed by an isoclinal fold phase (F2, which is synchronous with the main metamorphic phase and the growth of micas. S1 is very weak and subject to interpretation. The S2 schistosity is deformed by intense late-metamorphic F3 and F3b folds, which have formed under slightly different metamorphic conditions: practically no metamorphic micas have grown parallel to axial planes while within F3b folds there are a few granitic veins parallel to these planes. The F3 and F3b folds probably belong to one phase. S2 dominates in the mica schists while S3 and S3b dominate in the mica gneisses. The metapelites are also deformed by younger minor fold phases (F4 and F5. A composite schistosity (S0±S1±S2±S3, or S3b commonly occurs in the metapelites. The peak of regional metamorphism has been associated with the intrusion of 1.89-1.88 Ga old tonalite plutons. Geothermometric estimates for regional metamorphism are c. 730 °C at an assumed pressure of 5 kbar. Neosomes in the high-grade mica gneisses occur as patches rather than as elongated, narrow veins. Garnet coexists with cordierite, but the minerals are rarely in equilibrium. Muscovitization and the formation of retrogressive andalusite did not occur in the high-grade mica gneisses, but there is minor kyanite indicating that the crust probably underwent near-isobaric cooling. The area of highest

  16. GRAPHITIZATION OF METASEDIMENTARY ROCKS IN THE WESTERN KONYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin KURT

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Paleozoic-Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks in the study area are metacarbonate, metachert, metapelite, metasandstone and metaconglomerate. Graphite layers are 1cm to 2m thick, extend laterally for tens of meters and are intercalated with metasedimentary rocks. Generally, the graphite is black in color, with a well developed cleavage which is concordant with the cleavage of the host rocks. In addition, the crystal and flake graphites formed in metasedimentary rocks are mostly aligned parallel to the cleavage planes. These metamorphic rocks are subjected to shearing and granulation providing structural control for the development of graphite. It was probably this phenomenon that first led to emphasize the relationship between graphite and metasedimentary rocks. Graphite mineralization has been controlled by bedding, microfractures and granulations. Briefly, the metamorphism has converted carbonaceous matter into graphite .

  17. 'Escher' Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chemical Changes in 'Endurance' Rocks [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock dubbed 'Escher' on the southwestern slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists believe the rock's fractures, which divide the surface into polygons, may have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Opportunity has spent the last 14 sols investigating Escher, specifically the target dubbed 'Kirchner,' and other similar rocks with its scientific instruments. This image was taken on sol 208 (Aug. 24, 2004) by the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters. The graph above shows that rocks located deeper into 'Endurance Crater' are chemically altered to a greater degree than rocks located higher up. This chemical alteration is believed to result from exposure to water. Specifically, the graph compares ratios of chemicals between the deep rock dubbed 'Escher,' and the more shallow rock called 'Virginia,' before (red and blue lines) and after (green line) the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drilled into the rocks. As the red and blue lines indicate, Escher's levels of chlorine relative to Virginia's went up, and sulfur down, before the rover dug a hole into the rocks. This implies that the surface of Escher has been chemically altered to a greater extent than the surface of Virginia. Scientists are still investigating the role water played in influencing this trend. These data were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  18. 'Escher' Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chemical Changes in 'Endurance' Rocks [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock dubbed 'Escher' on the southwestern slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists believe the rock's fractures, which divide the surface into polygons, may have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Opportunity has spent the last 14 sols investigating Escher, specifically the target dubbed 'Kirchner,' and other similar rocks with its scientific instruments. This image was taken on sol 208 (Aug. 24, 2004) by the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters. The graph above shows that rocks located deeper into 'Endurance Crater' are chemically altered to a greater degree than rocks located higher up. This chemical alteration is believed to result from exposure to water. Specifically, the graph compares ratios of chemicals between the deep rock dubbed 'Escher,' and the more shallow rock called 'Virginia,' before (red and blue lines) and after (green line) the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drilled into the rocks. As the red and blue lines indicate, Escher's levels of chlorine relative to Virginia's went up, and sulfur down, before the rover dug a hole into the rocks. This implies that the surface of Escher has been chemically altered to a greater extent than the surface of Virginia. Scientists are still investigating the role water played in influencing this trend. These data were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  19. A new interpretation for the garnet zoning in metapelitic rocks of the silgará formation, southwestern santander massif, colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Ríos Reyes Carlos Alberto; Castellanos Alarcón Oscar Mauricio; Takasu Akira

    2011-01-01

    A Barrovian sequence of the Silgará Formation at the southwestern Santander Massif, Colombian Andes, contains zoned garnets in which major and trace element zoning correlates with distribution of mineral inclusions, which may indicate that garnet growth rate varied through time and affected both composition and texture ofgarnets, although different garnet producing reactions have also played an important role in the chemical zoning of garent. However, a local metasomatism process associated t...

  20. A NEW INTERPRETATION FOR THE GARNET ZONING IN METAPELITIC ROCKS OF THE SILGARÁ FORMATION, SOUTHWESTERN SANTANDER MASSIF, COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ríos Reyes Carlos Alberto

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A Barrovian sequence of the Silgará Formation at the southwestern Santander Massif, Colombian Andes, contains zoned garnets in which major and trace element zoning correlates with distribution of mineral inclusions, which may indicate that garnet growth rate varied through time and affected both composition and texture ofgarnets, although different garnet producing reactions have also played an important role in the chemical zoning of garent. However, a local metasomatism process associated to the action of late magmatic fluids associated to the emplacement of the Pescadero Pluton (external forcing mechanism would be also considered. In particular, Ca, Mn and Y zoning patterns in some garnets correspond with inclusion-rich vs. inclusion-free zones, althoughthe distribution of inclusions does not correlate with chemical zoning (i.e., the same inclusions are found in Ca-rich and Ca-poor zones of the garnet. There is a similar lack of correlation with accessory phases (apatite, monazite, xenotime, ilmenite or rutile. In a garnet from the garnet-staurolite zone, a high Mn core containsabundant and randomly oriented apatite, monazite and ilmenite inclusions, while a euhedral low Ca mantle zone is inclusion-free and the high Ca / low Mn rim zone contains apatite, monazite and ilmenite aligned parallel to the margins of the garnet. Inclusions in garnet can also represent mineral phases were not completely consumed during garnet growth. Association of garnet zoning trends and patterns with inclusion distribution may help differentiatebetween processes that identically affect major-element zoning but that produced variable textures in the garnet.

  1. Review of important rock mechanics studies required for underground high level nuclear waste repository program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S.; Cho, W. J

    2007-01-15

    Disposal concept adapting room and pillar method, which is a confirmed technique in mining and tunnel construction for long time, has advantages at cost, safety, technical feasibility, flexibility, and international cooperation point of views. Then the important rock mechanics principals and in situ and laboratory tests for understanding the behavior of rock, buffer, and backfill as well as their interactions will be reviewed. The accurate understanding of them is important for developing a safe disposal concept and successful operation of underground repository for permanent disposal of radioactive wastes. First of all, In this study, current status of rock mechanics studies for HLW disposal in foreign countries such as Sweden, USA, Canada, Finland, Japan, and France were reviewed. After then the in situ and laboratory tests for site characterization were summarized. Furthermore, rock mechanics studies required during the whole procedure for the disposal project from repository design to the final closure will be reviewed systematically. This study will help for developing a disposal system including site selection, repository design, operation, maintenance, and closure of a repository in deep underground rock. By introducing the required rock mechanics tests at different stages, it would be helpful from the planning stage to the operation stage of a radioactive waste disposal project.

  2. Experiments to constrain the garnet-talc join for metapelitic material at eclogite-facies conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielowski, Reia M.; Poli, Stefano; Fumagalli, Patrizia

    2010-05-01

    Increasing pressure due to the subduction of mica-dominated sediments results in a loss of biotite as garnet-talc becomes a stable assemblage. While this transition is observed in natural samples, it has not yet been well constrained experimentally. Previous experimental investigations into metapelitic compositions at the University of Milan (Poli and Schmidt 2002, Ferri et al., 2009) indicated that further work in the range of 600-700° C, 2-3 GPa was required to elucidate this tie-line transition. The assemblages leading to garnet-talc stability through tie-line flip reactions include biotite-chlorite, biotite-chloritoid, and biotite-kyanite. Furthermore the mutual stability of garnet-chlorite and chloritoid-biotite at relatively high pressure conditions below the garnet-talc field is reevaluated. Current investigations on two synthetic compositions (NM, NP) in the model metapelitic system CaO-K2O-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O are carried out in a piston cylinder apparatus at pressures and temperatures up to 2.7 GPa and to 740°C. Experiments are buffered with graphite, and are generally run under fluid saturated conditions. Two capsules, one of each composition, are included within the pressure chamber for each experiment. The NM composition is representative of metapelites and the NP composition is representative of metagreywackes. Experiments are characterized by XRD, BSE images and EMPA. The following summary includes both current investigations and the above mentioned previous work, undertaken on the same chemical compositions. All assemblages also contain quartz, white mica, fluid ± zoisite or lawsonite. The assemblage garnet-chlorite-chloritoid ± staurolite is present at 500° C at pressures of 1.4 and 1.6 GPa. The assemblage biotite-staurolite-chlorite is present at 600° C, 1.2 GPa and at 625° C, 1.4 GPa. The assemblage biotite-chloritoid-chlorite is present at 600° C for pressures ≥ 1.3 GPa and ≤ 1.7 GPa. The assemblage garnet-chloritoid-biotite is

  3. Assessment of natural radioactivity levels in rocks and their relationships with the geological structure of Johor state, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnour, I A; Wagiran, H; Ibrahim, N; Hamzah, S; Elias, M S; Laili, Z; Omar, M

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of natural radionuclides ((238)U, (232)Th and (40)K) and their radiological hazard effect in rocks collected from the state of Johor, Malaysia were determined by gamma spectroscopy using a high-purity germanium detector. The highest values of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K activity concentrations (67±6, 85±7 and 722±18 Bg kg(-1), respectively) were observed in the granite rock. The lowest concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th (2±0.1 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 2±0.1 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th) were observed in gabbro rock. The lowest concentration of (40)K (45±2 Bq kg(-1)) was detected in sandstone. The radium equivalent activity concentrations for all rock samples investigated were lower than the internationally accepted value of 370 Bq kg(-1). The highest value of radium equivalent in the present study (239±17 Bq kg(-1)) was recorded in the area of granite belonging to an acid intrusive rock geological structure. The absorbed dose rate was found to range from 4 to 112 nGy h(-1). The effective dose ranged from 5 to 138 μSv h(-1). The internal and external hazard index values were given in results lower than unity. The purpose of this study is to provide information related to radioactivity background levels and the effects of radiation on residents in the study area under investigation. Moreover, the relationships between the radioactivity levels in the rocks within the geological structure of the studied area are discussed.

  4. Monazite Growth from the Eocene to the Miocene: New Interpretations of the Metamorphic History of Greater Himalayan Rocks in the Eastern Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, S. M.; Kauffman, R.; Gonzales-Clayton, B.; Long, S. P.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Across the Himalaya, mid- to lower-crustal Greater-Himalayan (GH) rocks have been exhumed during active continent-continent collision. In the eastern Himalaya within Bhutan, GH rocks are divided into an upper and lower level by an intra-GH shear zone, the Kakthang thrust (KT). To decipher the metamorphic, melt-crystallization and exhumation history of the GH rocks exposed above and below the KT, monazite from metapelites and migmatites was dated and trace elements were analyzed by laser-ablation, split-stream ICPMS. The trace elements from the monazite were used to track when the rocks were at near-peak conditions (based on the depletion of HREE and the likely presence of garnet during monazite growth) versus likely undergoing initial exhumation and garnet breakdown (based on an increase in HREE). Samples were collected from two N-S transects that cross the KT in central and eastern Bhutan. The eastern transect reveals a progressive younging of near-peak metamorphism within the GH, with dates of ca. 23-20 Ma for the structurally-highest sample versus ca. 18-16 Ma in the structurally-lowest sample. The youngest dates from all structural levels of the eastern Bhutan metapelites are 13-15 Ma; the same analyses yield higher HREE abundances, suggesting garnet breakdown during their (re)crystallization. The migmatites yield ca. 14-16 Ma melt-crystallization ages, consistent with the GH having undergone cooling and initial exhumation to cause garnet breakdown by ca. 15 Ma. In comparison, the central Bhutan transect reveals older near-peak metamorphic ages, with garnet-stable monazite populations at ca. 48­-46 Ma within the KT zone, ca. 38-30 Ma for rocks in the middle of the upper-GH, and ca. 25-22 Ma for the structurally-highest sample. Youngest monazites from the central Bhutan transect that yield growth or recrystallization at garnet-unstable conditions range from ca. 17-26 Ma. These results suggest earlier metamorphism and exhumation of GH rocks in central Bhutan

  5. Microtectonic-assisted P-T determination on low-grade Alpine metamorphic rocks from the "Tisia Mega-Unit" of the Slavonian Mountains in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balen, Dražen; Lihter, Iva; Massonne, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-01

    The internal structure of the Tisia (Tisza) Mega-Unit in the Alpine-Carpathian-Dinaridic orogenic system encompasses large Alpine nappe systems brought to its present-day position by complex regional-scale movements. The Slavonian Mountains are part of the Bihor nappe system which is below the Codru and above the Mecsek nappe systems. The low-grade metamorphic schist unit of the Slavonian Mountains includes numerous rocks which were previously related to Precambrian and/or Lower Paleozoic orogeneses. However, recent studies (e.g. Balen, 2014, European Geosciences Union General Assembly, EGU 2014-6122) show that the metapelites of this unit should be attributed to the Alpine orogeny and the poorly known P-T conditions, which they experienced, should be refined. Although metapelites can be sensitive to changes of metamorphic conditions and, therefore, be suitable for the P-T estimation of metamorphic event(s), the extraction of mineral assemblages, being in equilibrium, and associated microtectonic data for particular low-grade metamorphic rocks is not straightforward. On the contrary, due to lack of suitable minerals and complex mictotectonic features, one can be faced with a severe problem concerning (dis)equilibrium. To avoid this, the observation scale in the research was set to the sub-mm level taking into account microtectonic positions of minerals. The investigated samples from the Slavonian Mountains are fine-grained schists consisting of chlorite (15-30 vol. %), white mica (15-25 vol. %), quartz (10-25 vol. %), feldspars (albite 10-15 vol. %; some K-feldspar), biotite (ages (113±20 and 82±23 Ma; Balen, 2014) has a significance in clarifying details of the geodynamic evolution during the Alpine orogeny. Financial support by the Croatian Science Foundation (IP-2014-09-9541) and T. Theye's help during microprobe work is greatly acknowledged.

  6. Tu-U-Pb{sub T} ages of monazite and geothermobarometry of high level metapelitic rocks in the orogenic system Itabuna-Salvador-Curaca, state of Bahia, Brazil: a study in electron microprobe; Idades Th-U-Pb{sub T} de monazita e geotermobarometria de rochas metapeliticas de alto grau do sistema orogenico Itabuna-Salvador-Curaca, BA, Brasil: um estudo em microsonda eletronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlach, Silvio Roberto Farias; Lama, Eliane Aparecida del [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Mineralogia e Geotectonica

    2002-12-15

    Electron microprobe Th-U-Pb T dating of monazite was performed on aluminous gneiss samples from the northern Jacurici and southern Ilheus areas of the Itabuna-Salvador-Curuca Orogenic System. Studied samples are spinel-sillimanite-cordierite-garnet gneiss and corundum-spinel-sillimanite-garnet gneiss that equilibrated during a high temperature metamorphism at T-P conditions of about 835 deg C/6,9 kbar and 890 deg C/7.4 kbar, respectively. Microprobe ages of monazite in equilibrium with these mineral associations are interpreted as true crystallization ages and date granulite facies metamorphism. Both samples gave ages of about 2.07 and 2.08 (+-0.02) Ga, in agreement with the known geochronological pattern in this system. The Ilheus sample contain a younger, contrasting monazite generation (e.g., with distinct REE patterns and Th/Gd ratios), dated at ca. 1.97 (+-0.04) Ga. Based on the occurrence of the corundum-sillimanite-quartz association in the sample and information from the literature, we suggest that this age may be related to a regional decompression event and/or a thermal overprint due to late intrusive magmatism (1.9 - 2.0 Ga) in the orogenic system. (author)

  7. Nonlinear rock behavior and its implications on deeper-level platinum mining

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Watson, BP

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available not appear to be dependent on borehole orientation but in the case of the Amandelbult and Union sites appears to have been influenced by the stress condition of the rock mass at the time of drilling. The paper describes the microscope and modelling work done...

  8. National survey of crystalline rocks and recommendations of regions to be explored for high-level radioactive waste repository sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedes, H.W.

    1983-04-01

    A reconnaissance of the geological literature on large regions of exposed crystalline rocks in the United States provides the basis for evaluating if any of those regions warrant further exploration toward identifying potential sites for development of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The reconnaissance does not serve as a detailed evaluation of regions or of any smaller subunits within the regions. Site performance criteria were selected and applied insofar as a national data base exists, and guidelines were adopted that relate the data to those criteria. The criteria include consideration of size, vertical movements, faulting, earthquakes, seismically induced ground motion, Quaternary volcanic rocks, mineral deposits, high-temperature convective ground-water systems, hydraulic gradients, and erosion. Brief summaries of each major region of exposed crystalline rock, and national maps of relevant data provided the means for applying the guidelines and for recommending regions for further study. It is concluded that there is a reasonable likelihood that geologically suitable repository sites exist in each of the major regions of crystalline rocks. The recommendation is made that further studies first be conducted of the Lake Superior, Northern Appalachian and Adirondack, and the Southern Appalachian Regions. It is believed that those regions could be explored more effectively and suitable sites probably could be found, characterized, verified, and licensed more readily there than in the other regions.

  9. Basic investigation and analysis for preferred host rocks and natural analogue study area with reference to high level radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Ryul; Park, J. K.; Hwang, D. H.; Lee, J. H.; Yun, H. S.; Kim, D. Y.; Park, H. S.; Koo, S. B.; Cho, J. D.; Kim, K. E. [Korea Inst. of Geology, Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study is basic investigation and analysis for preferred host rocks and natural analogue study area to develope underground disposal technique of high level radioactive waste in future. The study has been done for the crystalline rocks(especially granitic rocks) with emphasis of abandoned metallic mines and uranium ore deposits, and for the geological structure study by using gravity and aeromagnetic data. 138 refs., 54 tabs., 130 figs. (author)

  10. Process and Energy Optimization Assessment Level II Analysis. Rock Island Arsenal, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    room was later renovated in the 1960s and a hot zeolite lime/soda ash system was installed. A newer hot zeolite system was in- stalled in the late...University of Chicago Chicago, IL 60607-7054 Final Report Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for Rock Island Arsenal...Arsenal to prepare the DD1391 form for FY07 Army ECIP funding application. Support of project implementation and savings verification can be provided

  11. Optimum crushing level of blasted rock at the Prokop'evsk surface coal mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemba, V.I.; Starkov, V.L.; Ustyuzhanin, V.S.

    1987-06-01

    Explains that improving the quality of rock crushing using blasting energy increases the efficiency of excavators and other mining equipment, reduces the energy required for scooping and loading tasks and hence reduces the cost of excavating and transporting rock. Investigations performed in surface mines in the Southern Urals and the Kuzbass coal sections showed that changing the mean linear dimensions of the lumps of blasted rock from 0.2 to 0.8 m increased the power consumption of a EhKG-4,6 excavator from 0.12 to 0.3 kWh/m/sup 3/ and that of loading from 0.1 to 1.56 kWh/m/sup 3/. Uses actual values for the efficiency and costs of blasting, excavation and transporting operations (presented in tabular form) as the basis for a comparative evaluation with the aim of determining how to achieve maximum cost-efficiency and, taking all factors into account, calculates that for the Prokop'evsk surface mine the optimum lump size is 0.4 m.

  12. Mechanical analysis on deformation of surrounding rock with road-in packing of gob-side entry retaining in fully-mechanized sub-level caving face

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Chuan-qu; MIAO Xie-xing; LIU Ze

    2008-01-01

    Based on the movement regularity of surrounding rock with road-in packing of gob-side entry retaining in fully-mechanized sub-level caving face (RPGERFCF), the me-chanical model of its surrounding rock was established and the calculating formulas of the deformation of the roof, coal wall and filling body were attained. By the mechanical analy-sis to the deformation of the surrounding rock of RPGERFCF, the major factors influencing the deformation of the surrounding rock were found out and the technologic approaches reduced the deformation and enhanced the stability of the surrounding rock were put for-ward. Consequently, the scientific bases were provided for the stability control of the sur-rounding rock of RPGERFCF.

  13. Unusual N-Alkane Distributions in Extracts from Marine Carbonate Rocks at High Levels of Maturity and Overmaturity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JINGGUI(李景贵); R. PAUL PHILP; CUI MINGZHONG(崔明中)

    2002-01-01

    N-alkanes in extracts from possible carbonate source rocks of the Lower Ordovician Majiagou Formation in the central gas field of the Shanganning Basin and the Upper Sinian Dengying Formation in the Weiyuan gas field of the Sichuan Basin, are characterized by bimodal distributions with the dominant carbon numbers in the range C17-C21 and C25-C29. In most samples, the lower carbon number components are present in greater abundance than the higher carbon number ones. Most samples contain significant concentrations of waxy hydrocarbons ( C22 + )with C21-/C22+ ratios between 0.50 to 3.16, and an average value of 1.34. The n-alkanes in extracts of outcrops and shallow core samples of Upper Proterozoic and Lower Palaeozoic carbonate rocks in the western and southern parts of the North China Basin are of unimodal distributions dominated by n-alkanes maximizing in the C25-C29 range. These extracts have very high concentrations of waxy hydrocarbons with C21 -/C22 + ratios all <1.0, ranging from 0. 14 to 0. 90 and averaging 0.36. AⅡ of the extracts have a marked odd/even predominance in the high molecular weight n-alkane range regardless of whether they are from shallow or deep cores or outcrop samples. Simulation experiments were performed using typical sapropelic-type kerogens from the immature Sinian Lower Xiamalin Formation carbonate-rich shales collected at Jixian,Hebei Province, North China Basin, and the contemporary microplanktonic blue-green algae Spirulina subsala. Results indicate that the unusual distribution of n-alkanes in the extracts of Upper Proterozoic and Lower Palaeozoic carbonate rocks possibly originated from algae in the source rocks at high levels of maturity and overmaturity.

  14. Unusual N—Alkane Distributions in Extracts from Marine Carbonate Rocks at High Levels of Maturity and Overmaturity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李景贵; R.PAULPHILP; 等

    2002-01-01

    N-alkanes in extracts from possible carbonate source rocks of the Lower Ordovician Majiagou Formation in the central gas field of the Shanganning Basin and the Upper Sinian Dengying Formation in the Weiyuan gas field of the Sichuan Basin,are characterized by bimodal distributions with the dominant carbon numbers in the range C17-C21 and C25-C29.In most sam-ples,the lower carbon number components are present in greater abundance than the higher car-bon number ones.Most samples contain significant concentrations of waxy hydrocarbons(C22+)with C21-/C22+ ratios between 0.50 to 3.16 ,and an average value of 1.34.The n-alkanes in extracts of outcrops and shallow core samples of Upper Proterozoic and Lower Palaeozoic carbon-ate rocks in the western and southern parts of the North China Basin are of unimodal distribu-tions dominated by n-alkanes maximizing in the C25-C29 range.These extracts have very high concentrations of waxy hydrocarbons with C21-/C22+ ratios all<1.0,ranging from 0.14 to 0.90 and averaging 0.36.All of the extracts have a marked odd/even predominance in the high mo-lecular weight n-alkane range regardless of whether they are from shallow or deep cores or out-crop samples.Simulation experiments were performed using typical sapropelic-type kerogens from the immature Sinian Lower Xiamalin Formation carbonate-rich shales collected at Jixian ,Hebei Province,North China Basin ,and the contemporary microplanktonic blue-green algae Spirulina subsala.Results indicate that the unusual distribution of n-alkanes in the extracts of Upper Proterozoic and Lower Palaeozoic carbonate rocks possibly originated from algae in the source rocks at high levels fo maturity and overmaturity.

  15. Tourmaline 40Ar/39Ar chronology of tourmaline-rich rocks from Central Iberia dates the main Variscan deformation phases

    OpenAIRE

    Bea Barredo, Fernando; Pesquera P??rez, Alfonso; Gonz??lez Montero, Pilar; Torres-Ruiz, Jos??; Gil-Crespo, Pedro Pablo

    2009-01-01

    During crustal thickening, metapelites taken to depth release boron-bearing hydrothermal fluids because of progressive heating and dehydration. These fluids swiftly percolate upwards, especially if the crust is being actively deformed, to form tourmaline where the PT conditions and the chemical composition of the host-rock are favorable. The age of the so-formed tourmaline would record the age of the upward admittance of B-bearing fluids and, presumably, the age of the deformation. This proce...

  16. Fluxed-melting of shallow and hot high-grade metamorphic rocks in the Namcha Barwa Massif: A new mechanism for the generation of adakitic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, L.; Liu, J.; Hou, Z.; Gao, L.; Xie, K.

    2008-12-01

    Extremely rapid exhumation has been a major factor leading to rapid advection of relatively hot crustal rocks into shallow crustal levels in the Namcha Barwa massif. In such a hot tectonic regime, it is conceivable that hot crustal material can undergo partial melting assisted by excessive water. Previous studies indeed have documented extremely young Na-rich granitic rocks (63.5 and up to 237.1), consistent with garnet either as a non-reactant phase or as a residue phase; (2) these leucosomes have similar Sr isotope compositions to their host rocks, but some of them have Nd isotope compositions significantly deviated from their host by ~4-5 epsilon units. Since high-grade metamorphic rocks in the Namcha Barwa were already shallower than 10 km in the past 5 million years, these data is best explained by water- fluxed melting of granitic components in the source rocks. This interpretation is also consistent with at water- present and relatively lower temperature conditions, both apatite and garnet behaves as non-reactant phases during a partial melting event, which could lead to depletion of garnet-compatible elements as well as negative shift in Nd isotope compositions in the amphibolite- or metapelite-derived melts. Our data emphasize that at rapidly exhumed and relatively hot tectonic regimes (e.g. the Nanga Parbat and Namcha Barwa areas), fluxed-melting of high-graded metamorphic rocks at relatively shallower crustal levels could be another important mechanism to produced adakitic magma and associated porphyritic Cu-Au deposits.

  17. Establishment of earth tides effect on water level fluctuations in an unconfined hard rock aquifer using spectral analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Maréchal, Jean-Christophe; Ahmed, Shakeel; Lachassagne, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Short-interval water level measurements using automatic water level recorder in a deep well in an unconfined crystalline rock aquifer at the campus of NGRI, near Hyderabad shows a cyclic fluctuation in the water levels. The observed values clearly show the principal trend due to rainfall recharge. Spectral analysis was carried out to evaluate correlation of the cyclic fluctuation to the synthetic earth tides as well as groundwater withdrawal time series in the surrounding. It was found that these fluctuations have considerably high correlation with earth tides whereas groundwater pumping does not show any significant correlation with water table fluctuations. It is concluded that earth tides cause the fluctuation in the water table. These fluctuations were hitherto unobserved during manual observations made over larger time intervals. It indicates that the unconfined aquifer is characterised by a low porosity.

  18. Study on the locational criteria for submarine rock repositories of low and medium level radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G. H.; Kang, W. J.; Kim, T. J. and others [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-01-15

    Submarine repositories have significant advantages over their land counterparts locating close to the areas of daily human activities. Consequently, the construction of submarine repositories on the vast continental shelves around Korean seas is considered to be highly positive. In this context, the development of locational criteria primarily targeting the safety of submarine rock repositories is very important.The contents of the present study are: analyzing characteristics of marine environment: Search of potential hazards to, and environmental impact by, the submarine repositories; Investigation of the oceanographic, geochemical, ecological and sedimentological characteristics of estuaries and coastal seas. Locating potential hazards to submarine repositories by: Bibliographical search of accidents leading to the destruction of submarine structures by turbidity currents and other potentials; Review of turbidity currents. Consideration of environmental impact caused by submarine repositories: Logistics to minimize the environmental impacts in site selection; Removal and dispersion processes of radionuclides in sea water. Analyses of oceanographical characteristics of, and hazard potentials in, the Korean seas. Evaluation of the MOST 91-7 criteria for applicability to submarine repositories and the subsequent proposition of additional criteria.

  19. The Rock Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raman J.; Bushee, Jonathan

    1977-01-01

    Presents a rock cycle diagram suitable for use at the secondary or introductory college levels which separates rocks formed on and below the surface, includes organic materials, and separates products from processes. (SL)

  20. Petrology of blueschist facies metamorphic rocks of the Meliata Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faryad Shah Wali

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Meliata blueschists originated from basalts, limestones, pelites, psammitic and amphibolite facies basement rocks. Compositionally, the metabasalts have a geochemical signature mostly indicative of a transitional arc-MORB origin, but some mafic rocks having affinity with within plate basalts also present. The mafic blueschists consist of blue amphibole, epidote and albite, rarely also garnet, Na-pyroxene and chloritoid. Apart from phengite and quartz the metapelites and metapsammites contain one or more of the minerals: chloritoid, paragonite, glaucophane, albite, chlorite, occasionally also Na-pyroxene and garnet. Amphibolite facies rocks contain relic garnet, plagioclase and hornblende, the latter two replaced by albite and blue amphibole, respectively. The zoning patterns of blue amphibole, garnet and chloritoid suggest their formation during prograde stage of metamorphism. P-T conditions of meta-morphism are estimated to be about 350-460 oC and 10-12 kbar.

  1. The Rho GTPase Effector ROCK Regulates Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, and p27Kip1 Levels by Distinct Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Croft, Daniel R; Olson, Michael F.

    2006-01-01

    The members of the Rho GTPase family are well known for their regulation of actin cytoskeletal structures. In addition, they influence progression through the cell cycle. The RhoA and RhoC proteins regulate numerous effector proteins, with a central and vital signaling role mediated by the ROCK I and ROCK II serine/threonine kinases. The requirement for ROCK function in the proliferation of numerous cell types has been revealed by studies utilizing ROCK-selective inhibitors such as Y-27632. H...

  2. Deterministic Seismic Hazard Assessment at Bed Rock Level: Case Study for the City of Bhubaneswar, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanti Rout

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study an updated deterministic seismic hazard contour map of Bhubaneswar (20°12'0"N to 20°23'0"N latitude and 85°44'0"E to 85° 54'0"E longitude one of the major city of India with tourist importance, has been prepared in the form of spectral acceleration values. For assessing the seismic hazard, the study area has been divided into small grids of size 30˝×30˝ (approximately 1.0 km×1.0 km, and the hazard parameters in terms of spectral acceleration at bedrock level, PGA are calculated as the center of each of these grid cells by considering the regional Seismo-tectonic activity within 400 km radius around the city center. The maximum credible earthquake in terms of moment magnitude of 7.2 has been used for calculation of hazard parameter, results in PGA value of 0.017g towards the northeast side of the city and the corresponding maximum spectral acceleration as 0.0501g for a predominant period of 0.05s at bedrock level.

  3. A preliminary study on the suitability of host rocks for deep geological disposal of high level radioactive waste in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chun Soo; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Kyung Su; Park, Byung Yun; Koh, Young Kown

    2000-02-01

    It is expected that the key issues are listed as the disposal concept, reference disposal system and other relevant technical development for the deep geological disposal of HLW in each country. First above all, however, the preferred host rocks should be suggested prior execution of these activities. And, it is desirable to be reviewed and proposed some host rocks representative its country. For the reviewing of host rocks in Korean peninsula, several issues were considered such as the long-term geological stability, fracture system, surface and groundwater system and geochemical characteristics in peninsula. The three rock types such as plutonic rocks, crystalline gneisses and massive volcanic rocks were suggested as the preferred host rocks for the R and D of HLW disposal based on the upper stated information. In the following stages, it is suggested that these preferred host rocks would be made an object of all relevant R and D activities for HLW disposal. And, many references for these geologic medium should be characterized and constructed various technical development for the Korean reference disposal system.

  4. Metamorphic P-T-t path retrieved from metapelites in the southeastern Taihua metamorphic complex, and the Paleoproterozoic tectonic evolution of the southern North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun-Sheng; Zhai, Ming-Guo; Lu, Lin-Sheng; Wang, Hao Y. C.; Chen, Hong-Xu; Peng, Tao; Wu, Chun-Ming; Zhao, Tai-Ping

    2017-02-01

    The Taihua metamorphic complex in the southern part of the North China Craton is composed of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) gneisses, amphibolites, metapelitic gneisses, marbles, quartzites, and banded iron formations (BIFs). The protoliths of the complex have ages ranging from ∼2.1 to ∼2.9 Ga and was metamorphosed under the upper amphibolite to granulite facies conditions with NWW-SEE-striking gneissosity. Metapelitites from the Wugang area have three stages of metamorphic mineral assemblages. The prograde metamorphic mineral assemblage (M1) includes biotite + plagioclase + quartz + ilmenite preserved as inclusions in garnet porphyroblasts. The peak mineral assemblage (M2) consists of garnet porphyroblasts and matrix minerals of sillimanite + biotite + plagioclase + quartz + K-feldspar + ilmenite + rutile + pyrite. The retrograde mineral assemblage (M3), biotite + plagioclase + quartz, occurs as symplectic assemblages surrounding embayed garnet porphyroblasts. Garnet porphyroblasts are chemically zoned. Pseudosection calculated in the NCKFMASHTO model system suggests that mantles of garnet porphyroblasts define high-pressure granulites facies P-T conditions of 12.2 kbar and 830 °C, whereas garnet rims record P-T conditions of 10.2 kbar and 840 °C. Integrating the prograde mineral assemblages, zoning of garnet porphyroblasts with symplectic assemblages, a clockwise metamorphic P-T path can be retrieved. High resolution SIMS U-Pb dating and LA-ICP-MS trace element measurements of the metamorphic zircons demonstrate that metapelites in Wugang possibly record the peak or near peak metamorphic ages of ∼1.92 Ga. Furthermore, 40Ar/39Ar dating of biotite in metapelites suggests that the cooling of the Taihua complex may have lasted until ∼1.83 Ga. Therefore, a long-lived Palaeoproterozoic metamorphic event may define a slow exhumation process. Field relationship and new metamorphic data for the Taihua metamorphic complex does not support the previous

  5. From chemical mapping to pressure temperature deformation micro-cartography: mineralogical evolution and mass transport in thermo-mechanic disequilibrium systems: application to meta-pelites and confinement nuclear waste materials; De l'imagerie chimique a la micro-cartographie Pression-Temperature-Deformation: evolution mineralogique et transport de matiere dans des systemes en desequilibre thermomecanique. Applications aux metapelites et aux materiaux de stockage de dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, V. de

    2006-03-15

    The mineralogical composition of metamorphic rocks or industrial materials evolves when they are submitted to thermomechanical disequilibria, i.e. a spatial or temporal pressure and temperature evolution, or chemical disequilibria as variations in redox conditions, pH... For example, during low temperature metamorphic processes, rocks re-equilibrate only partially, and thus record locally thermodynamic equilibria increasing so the spatial chemical heterogeneities. Understanding the P-T evolution of such systems and deciphering modalities of their mineralogical transformation imply to recognize and characterize the size of these local 'paleo-equilibria', and so to have a spatial chemical information at least in 2 dimensions. In order to get this information, microprobe X-ray fluorescence maps have been used. Computer codes have been developed with Matlab to quantify these maps in view of thermo-barometric estimations. In this way, P-T maps of mineral crystallisation were produced using the multi-equilibria thermodynamic technique. Applications on two meta-pelites from the Sambagawa blue-schist belt (Japan) and from the Caledonian eclogitic zone in Spitsbergen, show that quantitative chemical maps are a powerful tool to retrieve the metamorphic history of rocks. From these chemical maps have been derived maps of P-T-time-redox-deformation that allow to characterize P-T conditions of minerals formation, and so, the P-T path of the sample, the oxidation state of iron in the chlorite phase. As a result, we underline the relation between deformation and crystallisation, and propose a relative chronology of minerals crystallisation and deformations. The Fe{sup 3+} content map in chlorite calculated by thermodynamic has also been validated by a {mu}-XANES mapping at the iron K-edge measured at the ESRF (ID24) using an innovative method. Another application relates to an experimental study of clay materials, main components of an analogical model of a nuclear

  6. Collecting Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙铮

    2007-01-01

    My hobby is collecting rocks.It is very special,isn’t it?I began to collect rocks about four years ago.I usually go hiking in the mountains,or near the river to look for rocks.When I find a rock,I pick it up and clean it with the brush and water.Then I put it into my bag.Most of the rocks I have collected are quartzite~*.They are really

  7. Rock magnetic and other geophysical signatures of relative sea level change in the Middle Cambrian Wheeler Formation, Drum Mountains, West-Central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halgedahl, S. L.; Jarrard, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Wheeler Formation of West-Central Utah is a succession of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic rocks deposited during the Middle Cambrian along a passive continental margin of Laurentia (western margin, in today's coordinates). The depositional setting was a gentle ramp, bounded by a normal fault on the south. The present study focuses on the Wheeler Formation in the Drum Mountains, Utah, which is thought to have recorded Middle Cambrian sea level changes and which is known to yield exceptionally-preserved fossils with soft parts, similar to the famed Burgess shale. An integrated approach has been used here to investigate the following: (1) high-resolution changes in water depth (sea level changes?) with stratigraphic position; (2) where exceptionally preserved fossils are most likely to occur; and (3) mineralogical indicators of sea level change, such as magnetic susceptibility and other rock magnetic properties. Rocks consist of limestones, argillaceous limestones, and finely-bedded mudstones (shales). Methods used here are: measurements of magnetic susceptibility, natural remanent magnetization, and viscous remanent magnetization; hysteresis loops; spectral gamma ray; coulometry to determine calcite content; X-ray diffraction; and field mapping. In these rocks, mineralogical analyses indicate primarily a 2-component system of calcite and terrigenous minerals, mainly illite. Magnetic susceptibility, gamma ray, and coulometry results strongly indicate that magnetic susceptibility stems primarily from the paramagnetic clay component, namely, illite. Thus, both magnetic susceptibility and gamma ray increase linearly with decreasing calcite content throughout the section studied. Deep-water shales yield very high values of gamma ray and magnetic susceptibility; by contrast, carbonates with low gamma ray and low magnetic susceptibilities were deposited in relatively shallow water. These results lead to the following conclusions: (1) changes in relative water depth have

  8. Major phylum-level differences between porefluid and host rock bacterial communities in the terrestrial deep subsurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momper, Lily; Kiel Reese, Brandi; Zinke, Laura; Wanger, Greg; Osburn, Magdalena R; Moser, Duane; Amend, Jan P

    2017-07-05

    Earth's deep subsurface biosphere (DSB) is home to a vast number and wide variety of microorganisms. Although difficult to access and sample, deep subsurface environments have been probed through drilling programs, exploration of mines and sampling of deeply sourced vents and springs. In an effort to understand the ecology of deep terrestrial habitats, we examined bacterial diversity in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), the former Homestake gold mine, in South Dakota, USA. Whole genomic DNA was extracted from deeply circulating groundwater and corresponding host rock (at a depth of 1.45 km below ground surface). Pyrotag DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed diverse communities of putative chemolithoautotrophs, aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs, numerous candidate phyla and unique rock-associated microbial assemblage. There was a clear and near-total separation of communities between SURF deeply circulating fracture fluids and SURF host-rocks. Sequencing data from SURF compared against five similarly sequenced terrestrial subsurface sites in Europe and North America revealed classes Clostridia and Betaproteobacteria were dominant in terrestrial fluids. This study presents a unique analysis showing differences in terrestrial subsurface microbial communities between fracture fluids and host rock through which those fluids permeate. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Rock Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国平

    2000-01-01

    Around the world young people are spending unbelievable sums of money to listen to rock music. Forbes Magazine reports that at least fifty rock stars have incomes between two million and six million dollars per year.

  10. KREEP Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹永廖; 徐琳; 欧阳自远

    2004-01-01

    KREEP rocks with high contents of K, REE and P were first recognized in Apollo-12 samples, and it was confirmed later that there were KREEP rock fragments in all of the Apollo samples, particularly in Apollo-12 and-14 samples. The KREEP rocks distributed on the lunar surface are the very important objects of study on the evolution of the moon, as well as to evaluate the utilization prospect of REE in KREEP rocks. Based on previous studies and lunar exploration data, the authors analyzed the chemical and mineral characteristics of KREEP rocks, the abundance of Th on the lunar surface materials, the correlation between Th and REE of KREEP rocks in abundance, studied the distribution regions of KREEP rocks on the lunar surface, and further evaluated the utilization prospect of REE in KREEP rocks.

  11. Climax Granite, Nevada Test Site, as a host for a rock mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high level nuclear wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-02-01

    This document discusses the potential of the Climax pluton, at the Nevada Test Site, as the host for a granite mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Climax granitic pluton has been the site of three nuclear weapons effects tests: Hard Hat, Tiny Tot, and Piledriver. Geologic exploration and mapping of the granite body were performed at the occasion of these tests. Currently, it is the site Spent Fuel Test (SFT-C) conducted in the vicinity of and at the same depth as that of the Piledriver drifts. Significant exploration, mapping, and rock mechanics work have been performed and continue at this Piledriver level - the 1400 (ft) level - in the context of SFT-C. Based on our technical discussions, and on the review of the significant geological and rock mechanics work already achieved in the Climax pluton, based also on the ongoing work and the existing access and support, it is concluded that the Climax site offers great opportunities for a rock mechanics test facility. It is not claimed, however, that Climax is the only possible site or the best possible site, since no case has been made for another granite test facility in the United States. 12 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Rock Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  13. Rock Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  14. Rock Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  15. Shaft sealing concepts for high-level radioactive waste repositories based on the host-rock options rock salt and clay stone; Schachtverschlusskonzepte fuer zukuenftige Endlager fuer hochradioaktive Abfaelle fuer die Wirtsgesteinsoptionen Steinsalz und Ton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudla, Wolfram; Gruner, Matthias [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Erdbau und Spezialtiefbau; Herold, Philipp; Jobmann, Michael [DBE Technology GmbH, Peine (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Unlike the shaft barriers used for the dry preservation of former mine workings and underground storage sites, shaft seals designed for radioactive-waste repositories must also fulfil additional requirements associated with the design diversity of the sealing system. This diversity makes use of the simple redundancy principle in order to prevent the proliferation of defects. In practice this means combining several sealing elements made from different materials or from materials with different properties. The R and D project, Shaft sealing systems for final repositories for high-level radioactive waste (ELSA) - phase 2: concept design for shaft seals and testing of the functional elements of shaft seals', which was funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi), set out to investigate potential sealing elements for the two host-rock options rock salt and mudstone. This paper combines the text that the authors presented at the First International Freiberg Shaft Colloquium held at the Freiberg University of Mining and Technology on 01.10.2014 with a presentation on the sealing elements that were investigated as part of the R and D project.

  16. Assessment of natural and anthropogenic radioactivity levels in rocks and soils in the environments of Juban town in Yemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd El-mageed, A.I., E-mail: mageed39@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Faculty of science, Assiut University (Egypt); El-Kamel, A.H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of science, Assiut University (Egypt); Abbady, A.; Harb, S.; Youssef, A.M.M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, South Valley University (Egypt); Saleh, I.I. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education-Toor Albaha, University of Aden (Yemen)

    2011-06-15

    The natural radioactivities of {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 232}Th and the fallout of {sup 137}Cs in rock and soil samples collected around Juban town in Yemen (south west of Asia) were measured. Concentrations of radionuclides in samples were determined by gamma-ray spectrometer using HPGe detector with specially designed shield. The average radioactivity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K were determined expressed in Bq/kg. The results show that these radionuclides were present in concentrations of (53.6{+-}4, 127{+-}6.7, and 1742.8{+-}62 Bq/kg), (55{+-}4, 121{+-}6.6, and 2341{+-}78 Bq/kg), (212.8{+-}8.7, 109 {+-}5.5, and 32.4{+-}4.7 Bq/kg), and (32.1{+-}3, 22.3{+-}2.9 and 190.9{+-}15 Bq/kg) for granite, gneiss, siltstone, and sandstone rocks, respectively. For soil the corresponding values were 44.4{+-}4.5, 58.2{+-}5.1, and 822.7{+-}31 Bq/kg. Low deposits of {sup 137}Cs were noted in investigation area, where the activity concentrations ranged from 0.1{+-}0.1 to 23.2{+-}1.2 Bq/kg. Also the radiological hazard of the natural radionuclides content, radium equivalent activity, total dose rates, external hazard index, and gamma activity concentration index of the (rocks/soils) samples in the area under consideration were calculated. The data were discussed and compared with those given in the literature.

  17. Assessment of natural and anthropogenic radioactivity levels in rocks and soils in the environments of Juban town in Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-mageed, A. I.; El-Kamel, A. H.; Abbady, A.; Harb, S.; Youssef, A. M. M.; Saleh, I. I.

    2011-06-01

    The natural radioactivities of 40K, 226Ra, and 232Th and the fallout of 137Cs in rock and soil samples collected around Juban town in Yemen (south west of Asia) were measured. Concentrations of radionuclides in samples were determined by gamma-ray spectrometer using HPGe detector with specially designed shield. The average radioactivity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K were determined expressed in Bq/kg. The results show that these radionuclides were present in concentrations of (53.6±4, 127±6.7, and 1742.8±62 Bq/kg), (55±4, 121±6.6, and 2341±78 Bq/kg), (212.8±8.7, 109 ±5.5, and 32.4±4.7 Bq/kg), and (32.1±3, 22.3±2.9 and 190.9±15 Bq/kg) for granite, gneiss, siltstone, and sandstone rocks, respectively. For soil the corresponding values were 44.4±4.5, 58.2±5.1, and 822.7±31 Bq/kg. Low deposits of 137Cs were noted in investigation area, where the activity concentrations ranged from 0.1±0.1 to 23.2±1.2 Bq/kg. Also the radiological hazard of the natural radionuclides content, radium equivalent activity, total dose rates, external hazard index, and gamma activity concentration index of the (rocks/soils) samples in the area under consideration were calculated. The data were discussed and compared with those given in the literature.

  18. 'Earhart' Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock informally named 'Earhart' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the pilot Amelia Earhart. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe fractures in Earhart could have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Rover team members do not have plans to investigate Earhart in detail because it is located across potentially hazardous sandy terrain. This image was taken on sol 219 (Sept. 4) by the rover's panoramic camera, using its 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  19. Rock Art

    OpenAIRE

    Huyge, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Rock art, basically being non-utilitarian, non-textual anthropic markings on natural rock surfaces, was an extremely widespread graphical practice in ancient Egypt. While the apogee of the tradition was definitely the Predynastic Period (mainly fourth millennium BCE), examples date from the late Palaeolithic (c. 15,000 BCE) until the Islamic era. Geographically speaking, “Egyptian” rock art is known from many hundreds of sites along the margins of the Upper Egyptian and Nubian Nile Valley and...

  20. Rock blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, W.

    2007-01-01

    Consider representation theory associated to symmetric groups, or to Hecke algebras in type A, or to q-Schur algebras, or to finite general linear groups in non-describing characteristic. Rock blocks are certain combinatorially defined blocks appearing in such a representation theory, first observed by R. Rouquier. Rock blocks are much more symmetric than general blocks, and every block is derived equivalent to a Rock block. Motivated by a theorem of J. Chuang and R. Kessar in the case of sym...

  1. EPMA monazite geochronology of the basement and supracrustal rocks within the Pur-Banera basin, Rajasthan: Evidence of Columbia breakup in Northwestern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozha, Manoj Kumar; Mishra, Biswajit; Hazarika, Pranjit; Jeyagopal, A. V.; Yadav, G. S.

    2016-03-01

    We deduce the timing of the rift-induced collisional event between two orogenies in the central Aravalli-Delhi Fold Belt using monazite chemical dating and metamorphic P-T estimates from metapelites of the Mangalwar Complex (MC), and the overlying Pur-Banera (PB) supracrustals. The MC rocks preserve evidence of three regional metamorphic events, while the PB rocks record the last event. The M1 metamorphism attained its peak P-T at ∼5.5 kbar and 520-550 °C in the MC rocks at ∼1.82 Ga, followed by the M2 event with peak P-T of ∼7.5 kbar and 580-660 °C at ∼1.35 Ga. The youngest high-pressure M3 metamorphism attained a peak P-T of ∼8.0 kbar and 590-640 °C at ∼0.99 Ga. Thermobarometry coupled with ages of included monazites in chemically zoned garnet from the MC metapelites indicate preservation of ages spanning between ∼1.82 Ga and ∼0.99 Ga from different zones (i.e., core to rim), implying episodic garnet growth during supercontinent cycle. The PB metapelites constitute two prominent ages of ∼1.37 Ga and ∼1.05 Ga. The youngest high-pressure metamorphism (M3) in the PB rocks with maximum P-T of ∼8.0 kbar, and 580-670 °C during the Neoproterozoic has overprinted their earlier metamorphic records. Based on monazite geochronology, we assign the ∼1.82 Ga and ∼1.37-1.35 Ga ages to the amalgamation and breakup of the Columbia supercontinent respectively. The youngest age record of ∼1.05-0.99 Ga indicates evidence of Rodinia formation in and around the Pur-Banera basin.

  2. Second order Coriolis resonance between the C-O stretch and the CH3 rock levels of methanol involving excited torsional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, I

    1997-12-01

    In this paper, it is shown that the interaction responsible for making the series of 'forbidden' transitions from the state (n tau K) = (110) in the ground vibrational (v = 0) state of the levels of (122+) in the CH3-rocking vibrational state (v = r) of methanol is 'Coriolis' resonance and not 'Fermi' resonance as proposed in a recent publication. This has been established from the J-dependence of the observed perturbed energy spacings between the two interacting pairs from high resolution spectroscopic analysis. The J-dependence clearly follows the classic 'Coriolis' interaction matrix elements for delta K = 2, which would not occur if the interaction were due to 'Fermi' resonance.

  3. Retention of Metasedimentary Carbon during Subduction through Forearcs: Evidence from HP/UHP Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, G. E.; Anderson, L. D.; Agard, P.; Bastoni, C.; Sills, G.; McCall, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Knowledge of the degrees of retention or loss of C during trench-to-subarc metamorphism of subducting sediments (and altered oceanic crust) is critical in any model of deep-Earth C cycling. Existing theoretical analyses of subduction-zone decarbonation indicate little decarbonation of more pure metacarbonates to great depths in relatively cool margins unless subducting sediments are fluxed by H2O-rich fluids introduced from an external source. Western Alps metasedimentary rocks in the Schistes Lustres (SL) and at Lago di Cignana (CIG) allow assessment of extents of prograde devolatilization along prograde P-T paths similar to those experienced in most modern convergent margins. These suites represent a wide range of peak P-T (350-625°C; 1.5-2.9 GPa), in the same structural nappe, and contain pelitic and impure carbonate lithologies interlayered at cm to km scales. Integrated petrologic-geochemical study of the metapelites has documented minimal dehydration and surprising retention of particularly fluid-mobile trace elements such as B, Cs, and N in even the CIG rocks representing subduction to ~90 km depths [1, this study]. Schistes Lustres metacarbonates (20-90 wt% carbonate) are remarkably devoid of calc-silicate phases, indicating little decarbonation, and carbonate δ13CVPDB in these rocks is accordingly uniform across grade (mostly between -1.5 and +1‰, values typical of oceanic carbonates). CIG marble layers containing minor amounts of garnet, clinozoisite, and titanite have similar carbonate δ13C. In metapelitic rocks, carbonaceous matter (full range 0.04-0.3 wt%; 0.04-0.1 wt% for CIG) shows subtle increase in δ13C from values typical of marine organic matter (-26 to -22‰) in low-grade SL to higher values approaching -16‰ in the highest-grade SL and at CIG. Metapelite C/N shows no significant change across grade, with values typical of seafloor sediments (2-10). δ15Nair is relatively uniform across grade (+2.5 to +5‰), but values for CIG at the

  4. Natural radioactivity levels in soils, rocks and water at a mining concession of Perseus gold mine and surrounding towns in Central Region of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faanu, A; Adukpo, O K; Tettey-Larbi, L; Lawluvi, H; Kpeglo, D O; Darko, E O; Emi-Reynolds, G; Awudu, R A; Kansaana, C; Amoah, P A; Efa, A O; Ibrahim, A D; Agyeman, B; Kpodzro, R; Agyeman, L

    2016-01-01

    Levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials prior to processing of gold ore within and around the new eastern concession area of Perseus Mining (Ghana) Limited were carried out to ascertain the baseline radioactivity levels. The study was based on situ measurements of external gamma dose rate at 1 m above ground level as well as laboratory analysis by direct gamma spectrometry to quantify the radionuclides of interest namely; (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K in soil, rock, ore samples and gross alpha/beta analysis in water samples. The average absorbed dose rate in air at 1 m above sampling point using a radiation survey metre was determined to be 0.08 ± 0.02 μGyh(-1) with a corresponding average annual effective dose calculated to be 0.093 ± 0.028 mSv. The average activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, and (40)K in the soil, rock, and ore samples were 65.1 ± 2.2, 71.8 ± 2.2 and 1168.3 Bqkg(-1) respectively resulting in an average annual effective dose of 0.91 ± 0.32 mSv. The average Radium equivalent activity value was 257.8 ± 62.4 Bqkg(-1) in the range of 136.6-340.2 Bqkg(-1). The average values of external and internal indices were 0.7 ± 0.2 and 0.9 ± 0.2 respectively. The average gross alpha and gross beta activity concentrations in the water samples were determined to be 0.0032 ± 0.0024 and 0.0338 ± 0.0083 Bql(-1) respectively. The total annual effective dose from the pathways considered for this study (gamma ray from the soil, rock and ore samples as well as doses determined from the gross alpha/beta activity concentration in water samples) was calculated to be 0.918 mSv. The results obtained in this study shows that the radiation levels are within the natural background radiation levels found in literature and compare well with similar studies for other countries and the total annual effective dose is below the ICRP recommended level of 1 mSv for public exposure control.

  5. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  6. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  7. Observational study of rock mass response to mining induced seismic events and controlled blasting experiments at deep level gold mines in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, A.; Durrheim, R. J.; Nakatani, M.; Yabe, Y.; Naoi, M. M.; Ogasawara, H.

    2012-12-01

    The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied to characterize the rock mass response and to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instruments, especially designed for recording strong ground motions, were installed underground at a number of deep level gold mines in South Africa. The instruments were recording data at the surface of the stope hangingwalls. A maximum value of 3 m/s was measured. Therefore data were compared to the data recorded in the solid rock by the mine seismic networks to determine the site response. The site response was defined as the ratio of the peak ground velocity measured at the surface of the excavations to the peak ground velocity inferred from the mine seismic data measured in the solid rocks. The site response measured at all mines studied was found to be 9 ± 3 times larger on average. In addition a number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to strong ground motion. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of peak particle velocity was found to be proportional to R-1.7. In order to improve the understanding of the rock mass behaviour around deep level mining the rate of tilt was monitor and then compare to the seismic ground motion. A good correspondence between the rate of tilt and seismic ground motion was found. The rate of coseismic and aseismic tilt, as well as seismicity recorded by the mine seismic network, are approximately constant until the daily blasting time

  8. Comparison between lead levels in blood and bone tissue of rock doves (Columba livia) treated with lead acetate or exposed to the environment of Alcala de Henares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, M.C.; Gonzalez, M. [Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain)

    1992-06-01

    The increase in the amount of lead released into the environment in developed countries during the last two to three decades has resulted in a significant increase in lead levels in organisms from completely different environments. Several surveys have been made in urban areas with high traffic densities in an attempt to identify plant and animal species that might reflect environmental metal concentrations so that those species could be used as sensitive biological indicators of heavy metal contamination. Studies of lead accumulation in U.K. rock doves imply that use of this species as a pollution indicator would facilitate periodic monitoring of chronic lead exposure conditions in the urban environment. Laboratory investigations cannot readily reflect environmental conditions since the validity of extrapolating laboratory results, where high doses are administered over short-time periods, to the natural environment has been seriously questioned. The present study was made on four rock dove (Columbia livia) populations: two groups (males and females) were dosed with lead acetate in the laboratory and two groups of males were housed in different parts of the city of Alcala de Henares. Data on lead bioaccumulation were collected in two situations: the first was in a laboratory with controlled amounts of lead, while in the second situation the amounts reflected the actual environmental levels in Alcala de Henares. Lead levels were determined in two tissues: blood, which is the target of first impact in possible acute situations; and bone, which is the main tissue where lead accumulates and, therefore, very important during chronic exposure. The study focused on the following three items: (1) lead tissue distribution; (2) variation with habitat; and (3) an evaluation of the levels of lead contamination in the city of Alcala de Henares. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. ROCK ON

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas Grose

    2014-01-01

    ..., however, was music - especially the high-pitched sounds of pop and rock, which boosted energy output by up to 40 percent. By contrast, classical music's lower pitches barely raised effectiveness. O...

  10. Partial melting of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks during continental collision: Evidence, time, mechanism, and effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Xiang; Zhou, Kun; Gao, Xiao-Ying

    2017-09-01

    Partial melting of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks during continental collision has been increasingly found in nature. More and more studies have devoted to the evidence, time, mechanism and effect of crustal anataxis at mantle to lower crust depths. This is particularly so for UHP rocks from the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt, whereas similar studies on these issues are relatively minor for other UHP terranes. The petrological evidence, especially microstructural observations and multiphase solid inclusion analyses, have been accumulated for the partial melting of UHP metamorphic rocks in collisional orogens. The results indicate that this is a kind of low-degree crustal anataxis at convergent plate margins due to decompressional dehydration of the UHP rocks themselves. Thus it has great bearing on intracrustal differentiation and crust-mantle interaction in continental subduction channels. Zircon may grow through peritectic reactions due to the breakdown of hydrous minerals. By dating of the peritectic zircons that contain coesite or diamond inclusions, the time of crustal anatexis under UHP conditions can be directly determined. In general, the partial melting of UHP rocks mainly took place at the stage of their early exhumation, partly still in the UHP regime and partly in the subsequent high-pressure (HP) regime. The crustal anatexis still at mantle depths is common in many UHP terranes, possibly facilitating exhumation of deeply subducted continental slices toward shallower levels. Petrological and geochemical studies indicate that phengite dehydration-driven melting during exhumation is the common mechanism for the anatexis of UHP rocks, though the other hydrous minerals were also involved in this process. The resulted HP to UHP melts may occur at different spatial scales and show significant fractionation in melt-mobile incompatible trace elements such as LILE and LREE. These melts are enriched in LILE to large extent and LREE and Th to small extent

  11. Tracing groundwater with low-level detections of halogenated VOCs in a fractured carbonate-rock aquifer, Leetown Science Center, West Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, L. Niel; Sibrell, Philip L.; Casile, Gerolamo C.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Hunt, Andrew G.; Schlosser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of low-level concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and estimates of groundwater age interpreted from 3H/3He and SF6 data have led to an improved understanding of groundwater flow, water sources, and transit times in a karstic, fractured, carbonate-rock aquifer at the Leetown Science Center (LSC), West Virginia. The sum of the concentrations of a set of 16 predominant halogenated VOCs (TDVOC) determined by gas chromatography with electron-capture detector (GC–ECD) exceeded that possible for air–water equilibrium in 34 of the 47 samples (median TDVOC of 24,800 pg kg−1), indicating that nearly all the water sampled in the vicinity of the LSC has been affected by addition of halogenated VOCs from non-atmospheric source(s). Leakage from a landfill that was closed and sealed nearly 20 a prior to sampling was recognized and traced to areas east of the LSC using low-level detection of tetrachloroethene (PCE), methyl chloride (MeCl), methyl chloroform (MC), dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12), and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-1,2-DCE). Chloroform (CHLF) was the predominant VOC in water from domestic wells surrounding the LSC, and was elevated in groundwater in and near the Fish Health Laboratory at the LSC, where a leak of chlorinated water occurred prior to 2006. The low-level concentrations of halogenated VOCs did not exceed human or aquatic-life health criteria, and were useful in providing an awareness of the intrinsic susceptibility of the fractured karstic groundwater system at the LSC to non-atmospheric anthropogenic inputs. The 3H/3He groundwater ages of spring discharge from the carbonate rocks showed transient behavior, with ages averaging about 2 a in 2004 following a wet climatic period (2003–2004), and ages in the range of 4–7 a in periods of more average precipitation (2008–2009). The SF6 and CFC-12 data indicate older water (model ages of 10s of years or more) in the low-permeability shale of the Martinsburg

  12. Determination of molybdenum and tungsten at trace levels in rocks and minerals by solvent extraction and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, N; Roy, N K; Das, A K

    1989-06-01

    Separation by solvent extraction followed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry has been used for determination of molybdenum and tungsten in rocks and minerals. Samples are decomposed either by heating with a mixture of hydrofluoric acid and perchloric acid or by fusion with potassium pyrosulphate, followed by extraction of molybdenum and tungsten with N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine in toluene from 4-5M sulphuric acid medium. The extract is collected on a mass of cellulose powder, which is dried in vacuum, mixed thoroughly and pressed into a disc for XRF measurements. The method is free from all matrix effects and needs no mathematical corrections for interelement effects. The method is suitable for determination of molybdenum and tungsten in geological materials down to ppm levels, with reasonable precision and accuracy.

  13. Far Field Sorption Data Bases for Performance Assessment of a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository in an Undisturbed Opalinus Clay Host Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradburry, M.; Baeyens, B

    2003-08-01

    An Opalinus Clay formation in the Zuercher Weinland is under consideration by Nagra as a potential location for a high-level and long-Iived intermediate-level radioactive waste repository. Performance assessment studies will be performed for this site and the purpose of this report is to describe the procedures used to develop sorption data bases appropriate for an undisturbed Opalinus Clay host rock which are required for such safety analysis calculations. In tight, low water content argillaceous rock formations such as Opalinus Clay, there is uncertainty concerning the in situ pH/P{sub CO{sub 2}}. In order to take this intrinsic uncertainty into account porewater chemistries were calculated for a reference case, pH = 7.24, and for two other pH values, 6.3 and 7.8. Sorption data bases are given for the three cases. The basis for the sorption data bases is 'in-house' sorption measurements for Cs(I), Sr(II), Ni(II), Eu(III), Sn(IV), Se(IV), Th(IV) and I(-I) carried out on Opalinus Clay samples from Mont Terri (Canton Jura) since at the time the experiments were performed no core samples from the Benken borehole (Zuercher Weinland) were available. The Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri and Benken are part of the same geological formation . Despite having directly measured data for the above key radionuclides, some of the required distribution ratios (Rd) used to generate the sorption data bases still came from the open literature. An important part of this report is concerned with describing the procedures whereby these selected literature Rd values were modified so as to apply to the Benken Opalinus Clay mineralogy and groundwater chemistries calculated at the three pH values given above. The resulting Rd values were then further modified using so-called Lab{yields}Field transfer factors to produce sorption values which were appropriate to the in situ bulk rock for the selected range of water chemistry conditions. Finally, it is important to have some

  14. 'Wopmay' Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows an unusual, lumpy rock informally named 'Wopmay' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the Canadian bush pilot Wilfrid Reid 'Wop' May. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe the lumps in Wopmay may be related to cracking and alteration processes, possibly caused by exposure to water. The area between intersecting sets of cracks eroded in a way that created the lumpy appearance. Rover team members plan to drive Opportunity over to Wopmay for a closer look in coming sols. This image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 248 (Oct. 4, 2004), using its 750-, 530- and 480-nanometer filters.

  15. Thermobarometry and electron-microprobe Th-U-Pb monazite dating in garnet metapelites from the Capelinha Formation, Aracuai Orogen, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroga, Glaucia Nascimento; Martins, Maximiliano de Souza; Castro, Marco Paulo de; Jordt-Evangelista, Hanna; Silva, Ana Lucia da, E-mail: glauciaqueiroga@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: maximilianomartins@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marco_pcastro@yahoo.com, E-mail: hanna@degeo.ufop.br, E-mail: alucia.silva@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil). Escola de Minas. Departamento de Geologia; Pedrosa-Soares, Antonio Carlos, E-mail: pedrosa@igc.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias. Departamento de Geologia; Schulz, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.schulz@mineral.tu-freiberg.de [TU Bergakademie - Institute of Mineralogy, Freiberg - Saxony (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The Capelinha Formation (Macaubas Group) consists of a lower quartzitic unit with metamafic intercalations and an upper metapelitic sequence. It occurs in a complex tectono-metamorphic sector of the Aracuai orogen, where post-collisional collapse-related structures superimposed collisional structures. The garnet-bearing assemblages started crystallization in the collisional deformation stage that formed the main regional foliation around 570 Ma. Garnet porphyroblasts display a well developed growth zonation of Fe-Mg-Ca-Mn and show, from core to rim, increasing almandine and pyrope contents in contrast with decreasing grossular and spessartine contents. Mineral relations and microstructures provide criteria for local equilibria and a structurally controlled application of geothermobarometry based on cation exchange and net transfer reactions. The P-T values calculated from cores to rims of garnets, aligned along clockwise trends, resulted in increasing temperatures (from 500 deg C up to 620 deg C) under decompression conditions (from 8.0 kbar to 4.5 kbar). The Th-UPb dating of homogeneous monazites by electron microprobe revealed a recrystallization period at around 490 - 480 Ma. These ages can be related to the tectono-thermal event associated with the gravitational collapse, constraining the youngest time limit for metamorphic processes in the Aracuai orogen. (author)

  16. Zircon U-Pb Ages from an Ultra-High Temperature Metapelite, Rauer Group, East Antarctica: Implications for Overprints by Grenvillian and Pan-African Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanbin; Tong, Laixi; Liu, Dunyi

    2007-01-01

    SHRIMP U-Pb dating of zircon from an ultra-high temperature (UHT, ~1000 °C) granulite-facies metapelite from the Rauer Group, Mather Peninsula, east Antarctica, has yielded evidence for two episodes of metamorphic zircon growth, at ~1.00 Ga and ~530 Ma, and two episodes of magmatism in the source region for the protolith sediment, at ~2.53 and ~2.65 Ga, were identified from the zircon cores. Successive zircon growth at ~1.00 Ga and ~530 Ma records a sequence of distinct, widely spaced high-temperature metamorphic and/or anatectic events related to Grenvillian and Pan-African orogenesis. This study presents the first robust geochronological evidence for the timing of UHT metamorphism of the Rauer Group, supporting arguments that the peak UHT metamorphic event occurred at ~1.00 Ga and was overprinted by a separate high-grade event at ~530 Ma. The new age data indicate that the UHT granulites of the Rauer Group experienced a complex, multi-stage tectonothermal history, which cannot simply be explained via a single Pan-African (~500 Ma) high-grade tectonic event. This is critical in understanding the role of the eastern Prydz Bay region during the assembly of the east Gondwana supercontinent, and the newly recognized inherited Archaean ages (~2.53 and ~2.65 Ga) suggest a close tectonic relationship between the Rauer Group and the adjacent Archaean of the Vestfold Hills

  17. Source rock

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakr F. Makky; Mohamed I. El Sayed; Ahmed S. Abu El-Ata; Ibrahim M. Abd El-Gaied; Mohamed I. Abdel-Fattah; Zakaria M. Abd-Allah

    2014-01-01

    West Beni Suef Concession is located at the western part of Beni Suef Basin which is a relatively under-explored basin and lies about 150 km south of Cairo. The major goal of this study is to evaluate the source rock by using different techniques as Rock-Eval pyrolysis, Vitrinite reflectance (%Ro), and well log data of some Cretaceous sequences including Abu Roash (E, F and G members), Kharita and Betty formations. The BasinMod 1D program is used in this study to construct the burial history ...

  18. Phase equilibria modelling and zircon dating for Precambrian metapelites from Xinghuadukou Group in Lvlin Forest of Erguna Massif, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiulei; Zheng, Changqing; Tajcmanova, Lucie; Zhong, Xin; Xu, Xuechun; Han, Xiaomeng; Wang, Zhaoyuan

    2017-04-01

    Xinghuadukou Group, the basement metamorphic complex of Erguna Massif in NE China, is considered to be Mesoproterozoic with Sm-Nd age of 1157±32 Ma. However, the new zircon data from these metamorphic supracrustal rocks in Lvlin Forest show that they formed in Neoproterozoic with the age of 800 Ma. Old zircon age with 2.5 Ga, 2.0 Ga and 1.8 Ga, indicate that the Erguna Massif had an affinity to both Columbia and Rodinia continents. Furthermore, we also present 500 Ma metamorphic age in micashists and 500 Ma age of adjacent granitoids that might have thermally influenced its surrounding. No detailed studies have been undertaken on the metamorphic evolution of the Xinghuadukou Complex. The typical paragneissic mineral assemblage of garnet sillimanite mica schist is Grt+Sil+Bt+Mus+Qtz±Kfs. (Zhou et al., 2011) proposed that the Xinghuadukou Complex appears to have undergone similar granulite facies metamorphic conditions based on the similarity of mineral assemblages to the Mashan Complex in the Jiamusi Massif, NE China. However, the new phase equilibria modelling result shows that these rocks are high amphibolite facies product with 650℃. We can easily find K-feldspar formed by partial melting due to the consuming of muscovite. Also the remaining muscovite is directly connected with a fluid channel in thin sections which indicate that the remaining muscovite formed from retrograde with the existence of fluid. The zoned garnet has low MgO and high CaO content in rims and high MgO and low CaO content in core. It seems that this garnet has high pressure and low temperature (HP-LT) in rims and low pressure and high temperature (LP-HT) in core which would point to an anti-clockwise metamorphic evolution. Zhou, J.B., Wilde, S.A., Zhang, X.Z., Zhao, G.C., Liu, F.L., Qiao, D.W., Ren, S.M. and Liu, J.H., 2011b. A> 1300km late Pan-African metamorphic belt in NE China: new evidence from the Xing'an block and its tectonic implications. Tectonophysics, 509(3): 280-292.

  19. Rock Paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Julienne Edwards

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the integration of art and academics in a fifth-grade instructional unit on Native American culture. Describes how students studied Native American pictographs, designed their own pictographs, made their own tools, and created rock paintings of their pictographs using these tools. Provides a list of references on Native American…

  20. Ayers Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧茹

    2002-01-01

    Ayers Rock is right in the centre of Australia.It's nearly two thousand kilometres______Sydney.So we flew most of the way.h was rather cloudy______But after we left the mountains behind us, there was hardly a cloud in thesky.

  1. Intellektuaalne rock

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Briti laulja-helilooja ja näitleja Toyah Willcox ning Bill Rieflin ansamblist R.E.M. ja Pat Mastelotto King Krimsonist esinevad koos ansamblitega The Humans ja Tuner 25. okt. Tallinnas Rock Cafés ja 27. okt Tartu Jaani kirikus

  2. Intellektuaalne rock

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Briti laulja-helilooja ja näitleja Toyah Willcox ning Bill Rieflin ansamblist R.E.M. ja Pat Mastelotto King Krimsonist esinevad koos ansamblitega The Humans ja Tuner 25. okt. Tallinnas Rock Cafés ja 27. okt Tartu Jaani kirikus

  3. Cataclastic rheology of carbonate rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiancai; SUN Yan; SHU Liangshu; GU Lianxing; GUO Jichun; ZHU Wenbin

    2005-01-01

    Based on the knowledge of the shallow-level mylonitization of detrital rocks and intrusive rocks, the poorly-known cataclastic rheology of carbonate rocks is discussed comprehensively in this paper. The cases taken from eastern China are analyzed in various aspects including ductile-brittle fault zone, rock texture and structure, clastomylonite layer, leucocratic stress minerals, and frictional dynamometamorphism. It is proposed that the cataclastic flow structure represented by clastomylonite texture is a cooling pattern of flow assemblage characterized by cooling metamorphism, cooling mylonite and cooling stress minerals. Such a pattern is formed generally in mildly reducing physicochemical environments, and is commonly related to regional tectonism and mesothermal and epithermal mineralization.

  4. U-Pb (Zircon Ages of Metavolcanic Rocks From the Itaiacoca Group: Tectonic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Siga Jr.

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this work is to present and discuss the U-Pb ages obtained for zircon grains from metavolcanic rocks of theItaiacoca Group. The Itaiacoca Group is a metavolcano-sedimentary sequence, which occurs as a narrow belt between theCunhaporanga granitic batholith to the northwest and the Itapirapuã shear zone to the south and southwest, which separates thesequence from the Três Córregos granite batholith and metasedimentary rocks of the Açungui Group. Geological studies of thesouthern part of the Itaiacoca belt led to the recognition of three units, represented (from base to top by metawackes with animportant volcanic component, metacarbonate, and metapelitic and metapsammitic rocks. The U-Pb geochronological analyses ofzircon grains from two outcrops of metavolcanic rocks yield ages of 628 ± 18 Ma (SHRIMP and 636 ± 30 Ma (conventional multigrainanalyses. These ages are quite close to the metamorphic event recorded in the Itaiacoca Group (628 – 610 Ma, suggesting ashort interval between the formation of these rocks and closure of the basin. Furthermore, this volcanism is very close to the age offormation of the Três Córregos (630 Ma and Cunhaporanga (590 Ma granitic batholiths, admitted as associated with a probablemagmatic arc. Such an isotopic pattern characterizes a Neoproterozoic tectonic scenario involving volcanism, metamorphism andgranitic plutonism, interpreted here as the final stages in the evolution of the Itaiacoca Basin.

  5. Determination of ejection velocity of rock fragments during rock burst in consideration of damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Yu-jun; LI Xi-bing; ZHOU Zi-long

    2005-01-01

    The ejection velocity of rock fragments during rock burst, one of the important indexes representing the rock burst strength, is used most conveniently in the supporting design of tunnel with rock burst tendency and is often determined by means of observation devices. In order to calculate the average ejection velocity of rock fragments theoretically, the energy of rock burst was divided into damage consuming energy and kinetic energy gained by unit volume of rock firstly, and then the rock burst kinetic proportional coefficient η was brought up which could be determined according to the rock-burst damage energy index WD , at last the expression of the average ejection velocity of rock fragments during rock burst was obtained and one deep level underground tunnel was researched using the mentioned method. The results show that the calculation method is valid with or without considering the tectonic stress of tunnels, and that the method can be a reference for supporting design of deep mining.

  6. Umhlanga Rocks coastal defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, L.; De Jong, B.; Ivanova, M.; Gerritse, A.; Rietberg, D.; Dorrepaal, S.

    2014-01-01

    The eThekwini coastline is a vulnerable coastline subject to chronic erosion and damage due to sea level rise. In 2007 a severe storm caused major physical and economic damage along the coastline, proving the need for action. Umhlanga Rocks is a densely populated premium holiday destination on the

  7. Umhlanga Rocks coastal defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, L.; De Jong, B.; Ivanova, M.; Gerritse, A.; Rietberg, D.; Dorrepaal, S.

    2014-01-01

    The eThekwini coastline is a vulnerable coastline subject to chronic erosion and damage due to sea level rise. In 2007 a severe storm caused major physical and economic damage along the coastline, proving the need for action. Umhlanga Rocks is a densely populated premium holiday destination on the e

  8. Isothermal decompression history in the “Western Granulite” terrain, central Tanzania: Evidence from reaction textures and trapped fluids in metapelites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Holger; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Kröner, Alfred; Muhongo, Sospeter

    2008-06-01

    The Mozambique Belt (MB) of the East Africa Orogen contains large areas of granulite-facies migmatitic gneisses with Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic protolith ages and that were recycled during the Neoproterozoic Pan-African orogeny. The study area is situated along the Great Ruaha River and within the Mikumi National Park in central Tanzania where migmatitic gneisses and mafic to intermediate granulites are interlayered with Neoproterozoic granulite-facies migmatitic metapelites. Mineral textures suggest isothermal decompression, with the peak mineral assemblage comprising Grt-Bt-Ky-Kfs-Pl-Qtz ± Phn ± Ti-Oxide ± melt and amphibolite-facies retrograde assemblage Grt-Bt-Sil-Ms-Kfs-Pl-Qtz ± Fe-Ti-Oxide. The near isothermal retrograde overprint is seen in well-developed formation of pseudomorphs after garnet. The HP granulite-facies assemblages record P- T conditions of 13-14 kbar at 760-800 °C. Retrogression and the release of fluids from crystallizing melts occurred at ˜7 kbar and 650-700 °C. A fluid inclusion study shows three types of fluid inclusion consisting of nearly pure CO 2, as well as H 2O-NaCl and H 2O-CO 2 mixtures. We suggest that a immiscible CO 2-bearing brine represents the fluid composition during high-grade peak metamorphism, and that the fluid inclusions containing H 2O-NaCl or nearly pure CO 2 represent trapped fluids from in situ crystallised melt. The results suggest strong isothermal decompression, which is probably related to a fast exhumation after crustal thickening in the central part of the Mozambique Belt in Tanzania.

  9. FEBEX project: full-scale engineered barriers experiment for a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberid, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Campos, R.; Cuevas, A. M.; Fernandez, E. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    FEBEX has the multiple objective of demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing, handling and constructing the engineered barriers and of developing codes for the thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical performance assessment of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive wastes. These objectives require integrated theoretical and experimental development work. The experimental work consists of three parts: an in situ test, a mock-up test and a series of laboratory tests. The experiments is based on the Spanish reference concept for crystalline rock, in which the waste capsules are placed horizontally in drifts surround by high density compacted bentonite blocks. In the two large-scale tests, the thermal effects of the wastes were simulated by means of heaters; hydration was natural in the in situ test and controlled in the mock-up test. The large-scale tests, with their monitoring systems, have been in operation for more than two years. the demonstration has been achieved in the in situ test and there are great expectation that numerical models sufficiently validated for the near-field performance assessment will be achieved. (Author)

  10. An in-situ stimulation experiment in crystalline rock - assessment of induced seismicity levels during stimulation and related hazard for nearby infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gischig, Valentin; Broccardo, Marco; Amann, Florian; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Esposito, Simona; Krietsch, Hannes; Doetsch, Joseph; Madonna, Claudio; Wiemer, Stefan; Loew, Simon; Giardini, Domenico

    2016-04-01

    A decameter in-situ stimulation experiment is currently being performed at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland by the Swiss Competence Center for Energy Research - Supply of Electricity (SCCER-SoE). The underground research laboratory lies in crystalline rock at a depth of 480 m, and exhibits well-documented geology that is presenting some analogies with the crystalline basement targeted for the exploitation of deep geothermal energy resources in Switzerland. The goal is to perform a series of stimulation experiments spanning from hydraulic fracturing to controlled fault-slip experiments in an experimental volume approximately 30 m in diameter. The experiments will contribute to a better understanding of hydro-mechanical phenomena and induced seismicity associated with high-pressure fluid injections. Comprehensive monitoring during stimulation will include observation of injection rate and pressure, pressure propagation in the reservoir, permeability enhancement, 3D dislocation along the faults, rock mass deformation near the fault zone, as well as micro-seismicity. The experimental volume is surrounded by other in-situ experiments (at 50 to 500 m distance) and by infrastructure of the local hydropower company (at ~100 m to several kilometres distance). Although it is generally agreed among stakeholders related to the experiments that levels of induced seismicity may be low given the small total injection volumes of less than 1 m3, detailed analysis of the potential impact of the stimulation on other experiments and surrounding infrastructure is essential to ensure operational safety. In this contribution, we present a procedure how induced seismic hazard can be estimated for an experimental situation that is untypical for injection-induced seismicity in terms of injection volumes, injection depths and proximity to affected objects. Both, deterministic and probabilistic methods are employed to estimate that maximum possible and the maximum expected induced

  11. Beach rock from Goa Coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Wagle, B.G.

    temperature under the beach and inland. However, the thickness depends upon variabilities of precipitation, hinterland, water table fluctuations, temperature changes, composition and changes in sea level. Since the beach rock is formed in the tidal or spray...

  12. A preliminary assessment of mineralogical criteria on the utility of argillaceous rocks and minerals for high-level radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, O.C.

    1986-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to review available data concerning the properties reported for shales and clay-rich rocks and clay minerals to determine whether such information could be instrumental in selecting the more favorable assemblages of clays for high-level waste repository purposes. Literature searches were conducted for reports dealing with the properties of these argillaceous materials. The properties that were obtained from appropriate references were recorded in an Appleworks Database. The data are divided into five major goups: chemical properties, general physical properties, hydrologic properties, mechanical properties, and thermal properties. The Database includes such information as the type of material, formation name, geological age, location, depth, test conditions, results, and reference(s). In general, noticeable correlations were not apparent when mineralogical information was compared with various properties using plots of the data for each individual property. The best correlations were obtained for chemical and certain mechanical and hydrologic properties. Thermal properties appear to be least influenced by clay mineral composition. An important reason for the inability to correlate mineralogical compositions with most properties was the lack of uniformity of test methods, test conditions, and even the units used for reporting the final data. There was very limited information concerning the mineralogical compositions of most of the shales tested. The potential exists for identifying the more suitable formations (or specific horizons within formations) using mineralogical data; however, in order to make such selections, it will be necessary to collect future data using standardized test methods and conditions. The mineralogical compositions of the samples tested need to be determined quantitatively rather than qualitatively.

  13. Coseismic and aseismic deformations of the rock mass around deep level mining in South Africa - Joint South African and Japanese study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, A. M.; Yabe, Y.; Naoi, M. M.; Nakatani, M.; Durrheim, R. J.; Ogasawara, H.; Scholz, C. H.

    2010-12-01

    Two underground sites in a deep level gold mine in South Africa were instrumented by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) with tilt meters and seismic monitors. One of the sites was also instrumented by JApanese-German Underground Acoustic emission Research in South Africa (JAGUARS) with a small network, approx. 40 m span, of eight Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors. The rate of tilt, defined as quasi-static deformations, and the seismic ground motion, defined as dynamic deformations, were analysed in order to understand the rock mass behavior around deep level mining. In addition the high frequency AE events recorded at hypocentral distances of about 50m were analysed. This was the first implementation of high frequency AE events at such a great depth (3300m below the surface). A good correspondence between the dynamic and quasi-static deformations was found. The rate of coseismic and aseismic tilt, as well as seismicity recorded by the mine seismic network, are approximately constant until the daily blasting time, which takes place from about 19:30 until shortly before 21:00. During the blasting time and the subsequent seismic events the coseismic and aseismic tilt shows a rapid increase indicated by a rapid change of the tilt during the seismic event. Much of the quasi-static deformation, however, occurs independently of the seismic events and was described as ‘slow’ or aseismic events. During the monitoring period a seismic event with MW 1.9 (2.1) occurred in the vicinity of the instrumented site. This event was recorded by both the CSIR integrated monitoring system and JAGUARS acoustic emotion network. The tilt changes associated with this event showed a well pronounced after-tilt. More than 21,000 AE aftershocks were located in the first 150 hours after the main event. Using the distribution of the AE events the position of the fault in the source area was successfully delineated. The distribution of the AE events following the main shock

  14. CERN Rocks

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    The 15th CERN Hardronic Festival took place on 17 July on the terrace of Rest 3 (Prévessin). Over 1000 people, from CERN and other International Organizations, came to enjoy the warm summer night, and to watch the best of the World's High Energy music. Jazz, rock, pop, country, metal, blues, funk and punk blasted out from 9 bands from the CERN Musiclub and Jazz club, alternating on two stages in a non-stop show.  The night reached its hottest point when The Canettes Blues Band got everybody dancing to sixties R&B tunes (pictured). Meanwhile, the bars and food vans were working at full capacity, under the expert management of the CERN Softball club, who were at the same time running a Softball tournament in the adjacent "Higgs Field". The Hardronic Festival is the main yearly CERN music event, and it is organized with the support of the Staff Association and the CERN Administration.

  15. Chemical and boron isotope microanalysis of tourmalines as a guide to fluid-rock interaction in the Habachtal emerald deposit, Tauern Window, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbull, R. B.; Krienitz, M.-S.; Grundmann, G.; Wiedenbeck, M.

    2009-04-01

    Tourmalines from the Habachtal emerald deposit in the Eastern Alps formed together with emerald in a ductile shear zone during blackwall metasomatism between pelitic country rocks and a serpentinite body. Electron microprobe and secondary ion mass spectrometric (SIMS) analyses provide a record of chemical and B-isotope variations in tourmalines which represent an idealized profile from metapelites into the blackwall sequence of biotite and chlorite schists. Tourmaline is intermediate schorl-dravite in the country rock and become increasingly dravitic in the blackwall zones, while F and Cr contents increase and Al drops. Metasomatic tourmaline from blackwall zones is typically zoned optically and chemically, with rim compositions rich in Mg, Ti, Ca and F compared with the cores. The total range in delta-11B values is -13.8 to -5.1 permil and the within-sample variations are typically 3 to 5 permil. Both of these ranges are beyond the reach of closed-system fractionation at the estimated 500-550C conditions of formation, and at least two boron components with contrasting isotopic composition are indicated. A key observation from tourmaline core analyses is a systematic shift in delta-11B from the country rock (-14 to -10 permil) to the inner blackwall zones (-9 to -5 permil). We suggest that two separate fluids were channeled and partially mixed in the Habachtal shear zone during blackwall alteration and tourmaline-emerald mineralization. A regional metamorphic fluid carried isotopically light boron as observed in the metapelite country rocks. The other fluid is derived from the serpentinite association and has isotopically heavier boron typical for MORB or altered oceanic crust.

  16. Tourmaline geochemistry and δ11B variations as a guide to fluid-rock interaction in the Habachtal emerald deposit, Tauern Window, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbull, Robert B.; Krienitz, Marc-Sebastian; Grundmann, Günter; Wiedenbeck, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Tourmalines from the Habachtal emerald deposit in the Eastern Alps formed together with emerald in a ductile shear zone during blackwall metasomatism between pelitic country rocks and a serpentinite body. Electron microprobe and secondary ion mass spectrometric (SIMS) analyses provide a record of chemical and B-isotope variations in tourmalines which represent an idealized profile from metapelites into the blackwall sequence of biotite and chlorite schists. Tourmaline is intermediate schorl-dravite in the country rock and become increasingly dravitic in the blackwall zones, while F and Cr contents increase and Al drops. Metasomatic tourmaline from blackwall zones is typically zoned optically and chemically, with rim compositions rich in Mg, Ti, Ca and F compared with the cores. The total range in δ11B values is -13.8 to -5.1‰ and the within-sample variations are typically 3-5‰. Both of these ranges are beyond the reach of closed-system fractionation at the estimated 500-550°C conditions of formation, and at least two boron components with contrasting isotopic composition are indicated. A key observation from tourmaline core analyses is a systematic shift in δ11B from the country rock (-14 to -10‰) to the inner blackwall zones (-9 to -5‰). We suggest that two separate fluids were channeled and partially mixed in the Habachtal shear zone during blackwall alteration and tourmaline-emerald mineralization. A regional metamorphic fluid carried isotopically light boron as observed in the metapelite country rocks. The other fluid is derived from the serpentinite association and has isotopically heavier boron typical for MORB or altered oceanic crust.

  17. Overexpression of ROCK1 and ROCK2 inhibits human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junbo; He, Xue; Ma, Yueying; Liu, Yanli; Shi, Huaiyin; Guo, Weiwei; Liu, Liangfa

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) over-expression has been implicated in the progression of many tumor types. The aim of this study was to explore the roles of ROCK1 and ROCK2 in human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression levels were examined in 50 cases of human LSCC samples by immunohistochemistry. Effects of ROCK1 and ROCK2 on LSCC cell proliferation and motility were investigated in the presence of the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. The results showed that ROCK1 expression was positively correlated with tumor size and lymph node metastasis (P ROCK2 positively correlated with tumor size (P ROCK2 by Y-27632 significantly inhibits proliferation, migration, and invasion of LSCC cells. Our data indicate that expression of ROCK1 and ROCK2 are closely associated with tumor growth and lymph node metastasis of LSCC. Thus, these two ROCK isoforms may be useful as molecular makers for LSCC diagnosis and may be useful therapeutic targets as well.

  18. Rock mass response to strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events and blasting observed at the surface of the excavations in deep level gold mines in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, Alexander; Durrheim, Ray; Ogasawara, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    The strong ground motion generated by mining induced seismic events was studied to characterize the rock mass response and to estimate the site effect on the surface of the underground excavations. A stand-alone instruments, especially designed for recording strong ground motions, were installed underground at a number of deep level gold mines in South Africa. The instruments were recording data at the surface of the stope hangingwalls. A maximum value of 3 m/s was measured. Therefore data were compared to the data recorded in the solid rock by the mine seismic networks to determine the site response. The site response was defined as the ratio of the peak ground velocity measured at the surface of the excavations to the peak ground velocity inferred from the mine seismic data measured in the solid rocks. The site response measured at all mines studied was found to be 9 ± 3 times larger on average. A number of simulated rockbursts were conducted underground in order to estimate the rock mass response when subjected to extreme ground motion and derive the attenuation factors in near field. The rockbursts were simulated by means of large blasts detonated in solid rock close to the sidewall of a tunnel. The numerical models used in the design of the simulated rockbursts were calibrated by small blasts taking place at each experimental site. A dense array of shock type accelerometers was installed along the blasting wall to monitor the attenuation of the strong ground motion as a function of the distance from the source. The attenuation of the ground motion was found to be proportional to the distance from the source following R^-1.1 & R^-1.7 for compact rock and R^-3.1 & R^-3.4 for more fractured rock close to the surface of the tunnel. In addition the ground motion was compared to the quasi-static deformations taking place around the underground excavations. The quasi-static deformations were measured by means of strain, tilt and closure. A good correspondence

  19. Chronic treatment with Ang-(1-7) reverses abnormal reactivity in the corpus cavernosum and normalizes diabetes-induced changes in the protein levels of ACE, ACE2, ROCK1, ROCK2 and omega-hydroxylase in a rat model of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Mariam H M; Makki, Batoul; El-Hashim, Ahmed Z; Akhtar, Saghir; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] may have beneficial effects in diabetes mellitus-induced erectile dysfunction (DMIED) but its molecular actions in the diabetic corpus cavernosum (CC) are not known. We characterized the effects of diabetes and/or chronic in vivo administration of Ang-(1-7) on vascular reactivity in the rat corpus cavernosum (CC) and on protein expression levels of potential downstream effectors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), ACE2, Rho kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2), and omega-hydroxylase, the cytochrome-P450 enzyme that metabolizes arachidonic acid to form the vasoconstrictor, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Streptozotocin-treated rats were chronicically administered Ang-(1-7) with or without A779, a Mas receptor antagonist, during weeks 4 to 6 of diabetes. Ang-(1-7) reversed diabetes-induced abnormal reactivity to vasoactive agents (endothelin-1, phenylepherine, and carbachol) in the CC without correcting hyperglycemia. Six weeks of diabetes led to elevated ACE, ROCK1, ROCK 2, and omega-hydroxylase and a concomitant decrease in ACE2 protein expression levels that were normalized by Ang-(1-7) treatment but not upon coadministration of A779. These data are supportive of the notion that the beneficial effects of Ang-(1-7) in DMIED involve counterregulation of diabetes-induced changes in ACE, ACE2, Rho kinases, and omega-hydroxylase proteins in the diabetic CC via a Mas receptor-dependent mechanism.

  20. Chronic Treatment with Ang-(1-7 Reverses Abnormal Reactivity in the Corpus Cavernosum and Normalizes Diabetes-Induced Changes in the Protein Levels of ACE, ACE2, ROCK1, ROCK2 and Omega-Hydroxylase in a Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam H. M. Yousif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7] may have beneficial effects in diabetes mellitus-induced erectile dysfunction (DMIED but its molecular actions in the diabetic corpus cavernosum (CC are not known. We characterized the effects of diabetes and/or chronic in vivo administration of Ang-(1-7 on vascular reactivity in the rat corpus cavernosum (CC and on protein expression levels of potential downstream effectors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, ACE2, Rho kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2, and omega-hydroxylase, the cytochrome-P450 enzyme that metabolizes arachidonic acid to form the vasoconstrictor, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Streptozotocin-treated rats were chronicically administered Ang-(1-7 with or without A779, a Mas receptor antagonist, during weeks 4 to 6 of diabetes. Ang-(1-7 reversed diabetes-induced abnormal reactivity to vasoactive agents (endothelin-1, phenylepherine, and carbachol in the CC without correcting hyperglycemia. Six weeks of diabetes led to elevated ACE, ROCK1, ROCK 2, and omega-hydroxylase and a concomitant decrease in ACE2 protein expression levels that were normalized by Ang-(1-7 treatment but not upon coadministration of A779. These data are supportive of the notion that the beneficial effects of Ang-(1-7 in DMIED involve counterregulation of diabetes-induced changes in ACE, ACE2, Rho kinases, and omega-hydroxylase proteins in the diabetic CC via a Mas receptor-dependent mechanism.

  1. Near Field sorption Data Bases for Compacted MX-80 Bentonite for Performance Assessment of a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository in Opalinus Clay Host Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.; Baeyens, B

    2003-08-01

    Bentonites of various types and compacted forms are being investigated in many countries as backfill materials in high-level radioactive waste disposal concepts. Nagra is currently considering an Opalinus clay (OPA) formation in the Zuercher Weinland as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. A compacted MX-80 bentonite is foreseen as a potential backfill material. Performance assessment studies will be performed for this site and one of the requirements for such an assessment are sorption data bases (SDB) for the bentonite near-field. The purpose of this report is to describe the procedures used to develop the SDB. One of the pre-requisites for developing a SDB is a water chemistry for the compacted bentonite porewater. For a number of reasons mentioned in the report, and discussed in more detail elsewhere, this is not a straightforward task. There are considerable uncertainties associated with the major ion concentrations and in particular with the system pH and Eh. The MX-80 SDB was developed for a reference bentonite porewater (pH = 7.25) which was calculated using the reference OPA porewater. In addition, two further SDBs are presented for porewaters calculated at pH values of 6.9 and 7.9 corresponding to lower and upper bound values calculated for the range of groundwater compositions anticipated for the OPA host rock. 'In house' sorption isotherm data were measured for Cs(I), Ni(II), Eu(III), Th(IV), Se(IV) and 1(-1) on the 'as received' MX-80 material equilibrated with a simulated porewater composition. Complementary 'in house' sorption edge and isotherm measurements on conditioned Na/Ca montmorillonites were also available for many of these radionuclides. These data formed the core of the SDB. Nevertheless, some of the required sorption data still had to be obtained from the open literature. An important part of this report is concerned with describing selection procedures and the modifications

  2. Rock bending creep and disturbance effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付志亮; 郑颖人; 刘元雪

    2008-01-01

    The bending creep and its disturbance effects of red sandstone rock beam and oil shale rock beam were studied by adopting the self-developed gravitation level style rock creep test machine and bending creep test system,and the constitutive equations were established.It is found that fracture morphology of rock beams under no disturbance load is regular,cracking position of fractures is on part of loading concentration,the crack starts from a neutral plane.However,fracture morphology of rock beams under disturbance load is irregular,cracking position of fractures deviates from a neutral plane.Delayed instability of rock beam occurs for some time under constant disturbance load.When disturbance load is beyond a certain range,suddenly instability of occurs rock beam in a certain time.The results show that there is a guiding significance for creep stability in the geotechnical engineering fields.

  3. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  4. Tourmaline occurrences within the Penamacor-Monsanto granitic pluton and host-rocks (Central Portugal): genetic implications of crystal-chemical and isotopic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, I. Ribeiro; Mourão, C.; Récio, C.; Guimarães, F.; Antunes, I. M.; Ramos, J. Farinha; Barriga, F. J. A. S.; Palmer, M. R.; Milton, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Tourmalinization associated with peraluminous granitic intrusions in metapelitic host-rocks has been widely recorded in the Iberian Peninsula, given the importance of tourmaline as a tracer of granite magma evolution and potential indicator of Sn-W mineralizations. In the Penamacor-Monsanto granite pluton (Central Eastern Portugal, Central Iberian Zone), tourmaline occurs: (1) as accessory phase in two-mica granitic rocks, muscovite-granites and aplites, (2) in quartz (±mica)-tourmaline rocks (tourmalinites) in several exocontact locations, and (3) as a rare detrital phase in contact zone hornfels and metapelitic host-rocks. Electron microprobe and stable isotope (δ18O, δD, δ11B) data provide clear distinctions between tourmaline populations from these different settings: (a) schorl-oxyschorl tourmalines from granitic rocks have variable foititic component (X□ = 17-57 %) and Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratios (0.19-0.50 in two-mica granitic rocks, and 0.05-0.19 in the more differentiated muscovite-granite and aplites); granitic tourmalines have constant δ18O values (12.1 ± 0.1 ‰), with wider-ranging δD (-78.2 ± 4.7 ‰) and δ11B (-10.7 to -9.0 ‰) values; (b) vein/breccia oxyschorl [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.31-0.44] results from late, B- and Fe-enriched magma-derived fluids and is characterized by δ18O = 12.4 ‰, δD = -29.5 ‰, and δ11B = -9.3 ‰, while replacement tourmalines have more dravitic compositions [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.26-0.64], close to that of detrital tourmaline in the surrounding metapelitic rocks, and yield relatively constant δ18O values (13.1-13.3 ‰), though wider-ranging δD (-58.5 to -36.5 ‰) and δ11B (-10.2 to -8.8 ‰) values; and (c) detrital tourmaline in contact rocks and regional host metasediments is mainly dravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.35-0.78] and oxydravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.51-0.58], respectively. Boron contents of the granitic rocks are low (Monsanto pluton, either as direct tourmaline precipitation in cavities and fractures crossing the

  5. Low- and intermediate level radioactive waste from Risoe, Denmark. Location studies for potential disposal areas. Report no. 2. Characterization of low permeable and fractured sediments and rocks in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravesen, P.; Nilsson, B.; Schack Pedersen, S.A.; Binderup, M.; Laier, T.

    2011-07-01

    The low and intermediate level radioactive waste from Risoe (the nuclear reactor buildings plus different types of material from the research periods) and radioactive waste from hospitals and research institutes have to be stored in a final disposal in Denmark for at least 300 years. In Denmark, many different kinds of fine-grained sediments and crystalline rocks occur from the ground surface down to 300 meters depth. Therefore, the possible geological situations include sediments and rocks of different composition and age. These situations are geographical distributed over large areas of Denmark. These sediments and rocks are shortly described based on existing information and include five different major types of sediments and rocks: 1: Crystalline granite and gneiss of Bornholm (because these rock types are host for waste disposals in many other countries). 2: Sandstone and shale from Bornholm (as these sediments are rela- tively homogeneous although they have fracture permeability). 3: Chalk and limestone (because these sediments may act as low permeable seals, but in most areas they act as groundwater reservoirs). 4: Fine-grained Tertiary clay deposits (as these sediments have a low permeability, are widely distributed and can reach large thicknesses). 5: Quaternary glacial, interglacial and Holocene clay deposits. These sediments are distributed all over Denmark. Following the descriptions of the geologic deposits, the areas below (including several possible locations for waste disposal sites) are selected for further investigation. The Precambrian basement rocks of Bornholm could be host rocks for the disposal. The rock types for further evaluation will be: Hammer Granite, Vang Granite, Roenne Granite, Bornholm gneiss, Paradisbakke Migmatite and Alminding Granite. In the Roskilde Fjord area around Risoe, a combination of Paleocene clays, meltwater clay and clayey till could be interesting. The area is partly included in the OSD area in North Sjaelland but

  6. Geotechnical Descriptions of Rock and Rock Masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    weathering is presented by Dornbusch (1982). 39. Mechanical, or physical, weathering of rock occurs primarily by (a) freeze expansion (or frost wedging...34Engineering Classifica- tion of In-Situ Rock," Technical Report No. AFWL-TR-67-144, Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, N. Mex. Dornbusch , W

  7. Seismic response of rock joints and jointed rock mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, A.; Hsiung, S.M.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1996-06-01

    Long-term stability of emplacement drifts and potential near-field fluid flow resulting from coupled effects are among the concerns for safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). A number of factors can induce drift instability or change the near-field flow patterns. Repetitive seismic loads from earthquakes and thermal loads generated by the decay of emplaced waste are two significant factors. One of two key technical uncertainties (KTU) that can potentially pose a high risk of noncompliance with the performance objectives of 10 CFR Part 60 is the prediction of thermal-mechanical (including repetitive seismic load) effects on stability of emplacement drifts and the engineered barrier system. The second KTU of concern is the prediction of thermal-mechanical-hydrological (including repetitive seismic load) effects on the host rock surrounding the engineered barrier system. The Rock Mechanics research project being conducted at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) is intended to address certain specific technical issues associated with these two KTUs. This research project has two major components: (i) seismic response of rock joints and a jointed rock mass and (ii) coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological (TMH) response of a jointed rock mass surrounding the engineered barrier system (EBS). This final report summarizes the research activities concerned with the repetitive seismic load aspect of both these KTUs.

  8. Thermally induced rock stress increment and rock reinforcement response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakala, M. [KMS Hakala Oy, Nokia (Finland); Stroem, J.; Nujiten, G.; Uotinen, L. [Rockplan, Helsinki (Finland); Siren, T.; Suikkanen, J.

    2014-07-15

    brittle deformation zones is included. The main conclusion is that, despite deep reaching damage potential, in all the load cases studied the currently designed and used reinforcement types and configurations (rock bolts, shotcrete) are capable of handling the dead weight of the damaged rock should this occur, with damage occurring on the shotcrete liner. The long term safety and stability of the repository during its lifetime can be guaranteed by perceiving the reinforcement strategy in two stages. Firstly, by installing the rock reinforcement to sustain the initial stresses and short term increases from the start of deposition with a monitoring programme in place. Secondly, by installing additional reinforcement, if found necessary through monitoring and observation of the underground facilities. In this way, the effect of any time dependent rock stress increase affecting the reinforcement structures can be observed, in addition to creep based damage, thus providing a better level of safety than a single stage design. (orig.)

  9. Repository for high level radioactive wastes in Brazil: the importance of geochemical (Micro thermometric) studies and fluid migration in potential host rocks; Repositorios para rejeitos radioativos de alto nivel (RANR) no Brasil: a importancia de estudos geoquimicos (microtermometricos) e de migracao de fluidos em rochas potenciamente hospedeiras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Francisco Javier; Fuzikawa, Kazuo; Alves, James Vieira; Neves, Jose Marques Correia [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Inclusoes Fluidas e Metalogenese]. E-mail: javier@cdtn.br

    2003-04-15

    A detailed fluid inclusion study of host rocks, is of fundamental importance in the selection of geologically suitable areas for high level nuclear waste repository constructions (HLRW). The LIFM-CDTN is enabled to develop studies that confirm: the presence or not, of corrosive fluid in minerals from host rocks of the repository and the possible presence of micro fractures (and fluid leakage) when these rocks are submitted to high temperatures. These fluid geochemistry studies, with permeability determinations by means of pressurized air injection must be carried out in rocks hosting nuclear waste. Micro fracture determination is of vital importance since many naturally corrosive solutions, present in the mineral rocks, could flow out through these plans affecting the walls of the repository. (author)

  10. My Pet Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  11. My Pet Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  12. Rock History and Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Éric

    2013-01-01

    Two ambitious works written by French-speaking scholars tackle rock music as a research object, from different but complementary perspectives. Both are a definite must-read for anyone interested in the contextualisation of rock music in western popular culture. In Une histoire musicale du rock (i.e. A Musical History of Rock), rock music is approached from the point of view of the people – musicians and industry – behind the music. Christophe Pirenne endeavours to examine that field from a m...

  13. Modeling of petrological and geophysical rock parameters in the Central Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Sandra; Bousquet, Romain; Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Schmidt, Sabine

    2017-04-01

    Intensely studied regions as the Alps allow interdisciplinary approaches for better understanding complex structure of the lithosphere in orogens. For this reason a geophysical 3D-density model of the Eastern Alps has been reworked from the petrological perspective. By modeling the metamorphic density of rocks using the Theriak-Domino software package the influence of temperature, pressure and chemical composition on the density has been analysed. Density-isopleth-plots of orthogneisses, metabasites, ultramafics and metapelites, which are typical rocks of the Tauern Window, have been calculated showing characteristic density trends for each rock type, depending on stable mineralogical phases and changes of reactions influenced by the chemical composition. To further investigation the influence of the chemical composition on rock densities various Zentralgneiss samples were analysed. Chemical compositions of 45 Zentralgneiss samples from literature were used in addition to five reworked and newly measured samples. By the usage of the corresponding thin sections, information on the metamorphic grade, weathering state and water content were gained. For the used temperature and pressure conditions a complex relation between the density and composition was observed, depending mainly on an increasing iron content. Based on the petrological findings a geophysical density model has been reinvestigated using the IGMAS+ software. With respect to the results of the TRANSALP working group and information about the Moho depth, a good correlation between the measured and modeled gravity field was reached in the new petrological 3D-density model. This model has been used to further analyse the impact of the Zentralgneiss unit on the short waves of the modeled gravity field, resulting in a shifting to a lower gravity anomaly of -15 % and +8 % for the calculated maximum and minimum density. In this study we emphasize the importance of multidisciplinary approaches to enable good

  14. Influence Mechanism of Grouting on Mechanical Characteristics of Rock Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jixun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Grouting technology has been widely used in all fields of geotechnical and civil engineering. Prospective engineering objectives including reinforcement of rock mass and groundwater leakage treatment can be achieved by grouting which will change the mechanical parameters of rock mass such as strength, elastic modulus, and coefficient of permeability. In this paper, rock mass is assumed as a composite material consisting of rock particles and random microcracks initially. Since part or all of the cracks will be filled with cement slurry after grouting, rock mass consists of rock particles, grout condensate, and some or no random microcracks after grouting. The damage constitutional law of the mesoscopic element is established based on the theory of mesoscopic damage mechanics. With the heterogeneity of the components of rock mass considered, the variation of mechanical characteristics of rock mass is studied before and after grouting. And the influence mechanism of grouting on rock mass is investigated at mesoscale level.

  15. Principles of rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchaninov, I.A.; Iofis, M.A.; Kasparyan, E.V.

    1979-01-01

    This book presents the principles of rock mechanics in a systematic way, reflecting both the historic development and the contemporary status of theoretical and experimental techniques used for the determination of the properties and stress state of rock masses, calculation of elements of systems for exploitation of useful mineral deposits and the design of mine openings. The subject of rock mechanics is discussed and methods and basic approaches are analyzed. The most widely used methods for determining the properties of rock in specimens and in situ are described. Problems of determining the stress strain state of the rock around mine openings by both experimental and analytic methods are discussed. The primary results of the study of the stress state of rock around main, development and production openings are presented. Problems of the movement of rock due to extraction of minerals are analyzed in detail, as are the conditions and causes of the development of rock bursts and sudden release of rock and gas in both surface and underground mines. Procedures for preventing or localizing rock bursts or sudden outbursts are described. (313 refs.)

  16. A methodology to constrain the parameters of a hydrogeological discrete fracture network model for sparsely fractured crystalline rock, exemplified by data from the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follin, Sven; Hartley, Lee; Rhén, Ingvar; Jackson, Peter; Joyce, Steven; Roberts, David; Swift, Ben

    2014-03-01

    The large-scale geological structure of the crystalline rock at the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, Sweden, has been classified in terms of deformation zones of elevated fracture frequency. The rock between deformation zones was divided into fracture domains according to fracture frequency. A methodology to constrain the geometric and hydraulic parameters that define a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for each fracture domain is presented. The methodology is based on flow logging and down-hole imaging in cored boreholes in combination with DFN realizations, fracture connectivity analysis and pumping test simulations. The simulations suggest that a good match could be obtained for a power law size distribution where the value of the location parameter equals the borehole radius but with different values for the shape parameter, depending on fracture domain and fracture set. Fractures around 10-100 m in size are the ones that typically form the connected network, giving inflows in the simulations. The report also addresses the issue of up-scaling of DFN properties to equivalent continuous porous medium (ECPM) bulk flow properties. Comparisons with double-packer injection tests provide confidence that the derived DFN formulation of detailed flows within individual fractures is also suited to simulating mean bulk flow properties and their spatial variability.

  17. Study of the raw materials used in the manufacture of ceramics in Fran Ali (Oued Laou, Marruecos); Estudio de materiales usados en la fabricacion de las ceramicas de Fran Ali (Oued Laou, Marruecos)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrios Neira, J.; Martin de la Cruz, J. C.; Montealegre Contreras, L.

    2012-11-01

    The thermal behaviour, mineralogy, texture and micro-structure of the original rocks used as raw materials in the manufacture of ceramics of the potter community in Fran Ali (Oued Laou, Tetouan, Morocco) were studied. The original rocks of the alteration deposit are metapelites and altered philites from the Units Malaguide-Gomaride in the Baetic-Rifian mountain system. The techniques used by local potters and the water used to prepare the ceramic bodies were also studied. Original rocks are metapelites or filadios and raw materials belong to levels caused by exogenous or supergene alteration (quartz-illite and chlorite type clays). The ceramics studied by microscopy exhibit anisotropy. (Author) 15 refs.

  18. ROCK inhibition prevents early mouse embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xing; Chen, Kun-Lin; Zhang, Yu; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-08-01

    ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector that is important for actin assembly and is involved in various cellular functions, including cell contraction, migration, motility, and tumor cell invasion. In this study, we investigated ROCK expression and function during early mouse embryo development. Inhibiting ROCK by Y-27632 treatment at the zygote stage resulted in first cleavage failure, and most embryos failed to develop to the 8-cell stage. When adding Y-27632 at the 8-cell stage, embryos failed to undergo compaction and could not develop into blastocysts. In addition, fluorescence staining intensity analysis indicated that actin expression at blastomere membranes was significantly reduced. After ROCK inhibition, two or more nuclei were observed in a cell, which indicated possible cytokinesis failure. Moreover, after ROCK inhibition with Y-27632, the phosphorylation levels of LIMK1/2, a downstream molecule of ROCK, were decreased at blastomere membranes. Thus, our results showed conserved roles for ROCK in this mammalian embryo model and indicated that a ROCK-LIMK1/2-actin pathway might regulate cleavage and blastocyst formation during early mouse embryo development.

  19. Níveis de radioatividade natural decorrente do radônio no complexo rochoso da Serra de São Vicente, SP Levels of natural radon-radioactivity in the São Vicente, SP, rock massif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Lima Marques

    2006-06-01

    ground waters; between 68 and 610 Bq/m³ in dwellings; from 0.41 to 3.46 kBq/m³ in soils and from 0.72 to 5.85 kBq/m³ inside rock cavities of the São Vicente rock massif. CONCLUSION: In some dwellings and in most of ground water samples, the radon concentration values found in this study have exceeded the maximum levels proposed by international agencies. Thus, intervention actions are recommended for radon dissipation in dwellings and during consumption water collection.

  20. Soft rocks in Argentina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giambastiani; Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Soft rocks are a still fairly unexplored chapter in rock mechanics. Within this category are the clastic sedimentary rocks and pyroclastic volcanic rocks, of low to moderate lithification (consolidation, cemen-tation, new formed minerals), chemical sedimentary rocks and metamorphic rocks formed by minerals with Mohs hardness less than 3.5, such as limestone, gypsum, halite, sylvite, between the first and phyllites, graphitic schist, chloritic shale, talc, etc., among the latter. They also include any type of rock that suffered alteration processes (hydrothermal or weathering). In Argentina the study of low-strength rocks has not received much attention despite having extensive outcrops in the Andes and great impact in the design criteria. Correlation between geomechanical properties (UCS, deformability) to physical index (porosity, density, etc.) has shown promising results to be better studied. There are many studies and engineering projects in Argentina in soft rock geological environments, some cited in the text (Chihuído dam, N. Kirchner dam, J. Cepernic Dam, etc.) and others such as International Tunnel in the Province of Mendoza (Corredor Bioceánico), which will require the valuable contribution from rock mechanics. The lack of consistency between some of the physical and mechanical parameters explored from studies in the country may be due to an insufficient amount of information and/or non-standardization of criteria for testing materials. It is understood that more and better academic and professional efforts in improv-ing techniques will result in benefits to the better understanding of the geomechanics of weak rocks.

  1. Isobaric heating and cooling path of the lower crust of a Variscan exotic unit: evidences from P -T estimates in NW Iberian metapelitic granulites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alampi, A.; Gomez Barreiro, J.; Alvarez Valero, A.; Castiñeiras, P.

    2012-12-01

    Allochthonous complexes (AC) in NW Iberia consist of a pile of exotic units characterized by distinct tectonothermal evolution and lithological association, and separated from each other by tectonic contacts, either thrust or extensional detachments. In the Órdenes AC, three groups of units are recognized from bottom to top in the pile: Basal, Ophiolitic and Upper units. Upper units comprise an ensemble of arc-related rocks with a lower section that underwent a high-P and high-T (HP-HT) evolution, and an upper section with an intermediate - pressure (IP) evolution. Extensional detachments have been commonly identifying at the boundary between HP-HT and IP Upper units, like the Fornás and Corredoiras detachments. Pelitic granulites from one IP upper unit, the O Pino unit, have been investigated. Petrologic studies reveal an isobaric tectono-metamorphic crustal evolution throughout a multidisciplinary integration of: (i) detailed microstructural analysis; (ii) EMP mineral chemistry; (iii) mass-balance of the key and representative chemical reactions observed in the microstructures and subsequent interpretation of the reaction sequence; (iv) P-T estimates and paths from phase diagram modeling. Results in the NCKFMASHT system describe an isobaric (c. 7 kbar) continuous heating (and later cooling) evolution ranging from c. 620 to 680 C crossing into the melt-bearing stability fields. These achieved anatectic conditions are evidenced by the presence of both leucosomes (quartz, plagioclase and muscovite) and glass inclusions, mainly in local garnet cores through the dehydration/melting reactions of muscovite first and biotite later. Chemically distinct generations of garnet and plagioclase are evident and stoichiometrically balance each other in continuous reactions. They are consistent with the observations of both a garnet overgrowth and large patches of plagioclase which host euhedral, smaller garnets. In the cooling episode, the newly-grown garnet reacted with melt

  2. Low- and intermediate level radioactive waste from Risoe, Denmark. Location studies for potential disposal areas. Report no. 2. Characterization of low permeable and fractured sediments and rocks in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravesen, P.; Nilsson, B.; Schack Pedersen, S.A.; Binderup, M.; Laier, T.

    2011-07-01

    The low and intermediate level radioactive waste from Risoe (the nuclear reactor buildings plus different types of material from the research periods) and radioactive waste from hospitals and research institutes have to be stored in a final disposal in Denmark for at least 300 years. In Denmark, many different kinds of fine-grained sediments and crystalline rocks occur from the ground surface down to 300 meters depth. Therefore, the possible geological situations include sediments and rocks of different composition and age. These situations are geographical distributed over large areas of Denmark. These sediments and rocks are shortly described based on existing information and include five different major types of sediments and rocks: 1: Crystalline granite and gneiss of Bornholm (because these rock types are host for waste disposals in many other countries). 2: Sandstone and shale from Bornholm (as these sediments are rela- tively homogeneous although they have fracture permeability). 3: Chalk and limestone (because these sediments may act as low permeable seals, but in most areas they act as groundwater reservoirs). 4: Fine-grained Tertiary clay deposits (as these sediments have a low permeability, are widely distributed and can reach large thicknesses). 5: Quaternary glacial, interglacial and Holocene clay deposits. These sediments are distributed all over Denmark. Following the descriptions of the geologic deposits, the areas below (including several possible locations for waste disposal sites) are selected for further investigation. The Precambrian basement rocks of Bornholm could be host rocks for the disposal. The rock types for further evaluation will be: Hammer Granite, Vang Granite, Roenne Granite, Bornholm gneiss, Paradisbakke Migmatite and Alminding Granite. In the Roskilde Fjord area around Risoe, a combination of Paleocene clays, meltwater clay and clayey till could be interesting. The area is partly included in the OSD area in North Sjaelland but

  3. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  4. Rock Cycle Roulette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stan M.; Palmer, Courtney

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an activity on the rock cycle. Sets 11 stages representing the transitions of an earth material in the rock cycle. Builds six-sided die for each station, and students move to the stations depending on the rolling side of the die. Evaluates students by discussing several questions in the classroom. Provides instructional information for…

  5. Tracer tomography (in) rocks!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Jimenez Parras, Santos; Bayer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Physical behavior of fractured aquifers is rigorously controlled by the presence of interconnected conductive fractures, as they represent the main pathways for flow and transport. Ideally, they are simulated as a discrete fracture network (DFN) in a model to capture the role of fracture system geometry, i.e. fracture length, height, and width (aperture/transmissivity). Such network may be constrained by prior geological information or direct data resources such as field mapping, borehole logging and geophysics. With the many geometric features, however, calibration of a DFN to measured data is challenging. This is especially the case when spatial properties of a fracture network need to be calibrated to flow and transport data. One way to increase the insight in a fractured rock is by combining the information from multiple field tests. In this study, a tomographic configuration that combines multiple tracer tests is suggested. These tests are conducted from a borehole with different injection levels that act as sources. In a downgradient borehole, the tracer is recorded at different levels or receivers, in order to maximize insight in the spatial heterogeneity of the rock. As tracer here we chose heat, and temperature breakthrough curves are recorded. The recorded tracer data is inverted using a novel stochastic trans-dimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure. An initial DFN solution is generated and sequentially modified given available geological information, such as expected fracture density, orientation, length distribution, spacing and persistency. During this sequential modification, the DFN evolves in a trans-dimensional inversion space through adding and/or deleting fracture segments. This stochastic inversion algorithm requires a large number of thousands of model runs to converge, and thus using a fast and robust forward model is essential to keep the calculation efficient. To reach this goal, an upwind coupled finite difference method is employed

  6. PETROGENESIS OF THE METACARBONATE AND RELATED ROCKS OF THE SILGARÁ FORMATION, CENTRAL SANTANDER MASSIF, COLOMBIAN ANDES: AN OVERVIEW OF A “REACTION CALCIC EXOSCARN”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellanos O.M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Metacarbonate rocks (pure and impure marbles, carbonate-silicate rocks, calc-silicate rocks and carbonate-bearing silicate rocks form a very complex group within the metamorphic sequence of the Silgará Formation at the central Santander Massif (CSM. These rocks are interpreted as derived from a sedimentary sequence (including limestones and dolostones, carbonate-bearing mudstones,  sandstones, tuffaceous and evaporitic sediments and marlstones overprinted by near-isochemical regional metamorphism. They usually appear as scarce intercalations from millimeter up to meter scale, within the high-grade pelitic rocks, in the lower part of the metamorphic section, although the proportion of metacarbonate rocks can be higher and different marble layers are exploited. We report for the first time the occurrence of a "reaction calcic exoskarn", which corresponds to
    such metacarbonate rocks, taking into account that a skarn can be developed during regional metamorphism and by different metasomatic processes, adjacent to intrusive bodies, along faults and shear zones, and what defines these rocks as a skarn is its mineralogy, which includes a variety of calc-silicate and associated minerals, usually dominated by garnet and pyroxene. Therefore, this paper focus attention to the occurrence of metacarbonate and
    related rocks, which occurs as small scale reactions zones that show a gradational contact from garnet-bearing pelitic rocks to marbles or carbonate-silicate rocks, giving particular interest to the calc-silicate rocks, which are characterized by the presence of elongated grains of banded clinopyroxene (diopside and scapolite and massive
    or scattered garnet. Several reaction-zones occur in the contact between impure calcite marble and garnet-bearing metapelite and the sequence of mineral assemblages in these reaction zones is: biotite + plagioclase K-feldspar garnet (Zone I, biotite + plagioclase K-feldspar garnet staurolite epidote

  7. MicroRNA-144 suppresses osteosarcoma growth and metastasis by targeting ROCK1 and ROCK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Xin; Wei, Min

    2015-04-30

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary tumor of bone. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenously expressed small non-coding RNAs that are strongly implicated in cancerous processes. However, our current understanding of the biological role of miRNAs in OS remains incomplete. In the present study, miR-144 was markedly downregulated in OS cell lines and clinical specimens. Low-level expression of miR-144 was significantly associated with distant metastasis and poor prognosis. Functional studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of miR-144 suppresses tumor cell proliferation and metastasis in vitro as well as in vivo. Furthermore, we identified Rho-associated kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2) as direct targets for miR-144 binding, resulting in suppression of their expression. Exogenous expression of ROCK1 or ROCK2 in 143B-miR-144 cells partially restored miR-144-inhibited cell proliferation and invasion. In clinical OS specimens, ROCK1 and ROCK2 levels were elevated, relative to that in paired normal bone tissues, and inversely correlated with miR-144 expression. Taken together, miR-144 suppresses OS progression by directly downregulating ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression, and may be a promising therapeutic target for OS.

  8. Kimberley rock art dating project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, G.L. [Takarakka Rock Art Research Centre, NT, (Australia); Morwood, M. [New England University, Armidale, NSW, (Australia). Dept of Archaeology and Palaeoanthropology

    1997-12-31

    The art`s additional value, unequalled by traditionally recognised artefacts, is its permanent pictorial documentation presenting a `window` into the otherwise intangible elements of perceptions, vision and mind of pre-historic cultures. Unfortunately it`s potential in establishing Kimberley archaeological `big picture` still remains largely unrecognised. Some of findings of the Kimberley Rock Art Dating Project, using AMS and optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating techniques, are outlined. It is estimated that these findings will encourage involvement by a greater diversity of specialist disciplines to tie findings into levels of this art sequence as a primary reference point. The sequence represents a sound basis for selecting specific defined images for targeting detailed studies by a range of dating technique. This effectively removes the undesirable ad hoc sampling of `apparently old paintings`; a process which must unavoidably remain the case with researchers working on most global bodies of rock art.

  9. CRITERIA FOR ROCK ENGINEERING FAILURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUDeren; ZHANGYuzhuo

    1995-01-01

    A great number of underground rock projects are maintained in the rock mass which is subject to rock damage and failure development. In many cases, the rock. engineering is still under normal working conditions even though rock is already fails to some extent. This paper introduces two different concepts: rock failure and rock engineering failure. Rock failure is defined as a mechanical state under which an applicable characteristic is changed or lost.However, the rock engineering failure is an engineering state under which an applicable function is changed or lost. The failure of surrounding rocks is the major reason of rock engineering failure. The criterion of rock engineering failure depends on the limit of applicable functions. The rock engineering failure state possesses a corresponding point in rock failure state. In this paper, a description of rock engineering failure criterion is given by simply using a mechanical equation or expression. It is expected that the study of rock engineering failure criterion will be an optimal approach that combines research of rock mechanics with rock engineering problems.

  10. Rock shelter occupation during isotopic stage 5: level D of the site of Payre (Ardèche, France. Territorial organisation and intra-site activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncel, Marie-Hélène

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results obtained from an interdisciplinary study of the level D archaeological assemblages from Payre (Ardèche, France. This site is dated to the final of OIS 6 and the beginning of OIS 5. The combined analysis of the lithic and faunal assemblages accumulated and their management “into” and “out of” the site gives a better understanding of the behaviour of the Neanderthal groups that inhabited it. This study has allowed us to correlate the territorial exploitation for game hunting and for raw material procurement, within the context of seasonal short term occupations probably during the end of autumn and the beginning of winter.  

    Este artículo presenta los resultados obtenidos a través del estudio multidisciplinar del registro arqueológico del nivel D del yacimiento de Payre (Ardèche, Francia datado entre el final del OIS 6 y el comienzo del OIS 5. El análisis conjunto de la industria lítica y de los restos óseos recuperados en el yacimiento y de la gestión de dichos recursos dentro y fuera de él, ha hecho posible la comprensión de los comportamientos humanos de los grupos neandertales que lo ocuparon. Dicho estudio nos ha permitido poner en relación el tipo de explotación del territorio de caza y de captación de materias primas, dentro del marco de ocupaciones estacionales de corta duración desarrolladas probablemente entre el final del otoño y el principio del invierno.  

  11. Days of Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN

    2004-01-01

    FROM last October 1 st to 3rd, at the foot of Fragrant Hill, a suburban Beijing resort famous for its flaming maple leaves in autumn, more than 20,000 rock fans indulged themselves in music for three days.

  12. Writing Rock Music Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donal

    1980-01-01

    Suggests ways student reviewers of rock music groups can write better reviews. Among the suggestions made are that reviewers occasionally discuss the audience or what makes a particular group unique, support general comment with detail, and avoid ecstatic adjectives. (TJ)

  13. Rock kinoekraanil / Katrin Rajasaare

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rajasaare, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    7.-11. juulini kinos Sõprus toimuval filminädalal "Rock On Screen" ekraanile jõudvatest rockmuusikuid portreteerivatest filmidest "Lou Reed's Berlin", "The Future Is Unwritten: Joe Strummer", "Control: Joy Division", "Hurriganes", "Shlaager"

  14. Art on Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    With sprawling deserts and serene lakes, the natural wonders of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region have never failed totake the breath away from visitors. The areahas another major attraction, though: the Helan Mountain rock engravings.

  15. Rock kinoekraanil / Katrin Rajasaare

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rajasaare, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    7.-11. juulini kinos Sõprus toimuval filminädalal "Rock On Screen" ekraanile jõudvatest rockmuusikuid portreteerivatest filmidest "Lou Reed's Berlin", "The Future Is Unwritten: Joe Strummer", "Control: Joy Division", "Hurriganes", "Shlaager"

  16. Pop & rock / Berk Vaher

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaher, Berk, 1975-

    2001-01-01

    Uute heliplaatide Redman "Malpractice", Brian Eno & Peter Schwalm "Popstars", Clawfinger "A Whole Lot of Nothing", Dario G "In Full Color", MLTR e. Michael Learns To Rock "Blue Night" lühitutvustused

  17. Pop & rock / Berk Vaher

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaher, Berk, 1975-

    2001-01-01

    Uute heliplaatide Redman "Malpractice", Brian Eno & Peter Schwalm "Popstars", Clawfinger "A Whole Lot of Nothing", Dario G "In Full Color", MLTR e. Michael Learns To Rock "Blue Night" lühitutvustused

  18. Art on Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU YUE

    2010-01-01

    @@ With sprawling deserts and serene lakes, the natural wonders of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region have never failed to take the breath away from visitors. The area has another major attraction, though: the Helan Mountain rock engravings.

  19. Rock avalanches on glaciers

    OpenAIRE

    Shugar, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This thesis examines relations between rock avalanches and the glaciers on which they are deposited. I have attempted to understand a geophysical phenomenon from two viewpoints: sedimentology and glaciology. The contributions are both methodological, and practical. I have used a GIS to quantify debris sheet geomorphology. A thorough characterization of rock avalanche debris is a necessary step in understanding the flow mechanics of large landslide. I have also developed a technique for solvin...

  20. Weathering of rock 'Ginger'

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    One of the more unusual rocks at the site is Ginger, located southeast of the lander. Parts of it have the reddest color of any material in view, whereas its rounded lobes are gray and relatively unweathered. These color differences are brought out in the inset, enhanced at the upper right. In the false color image at the lower right, the shape of the visible-wavelength spectrum (related to the abundance of weathered ferric iron minerals) is indicated by the hue of the rocks. Blue indicates relatively unweathered rocks. Typical soils and drift, which are heavily weathered, are shown in green and flesh tones. The very red color in the creases in the rock surface correspond to a crust of ferric minerals. The origin of the rock is uncertain; the ferric crust may have grown underneath the rock, or it may cement pebbles together into a conglomerate. Ginger will be a target of future super-resolution studies to better constrain its origin.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  1. Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riaz, M.

    1977-12-01

    The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

  2. Cecal bacterial communities in wild Japanese rock ptarmigans and captive Svalbard rock ptarmigans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushida, Kazunari; Segawa, Takahiro; Tsuchida, Sayaka; Murata, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Preservation of indigenous gastrointestinal microbiota is deemed to be critical for successful captive breeding of endangered wild animals, yet its biology is poorly understood. Here, we investigated cecal bacterial communities in wild Japanese rock ptarmigans (Lagopus muta japonica) and compared them with those in Svalbard rock ptarmigans (L. m. hyperborea) in captivity. Ultra-deep sequencing of 16S rRNA gene indicated that the community structure of cecal microbiota in wild rock ptarmigans was remarkably different from that in captive Svalbard rock ptarmigans. Fundamental differences between bacterial communities in the two groups of birds were detected at the phylum level. Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Synergistetes were the major phyla detected in wild Japanese rock ptarmigans, whereas Firmicutes alone occupied more than 80% of abundance in captive Svalbard rock ptarmigans. Furthermore, unclassified genera of Coriobacteriaceae, Synergistaceae, Bacteroidaceae, Actinomycetaceae, Veillonellaceae and Clostridiales were the major taxa detected in wild individuals, whereas in zoo-reared birds, major genera were Ruminococcus, Blautia, Faecalibacterium and Akkermansia. Zoo-reared birds seemed to lack almost all rock ptarmigan-specific bacteria in their intestine, which may explain the relatively high rate of pathogenic infections affecting them. We show evidence that preservation and reconstitution of indigenous cecal microflora are critical for successful ex situ conservation and future re-introduction plan for the Japanese rock ptarmigan.

  3. Location-Related Differences in Weathering Behaviors and Populations of Culturable Rock-Weathering Bacteria Along a Hillside of a Rock Mountain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Rongrong; He, Linyan; Sheng, Xiafang

    2016-12-21

    Bacteria play important roles in rock weathering, elemental cycling, and soil formation. However, little is known about the weathering potential and population of bacteria inhabiting surfaces of rocks. In this study, we isolated bacteria from the top, middle, and bottom rock samples along a hillside of a rock (trachyte) mountain as well as adjacent soils and characterized rock-weathering behaviors and populations of the bacteria. Per gram of rock or surface soil, 10(6)-10(7) colony forming units were obtained and total 192 bacteria were isolated. Laboratory rock dissolution experiments indicated that the proportions of the highly effective Fe (ranging from 67 to 92 %), Al (ranging from 40 to 48 %), and Cu (ranging from 54 to 81 %) solubilizers were significantly higher in the top rock and soil samples, while the proportion of the highly effective Si (56 %) solubilizers was significantly higher in the middle rock samples. Furthermore, 78, 96, and 6 % of bacteria from the top rocks, soils, and middle rocks, respectively, significantly acidified the culture medium (pH rock dissolution process. Most rock-weathering bacteria (79 %) from the rocks were different to those from the soils and most of them (species level) have not been previously reported. Furthermore, location-specific rock-weathering bacterial populations were found and Bacillus species were the most (66 %) frequently isolated rock-weathering bacteria in the rocks based on cultivation methods. Notably, the top rocks and soils had the highest and lowest diversity of rock-weathering bacterial populations, respectively. The results suggested location-related differences in element (Si, Al, Fe, and Cu) releasing effectiveness and communities of rock-weathering bacteria along the hillside of the rock mountain.

  4. A rock-/ice mechanical model for the destabilisation of permafrost rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautblatter, Michael; Funk, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    properties of identical sand-blasted surfaces between +5° and -7°C. Normal stress was set to a level that equals 4 m rock overburden and promotes the shearing of the asperities on the fracture surface. First results show that the friction decreases by a mean value of approximately 30 % subsequent to thawing (even after enhanced fracture smoothing due to repeated shearing experiments). Here we show, that thawing-related changes in rock-mechanical properties may dominate early stages of the destabilisation of larger thawing permafrost rocks irrespective of the presence of ice in the system. The models imply that only after the deformation accelerates to a certain velocity level (where significant strain is applied to ice-filled discontinuities) ice-mechanical properties outbalance the importance of rock-mechanical components. We present two quantitative models that relate the destabilisation of thawing permafrost rocks to temperature-related effects on rock- and ice-mechanics.

  5. Digital carbonate rock physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Erik H.; Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim; Uribe, David; Osorno, Maria; Duda, Mandy; Steeb, Holger

    2016-08-01

    Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions in the µm range for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study which we complement with nanoindentation experiments (for local elastic properties). In a first step a non-local mean filter is applied to the raw image data. We then apply different thresholds to identify pores and solid phases. Because of a non-neglectable amount of unresolved microporosity (micritic phase) we also define intermediate threshold values for distinct phases. Based on this segmentation we determine porosity-dependent values for effective P- and S-wave velocities as well as for the intrinsic permeability. For effective velocities we confirm an observed two-phase trend reported in another study using a different carbonate data set. As an upscaling approach we use this two-phase trend as an effective medium approach to estimate the porosity-dependent elastic properties of the micritic phase for the low-resolution images. The porosity measured in the laboratory is then used to predict the effective rock properties from the observed trends for a comparison with experimental data. The two-phase trend can be regarded as an upper bound for elastic properties; the use of the two-phase trend for low-resolution images led to a good estimate for a lower bound of effective elastic properties. Anisotropy is observed for some of the considered subvolumes, but seems to be insignificant for the analysed rocks at the DRP scale. Because of the complexity of carbonates we suggest using DRP as a complementary tool for rock characterization in addition to classical experimental methods.

  6. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  7. Generalized Models for Rock Joint Surface Shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigui Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized models of joint surface shapes are the foundation for mechanism studies on the mechanical effects of rock joint surface shapes. Based on extensive field investigations of rock joint surface shapes, generalized models for three level shapes named macroscopic outline, surface undulating shape, and microcosmic roughness were established through statistical analyses of 20,078 rock joint surface profiles. The relative amplitude of profile curves was used as a borderline for the division of different level shapes. The study results show that the macroscopic outline has three basic features such as planar, arc-shaped, and stepped; the surface undulating shape has three basic features such as planar, undulating, and stepped; and the microcosmic roughness has two basic features such as smooth and rough.

  8. The determination of maturity levels in source rocks of the La Luna Formation, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela, based on convention geochemical parameters and asphaltenes; Determinacao do grau de maturacao em rochas geradoras de petroleo, formacao La Luna, Bacia de Maracaibo, Venezuela: parametros geoquimicos convencionais e asfaltenos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, L.P. de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Centro de Excelencia em Pesquisas sobre o Armazenamento de Carbono; Franco, N. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia; Lopez, L.; Lo Monaco, S.; Escobar, G. [Universidad Central de Venezuela (UCV), Caracas (Venezuela); Kalkreuth, W. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Centro de Excelencia em Analises de Carvao e Rochas Geradoras de Petroleo

    2008-07-01

    The La Luna Formation, main source rock of the Maracaibo Basin was studied by conventional geochemical parameters, used to determine the maturity, and they were compared with the physic-chemical and molecular properties of the asphaltenes present in the bitumen of the rocks. Three wells were studied (A, B and C) with a total of 13 samples. Based on Rock-Eval results the organic matter in well A (455 deg C Tmax) shows a relatively high level of maturation (top of the oil window), whereas the organic matter in well B (435 - 436 deg C Tmax) is in the beginning of the oil window. Tmax values in well C (438 - 446 deg C) and well C suggest an intermediate maturity level. The biomarkers identified in well B and C show ratios indicating an equilibrium state in the maturity level. A good correlation was found comparing the conventional analytical data with the determination of maturity level obtained from the asphaltenes precipitated from the bitumen of the samples. With increased maturity levels the H1 NMR analysis showed enrichment in aromatic molecules in relation to aliphatic, due to the bitumen aromatization process. Similarly, the asphaltenes molecular weight has higher values in samples characterized by elevated maturity levels. This confirms earlier studies that showed that asphaltenes may be utilized as maturity parameter of organic matter. (author)

  9. Bioremediation in Fractured Rock: 2. Mobilization of Chloroethene Compounds from the Rock Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Allen M; Tiedeman, Claire R; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E; Goode, Daniel J; Hsieh, Paul A; Lacombe, Pierre J; DeFlaun, Mary F; Drew, Scott R; Curtis, Gary P

    2017-09-05

    A mass balance is formulated to evaluate the mobilization of chlorinated ethene compounds (CE) from the rock matrix of a fractured mudstone aquifer under pre- and postbioremediation conditions. The analysis relies on a sparse number of monitoring locations and is constrained by a detailed description of the groundwater flow regime. Groundwater flow modeling developed under the site characterization identified groundwater fluxes to formulate the CE mass balance in the rock volume exposed to the injected remediation amendments. Differences in the CE fluxes into and out of the rock volume identify the total CE mobilized from diffusion, desorption, and nonaqueous phase liquid dissolution under pre- and postinjection conditions. The initial CE mass in the rock matrix prior to remediation is estimated using analyses of CE in rock core. The CE mass mobilized per year under preinjection conditions is small relative to the total CE mass in the rock, indicating that current pump-and-treat and natural attenuation conditions are likely to require hundreds of years to achieve groundwater concentrations that meet regulatory guidelines. The postinjection CE mobilization rate increased by approximately an order of magnitude over the 5 years of monitoring after the amendment injection. This rate is likely to decrease and additional remediation applications over several decades would still be needed to reduce CE mass in the rock matrix to levels where groundwater concentrations in fractures achieve regulatory standards. © 2017, National Ground Water Association.

  10. Teaching the Rock Cycle with Ease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereki, Debra

    2000-01-01

    Describes a hands-on lesson for teaching high school students the concept of the rock cycle using sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks. Students use a rock cycle diagram to identify pairs of rocks. From the rock cycle, students explain on paper how their first rock became the second rock and vice versa. (PVD)

  11. Microcraters on lunar rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D. A.; Mckay, D. S.; Heiken, G. H.; Moore, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    Microcrater frequency distributions have been obtained for nine Apollo rocks and an exterior chip of an Apollo 12 rock. The frequency distributions indicate that five of the Apollo 14 rocks were tumbled more than once exposing different rock faces whereas four were not tumbled and represent a single exposure interval. The cumulative frequency of craters per square centimeter was extended below optical resolution limits using a SEM scan of an exterior chip of breccia 12073. No craters with central pit diameters less than 15 microns were seen in a total area of 0.44 sq cm. A detailed SEM scan of crystal faces and glassy crater liners revealed no microcraters equal to or larger than the resolution limit of 5 microns. An upper limit of 170 craters per sq cm with central pit diameters larger than 5 microns was set. The slope of the cumulative frequency curve for craters with central pit diameters less than about 75 microns is less than that obtained by other workers.

  12. Rock-hard coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft jet engines have to be able to withstand infernal conditions. Extreme heat and bitter cold tax coatings to the limit. Materials expert Dr Ir. Wim Sloof fits atoms together to develop rock-hard coatings. The latest invention in this field is known as ceramic matrix composites. Sloof has sign

  13. Slippery Rock University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnhold, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Slippery Rock University (SRU), located in western Pennsylvania, is one of 14 state-owned institutions of higher education in Pennsylvania. The university has a rich tradition of providing professional preparation programs in special education, therapeutic recreation, physical education, and physical therapy for individuals with disabilities.…

  14. Range sections as rock models for intensity rock scene segmentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mkwelo, S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents another approach to segmenting a scene of rocks on a conveyor belt for the purposes of measuring rock size. Rock size estimation instruments are used to monitor, optimize and control milling and crushing in the mining industry...

  15. New insights into the history and origin of the southern Maya block, SE Mexico: U-Pb-SHRIMP zircon geochronology from metamorphic rocks of the Chiapas massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bodo; Iriondo, Alexander; Premo, Wayne R.; Hecht, Lutz; Schaaf, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The histories of the pre-Mesozoic landmasses in southern México and their connections with Laurentia, Gondwana, and among themselves are crucial for the understanding of the Late Paleozoic assembly of Pangea. The Permian igneous and metamorphic rocks from the Chiapas massif as part of the southern Maya block, México, were dated by U–Pb zircon geochronology employing the SHRIMP (sensitive high resolution ion microprobe) facility at Stanford University. The Chiapas massif is composed of deformed granitoids and orthogneisses with inliers of metasedimentary rocks. SHRIMP data from an anatectic orthogneiss demonstrate that the Chiapas massif was part of a Permian (∼ 272 Ma) active continental margin established on the Pacific margin of Gondwana after the Ouachita orogeny. Latest Permian (252–254 Ma) medium- to high-grade metamorphism and deformation affected the entire Chiapas massif, resulting in anatexis and intrusion of syntectonic granitoids. This unique orogenic event is interpreted as the result of compression due to flat subduction and accretionary tectonics. SHRIMP data of zircon cores from a metapelite from the NE Chiapas massif yielded a single Grenvillian source for sediments. The majority of the zircon cores from a para-amphibolite from the SE part of the massif yielded either 1.0–1.2 or 1.4–1.5 Ga sources, indicating provenance from South American Sunsás and Rondonian-San Ignacio provinces.

  16. Rock and mineral magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    O’Reilly, W

    1984-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a revolution in the earth sciences. The quantitative, instrument-based measurements and physical models of. geophysics, together with advances in technology, have radically transformed the way in which the Earth, and especially its crust, is described. The study of the magnetism of the rocks of the Earth's crust has played a major part in this transformation. Rocks, or more specifically their constituent magnetic minerals, can be regarded as a measuring instrument provided by nature, which can be employed in the service of the earth sciences. Thus magnetic minerals are a recording magnetometer; a goniometer or protractor, recording the directions of flows, fields and forces; a clock; a recording thermometer; a position recorder; astrain gauge; an instrument for geo­ logical surveying; a tracer in climatology and hydrology; a tool in petrology. No instrument is linear, or free from noise and systematic errors, and the performance of nature's instrument must be assessed and ...

  17. Pitted Rock Named Ender

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This image was taken by the Sojourner rover's right front camera on Sol 33. The rock in the foreground, nicknamed 'Ender', is pitted and marked by a subtle horizontal texture. The bright material on the top of the rock is probably wind-deposited dust. The Pathfinder Lander is seen in the distance at right. The lander camera is the cylindrical object on top of the deployed mast.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and managed the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  18. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  19. Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in rock musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høydal, Erik Harry; Lein Størmer, Carl Christian; Laukli, Einar; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2017-09-01

    Our focus in this study was the assessment of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) in a large group of rock musicians. A further objective was to analyse tinnitus among rock musicians as related to TEOAEs. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random. A control group was included at random for comparison. We recruited 111 musicians and a control group of 40 non-musicians. Testing was conducted by using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, TEOAEs and a questionnaire. TEOAE SNR in the half-octave frequency band centred on 4 kHz was significantly lower bilaterally in musicians than controls. This effect was strongly predicted by age and pure-tone hearing threshold levels in the 3-6 kHz range. Bilateral hearing thresholds were significantly higher at 6 kHz in musicians. Twenty percent of the musicians had permanent tinnitus. There was no association between the TEOAE parameters and permanent tinnitus. Our results suggest an incipient hearing loss at 6 kHz in rock musicians. Loss of TEOAE SNR in the 4 kHz half-octave frequency band was observed, but it was related to higher mean 3-6 kHz hearing thresholds and age. A large proportion of rock musicians have permanent tinnitus.

  20. Percolation and Physical Properties of Rock Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarzadeh, S.; Hesse, M. A.; Prodanovic, M.

    2015-12-01

    Textural equilibrium controls the distribution of the liquid phase in many naturally occurring porous materials such as partially molten rocks and alloys, salt-brine and ice-water systems. In these materials, pore geometry evolves to minimize the solid-liquid interfacial energy while maintaining a constant dihedral angle, θ, at solid-liquid contact lines. A characteristic of texturally equilibrated porous media, in the absence of deformation, is that the pore network percolates at any porosity for θ60°. However, in ductile polycrystalline materials including rock salt, the balance between surface tension and ductile deformation controls the percolation of fluid pockets along grain corners and edges. Here we show sufficiently rapid deformation can overcome this threshold by elongating and connecting isolated pores by examining a large number of accessible salt samples from deep water Gulf of Mexico. We first confirm the percolation threshold in static laboratory experiments on synthetic salt samples with X-ray microtomography. We then provide field evidence on existence of interconnected pore space in rock salt in extremely low porosities, significantly below the static percolation threshold. Scaling arguments suggest that strain rates in salt are sufficient to overcome surface tension and may allow percolation. We also present the first level-set computations of three-dimensional texturally equilibrated melt networks in realistic rock fabrics. The resulting pore space is used to obtain the effective physical properties of rock, effective electrical conductivity and mechanical properties, with a novel numerical model.

  1. Hand Injury in Rock Climbing: Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, A; Pivato, G; Pegoli, L

    2016-02-01

    With the amazing increasing in number of participants, rock climbing has become a popular sport in the last decade. A growing number of participants, with different skill level, inevitably leads to an increased number of injuries related to this practice. The kind of lesions that can be observed in rock-climbers is very specific and often involves the hand. For this reason is very important for any hand surgeon that is exposed to sport injuries to know which and the most common injuries related to this sport and which are the basic principles for the treatment of those. The aim of this article is to review the literature that has been published in the last ten year in this topic. On the NCBI database 22 articles where found that where related to rock climbing lesion affecting the hand or the whole body. Differences where found according to kind of rock climbing activity that was analyzed, alpine climb leads to more serious injuries, often affecting the lower limb, while in sport and recreational rock climbing the upper limb and the hand are definitely the most affected parts. Flexor pulley lesions, followed by fractures and strains are the most common lesions affecting the hand that are related to this practice.

  2. Alkaline Rocks and Geodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    BONIN, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    Origin of A-type alkali feldspar granites is currently the subject of a world-wide debate. Contrasting hypotheses have been proposed, which range from an entirely crustal origin to an almost complete mantle derivation. A-type alkali feldspar granites belong to either unimodal granite (rhyolite)-dominated association, or bimodal gabbro (basalt)-granite (rhyolite) suite. It is argued that (i) the ultimate mantle origin of basic to intermediate rocks is beyond doubt, (ii) highly evolved felsi...

  3. Rock blasting and explosives engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, P.-A.; Holmberg, R.; Lee, J. (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Research Center for Energetic Materials)

    1994-01-01

    The book covers the practical engineering aspects of different kinds of rock blasting. It includes a thorough analysis of the cost of the entire process of tunneling by drilling and blasting compared with full-face boring. It covers the economics of the entire rock blasting operation and its dependence on the size of excavation. The book highlights the fundamentals of rock mechanics, shock waves and detonation, initiation and mechanics of rock motion. It describes the engineering design principles and computational techniques for many separate mining methods and rock blasting operations. 274 refs.

  4. Rock in Rio: forever young

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ferreira Freitas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of Rock in Rio: The Musical, as herald of megafestival Rock in Rio. Driven by the success that musicals have reached in Brazil, we believe that the design of this spectacle of music, dance and staging renews the brand of the rock festival, once it adds the force of young and healthy bodies to its concept. Moreover, the musical provides Rock in Rio with some distance from the controversal trilogy of sex, drugs and rock and roll, a strong mark of past festivals around the world. Thus, the musical expands the possibilities of growth for the brand.

  5. Rock in Rio: eternamente jovem

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Ferreira Freitas; Flávio Lins Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of Rock in Rio: The Musical, as herald of megafestival Rock in Rio. Driven by the success that musicals have reached in Brazil, we believe that the design of this spectacle of music, dance and staging renews the brand of the rock festival, once it adds the force of young and healthy bodies to its concept. Moreover, the musical provides Rock in Rio with some distance from the controversal trilogy of sex, drugs and rock and roll, a strong mark ...

  6. Precambrian crustal evolution and Cretaceous–Palaeogene faulting in West Greenland: Pre-Nagssugtoqidian crustal evolution in West Greenland: geology, geochemistry and deformation of supracrustal and granitic rocks north-east of Kangaatsiaq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watt, Gordon R.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The area north-east of Kangaatsiaq features polyphase grey orthogneisses, supracrustal rocks and Kangaatsiaq granite exposed within a WSW–ENE-trending synform. The supracrustal rocks are comprised of garnet-bearing metapelites, layered amphibolites and layered, likewise grey biotite paragneisses. Their association and geochemical compositions are consistent with a metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary basin (containing both tholeiitic and calc-alkali lavas and is similar to other Archaean greenstone belts. The Kangaatsiaq granite forms a 15 × 3 km flat, subconcordant body of deformed,pink, porphyritic granite occupying the core of the supracrustal synform, and is demonstrably intrusive into the amphibolites. The granite displays a pronounced linear fabric (L or L > S. Thepost-granite deformation developed under lower amphibolite facies conditions (400 ± 50°C, and is characterised by a regular, NE–SW-trending subhorizontal lineation and an associated irregular foliation, whose poles define a great circle; together they are indicative of highly constrictional strain. The existence of a pre-granite event is attested by early isoclinal folds and a foliation within the amphibolites that is not present in the granite, and by the fact that the granite cuts earlier structures in the supracrustal rocks. This early event, preserved only in quartz-free lithologies, resulted in high-temperature fabrics being developed under upper amphibolite to granulite facies conditions.

  7. ROCK1 as a novel prognostic marker in vulvar cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akagi, Erica M; Lavorato-Rocha, André M; Maia, Beatriz de Melo

    2014-01-01

    infection, but most cases develop in women aged over 50 years through poorly understood genetic mechanisms. Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) has been implicated in many cellular processes, but its function in vulvar cancer has never been examined. In this study, we aimed...... to determine the prognostic value of ROCK1 gene and protein analysis in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (VSCC). METHODS: ROCK1 expression levels were measured in 16 vulvar tumour samples and adjacent normal tissue by qRT-PCR. Further, 96 VSCC samples were examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) to confirm...... the involvement of ROCK1 in the disease. The molecular and pathological results were correlated with the clinical data of the patients. Sixteen fresh VSCC samples were analyzed by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). RESULTS: In each pair of samples, ROCK1 levels were higher by qRT-PCR in normal...

  8. Major and trace-element composition and pressure-temperature evolution of rock-buffered fluids in low-grade accretionary-wedge metasediments, Central Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, George D.; Wagner, Thomas; Wälle, Markus; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2013-05-01

    The chemical composition of fluid inclusions in quartz crystals from Alpine fissure veins was determined by combination of microthermometry, Raman spectroscopy, and LA-ICPMS analysis. The veins are hosted in carbonate-bearing, organic-rich, low-grade metamorphic metapelites of the Bündnerschiefer of the eastern Central Alps (Switzerland). This strongly deformed tectonic unit is interpreted as a partly subducted accretionary wedge, on the basis of widespread carpholite assemblages that were later overprinted by lower greenschist facies metamorphism. Veins and their host rocks from two locations were studied to compare several indicators for the conditions during metamorphism, including illite crystallinity, graphite thermometry, stability of mineral assemblages, chlorite thermometry, fluid inclusion solute thermometry, and fluid inclusion isochores. Fluid inclusions are aqueous two-phase with 3.7-4.0 wt% equivalent NaCl at Thusis and 1.6-1.7 wt% at Schiers. Reproducible concentrations of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, B, Al, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Sb, Cl, Br, and S could be determined for 97 fluid inclusion assemblages. Fluid and mineral geothermometry consistently indicate temperatures of 320 ± 20 °C for the host rocks at Thusis and of 250 ± 30 °C at Schiers. Combining fluid inclusion isochores with independent geothermometers results in pressure estimates of 2.8-3.8 kbar for Thusis, and of 3.3-3.4 kbar for Schiers. Pressure-temperature estimates are confirmed by pseudosection modeling. Fluid compositions and petrological modeling consistently demonstrate that chemical fluid-rock equilibrium was attained during vein formation, indicating that the fluids originated locally by metamorphic dehydration during near-isothermal decompression in a rock-buffered system.

  9. Mont Terri Project - Heater experiment : rock and bentonite thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in the near field of a thermal source for development of deep underground high level radioactive waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goebel, I.; Alheid, H.-J.; Kaufhold, St.; Naumann, M.; Pletsch, Th.; Plischke, I.; Schnier, H.; Schuster, K.; Sprado, K. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Meyer, T.; Miehe, R.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Braunschweig (Germany); Mayor, J.C. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos SA (ENRESA), Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Sineriz, J.; Rey, M. [Asociacion para la Investigacion y Desarollo Industrial de los Recursos Naturales (AITEMIN), Madrid (Spain); Alonso, E.; Lloret, A.; Munoz, J.J. [Centre Internacional de Metodos Numerics en Ingenyeria (CIMNE), Barcelona (Spain); Weber, H. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), Wettingen (Switzerland); Ploetze, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich, Institut fuer Geotechnik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Klubertanz, G. [Colenco Power Engineering Ltd, Baden (Switzerland); Ammon, Ch. [Rothpletz Lienhard und Cie AG, Aarau (Switzerland); Graf, A.; Nussbaum, Ch.; Zingg, A. [Goetechnical Institute Ltd, Saint-Ursanne (Switzerland); Bossart, P. [Federal Office of Topography (swisstopo), Wabern (Switzerland); Buehler, Ch.; Kech, M.; Trick, Th. [Solexperts AG, Moenchaltorf (Switzerland); Emmerich, K. [ITC-WGT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Fernandez, A. M. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The long-term safety of underground permanent repositories for radioactive waste relies on a combination of several engineered and geological barriers. The interactions between a host rock formation of the type 'Opalinus Clay' and an engineered barrier of the type 'bentonite buffer' are observed in the Heater Experiment (HE) during a hydration and a heating phase. The objective of the experiment is an improved understanding of the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in a host rock-buffer system achieved by experimental observations as well as numerical modelling. The basic objectives are in detail: a) Long-term monitoring in the vicinity of the heater during hydration and heating; especially observation and study of coupled THM processes in the near field, i.e. continuous measurements of temperatures, pore pressures, displacements, electric conductivity, and analysis of the gases and water released into the rock by effect of heating; b) Determination of the properties of barrier and host rock done mainly by laboratory and in situ experiments, i.e. general mechanical and mineralogical properties, mechanical state in-situ, and changes induced by the experiment; c) Study of the interaction between host rock and bentonite buffer as well as validation and refinement of existing tools for modelling THM processes; d) Study of the behaviour and reliability of instrumentation and measuring techniques, i.e. inspection of sensors after dismantling the experimental setting. To achieve the objectives, the experiment was accompanied by an extensive programme of continuous monitoring, experimental investigations on-site as well as in laboratories, and numerical modelling of the coupled THM processes. Finally, the experiment was dismantled to provide laboratory specimens of post-heating buffer and host rock material. The continuous monitoring of the experiment by a multitude of sensors (for temperature, pore pressure, total pressure, relative

  10. Geochemical and zircon isotopic evidence for extensive high level crustal contamination in Miocene to mid-Pleistocene intra-plate volcanic rocks from the Tengchong field, western Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Shi, Yuruo; Williams, Ian S.; Anderson, J. Lawford; Wu, Zhonghai; Wang, Shubing

    2017-08-01

    SHRIMP zircon Pb/U dating of Cenozoic volcanic rocks in the Tengchong area, western Yunnan Province, China, shows that the dacite and andesitic breccia lavas from Qushi village were intruded at 480 ± 10 ka and 800 ± 40 ka, respectively. Moreover, Pb/U dating of trachyandesite from Tuantian village and olivine basalt from Wuhe village give weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 2.82 ± 0.08 Ma and 12.28 ± 0.30 Ma. Corrections for initial 230Th disequilibrium of zircon were used for the former two younger ages. The Tengchong volcanic rocks have a large range of SiO2 (48.6-66.9 wt.%) and mostly belong to a high-K calc-alkaline series. The lavas originated from heterogeneous sources and were modified by subsequent fractional crystallization. The REE and other trace element patterns of the Tengchong volcanic rocks resemble magmas having a large component of continental crust. All have similar degrees of LREE and HREE fractionation and are enriched in LILE, La, Ce and Pb, with depletions in Nb, Ta, Ti, Sr and P relative to primitive mantle. Zircon δ18O values of 6.96 ± 0.17 and 7.01 ± 0.24‰ and highly varied negative εHf(t) values of - 1.5 to - 11.0 and - 10.3 to - 13.7, as well as the presence of inherited zircon grains in the studied samples, indicate that the magmas contain crustal material on a large scale. The Tengchong volcanic rocks have HFSE ratios (e.g., Nb/Ta, La/Nb, Zr/Y) similar to continental flood basalts, indicative of an intra-plate extensional tectonic setting. Widespread distributed faults might have facilitated upwelling of mantle-derived melts and eruptions from shallow crustal magma chambers to form the large volcanic field.

  11. Evolution of Sedimentary Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veizer, J.; MacKenzie, F. T.

    2003-12-01

    For almost a century, it has been recognized that the present-day thickness and areal extent of Phanerozoic sedimentary strata increase progressively with decreasing geologic age. This pattern has been interpreted either as reflecting an increase in the rate of sedimentation toward the present (Barrell, 1917; Schuchert, 1931; Ronov, 1976) or as resulting from better preservation of the younger part of the geologic record ( Gilluly, 1949; Gregor, 1968; Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971a; Veizer and Jansen, 1979, 1985).Study of the rocks themselves led to similarly opposing conclusions. The observed secular (=age) variations in relative proportions of lithological types and in chemistry of sedimentary rocks (Daly, 1909; Vinogradov et al., 1952; Nanz, 1953; Engel, 1963; Strakhov, 1964, 1969; Ronov, 1964, 1982) were mostly given an evolutionary interpretation. An opposing, uniformitarian, approach was proposed by Garrels and Mackenzie (1971a). For most isotopes, the consensus favors deviations from the present-day steady state as the likely cause of secular trends.This chapter attempts to show that recycling and evolution are not opposing, but complementary, concepts. It will concentrate on the lithological and chemical attributes of sediments, but not deal with the evolution of sedimentary mineral deposits (Veizer et al., 1989) and of life ( Sepkoski, 1989), both well amenable to the outlined conceptual treatment. The chapter relies heavily on Veizer (1988a) for the sections dealing with general recycling concepts, on Veizer (2003) for the discussion of isotopic evolution of seawater, and on Morse and Mackenzie (1990) and Mackenzie and Morse (1992) for discussion of carbonate rock recycling and environmental attributes.

  12. Michael Learns to Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪海涛

    2004-01-01

    夜幕降临.空气中传来北欧的声音,来自丹麦的四人流行乐队Michael Learns to Rock(迈克学摇滚)正把探情款款的歌声带到上海的咖啡厅和酒吧。北欧一直活跃着一批世界顶级的乐队.从丹麦的A-Ha到Aqua,从瑞典的ABBA到Roxette和Ace of Base,从挪威的Se

  13. From stones to rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Marie-Astrid; Jean-Leroux, Kathleen; Cirio, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    With the Aquila earthquake in 2009, earthquake prediction is more and more necessary nowadays, and people are waiting for even more accurate data. Earthquake accuracy has increased in recent times mainly thanks to the understanding of how oceanic expansion works and significant development of numerical seismic prediction models. Despite the improvements, the location and the magnitude can't be as accurate as citizen and authorities would like. The basis of anticipating earthquakes requires the understanding of: - The composition of the earth, - The structure of the earth, - The relations and movements between the different parts of the surface of the earth. In order to answer these questions, the Alps are an interesting field for students. This study combines natural curiosity about understanding the predictable part of natural hazard in geology and scientific skills on site: observing and drawing landscape, choosing and reading a representative core drilling, replacing the facts chronologically and considering the age, the length of time and the strength needed. This experience requires students to have an approach of time and space radically different than the one they can consider in a classroom. It also limits their imagination, in a positive way, because they realize that prediction is based on real data and some of former theories have become present paradigms thanks to geologists. On each location the analyzed data include landscape, core drilling and the relation established between them by students. The data is used by the students to understand the meaning, so that the history of the formation of the rocks tells by the rocks can be explained. Until this year, the CBGA's perspective regarding the study of the Alps ground allowed students to build the story of the creation and disappearance of the ocean, which was a concept required by French educational authorities. But not long ago, the authorities changed their scientific expectations. To meet the

  14. Rock critics as 'Mouldy Modernists'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky Shepherd

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary rock criticism appears to be firmly tied to the past. The specialist music press valorise rock music of the 1960s and 1970s, and new emerging artists are championed for their ‘retro’ sounding music by journalists who compare the sound of these new artists with those included in the established ‘canon’ of rock music. This article examines the narrative tropes of authenticity and nostalgia that frame the retrospective focus of this contemporary rock writing, and most significantly, the maintenance of the rock canon within contemporary popular culture. The article concludes by suggesting that while contemporary rock criticism is predominately characterised by nostalgia, this nostalgia is not simply a passive romanticism of the past. Rather, this nostalgia fuels a process of active recontextualisation within contemporary popular culture.

  15. Fossils, rocks, and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John

    1999-01-01

    We study our Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are now on top of a mountain may once have been at the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the Sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  16. Rock Properties Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Lum

    2004-09-16

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

  17. A smart rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressel, Phil

    2014-12-01

    This project was to design and build a protective weapon for a group of associations that believed in aliens and UFO's. They collected enough contributions from societies and individuals to be able to sponsor and totally fund the design, fabrication and testing of this equipment. The location of this facility is classified. It also eventually was redesigned by the Quartus Engineering Company for use at a major amusement park as a "shoot at targets facility." The challenge of this project was to design a "smart rock," namely an infrared bullet (the size of a gallon can of paint) that could be shot from the ground to intercept a UFO or any incoming suspicious item heading towards the earth. Some of the challenges to design this weapon were to feed cryogenic helium at 5 degrees Kelvin from an inair environment through a unique rotary coupling and air-vacuum seal while spinning the bullet at 1500 rpm and maintain its dynamic stability (wobble) about its spin axis to less than 10 micro-radians (2 arc seconds) while it operated in a vacuum. Precision optics monitored the dynamic motion of the "smart rock."

  18. Managing Rock Squirrels in Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Frey, Nicki

    2015-01-01

    Although they do not exist in large colonies like other ground squirrels, rock squirrels can still sometimes generate conflicts with homeowners and farmers alike. Most damage occurs when a few rock squirrels take residence in a homeowner’s back yard, and begin to forage on garden vegetables and fruit trees. There are several direct and indirect ways that private landowners can manage and reduce rock squirrels on their property. This fact sheet give management tips.

  19. [Hearing disorders and rock music].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhardt, Bjarne Orskov

    2008-12-15

    Only few studies have investigated the frequency of hearing disorders in rock musicians. Performing rock music is apparently associated with a hearing loss in a fraction of musicians. Tinnitus and hyperacusis are more common among rock musicians than among the background population. It seems as if some sort of resistance against further hearing loss is developed over time. The use of ear protection devices have not been studied systematically but appears to be associated with diminished hearing loss.

  20. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory Annual Report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory has been constructed as part of the preparations for the deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments are made to gain a better understanding of radionuclide retention in the rock and create confidence in the radionuclide transport models that are intended to be used in the licensing of a deep repository for spent fuel. The TRUE -1 experiment including tests with sorbing radioactive tracers in a single fracture over a distance of about 5 m has been completed. Diffusion and sorption in the rock matrix is the dominant retention mechanism over the time scales of the experiments. The main objective of the TRUE Block Scale Experiment is to increase understanding and our ability to predict tracer transport in a fracture network over spatial scales of 10 to 50 m. In total six boreholes have been drilled into the experimental volume located at the 450 m level. The Long-Term Diffusion Experiment is intended as a complement to the dynamic in-situ experiments and the laboratory experiments performed in the TRUE Programme. Diffusion from a fracture into the rock matrix will be studied in situ. The REX project focuses on the reduction of oxygen in a repository after closure due to reactions with rock minerals and microbial activity. Results show that oxygen is consumed within a few days both for the field and laboratory experiments. A new site for the CHEMLAB experiments was selected and prepared during 1999. All future experiment will be conducted in the J niche at 450 m depth. The Prototype Repository Test is focused on testing and demonstrating repository system function. A full-scale prototype including six deposition holes with canisters with electric heaters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite will be built and instrumented. Characterisation of the rock mass in the area of the Prototype repository is completed and the six deposition holes have been drilled. The Backfill and

  1. The disturbed rock zone at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Francis D.

    2003-12-01

    The Disturbed Rock Zone constitutes an important geomechanical element of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The science and engineering underpinning the disturbed rock zone provide the basis for evaluating ongoing operational issues and their impact on performance assessment. Contemporary treatment of the disturbed rock zone applied to the evaluation of the panel closure system and to a new mining horizon improves the level of detail and quantitative elements associated with a damaged zone surrounding the repository openings. Technical advancement has been realized by virtue of ongoing experimental investigations and international collaboration. The initial portion of this document discusses the disturbed rock zone relative to operational issues pertaining to re-certification of the repository. The remaining sections summarize and document theoretical and experimental advances that quantify characteristics of the disturbed rock zone as applied to nuclear waste repositories in salt.

  2. Theoretical study of rock mass investigation efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmen, Johan G.; Outters, Nils [Golder Associates, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2002-05-01

    The study concerns a mathematical modelling of a fractured rock mass and its investigations by use of theoretical boreholes and rock surfaces, with the purpose of analysing the efficiency (precision) of such investigations and determine the amount of investigations necessary to obtain reliable estimations of the structural-geological parameters of the studied rock mass. The study is not about estimating suitable sample sizes to be used in site investigations.The purpose of the study is to analyse the amount of information necessary for deriving estimates of the geological parameters studied, within defined confidence intervals and confidence level In other words, how the confidence in models of the rock mass (considering a selected number of parameters) will change with amount of information collected form boreholes and surfaces. The study is limited to a selected number of geometrical structural-geological parameters: Fracture orientation: mean direction and dispersion (Fisher Kappa and SRI). Different measures of fracture density (P10, P21 and P32). Fracture trace-length and strike distributions as seen on horizontal windows. A numerical Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) was used for representation of a fractured rock mass. The DFN-model was primarily based on the properties of an actual fracture network investigated at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The rock mass studied (DFN-model) contained three different fracture sets with different orientations and fracture densities. The rock unit studied was statistically homogeneous. The study includes a limited sensitivity analysis of the properties of the DFN-model. The study is a theoretical and computer-based comparison between samples of fracture properties of a theoretical rock unit and the known true properties of the same unit. The samples are derived from numerically generated boreholes and surfaces that intersect the DFN-network. Two different boreholes are analysed; a vertical borehole and a borehole that is

  3. Critical issues in soft rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milton Assis Kanji

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses several efforts made to study and investigate soft rocks, as well as their physico-mechanical characteristics recognized up to now, the problems in their sampling and testing, and the possibility of its reproduction through artificially made soft rocks. The problems in utilizing current and widespread classification systems to some types of weak rocks are also discussed, as well as other problems related to them. Some examples of engineering works in soft rock or in soft ground are added, with emphasis on their types of problems and solutions.

  4. Rock.XML - Towards a library of rock physics models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Erling Hugo; Hauge, Ragnar; Ulvmoen, Marit; Johansen, Tor Arne; Drottning, Åsmund

    2016-08-01

    Rock physics modelling provides tools for correlating physical properties of rocks and their constituents to the geophysical observations we measure on a larger scale. Many different theoretical and empirical models exist, to cover the range of different types of rocks. However, upon reviewing these, we see that they are all built around a few main concepts. Based on this observation, we propose a format for digitally storing the specifications for rock physics models which we have named Rock.XML. It does not only contain data about the various constituents, but also the theories and how they are used to combine these building blocks to make a representative model for a particular rock. The format is based on the Extensible Markup Language XML, making it flexible enough to handle complex models as well as scalable towards extending it with new theories and models. This technology has great advantages as far as documenting and exchanging models in an unambiguous way between people and between software. Rock.XML can become a platform for creating a library of rock physics models; making them more accessible to everyone.

  5. Rock the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    Created in 2005, the Swiss rock band "Wind of Change" is now candidate for the Eurovision Song Contest 2011 with a new song " Night & Light " with the music video filmed at CERN.   With over 20 gigs under their belt and two albums already released, the five members of the band (Alex Büchi, vocals; Arthur Spierer, drums; David Gantner, bass; Romain Mage and Yannick Gaudy, guitar) continue to excite audiences. For their latest composition "Night & Light", the group filmed their music video in the Globe of Science and Innovation. Winning the Eurovision contest would be a springboard in their artistic career for these young musicians. The selection results will be available December 11, 2010.      

  6. Electrochemistry of lunar rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, D. J.; Haskin, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Electrolysis of silicate melts has been shown to be an effective means of producing metals from common silicate materials. No fluxing agents need be added to the melts. From solution in melts of diopside (CaMgSi2O6) composition, the elements Si, Ti, Ni, and Fe have been reduced to their metallic states. Platinum is a satisfactory anode material, but other cathode materials are needed. Electrolysis of compositional analogs of lunar rocks initially produces iron metal at the cathode and oxygen gas at the anode. Utilizing mainly heat and electricity which are readily available from sunlight, direct electrolysis is capable of producing useful metals from common feedstocks without the need for expendable chemicals. This simple process and the products obtained from it deserve further study for use in materials processing in space.

  7. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  8. Rock Art in Kurdistan Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Lahafian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kurdistan, with great potential and prehistoric resources, has numerous petroglyphs in different areas of the province. During the last 14 years of extensive field study, more than 30 sites of rock art have been identified and introduced by the author. In this article, we summarize these rock art areas in Iranian Kurdistan.

  9. Rock Art in Kurdistan Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Jamal Lahafian

    2013-01-01

    Kurdistan, with great potential and prehistoric resources, has numerous petroglyphs in different areas of the province. During the last 14 years of extensive field study, more than 30 sites of rock art have been identified and introduced by the author. In this article, we summarize these rock art areas in Iranian Kurdistan.

  10. Rockin' around the Rock Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frack, Susan; Blanchard, Scott Alan

    2005-01-01

    In this activity students will simulate how sedimentary rocks can be changed into metamorphic rocks by intense pressure. The materials needed are two small pieces of white bread, one piece of wheat bread, and one piece of a dark bread (such as pumpernickel or dark rye) per student, two pieces of waxed paper, scissors, a ruler, and heavy books.…

  11. Rock suitability classification RSC 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, T. (ed.) [McEwen Consulting, Leicester (United Kingdom); Kapyaho, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hella, P. [Saanio and Riekkola, Helsinki (Finland); Aro, S.; Kosunen, P.; Mattila, J.; Pere, T.

    2012-12-15

    This report presents Posiva's Rock Suitability Classification (RSC) system, developed for locating suitable rock volumes for repository design and construction. The RSC system comprises both the revised rock suitability criteria and the procedure for the suitability classification during the construction of the repository. The aim of the classification is to avoid such features of the host rock that may be detrimental to the favourable conditions within the repository, either initially or in the long term. This report also discusses the implications of applying the RSC system for the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements concerning the host rock as a natural barrier and the site's overall suitability for hosting a final repository of spent nuclear fuel.

  12. Phase equilibria and P-T-X(Fe-Mg relations involving Gl-St-Cd-Als-Bi-Mu-Oz-Kfs-H2O in medium-high grade metapelites (KFASH, KMASH and KFMASH sistems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez, F. J.

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available In different areas of the Hercynian in the Iberian Peninsula some reactions are repeatedly observed in pelites, these reactions are: Staurolite + muscovite + quartz = Biotite+ Al2SiO5+ H2O Garnet + muscovite = Al2SiO5+ biotite+ quartzBiotite + Al2SiO5 + quartz = Cordierite + K feldspar+Hp In order to examinate the P-T stability fields of these, and other similar reactions, aH the univariant equilibria in multisystems with Gt-Cd-St-Bi-Mu-Als-Qz-HP, Gt-St-Bi-Mu-Fk-AIs-QzHp and Cd-St-Bi-Mu-Fk-AIs-Qz-H2O in Kp-FeO-AI2O r SiO2-H2O (KFASH system have been calculated, and their corresponding P-T grids have been constructed. The expansion of these reactions into divariant surfaces through the P-T-X (Fe-Mg space was made by studying the assemblage Gt-Cd-St-Bi-Mu-Fk-AIs-Qz-HP in K2O-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O (KFMASH with a Fe/Fe+Mg relationship Gt > St > Bi > Cd such as observed in most of natural pelites. A resultant grid was obtained by combining those obtained in the aboye systerns. This grid has been P-T located for PH20 = P19 near QFM buffer, and excess muscovite and quartz conditions Reaction slopes in this grid were calculated within different P-T surroundings from thermodynamic data as weH as by considering the existing experimental data. In addition to the stability fields of reactions the P-T-XFe-Mg theoric relations for three univariant and thirteen divariant reactions have been obtained. The grid confirms the imposibility of staurolite-K feldspar and Garnet-Cordierite-Muscovite coexistence, as weH as the extension of the stability fields for Garnet-Staurolite, Cordierite-Staurolite and Garnet-Cordierite assemblages in muscovite-poor metapelites.En rocas metapelíticas de diversas áreas en el Hercínico de la Península Ibérica se observan a menudo las siguientes reacciones: Estaurolita + moscovita + cuarzo = biotita + Al2SiO5+ H2OGranate + moscovita = Al2SiO5 + biotita ± cuarzo Biotita + Al2SiO5 + cuarzo = cordierita + feldespato pot

  13. Seismic properties of polyphase rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin

    2005-11-01

    Knowledge about the seismic properties of polyphase rocks is fundamental for interpreting seismic refraction and reflection data and for establishing lithospheric structure and composition models. This study aims to obtain more precise relationships between seismic properties of rocks and controlling factors (e.g., pressure, temperature, mineralogical and chemical compositions, microstructure of rocks), particularly for those rocks imprinted by ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism. These relationships will be very helpful to extrapolate calculated and measured seismic properties of rocks to depths of interest and to engender interpretations relevant to petrological composition and tectonic process. An Internet Database of Rock Seismic Properties (DRSP) was set up and a Handbook of Seismic Properties of Minerals, Rocks and Ores was published. They comprise almost all data available in the literature during the past 4 decades and can serve as a convenient, comprehensive and concise information source on physical properties of rocks to the earth sciences and geotechnical communities. Statistical results of the DRSP reveal the dependence of seismic properties on density, porosity, humidity, and mineralogical and chemical compositions. Using 16 different averaging methods, we calculated P-wave velocities of 696 dry samples according to the volume fraction and elastic constants of each constituent mineral. Although only 22 common minerals were taken into account in the computation, the calculated P-wave velocities agree well with laboratory values measured at about 300 MPa, where most microcracks are closed and the mean Vp of a polymineralic rock is exclusively controlled by its modal composition. However, none of these mixture rules can simultaneously fit measured P-wave velocities for all lithologies or at all pressures. Therefore, more prudence is required in selecting an appropriate mixture rule for calculation of seismic velocities of different rock types.

  14. Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-04-15

    Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

  15. Research on Mechanism of Rock Burst Generation and Development for High Stress Rock Tunnels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高全臣; 赫建明; 王代华

    2001-01-01

    Through the investigation and analysis of high stress distribution in surrounding rock during the excavation of rock tunnels,the key factors to cause rock burst and the mechanism of rock burst generation and development are researched. The result shows that the scale and range of rock burst are related with elastic deformation energy storied in rock mass and the characteristics of unloading stress waves. The measures of preventing from rock burst for high stress rock tunnels are put forward.

  16. Engineering rock mass classification of the Olkiluoto investigation site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeikaes, K. [ed.; Hagros, A.; Johansson, E. [Saanio and Riekkola Consulting Engineers, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    2000-06-01

    Olkiluoto in Eurajoki is being investigated as a possible site for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel from the Finnish nuclear power plants. The selection of the depth, placement and layout of the repository is affected by the constructability of the bedrock. The constructability, in turn, is influenced by several properties of the host rock, such as its Ethology, the extent of fracturing, its hydrogeological properties and rock engineering characteristics and also by the magnitude and orientation of the in situ stresses and the chemistry of the groundwater. The constructability can be evaluated by the application of a rock classification system in which the properties of the host rock are assessed against common rock engineering judgements associated with underground construction. These judgements are based partly on measurements of in situ stresses and the properties of the bedrock determined from rock samples, but an important aspect is also the practical experience which has been gained during underground excavation in similar conditions and rock types. The aim of the engineering rock mass classification was to determine suitable bedrock volumes for the construction of the repository and has used data from the site characterisation programme carried out at Olkiluoto, which consisted of both surface studies and borehole investigations. The classification specifies three categories of constructability - normal, demanding and very demanding. In addition, rock mass quality has also been classified according to the empirical Q-system to enable a comparison to be made. The rock mass parameters that determine the constructability of the bedrock at Olkiluoto depend primarily on the depth and the Ethology, as well as on whether construction takes place in intact or in fractured rock. The differences in the characteristics of intact rock within a single rock type have been shown to be small. The major lithological unit at Olkiluoto, the mica gneiss, lies in the

  17. The Blaník Gneiss in the southern Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic): a rare rock composition among the early palaeozoic granites of Variscan Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    René, Miloš; Finger, Fritz

    2016-08-01

    Metamorphosed and deformed tourmaline-bearing leucogranites with a Cambro-Ordovician formation age are widespread in the Monotonous Group of the Variscan southern Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic. The rocks, known locally as Blaník gneiss, are strongly peraluminous and classify as phosphorus-rich low-T, S-type granite. The magma formed from a metapelitic source, most likely through muscovite dehydration melting. With respect to its low-T origin and the abundance of tourmaline, the Blaník gneiss is exotic within the spectrum of Early Palaeozoic granites of the Variscan fold belt of Central Europe. Coeval granitic gneisses in the neighbouring Gföhl unit of the Bohemian Massif can be classified as higher T S-type granites and were probably generated through biotite dehydration melting. The geochemical differences between the Early Palaeozoic granitic magmatism in the Gföhl unit and the Monotonous Group support models claiming that these two geological units belonged to independent peri-Gondwana terranes before the Variscan collision. It is suggested here, that the Gföhl unit and the Monotonous Group represent zones of higher and lower heat flow within the Early Palaeozoic northern Gondwana margin, respectively. The geochemical data presented in this study could be helpful for terrane correlations and palaeogeographic reconstructions.

  18. Rock discontinuity surface roughness variation with scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitenc, Maja; Kieffer, D. Scott; Khoshelham, Kourosh

    2017-04-01

    hypothesize that roughness can increase or decrease with the joint size, depending on the large scale roughness (or waviness), which is entering the roughness calculation once the discontinuity size increases. Therefore, our objective is to characterize roughness at various spatial scales, rather than at changing surface size. Firstly, the rock surface is interpolated into a grid on which a Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) is applied. The resulting surface components have different frequencies, or in other words, they have a certain physical scale depending on the decomposition level and input grid resolution. Secondly, the Grasselli Parameter is computed for the original and each decomposed surface. Finally, the relative roughness change is analyzed with respect to increasing roughness wavelength for four different rock samples. The scale variation depends on the sample itself and thus indicates its potential mechanical behavior. References: - Barton, N. and V. Choubey (1977). "The shear strength of rock joints in theory and practice." Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering 10(1): 1-54. - Grasselli, G. (2001). Shear strength of rock joints based on quantified surface description. École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. Lausanne, EPFL. - Tatone, B. S. A. and G. Grasselli (2009). "A method to evaluate the three-dimensional roughness of fracture surfaces in brittle geomaterials." Review of Scientific Instruments 80(12) - Tatone, B. and G. Grasselli (2012). "An Investigation of Discontinuity Roughness Scale Dependency Using High-Resolution Surface Measurements." Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering: 1-25.

  19. Source rock potential in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raza, H.A. (Hydrocarbon Development Institute of Pakistan, Islamabad (Pakistan))

    1991-03-01

    Pakistan contains two sedimentary basins: Indus in the east and Balochistan in the west. The Indus basin has received sediments from precambrian until Recent, albeit with breaks. It has been producing hydrocarbons since 1914 from three main producing regions, namely, the Potwar, Sulaisman, and Kirthar. In the Potwar, oil has been discovered in Cambrian, Permian, Jurassic, and Tertiary rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Infra-Cambrian, Permian, Paleocene, and Eocene successions, but Paleocene/Eocene Patala Formation seems to be the main source of most of the oil. In the Sulaiman, gas has been found in Cretaceous and Tertiary; condensate in Cretaceous rocks. Potential source rocks are indicated in Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene successions. The Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age appears to be the source of gas. In the Kirthar, oil and gas have been discovered in Cretaceous and gas has been discovered in paleocene and Eocene rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Kirthar and Ghazij formations of Eocene age in the western part. However, in the easter oil- and gas-producing Badin platform area, Union Texas has recognized the Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age as the only source of Cretaceous oil and gas. The Balochistan basin is part of an Early Tertiary arc-trench system. The basin is inadequately explored, and there is no oil or gas discovery so far. However, potential source rocks have been identified in Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene successions based on geochemical analysis of surface samples. Mud volcanoes are present.

  20. Rock salt constitutive modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickell, R.E.

    1980-03-18

    The Serata model is the best operational model available today because it incorporates: (1) a yield function to demarcate between viscoelastic and viscoplastic behavior of rock salt; (2) a pressure and temperature dependence for yield stresses; and (3) a standard linear solid, which can be readily extended into the non-linear regime, to represent creep behavior. Its only deficiencies appear to be the lack of secondary creep behavior (a free dashpot) and some unsettling arbitrariness about the Poisson's ratio (..nu.. ..-->.. 0.5) argument for viscoplasticity. The Sandia/WIPP model will have good primary and secondary creep capability, but lacks the viscoplastic behavior. In some cases, estimated inelastic strains may be underpredicted. If a creep acceleration mechanism associated with brine inclusions is observed, this model may require extensive revision. Most of the other models available (SAI, RE-SPEC, etc.) are only useful for short-term calculations, because they employ temporal power law (t/sup n/) primary creep representations. These models are unsatisfactory because they cannot represent dual mechanisms with differing characteristic times. An approach based upon combined creep and plasticity is recommended in order to remove the remaining deficiency in the Serata model. DOE/Sandia/WIPP should be encouraged to move aggressively in this regard.

  1. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  2. They will rock you!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    On 30 September, CERN will be the venue for one of the most prestigious events of the year: the concert for the Bosons&More event, the Organization’s celebration of the remarkable performance of the LHC and all its technical systems, as well as the recent fundamental discoveries. Topping the bill will be the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, the CERN Choir, the Zürcher Sing-Akademie and the Alan Parsons Live Project rock group, who have joined forces to create an unforgettable evening’s entertainment.   The Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, directed by Maestro Neeme Järvi, artistic and musical director of the OSR. (Image: Grégory Maillot). >>> From the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande… Henk Swinnen, General Manager of the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande (OSR), answers some questions for the CERN Bulletin, just a few days before the event. How did this project come about? When CERN invited us to take part in the B...

  3. Multiverso: Rock'n'Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J. A.

    2012-05-01

    In the last few years, there have been several projects involving astronomy and classical music. But have a rock band ever appeared at a science conference or an astronomer at a rock concert? We present a project, Multiverso, in which we mix rock and astronomy, together with poetry and video art (Caballero, 2010). The project started in late 2009 and has already reached tens of thousands people in Spain through the release of an album, several concert-talks, television, radio, newspapers and the internet.

  4. Geoelectrical Characterization of Sulphate Rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Guinea Maysounave, Ander

    2012-01-01

    [eng] Gypsum rocks are widely exploited in the world as industrial minerals. The purity of the gypsum rocks (percentage in gypsum mineral –CaSO4•2H2O- in the whole rock) is a critical factor to evaluate the potential exploitability of a gypsum deposit. It is considered than purities higher than 80% in gypsum are required to be economically profitable. Gypsum deposits have been studied with geoelectrical methods; a direct relationship between the electrical resistivity values of the gypsum roc...

  5. Doses de basalto moído nas propriedades químicas de um Latossolo Amarelo distrófico da savana de Roraima Levels of finely ground basalt rock in the chemical properties of a yellow latosol of the savannah of Roraima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdinar Ferreira Melo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As rochas basálticas possuem composição rica em elementos químicos considerados nutrientes às plantas, o que a torna apta para o uso agrícola, melhorando a fertilidade dos solos. Objetivou-se com esse trabalho avaliar o efeito de doses de basalto moído nos teores de alguns nutrientes no solo. Foi utilizado um Latossolo Amarelo ácido e de baixa CTC, formação geológica Boa Vista, estado de Roraima. A rocha basáltica da formação Apoteri foi coletada na pedreira da serra de Nova Olinda, Boa Vista. Os tratamentos consistiram da incorporação e incubação de oito doses do pó da rocha (0; 0,85; 1,70; 3,35; 5,03; 10,05; 20,40 e 40,80 g kg-1, correspondente a 0; 2,0; 4,0; 8,0; 12,0; 24,0; 48,0 e 96 t ha-1. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado com oito tratamentos e três repetições. Após a incorporação do basalto moído ao solo e por um período 180 dias de incubação, o solo foi analisado quanto aos teores de Ca2+, Mg2+ e Al3+ trocáveis, acidez potencial (H+Al, teores disponíveis de Zn, Fe, Cu e Mn e valores de pH em H2O e em KCl. A dose de 20,40 g kg-1 de basalto proporcionou a máxima redução da acidez ativa, com pH aumentando de 4,8 para 5,5. Os teores de Ca2+ e Mg2+ trocáveis aumentaram, porém proporcionaram baixos incrementos desses cátions no solo. As doses de basalto apresentaram alta eficiência para a neutralização da acidez potencial. A adição do basalto moído proporcionou incremento nos teores de Zn, Fe e Cu no solo com o tempo de incubação.Basaltic rocks have chemical and mineralogical composition that allows its agricultural application due to its capability of improving soil fertility. The aim in this work was to evaluate the effect of levels of finely crushed basalt rock in soil chemical conditioning. A dystrophic Yellow Latosol from pre-weathered Boa Vista Formation was used. The rock of the Apoteri formation was collected in the mine of Nova Olinda near Boa Vista. The treatments

  6. Injury patterns in recreational rock climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooks, M D; Johnston, R B; Ensor, C D; McIntosh, B; James, S

    1995-01-01

    We studied 39 recreational rock climbers to determine the incidence and pattern of injuries sustained in the sport at their level. Eleven climbers (26%), who climbed beyond the sport level, had sustained a major injury from a fall. Thirty-five climbers (89%) sustained at least one significant injury. Fifty percent of the injuries involved the hand or wrist. Only seven climbers (19%) had evidence of a digital pulley injury (climber's finger). Four climbers (11%) had evidence of a carpal tunnel syndrome. Twenty climbers (50%) had tendinitis in an upper extremity on physical examination.

  7. Rock mechanics stability at Olkiluoto, Haestholmen, Kivetty and Romuvaara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, E.; Rautakorpi, J. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2000-02-01

    Posiva Oy is studying the suitability of the Finnish bedrock for the geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel at four sites, Olkiluoto in Eurajoki, Haestholmen in Loviisa, Kivetty in Aeaenekoski and Romuvaara in Kuhmo. To enable the rock properties to be specified in great detail, the site-selection research programme has included rock mechanics investigations such as the measurement of in-situ rock stress and laboratory tests on rock samples. This report presents the results of the rock mechanics analyses performed on the main rock types at the Olkiluoto, Romuvaara, Kivetty and Haestholmen sites. The objective of this study was to assess the near-field stability of the final disposal tunnels and deposition holes at each of the investigation sites. Two empirical methods and a numerical method based on three-dimensional element code (3DEC) were used the analysis tools. A statistical approach was used to select the necessary input data and to specify the cases being analysed. The stability of the KBS-3 and MLH (Medium Long Hole) repository concepts during the pre-closure and post-closure phases was analysed. The repository depths investigated lay between 300 m and 700 m. The empirical methods are based on the study of the ratios between rock strength and the in-situ stress which could result in possible fracturing of the rock mass. Interpretation of the numerical analyses is based on the assumption of an elastic distribution of stress around the disposal tunnel and the deposition hole and the brittle rock strength criterion. The results obtained in this study indicate that in general, the rock mechanics conditions during the pre-closure and post-closure phases at each of the investigated sites remain good and stable between the studied depth levels, especially when the deposition rooms are oriented in a direction parallel to the major in-situ stress. If the disposal tunnels are orientated in a direction perpendicular to the major in-situ stress, the resultant

  8. Anthropic Rock: a brief history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Cathcart

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Stone tool-making is a reductive process. Synthetic rock manufacturing, preeminently an additive process, will not for-ever be confined to only the Earth-biosphere. This brief focuses on humanity's ancient past, hodiernal and possible future even more massive than present-day creation of artificial rocks within our exploitable Solar System. It is mostly Earth-centric account that expands the factual generalities underlying the unique non-copyrighted systemic technogenic rock classification first publicly presented (to the American Geological Society during 2001, by its sole intellectual innovator, James Ross Underwood, Jr. His pioneering, unique exposition of an organization of this ever-increasingly important aspect of the Anthropic Rock story, spatially expansive material lithification, here is given an amplified discussion for the broader geo and space science social group-purpose of encouragement of a completer 21st Century treatment of Underwood's explicative subject-chart (Fig. 2.

  9. ROCK DEFORMATION. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-05-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on ROCK DEFORMATION was held at II Ciocco from 5/19/02 thru 5/24/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  10. A quantitative analysis of rock cliff erosion environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, M.; Rosser, N.; Petley, D. N.; Norman, E. C.; Barlow, J.

    2009-12-01

    The spatial patterns and temporal sequencing of failures from coastal rock cliffs are complex and typically generate weak correlations with environmental variables such as tidal inundation, wave energy, wind and rain. Consequently, understanding of rock cliff behaviour, its response to predicted changes in environmental forcing and, more specifically, the interaction between marine and climatic factors in influencing failure processes has remained limited. This work presents the results from the first attempt to characterise and quantify the conditions on coastal cliffs that lead to accelerated rates of material detachment. The rate of change in an 80 m high section of coastal rock cliffs has been surveyed annually with high-resolution terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). The rockfall data have been analysed according to a simplified source geology that exhibit distinct magnitude-frequency distributions relating to the dominance of particular failure types. An integrated network of sensors and instrumentation designed to reflect the lithological control on failure has been installed to examine both the distinction between prevailing conditions and those affecting the local cliff environment and the physical response of different rock types to micro-climatic processes. The monitoring system records near-surface rock strain, temperature, moisture and micro-seismic displacement in addition to air temperature, humidity, radiation, precipitation, water-level and three-dimensional wind characteristics. A characteristic environmental signal, unique to the cliff face material, has been identified that differs substantially from that experienced by the surrounding area; suggesting that established methods of meteorological and tidal data collection are insufficient and inappropriate to represent erosive processes. The interaction between thermo- and hydro-dynamics of the cliff environment and the physical response of the rock highlights the composite environmental effects

  11. Institute for Rock Magnetism established

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Subir K.

    There is a new focal point for cooperative research in advanced rock magnetism. The University of Minnesota in Minneapolis has established an Institute for Rock Magnetism (IRM) that will provide free access to modern equipment and encourage visiting fellows to focus on important topics in rock magnetism and related interdisciplinary research. Funding for the first three years has been secured from the National Science Foundation, the W.M. Keck Foundation, and the University of Minnesota.In the fall of 1986, the Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism (GP) section of the AGU held a workshop at Asilomar, Calif., to pinpoint important and emerging research areas in paleomagnetism and rock magnetism, and the means by which to achieve them. In a report of this workshop published by the AGU in September 1987, two urgent needs were set forth. The first was for interdisciplinary research involving rock magnetism, and mineralogy, petrology, sedimentology, and the like. The second need was to ease the access of rock magnetists and paleomagnetists around the country to the latest equipment in modern magnetics technology, such as magneto-optics or electronoptics. Three years after the publication of the report, we announced the opening of these facilities at the GP section of the AGU Fall 1990 Meeting. A classified advertisement inviting applications for visiting fellowships was published in the January 22, 1991, issue of Eos.

  12. RhoA、ROCK1和ROCK2信号蛋白在乳腺浸润性导管癌中的表达%Expressions of RhoA, Rock1, and Rock2 signaling proteins in mammary invasive duct carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    印永祥; 赵华; 顾颖; 陈道桢

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨RhoA、ROCK1和ROCK2蛋白在乳腺浸润性导管癌组织中的表达.方法:用免疫组织化学检测RhoA、ROCK1、ROCK2、雌激素ER在35例乳腺浸润性导管癌组织中的表达.结果:与病理分级Ⅰ~Ⅱ级比较,病理分级Ⅲ级RhoA蛋白表达减少,ROCK1蛋白表达明显增加,ROCK2蛋白表达明显减少.与淋巴结未转移组比较,有淋巴结转移组RhoA蛋白和ROCK1蛋白表达增加,ROCK2蛋白表达明显增加.与ER蛋白阴性组相比,ER蛋白阳性组RhoA蛋白表达增加,ROCK1蛋白表达减少,ROCK2蛋白表达增加.RhoA蛋白高表达时,ROCK1蛋白低表达,但无相关性(r=-0.259,P>0.05);RhoA蛋白高表达时,ROCK2蛋白高表达,呈显著正相关(r=0.673,P<0.05);ROCK1蛋白高表达时,ROCK2蛋白低表达,但无相关性(r=-0.087,P>0.05).结论:ROCK2蛋白高表达可能促进乳腺癌淋巴结转移,RhoA与ROCK信号途径有可能成为乳腺癌治疗靶点.%Objective: To explore the expressions of RhoA, ROCK1 , and ROCK2 protein in mammary invasive duct carcinoma. Methods: Immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expressions of RhoA, ROCK1, ROCK2, and estrogen receptor (ER) in 35 cases with mammary invasive duct carcinoma. Results: Compared with cases with mammary lesions of pathological Ⅰ -Ⅱ stages, RhoA protein expression in cases with mammary lesions of pathological Ⅲ stage decreased, ROCK1 protein expression increased significantly, ROCK2 protein expression decreased significantly. Comparted with non - lymph node metastasis group, the expression levels of RhoA protein and ROCK1 protein in lymph node metastasis group increased, ROCK2 protein expression increased significantly. Compared with negative ER group, RhoA protein expression in positive ER group increased, while ROCK1 protein expression decreased, ROCK2 protein expression increased. When the expression level of RhoA protein was high, the expression level of ROCK1 protein was low, but there was no correlation (

  13. Knowledge representation of rock plastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarpanah, Armita; Babaie, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    The first iteration of the Rock Plastic Deformation (RPD) ontology models the semantics of the dynamic physical and chemical processes and mechanisms that occur during the deformation of the generally inhomogeneous polycrystalline rocks. The ontology represents the knowledge about the production, reconfiguration, displacement, and consumption of the structural components that participate in these processes. It also formalizes the properties that are known by the structural geology and metamorphic petrology communities to hold between the instances of the spatial components and the dynamic processes, the state and system variables, the empirical flow laws that relate the variables, and the laboratory testing conditions and procedures. The modeling of some of the complex physio-chemical, mathematical, and informational concepts and relations of the RPD ontology is based on the class and property structure of some well-established top-level ontologies. The flexible and extensible design of the initial version of the RPD ontology allows it to develop into a model that more fully represents the knowledge of plastic deformation of rocks under different spatial and temporal scales in the laboratory and in solid Earth. The ontology will be used to annotate the datasets related to the microstructures and physical-chemical processes that involve them. This will help the autonomous and globally distributed communities of experimental structural geologists and metamorphic petrologists to coherently and uniformly distribute, discover, access, share, and use their data through automated reasoning and enhanced data integration and software interoperability.

  14. No Reprieve for Tasmanian Rock Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C. Sims

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Australian State of Tasmania, at latitude 42 degrees south, became an island about 8,000 years ago when the sea rose to its present level, following the melting of polar and glacial ice that covered much of the land mass. After that time, the Tasmanian Aboriginal rock art developed independently of mainland Australia, with its form being basically linear with some naturalistic figures and a predominance of cupules. The petroglyphs with one lithophone site occur on various rock substrates varying in hardness from granite to sandstone. Many sites exist along the western coastline that borders the Southern Ocean where the landscape in some places has changed little since the arrival of Europeans in 1803. The significance of this Tasmanian Aboriginal cultural heritage along what is now known as the Tarkine Coast, named after an Aboriginal band that once inhabited this area, was recognised by the Australian Government in February 2013 when a 21,000 ha strip, 2 km wide, was inscribed on its National Heritage Register, being one of 98 special places listed in the country. However, politics and racism hamper its management. This paper is based on the results of 40 years of field recording of the Tasmanian Aboriginal rock art sites, many of which remain unpublished.

  15. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  16. Targeting the RhoA-ROCK pathway to reverse T-cell dysfunction in SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozo, Cristina; Chinenov, Yurii; Maharaj, Reena Khianey; Gupta, Sanjay; Leuenberger, Laura; Kirou, Kyriakos A; Bykerk, Vivian P; Goodman, Susan M; Salmon, Jane E; Pernis, Alessandra B

    2017-04-01

    Deregulated production of interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-21 contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Production of IL-17 and IL-21 can be regulated by ROCK2, one of the two Rho kinases. Increased ROCK activation was previously observed in an SLE cohort. Here, we evaluated ROCK activity in a new SLE cohort, and an RA cohort, and assessed the ability of distinct inhibitors of the ROCK pathway to suppress production of IL-17 and IL-21 by SLE T cells or human Th17 cells. ROCK activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 29 patients with SLE, 31 patients with RA and 28 healthy controls was determined by ELISA. SLE T cells or in vitro-differentiated Th17 cells were treated with Y27632 (a pan-ROCK inhibitor), KD025 (a selective ROCK2 inhibitor) or simvastatin (which inhibits RhoA, a major ROCK activator). ROCK activity and IL-17 and IL-21 production were assessed. The transcriptional profile altered by ROCK inhibitors was evaluated by NanoString technology. ROCK activity levels were significantly higher in patients with SLE and RA than healthy controls. Th17 cells exhibited high ROCK activity that was inhibited by Y27632, KD025 or simvastatin; each also decreased IL-17 and IL-21 production by purified SLE T cells or Th17 cells. Immune profiling revealed both overlapping and distinct effects of the different ROCK inhibitors. ROCK activity is elevated in PBMCs from patients with SLE and RA. Production of IL-17 and IL-21 by SLE T cells or Th17 cells can furthermore be inhibited by targeting the RhoA-ROCK pathway via both non-selective and selective approaches. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Partial deletion of the ROCK2 protein fails to reduce renal fibrosis in a unilateral ureteral obstruction model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Itsuko; Egi, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is a well‑known cause for the progression of chronic kidney disease. Rho/Rho‑associated coiled‑coil kinase (ROCK) signaling is involved in renal fibrotic processes. Non‑selective ROCK1/2 inhibitors have been reported to reduce renal interstitial fibrosis in a rodent unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model. To clarify the role and contribution of ROCK2 in renal fibrosis, the present study used ROCK2 heterozygous knockout (HKO) mice to assess collagen deposition and fibrosis‑associated gene expression in the kidney of the UUO model. In the ROCK2 HKO mice, the expression level of ROCK2 in the normal kidney was half of that in the kidney of wild‑type (WT) mice. The expression levels of ROCK1 in the ROCK2 HKO mice and WT mice were equivalent. Furthermore, in the ROCK2 HKO and the WT mice, the hydroxyproline content and the gene expression levels of collagen I and transforming growth factor‑β1 in the obstructed kidneys were augmented following UUO. By contrast, the mRNA expression of α‑smooth muscle actin decreased in the ROCK2 HKO mice, compared with that in the WT mice. The activity of ROCK in the obstructed kidneys, indicated by the phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit‑1, which is a non‑selective substrate of ROCK1 and ROCK2, was equivalent among the ROCK2 HKO and WT mice. In conclusion, no differences in renal interstitial fibrosis or UUO‑induced ROCK activity were identified between the ROCK2 HKO and WT mice, indicating that the genetic partial disruption of ROCK2 is insufficient for protecting against renal fibrosis.

  18. The importance of bass clarity in pop and rock venues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert

    2008-01-01

    High levels of bass sound have been shown to stimulate the part of the brain that controls such basic instincts as sexual desire and hunger [Todd, 2000]. In rock and pop music, the bass frequencies from 40-125 Hz get amplified to very loud levels. Easily half of the electrical power of the PA and...

  19. Determining the stress of rock massif

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Defining the stress rock massif is essential for design of underground facilities and methods of mining in the mines. Assessment the value of stress state of rock massif and rock strength in the various loads allows rational design. This is of particular importance when sizing columns, determining the extent of excavation, the cross-sections of underground rooms in problems with rock bursts and others. This paper briefly gives the basic methods of determining the rock massif stress as part of...

  20. Ellipsoidal anisotropy in elasticity for rocks and rock masses

    CERN Document Server

    Pouya, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    One of the interesting features with the ellipsoidal models of anisotropy presented in this paper is their acceptance of analytical solutions for some of the basic elasticity problems. It was shown by Pouya (2000) and Pouya and Zaoui (2006) that many closed-form solutions for basic problems involving linear isotropic materials could be extended by linear transformation to cover a variety of "ellipsoidal" materials. This paper will describe two main varieties of ellipsoidal elastic models and show how well they fit the in situ data for sedimentary rocks; numerical homogenization results for several varieties of fractured rock masses will also be provided.

  1. On Sand or Rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Norma E.

    Future teachers of English at the college level should initially be allowed to discuss and consider some of the important facts of this decade: the dwindling resources of our planet, overpopulation, hunger and disease, and the increase in global communication. They should be informed about the small number of job openings at present in the field…

  2. Used fuel disposition in crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jerden, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Copple, Jacqueline M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cruse, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ebert, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Buck, E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eittman, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tinnacher, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tournassat, Christophe. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Viswanathan, H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dittrich, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyman, F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makedonska, N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Fuel Cycle Technology established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) in fiscal year 2010 (FY10) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and high level nuclear waste. The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of long-term disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media.

  3. Flexor Tendon Pulley Injuries in Rock Climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Elizabeth A; Lien, John R

    2017-02-01

    Closed pulley ruptures are rare in the general population but occur more frequently in rock climbers due to biomechanical demands on the hand. Injuries present with pain and swelling over the affected pulley, and patients may feel or hear a pop at the time of injury. Sequential pulley ruptures are required for clinical bowstringing of the flexor tendons. Ultrasound confirms diagnosis of pulley rupture and evaluates degree of displacement of the flexor tendons. Isolated pulley ruptures frequently are treated conservatively with early functional rehabilitation. Sequential pulley ruptures require surgical reconstruction. Most climbers are able to return to their previous activity level.

  4. Characterization of verdete rock as a potential source of potassium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedisson Oliveira Santos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Potassium is a nutrient found at low levels in Brazilian soils, requiring large inputs of fertilizers to achieve satisfactory crop yields. Brazil has high external dependence and limited reserves of soluble K mineral, which is traditionally exploited for the production of fertilizers. On the other hand, it is common the occurrence in the country of potassium-rich silicate minerals which are not commercially exploited. This study aimed to characterize mineralogically and chemically samples of verdete rock separated into size fractions and evaluate its potential as potassium fertilizer. The mineral composition of verdete rock is based on glauconite, quartz and feldspar. The total K2O content in verdete rock ranged from 5.18 to 9.0 dag/kg. The K content extracted in water or 2% citric acid was 2.4% below the total of K, indicating low reactivity of verdete rock and limitations for direct use as K source. The processes of physical fractionation and sedimentation in water are inefficient to promote the concentration of K in the different verdete rock fractions. The total K content in some samples are considerable and may enable the use of this rock as raw material for production of more reactive potassium fertilizers.

  5. Attachable rock bolters for roadheaders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weibezahn, K. [Wirth Maschinen- und Bohrgeraete-Fabrik GmbH, Erkelenz (Germany); West, M. [Deilmann-Haniel Mining Systems GmbH (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Roadheaders are used in mining and tunnelling in medium hard rock formations. The excavated space is made safe either by NATM-technology or a steel support system. The application of a rock bolting system up to now was restricted to formations that can cope with at least some support lag. A new system was developed in close cooperation between WIRTH Maschinen- und Bohrgeraetefabrik GmbH and deilmann-haniel mining systems gmbh that allows to carry out rock bolting with two drill rigs whicht are attached to the cutting boom of the roadheader even in front of the cutter head directly after cutting. Alternatively a robot may be attached to above named system that enables remotely controlled shot-creting close to the face.

  6. Hot dry rock geothermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiken, G.; Murphy, H.; Nunz, G.; Potter, R.

    1981-08-01

    Man-made geothermal systems are discussed which make it possible to extract heat from hot rocks in areas where natural fluids are insufficient for the development of hydrothermal energy. The location and magnitude of high- and low-temperature geothermal resources in the USA for such hot dry rock (HDR) systems are examined. An HDR concept is described in which water is injected into one of two nearly parallel wells connected at depth by man-made fractures; the injected water circulates through the fracture system, where it is heated by conduction from the hot rock, and hot fluid, which can be used for heating or for electric power generation, rises through the second well. Some heat-extraction experiments using the described concept are reviewed which are being conducted in a complex volcanic field in New Mexico. The economics of HDR energy is evaluated.

  7. The importance of bass clarity in pop and rock venues

    OpenAIRE

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert

    2008-01-01

    High levels of bass sound have been shown to stimulate the part of the brain that controls such basic instincts as sexual desire and hunger [Todd, 2000]. In rock and pop music, the bass frequencies from 40-125 Hz get amplified to very loud levels. Easily half of the electrical power of the PA and monitor system goes to these 1.5 octaves. A recent survey [Adelman-Larsen et al., 2007] showed that the most important subjective parameter for a rock and pop music hall to score a high rating was 'b...

  8. ROCK1 deficiency enhances protective effects of antioxidants against apoptosis and cell detachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Surma

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that the homologous Rho kinases, ROCK1 and ROCK2, play different roles in regulating stress-induced stress fiber disassembly and cell detachment, and the ROCK1 deficiency in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF has remarkable anti-apoptotic, anti-detachment and pro-survival effects against doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic drug. This study investigated the roles of ROCK isoforms in doxorubicin-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation which is believed to be the major mechanism underlying its cytotoxicity to normal cells, and especially to cardiomyocytes. Different antioxidants have been shown to provide a protective role reported in numerous experimental studies, but clinical trials of antioxidant therapy showed insufficient benefit against the cardiac side effect. We found that both ROCK1-/- and ROCK2-/- MEFs exhibited reduced ROS production in response to doxorubicin treatment. Interestingly, only ROCK1 deficiency, but not ROCK2 deficiency, significantly enhanced the protective effects of antioxidants against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. First, ROCK1 deficiency and N-acetylcysteine (an anti-oxidant treatment synergistically reduced ROS levels, caspase activation and cell detachment. In addition, the reduction of ROS generation in ROCK1-/- MEFs in response to doxorubicin treatment was in part through inhibiting NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, ROCK1 deficiency enhanced the inhibitory effects of diphenyleneiodonium (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase on ROS generation and caspase 3 activation induced by doxorubicin. Finally, ROCK1 deficiency had greater protective effects than antioxidant treatment, especially on reducing actin cytoskeleton remodeling. ROCK1 deficiency not only reduced actomyosin contraction but also preserved central stress fiber stability, whereas antioxidant treatment only reduced actomyosin contraction without preserving central stress fibers. These results reveal a novel strategy to enhance

  9. Petrophysics at the rock matrix scale: hydraulic properties and petrographic interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoto, M.

    2003-07-01

    The main objective of this publication is to review, summarize and make comprehensive the hydraulic properties of rocks, at the rock matrix or in tact rock scale. Also to describe how to petrographically interpret those properties. For this purpose, the procedures for the characterization and visualisation of the rock-forming components and in special the water path-ways at that scale are explained. Further more, to establish a methodological approach for an appropriate petrographic interpretation of all the mentioned properties is intended. This Technical Report is applied to the geological solution for the final disposal of high level radioactive wastes. In any case, most of the aspects covered here are of scientific and technical interest for any researcher interested in the behaviour of water in rocks and vice versa, also in the potential fluid- rock interactions. The document is divided into six Chapters, mainly theoretical and methodological, and six Appen - dixes, more focussed to practical tests and procedures for rock characterization. Two significant rock types in high level radioactive waste, HLW, granites and clays, have been used for illustrating most of the examples here included. Under a wide geological perspective, it must be stated that in any geological scenario two different systems or scales coexist; the rock massif (with fractures of about m to km) and the rock matrix (with internal discontinuities such as fissures and cracks to the order of Fm to dm). Their different behaviour is considered in Chapter 1 as well as the specific role played by the rock matrix in the long- and short-term period. General considerations about physical properties of rocks and comparative advantages and disadvantages of the main candidate rocks for radioactive repositories are also included. (Author)

  10. Inelastic deformation in crystalline rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, H.; Borja, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    The elasto-plastic behavior of crystalline rocks, such as evaporites, igneous rocks, or metamorphic rocks, is highly dependent on the behavior of their individual crystals. Previous studies indicate that crystal plasticity can be one of the dominant micro mechanisms in the plastic deformation of crystal aggregates. Deformation bands and pore collapse are examples of plastic deformation in crystalline rocks. In these cases twinning within the grains illustrate plastic deformation of crystal lattice. Crystal plasticity is governed by the plastic deformation along potential slip systems of crystals. Linear dependency of the crystal slip systems causes singularity in the system of equations solving for the plastic slip of each slip system. As a result, taking the micro-structure properties into account, while studying the overall behavior of crystalline materials, is quite challenging. To model the plastic deformation of single crystals we use the so called `ultimate algorithm' by Borja and Wren (1993) implemented in a 3D finite element framework to solve boundary value problems. The major advantage of this model is that it avoids the singularity problem by solving for the plastic slip explicitly in sub steps over which the stress strain relationship is linear. Comparing the results of the examples to available models such as Von Mises we show the significance of considering the micro-structure of crystals in modeling the overall elasto-plastic deformation of crystal aggregates.

  11. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>20041935 Chen Bailin (China University of Geosciences, Beijing);Shu Bin X-Ray Analysis of Deformed Rocks from Beishan Area, Gansu Province, China (Journal of Jilin University (Earth Science Edition ), ISSN 1671-5888 CN22-1343/P, 33(4), 2003, p. 424-429, 442, 2 illus. , 3 tables, 13 refs. )

  12. Los abuelos de nuestro rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Celnik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Los Yetis. Una bomba atómica a go go. La historia de los abuelos de nuestro rock. Diego Londoño; Pulso & Letra Editores, Instituto para el Desarrollo de Antioquia, Instituto de Cultura y Patrimonio de Antioquia, 2014, 98 págs., fotografías.

  13. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131550 Bai Jinfeng(Institute of Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration,Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences,Langfang 065000,China);Bo Wei Determination of 36Elements in Geochemical Samples by High Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry(Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN0254-5357,CN11-2131/TD,31(5),2012,p.814

  14. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>20050704 Cheng Lin (Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, China); Feng Songlin Analysis of Colored Elements in Ancient Colored Glaze by SRXRF (Rock and Mineral Analysis, ISSN0254-5357, CN11 -2131/TD, 23 (2), 2004, p. 113-116, 120, 3 illus. , 3 tables, 6 refs. )

  15. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20142093Chen Daohua(Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey,Guangzhou 510075,China);Diao Shaobo The Latest Progress of Geological Marine Testing Technology in China(Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN0254-5357,CN11-2131/TD,32(6),2013,p.850-859,105refs.)Key words:chemical analysis,China

  16. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070252 Chen Meilan (Biological and Environmental College, Zhejiang Shuren University, Hangzhou 310015, China); Li Li Study on Adsorption of Phenol by Modified Organobentonite (Rock and Mineral Analysis, ISSN0254-5357, CN11-2131/TD, 24(4), 2005, p.259-261, 267, 6 illus., 1 table, 11 refs.) Key words: bentonite, benzene, adsorption

  17. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    20160255 Wang Na(Tianjin Center of Geological Survey,China Geological Survey,Tianjin 300170,China);Teng Xinhua Determination of Low-Content Iron Carbonate in Stream Sediments by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with Aluminum Chloride Extraction(Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN0254-5357,CN11-2131/TD,34(2),2015,p.229

  18. Metamorphic Rocks in West Irian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegen, van der G.

    1971-01-01

    Low-grade metamorphics of West Irian occur to the east of Geelvink Bay associated with two narrow belts of basic and ultrabasic igneous rocks which represent ophiolitic suites of an eugeosynclinical development beginning in Early Mesozoic time. In both of these belts there are indications of regiona

  19. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20140786Deng Zhenping(Institute of Karst Geology,Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences,Guilin 541004,China);Yang Wen-qiong Application of Stripping Voltammetry with a Solid Amalgam Electrode for Determination of Copper in a Tracer and Groundwater Tracing Experiment(Rock and Mineral Analy-

  20. Plant Communities of Rough Rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Linda

    A unit of study on plants grown in the Navajo community of Rough Rock, Arizona, is presented in sketches providing the common Navajo name for the plant, a literal English translation, the English name of the plant, and the Latin name. A brief description of each plant includes where the plant grows, how the Navajos use the plant, and the color and…

  1. Rock selection for nesting in Proformica longiseta Collingwood, 1978 (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) in a Mediterranean high mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio, Fernández Escudero; Tinaut, Alberto; Ruano, Francisca

    1993-06-01

    Proformica longiseta, an ant species endemic to certain high mountains, has been studied with regard to its tendency to nest underneath rocks. This behaviour led us to investigate whether a particular type of rock is selected, and, if so, the advantages to this species of the selection. This study was located at 2400 m above sea-level in the Sierra Nevada mountains (Granada, Spain). To determine the range of rock sizes available, in eight control plots the thicknesses were recorded and also the maximum and minimum diameters of all rocks with surface area of more than 6 cm2. A total of 1724 rocks were recorded, noting among the rock types available those that were used for nesting. Also as a preliminary estimate of the thermal characteristics of the rocks, we recorded the temperatures of the air, soil surface, soil under a rock covering an ant nest, and soil at 30 cm depth. The results indicate that P. longiseta selects flat rocks with a surface area/thickness ratio of 2 5, the thickness being not less than 1.5 cm, the surface area being 50 250 cm2 and volume less than 1000 cm3. This type of rock offers the nests two beneficial but apparently contradictory effects: (1) protection against high temperatures on hot days, and (2) warmth on colder days by absorbing the diffusing solar heat more effectively than the air or soil around the nest.

  2. Using CTX Image Features to Predict HiRISE-Equivalent Rock Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Navid; Huertas, Andres; McGuire, Patrick; Mayer, David; Ardvidson, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Methods have been developed to quantitatively assess rock hazards at candidate landing sites with the aid of images from the HiRISE camera onboard NASA s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. HiRISE is able to resolve rocks as small as 1-m in diameter. Some sites of interest do not have adequate coverage with the highest resolution sensors and there is a need to infer relevant information (like site safety or underlying geomorphology). The proposed approach would make it possible to obtain rock density estimates at a level close to or equal to those obtained from high-resolution sensors where individual rocks are discernable.

  3. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    , these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer.......Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key...... regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active...

  4. Folding and Fracturing of Rocks: the background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, John G.

    2017-04-01

    This book was generated by structural geology teaching classes at Imperial College. I was appointed lecturer during 1957 and worked together with Dr Gilbert Wilson teaching basic structural geology at B.Sc level. I became convinced that the subject, being essentially based on geometric field observations, required a firm mathematical basis for its future development. In particular it seemed to me to require a very sound understanding of stress and strain. My field experience suggested that a knowledge of two- and three-demensional strain was critical in understanding natural tectonic processes. I found a rich confirmation for this in early publications of deformed fossils, oolitic limestones and spotted slates made by several geologists around the beginning of the 20th century (Sorby, Philips, Haughton, Harker) often using surprisingly sophisticated mathematical methods. These methods were discussed and elaborated in Folding and Fracturing of Rocks in a practical way. The geometric features of folds were related to folding mechanisms and the fold related small scale structures such as cleavage, schistosity and lineation explained in terms of rock strain. My work in the Scottish Highlands had shown just how repeated fold superposition could produce very complex geometric features, while further work in other localities suggested that such geometric complications are common in many orogenic zones. From the development of structural geological studies over the past decades it seems that the readers of this book have found many of the ideas set out are still of practical application. The mapping of these outcrop-scale structures should be emphasised in all field studies because they can be seen as ''fingerprints'' of regional scale tectonic processes. My own understanding of structural geology has been inspired by field work and I am of the opinion that future progress in understanding will be likewise based on careful observation and measurement of the features of

  5. Two functional polymorphisms of ROCK2 enhance arterial stiffening through inhibiting its activity and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi-Chu; Liu, Ping-Yen; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Lin, Wen-Yi; Liao, James K; Juo, Suh-Hang H

    2015-02-01

    Derangement of Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) has been related to coronary artery disease and stroke. ROCK2, rather than ROCK1, plays a predominant role in vascular contractility. The present study aims to test (1) the associations between ROCK2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and arterial stiffness, and (2) the molecular mechanism accounting for their effects. Stiffness parameters including beta (β), elasticity modulus (Ep) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were obtained by carotid ultrasonography. Seven tagging SNPs of ROCK2 were initially genotyped in 856 subjects and significant SNPs were replicated in another group of 527 subjects. Two SNPs in complete linkage disequilibrium were found to be significantly associated with arterial stiffness. The major alleles of rs978906 (A allele) and rs9808232 (C allele) were associated with stiffer arteries. SNP rs978906 was predicted to influence microRNA(miR)-1183 binding to ROCK2, while rs9808232 causes amino acid substitution. To determine their functional impact, plasmid constructs carrying different alleles of the significant SNPs were created. Compared to rs978906G-allele constructs, cells transfected with rs978906A-allele constructs had higher baseline luciferase activities and were less responsive to miR-1183 changes. Oxidized-low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) suppressed miR-1183 levels and increased ROCK2 protein amounts. For rs9808232, cells transfected with C-allele constructs had significantly higher ROCK activities than those with A-allele constructs. Leukocyte ROCK activities were further measured in 52 healthy subjects. The average ROCK activity was highest in human subjects with CC genotype at rs9808232, followed by those with AC and lowest in AA. Taken together, the present study showed that two functional SNPs of ROCK2 increase susceptibility of arterial stiffness in the Chinese population. Non-synonymous SNP rs9808232 influences ROCK2 activity, while 3' UTR SNP rs978906 affects the ROCK2 protein

  6. ROCK1 isoform-specific deletion reveals a role for diet-induced insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Huang, Hu; Choi, Kangduk; Lee, Dae Ho; Shi, Jianjian; Liu, Tiemin; Chun, Kwang Hoon; Seo, Ji A.; Lima, Ines S.; Zabolotny, Janice M.; Wei, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Rho kinase (ROCK) isoforms regulate insulin signaling and glucose metabolism negatively or positively in cultured cell lines and skeletal muscle. However, the in vivo function of the ROCK1 isoform in adipose tissue has not been addressed. To determine the specific role of the adipose ROCK1 isoform in the development of insulin resistance and obesity, mice lacking ROCK1 in adipose tissue globally or selectively were studied. Here, we show that insulin's ability to activate IRS-1/PI3K/Akt signaling was greatly enhanced in adipose tissue of ROCK1−/− mice compared with wild-type mice. These effects resulted from the inhibitory effect of ROCK1 on insulin receptor action, as evidenced by the fact that IR tyrosine phosphorylation was abolished in ROCK1−/− MEF cells when ROCK1 was reexpressed. Consistently, adipose-specific disruption of ROCK1 increased IR tyrosine phosphorylation in adipose tissue and modestly improved sensitivity to insulin in obese mice induced by high-fat feeding. This effect is independent of any changes in adiposity, number or size of adipocytes, and metabolic parameters, including glucose, insulin, leptin, and triglyceride levels, demonstrating a minimal effect of adipose ROCK1 on whole body metabolism. Enzymatic activity of ROCK1 in adipose tissue remained ∼50%, which likely originated from the fraction of stromal vascular cells, suggesting involvement of these cells for adipose metabolic regulation. Moreover, ROCK isoform activities were increased in adipose tissue of diet-induced or genetically obese mice. These data suggest that adipose ROCK1 isoform plays an inhibtory role for the regulation of insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obesity in vivo. PMID:24326423

  7. The role of boron and fluids in high temperature, shallow level metamorphism of the Chugach Metamorphic Complex, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, V. B.; Leeman, W. P.

    1988-01-01

    The possible role of boron (B) involvement in granite equilibria and generation of melts during crustal metamorphism has been a focus of speculation in recent literature. Most of the evidence for such involvement derives from experimental data which implies that the addition of B will lower the temperature of the granite solidus. Also the presence of tourmaline has a minor effect on the temperature of the solidus. Further indirect evidence that B may be involved in partial melting processes is the observation that granulites are commonly depleted in B, whereas the B content of low grade metapelites can be high (up to 2000 ppm). Researchers' measurements of the whole-rock B contents of granulites from the Madras region, India are low, ranging from 0.4 to 2.6 ppm. Ahmad and Wilson suggest that B was mobilized in the fluid phase during granulite facies metamorphism of the Broken Hill Complex, Australia. Thus, it appears that during the amphibolite to granulite transition, B is systematically lost from metasediments. The B that is released will probably partition into the vapor phase and/or melt phase. Preliminary measurements imply that the boron content of rocks in the Chugach Metamorphic Complex is not sufficient to influence the processes of partial melting at low pressures.

  8. Exercise Desert Rock Letter Orders. Army, Camp Desert Rock, Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1957-08-01

    WILF.iED J MSGT A19032i3 HJ;,ŕWAY, ELLafGzJN 8FC Xf,37791267 INOZ W, P. 1. PVT2 US52401808 KELLEY, JESSIE J SFC R1� EVaS, LOUIS PFC .,53073109...Ord Co (HAM) Camo Desert Rock, Nevada You will preeeed to Reynolds Funeral Vome, Sigourney, Iowa 0/a 24 AU ist 1957 for apprx fourteen (14) days to

  9. Sm-Nd and U-Pb isotopic constraints for crustal evolution during Late Neoproterozic from rocks of the Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica: geodynamic development coeval with the East African Orogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikant, V.; Laux, J.H.; Pimentel, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent post-750 Ma continental reconstructions constrain models for East African Orogeny formation and also the scattered remnants of ~640 Ma granulites, whose genesis is controversial. One such Neoproterozoic granulite belt is the Schirmacher Oasis in East Antarctica, isolated from the distinctly younger Pan-African orogen to the south in the central Droning Maud Land. To ascertain the duration of granulite-facies events in these remnants, garnet Sm-Nd and monazite and titanite U-Pb IDTIMS geochronology was carried out on a range of metamorphic rocks. Garnet formation ages from a websterite enclave and gabbro were 660±48 Ma and 587±9 Ma respectively, and those from Stype granites were 598±4 Ma and 577±4 Ma. Monazites from metapelite and metaquartzite yielded lower intercept UPb ages of 629±3 Ma and 639±5 Ma, respectively. U-Pb titanite age from calcsilicate gneiss was 580±5 Ma. These indicate peak metamorphism to have occurred between 640 and 630 Ma, followed by near isobaric cooling to ~580 Ma. Though an origin as an exotic terrane from the East African Orogen cannot be discounted, from the present data there is a greater likelihood that Mesoproterozoic microplate collision between Maud orogen and a northerly Lurio-Nampula block resulted in formation of these granulite belt(s).

  10. Inhibition of Rac and ROCK Signalling Influence Osteoblast Adhesion, Differentiation and Mineralization on Titanium Topographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowse, Paul D. H.; Elliott, Christopher G.; Hutter, Jeff; Hamilton, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the time required for initial integration of bone-contacting implants with host tissues would be of great clinical significance. Changes in osteoblast adhesion formation and reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton in response to altered topography are known to be upstream of osteoblast differentiation, and these processes are regulated by the Rho GTPases. Rac and RhoA (through Rho Kinase (ROCK)). Using pharmacological inhibitors, we tested how inhibition of Rac and ROCK influenced osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on PT (Pre-treated) and SLA (sandblasted large grit, acid etched) topographies. Inhibition of ROCK, but not Rac, significantly reduced adhesion number and size on PT, with adhesion size consistent with focal complexes. After 1 day, ROCK, but not Rac inhibition increased osteocalcin mRNA levels on SLA and PT, with levels further increasing at 7 days post seeding. ROCK inhibition also significantly increased bone sialoprotein expression at 7 days, but not BMP-2 levels. Rac inhibition significantly reduced BMP-2 mRNA levels. ROCK inhibition increased nuclear translocation of Runx2 independent of surface roughness. Mineralization of osteoblast cultures was greater on SLA than on PT, but was increased by ROCK inhibition and attenuated by Rac inhibition on both topographies. In conclusion, inhibition of ROCK signalling significantly increases osteoblast differentiation and biomineralization in a topographic dependent manner, and its pharmacological inhibition could represent a new therapeutic to speed bone formation around implanted metals and in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23505566

  11. Inhibition of Rac and ROCK signalling influence osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on titanium topographies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D H Prowse

    Full Text Available Reducing the time required for initial integration of bone-contacting implants with host tissues would be of great clinical significance. Changes in osteoblast adhesion formation and reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton in response to altered topography are known to be upstream of osteoblast differentiation, and these processes are regulated by the Rho GTPases. Rac and RhoA (through Rho Kinase (ROCK. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we tested how inhibition of Rac and ROCK influenced osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on PT (Pre-treated and SLA (sandblasted large grit, acid etched topographies. Inhibition of ROCK, but not Rac, significantly reduced adhesion number and size on PT, with adhesion size consistent with focal complexes. After 1 day, ROCK, but not Rac inhibition increased osteocalcin mRNA levels on SLA and PT, with levels further increasing at 7 days post seeding. ROCK inhibition also significantly increased bone sialoprotein expression at 7 days, but not BMP-2 levels. Rac inhibition significantly reduced BMP-2 mRNA levels. ROCK inhibition increased nuclear translocation of Runx2 independent of surface roughness. Mineralization of osteoblast cultures was greater on SLA than on PT, but was increased by ROCK inhibition and attenuated by Rac inhibition on both topographies. In conclusion, inhibition of ROCK signalling significantly increases osteoblast differentiation and biomineralization in a topographic dependent manner, and its pharmacological inhibition could represent a new therapeutic to speed bone formation around implanted metals and in regenerative medicine applications.

  12. Particulate Matter and Noise Impact Studies of Waste Rock Dump*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2016-06-01

    Jun 1, 2016 ... pressure level modelling indicates that the waste rock dump has a potential to ... Problems related to noise include stress related illnesses, high blood pressure, speech ... modelling consist of physical parameters that are ... The monitoring activity was ... efficiency of 40% (assumed) will reduce the noise.

  13. Microbial biodiversity in Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radax, C.; Wieland, H.; Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Leuko, S.; Rittmann, S.; Weidler, G.; Gruber, C.; Stan-Lotter, H.

    2003-04-01

    Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt (age 200-250 million years) was shown several times to contain living extremely halophilic Archaea. These organisms might stem from ancient populations that became entrapped and persisted in the rock salt since then. For this reason, rock salt is considered a promising model system for the search for bacterial extraterrestrial life. In our studies on biodiversity in Alpine rock salt, we employed both culture-dependent and culture-independent, PCR-based methods. The latter approach indicated the presence of at least 12 distinct sequence types (phylotypes) in our samples, all of which belonged to the extremely halophilic Archaea. None of the recovered sequences was identical to sequences from databases, suggesting the avoidance of contaminants during experimental procedures. Two phylotypes could be assigned to taxonomically described members of this family; the remaining ten phylotypes appeared only remotely related to known genera of the extremely halophilic Archaea. In contrast, attempts to isolate organisms from the same sample on 15 different growth media so far yielded only two groups of isolates that could be differentiated based on their 16S rRNA genes. One group was very similar to Halococcus strains that we frequently isolated from Alpine rock salt; the other group was closely correlated to one of our novel phylotypes. Analyses of whole cell protein patterns allowed to further differentiate the latter group into two different subgroups that could not be distinguished at the molecular level. These results show that both culture-dependent and culture-independent strategies have to be applied in order to obtain a more complete view of microbial biodiversity in Permo-Triassic rock salt: culture-independent methods yield information on the gross microbial diversity in rock salt, whereas subtle differences can currently only be registered between cultivated strains.

  14. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Emi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Furumatsu, Takayuki, E-mail: matino@md.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  15. Rock Art: Connecting to the Past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, Marianne

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity for fourth-grade students in which they learn about ancient art and create their own authentic-looking rock sculptures with pictograms, or painted images. Explains how the students create their own rocks and then paint a pictograph on the rocks with brown paint. (CMK)

  16. Rock Music's Place in the Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politis, John

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of the importance of rock music as an expression of aural culture includes its history, rock music today, and the development of a rock music collection in the library (placement of collection and books which aid in developing a collection of permanent value). Three references are included. (EJS)

  17. 30 CFR 57.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ground Control Scaling and Support-Surface and Underground § 57.3203 Rock fixtures. (a) For rock bolts and accessories addressed in... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock fixtures. 57.3203 Section 57.3203 Mineral...

  18. Rock-degrading endophytic bacteria in cacti

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Esther Puente; Ching Y. Li; Yoav Bashan

    2009-01-01

    A plant-bacterium association of the cardon cactus (Pachycereus pringlei) and endophytic bacteria promotes establishment of seedlings and growth on igneous rocks without soil. These bacteria weather several rock types and minerals, unbind significant amounts of useful minerals for plants from the rocks, fix in vitro N2. produce...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5180 - Rocking bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rocking bed. 868.5180 Section 868.5180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5180 Rocking bed. (a) Identification. A rocking bed is a...

  20. Thallium and its contents in Remata carbonate rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondelová Marcela

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents at first the list of thallium own minerals and its isomorphic content in other minerals, especially in Slovakian ore deposits. This trace element was found in numerous dolomite-rock samples from Remata massif near Handlová. An interesting level of Tl content was analyzed in nonsilicified rocks; the highest content of Tl (and Ag are along the E – W line of disturbance. The presence of thallium in some limonitic aggregates in close Kremnica-gold deposit indicate any continuous relation. Some similarities to type gold deposits Carlin ( USA are discussed, even if no gold and discrete thallium phases were in Remata determined yet.

  1. Differentiation and analysis on rock breaking characteristics of TBM disc cutter at different rock temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭青; 张桂菊; 夏毅敏; 李建芳

    2015-01-01

    In order to study rock breaking characteristics of tunnel boring machine (TBM) disc cutter at different rock temperatures, thermodynamic rock breaking mathematical model of TBM disc cutter was established on the basis of rock temperature change by using particle flow code theory and the influence law of interaction mechanism between disc cutter and rock was also numerically simulated. Furthermore, by using the linear cutting experiment platform, rock breaking process of TBM disc cutter at different rock temperatures was well verified by the experiments. Finally, rock breaking characteristics of TBM disc cutter were differentiated and analyzed from microscale perspective. The results indicate the follows. 1) When rock temperature increases, the mechanical properties of rock such as hardness, and strength, were greatly reduced, simultaneously the microcracks rapidly grow with the cracks number increasing, which leads to rock breaking load decreasing and improves rock breaking efficiency for TBM disc cutter. 2) The higher the rock temperature, the lower the rock internal stress. The stress distribution rules coincide with the Buzin Neske stress circle rules: the maximum stress value is below the cutting edge region and then gradually decreases radiant around; stress distribution is symmetrical and the total stress of rock becomes smaller. 3) The higher the rock temperature is, the more the numbers of micro, tensile and shear cracks produced are by rock as well as the easier the rock intrusion, along with shear failure mode mainly showing. 4) With rock temperature increasing, the resistance intrusive coefficients of rock and intrusion power decrease obviously, so the specific energy consumption that TBM disc cutter achieves leaping broken also decreases subsequently. 5) The acoustic emission frequency remarkably increases along with the temperature increasing, which improves the rock breaking efficiency.

  2. Mechanism of Rock Burst Occurrence in Specially Thick Coal Seam with Rock Parting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-chao; Jiang, Fu-xing; Meng, Xiang-jun; Wang, Xu-you; Zhu, Si-tao; Feng, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Specially thick coal seam with complex construction, such as rock parting and alternative soft and hard coal, is called specially thick coal seam with rock parting (STCSRP), which easily leads to rock burst during mining. Based on the stress distribution of rock parting zone, this study investigated the mechanism, engineering discriminant conditions, prevention methods, and risk evaluation method of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP through setting up a mechanical model. The main conclusions of this study are as follows. (1) When the mining face moves closer to the rock parting zone, the original non-uniform stress of the rock parting zone and the advancing stress of the mining face are combined to intensify gradually the shearing action of coal near the mining face. When the shearing action reaches a certain degree, rock burst easily occurs near the mining face. (2) Rock burst occurrence in STCSRP is positively associated with mining depth, advancing stress concentration factor of the mining face, thickness of rock parting, bursting liability of coal, thickness ratio of rock parting to coal seam, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal, whereas negatively associated with shear strength. (3) Technologies of large-diameter drilling, coal seam water injection, and deep hole blasting can reduce advancing stress concentration factor, thickness of rock parting, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal to lower the risk of rock burst in STCSRP. (4) The research result was applied to evaluate and control the risk of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP.

  3. ESR dating of fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then trow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size : these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected from the Yangsan fault system. ESR dates from the this fault system range from 870 to 240 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity continued into the pleistocene.

  4. Methods of rock burst prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genkin, V.A.; Minin, Yu.Ya.; Morozov, G.D.; Proskuryakov, V.M.; Cmirnov, V.A.

    1979-07-01

    Some methods of predicting rock bursts in underground coal and iron ore mines are evaluated: using BP-18 indenters and the MGD indenter with automatic recording; seismic method consisting in measuring the speed of shock waves travelling through various layers (apparatus SB-20 is designed for use in coal mines); electrometric method (measuring resistance between two electrodes when electric currents flow through coal and rocks). The design of the AEhSSh-1 measuring instrument, used in the electrometric method in coal mines is also described. Each of the methods is described and mathematical fomulae used as their theoretical basis are presented. The calculating process is explained and brief information on the design and use of the measuring instrument is given. The methods are evaluated from the viewpoint of precision. (In Russian)

  5. Origin of lunar feldspathic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D.; Grove, T. L.; Longhi, J.; Stolper, E. M.; Hays, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Melting experiments and petrographic studies of lunar feldspathic rocks reveal possible genetic relationships among several compositionally and mineralogically distinct groups of lunar rocks and soil fragments. Dry, low PO2 partial melting of crustal anorthositic norites of the anorthositic-noritic-troctolitic (ANT) suite produces liquids of the KREEP-Fra Mauro basalt type; dry, low PO2 partial melting of pink spinel troctolite (PST) produces liquids of the 'very high alumina basalt' or microtroctolite type. Both ANT and PST are probable components of the primitive terra crust. If crystal fractionation in a cooling basaltic liquid could have produced such a crust, it would also produce a mafic interior capable of yielding mare basalts by later remelting at depth.

  6. Damage Model of Brittle Coal-Rock and Damage Energy Index of Rock Burst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹光志; 张东明; 魏作安; 李东伟

    2003-01-01

    Based on the mechanical experiment of brittle coal-rock and the damage mechanical theory, a damage model was established. Coal-Rock damage mechanical characteristic was researched. Furthermore, interior energy transformation mechanism of rock was analyzed from the point of view of damage mechanics and damage energy release rate of brittle coal rock was derived. By analyzing the energy transformation of rock burst, a new conception, damage energy index of rock burst, was put forward. The condition of rock burst was also established.

  7. Study of TL response in heavily irradiated rock salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, X.; Dies, X. (Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain). Inst. de Tecniques Energetiques); Cuevas, C. de las (Barcelona Univ. (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    Within the framework of the CEC R and D Programme ''Management and Storage of Radioactive Waste'', the study of the generation of radiation damage in heavily irradiated rock salt is being carried out. This work describes the experiments carried out for the validation of the TL techniques, in the assessment of the phenomena related to the energy absorbed by the rock salt, due to the high levels of irradiation. The samples analysed are natural rock salt coming from the Sallent mine (Spain). The chemical composition of the rocks is, in all cases, higher than 90% NaCl, having small amounts of SO[sub 4], Mg, K, Br and Sr as major impurities. A first set of irradiations was performed at the laboratory with a source of [sup 137]Cs. The doses reached were lower than 20Gy. A second set of irradiations was performed at an industrial facility with a source of [sup 60]Co, achieving doses up to 2.5 MGy. Afterwards the irradiated samples were analysed with TL and optical absorption techniques. The results have facilitated a study of the glow curves, their evolution in time and the influence of the chemical composition, the absorbed dose, and the absorbed dose rate. These experiments have increased knowledge of the behaviour of heavily irradiated rock salt. (Author).

  8. Consumption and diffusion of dissolved oxygen in sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaka, M; Takeda, M

    2016-10-01

    Fe(II)-bearing minerals (e.g., biotite, chlorite, and pyrite) are a promising reducing agent for the consumption of atmospheric oxygen in repositories for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. To estimate effective diffusion coefficients (De, in m(2)s(-1)) for dissolved oxygen (DO) and the reaction rates for the oxidation of Fe(II)-bearing minerals in a repository environment, we conducted diffusion-chemical reaction experiments using intact rock samples of Mizunami sedimentary rock. In addition, we conducted batch experiments on the oxidation of crushed sedimentary rock by DO in a closed system. From the results of the diffusion-chemical reaction experiments, we estimated the values of De for DO to lie within the range 2.69×10(-11)concentration of reactive sites was about 10(-4)molm(-2) from batch experiments. In contrast, the value of reactive sites estimated from the physical surface area was about 10(-8)molm(-2), indicating that the reaction within intact rock is limited to the sites that originally existed with accessible porosity for O2(aq). This difference arises because the batch experiments used powdered samples, meaning that new sites which formed during milling were added to the original reaction sites. On the basis of these observations and interpretations, diffusion-chemical reaction experiments make it possible to determine the values of the kinetic parameter and diffusivity for an intact rock sample simultaneously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Folding and faulting of strain-hardening sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    The question of whether single- or multi-layers of sedimentary rocks will fault or fold when subjected to layer-parallel shortening is investigated by means of the theory of elastic-plastic, strain-hardening materials, which should closely describe the properties of sedimentary rocks at high levels in the Earth's crust. The most attractive feature of the theory is that folding and faulting, intimately related in nature, are different responses of the same idealized material to different conditions. When single-layers of sedimentary rock behave much as strain-hardening materials they are unlikely to fold, rather they tend to fault, because contrasts in elasticity and strength properties of sedimentary rocks are low. Amplifications of folds in such materials are negligible whether contacts between layer and media are bonded or free to slip for single layers of dolomite, limestone, sandstone, or siltstone in media of shale. Multilayers of these same rocks fault rather than fold if contacts are bonded, but they fold readily if contacts between layers are frictionless, or have low yield strengths, for example due to high pore-water pressure. Faults may accompany the folds, occurring where compression is increased in cores of folds. Where there is predominant reverse faulting in sedimentary sequences, there probably were few structural units. ?? 1980.

  10. Search for magnetic monopoles in polar volcanic rocks

    CERN Document Server

    Bendtz, K; Hächler, H -P; Hirt, A M; Mermod, P; Michael, P; Sloan, T; Tegner, C; Thorarinsson, S B

    2013-01-01

    For a broad range of values of magnetic monopole mass and charge, the abundance of monopoles trapped inside the Earth would be expected to be enhanced in the mantle beneath the geomagnetic poles. A search for magnetic monopoles was conducted using the signature of an induced persistent current following the passage of igneous rock samples through a SQUID-based magnetometer. A total of 24.6 kg of rocks from various selected sites, among which 23.4 kg are mantle-derived rocks from the Arctic and Antarctic areas, was analysed. No monopoles were found and a 90% confidence level upper limit of $1.6\\cdot 10^{-28}$ is set on the monopole to nucleon ratio in the search samples.

  11. Search for Magnetic Monopoles in Polar Volcanic Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtz, K.; Milstead, D.; Hächler, H. -P.

    2013-01-01

    For a broad range of values of magnetic monopole mass and charge, the abundance of monopoles trapped inside Earth would be expected to be enhanced in the mantle beneath the geomagnetic poles. A search for magnetic monopoles was conducted using the signature of an induced persistent current...... following the passage of igneous rock samples through a SQUID-based magnetometer. A total of 24.6 kg of rocks from various selected sites, among which 23.4 kg are mantle-derived rocks from the Arctic and Antarctic areas, was analyzed. No monopoles were found, and a 90% confidence level upper limit of 9.8 x...... 10(-5)/g is set on the monopole density in the search samples. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.121803...

  12. Thermophysical Properties of Selected Rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-04-01

    Thermal Condutivity (K) (W m-4 K- 1) 300 2.497 400 2.258 500 2.035 600 1.825 700 1.645 800 1.481 900 1.345 1000 1.252 *No selections were made for...WORDS (Continue on revese side it necessay and identify by block number) *Thermophysical properties-- *Rocks --- Thermal conductivity --- Thermal ...diffusivity --- Thermal linear expansion --- Specif ic heat --- Basalt --- Dacite--Dunite --- Gabbro --- Granite--- *Granodiorite --- Limestone --- Marble

  13. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>20101621 Chen Heping (Nanyang Geology Testing & Research Center of Henan Province, Nanyang 473000, China); Sha Yanmei Simultaneous Determination of Major and Minor Elements in Carbonates by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry with Multi-direction Viewing Mode (Rock and Mineral Analysis, ISSN0254-5357, CN11-2131/TD, 28(4), 2009, p.367-369, 5 tables, 10 refs.)

  14. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070970 Cheng Jian(Center of Analysis and Testing,Hunan Zhuye Torch Metals Co., Ltd.,Zhuzhou 412004,China)Direct Deter- mination of Lead in Refined Indium by Flume Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN 0254- 5357,CN11-2131/TD,25(1),2006,p.91 -92,94,1 illus.,7 tables,5 refs.) Key words:lead,atomic absorption

  15. The structures of noncrystalline rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The structural studies of noncrystalline rocks by total radial distribution function (RDF) which was derived from the wide angular X-ray scattering (WAXS) have been reported. In order to make a further study of the structural features shown by RDF, the unsymmetric peaks in total RDF were separated into the approximately symmetric peaks by the multi-peaks separation processing. By analyzing the relationship of the peak parameters with the compositions, the information of further structures has been discussed.

  16. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20111673 Cao Ban(Zhejiang Institute of Geological & Mineral Resources,Hangzhou 310007,China);Ma Jun Determination of 16 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Groundwater by High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence-Ultraviolet Detector(Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN0254-5357,CN11-2131/TD,29(5),2010,p.539-542,2 illus.,4 tables,15 refs.)Key words:liquid chromatography,polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons,fluorescence analysis

  17. 20020118: Rock (2), panel (14)

    OpenAIRE

    None

    2002-01-01

    Rock Art photograph, unknown [cam element='coordinate' qualifier='longitude']W 70deg34'55.9"[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='latitude']S 32deg49'49.0"[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='altitude']924[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='bearing']60[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='inclination']75[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='cartesian'](1.950,1.640,2.190)[/cam

  18. Shock Propagation In Crustal Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-29

    Muscovite dehydroxylation: High-temperature studies, Am. Mineral., 72, 537-550, 1986. Halbach, H., and N. D. Chatterjee, An empirical Redlich - Kwong ...earth and other planetary surfaces as well having application in the study of the Earth’s interior. Granitic rocks are the most common component of...their applicability to muscovite above 1000 K. Thermodynamic functions for H20 were taken from Halbach and Chatterjee [1982]. Gibbs’ free energy

  19. The impact of mechanical properties of rock to the collision of rock piece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Macuh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analytical solution of the rock piece motion considering influences of geometrical and mechanical characteristics of rock mass on the arbitrary slope. The main objective of the paper is to determine the motion of the rock piece considering possibility of rock piece failure due to collision. Brief description of the analytical solution of the rock piece motion on a steep slope is given. The laboratory tests were performed to determine uniaxial compressive strength and elastic properties of the considered rock mass. Further, velocities that cause rock piece failure were determined. These maximum velocities indirectly belong to certain mass of rock piece and can be lower than velocities calculated in rock-fall analysis for certain slope geometry. Consequently, the energy magnitude is limited, because at certain velocity and mass of rock piece bigger pieces crash at collision.

  20. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110887 Chen Yong(College of Geo-Resources and Information,China University of Petroleum,Qingdao 266555,China);Ge Yunjin Experimental Study on the Modes of Hydrocarbon-Bearing Inclusion Trapped in Carbonate Rock Reservoirs(Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN0254-5357,CN11-2131/TD,29(3),2010,p.217-220,1 illus.,16 refs.,with English abstract)Key words:petroleum products,organic inclusion,carbonates20110888 Cheng Zhizhong(Institute of Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration,Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences,Langfang 065000,China);Gu Tiexin Preparation of Nine Iron Ore Reference Materials of GFe-1~GFe-9(Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN0254-5357,CN11-2131/TD,29(3),2010,p.305-308,5 tables,13 refs.)Key words:iron ores,type specimens Nine standard reference iron ore samples of GFe-1~GFe-9 were developed.The concentrations of TFe of the samples ranged from 20.17% to 66.87%,which covered a wide iron concentration range from concentrated iron ore powder to poor iron ores and can meet the needs for iron ore exploration and ore-dressing.Powder XRF technique was used for homogeneity test and the analytical results indicated that all elements tested were in good homogeneity.

  1. ESR dating of fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then grow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs. grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size; these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected near the Gori nuclear reactor. Most of the ESR signals of fault rocks collected from the basement are saturated. This indicates that the last movement of the faults had occurred before the Quaternary period. However, ESR dates from the Oyong fault zone range from 370 to 310 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity of the Oyong fault zone continued into the Pleistocene.

  2. The physical principles of rock magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Frank

    1974-01-01

    Developments in Solid Earth Geophysics 5: The Physical Principles of Rock Magnetism explores the physical principles of rock magnetism, with emphasis on the properties of finely divided magnetic materials. It discusses the origin and stability of rock magnetizations, the role of remanent magnetism in interpreting magnetic surveys, magnetic anisotropy as an indicator of rock fabric, and the relationship between piezomagnetic changes and seismic activity. Organized into 13 chapters, this volume discusses the properties of solids, magnetite and hematite grains, and rocks with magnetite grains

  3. A Review on the British Rock Music

    OpenAIRE

    Hutapea, Alfian Hadi Pranata

    2011-01-01

    Music has an important role in people’s life. In people’s daily, music is often hearing of course and in people’s customs and traditions music is also be used. Music has many genres, one of them is rock music. Many people like rock music especially youngman because rock music has given a message in a song through enthusiasm expression. Rock music has many subgenres and each of subgenres have a distinctive feature. The developing of rock music is very wide in the world, especially in Great Bri...

  4. ROCK I Has More Accurate Prognostic Value than MET in Predicting Patient Survival in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Bharadwaj, Shruthi S; Guzman, Grace; Vishnubhotla, Ramana; Glover, Sarah C

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States despite improvements in incidence rates and advancements in screening. The present study evaluated the prognostic value of two tumor markers, MET and ROCK I, which have been noted in other cancers to provide more accurate prognoses of patient outcomes than tumor staging alone. We constructed a tissue microarray from surgical specimens of adenocarcinomas from 108 colorectal cancer patients. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression levels of tumor markers MET and ROCK I, with a pathologist blinded to patient identities and clinical outcomes providing the scoring of MET and ROCK I expression. We then used retrospective analysis of patients' survival data to provide correlations with expression levels of MET and ROCK I. Both MET and ROCK I were significantly over-expressed in colorectal cancer tissues, relative to the unaffected adjacent mucosa. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that patients' 5-year survival was inversely correlated with levels of expression of ROCK I. In contrast, MET was less strongly correlated with five-year survival. ROCK I provides better efficacy in predicting patient outcomes, compared to either tumor staging or MET expression. As a result, ROCK I may provide a less invasive method of assessing patient prognoses and directing therapeutic interventions. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. A load measuring anchor plate for rock bolt using fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Li, Weijie; Wang, Bo; Song, Gangbing

    2017-05-01

    Rock bolts are the devices that used to reinforce the rock masses in mining tunnels and underground excavation structures. The loading level of the rock bolt indicates the reinforcing efficiency and is able to ensure safe underground operation by giving warnings to the underground miners prior to any accidents. Therefore, it is very important to monitor the load level of the rock bolts. In this short communication, we propose a smart anchor plate, a simple but effective device that uses fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) type optic sensor, to monitor the load level of the rock bolt. Instead of measuring the stress/strain on the rock bolt, which adds more complexity, the proposed method monitors the rock bolt load by measuring the load experience on the rock bolt anchor plate. Such a configuration has the advantages of simple structure and flexible implementation. In experimental observation, the FBG instrumented anchor plate is able to observe the load of the plate with good repeatability. This test will lead to further in-depth studies involving finite element analysis as well as more complex applications.

  6. Inhibitors of Rho kinase (ROCK) signaling revert the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells in 3D context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Masahiro; Bissell, Mina J

    2016-05-31

    Loss of polarity and quiescence along with increased cellular invasiveness are associated with breast tumor progression. ROCK plays a central role in actin-cytoskeletal rearrangement. We used physiologically relevant 3D cultures of nonmalignant and cancer cells in gels made of laminin-rich extracellular matrix, to investigate ROCK function. Whereas expression levels of ROCK1 and ROCK2 were elevated in cancer cells compared to nonmalignant cells, this was not observed in 2D cultures. Malignant cells showed increased phosphorylation of MLC, corresponding to disorganized F-actin. Inhibition of ROCK signaling restored polarity, decreased disorganization of F-actin, and led to reduction of proliferation. Inhibition of ROCK also decreased EGFR and Integrinβ1 levels, and consequently suppressed activation of Akt, MAPK and FAK as well as GLUT3 and LDHA levels. Again, ROCK inhibition did not inhibit these molecules in 2D. A triple negative breast cancer cell line, which lacks E-cadherin, had high levels of ROCK but was less sensitive to ROCK inhibitors. Exogenous overexpression of E-cadherin, however, rendered these cells strikingly sensitive to ROCK inhibition. Our results add to the growing literature that demonstrate the importance of context and tissue architecture in determining not only regulation of normal and malignant phenotypes but also drug response.

  7. Petrology of unshocked crystalline rocks and shock effects in lunar rocks and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, E.C.T.; James, O.B.; Minkin, J.A.; Boreman, J.A.; Jackson, E.D.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1970-01-01

    On the basis of rock modes, textures, and mineralogy, unshocked crystalline rocks are classified into a dominant ilmenite-rich suite (subdivided into intersertal, ophitic, and hornfels types) and a subordinate feldspar-rich suite (subdivided into poikilitic and granular types). Weakly to moderately shocked rocks show high strain-rate deformation and solid-state transformation of minerals to glasses; intensely shocked rocks are converted to rock glasses. Data on an unknown calcium-bearing iron metasilicate are presented.

  8. Mechanical property and cutting rate of microwave treated granite rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lek Sikong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of microwave treatment, especially at low power level on compressive strength and cutting rate of granite rock by using multimodal cavity. The power level and cooling rate of treated samples were found to have an effect on the compressive strength, and the cutting rate. This effect is due to the induction of the plastic zones and micro cracks in the rock matrix, especially at the grain boundaries induced by the thermal stresses of rock forming minerals which have the difference in dielectric properties after microwave heating for a certain exposure time together with the thermal-shock treatment after the heating. It was found that the strength of treated granite is less than 60% of the original after 30 minutes of exposure.The dry heated samples with a water quenching seem to be the most affected samples. They exhibit a significant decrease in compressive strength up to 70% and cutting rate up to 38% after 30-minute treatment at the power of 850W, and after 10-minute treatment at the power of 600W respectively. Prolonged treatment causes the relaxation of induced thermal stresses in the rock mass, leading to a slight increase in compressive strength, and a slight decrease in cutting rate. For dry samples, the cutting rate can be enhanced because of a decrease in hardness of rock mass dropped from 61.5 to 55.4 HRC afterthe 10-minute heating at 600W with thermal shock treatment.The absorbed water in the pores of rock mass also has an effect on a decrease in compressive strength. Because micro cracks developed by the water vapor generated by heat which escapes through open pores. However, it seems to have less effect on the cutting rate because it causes a slight decrease in the hardness.

  9. Approaches to confirmatory testing of a groundwater flow model for sparsely fractured crystalline rock, exemplified by data from the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follin, Sven; Hartley, Lee

    2014-03-01

    The Svensk Kärnbränslehantering AB (SKB) has proposed the Forsmark site as a future repository for spent high-level nuclear fuel, involving disposal at about 470 m depth in sparsely fractured crystalline bedrock. An essential part of the completed inter-disciplinary site investigation was to develop an integrated account of the site and its regional setting, including the current state of the geosphere and the biosphere as well as natural processes affecting long-term evolution. First, this report recollects the integrated understanding and some key hydraulic characteristics of the crystalline bedrock at Forsmark along with a description of the flow model set-up and the methodology used for paleoclimatic flow modeling. Second, the protocol used for site-scale groundwater flow and solute transport modeling is demonstrated. In order to conduct a quantitative assessment of groundwater flow paths at Forsmark, the standard guide for groundwater flow modeling was elaborated on, to support both discrete and porous media flow approaches. In total, four independent types of data were used to confirm that the final groundwater flow model for the crystalline bedrock was representative of site conditions.

  10. Earthquake resistant design of rock oil tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, M.; Iwano, M.; Izumi, H.; Shiba, Y.; Sugihara, Y.

    1983-01-01

    In order to establish a rational procedure of the earthquake resistant design of large rock caverns, such as oil storage tanks on nuclear power plants, experimental and numerical studies were conducted. Dynamic strains during earthquakes were observed on the lining of a railway tunnel constructed in a hard rock mountain, while the seismic motion in the surrounding rock was examined precisely. The observation clarified that the lining strain of the tunnel was linearly and statically related to the rock strain and the ratio of the lining strain to the rock strain was dominated by the relative stiffness of the lining and rock. Based on the results of the earthquake observation, numerical models were proposed for the estimation of the dynamic strains of rock caverns. A good agreement between the calculated strains and the observed ones assured the adequacy of the numerical models.

  11. Clay Characteristics of Tertiary Rocks with Parallel Level Fractures in Western Qaidam Basin%柴西地区第三系发育平行层面缝岩石的粘土矿物特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    畅斌; 张金功

    2013-01-01

    Core sample and microscopic fluorescent observation, SEM and X-ray diffraction research showed that there are two types of clay minerals combination from top to bottom of parallel level fractures, the Tertiary in western Qaidam basin: I/S+I+CH+(K)→I+CH+I/S+C/S+(K). Contents of clay minerals lie between 7% -27%, and tend to decrease gradually with increasing depth. Organo clay complexe is the consequence of abnormal high fluid pressure, reduction environment, organic matter, passage system of fractures and hydrodynamic force.%柴西地区第三系地层中多发育平行层面缝,通过岩心及荧光显微镜观察,并借助扫描电子显微镜(SEM)和X射线衍射分析(XRD),确定了柴西地区第三系发育平行层面缝岩石自上而下存在2种粘土矿物组合:伊/蒙间层+伊利石+绿泥石+(高岭石)→伊利石+绿泥石+伊/蒙间层+绿/蒙间层+(高岭石),粘土矿物占全岩矿物比例介于7%~27%之间,粘土矿物吸附并保存了有机质,这是异常高压、强还原环境、有机质及平行层面缝优势输导体系和强水动力作用多种因素叠加影响的结果.

  12. Modeling field-scale multiple tracer injection at a low-level waste disposal site in fractured rocks: Effect of multiscale heterogeneity and source term uncertainty on conceptual understanding of mass transfer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwo, Jin-Ping; Jardine, Philip M.; Sanford, William E.

    2005-03-01

    Multiple factors may affect the scale-up of laboratory multi-tracer injection into structured porous media to the field. Under transient flow conditions and with multiscale heterogeneities in the field, previous attempts to scale-up laboratory experiments have not answered definitely the questions about the governing mechanisms and the spatial extent of the influence of small-scale mass transfer processes such as matrix diffusion. The objective of this research is to investigate the effects of multiscale heterogeneity, mechanistic and site model conceptualization, and source term density effect on elucidating and interpreting tracer movement in the field. Tracer release and monitoring information previously obtained in a field campaign of multiple, conservative tracer injection under natural hydraulic gradients at a low-level waste disposal site in eastern Tennessee, United States, is used for the research. A suite of two-pore-domain, or fracture-matrix, groundwater flow and transport models are calibrated and used to conduct model parameter and prediction uncertainty analyses. These efforts are facilitated by a novel nested Latin-hypercube sampling technique. Our results verify, at field scale, a multiple-pore-domain, multiscale mechanistic conceptual model that was used previously to interpret only laboratory observations. The results also suggest that, integrated over the entire field site, mass flux rates attributable to small-scale mass transfer are comparable to that of field-scale solute transport. The uncertainty analyses show that fracture spacing is the most important model parameter and model prediction uncertainty is relatively higher at the interface between the preferred flow path and its parent bedrock. The comparisons of site conceptual models indicate that the effect of matrix diffusion may be confined to the immediate neighborhood of the preferential flow path. Finally, because the relatively large amount of tracer needed for field studies, it is

  13. Aespoe hard rock laboratory. Annual report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    the repository system, which are of importance for long-term safety. The Prototype Repository experiment is focused on testing and demonstrating repository system function in full scale, and consists of six deposition holes with canisters and electric heaters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. The work during 2000 has focused on geoscientific characterisation and specially hydraulic properties and conditions of the rock. Preparatory work with design, purchase and manufacturing as well as rock work (slots for the two plugs) have been going on with the aim of preparing for start of installation during the second quarter of 2001. Equipment for installation of bentonite blocks and canisters were tested before start of installation in the Canister Retrieval Test. This test was completed in October and the heaters as well as the artificial saturation system was turned on immediately thereafter. The objectives of the Demonstration of Repository Technology are to develop, test, and demonstrate methodology and equipment for encapsulation and deposition of spent nuclear fuel. The demonstration of handling and deposition is made with the specially designed full scale prototype to a deposition machine at 420 m level. The Backfill and Plug Test includes tests of backfill materials and emplacement methods and a test of a full-scale plug. Half the test part is filled with a mixture of 30% bentonite and crushed granite rock. The other half is filled with crushed rock without addition of bentonite, except for the upper 100-200 mm, where a slot was filled with blocks of highly compacted bentonite/crushed rock mixture and bentonite pellets. The backfill and rock has been instrumented with about 230 transducers for measuring the thermo- hydro-mechanical processes. Water saturation has been going on the whole year and the saturation speed has been slower than expected due to a lower salt content in the water than expected. In order to increase the speed a water with a higher salt

  14. Numerical analysis of soil-rock mixture's meso-mechanics based on biaxial test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-yang; XU Wen-jie; YU Yu-zhen

    2016-01-01

    Soil-rock mixture(S-RM)is a widely distributed geotechnical medium composed of "soil" and "rock block" different both in size and strength. Internal rock blocks form special and variable meso-structural characteristics of S-RM. The objective of this work was to study the control mechanism of meso-structural characteristics on mechanical properties of S-RM. For S-RM containing randomly generated polygonal rock blocks, a series of biaxial tests based on DEM were conducted. On the basis of research on the effects of rock blocks' breakability and sample lateral boundary type (rigid, flexible) on macroscopic mechanical behavior of S-RM, an expanded Mohr-Coulomb criterion in power function form was proposed to represent the strength envelop. At the mesoscopic level, the variations of meso-structure such as rotation of rock block, and the formation mechanism and evolution process of the shear band during tests were investigated. The results show that for S-RM with a high content of rock block, translation, rotating and breakage of rock blocks have crucial effects on mechanical behavior of S-RM. The formation and location of the shear band inside S-RM sample are also controlled by breakability and arrangement of rock blocks.

  15. ROCK2 is involved in accelerated fetal lung development induced by in vivo lung distension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Marc; Tremblay, Monique; Piedboeuf, Bruno

    2010-10-01

    Lung development is strongly influenced by its state of distension. For instance, increasing distension induced by fetal tracheal occlusion (TO) stimulates lung development. In contrast, oligohydramnios (OH) reduces lung distending forces and results in lung hypoplasia. We hypothesize that Rho/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) pathway plays an important role as mechanosensor in vivo acting either directly or indirectly in the translation of increased distension into acceleration of lung growth. TO was done in fetal mice sacrificed either 3 or 24 hr later; in a subset of dam, fasudil, a specific ROCK inhibitor, or vehicle was injected intra-peritoneally. OH was done by puncture of the amniotic sac. ROCK2 protein levels were assessed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC); lung development was assessed by measuring the generation of distal respiratory airway. Significant differences were found in ROCK2 protein levels between TO and Sham-TO at 3 and 24 hr, but not for ROCK1. Indeed, IHC revealed that ROCK2 staining was sparse and restricted to a few mesenchymal cells in Sham-TO, whereas it was strong in acini of TO lungs. OH lungs expressed lower levels of ROCK2 in the acini when compared to untouched controls. In fasudil-treated animals, the degree of lung development following TO was significantly lower than in the group injected with vehicle. At the dose regimen used, fasudil did not affect normal lung development, as observed in the untouched animals. In summary, ROCK2 protein levels was affected by the degree of lung expansion and blunting ROCK activity abolished the response to increased lung distension, suggesting that ROCK is a key regulator in TO-induced accelerated lung development.

  16. Pharmacologic inhibition of ROCK2 suppresses amyloid-β production in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Feng, Yangbo; Mattheyses, Alexa L; Hales, Chadwick M; Higginbotham, Lenora A; Duong, Duc M; Montine, Thomas J; Troncoso, Juan C; Thambisetty, Madhav; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Levey, Allan I; Lah, James J

    2013-12-04

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and has no cure. Genetic, cell biological, and biochemical studies suggest that reducing amyloid-β (Aβ) production may serve as a rational therapeutic avenue to delay or prevent AD progression. Inhibition of RhoA, a Rho GTPase family member, is proposed to curb Aβ production. However, a barrier to this hypothesis has been the limited understanding of how the principal downstream effectors of RhoA, Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) 1 and ROCK2, modulate Aβ generation. Here, we report that ROCK1 knockdown increased endogenous human Aβ production, whereas ROCK2 knockdown decreased Aβ levels. Inhibition of ROCK2 kinase activity, using an isoform-selective small molecule (SR3677), suppressed β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) enzymatic action and diminished production of Aβ in AD mouse brain. Immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analyses revealed that SR3677 alters BACE1 endocytic distribution and promotes amyloid precursor protein (APP) traffic to lysosomes. Moreover, SR3677 blocked ROCK2 phosphorylation of APP at threonine 654 (T654); in neurons, T654 was critical for APP processing to Aβ. These observations suggest that ROCK2 inhibition reduces Aβ levels through independent mechanisms. Finally, ROCK2 protein levels were increased in asymptomatic AD, mild cognitive impairment, and AD brains, demonstrating that ROCK2 levels change in the earliest stages of AD and remain elevated throughout disease progression. Collectively, these findings highlight ROCK2 as a mechanism-based therapeutic target to combat Aβ production in AD.

  17. RhoA、RhoB/Rock1、Rock2蛋白分子在重度子(癎)前期患者的表达%The expressions of protein RhoA/RhoB ang Rock1/Rock2 in severe preeclampsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盖立文

    2015-01-01

    目的 研究重度子(癎)前期(sPE)患者的胎盘组织中Rho亚家族蛋白A(RhoA)、Rho亚家族蛋白B(RhoB)/相关卷曲螺旋形成蛋白激酶1(R0ck1)、相关卷曲螺旋形成蛋白激酶2(Rock2)蛋白分子的表达,探讨其与重度子(癎)前期发病的机制.方法 采用免疫组织化学法检测重度子(癎)前期组及正常晚期妊娠组胎盘组织中的RhoA、RhoB/Rock1、Rock2蛋白分子的表达定位及差异.结果 RhoA蛋白与RhoB蛋白及Rock1蛋白与Rock2蛋白在正常晚期妊娠组和重度子(癎)前期组胎盘滋养细胞、内皮细胞及一些间质细胞的胞浆中均有表达,以合体滋养细胞胞浆中表达为主,而Rock1蛋白与Rock2蛋白胞核中少量表达.RhoA、RhoB、Rock1、Rock2蛋白在重度子(癎)前期组的表达显著高于正常晚期妊娠组(P<0.05).结论 RhoA、RhoB蛋白和其下游靶分子Rock1、Rock2组成的信号通路,在子(癎)前期的胎盘组织中呈高表达,可能参与了子(癎)前期的胎盘的滋养细胞侵袭障碍、胎盘的滋养细胞的凋亡、缺血及缺氧、血管的部分内皮细胞损伤及动脉血管痉挛的病理过程,提示其蛋白分子在重度子(癎)前期发病中起着重要作用.%Objective To investigate expressions of Ras homologue protein family A (RhoA)/RhoB and Rho-associated coiled coil Rho forming protein Kinase 1 (Rock1)/Rock2 in placenta tissues of severe preeclampsia (sPE) to clarify the molecular mechanisms of sPE.Methods The locations and expressions of RhoA/RhoB and Rock1/Rock2 between two groups were detected with immunohistochemistry.Results RhoA,RhoB,Rock1,and Rock2 were mainly distributed in cytoplasms of syncytiotrophoblasts,cytotrophoblast,endothelial cells,and endometrial stromal cells.Rock1 and Rock2 were less expressed in nucleus.The expression levels of RhoA,RhoB,Rock1,and Rock2 in sPE group were significantly higher than control group (P < 0.05).Conclusions The signal pathway that consists of upstream Rho

  18. Rock burst proneness prediction by acoustic emission test during rock deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志镇; 高峰; 尚晓吉

    2014-01-01

    Rock burst is a severe disaster in mining and underground engineering, and it is important to predict the rock burst risk for minimizing the loss during the constructing process. The rock burst proneness was connected with the acoustic emission (AE) parameter in this work, which contributes to predicting the rock burst risk using AE technique. Primarily, a rock burst proneness index is proposed, and it just depends on the heterogeneous degree of rock material. Then, the quantificational formula between the value of rock burst proneness index and the accumulative AE counts in rock sample under uniaxial compression with axial strain increases is developed. Finally, three kinds of rock samples, i.e., granite, limestone and sandstone are tested about variation of the accumulative AE counts under uniaxial compression, and the test data are fitted well with the theoretic formula.

  19. Pore Structure of Cement Pastes Blended with Volcanic Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Lehua; ZHOU Shuangxi; LI Liling

    2016-01-01

    The pore parameters of cement pastes blended with volcanic rock at the curing age of 1, 28 and 90 d were de-termined by a mercury intrusion porosimetry. The pore structure of the pastes was characterized through the analysis of porosity, average pore diameter, the most probable pore aperture, pore size distribution, as well as total pore volume. For the improvement of mechanical property and durability of cement-based material, the correlation of the formed pore structure with hydration time and replacement level of volcanic rock for cement was revealed. The results indicate that volcanic rock can diminish porosity and reduce pore size in cement paste when curing time prolongs, which is particu-larly prominent with replacement level of less than 20% in late period. The more harmful pores (i.e., capillary pore) are gradually transformed into harmless pore (i.e., gel pores or micropore), even fully filled and disappeared when hydration products increase. The pore structure of the cement paste is thus refined. The beneficial effect of volcanic rock on the pore structure of cement paste could enhance the mechanical property and durability of cement-based material.

  20. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic

  1. Rock Goes to School on Screen: A Model for Teaching Non-"Learned" Musics Derived from the Films "School of Rock" (2003) and "Rock School" (2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Michael

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from two films with "rock" and "school" in their titles, about rock in school and about music and schooling more broadly? "School of Rock" (2003), a "family comedy," and "Rock School" (2005), a documentary, provoke a range of questions, ideological and otherwise, surrounding the inclusion of rock in formal instructional…

  2. Anxiety Reduction in Preservice Elementary Teachers and the Fulfillment of Expectations for Identification of Minerals and Rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerback, Mary E.; Gonzalez, Clemencia

    This study examined: (1) the relationship between the fulfillment of expectations for the identification of rocks and minerals after experience with specimens selected to meet expectations and anxiety levels; (2) changes in anxiety levels after this experience was followed by experience with rocks and minerals which did not meet expectations; and…

  3. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    origin and age of matrix fluids, i.e. accessible pore water, in fissures and small-scale fractures and their possible influence on fluid chemistry in the bedrock. When the EC-project EQUIP, which concentrated on the formulation of a methodology for how to conduct a palaeo hydrogeological study, ended in 2000 there was a need for continued fracture mineral investigations and model testing of the obtained results and a new EC-project was initiated in the beginning of 2002. This project is called PADAMOT (Palaeo hydrogeological Data Analysis and Model Testing) and includes further developments of analytical techniques and modelling tools to interpret data, but also further research to investigate specific processes that might link climate and groundwater properties in low permeability rocks. The project Demonstration of repository technology provides a full-scale demonstration of canister deposition under radiation-shielded conditions and works with testing of canister and bentonite handling in full size deposition holes. The Prototype Repository project focuses on testing and demonstrating repository system function in full scale and is co-funded by the EC. The experiment comprises six full size canisters with electrical heaters surrounded by bentonite. The Backfill and Plug Test is a test of the hydraulic and mechanical function of different backfill materials, emplacement methods, and a full-scale plug. The 28 m long test region is located in the ZEDEX drift. The inner part of the drift is backfilled with a mixture of bentonite and crushed rock and the outer part is filled with crushed rock. The wetting of the backfill started late 1999 and the final step of increasing the water pressure in the mats to 500 kPa was taken in January 2002. The Canister Retrieval Test, located in the main test area at the 420 m level, is aiming at demonstrating the readiness for recovering of emplaced canisters also after the time when the bentonite is fully saturated. The Long Term Test of

  4. Black ★Rock Shooter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuko

    2012-01-01

    《黑岩射手(Black RockShooter)》无疑是2月番中最吸引眼球的新番了。本作的人气高到几乎全国各地的漫展都可以看到黑岩射手MATO(麻陶)的Cosplay——一位身穿黑衣短裤.手持巨型枪械,左眼发出蓝色火焰般的光芒的少女。

  5. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110144 Hu Lan(Anhui Institute of Geological Experiment,Hefei 230001,China);Liu Yueyou Determination of Micro-amount of Bismuth in Polymetallic Ores by Hydride Generation-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry with Alkaline Mode(Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN0254-5357,CN11-2131/TD,29(1),2010,p.87-88,2 tables,10 refs.)Key words:atomic fluorescence spectrometry,bismuthA method for the determination of micro-amount of bismuth in polymetallic ores by hydride gen

  6. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20150204 Abaydulla Alimjan(Department of Chemistry and Environmental Sciences,Kashgar Teachers College,Kashgar 844006,China);Cheng Chunying Non-Metallic Element Composition Analysis of Non-Ferrous Metal Ores from Oytagh Town,Xinjiang(Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN0254-5357,CN11-2131/TD,33(1),2014,p.44-50,5illus.,4tables,28refs.)Key words:nonferrous metals ore,nonmetals,chemical analysis,thermogravimetric analysis Anions in non-ferrous ore materials

  7. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    CERN Multimedia

    Brian Cox; John Barrowman; Eddie Izzard

    2008-01-01

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  8. Disposal of radioactive waste in Swedish crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greis Dahlberg, Christina; Wikberg, Peter [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    SKB, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company is tasked with managing Swedish nuclear and radioactive waste. Crystalline rock is the obvious alternative for deep geological disposal in Sweden. SKB is, since 1988, operating a near surface repository for short-lived low and intermediate-level waste, SFR. The waste in SFR comprises operational and decommissioning waste from nuclear plants, industrial waste, research-related waste and medical waste. Spent nuclear fuel is currently stored in an interim facility while waiting for a license to construct a deep geological repository. The Swedish long-lived low and intermediate-level waste consists mainly of BWR control rods, reactor internals and legacy waste from early research in the Swedish nuclear programs. The current plan is to dispose of this waste in a separate deep geological repository, SFL, sometimes after 2045. Understanding of the rock properties is the basis for the design of the repository concepts. Swedish crystalline rock is mechanical stable and suitable for underground constructions. The Spent Fuel Repository is planned at approximately 500 meters depth in the rock at the Forsmark site. The host rock will keep the spent fuel isolated from human and near-surface environment. The rock will also provide the stable chemical and hydraulic conditions that make it possible to select suitable technical barriers to support the containment provided by the rock. A very long lasting canister is necessary to avoid release and transport of radionuclides through water conducting fractures in the rock. A canister designed for the Swedish rock, consists of a tight, 5 cm thick corrosion barrier of copper and a load-bearing insert of cast iron. To restrict the water flow around the canister and by that prevent fast corrosion, a bentonite buffer will surround the canister. Secondary, the bentonite buffer will retard a potential release by its strong sorption of radionuclides. The SFR repository is situated in

  9. Differential Regulation of Adhesion Complex Turnover by ROCK1 and ROCK2

    OpenAIRE

    Lock, Frances E.; Katie R Ryan; Poulter, Natalie S.; Maddy Parsons; Hotchin, Neil A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ROCK1 and ROCK2 are serine/threonine kinases that function downstream of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA. Rho signalling via ROCK regulates a number of cellular functions including organisation of the actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and cell migration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we use RNAi to specifically knockdown ROCK1 and ROCK2 and analyse their role in assembly of adhesion complexes in human epidermal keratinocytes. We observe that loss of ROCK1 inhibi...

  10. Rock-property changes during reservoir compaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, N. (Conoco, Inc., Ponca City, OK (United States)); Gray, K.E. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)); Srouji, F.A.A.; Jogi, P.N. (Teleco Oilfield Services Inc., Meviden, CT (US))

    1992-09-01

    Deformations, absolute permeability, electrical resistivity, PV change, and compressional- and shear-wave velocities were measured for Berea sandstone under various loading paths at temperatures from 70 to 380{degrees} F. The experimental behavior was subdivided into five categories. The experimental results were analyzed for each category, and the analysis was used to construct semianalytical rock-property equations, are expressed in terms of strain components. This formalism is practical because strains are more directly related to rock properties that are stress components. This paper presents unique rock-property data, including axial and radial measurements with various loading paths and temperatures; semianalytical equations that accurately simulate rock properties under various loading paths up to rock failure; and realistic predictions of rock-property changes during reservoir compaction.

  11. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-05-01

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

  12. Multiversos: Rock'n'Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J. A.; Arias, A.; García, N.

    2011-11-01

    Imagine that you can use your fingers only for typing target coordinates at thetelescope, reduce images and spectra with IRAF, or write papers for Astronomy &Astrophysics, but you would never be able to play an electric guitar.Imagine that you love music, work in front of the computer always withheadphones, and dream of playing with your favourite rock band in a tumultuousconcert.Imagine that you are an astronomer who, after a "cosmic fluke", share stagewith the band which themes you have always hummed since you were a teenager.Imagine that you were born for rock, played a main role in the best Spanishalbum of the 90s (Omega, with Enrique Morente), and your songs arerutinary played by Radio 3, but you would never be able to detect an exoplanetor a galaxy at a high redshift.Imagine that you love Astronomy, try to see the Moon craters and Andromeda withyour small telescope through the light pollution of your city, and explain yourdaughter that Pluto is not a planet any longer. Imagine that you are a musician who, after a "cosmic fluke", give a talk justafter a Nobel laureate that discovered the cosmic microwave backgroundradiation.Such "cosmic flukes" sometimes happen. If you were not at the dinner of the SEA meeting and do not believe us, visithttp://www.myspace.com/antonioariasmultiverso or open the proceedings DVD andlisten "El ordenador simula el nacimiento de las estrella...".

  13. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-05-01

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

  14. Geochemical Characteristics and Metallogenesis of Volcanic Rocks as Exemplified by Volcanic Rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁庚; 叶霖

    1997-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang,occurring in the collision zone between the Siberia Plate and the Junggar Plate,are distributed along the Eritix River Valley in northern Xinjiang.The volcanic rocks were dated at Late Paleozoic and can be divided into the spilite-keratophyre series and the basalt-andesite series.The spilite-keratophyre series volcanic rocks occur in the Altay orogenic belt at the southwest margin of the Siberia Plate.In addition to sodic volcanic rocks.There are also associated potassic-sodic volcanic rocks and potassic volcanic rocks.The potassic-sodic volcanic rocks occur at the bottom of the eruption cycle and control the distribution of Pb and Zn deposits.The potassic volcanic rocks occur at the top of the eruption cycle and are associated with Au and Cu mineralizations.The sodic volcanic rocks occur in the middle stage of eruption cycle and control the occurrence of Cu(Zn) deposits.The basalt-andesite series volcanic rocks distributed in the North Junggar orogenic belt at the north margin of the Junggar-Kazakstan Plate belong to the potassic sodic volcain rocks.The volcanic rocks distributed along the Ulungur fault are relatively rich in sodium and poor in potassium and are predominated by Cu mineralization and associated with Au mineralization.Those volcanic rocks distributed along the Ertix fault are relatively rich in K and poor in Na,with Au mineralization being dominant.

  15. Targeting ROCK2 rather than ROCK1 inhibits Ewing sarcoma malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinca, Rosa Simona; Manara, Maria Cristina; Chiadini, Valentina; Picci, Piero; Zucchini, Cinzia; Scotlandi, Katia

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the molecular processes characterizing Ewing sarcoma (EWS) cell migration is crucial to highlight novel therapies for patients with disseminated disease. In this study we analyzed the role of ROCK kinases in the regulation of cell migration, growth and differentiation of EWS cells. Overexpression of ROCK promotes invasion and metastasis in many solid tumors. However, the effect of ROCK in EWS has not been extensively investigated. Expression of ROCK1 and ROCK2 was analyzed by western blotting in a representative panel of human EWS cell lines, in comparison with the parameters of in vitro malignancy. We investigated the effects of a ROCK2 specific inhibitor toward those of a pan-ROCK inhibitor on the growth, migration and differentiation of two EWS cell lines. ROCK2 but not ROCK1 expression was found to be associated with in vitro cell migration and anchorage-independent growth capabilities. Exposure of EWS cells to ROCK inhibitors significantly reduced migration and growth, while favoring morphology changes and neural differentiation. These effects were more striking when cells were specifically deprived of ROCK2 activity. Our findings lead to consider ROCK2, rather than ROCK1, as a possible molecular target for the treatment of EWS. PMID:28112365

  16. Rock Testing Handbook (Test Standards 1993)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    and Earth (50) International Glossary of H.tlrology, Geneva, Switzerland, World Structures, McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., New York, (1951...reactive with alkalies in concrete. igneous rocks of lower silica content such as diorite, gabbro , 5.2 opal-a hydrous form of silica (SiO 2 -nH 2O...in European many rocks, such as ferruginous sandstones, shales. clay- usage dolerite) is a rock of similar composition to gabbro and ironstones, and

  17. Motion of rock masses on slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Petje

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the different ways of how rock masses (stones, rocks, and blocks move along slopes and for each different way of motion (free fall, bouncing, rolling, sliding, slowing down, lubrication, fluidizationadequatedynamicequationsaregiven.Knowingthe kinematics and dynamics of travelling rock masses is necessary for mathematical modeling of motion and by this an assessment of maximal possible rockfall runout distances as an example of a sudden and hazardeous natural phenomenon, threatening man and his property, especially in the natural environment.

  18. Huashan rock paintings and other simitar paintings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    China is one of the countries with the rechest rock paintings in the world. The Huashan rock paintings features color paintings, quite different from those in the North China areas where petroglyphs were created by engraving, chiseling,incising,or grinding,such as those in Inner Mongolia and Helan Mountains in Gansu.The rock paintings at Ulanchabu of Inner Mongolia are regarded as works of the Neolithic age,bronze age and iron age ,featuring mainly such grassland animals as

  19. The rock resources of the Northern Emirates

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive; Styles, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The Rock Resources of the Northern Emirates The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has vast resources of limestone and hard rock in the northern Emirates. These are currently exploited by quarrying companies to produce construction aggregate and raw material for the manufacture of cement, with a small amount being used to produce rock wool, dimension stone and mineral filler. The demand by industry for higher value mineral products that could be produced from these resources is mostly met by impor...

  20. Palaeomagnetic, rock-magnetic and mineralogical investigations of metadolerites from Western Svalbard : A preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Krzysztof; Nejbert, Krzysztof; Domańska-Siuda, Justyna; Manby, Geoffrey

    2014-05-01

    A group of 42 independently oriented palaeomagnetic samples from 7 sites located in central part of the West Spitsbergen Thrust and Fault Belt has been investigated. The samples were collected from 5 distinct metadolerite sheets intruded into the Proterozoic - Lower Paleozoic metamorphic complex of Western Oscar II Land (Western Svalbard Caledonian Terrane - Harland, 1997 division). All analyzed metadolerite samples were metamorphosed under greenschist facies metamorphism. The metamorphic assemblage consist of hornblende, biotite, actinolite, chlorite, epidote, stilpnomelane, titanite, albite, and quartz. Calcite, associated with pyrrhotite, pyrite chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and covellite, that occurs as irregular intergrowths or thin veins, document high activity of H2O-CO2-rich fluids during metamorphism. Primary magmatic phases represented by clinopyroxene occur rarely, and only in thick metadolerite dykes. Accessory oxides change their mineralogical and chemical composition during metamorphism. In all examined samples primary Ti-magnetite and oxy-exsolved hematite break-down completely into titanite or have been dissolved. The ilmenite are also replaced by titanite, but in metadolerites at contact with host metapelites, slightly altered ilmenite grains with preserved hematite exsolution were documented. Basing on mineralogical observations it should be expected that metamorphic processes have almost completely reset the paleomagnetic data record from the time of dolerite crystallization. This stage can document only rare hematite oxy-exsolution preserved within ilmenite, and presumably small inclusion of magnetite still preserved within unaltered clinopyroxene. The paleomagnetic record of metamorphic stage is probably recorded by pyrrhotite, hematite, goethite, and late Ti-free magnetite that can grow during breakdown of pyrrhotite to pyrite (Ramdohr. 1980). The NRM (Natural Remanent Magnetisation) intensities of the palaeomagnetic samples exceed the minimum 10

  1. Avaliação do fosfato de rocha com baixo teor de flúor na alimentação de eqüinos em crescimento Evaluation of rock phosphate with low fluorine level in diets for growing horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Dal Secco de Oliveira

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Utilizaram-se 18 potras com idade média de 11 meses e peso vivo médio de 250 kg, alimentadas com 3 dietas contendo fosfato bicálcico (FB; 50% de fosfato bicálcico mais 50% fosfato de rocha de Tapira (BT e fosfato de rocha de Tapira (FT, incorporados ao concentrado (1,5% do peso vivo/animal/dia e ao sal mineralizado (50 g/animal/dia. O nível médio de flúor nas dietas FB, BT e FT foi, respectivamente, de 53,0; 90,0 e 184,0 ppm. O consumo diferenciado de fluoreto nas diferentes dietas não acarretou efeitos sobre os parâmetros ganho de peso, perímetro torácico, perímetro do joelho e perímetro da canela. Os animais que receberam a dieta contendo exclusivamente fosfato de rocha apresentaram menor aumento de altura na cernelha (1,27cm quando comparados àqueles que receberam dietas contendo fosfato bicálcico (1,55 e 1,30cm.Eighteen fillies of Brasileiro de Hipismo breed with initial age between 9 and 12 months and 250kg of average weight were used in a complete block design, during a five-month trial to evaluate the use of three different inorganic phosphorus sources. The sources were dicalcium phosphate (FB, half and half dicalcium phosphate/Tapira rock phosphate mixture (BT and Tapira rock phosphate (FT. They were added to a basal concentrate, given at the rate of 1.5% of average body weight and to a mineralized salt, of which 50 g/animal was offered daily. The mean fluoride level (concentrate plus salt in diets FB, BT and FT was 53, 90 and 184 ppm respectively. The mean monthly withers height gain was 1.55 (FB, 1.30 (BT and 1.27cm (FT and there was a significant difference between FB and FT diets.

  2. Role of ROCK Isoforms in Regulation of Stiffness Induced Myofibroblast Differentiation in Lung Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Htwe, Su S; Cha, Byung H; Yue, Kan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Knox, Alan J; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2017-02-22

    Fibrosis is a major cause of progressive organ dysfunction in several chronic pulmonary diseases. Rho associated coiled-coil forming kinase (ROCK) has shown to be involved in myofibroblast differentiation driven by altered matrix stiffness in fibrotic state. There are two known ROCK isoforms in human, ROCK1 (ROKβ) and ROCK2 (ROKα), but specific role of each isoform in myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibrosis remains unknown. To study this, we developed a Gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogel based culture system with different stiffness levels relevant to healthy and fibrotic lungs. We have shown that stiff matrix and not soft matrix, can induce myofibroblast differentiation with high αSMA expression. Furthermore, our data confirm that the inhibition of ROCK signalling by a pharmacological inhibitor (i.e. Y27632) attenuates stiffness induced αSMA expression and fibre assembly in myofibroblasts. To assess the role of ROCK isoforms in this process we used siRNA to knock down the expression of each isoform. Our data showed that knocking down either ROCK1 or ROCK2 did not result in a reduction in αSMA expression in myofibroblasts on stiff matrix as opposed to soft matrix where αSMA expression was reduced significantly. Paradoxically, on stiff matrix, the absence of one isoform (particularly ROCK2) exaggerated αSMA expression and led to thick fibre assembly. Moreover complete loss of αSMA fibre assembly was seen only in the absence of both ROCK isoforms suggesting that both isoforms are implicated in this process. Overall our results indicate the differential role of ROCK isoforms in myofibroblast differentiation on soft and stiff matrices.

  3. Effect of longwall length on mechanical characteristics of surrounding rock stress shell in mining face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guang-Xiang Xie; Lei Wang [Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China)

    2008-12-15

    The mechanical characteristics of surrounding rock stress shell in longwall mining face were studied, based on the results of in-situ measurement combined with numerical simulation, and the effect of longwall length on mechanical characteristics of surrounding rock stress shell was discovered. The results show that the mechanical characteristics of surrounding rock stress shell are influenced by the length of the face. With an increase of mining face length, the level of concentration of shell stress located in the front face and surrounding rock of roadway is amplified and the three- dimensional stress is focused in the working face. The damage lies in the head entry corner of face and the vertical displacement is reduced but horizontal displacement is enlarged. The dynamic balance of surrounding rock stress shell is improved with rational adjustment of face length. It is effective in protecting the working face and controlling strata behavior. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  4. A Reconsideration of the Extension Strain Criterion for Fracture and Failure of Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseloo, J.; Stacey, T. R.

    2016-12-01

    The complex behaviours of rocks and rock masses have presented paradoxes to the rock engineer, including the fracturing of seemingly strong rock under low stress conditions, which often occurs near excavation boundaries. The extension strain criterion was presented as a fracture initiation criterion under these conditions (Stacey in Int J Rock Mech Min Sci 18:469-474, 1981). This criterion has been used successfully by some and criticised by others. In this paper, we review the literature on the extension strain criterion and present a case for the correct interpretation of the criterion and the conditions suitable for its use. We argue that the extension strain criterion can also be used to provide an indication of damage level under conditions of relatively low confining stress. We also present an augmentation of the criterion, the ultimate extension strain, which is applicable under extensional loading conditions when σ 2 is similar in magnitude to σ 1.

  5. Piezoelectric responses of brittle rock mass containing quartz to static stress and exploding stress wave respectively

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Guo-xiang; LI Xi-bing; HONG Liang

    2008-01-01

    The electromagnetic emission (EME) induced from the rock containing piezoelectric materials was investigated under both static stress and exploding stress wave in the view of piezoelectric effect. The results show that the intensity of the EME induced from the rock under static stress increases with increasing stress level and loading rate; the relationship between the amplitude of theme from the rock under different modes of stress wave and elastic parameters and propagation distance was presented. The intensity of the EME relates not only to the strength and elastic moduli of rock masses, but also to the initial damage of the rock. The intensity of EME induced by stress wave reaches the highest at the explosion-center and attenuates with the propagation distance. The intensity of EME increases with increasing the elastic modulus and decreases with increasing initial damage. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active conformation by the direct binding of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–loaded Rho. In recent years, a number of ROCK isoform-specific binding partners have been found to modulate the kinase activity through direct interactions with the catalytic domain or via altered cellular localization of the kinases. Thus, these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer. PMID:23204112

  7. Meteorite Linked to Rock at Meridiani

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This meteorite, a basalt lava rock nearly indistinguishable from many Earth rocks, provided the first strong proof that meteorites could come from Mars. Originally weighing nearly 8 kilograms (17.6 pounds), it was collected in 1979 in the Elephant Moraine area of Antarctica. The side of the cube at the lower left in this image measures 1 centimeter (0.4 inches). This picture shows a sawn face of this fine-grained gray rock. (The vertical stripes are saw marks.) The black patches in the rock are melted rock, or glass, formed when a large meteorite hit Mars near the rock. The meteorite impact probably threw this rock, dubbed 'EETA79001,' off Mars and toward Antarctica on Earth. The black glass contains traces of martian atmosphere gases. The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has discovered that a rock dubbed 'Bounce' at Meridiani Planum has a very similar mineral composition to this meteorite and likely shares common origins. Bounce itself is thought to have originated outside the area surrounding Opportunity's landing site; an impact or collision likely threw the rock away from its primary home.

  8. Assessment of rock wool as support material for on-site sanitation: hydrodynamic and mechanical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanko, Adrien; Laurent, Julien; Bois, Paul; Mosé, Robert; Wagner-Kocher, Christiane; Bahlouli, Nadia; Tiffay, Serge; Braun, Bouke; Provo kluit, Pieter-Willem

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes mechanical and hydrodynamic characterization of rock wool used as support material in compact filter. A double-pronged approach, based on experimental simulation of various physical states of this material was done. First of all a scanning electron microscopy observation allows to highlight the fibrous network structure, the fibres sizing distribution and the atomic absorption spectrum. The material was essentially lacunar with 97 ± 2% of void space. Static compression tests on variably saturated rock wool samples provide the fact that the strain/stress behaviours depend on both the sample conditioning and the saturation level. Results showed that water exerts plastifying effect on mechanical behaviour of rock wool. The load-displacement curves and drainage evolution under different water saturation levels allowed exhibiting hydraulic retention capacities under stress. Finally, several tracer experiments on rock wool column considering continuous and batch feeding flow regime allowed: (i) to determine the flow model for each test case and the implications for water dynamic in rock wool medium, (ii) to assess the rock wool double porosity and discuss its advantages for wastewater treatment, (iii) to analyse the benefits effect for water treatment when the high level of rock wool hydric retention was associated with the plug-flow effect, and (iv) to discuss the practical contributions for compact filter conception and management.

  9. Prediction of rock brittleness using nondestructive methods for hard rock tunneling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rennie B. Kaunda; Brian Asbury

    2016-01-01

    The material and elastic properties of rocks are utilized for predicting and evaluating hard rock brit-tleness using artificial neural networks (ANN). Herein hard rock brittleness is defined using Yagiz’ method. A predictive model is developed using a comprehensive database compiled from 30 years’ worth of rock tests at the Earth Mechanics Institute (EMI), Colorado School of Mines. The model is sensitive to density, elastic properties, and P-and S-wave velocities. The results show that the model is a better predictor of rock brittleness than conventional destructive strength-test based models and mul-tiple regression techniques. While the findings have direct implications on intact rock, the methodology can be extrapolated to rock mass problems in both tunneling and underground mining where rock brittleness is an important control.

  10. Matrix rigidity differentially regulates invadopodia activity through ROCK1 and ROCK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrell, Rachel J; Parekh, Aron

    2016-04-01

    ROCK activity increases due to ECM rigidity in the tumor microenvironment and promotes a malignant phenotype via actomyosin contractility. Invasive migration is facilitated by actin-rich adhesive protrusions known as invadopodia that degrade the ECM. Invadopodia activity is dependent on matrix rigidity and contractile forces suggesting that mechanical factors may regulate these subcellular structures through ROCK-dependent actomyosin contractility. However, emerging evidence indicates that the ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms perform different functions in cells suggesting that alternative mechanisms may potentially regulate rigidity-dependent invadopodia activity. In this study, we found that matrix rigidity drives ROCK signaling in cancer cells but that ROCK1 and ROCK2 differentially regulate invadopodia activity through separate signaling pathways via contractile (NM II) and non-contractile (LIMK) mechanisms. These data suggest that the mechanical rigidity of the tumor microenvironment may drive ROCK signaling through distinct pathways to enhance the invasive migration required for cancer progression and metastasis.

  11. Prediction of rock brittleness using nondestructive methods for hard rock tunneling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rennie B. Kaunda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The material and elastic properties of rocks are utilized for predicting and evaluating hard rock brittleness using artificial neural networks (ANN. Herein hard rock brittleness is defined using Yagiz' method. A predictive model is developed using a comprehensive database compiled from 30 years' worth of rock tests at the Earth Mechanics Institute (EMI, Colorado School of Mines. The model is sensitive to density, elastic properties, and P- and S-wave velocities. The results show that the model is a better predictor of rock brittleness than conventional destructive strength-test based models and multiple regression techniques. While the findings have direct implications on intact rock, the methodology can be extrapolated to rock mass problems in both tunneling and underground mining where rock brittleness is an important control.

  12. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Aespoe HRL has been constructed as part of the preparations for the deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. Geoscientific investigations on Aespoe and nearby islands began 1986. Since then, bedrock conditions have been investigated by several deep boreholes. The Aespoe research village has been built and extensive underground construction work has been undertaken in parallel with comprehensive research. This has resulted in a thorough test of methods for investigation and evaluation of bedrock conditions for construction of a deep repository. The objective of the ZEDEX project is to compare the mechanical disturbance to the rock for excavation by tunnel boring and blasting. The results indicate that the role of the EDZ as a preferential pathway to radionuclide transport is limited to the damaged zone. The tracer retention understanding experiments are made to gain a better understanding of radionuclide retention in the rock and create confidence in the radionuclide transport models. During 1996 a series of tracer experiments in radially converging and dipole flow configuration have been performed. A special borehole probe has been designed for different kinds of retention experiments where data can be obtained representative for the in situ properties of groundwater at repository depth. The prototype repository test is focused on testing and demonstrating repository system function, and includes backfill and plug tests and demonstration of methods for deposition and retrieval of canisters in a new tunnel at the 420 m level. The long term tests of buffer material aim to validate models of buffer performance and at quantifying clay buffer alteration processes at adverse conditions. 80 refs, 53 figs, 16 tabs.

  13. Elastic Properties of Sedimentary Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez Martinez, Jaime

    Sedimentary rocks are an important research topic since such rocks are associated to sources of ground water as well as oil, gas, and mineral reservoirs. In this work, elastic and physical properties of a variety of sedimentary samples that include glacial sediments, carbonates, shales, one evaporite, and one argillite from a variety of locations are investigated. Assuming vertical transverse isotropy, ultrasonic compressional- and shear-waves (at 1 MHz central frequency) were measured as a function of confining pressure on all samples with the exception of glacial samples which were tested assuming isotropy. Tensile strength tests (Brazilian test) were also carried out on selected glacial samples and, in addition, static-train measurements were conducted on shales and argillite samples. Lithological and textural features of samples were obtained through thin section techniques, scanning electron microscopy images and micro-tomography images. X-ray diffraction and X-Ray fluorescence provided the mineralogical oxides content information. Porosity, density, and pore structure were studied by using a mercury intrusion porosimeter and a helium pycnometer. The wide range of porosities of the studied samples (ranging from a minimum of 1% for shales to a maximum 45% for some glacial sediments) influence the measured velocities since high porosity sample shows an noticeable velocity increment as confining pressure increases as a consequence of closure of microcracks and pores, unlike low porosity samples where increment is quasi-lineal. Implementation of Gassmann's relation to ultrasonic velocities obtained from glacial samples has negligible impact on them when assuming water saturated samples, which suggests that state of saturation it is no so important in defining such velocities and instead they are mainly frame-controlled. On the other hand, velocities measured on carbonate and evaporite samples show that samples are at best weak anisotropic, thus the intrinsic

  14. Rho-GTPase effector ROCK phosphorylates cofilin in actin-meditated cytokinesis during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xing; Liu, Jun; Dai, Xiao-Xin; Liu, Hong-Lin; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Wang, Qiang; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-02-01

    During oocyte meiosis, a spindle forms in the central cytoplasm and migrates to the cortex. Subsequently, the oocyte extrudes a small body and forms a highly polarized egg; this process is regulated primarily by actin. ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector that is involved in various cellular functions, such as stress fiber formation, cell migration, tumor cell invasion, and cell motility. In this study, we investigated possible roles for ROCK in mouse oocyte meiosis. ROCK was localized around spindles after germinal vesicle breakdown and was colocalized with cytoplasmic actin and mitochondria. Disrupting ROCK activity by RNAi or an inhibitor resulted in cell cycle progression and polar body extrusion failure. Time-lapse microscopy showed that this may have been due to spindle migration and cytokinesis defects, as chromosomes segregated but failed to extrude a polar body and then realigned. Actin expression at oocyte membranes and in cytoplasm was significantly decreased after these treatments. Actin caps were also disrupted, which was confirmed by a failure to form cortical granule-free domains. The mitochondrial distribution was also disrupted, which indicated that mitochondria were involved in the ROCK-mediated actin assembly. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of Cofilin, a downstream molecule of ROCK, decreased after disrupting ROCK activity. Thus, our results indicated that a ROCK-Cofilin-actin pathway regulated meiotic spindle migration and cytokinesis during mouse oocyte maturation.

  15. Speciation of Cu and Zn during composting of pig manure amended with rock phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Duian; Wang, Lixia; Yan, Baixing; Ou, Yang; Guan, Jiunian; Bian, Yu; Zhang, Yubin

    2014-08-01

    Pig manure usually contains a large amount of metals, especially Cu and Zn, which may limit its land application. Rock phosphate has been shown to be effective for immobilizing toxic metals in toxic metals contaminated soils. The aim of this study work was to investigate the effect of rock phosphate on the speciation of Cu and Zn during co-composting of pig manure with rice straw. The results showed that composting process and rock phosphate addition significantly affected the changes of metal species. During co-composting, the exchangeable and reducible fractions of Cu were transformed to organic and residue fractions, thus the bioavailable Cu fractions were decreased. The rock phosphate addition enhanced the metal transformation depending on the level of rock phosphate amendment. Zinc was found in the exchangeable and reducible fractions in the compost. The bioavailable Zn fraction changed a little during the composting process. The composting process converted the exchangeable Zn fraction into reducible fraction. Addition of an appropriate amount (5.0%) of rock phosphate could advance the conversion. Rock phosphate could reduce metal availability through adsorption and complexation of the metal ions on inorganic components. The increase in pH and organic matter degradation could be responsible for the reduction in exchangeable and bioavailable Cu fractions and exchangeable Zn fraction in rock phosphate amended compost.

  16. Some influences of rock strength and strain rate on propagation of rock avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Elisabeth; Rait, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Rock avalanches are extreme and destructive mass movements in which large volumes of rock (typically >1 million cubic metres) travel at high speeds, covering large distances, and the occurrence of which is highly unpredictable. The "size effect" in rock avalanches, whereby those with larger volumes produce greater spreading efficiency (as defined by an increase in normalised runout) or lower farboschung angle (defined as the tangent of the ratio of fall height to runout length), is well known. Studies have shown that rock strength is a controlling factor in the mobility of rock avalanches - that is, mass movements involving lower strength rock are generally found to produce greater mobility as evidenced by the spread of deposits or low farboschung angle. However, there are conflicting ideas as to how and why this influence is manifested. This paper discusses different theories of rock comminution in light of numerical simulations of rock clasts undergoing normal and shear induced loading, experimental work on rock avalanche behaviour, and dynamic fracture mechanics. In doing so, we introduce the idea of thresholds of strain rate for the production of dynamic fragmentation (as opposed to pseudo-static clast crushing) that are based, inter alia, on static rock strength. To do this, we refer to data from physical models using rock analogue materials, field data on chalk cliff collapses, and field statistics from documented rock avalanches. The roles of normal and shear loading and loading rate within a rock avalanche are examined numerically using 3D Discrete Element Method models of rock clasts loaded to failure. Results may help to reconcile the observations that large rock avalanches in stronger materials tend not to fragment as much as those in weaker materials and also possess lower mobility, while small cliff collapses (typically > 1000 cubic metres) in weak chalk can exhibit rock avalanche-like behaviour at much smaller volumes.

  17. Plant growth in amended molybdenum mine waste rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burney, Owen T; Redente, Edward F; Lambert, Charles E

    2017-04-01

    This greenhouse study examined the use of organic and inorganic soil amendments in waste rock material from the former Questa Molybdenum Mine in northern New Mexico to promote beneficial soil properties. Waste rock material was amended with 11 soil amendment treatments that included municipal composted biosolids, Biosol®, inorganic fertilizer, and two controls (pure waste rock and sand). Elymus trachycaulus and Robinia neomexicana growth performance and plant chemistry were assessed across all treatments over a period of 99 and 141 days, respectively. Even though waste rock material had more than 200 times the molybdenum concentration of native soils, adverse effects were not observed for either species. The two main limiting factors in this study were soil nutritional status and soil water retention. The biosolid amendment was found to provide the greatest buffer against these limiting factors due to significant increases in both nutrition and soil water retention. As a result, both species responded with the highest levels of biomass production and the least amount of required water demands. Use of organic amendments such as biosolids, even though short lived in the soil, may provide plants the necessary growth stimulus to become more resilient to the harsh conditions found on many mine reclamation sites.

  18. Quantitative geophysical log interpretation for rock mass characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Hatherly; Renate Sliwa; Roland Turner; Terry Medhurst

    2004-04-01

    Geophysical borehole logging is routinely employed as part of exploration drilling in open pit and underground mining operations. Analysis of results is often empirical or based on theoretical considerations that need not relate to the actual properties of the rocks under consideration. The objectives of this project are to develop techniques for quantitative geophysical log interpretation techniques to enable: better estimation of coal and rock properties such as strength and permeability; better lithological interpretation and strata correlation between boreholes; a rock mass rating scheme for mine design purposes which is based on geophysical logging. This study has placed the techniques for quantitative geophysical log assessment on a firm footing. The authors have demonstrated an approach for log assessment that can be routinely applied. Many of the mineralogical and physical rock properties that impact on the assessments have been investigated and discussed. They have also demonstrated the benefits of quantitative geophysical log assessment. The major recommendation made is that geologists and engineers in the coal mining industry take the time to study this report and begin to put the approach described into practice. The collective understanding that this experience will provide can only help fuel the drive to take the benefits of geophysical logging to greater levels.

  19. Differential regulation of adhesion complex turnover by ROCK1 and ROCK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances E Lock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ROCK1 and ROCK2 are serine/threonine kinases that function downstream of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA. Rho signalling via ROCK regulates a number of cellular functions including organisation of the actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and cell migration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we use RNAi to specifically knockdown ROCK1 and ROCK2 and analyse their role in assembly of adhesion complexes in human epidermal keratinocytes. We observe that loss of ROCK1 inhibits signalling via focal adhesion kinase resulting in a failure of immature adhesion complexes to form mature stable focal adhesions. In contrast, loss of ROCK2 expression results in a significant reduction in adhesion complex turnover leading to formation of large, stable focal adhesions. Interestingly, loss of either ROCK1 or ROCK2 expression significantly impairs cell migration indicating both ROCK isoforms are required for normal keratinocyte migration. CONCLUSIONS: ROCK1 and ROCK2 have distinct and separate roles in adhesion complex assembly and turnover in human epidermal keratinocytes.

  20. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20091570 Ge Yunjin(College of Geo-Resource and Information,China University of Petroleum,Dongying 257061,China);Chen Yong Advance in Low Temperature Phase Transition and Raman Spectrum Technique in Composition Determination of Fluid Inclusions(Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN0254-5357,CN11-2131/TD,27(3),2008,p.207-210,22 refs.)Key words:fluid inclusions,Raman spectraThe principle and development of low-temperature analytical techniques for fluid inclusions were expounded.The traditional low-temperature analytical technology mainly focused on the measurement of inorganic salt using congealed microthermometry,but now it is developed to semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of fluid inclusions using in-situ cryogenic Raman spectrometry.

  1. Hard rock, heavy metal, metal

    OpenAIRE

    Hein, Fabien

    2011-01-01

    Le terme générique metal désigne une multitude de genres et de sous-genres musicaux issus de l’appariement du hard rock et du heavy metal. Il résulte d’une agrégation sémantique consécutive de l’érosion et de l’interpénétration de ces termes au cours des années 1980. Leurs modèles canoniques, respectivement représentés par les groupes Led Zeppelin et Black Sabbath, se sont progressivement dilués sous l’effet d’une filiation particulièrement effervescente et féconde : black, thrash, doom, prog...

  2. Consequence assessment of large rock slope failures in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppikofer, Thierry; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Horton, Pascal; Sandøy, Gro; Roberts, Nicholas J.; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Böhme, Martina; Yugsi Molina, Freddy X.

    2014-05-01

    Steep glacially carved valleys and fjords in Norway are prone to many landslide types, including large rockslides, rockfalls, and debris flows. Large rockslides and their secondary effects (rockslide-triggered displacement waves, inundation behind landslide dams and outburst floods from failure of landslide dams) pose a significant hazard to the population living in the valleys and along the fjords shoreline. The Geological Survey of Norway performs systematic mapping of unstable rock slopes in Norway and has detected more than 230 unstable slopes with significant postglacial deformation. This large number necessitates prioritisation of follow-up activities, such as more detailed investigations, periodic displacement measurements, continuous monitoring and early-warning systems. Prioritisation is achieved through a hazard and risk classification system, which has been developed by a panel of international and Norwegian experts (www.ngu.no/en-gb/hm/Publications/Reports/2012/2012-029). The risk classification system combines a qualitative hazard assessment with a consequences assessment focusing on potential life losses. The hazard assessment is based on a series of nine geomorphological, engineering geological and structural criteria, as well as displacement rates, past events and other signs of activity. We present a method for consequence assessment comprising four main steps: 1. computation of the volume of the unstable rock slope; 2. run-out assessment based on the volume-dependent angle of reach (Fahrböschung) or detailed numerical run-out modelling; 3. assessment of possible displacement wave propagation and run-up based on empirical relations or modelling in 2D or 3D; and 4. estimation of the number of persons exposed to rock avalanches or displacement waves. Volume computation of an unstable rock slope is based on the sloping local base level technique, which uses a digital elevation model to create a second-order curved surface between the mapped extent of

  3. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), in the Simpevarp area in the municipality of Oskarshamn constitutes an important part of SKB's work with the design and construction of a deep geological repository for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental reasons behind SKB's decision to construct an underground laboratory was to create an opportunity for research, development and demonstration in a realistic and undisturbed rock environment down to repository depth. The underground part of the laboratory consists of a tunnel from the Simpevarp peninsula to the southern part of Aespoe where the tunnel continues in a spiral down to a depth of 460 m. Aespoe HRL has been in operation since 1995 and considerable international interest has been shown in its associated research, as well as in the development and demonstration tasks. Most of the research is focused on processes of importance for the long-term safety of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. Demonstration addresses the performance of the engineered barriers and practical means of constructing and operating a repository for spent fuel. To meet the overall time schedule for SKB's RD and D work, the following stage goals were initially defined for the work at the Aespoe HRL: 1. Verify pre-investigation methods. Demonstrate that investigations on the ground surface and in boreholes provide sufficient data on essential safety-related properties of the rock at repository level. 2. Finalise detailed investigation methodology. Refine and verify the methods and the technology needed for characterisation of the rock in the detailed site investigations. 3. Test models for description of the barrier functions at natural conditions. Further develop, and at repository depth, test methods and models for description of groundwater flow, radionuclide migration and chemical conditions during operation of a repository and after closure. 4. Demonstrate technology for and function of important

  4. Toe rock stability for rubble mound breakwaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, S.; Ebbens, R.; Nammuni-Krohn, J.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Present design tools, as found in the Rock Manual or Coastal Engineering Manual, for the determination of toe rock size for rubble mound breakwaters are based on test data with a large spread: data is relatively dispersed around the centre and descriptive equations have limited applicability ranges.

  5. Rock Music and Korean Adolescent's Antisocial Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inkyung; Kwak, Keumjoo; Chang, Geunyoung; Yang, Jinyoung

    The relationship between rock music preference and antisocial behavior among Korean adolescents was examined. The Korean versions of the Sensation Seeking Scale and the Antisocial Behavior Checklist were used to measure sensation seeking motivation and delinquency. Adolescents (N=1,079) were categorized as "rock/metal,""dance,"…

  6. Acoustics in rock and pop music halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of rhythmic music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of twenty rock music venues...

  7. Tunnel Design by Rock Mass Classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    fact, rock mass classifications have been successfully applied throughout the world : in the United States,2 - Canada,7 8 Western Europe, 9 -12 South...gneiss. Very high strength >30000 >200 Quartzite, dolerite, gabbro , basalt. Table 10 3 Classification for Discontinuity Spacing Spacing of Rock Mass

  8. Using Rock Music To Teach History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Paul Dennis

    1985-01-01

    A secondary history teacher describes how he uses rock and roll music to help students study and interpret modern American history. Besides being a lot of fun to teach, a rock unit makes students realize that even contemporary music has a place in history. (RM)

  9. Preparation for Moving a Rock on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The robotic arm on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander enlarged a trench beside a rock called 'Headless' during the mission's 115th Martian day (Sept. 20, 2008) in preparation for sliding the rock into the trench. The lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image later that afternoon, showing the enlarged trench and the rock. The robotic arm successfully moved the rock two days later. The Phoenix science team sought to move the rock in order to study the soil and the depth to subsurface ice underneath where the rock had been. Headless is about the size and shape of a VHS videotape. The trench, called 'Neverland,' was excavated to about 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) deep near the rock. The ground surface between the rock and the lip of the trench slopes downward about 3 degrees toward the trench. This image was taken at about 4:35 p.m., local solar time on Mars. The view is to the north northeast of the lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Hot-dry-rock feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-08-01

    The hot-dry-rock project tasks are covered as follows: hot-dry-rock reservoir; generation facilities; water resources; transmission requirements; environmental issues; government and community institutional factors; leasing, ownership and management of facilities; regulations, permits, and laws; and financial considerations. (MHR)

  11. High-temperature carbidization of carboniferous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, B. A.; Grass, V. E.; Nadutkin, A. V.; Nazarova, L. Yu.

    2009-08-01

    Processes of thermal metamorphism of carboniferous rocks have been studied experimentally. The conditions of high-temperature interaction of shungite carbon with components of the contained rocks, leading to formation of carbide compounds, have been determined. The results of this investigation contribute to the works on searching for new raw material for prospective material production.

  12. Rock Music and Korean Adolescent's Antisocial Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inkyung; Kwak, Keumjoo; Chang, Geunyoung; Yang, Jinyoung

    The relationship between rock music preference and antisocial behavior among Korean adolescents was examined. The Korean versions of the Sensation Seeking Scale and the Antisocial Behavior Checklist were used to measure sensation seeking motivation and delinquency. Adolescents (N=1,079) were categorized as "rock/metal,""dance," or "ballad" based…

  13. Rock Cycle. K-6 Science Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueford, J. R.; And Others

    Rock Cycle is one of the units of a K-6 unified science curriculum program. The unit consists of four organizing sub-themes: (1) chemistry (introducing the topics of matter, elements, compounds, and chemical bonding); (2) characteristics (presenting hands-on activities with rocks and minerals); (3) minerals (emphasizing the aesthetic and economic…

  14. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia cover about 90,000 km2, one of the largest areas of alkali olivine basalt in the world. These volcanic rocks are in 13 separate fields near the eastern coast of the Red Sea and in the western Arabian Peninsula highlands from Syria southward to the Yemen Arab Republic.

  15. Rock Plasticity from Microtomography and Upscaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Liu; Reem Freij-Ayoub; Klaus Regenauer-Lieb

    2015-01-01

    We present a workflow for upscaling of rock properties using microtomography and percolation theory. In this paper we focus on a pilot study for assessing the plastic strength of rocks from a digital rock image. Firstly, we determine the size of mechanical representative volume ele-ment (RVE) by using upper/lower bound dissipation computations in accordance with thermody-namics. Then the mechanical RVE is used to simulate the rock failure at micro-scale using FEM. Two cases of different pressures of linear Drucker-Prager plasticity of rocks are computed to com-pute the macroscopic cohesion and the angle of internal friction of the rock. We also detect the criti-cal exponents of yield stress for scaling laws from a series of derivative models that are created by a shrinking/expanding algorithm. We use microtomographic data sets of two carbonate samples and compare the results with previous results. The results show that natural rock samples with irregular structures may have the critical exponent of yield stress different from random models. This unex-pected result could have significant ramifications for assessing the stability of solid materials with internal structure. Therefore our pilot study needs to be extended to investigate the scaling laws of strength of many more natural rocks with irregular microstructure.

  16. Statistical pattern recognition for rock joint images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixing; Bin, Cui

    2005-10-01

    As a cooperation project between Sweden and China, we sampled a number of rock specimens for analyze rock fracture network by optical image technique. The samples are resin injected, in which way; opened fractures can be seen clearly by means of UV (Ultraviolet) light illumination. In the study period, Recognition of rock fractures is crucial in many rock engineering applications. In order to successfully applying automatic image processing techniques for the problem of automatic (or semi-automatic) rock fracture detection and description, the key (and hardest task) is the automatic detection of fractures robustly in images. When statistical pattern recognition is used to segment a rock joint color image, features of different samples can be learned first, then, each pixel of the image is classified by these features. As the testing result showing, an attribute rock fracture image is segmented satisfactorily by using this way. The method can be widely used for other complicated images too. In this paper, Kernel Fisher discrimination (KFD) is employed to construct a statistical pattern recognition classifier. KFD can transform nonlinear discrimination in an attribute space with high dimension, into linear discrimination in a feature space with low dimension. While one needs not know the detailed mapping form from attribute space to feature space in the process of transformation. It is proved that this method performs well by segmenting complicated rock joint color images.

  17. Distributed snow and rock temperature modelling in steep rock walls using Alpine3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkorn, Anna; Wever, Nander; Hoelzle, Martin; Phillips, Marcia; Kenner, Robert; Bavay, Mathias; Lehning, Michael

    2017-02-01

    In this study we modelled the influence of the spatially and temporally heterogeneous snow cover on the surface energy balance and thus on rock temperatures in two rugged, steep rock walls on the Gemsstock ridge in the central Swiss Alps. The heterogeneous snow depth distribution in the rock walls was introduced to the distributed, process-based energy balance model Alpine3D with a precipitation scaling method based on snow depth data measured by terrestrial laser scanning. The influence of the snow cover on rock temperatures was investigated by comparing a snow-covered model scenario (precipitation input provided by precipitation scaling) with a snow-free (zero precipitation input) one. Model uncertainties are discussed and evaluated at both the point and spatial scales against 22 near-surface rock temperature measurements and high-resolution snow depth data from winter terrestrial laser scans.In the rough rock walls, the heterogeneously distributed snow cover was moderately well reproduced by Alpine3D with mean absolute errors ranging between 0.31 and 0.81 m. However, snow cover duration was reproduced well and, consequently, near-surface rock temperatures were modelled convincingly. Uncertainties in rock temperature modelling were found to be around 1.6 °C. Errors in snow cover modelling and hence in rock temperature simulations are explained by inadequate snow settlement due to linear precipitation scaling, missing lateral heat fluxes in the rock, and by errors caused by interpolation of shortwave radiation, wind and air temperature into the rock walls.Mean annual near-surface rock temperature increases were both measured and modelled in the steep rock walls as a consequence of a thick, long-lasting snow cover. Rock temperatures were 1.3-2.5 °C higher in the shaded and sunny rock walls, while comparing snow-covered to snow-free simulations. This helps to assess the potential error made in ground temperature modelling when neglecting snow in steep bedrock.

  18. Chemical screening identifies ROCK as a target for recovering mitochondrial function in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Joon Tae; Choi, Kobong; Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Gyu Ree; Lee, Young-Sam; Park, Sang Chul

    2017-03-19

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) constitutes a genetic disease wherein an aging phenotype manifests in childhood. Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in HGPS phenotype progression. Thus, pharmacological reduction in ROS levels has been proposed as a potentially effective treatment for patient with this disorder. In this study, we performed high-throughput screening to find compounds that could reduce ROS levels in HGPS fibroblasts and identified rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-27632) as an effective agent. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of ROCK in regulating ROS levels, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen and discovered that ROCK1 interacts with Rac1b. ROCK activation phosphorylated Rac1b at Ser71 and increased ROS levels by facilitating the interaction between Rac1b and cytochrome c. Conversely, ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 abolished their interaction, concomitant with ROS reduction. Additionally, ROCK activation resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, whereas ROCK inactivation with Y-27632 induced the recovery of mitochondrial function. Furthermore, a reduction in the frequency of abnormal nuclear morphology and DNA double-strand breaks was observed along with decreased ROS levels. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism through which alleviation of the HGPS phenotype is mediated by the recovery of mitochondrial function upon ROCK inactivation.

  19. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza

    There are many examples of rock surfaces, rock art and stone structures whose ages are of great importance to the understanding of various phenomena in geology, climatology and archaeology. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a well-established chronological tool that has successfully...... of rock surfaces is successfully tested by application to two different quartz-rich rock types (sandstone and quartzite). Together with the measurement of infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals as a function of depth into the surface of different granites it is clear that both OSL and IRSL can....... Based on the studies of residual luminescence as a function of depth into a rock surface discussed above, a model is developed that relates this increase in residual luminescence to the exposure time. The model is then further developed using the quartz OSL signal from buried quartzite cobbles...

  20. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza

    There are many examples of rock surfaces, rock art and stone structures whose ages are of great importance to the understanding of various phenomena in geology, climatology and archaeology. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a well-established chronological tool that has successfully...... determined the depositional age of a wide variety of fine-grained sediments, from several years to several hundred thousands of years. However, there is no routine OSL dating method applicable to larger clasts such as cobbles, boulders and other rock surfaces. Here the application of quartz OSL to the dating...... of rock surfaces is successfully tested by application to two different quartz-rich rock types (sandstone and quartzite). Together with the measurement of infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals as a function of depth into the surface of different granites it is clear that both OSL and IRSL can...

  1. Characteristics of fluid substitution in porous rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shengjie

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of the effect of changes in fluid properties of rocks on the compressional-wave velocity VP and shear-wave velocity Vs is very important for understanding the rock physical properties, especially in oilfield exploration and development.The fluid substitution process was analyzed by using ultrasonic measurement and theoretical calculations.The results showed that the effect of fluid substitution on the rock elastic modulus was mainly controlled by fluid properties, saturation, and confining pressure.For a rock with specific properties and porosity, the result of theoretical prediction for fluid substitution accorded with the experimental result under high confining pressure (higher than 60 MPa for our experimental data), but failed to describe the trend of experimental result under low confining pressure and VP predicted by Gassmann's equation was higher than that measured by experiment.A higher porosity resulted in stronger sensitivity of the bulk modulus of saturated rocks to the change of fluid properties.

  2. A study of rock bolting failure modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Chen; Jan Nemcik; Ren Ting; Naj Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Rock bolting has advanced rapidly during the past 4 decades due to a better understanding of load transfer mechanisms and advances made in the bolt system technology.Bolts are used as permanent and temporary support systems in tunnelling and mining operations.A review of has indicated that three systems of reinforcement devices have evolved as part of rock bolt and ground anchor while the rock is not generally thought of as being a component of the reinforcement system.A classification of rock bolting reinforcement systems is presented,followed by the fundamental theory of the load transfer mechanism.The failure mode of two phases of rock bolting system is formularised.The failure modes of cable bolting are discussed using a bond strength model as well as an iterative method.Finally,the interfacial shear stress model for ribbed bar is introduced and a closed form solution is obtained using a tri-line stress strain relationship.

  3. Evidence of Ancient Blisters in Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This image from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows scoriaceous rocks (rocks containing holes or cavities) on the ground, as well as a transition from rocky terrain (foreground) to smoother terrain (background). Spirit is heading toward the smoother terrain on its way to the 'Columbia Hills.' The holes in some of the rocks may have resulted from 'blisters' formed by water vapor as it escaped lava. This indicates that the rocks were chilled atop an ancient lava flow. Porous rocks such as these, now appearing in abundance, have not been seen since early in the mission. Scientists believe they may have been covered by crater ejecta. This image was taken on sol 110 (April 24, 2004) at a region dubbed 'site 35.'

  4. ROCK2 is a major regulator of axonal degeneration, neuronal death and axonal regeneration in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, J C; Tönges, L; Barski, E; Michel, U; Bähr, M; Lingor, P

    2014-05-15

    The Rho/ROCK/LIMK pathway is central for the mediation of repulsive environmental signals in the central nervous system. Several studies using pharmacological Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitors have shown positive effects on neurite regeneration and suggest additional pro-survival effects in neurons. However, as none of these drugs is completely target specific, it remains unclear how these effects are mediated and whether ROCK is really the most relevant target of the pathway. To answer these questions, we generated adeno-associated viral vectors to specifically downregulate ROCK2 and LIM domain kinase (LIMK)-1 in rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in vitro and in vivo. We show here that specific knockdown of ROCK2 and LIMK1 equally enhanced neurite outgrowth of RGCs on inhibitory substrates and both induced substantial neuronal regeneration over distances of more than 5 mm after rat optic nerve crush (ONC) in vivo. However, only knockdown of ROCK2 but not LIMK1 increased survival of RGCs after optic nerve axotomy. Moreover, knockdown of ROCK2 attenuated axonal degeneration of the proximal axon after ONC assessed by in vivo live imaging. Mechanistically, we demonstrate here that knockdown of ROCK2 resulted in decreased intraneuronal activity of calpain and caspase 3, whereas levels of pAkt and collapsin response mediator protein 2 and autophagic flux were increased. Taken together, our data characterize ROCK2 as a specific therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases and demonstrate new downstream effects of ROCK2 including axonal degeneration, apoptosis and autophagy.

  5. Research on inspection of stability of subsiding area in composite rock-mass roadway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    来兴平

    2002-01-01

    The research concentrates mainly on the development of failure process in composite rock-mass through acoustic emission, convergence inspection, stress measurement, subside area measurement, level measurement in the process of stability and safety monitoring as well as inspecting of subside area in composite hard rock. In terms of the modern signal analysis technology, various aspects are discussed. The monitoring result and the stability of rock mass can be synthetically evaluated and inferred, and the location of acoustic origin according to the acoustic emission regularity can be successfully detected. Finally the key factors of the deformation can be inferred from in subside area.

  6. Distinct roles for ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the regulation of cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianjian; Wu, Xiangbing; Surma, Michelle; Vemula, Sasidhar; Zhang, Lumin; Yang, Yu; Kapur, Reuben; Wei, Lei

    2013-02-07

    This study, using mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells derived from ROCK1(-/-) and ROCK2(-/-) mice, is designed to dissect roles for ROCK1 and ROCK2 in regulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization induced by doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic drug. ROCK1(-/-) MEFs exhibited improved actin cytoskeleton stability characterized by attenuated periphery actomyosin ring formation and preserved central stress fibers, associated with decreased myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) phosphorylation but preserved cofilin phosphorylation. These effects resulted in a significant reduction in cell shrinkage, detachment, and predetachment apoptosis. In contrast, ROCK2(-/-) MEFs showed increased periphery membrane folding and impaired cell adhesion, associated with reduced phosphorylation of both MLC2 and cofilin. Treatment with inhibitor of myosin (blebbistatin), inhibitor of actin polymerization (cytochalasin D), and ROCK pan-inhibitor (Y27632) confirmed the contributions of actomyosin contraction and stress fiber instability to stress-induced actin cytoskeleton reorganization. These results support a novel concept that ROCK1 is involved in destabilizing actin cytoskeleton through regulating MLC2 phosphorylation and peripheral actomyosin contraction, whereas ROCK2 is required for stabilizing actin cytoskeleton through regulating cofilin phosphorylation. Consequently, ROCK1 and ROCK2 can be functional different in regulating stress-induced stress fiber disassembly and cell detachment.

  7. Potential anthropogenic mobilisation of mercury and arsenic from soils on mineralised rocks, Northland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craw, D

    2005-02-01

    Eroded roots of hot spring systems in Northland, New Zealand consist of mineralised rocks containing sulfide minerals. Marcasite and cinnabar are the dominant sulfides with subordinate pyrite. Deep weathering and leached soil formation has occurred in a warm temperate to subtropical climate with up to 3 m/year rainfall. Decomposition of the iron sulfides in natural and anthropogenic rock exposures yields acid rock drainage with pH typically between 2 and 4, and locally down to pH 1. Soils and weathered rocks developed on basement greywacke have negligible acid neutralisation capacity. Natural rainforest soils have pH between 4 and 5 on unmineralised greywacke, and pH is as low as 3.5 in soils on mineralised rocks. Roads with aggregate made from mineralised rocks have pH near 3, and quarries from which the rock was extracted can have pH down to 1. Mineralised rocks are enriched in arsenic and mercury, both of which are environmentally available as solid solution impurities in iron sulfides and phosphate minerals. Base metals (Cu, Pb, Zn) are present at low levels in soils, at or below typical basement rock background. Decomposition of the iron sulfides releases the solid solution arsenic and mercury into the acid rock drainage solutions. Phosphate minerals release their impurities only under strongly acid conditions (pHacid rock drainage areas have arsenic and mercury below drinking water limits. Leaching experiments and theoretical predictions indicate that both arsenic and mercury are least mobile in acid soils, at pH of c. 3-4. This optimum pH range for fixation of arsenic and mercury on iron oxyhydroxides in soils is similar to natural pH at the field site of this study. However, neutralisation of acid soils developed on mineralised rocks is likely to decrease adsorption and enhance mobility of arsenic and mercury. Hence, development of farmland by clearing forest and adding agricultural lime may mobilise arsenic and mercury from underlying soils on mineralised

  8. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    origin and age of matrix fluids, i.e. accessible pore water, in fissures and small-scale fractures and their possible influence on fluid chemistry in the bedrock. When the EC-project EQUIP, which concentrated on the formulation of a methodology for how to conduct a palaeo hydrogeological study, ended in 2000 there was a need for continued fracture mineral investigations and model testing of the obtained results and a new EC-project was initiated in the beginning of 2002. This project is called PADAMOT (Palaeo hydrogeological Data Analysis and Model Testing) and includes further developments of analytical techniques and modelling tools to interpret data, but also further research to investigate specific processes that might link climate and groundwater properties in low permeability rocks. The project Demonstration of repository technology provides a full-scale demonstration of canister deposition under radiation-shielded conditions and works with testing of canister and bentonite handling in full size deposition holes. The Prototype Repository project focuses on testing and demonstrating repository system function in full scale and is co-funded by the EC. The experiment comprises six full size canisters with electrical heaters surrounded by bentonite. The Backfill and Plug Test is a test of the hydraulic and mechanical function of different backfill materials, emplacement methods, and a full-scale plug. The 28 m long test region is located in the ZEDEX drift. The inner part of the drift is backfilled with a mixture of bentonite and crushed rock and the outer part is filled with crushed rock. The wetting of the backfill started late 1999 and the final step of increasing the water pressure in the mats to 500 kPa was taken in January 2002. The Canister Retrieval Test, located in the main test area at the 420 m level, is aiming at demonstrating the readiness for recovering of emplaced canisters also after the time when the bentonite is fully saturated. The Long Term Test of

  9. Inside a Crustal Earthquake - the Rock Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibson, R. H.

    2012-12-01

    Exhumed fault rock assemblages provide insights into fault zone structure, rupture processes and physical conditions of seismogenesis which can be melded with high-resolution geophysical information on modern earthquakes. The transition from dominantly cataclasite-series to mylonite-series fault rocks at greenschist and greater grades of metamorphism is the basis of fault zone models and rheological strength profiles defining the FR-VS (frictional-viscous) transition which governs the base of the microseismically defined seismogenic zone, within which larger ruptures are mostly contained. In areas of crust deforming under moderate-to-high heat flow (e.g. Japan, California) there is good correlation between geothermal gradient and the base of microseismic activity in the crust. However, compositional variations (e.g. quartz- vs. feldspar-dominant rheology) plus other factors such as water content locally perturb the base of the seismogenic zone, creating strength asperities which may affect the nucleation of large ruptures (e.g.1989 M6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake). The level of shear stress driving rupturing within the seismogenic zone remains problematic. While some estimates (e.g. those inferred from pseudotachylyte friction-melts) are broadly consistent with expectations for the frictional strength of optimally oriented faults with 'Byerlee friction' (τ ~ 80-240 MPa at 10 km depth, depending on faulting mode), others (e.g. faults with associated hydrothermal extension veins) appear to slip at much lower levels of shear stress (max. τ 90% of global seismic moment release) and areas of active compressional inversion (e.g. NE Honshu). However, while fault overpressuring is more easily generated and sustained in compressional regimes, it may be more widespread than once thought. The presence of incrementally deposited hydrothermal veins along fault slip surfaces (often associated with subsidiary extension vein arrays) is not uncommon in fault assemblages exhumed from

  10. Distinct roles of ROCK1 and ROCK2 during development of porcine preimplantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin Yu; Dong, Huan Sheng; Oqani, Reza K; Lin, Tao; Kang, Jung Won; Jin, Dong Il

    2014-07-01

    Cell-to-cell contact mediated by cell adhesion is fundamental to the compaction process that ensures blastocyst quality during embryonic development. In this study, we first showed that Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinases (ROCK1 and ROCK2) were expressed both in porcine oocytes and IVF preimplantation embryos, playing different roles in oocytes maturation and embryo development. The amount of mRNA encoding ROCK1 and the protein concentration clearly increased between the eight-cell and morula stages, but decreased significantly when blastocysts were formed. Conversely, ROCK2 was more abundant in the blastocyst compared with other embryonic stages. Moreover, immunostaining showed that ROCK1 protein distribution changed as the embryo progressed through cleavage and compaction to the morula stage. Initially, the protein was predominantly associated with the plasma membrane but later became cytoplasmic. By contrast, ROCK2 protein was localized in both the cytoplasm and the spindle rotation region during oocyte meiosis, but in the cytoplasm and nucleus as the embryo developed. In addition, ROCK2 was present in the trophectoderm cells of the blastocyst. Treatment with 15 μM Y27632, a specific inhibitor of ROCKs, completely blocked further development of early four-cell stage embryos. Moreover, we did not detect the expression of ROCK1 but did detect ROCK2 expression in blastocysts. Moreover, lysophosphatidic acid an activator of ROCKs significantly improved the rates of blastocyst formation. These data demonstrate that ROCKs are required for embryo development to the blastocyst stage. Together, our results indicate that ROCK1 and ROCK2 may exert different biological functions during the regulation of compaction and in ensuring development of porcine preimplantation embryos to the blastocyst stage.

  11. Rock avalanches: significance and progress (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    1. The probability distribution of landslide volumes follows a power-law indicating that large rock avalanches dominate the terrestrial sediment supply from mountains, and that their source area morphologies dominate mountain topography. 2. Large rock slope failures (~ 106 m3 or greater) often mobilise into rock avalanches, which can travel extraordinarily long distances with devastating effect. This hypermobility has been the subject of many investigations; we have demonstrated that it can be explained quantitatively and accurately by considering the energetics of the intense rock fragmentation that always occurs during motion of a large rock mass. 3. Study of rock avalanche debris psd shows that the energy used in creating new rock surface area during fragmentation is not lost to surface energy, but is recycled generating a high-frequency elastic energy field that reduces the frictional resistance to motion during runout. 4. Rock avalanches that deposit on glaciers can eventually form large terminal moraines that have no connection with any climatic event; unless these are identified as rock-avalanche-influenced they can confuse palaeoclimatic inferences drawn from moraine ages. Rock-avalanche-derived fines, however, can be identified in moraine debris up to ten thousand years old by the characteristic micron-scale agglomerates that form during intense fragmentation, and which are absent from purely climatically-induced moraines; there is thus a strong case for re-examining existing palaeoclimatic databases to eliminate potentially rock-avalanche-influenced moraine ages. 5. Rock avalanches (especially coseismic ones) are a serious hazard, being very destructive in their own right; they also block river valleys, forming landslide dams and potentially devastating dambreak floods, and subsequent severe decade-scale aggradation of downstream fans and floodplains. Rock avalanches falling into lakes or fiords can cause catastrophic tsunami that pose a serious risk to

  12. Rock Burst Intensity Classification Based on the Radiated Energy with Damage Intensity at Jinping II Hydropower Station, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Rui; Feng, Xia-Ting; Li, Qing-Peng; Luo, Ru-Zhou; Li, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Based on the radiated energy of 133 rock bursts monitored by a microseismic technique at the Jinping II hydropower station, in Sichuan province, China, we analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of qualitative classification methods for the rock burst intensity. Then, we investigated the characteristics, magnitude, and laws of the radiated energy, as well as the relationship between the rock burst radiated energy and intensity. Then, we selected the energy as an evaluation index for the rock burst intensity classification, and proposed a new rock burst intensity quantitative classification method, which utilized the hierarchical clustering analysis technique with the complete-linkage method. Next, we created a new set of criteria for the quantitative classification of the rock burst intensity based on radiated energy and surrounding rock damage severity. The new criteria classified the rock burst intensity into five levels: extremely intense, intense, moderate, weak, and none, and the common logarithms of the radiated energy of each level were >7 lg( E/J), >4 lg( E/J) and 2 lg( E/J) and 1 lg( E/J) and <2 lg( E/J), and <1 lg( E/J), respectively. Finally, we investigated the factors influencing the classification, and verified its feasibility and applicability via several practical rock burst examples.

  13. Turning Bread into Rocks: A Multisensory Unit Opener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shaw

    2000-01-01

    Presents an earth science activity on rocks to demonstrate the vital links between minerals and rocks. Uses different kinds of breads to demonstrate that rocks, like breads, are composed of various ingredients in different proportions. (ASK)

  14. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-15

    The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) is an important part of SKB's work with the design and construction of a deep geological repository for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The main activities in the geoscientific fields have been: (1) Geology - completion of the feasibility study concerning geological mapping techniques and mapping of rock surfaces in the new tunnel, (2) Hydrogeology - monitoring and storage of data in the computerised Hydro Monitoring System, (3) Geochemistry - sampling of groundwater in the yearly campaign and for specific experiments and (4) Rock Mechanics - field tests to evaluate the counterforce needed to prevent thermally-induced spalling in deposition holes. At Aespoe HRL, experiments are performed under the conditions that are expected to prevail at repository depth. The aim is to provide information about the long-term function of natural and repository barriers. Experiments are performed to develop and test methods and models for the description of groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, and chemical conditions at repository depth. The programme includes projects which aim to determine parameter values that are required as input to the conceptual and numerical models. A number of large-scale field experiments and supporting activities concerning Engineered barriers are carried out at Aespoe HRL. The experiments focus on different aspects of engineering technology and performance testing: The Prototype Repository is a demonstration of the integrated function of the repository and provides a full-scale reference for tests of predictive models concerning individual components as well as the complete repository system; The Long Term Test of Buffer Material (Lot-experiment) aims at validating models and hypotheses concerning physical properties in a bentonite buffer material and of related processes regarding microbiology, radionuclide transport, copper corrosion and gas transport; The objective of the project Alternative

  15. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-04-15

    The main activities in the geoscientific fields have been: (1) Geology - besides mapping of rock surfaces and drill cores a feasibility study concerning geological mapping techniques is performed, (2) Hydrogeology - completion of the modelling work for the detailed hydro-structural model for the -450 m level and monitoring/storage of data in the computerised Hydro Monitoring System, (3) Geochemistry - sampling of groundwater in the yearly campaign and for specific experiments and (4) Rock Mechanics - field work to determine the stress levels at which core disking occur followed by numerical modelling. Experiments are performed to develop and test methods and models for the description of groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, and chemical conditions at repository depth. The programme includes projects which aim to determine parameter values that are required as input to the conceptual and numerical models. At Aespoe HRL, experiments are performed under the conditions that are expected to prevail at repository depth. The experiments are related to the rock, its properties and in situ environmental conditions. The aim is to provide information about the long-term function of natural and repository barriers. Experiments are performed to develop and test methods and models for the description of groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, and chemical conditions at repository depth. The programme includes projects which aim to determine parameter values that are required as input to the conceptual and numerical models. An important goal is to demonstrate technology for and the function of important parts of the repository system. This implies translation of current scientific knowledge and state-of- the-art technology into engineering practice applicable in a real repository. It is important that development, testing and demonstration of methods and procedures are conducted under realistic conditions and at an appropriate scale. A number of large-scale field

  16. Review of Studies of Mechanoelectrical Transformations in Rocks in Russia and Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomishin, E.; Yavorovich, L.

    2016-06-01

    The problem of monitoring and forecast of dynamic manifestations of rock masses becomes immediate in the mining industry because of the growth of mining work intensity and changeover to the mining operations in deeper levels. The article presents a short review of the scientific works of foreign researchers for more complete and in-depth study of geophysical methods of control of the stress-strain state and bump hazard of rock masses.

  17. Effect of an On-Sight Lead on the Physiological and Psychological Responses to Rock Climbing

    OpenAIRE

    Nick Draper; Jones, Glenys A.; Simon Fryer; Chris Hodgson; Gavin Blackwell

    2008-01-01

    Rock climbing is a multi-discipline activity that encompasses forms such as bouldering, top roping and lead climbing on natural and artificial climbing surfaces. A major focus of research has been explanation of physiological functioning. More recent research indicates that anxiety levels are elevated for less experienced climbers and in response to lead climbing ascents. Research regarding the demands of rock climbing has placed a lesser focus on the interaction of psychological and physiolo...

  18. Rocks in motion: a one parameter description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, O. T.; Rosenau, M.; Leever, K.; Oncken, O.

    2013-12-01

    Rock fall, slide and avalanches are dynamically different phenomena of rocks in motion: falls are mostly dominated by free fall and elastic impacts, slides by friction at their base and avalanches by granular flow. Despite these dynamical differences, the properties of the material involved can be viewed similar, and the main (and only?) difference is typically the size of the systems (falls: 10 meters, slides: 102 meters, avalanches: 103 meters). If only size matters: can gravitational rock movements be described in a simple quantitative framework without losing any underlying physics? To explore the dynamics of gravitational rock movements we performed a dimensional analysis combined with experimental validation. Dimensional analysis suggests 9 dimensionless parameters that describe the system, one of which is Π = C/ρgh, where ρ is density, h height and C cohesion of the material and g is the gravitational acceleration. This dimensionless number describes how strong the material is compared to its size, and varies from 10-4 for rock avalanches. Can this parameter be used to describe the spectrum of dynamics for rocks in motions in a physically meaningful way? To test this, we performed experiments using labscale rock analogues. Gravitational rock movements are modeled under normal gravity conditions, by releasing material down a 1 meter planar slope at an angle of 45°. The material used is a cemented granular material, the cohesion of which can be controlled over several order of magnitude (101 to 106 Pa). The experiments are monitored using a 50 Hz digital camera. Surface velocities are quantified using a Particle Image Velocimetry while other physical parameters (fragment size distribution, position, friction) are measured using optical image analysis. We perform experiments where the initial value of Π (Π0) is varied over 7 orders of magnitude (10-2 to 104), mapping a parameters space large enough to study a wide range of gravitational rock movement

  19. Rock cavern storage of spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Won Jin; Kim, Kyung Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Sang Ki [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The rock cavern storage for spent fuel has been assessed to apply in Korea with reviewing the state of the art of the technologies for surface storage and rock cavern storage of spent fuel. The technical feasibility and economic aspects of the rock cavern storage of spent fuel were also analyzed. A considerable area of flat land isolated from the exterior are needed to meet the requirement for the site of the surface storage facilities. It may, however, not be easy to secure such areas in the mountainous region of Korea. Instead, the spent fuel storage facilities constructed in the rock cavern moderate their demands for the suitable site. As a result, the rock cavern storage is a promising alternative for the storage of spent fuel in the aspect of natural and social environments. The rock cavern storage of spent fuel has several advantages compared with the surface storage, and there is no significant difference on the viewpoint of economy between the two alternatives. In addition, no great technical difficulties are present to apply the rock cavern storage technologies to the storage of domestic spent fuel.

  20. Low grade metamorphism of mafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Peter

    1995-07-01

    Through most of this past century, metamorphic petrologists in the United States have paid their greatest attention to high grade rocks, especially those which constitute the core zones of exhumed, mountain belts. The pioneering studies of the 50's through the 80's, those which applied the principles of thermodynamics to metamorphic rocks, focused almost exclusively on high temperature systems, for which equilibrium processes could be demonstrated. By the 1980's, metamorphic petrologists had developed the methodologies for deciphering the thermal and baric histories of mountain belts through the study of high grade rocks. Of course, low grade metamorphic rocks - here defined as those which form at pressures and temperatures up to and including the greenschist facies - had been well known and described as well, initially through the efforts of Alpine and Circum-Pacific geologists who recognized that they constituted an integral and contiguous portion of mountain belts, and that they underlay large portions of accreted terranes, many of oceanic origins. But until the mid 80's, much of the effort in studying low grade rocks - for a comprehensive review of the literature to that point see Frey (1987) - had been concentrated on mudstones, volcanoclastic rocks, and associated lithologies common to continental mountain belts and arcs. In the mid 80's, results of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) rather dramatically mitigated a shift in the study of low grade metamorphic rocks.

  1. Research present situation and analysis on classification of rock drillability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhi-hong; MA Qin-yong

    2001-01-01

    Rock drillability reflects the drill bit fragments rock hardly or easily. At present, rock drillability classification indexes have rock single-axle compressive strength, point load intensity,fracture stress during chiseling, drill speed, chiseling specific work, acoustic parameter, cutting magnitude, and so on. Every index reflects rock drillability but isn't overall. It is feasible that using many indexes of fuzzy mathematics method etc. to evaluate rock drillability.

  2. Rock stars for the day

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    After a two-year hiatus, the CERN Hardronic Festival is back! On 8 August, ten CERN MusiClub bands will take to the stage for the popular event. As usual, the non-stop show will take place on the terrace of Restaurant 3 and will run until after midnight.   The Canettes Blues Band, part of the CERN MusiClub, performing live on the Music In The Park stage at the Montreux Jazz Festival, on 18 July 2013. A large range of musical styles will entertain the audience: from Irish folk, via 70s/80s/90s rock, to pop, blues and R&B. Alongside the music there will be activities for kids and food and drink stands. This year, the income from food sales will be donated to charity. The spirit that has characterised the festival ever since the first event in 1989 is that of a staff party. Any band who volunteers to play also helps to organise the event and set up the stage. “This is a really good thing because a festival that has been growing for many years requires a considerable amount of har...

  3. A strategy for rock/coal outburst prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.H. Steve Zou; CHENG Jiu-long

    2007-01-01

    The current practice of rock/coal outburst monitoring, prevention and control was reviewed. The uncertainty of major factors contributing to the occurrence of such hazards and the complexicity of mining conditions surrounding the occurrence were analyzed. A strategic concept for rock/coal outburst prevention was introduced. The objective is to identify the bursting potential in an area, rather than predicting the bursting, by introducing a multi- dimension index model: potential-of-bursting (POB), taking into consideration major contributing factors. In application, once the index has passed certain critical level indicating high risk, actions must be taken to reduce the bursting potential and to effectively prevent the hazard from occurring. A conceptual 2D model involving stress and methane pressure was described to demonstrate the methodology for determining the POB. However in practice, a POB model has to be established through experiments, field monitoring and calibration against case studies. To achieve this objective, coordinated research and international collaboration will be needed.

  4. Sliding rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: first observation of rocks in motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Richard D; Norris, James M; Lorenz, Ralph D; Ray, Jib; Jackson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The engraved trails of rocks on the nearly flat, dry mud surface of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park, have excited speculation about the movement mechanism since the 1940s. Rock movement has been variously attributed to high winds, liquid water, ice, or ice flotation, but has not been previously observed in action. We recorded the first direct scientific observation of rock movements using GPS-instrumented rocks and photography, in conjunction with a weather station and time-lapse cameras. The largest observed rock movement involved > 60 rocks on December 20, 2013 and some instrumented rocks moved up to 224 m between December 2013 and January 2014 in multiple move events. In contrast with previous hypotheses of powerful winds or thick ice floating rocks off the playa surface, the process of rock movement that we have observed occurs when the thin, 3 to 6 mm, "windowpane" ice sheet covering the playa pool begins to melt in late morning sun and breaks up under light winds of -4-5 m/s. Floating ice panels 10 s of meters in size push multiple rocks at low speeds of 2-5 m/min. along trajectories determined by the direction and velocity of the wind as well as that of the water flowing under the ice.

  5. A Novel Mobile Testing Equipment for Rock Cuttability Assessment: Vertical Rock Cutting Rig (VRCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Serdar; Yilmaz, Ali Osman

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a new mobile rock cutting testing apparatus was designed and produced for rock cuttability assessment called vertical rock cutting rig (VRCR) which was designed specially to fit into hydraulic press testing equipment which are available in almost every rock mechanics laboratory. Rock cutting trials were initiated just after the production of VRCR along with calibration of the measuring load cell with an external load cell to validate the recorded force data. Then, controlled rock cutting tests with both relieved and unrelieved cutting modes were implemented on five different volcanic rock samples with a standard simple-shaped wedge tool. Additionally, core cutting test which is an important approach for roadheader performance prediction was simulated with VRCR. Mini disc cutters and point attack tools were used for execution of experimental trials. Results clearly showed that rock cutting tests were successfully realized and measuring system is delicate to rock strength, cutting depth and other variables. Core cutting test was successfully simulated, and it was also shown that rock cutting tests with mini disc cutters and point attack tools are also successful with VRCR.

  6. Distinct roles for ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the regulation of keratinocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances E Lock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human epidermis is comprised of several layers of specialized epithelial cells called keratinocytes. Normal homoeostasis of the epidermis requires that the balance between keratinocyte proliferation and terminal differentiation be tightly regulated. The mammalian serine/threonine kinases (ROCK1 and ROCK2 are well-characterised downstream effectors of the small GTPase RhoA. We have previously demonstrated that the RhoA/ROCK signalling pathway plays an important role in regulation of human keratinocyte proliferation and terminal differentiation. In this paper we addressed the question of which ROCK isoform was involved in regulation of keratinocyte differentiation. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used RNAi to specifically knockdown ROCK1 or ROCK2 expression in cultured human keratinocytes. ROCK1 depletion results in decreased keratinocyte adhesion to fibronectin and an increase in terminal differentiation. Conversely, ROCK2 depletion results in increased keratinocyte adhesion to fibronectin and inhibits terminal differentiation. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that ROCK1 and ROCK2 play distinct roles in regulating keratinocyte adhesion and terminal differentiation.

  7. Sliding rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: first observation of rocks in motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Norris

    Full Text Available The engraved trails of rocks on the nearly flat, dry mud surface of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park, have excited speculation about the movement mechanism since the 1940s. Rock movement has been variously attributed to high winds, liquid water, ice, or ice flotation, but has not been previously observed in action. We recorded the first direct scientific observation of rock movements using GPS-instrumented rocks and photography, in conjunction with a weather station and time-lapse cameras. The largest observed rock movement involved > 60 rocks on December 20, 2013 and some instrumented rocks moved up to 224 m between December 2013 and January 2014 in multiple move events. In contrast with previous hypotheses of powerful winds or thick ice floating rocks off the playa surface, the process of rock movement that we have observed occurs when the thin, 3 to 6 mm, "windowpane" ice sheet covering the playa pool begins to melt in late morning sun and breaks up under light winds of -4-5 m/s. Floating ice panels 10 s of meters in size push multiple rocks at low speeds of 2-5 m/min. along trajectories determined by the direction and velocity of the wind as well as that of the water flowing under the ice.

  8. "All Yugoslavia Is Dancing Rock and Roll"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jovanovic, Zlatko

    The thesis examines the sense of Yugoslav-ness in the Yugoslav rock music culture in the specific socio-politico-economic situation of 1980s Yugoslavia. The main question in the thesis focuses on how this sense of community was caught up in the system of references to the country’s specific...... with the arrival of New Wave into the country in the late 1970s. The study is carried through micro-historical analyses of the local rock scenes in the country’s four principal rock centres: Belgrade, Zagreb, Sarajevo and Ljubljana. The scenes are used as empirical platforms for discussing broader issues...

  9. Laboratory measurements of rock thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bording, Thue Sylvester; Balling, N.; Nielsen, S.B.

    The thermal properties of rocks are key elements in understanding and modelling the temperature field of the subsurface. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity can be measured in the laboratory if rock samples can be provided. We have introduced improvements to the divided bar and needle...... probe methods to be able to measure both thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. The improvements we implement include, for both methods, a combination of fast numerical finite element forward modelling and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion scheme for estimating rock thermal parameters...

  10. Mechanic behavior of unloading fractured rock mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Ke; ZHANG Yongxing; WU Hanhui

    2003-01-01

    Under tension and shear conditions related to unloading of rock mass, a jointed rock mass model of linear elastic fracture mechanics is established. According to the model, the equations of stresses, strains and displacements of the region influenced by the crack but relatively faraway the crack (the distance between the research point and the center of the crack is longer than the length of crack) are derived. They are important for evaluating the deformation of cracked rock. It is demonstrated by the comparison between computational results of these theoretical equations and the observed data from unloading test that they are applicable for actual engineering.

  11. Acoustics in rock and pop music halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of rhythmic music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of twenty rock music venues...... in Denmark and a questionnaire was used in a subjective assessment of those venues with professional rock musicians and sound engineers. Correlations between the objective and subjective results lead, among others, to a recommendation for reverberation time as a function of hall volume. Since the bass...

  12. Laboratory measurements of rock thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bording, Thue Sylvester; Balling, N.; Nielsen, S.B.

    The thermal properties of rocks are key elements in understanding and modelling the temperature field of the subsurface. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity can be measured in the laboratory if rock samples can be provided. We have introduced improvements to the divided bar and needle...... probe methods to be able to measure both thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. The improvements we implement include, for both methods, a combination of fast numerical finite element forward modelling and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion scheme for estimating rock thermal parameters...

  13. THEORIES OF ROCK BREAKAGE WITH EXPLOSIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Škrlec

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The prediction and observation of the nature and dimensions of damaged zones in the surrounding rock mass and understanding the mechanisms of fracturing and crushing of the rock mass with explosives is one of the most important parameters in blasting design in order to obtain preferred granulation and reduce damaging effects of blasting on the environment. An overview of existing rock breakage theories with the energy released by the detonation of explosives is given in this paper (the paper is published in Croatian.

  14. Experimental investigation of creep behavior of clastic rock in Xiangjiaba Hydropower Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu ZHANG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many fracture zones crossing the dam foundation of the Xiangjiaba Hydropower Project in southwestern China. Clastic rock is the main media of the fracture zone and has poor physical and mechanical properties. In order to investigate the creep behavior of clastic rock, triaxial creep tests were conducted using a rock servo-controlling rheological testing machine. The results show that the creep behavior of clastic rock is significant at a high level of deviatoric stress, and less time-dependent deformation occurs at high confining pressure. Based on the creep test results, the relationship between axial strain and time under different confining pressures was investigated, and the relationship between axial strain rate and deviatoric stress was also discussed. The strain rate increases rapidly, and the rock sample fails eventually under high deviatoric stress. Moreover, the creep failure mechanism under different confining pressures was analyzed. The main failure mechanism of clastic rock is plastic shear, accompanied by a significant compression and ductile dilatancy. On the other hand, with the determined parameters, the Burgers creep model was used to fit the creep curves. The results indicate that the Burgers model can exactly describe the creep behavior of clastic rock in the Xiangjiaba Hydropower Project.

  15. Quantitative calculation for the dissipated energy of fault rock burst based on gradient-dependent plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuebin Wang; Shuhong Dai; Long Hai

    2004-01-01

    The capacity of energy absorption by fault bands after rock burst was calculated quantitatively according to shear stressshear deformation curves considering the interactions and interplaying among microstructures due to the heterogeneity of strain softening rock materials. The post-peak stiffness of rock specimens subjected to direct shear was derived strictly based on gradientdependent plasticity, which can not be obtained from the classical elastoplastic theory. Analytical solutions for the dissipated energy of rock burst were proposed whether the slope of the post-peak shear stress-shear deformation curve is positive or not. The analytical solutions show that shear stress level, confining pressure, shear strength, brittleness, strain rate and heterogeneity of rock materials have important influence on the dissipated energy. The larger value of the dissipated energy means that the capacity of energy dissipation in the form of shear bands is superior and a lower magnitude of rock burst is expected under the condition of the same work done by external shear force. The possibility of rock burst is reduced for a lower softening modulus or a larger thickness of shear bands.

  16. Rho/ROCK signaling in regulation of corneal epithelial cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Guerriero, Emily; Lathrop, Kira; SundarRaj, Nirmala

    2008-01-01

    The authors' previous study showed that the expression of a Rho-associated serine/threonine kinase (ROCK) is regulated during cell cycle progression in corneal epithelial cells. The present study was conducted to determine whether and how Rho/ROCK signaling regulates cell cycle progression. Rabbit corneal epithelial cells (RCECs) in culture were arrested in the G(0) phase of the cell cycle by serum deprivation and then allowed to re-enter the cell cycle in the presence or absence of the ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) in serum-supplemented medium. The number of cells in the S phase, the relative levels of specific cyclins and CDKs and their intracellular distribution, and the relative levels of mRNAs were determined by BrdU labeling, Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses, and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. ROCK inhibition delayed the progression of G(1) to S phase and led to a decrease in the number of RCECs entering the S phase between 12 and 24 hours from 31.5% +/- 4.5% to 8.1% +/- 2.6%. During the cell cycle progression, protein and mRNA levels of cyclin-D1 and -D3 and cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 were significantly lower, whereas the protein levels of the CDK inhibitor p27(Kip1) were higher in ROCK-inhibited cells. Intracellular mRNA or protein levels of cyclin-E and protein levels of CDK2 were not significantly affected, but their nuclear translocation was delayed by ROCK inhibition. ROCK signaling is involved in cell cycle progression in RCECs, possibly by upregulation of cyclin-D1 and -D3 and CDK4, -6, and -2; nuclear translocation of CDK2 and cyclin-E; and downregulation of p27(Kip1).

  17. Geology and Geochemistry of Reworking Gold Deposits in Intrusive Rocks of China—Ⅰ. Features of the Intrusive Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀璋; 程景平; 等

    1998-01-01

    Most gold deposits in intrusive rocks were formed as a result of reworking processes.the intrusive rocks containing gold deposits and consisting of ultramafic-mafic,intermediateacid and alkaline rocks of the Archean,Proterozoic,Caledonian,Hercynian and Yenshanian periods occur in cratons,activated zones of cratons and fold belts.Among them,ultramaficmafic rocks,diorite,alkaline rocks,and anorthosite are products of remelting in the mantle or mantle-crust or mantle with crustal contamination,However,auriferous intermediate-acid rocks are products of metasomatic-remelting in auriferous volcainc rocks or auriferous volcanosedimentary rocks in the deep crust.

  18. Biogenic Cracks in Porous Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerle, A.; Hartung, J.; Hallatschek, O.; Goehring, L.; Herminghaus, S.

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms growing on and inside porous rock may fracture it by various processes. Some of the mechanisms of biofouling and bioweathering are today identified and partially understood but most emphasis is on chemical weathering, while mechanical contributions have been neglected. However, as demonstrated by the perseverance of a seed germinating and cracking up a concrete block, the turgor pressure of living organisms can be very significant. Here, we present results of a systematic study of the effects of the mechanical forces of growing microbial populations on the weathering of porous media. We designed a model porous medium made of glass beads held together by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a curable polymer. The rheological properties of the porous medium, whose shape and size are tunable, can be controlled by the ratio of crosslinker to base used in the PDMS (see Fig. 1). Glass and PDMS being inert to most chemicals, we are able to focus on the mechanical processes of biodeterioration, excluding any chemical weathering. Inspired by recent measurements of the high pressure (~0.5 Mpa) exerted by a growing population of yeasts trapped in a microfluidic device, we show that yeast cells can be cultured homogeneously within porous medium until saturation of the porous space. We investigate then the effects of such an inner pressure on the mechanical properties of the sample. Using the same model system, we study also the complex interplay between biofilms and porous media. We focus in particular on the effects of pore size on the penetration of the biofilm within the porous sample, and on the resulting deformations of the matrix, opening new perspectives into the understanding of life in complex geometry. Figure 1. Left : cell culture growing in a model porous medium. The white spheres represent the grains, bonds are displayed in grey, and microbes in green. Right: microscopy picture of glass beads linked by PDMS bridges, scale bar: 100 μm.

  19. ONKALO rock mechanics model (RMM). Version 2.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haekkinen, T.; Merjama, S.; Moenkkoenen, H. [WSP Finland, Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    The Rock Mechanics Model of the ONKALO rock volume includes the most important rock mechanics features and parameters at the Olkiluoto site. The main objective of the model is to be a tool to predict rock properties, rock quality and hence provide an estimate for the rock stability of the potential repository at Olkiluoto. The model includes a database of rock mechanics raw data and a block model in which the rock mechanics parameters are estimated through block volumes based on spatial rock mechanics raw data. In this version 2.3, special emphasis was placed on refining the estimation of the block model. The model was divided into rock mechanics domains which were used as constraints during the block model estimation. During the modelling process, a display profile and toolbar were developed for the GEOVIA Surpac software to improve visualisation and access to the rock mechanics data for the Olkiluoto area. (orig.)

  20. Fluorine geochemistry in volcanic rock series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stecher, Ole

    1998-01-01

    A new analytical procedure has been established in order to determine low fluorine concentrations (30–100 ppm F) in igneous rocks, and the method has also proven successful for higher concentrations (100–4000 ppm F). Fluorine has been measured in a series of olivine tholeiites from the Reykjanes...... Peninsula, a tholeiite to rhyolitic rock series from Kerlingarfjöll, central Iceland, and an alkaline rock series from Jan Mayen that ranges from ankaramites to trachytes. Fluorine is not appreciably degassed during extrusion and appears to be insensitive to slight weathering. The olivine tholeiites from...... the Reykjanes Peninsula have F contents of 30–300 ppm and exhibit linear increases proportional to the incompatible elements K, P, and Ti. Such incompatible behaviour for F has been confirmed for the less evolved rocks of the other series. The tholeiites from Kerlingarfjöll (100–2000 ppm F) show a linear...

  1. Shape Memory Alloy Rock Splitters (SMARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benafan, Othmane (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) may be used for static rock splitting. The SMAs may be used as high-energy multifunctional materials, which have a unique ability to recover large deformations and generate high stresses in response to thermal loads.

  2. Reappraisal of hydrocarbon biomarkers in Archean rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Katherine L.; Hallmann, Christian; Hope, Janet M.; Schoon, Petra L.; Zumberge, J. Alex; Hoshino, Yosuke; Peters, Carl A.; George, Simon C.; Love, Gordon D.; Brocks, Jochen J.; Buick, Roger; Summons, Roger E.

    2015-05-01

    Hopanes and steranes found in Archean rocks have been presented as key evidence supporting the early rise of oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes, but the syngeneity of these hydrocarbon biomarkers is controversial. To resolve this debate, we performed a multilaboratory study of new cores from the Pilbara Craton, Australia, that were drilled and sampled using unprecedented hydrocarbon-clean protocols. Hopanes and steranes in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates from these new cores were typically at or below our femtogram detection limit, but when they were detectable, they had total hopane (oxygenic photosynthesis and eukaryotes by ∼2.7 billion years ago. Although suitable Proterozoic rocks exist, no currently known Archean strata lie within the appropriate thermal maturity window for syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarker preservation, so future exploration for Archean biomarkers should screen for rocks with milder thermal histories.

  3. RELIABILITY OF TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS OF ROCK HAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stepanov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The ways of increasing of exploitation reliability of dump trucks with the aim of increasing of effectiveness of exploitation of transportation systems of rock heaps at coal mines.

  4. FRACTAL PROPERTIES OF ROCK FRACTURE SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金安; 谢和平; MarekA.KWASNIEWSKI

    1996-01-01

    To give a better understanding of the morphological features of rock fracture surfaces within the framework of fractal geometry, the fractal characters of the rough surfaces in" rock are analyzed according to the variogram method. The study elaborates the significance of the geometric parameters-fractal dimension D and the intercept A on a log-log plot to the surface structure. Investigation extends to the anisotropy and heterogeneity of rock fracture surfaces, and the scale effect on the fractal estimation. The present study indicates that fractal dimension alone may not be sufficient to characterize the surface roughness of rock joints. A reliable estimation should take into account the combination of D and A.

  5. Study on fault induced rock bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-hua; DOU Lin-ming; LU Cai-ping; MU Zong-long; CAO An-ye

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the rules of rock bursts caused by faults by means of mechanical analysis of a roof rock-mass balanced structure and numerical simulation about fault slip destabilization, the effect of coal mining operation on fault plane stresses and slip displacement were studied. The results indicate that the slip displacement sharply increases due to the decrease of normal stress and the increase of shear stress at the fault plane when the working face advances from the footwall to the fault itself, which may induce a fault rock burst. However, this slip displacement will be very small due to the increase of normal stress and the decrease of shear stress when the working face advances from the hanging wall to the fault itself, which results in a very small risk of a fault rock burst.

  6. 'Palenque' Rock: Tempting Target, Poor Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 A rock dubbed 'Palenque' in the 'Columbia Hills' of Mars has contrasting textures in upper and lower portions. This view of the rock combines two frames taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 278th martian day (Oct. 14, 2004). The layers meet each other at an angular unconformity that may mark a change in environmental conditions between the formation of the two portions of the rock. Scientists would have liked the rover to take a closer look, but Palenque is not on a north-tilted slope, which is the type of terrain needed to keep the rover's solar panels tilted toward the winter sun. The exposed portion of the rock is about 100 centimeters (39 inches) long.

  7. Gravitational stresses in anisotropic rock masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadei, B.; Savage, W.Z.; Swolfs, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents closed-form solutions for the stress field induced by gravity in anisotropic rock masses. These rocks are assumed to be laterally restrained and are modelled as a homogeneous, orthotropic or transversely isotropic, linearly elastic material. The analysis, constrained by the thermodynamic requirement that strain energy be positive definite, gives the following important result: inclusion of anisotropy broadens the range of permissible values of gravity-induced horizontal stresses. In fact, for some ranges of anisotropic rock properties, it is thermodynamically admissible for gravity-induced horizontal stresses to exceed the vertical stress component; this is not possible for the classical isotropic solution. Specific examples are presented to explore the nature of the gravity-induced stress field in anisotropic rocks and its dependence on the type, degree and orientation of anisotropy with respect to the horizontal ground surface. ?? 1987.

  8. ROCK GLACIERS IN THE KOLYMA HIGHLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Galanin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on remote mapping and field studies inGrand Rapids, Tumansky,Hasynsky,Del-Urechen Ridges as well as Dukchinsky and Kilgansky Mountain Massifs there were identified about 1160 landforms which morphologically are similar to the rock glaciers or they develop in close association with them. Besides tongue-shaped cirque rock glaciers originated due to ablation, a large number of lobate-shaped slope-associated rock glaciers were recognized. Significant quantity of such forms are developing within the active neotectonic areas, in zones of seismic-tectonic badland and in association with active earthquakes-controlling faults. Multiplication of regional data on volcanic-ash-chronology, lichenometry, Schmidt Hammer Test, pollen spectra and single radiocarbon data, most of the active rock glaciers were preliminary attributed to the Late Holocene.

  9. 1981 rock ptarmigan census, Adak Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Most of the Aleutian Islands support populations of rock ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus), where their abundance is believed to be greatly influenced by the abundance of...

  10. Catastrophe mechanism and disaster countermeasure for soft rock roadway surrounding rock in Meihe mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yang⇑; Zhu Caikun; Chong Deyu; Liu Yang; Li Sichao

    2015-01-01

    The soft rock’s heterogeneity and nonlinear mechanical behavior cause extremely difficult maintenance on the soft rock roadway. Aiming at the asymmetric deformation and destruction phenomenon appearing after excavating and supporting the 7101 air return way in Meihe mine, this paper comprehensively adopted a variety of methods to analyze the roadway surrounding rock deformation rule, obtaining the roadway surrounding rock stress and plastic zone distribution rule under no supporting condition and the roadway surrounding rock deformation features under original symmetric supporting condition. Furthermore, this paper revealed the catastrophe mechanism, and proposed the concept of‘weak struc-ture’ and the disaster countermeasure of‘overall stabilizing the roadway and strengthening the support of weak structure’ . The industrial test shows that the disaster control technology can realize the coordination deformation of the supporting structure and roadway surrounding rock, thus significantly controlling the deformation of roadway surrounding rock.

  11. Relating rock avalanche morphology to emplacement processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Anja; Prager, Christoph; Bösmeier, Annette

    2015-04-01

    The morphology, structure and sedimentological characteristics of rock avalanche deposits reflect both internal emplacement processes and external influences, such as runout path characteristics. The latter is mainly predisposed by topography, substrate types, and hydrogeological conditions. Additionally, the geological setting at the source slope controls, e.g. the spatial distribution of accumulated lithologies and hence material property-related changes in morphology, or the maximum clast size and amount of fines of different lithological units. The Holocene Tschirgant rock avalanche (Tyrol, Austria) resulted from failure of an intensely deformed carbonate rock mass on the southeast face of a 2,370-m-high mountain ridge. The initially sliding rock mass rapidly fragmented as it moved towards the floor of the Inn River valley. Part of the 200-250 x 106 m3 (Patzelt 2012) rock avalanche debris collided with and moved around an opposing bedrock ridge and flowed into the Ötz valley, reaching up to 6.3 km from source. Where the Tschirgant rock avalanche spread freely it formed longitudinal ridges aligned along motion direction as well as smaller hummocks. Encountering high topography, it left runup ridges, fallback patterns (i.e. secondary collapse), and compressional morphology (successively elevated, transverse ridges). Further evidence for the mechanical landslide behaviour is given by large volumes of mobilized valley-fill sediments (polymict gravels and sands). These sediments indicate both shearing and compressional faulting within the rock avalanche mass (forming their own morphological units through, e.g. in situ bulldozing or as distinctly different hummocky terrain), but also indicate extension of the spreading landslide mass (i.e. intercalated/injected gravels encountered mainly in morphological depressions between hummocks). Further influences on its morphology are given by the different lithological units. E.g. the transition from massive dolomite

  12. Petrologic and REE Geochemical Characters of Burnt Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lei; LIU Chiyang; YANG Lei; ZHAO Junfeng; FANG Jianjun

    2008-01-01

    The study of burnt rocks is beneficial to the discussion on the tectonic movement,paleoclimate and paleogeography that coal seams are subjected to after they were formed. In order to obtain the basic data on the features of the burnt rocks, a systematic study of petrology and REE geochemistry on burnt rocks in Shenmu, Northern Shaanxi Province has been done, using the methods of SEM, EDS, susceptibility measurements and ICP-MS. The burnt rocks are divided into two series in the section: the melted rocks and the baked rocks. SEM and EDS analyses reveal that all the minerals show burnt and melted traces, and there are no clay minerals except iliite found in the burnt rocks. Susceptibility measurements reveal that the burnt rocks have abnormally high susceptibility values,whereas a geochemical analysis shows that the REE distribution pattern of burnt rocks is similar to that of sedimentary rocks (initial rocks). In the longitudinal section, with increasing degree of burning (from baked rocks to melted rocks), the ΣREE gradually decreases, and the total REE of melted rocks is obviously lower than that of baked rocks. Besides, the melted rocks show apparent negative Ce anomalies, while the baked rocks show no anomaly of Ce, and sometimes even show positive anomalies.

  13. Preliminary rock mechanics laboratory: Investigation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oschman, K.P.; Hummeldorf, R.G.; Hume, H.R.; Karakouzian, M.; Vakili, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This document presents the rationale for rock mechanics laboratory testing (including the supporting analysis and numerical modeling) planned for the site characterization of a nuclear waste repository in salt. This plan first identifies what information is required for regulatory and design purposes, and then presents the rationale for the testing that satisfies the required information needs. A preliminary estimate of the minimum sampling requirements for rock laboratory testing during site characterization is also presented. Periodic revision of this document is planned.

  14. Quantitative Chemical Indices of Weathered Igneous Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of different weathering indices for characterising weathered igneous rocks of Hong Kong. Among eight chemical indices evaluated in this study, the Parker index has been found most suitable for a quantitative description of state of weathering. Based on geochemical results of 174 samples, the index decreases almost linearly with an increasing extent of weathering. The results enable a better understanding of the modification of geotechnical properties of igneous rocks associated with weathering processes.

  15. Digital Rock Studies of Tight Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, Dmitriy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-07

    This technical report summarizes some recently developed approaches to studies of rock properties at a pore scale. Digital rock approach is complementary to laboratory and field studies. It can be especially helpful in situations where experimental data are uncertain, or are difficult or impossible to obtain. Digitized binary images of the pore geometries of natural rocks obtained by different imaging techniques are the input data. Computer-generated models of natural rocks can be used instead of images in a case where microtomography data are unavailable, or the resolution of the tools is insufficient to adequately characterize the features of interest. Simulations of creeping viscous flow in pores produce estimates of Darcy permeability. Maximal Inscribed Spheres calculations estimate two-phase fluid distribution in capillary equilibrium. A combination of both produce relative permeability curves. Computer-generated rock models were employed to study two-phase properties of fractured rocks, or tight sands with slit-like pores, too narrow to be characterized with micro-tomography. Various scenarios can simulate different fluid displacement mechanisms, from piston-like drainage to liquid dropout at the dew point. A finite differences discretization of Stokes equation is developed to simulate flow in the pore space of natural rocks. The numerical schemes are capable to handle both no-slip and slippage flows. An upscaling procedure estimates the permeability by subsampling a large data set. Capillary equilibrium and capillary pressure curves are efficiently estimated with the method of maximal inscribed spheres both an arbitrary contact angle. The algorithms can handle gigobytes of data on a desktop workstation. Customized QuickHull algorithms model natural rocks. Capillary pressure curves evaluated from computer-generated images mimic those obtained for microtomography data.

  16. Acoustics in rock and pop music halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of rhythmic music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of twenty rock music venues in D...... frequency sounds are typically highly amplified, they play an important role in the subjective ratings and the 63-Hz-band must be included in objective measurements and recommendations....

  17. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  18. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  19. Effect of pre-tensioned rock bolts on stress redistribution around a roadway - insight from numerical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu-qiang Gao; Hong-pu Kang [Central Coal Research Institute, Beijing (China). Mining and Designing Branch

    2008-12-15

    The importance of the pre-tensioned force of rock bolts has been recognized by more and more researchers. To investigate the effect of pre-tensioned rock bolts on stress redistribution around roadways, a numerical analysis was carried out on a level drift at Chengzhuang coal mine using FLAC3D and a special post-process methodology, using surfer, is proposed to process the numerical simulation results. The results indicate that pre-tensioned rock bolts have a significant effect on stress redistribution around a roadway. In the roof, pre-tensioned rock bolts greatly increase vertical stress; as a result, the strength of the rock mass increased significantly which results in a greater capacity of bearing a large horizontal stress. The horizontal stress decreases in the upper section of the roof, indicating that pre-tensioned rock bolts significantly reduce the coefficient and the size of the region concentration of horizontal stress. At the lateral side, pre-tensioned rock bolts greatly increase the horizontal stress; therefore, the rock mass strength significantly increases which results also in a greater capacity of bearing a large vertical stress. The greater the size of pre-tensioned force, the larger the region of stress redistribution around a roadway is affected and the higher the size of the stress on the roadway surface the more the rock mass strength increases. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Rho/ROCK signal cascade mediates asymmetric dimethylarginine-induced vascular smooth muscle cells migration and phenotype change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi-ming; Lan, Xi; Guo, Han-bin; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Li; Cao, Jian-biao

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) induces vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) migration. VSMC phenotype change is a prerequisite of migration. RhoA and Rho-kinase (ROCK) mediate migration of VSMCs. We hypothesize that ADMA induces VSMC migration via the activation of Rho/ROCK signal pathway and due to VSMCs phenotype change. ADMA activates Rho/ROCK signal pathway that interpreted by the elevation of RhoA activity and phosphorylation level of a ROCK substrate. Pretreatment with ROCK inhibitor, Y27632 completely reverses the induction of ADMA on ROCK and in turn inhibits ADMA-induced VSMCs migration. When the Rho/ROCK signal pathway has been blocked by pretreatment with Y27632, the induction of ERK signal pathway by ADMA is completely abrogated. Elimination of ADMA via overexpression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 2 (DDAH2) and L-arginine both blocks the effects of ADMA on the activation of Rho/ROCK and extra cellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in VSMCs. The expression of differentiated phenotype relative proteins was reduced and the actin cytoskeleton was disassembled by ADMA, which were blocked by Y27632, further interpreting that ADMA inducing VSMCs migration via Rho/ROCK signal pathway is due to its effect on the VSMCs phenotype change. Our present study may help to provide novel insights into the therapy and prevention of atherosclerosis.

  1. Partial deletion of ROCK2 protects mice from high-fat diet-induced cardiac insulin resistance and contractile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Hesham; Nyamandi, Vongai; Garcia-Patino, Marysol; Varela, Julia Nogueira; Bankar, Girish; Lin, Guorong; Jia, Zhengping; MacLeod, Kathleen M

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is associated with cardiac insulin resistance and contractile dysfunction, which contribute to the development of heart failure. The RhoA-Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway has been reported to modulate insulin resistance, but whether it is implicated in obesity-induced cardiac dysfunction is not known. To test this, wild-type (WT) and ROCK2(+/-) mice were fed normal chow or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 17 wk. Whole body insulin resistance, determined by an insulin tolerance test, was observed in HFD-WT, but not HFD-ROCK2(+/-), mice. The echocardiographically determined myocardial performance index, a measure of global systolic and diastolic function, was significantly increased in HFD-WT mice, indicating a deterioration of cardiac function. However, no change in myocardial performance index was found in hearts from HFD-ROCK2(+/-) mice. Speckle-tracking-based strain echocardiography also revealed regional impairment in left ventricular wall motion in hearts from HFD-WT, but not HFD-ROCK2(+/-), mice. Activity of ROCK1 and ROCK2 was significantly increased in hearts from HFD-WT mice, and GLUT4 expression was significantly reduced. Insulin-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS) Tyr(612), Akt, and AS160 was also impaired in these hearts, while Ser(307) phosphorylation of IRS was increased. In contrast, the increase in ROCK2, but not ROCK1, activity was prevented in hearts from HFD-ROCK2(+/-) mice, and cardiac levels of TNFα were reduced. This was associated with normalization of IRS phosphorylation, downstream insulin signaling, and GLUT4 expression. These data suggest that increased activation of ROCK2 contributes to obesity-induced cardiac dysfunction and insulin resistance and that inhibition of ROCK2 may constitute a novel approach to treat this condition.

  2. Marine source rocks of New Zeland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, A.P.; Norgate, C.; Summons, R.E. (Australian Geological Survey Organisation, Canberra (Australia)) (and others)

    1996-01-01

    Exploration in New Zealand is moving beyond the Taranaki Basin with its mainly terrestrial source rocks. Good to excellent quality marine source rocks exist and have generated oil in the Northland, East Coast W North Taranaki Basins. These high quality source rocks are Wespread throughout the late Cretaceous - Paleocene passive margin sequence in these basins as well in offshore Canterbury and the Great South Basin. This paper details the character, distribution, generative capacity and maturation behavior of the two main source units and shows how they can be correlated to the numerous seeps and oil impregnations found in the East Coast and Northland Basins. As well as being useful in basin modelling, kinetic maturation parameters for these two source rock facies help to explain differences in the biomarker and isotopic composition of seep oils and also explain trends in Rock Eval Tmax which are unrelated to maturity. In the East Coast Basin alone, the raw oil potential of the Waipawa Black Shale approaches 80 billion barrels. An understanding of the marine source rocks described here is crucial to evaluating the hydrocarbon prospectivity of New Zealand away from the Taranaki Basin.

  3. Marine source rocks of New Zeland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, A.P.; Norgate, C.; Summons, R.E. [Australian Geological Survey Organisation, Canberra (Australia)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Exploration in New Zealand is moving beyond the Taranaki Basin with its mainly terrestrial source rocks. Good to excellent quality marine source rocks exist and have generated oil in the Northland, East Coast W North Taranaki Basins. These high quality source rocks are Wespread throughout the late Cretaceous - Paleocene passive margin sequence in these basins as well in offshore Canterbury and the Great South Basin. This paper details the character, distribution, generative capacity and maturation behavior of the two main source units and shows how they can be correlated to the numerous seeps and oil impregnations found in the East Coast and Northland Basins. As well as being useful in basin modelling, kinetic maturation parameters for these two source rock facies help to explain differences in the biomarker and isotopic composition of seep oils and also explain trends in Rock Eval Tmax which are unrelated to maturity. In the East Coast Basin alone, the raw oil potential of the Waipawa Black Shale approaches 80 billion barrels. An understanding of the marine source rocks described here is crucial to evaluating the hydrocarbon prospectivity of New Zealand away from the Taranaki Basin.

  4. Kinematics analysis of a robotic rock grinder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With the aim to discover water, life and resources in other planets, robotic sampling instrument is a crucial part of the space exploration robot. To remove dusty and weathered surfaces and expose the fresh rock underneath the planetary surface, a robotic rock grinder is considered to replace the geologist's rock hammer to carry out the geological investigation. A primary prototype of the robotic rock grinder with three degrees of freedom has been developed in this paper. Planetary transmission system is used in the grinding driving system with two inputs (rotation motor and revolution motor) and two outputs (grinding wheel and cutting brush). The grinding wheel with two teeth has been used to abrade the rock. The cutting brush is used to sweep the debris. The third actuator is to feed the grinding system. Kinematics of the grinding system has been analyzed. To get a continuous and smooth fresh face over the rock, grinding trajectory of the grinding wheel has been discussed and planned. Lastly, abrasion experiments have been made to testify the feasibility and the basic function of this system.

  5. The Rock that Hit New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Keksis, August Lawrence [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-03

    On January 12, 1975, a rock seemed to fall from the sky over New York State’s Schoharie County hitting the tractor of a local farmer, who was “preparing his fields for spring planting.” As the farmer later described the event to a reporter from the UFO INVESTIGATOR, the object glanced off the tractor, fell to the ground, and melted its way through a patch of ice that was two and one half inches thick. The farmer, Leonard Tillapaugh, called the county sheriff, Harvey Stoddard, who recovered the rock, noting that it “was still warm.” Why and how a sample of the rock came to Los Alamos is not known. However, it captivated a wide Laboratory audience, was subjected to rigorous testing and evaluation. Los Alamos used the scientific method in the manner promoted by Hynek. Did Los Alamos solve the mystery of the rock’s origin? Not definitively. Although the exact origin could not be determined, it was shown conclusively that the rock was not from outer space. With that said, the saga of Rock that hit New York came to an end. Nothing more was said or written about it. The principals involved have long since passed from the scene. The NICAP ceased operations in 1980. And, the rock, itself, has disappeared.

  6. Mechanism of zonal disintegration in surrounding rock mass around deep rock engineering and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical behaviors of deep rock mass are different from those of shallow rock mass.Through cases of Jinping II Hydropower Station,the special phenomenon of zonal disintegration in the surrounding rock mass around the diversion tunnels,is analyzed.On the basis of fracture mechanics,a new strength criterion for deep rock mass is derived.The new nonlinear strength criterion that is relative to the rock mass rating classification can be applied to the study of the tensile failure of deep rock mass.Subsequently,zonal disintegration model is established,and the radius of fractured zone and none-fractured zone of deep surrounding rock mass around cylindrical tunnel are obtained,their exact positions and the evolution law of zonal disintegration of surrounding rock mass is determined.To validate the present model,comparison between calculation results and the experiment observation on facture and failure around underground openings is carried out.It is found that the numerical simulation result is in good agreement with the experimental one on failure modes around the hole.Through sensitivity analysis,the effects of stress condition,cohesion and the angle of internal friction on the phenomenon of zonal disintegration are determined.Finally,the present model is adopted in the analysis of the zonal disintegration in the surrounding rock mass around the diversion tunnels in Jinping II Hydropower Station.Meanwhile,the magnitude and distributions of fractured zones are determined by numerical simulation.

  7. Comparative study of static and dynamic parameters of rock for the Xishan Rock Cliff Statue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin JIANG; Jin-zhong SUN

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic wave testing was applied to investigate the quality and weathering status of rock specimens obtained in two borings situated in the Xishan Buddha rock slope in Taiyuan,China.This paper pays special attention to the distribution of bulk density,dynamic parameters and static parameters of rock specimens as well as the relationship between static and dynamic parameters.The results illustrate that the distribution of both parameters is identical along the depth of two drilled holes in the rock slope.When the hole depth increases,the density of rock mass,saturated compression strength and static elastic modulus,dynamic elastic modulus and wave velocity also show increase tendency.The weathering degree in the rock mass ranging from the surface of cliffto the depth of 2.5 m is the highest while the rock mass is unsalted and more rigid when the depth is larger than 3.0 m.The relationship between dynamic elastic modulus,sonic wave velocity and horizontal depth indicates that dynamic elastic modulus is more sensitive than sonic wave velocity.Conversely,by comparing quantity relationship between static elastic modulus and sonic wave velocity,it is found that the composition of rock has a great influence on the relationship between static and dynamic parameters,that is,inequality of rock composition will lead to dispersion and abnormality of the distribution of static and dynamic parameters.

  8. Rock Cracking Indices for Improved Tunnel Support Design: A Case Study for Columnar Jointed Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xia-Ting; Hao, Xian-Jie; Jiang, Quan; Li, Shao-jun; Hudson, John A.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements indicate that the development of cracking is a key feature relating to the strength and collapse of a columnar jointed rock mass. In this context, a new support design method utilising rock cracking indices for columnar jointed rock mass under high stress is proposed to restrain the development of cracking in the surrounding rock mass. The method involves limiting the cracking evolution of the surrounding rock mass by designing the appropriate parameters and time of installation of the support system. Two indices are suggested: the allowable depth of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ); and the allowable damage extent of the rock mass in the EDZ. The method involves limiting the evolution of cracking in the surrounding rock mass by designing the parameters and time of installation of the support system. The support system should have a suitable stiffness and installation time so as to restrain the evolution of the depth and damage extent of the EDZ within the surrounding rock. Therefore, the depth and damage extent of the EDZ, as well as the axial stress in the anchor bolts, are calculated at different distances between the support location and the tunnel working face to find the appropriate stiffness and installation time of the support system. The method has been successfully adopted to determine the thickness of shotcrete, the arrangement and installation time of rockbolts, and other parameters, for five large diversion tunnels at the Baihetan hydropower station, China, which were excavated in columnar jointed rock masses.

  9. Quantification of rock fall processes on recently deglaciated rock slopes, Gepatsch glacier, Tyrol (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehling, Lucas; Rohn, Joachim; Moser, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The recently deglaciated area in alpine glacier forefields is characterized by intensified mass movement processes in particular debris flows, shallow landslides and rockfalls. Due to enhanced geomorphic activity, rock slopes adjacent to shrinking glaciers contribute in a substantial way to the sediment budget. In this study, direct measurements of rock fall intensity are conducted by rock fall collector nets and natural sediment traps. The study area is a high mountain (1750-3520m a.s.l) catchment, which is recently about 30% glaciated. The extension of the Gepatsch glacier has been reducing since the little ice age maximum in the mid of the 19th century with an average annual shrinking rate of a few decameters at its tongue. The first results of the direct measurements demonstrate that on the recently deglaciated rock slopes, rock fall intensity is at least one order of magnitude higher (2,38-6,64 g/m2/d - corresponding backweathering rate: 0,3-0,9 mm/a) than on rock slopes which had has ice free since the last Pleistocene deglaciation (0,04-0,38 g/m2/d - backweathering rate: 0,005-0,05 mm/a). The highest rock fall intensity is attributed to the recent deglaciated rock slopes which are located close to larger fault systems (>60 g/m2/d - backweathering rate: >8 mm/a). Rock fall intensity shows also considerable intra-annual variations which are related to cold climate weathering processes and rainstorm activity.

  10. Phosphate Rock Application on Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. Production and Macronutrients in Latosol Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of phosphate rocks (PRs fertilizer compared to chemical P fertilizer for the best crop production and macronutrients of alfalfa. A completely randomized design under 3x3 factorial patterns was used in this research. The first factor was different sources of P fertilizer: Guizhou Phosphate Rock (GPR, Jingxiang Phosphate Rock (JPR, and Single Super Phosphate (SSP. The second factor was level of P fertilizer: 75, 100, and 125 mg P2O5/kg soil. A control treatment (without addition of P fertilizer, CK was added as a comparison with the treatments. The results showed that JPR was the best for alfalfa production, whereas GPR and SSP were better for nutrient content in the alfalfa tissue than JPR. On the whole, phosphate rocks had similar effect on alfalfa growth compared to SSP at the experimental conditions.

  11. Experimental Investigation on Creep Deformation Behavior of Medium-strength Marble Rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The creep deformation behavior of rocks has significant effect on the stability of underground structures. This study presents the short-term and creep deformation behavior of medium-strength marble rock using a conventional uniaxial compression testing machine and a servo-controlled rheology testing machine. The uniaxial compressive strength is obtained by the uniaxial compression testing machine. During the creep behavior test, two types of rock specimens (dry and water-saturated are specified to be used to perform the uniaxial creep tests. Two rheological failure modes and the relationship curves between axial/circumferential strain and stress levels of marble specimens are also obtained from the creep test results. Eventually, the creep deformation behaviors are compared with those of typical soft rocks. These creep curves combined with a given creep constitutive model would provide accurate parameters for long-term stability analyses of actual projects.

  12. RhoA/ROCK signaling in chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs induced by TGF-β1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Xu; Shuhua Yang; Hongtao Tian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of RhoA/ROCK in the process of chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro induced by TGF-β1. Methods: MSCs were isolated from rat bone marrow, cultured and passaged. The cultured MSCs at the 3rd passage were induced to differentiate into chondrocytes in induction medium containing TGF-β1, the expressions of RhoA and ROCK1/2 in the induced MSCs cells were detected by Western-blot and RT-PCR. Results: In parallel to chondrogenic marker gene expressions of collagen Ⅱ and aggrecan, ROCK inhibition by Y27632 in these cells caused a significant decrease in mRNA level of collagen Ⅱ. Conclusion: The results suggest that RhoA/ROCK pathway may play an important and complex role in regulation of chondrogenic differentiation and gene expression.

  13. A comparative study on dynamic mechanical performance of concrete and rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhengbing

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available of underground cavities and field-leveling excavation. Dynamic mechanical performance of rocks has been gradually attached importance both in China and abroad. Concrete and rock are two kinds of the most frequently used engineering materials and also frequently used as experimental objects currently. To compare dynamic mechanical performance of these two materials, this study performed dynamic compression test with five different strain rates on concrete and rock using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB to obtain basic dynamic mechanical parameters of them and then summarized the relationship of dynamic compressive strength, peak strain and strain rate of two materials. Moreover, specific energy absorption is introduced to confirm dynamic damage mechanisms of concrete and rock materials. This work can not only help to improve working efficiency to the largest extent but also ensure the smooth development of engineering, providing rich theoretical guidance for development of related engineering in the future

  14. MINING INDUCED INFLUENCE ON THE ROADWAYS IN WEAK SURROUNDING ROCK AND ITS CONTROLLING MEASURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆士良; 王悦汉

    1991-01-01

    The application of destressing method can change the distribution patterns of the stress field in the weak rock surrounding openings, locate the openings in the zone of low stress level, thus improve their loading and maintaining conditions. Such method is considered as a new way of opening maintenance in weak rock and has caused extensive interests in mining industry both at home and abroad. The results of theoretic research and lab experiments of utilizing topdestresslng trough to maintain the opening affected by mining activities in weak rock, as well as its practical application in a coal mine are introduced in this paper. The research results indicate that the deformation and floor heaving of the opening in weak rock can be effectively controlled, and long-term stability of the opening can be realized by applying destressing method as long as the destressing plan and concerned parameters are carefully determined.

  15. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces phytoextraction of uranium, thorium and other elements from phosphate rock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Per; Jakobsen, Iver

    2008-01-01

    Uptake of metals from uranium-rich phosphate rock was studied in Medicago truncatula plants grown in symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices or in the absence of mycorrhizas. Shoot concentrations of uranium and thorium were lower in mycorrhizal than in non......-fungus uptake systems. The results support the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza as being an important component in phytostabilization of uranium. This is the first study to report on mycorrhizal effect and the uptake and root-to-shoot transfer of thorium from phosphate rock. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights......-mycorrhizal plants and root-to-shoot ratio of most metals was increased by mycorrhizas. This protective role of mycorrhizas was observed even at very high supplies of phosphate rock. In contrast, phosphorus uptake was similar at all levels of phosphate rock, suggesting that the P was unavailable to the plant...

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces phytoextraction of uranium, thorium and other elements from phosphate rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, Per [Radiation Research Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Jakobsen, Iver [Biosystems Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)], E-mail: iver.jakobsen@risoe.dk

    2008-05-15

    Uptake of metals from uranium-rich phosphate rock was studied in Medicago truncatula plants grown in symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices or in the absence of mycorrhizas. Shoot concentrations of uranium and thorium were lower in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal plants and root-to-shoot ratio of most metals was increased by mycorrhizas. This protective role of mycorrhizas was observed even at very high supplies of phosphate rock. In contrast, phosphorus uptake was similar at all levels of phosphate rock, suggesting that the P was unavailable to the plant-fungus uptake systems. The results support the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza as being an important component in phytostabilization of uranium. This is the first study to report on mycorrhizal effect and the uptake and root-to-shoot transfer of thorium from phosphate rock.

  17. Measurement of nonlinear elastic response in rock by the resonant bar method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rasolofosaon, P.; Zinszner, B. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1993-04-01

    In this work we are studying the behavior of the fundamental (Young`s) mode resonant peak as a function of drive amplitude in rock samples. Our goal from these studies is to obtain nonlinear moduli for many rock types, and to study the nonlinear moduli as a function of water saturation and other changes in physical properties. Measurements were made on seven different room dry rock samples. For one sample measurements were taken at 16 saturation levels between 1 and 98%. All samples display a ``softening`` nonlinearity, that is, the resonant frequency shifts downward with increasing drive amplitude. In extreme cases, the resonant frequency changes by as much as 25% over a strain interval of 10{sup {minus}7} to {approximately}4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}. Measurements indicate that the nonlinear response is extremely sensitive to saturation. Estimates of a combined cubic and quartic nonlinear parameter {Gamma} range from approximately {minus}300 to {minus}10{sup 9} for the rock samples.

  18. Application of rock-cad modelling system in characterization of crystalline bedrock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksa, Pauli

    The Finnish power company Teollisuuden Voima Oy studies crystalline bedrock in Finland for final disposal of high-level nuclear fuel waste. In evaluation of the varying lithological and structural conditions CAD-based ROCK-CAD system has been developed. ROCK-CAD is based on true solid modelling approach. One modelled volume consists of several mutually independent submodels. Mainly lithological, structural (fracturing) and hydraulical properties are modelled. ROCK-CAD is in operational use and experiences have been got from four sites modelled this far. The main uses of the software, have been in general visualization, in planning of sopplementary investigations and in qualitative interpretation and model development done by the experts. Computerized models form also the basis for ground water flow simulations and rock mechanical calculations. Two example drawings are presented and discussed.

  19. Peptide substrates for Rho-associated kinase 2 (Rho-kinase 2/ROCK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hun Kang

    Full Text Available Peptide substrates sensitive for a certain protein kinase could be important for new-drug development and to understand the mechanism of diseases. Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase/ROCK is a serine/threonine kinase, and plays an important part in cardiovascular disease, migration and invasion of tumor cells, and in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study was to find substrates with high affinity and sensitivity for ROCK2. We synthesized 136 peptide substrates from protein substrates for ROCK2 with different lengths and charged peptides. Incorporation of (32P [counts per minute (CPM] for each peptide substrate was determined by the radiolabel assay using [γ-(32P]ATP. When the top five peptide substrates showing high CPMs (R4, R22, R133, R134, and R135 were phosphorylated by other enzymes (PKA, PKCα, and ERK1, R22, R133, and R135 displayed the highest CPM level for ROCK2 compared with other enzymes, whereas R4 and R134 showed similar CPM levels for ROCK2 and PKCα. We hypothesize that R22, R133, and R135 can be useful peptide substrates for ROCK2.

  20. Peptide substrates for Rho-associated kinase 2 (Rho-kinase 2/ROCK2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Hun; Asai, Daisuke; Tsuchiya, Akira; Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2011-01-01

    Peptide substrates sensitive for a certain protein kinase could be important for new-drug development and to understand the mechanism of diseases. Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase/ROCK) is a serine/threonine kinase, and plays an important part in cardiovascular disease, migration and invasion of tumor cells, and in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study was to find substrates with high affinity and sensitivity for ROCK2. We synthesized 136 peptide substrates from protein substrates for ROCK2 with different lengths and charged peptides. Incorporation of (32)P [counts per minute (CPM)] for each peptide substrate was determined by the radiolabel assay using [γ-(32)P]ATP. When the top five peptide substrates showing high CPMs (R4, R22, R133, R134, and R135) were phosphorylated by other enzymes (PKA, PKCα, and ERK1), R22, R133, and R135 displayed the highest CPM level for ROCK2 compared with other enzymes, whereas R4 and R134 showed similar CPM levels for ROCK2 and PKCα. We hypothesize that R22, R133, and R135 can be useful peptide substrates for ROCK2.

  1. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Annual Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-04-15

    The main activities in the geoscientific fields have been: (1) Geology - besides mapping of rock surfaces and drill cores a feasibility study concerning geological mapping techniques is performed, (2) Hydrogeology - completion of the modelling work for the detailed hydro-structural model for the -450 m level and monitoring/storage of data in the computerised Hydro Monitoring System, (3) Geochemistry - sampling of groundwater in the yearly campaign and for specific experiments and (4) Rock Mechanics - field work to determine the stress levels at which core disking occur followed by numerical modelling. Experiments are performed to develop and test methods and models for the description of groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, and chemical conditions at repository depth. The programme includes projects which aim to determine parameter values that are required as input to the conceptual and numerical models. At Aespoe HRL, experiments are performed under the conditions that are expected to prevail at repository depth. The experiments are related to the rock, its properties and in situ environmental conditions. The aim is to provide information about the long-term function of natural and repository barriers. Experiments are performed to develop and test methods and models for the description of groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, and chemical conditions at repository depth. The programme includes projects which aim to determine parameter values that are required as input to the conceptual and numerical models. An important goal is to demonstrate technology for and the function of important parts of the repository system. This implies translation of current scientific knowledge and state-of- the-art technology into engineering practice applicable in a real repository. It is important that development, testing and demonstration of methods and procedures are conducted under realistic conditions and at an appropriate scale. A number of large-scale field

  2. Comparisons of venus surface compositions with terrestrial ocean floor rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvin, J.B.; Bryan, W.B.

    1987-10-01

    Statistical comparison of Venera and Vega lander x-ray fluorescence spectrometer measurements of the composition of the Venus surface with an extensive database of compositional data for terrestrial ocean floor rocks indicates that the Venera 14 data matches certain tholeiitic basalts from the Kane Fracture Zone (KFZ) in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (22-25/sup 0/N) at high confidence levels. The tholeiites most similar to the Venera measurements are very primitive, low-calcium, high-alumina pillow basalts depleted in clinopyroxene, and are relatively unique to certain fracture zones in oceanic regions. If the Venera 14 analogy is valid, the implication is that certain Venus basaltic magmas have lost clinopyroxene at relatively high pressures by fractionation, perhaps within a deep source region. Comparisons of Venera 13 and Vega 2 data with oceanic rocks yield poorer matches. Venera 13 matches Loihi seamount alkali basalts, as well as potassic mafic rocks from oceanic island such as Tristan de Cunha. The best analogy to Vega 2 may be altered gabbros or basic lavas from terrestrial basic intrusions such as the Troodos ophiolite. The close similarity of a representative sample of Venera 14 material with distinctive ocean floor tholeiitic basalts suggests that deep magma storage regions exist on Venus, and that derivation of both tholeiitic and alkalic magmas from a single primitive parent may be an important process on Venus.

  3. Elastic and inelastic deformation of fluid-saturated rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhnenko, Roman Y; Labuz, Joseph F

    2016-10-13

    In situ rock is often saturated with fluid, the presence of which affects both elastic parameters and inelastic deformation processes. Techniques were developed for testing fluid-saturated porous rock under the limiting conditions of drained (long-term), undrained (short-term) and unjacketed (solid matrix) response in hydrostatic, axisymmetric and plane-strain compression. Drained and undrained poroelastic parameters, including bulk modulus, Biot and Skempton coefficients, of Berea sandstone were found to be stress dependent up to 35 MPa mean stress, and approximately constant at higher levels of loading. The unjacketed bulk modulus was measured to be constant for pressure up to 60 MPa, and it appears to be larger than the unjacketed pore bulk modulus. An elasto-plastic constitutive model calibrated with parameters from drained tests provided a first-order approximation of undrained inelastic deformation: dilatant hardening was observed due to pore pressure decrease during inelastic deformation of rock specimens with constant fluid content.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'.

  4. Comparison of preservice elementary teachers anxiety about teaching students to identify minerals and rocks and students in geology courses anxiety about identification of minerals and rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerback, Mary E.; Gonzalez, Clemencia; Primavera, Louis H.

    Students were given clearly defined, characteristics for the identification of minerals and rocks. This system requires visual identification of decisive characteristics, not rote memorization. In addition, this classification system differs from the usual method of first grouping rocks into the igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic categories. In this study the initial grouping of rocks was crystalline or noncrystalline. Two groups of students (preservice elementary teachers & students in geology courses) were tested on their ability to identify, the characteristics listed in Figure 1. The preservice teachers were anxious about teaching students to identify minerals and rocks. This initial high anxiety was reduced by completion of the task of identification. Students in geology classes were given the same task as the preservice teachers. However, the students in geology courses were not anxious about identifying minerals and rocks. Further analysis of the geology students showed that students whose grades on the lab exam were above the mean had low initial anxiety and the level of anxiety was reduced after the exam. Geology students with grades below the mean had high initial anxiety and the anxiety level was elevated after the exam. This indicates an inverse relationship between anxiety and performance in these students, and supports the work of researchers in the field of psychology.

  5. Detection of anorthosite rocks on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.; Poulet, F.; Flahaut, J.; Ody, A.

    2012-12-01

    The surface of Mars is primarily made up of basaltic (volcanic) rocks comprised of pyroxene, olivine and intermediate felsic plagioclase minerals [e.g. 1,2] and additionally a smaller fraction of sedimentary rocks, at times composed of hydrated salt and clay minerals [3,4]. A few localized eruptive sequences may indicate some compositional evolution from basaltic to dacitic rocks [1], but these remain in essence volcanic rocks. Using the CRISM (Compact Imaging Reconnaissance Spectrometer for Mars) near-infrared imaging spectrometer orbiting Mars [5], we report the detection of a new rock type on Mars, anorthosite. Anorthosite is a highly felsic (>90% plagioclase, 4.3 Gyrs ago [6]. At least 8 anorthosite exposures have been found scattered over the southern highlands of Mars. These are found in the rims of large (D > 50 km) craters or as outcrops in massif units. The unit age for these anorthosite exposures places their formation early in the planet's history (> 4 Gyrs). The massifs exposures are interpreted as deep crustal material uplifted from the Hellas basin forming event [7], which together with the crater rim exposures, suggest a formation at depth in all cases. The preferential co-occurrence of Al-rich clays mixed with several anorthosite exposures also suggests that these rocks were later altered by water at or near the surface. On Mars, there are several reasons to explain why such rocks would not have been formed during its primordial differentiation. In particular, the production of significant quantities of highly differentiated, siliceous melt that would form anorthositic rocks requires specific mechanisms such as fractional crystallization, assimilation, or partial melting of an already evolved source incompatible with the ultramafic source composition inferred for Mars [8,9]. The unforeseen detection of anorthositic-rocks therefore places new and strong constraints on the formation and the evolution of the crust and the mantle of Mars. Two possible

  6. Characterization and nutrient release from silicate rocks and influence on chemical changes in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Ramos Guelfi Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of Brazilian agriculture has led to a heavy dependence on imported fertilizers to ensure the supply of the growing food demand. This fact has contributed to a growing interest in alternative nutrient sources, such as ground silicate rocks. It is necessary, however, to know the potential of nutrient release and changes these materials can cause in soils. The purpose of this study was to characterize six silicate rocks and evaluate their effects on the chemical properties of treated soil, assessed by chemical extractants after greenhouse incubation. The experimental design consisted of completely randomized plots, in a 3 x 6 factorial scheme, with four replications. The factors were potassium levels (0-control: without silicate rock application; 200; 400; 600 kg ha-1 of K2O, supplied as six silicate rock types (breccia, biotite schist, ultramafic rock, phlogopite schist and two types of mining waste. The chemical, physical and mineralogical properties of the alternative rock fertilizers were characterized. Treatments were applied to a dystrophic Red-Yellow Oxisol (Ferralsol, which was incubated for 100 days, at 70 % (w/w moisture in 3.7 kg/pots. The soil was evaluated for pH; calcium and magnesium were extracted with KCl 1 mol L-1; potassium, phosphorus and sodium by Mehlich 1; nickel, copper and zinc with DTPA; and the saturation of the cation exchange capacity was calculated for aluminum, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium, and overall base saturation. The alternative fertilizers affected soil chemical properties. Ultramafic rock and Chapada mining byproduct (CMB were the silicate rocks that most influenced soil pH, while the mining byproduct (MB led to high K levels. Zinc availability was highest in the treatments with mining byproduct and Cu in soil fertilized with Chapada and mining byproduct.

  7. 27 CFR 9.203 - Saddle Rock-Malibu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Saddle Rock-Malibu. 9.203... Saddle Rock-Malibu. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Saddle Rock-Malibu”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Saddle Rock-Malibu” is a term of...

  8. Constitutive Modeling of the Thermomechanical Behavior of Rock Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, A.

    2016-12-01

    For the safe disposal of heat-generating high-level radioactive waste in rock salt formations, highly reliable numerical simulations of the thermomechanical and hydraulic behavior of the host rock have to be performed. Today, the huge progress in computer technology has enabled experts to calculate large and detailed computer models of underground repositories. However, the big ad­van­ces in computer technology are only beneficial when the applied material models and modeling procedures also meet very high demands. They result from the fact that the evaluation of the long-term integrity of the geological barrier requires an extra­polation of a highly nonlinear deforma­tion behavior to up to 1 million years, while the underlying experimental investigations in the laboratory or in situ have a duration of only days, weeks or at most some years. Several advanced constitutive models were developed and continuously improved to describe the dependences of various deformation phenomena in rock salt on in-situ relevant boundary conditions: transient and steady-state creep, evolution of damage and dilatancy in the DRZ, failure, post-failure behavior, residual strength, damage and dilatancy reduction, and healing. In a joint project series between 2004 and 2016, fundamental features of the advanced models were investigated and compared in detail with benchmark calculations. The study included procedures for the determination of characteristic salt-type-specific model parameter values and for the performance of numerical calculations of underground structures. Based on the results of this work and on specific laboratory investigations, the rock mechanical modeling is currently developed further in a common research project of experts from Germany and the United States. In this presentation, an overview about the work and results of the project series is given and the current joint research project WEIMOS is introduced.

  9. Hillslope evolution in landscapes dominated by layered rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glade, R.; Anderson, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Geologic structure and lithology can exert fundamental control over hillslope evolution. Landforms common across the western US, such as mesas, hogbacks, flatirons, and symmetric ridges bounding dikes, develop in the face of differential weathering of layered rocks in a horizontal, tilted, or vertical structural orientation. These features exhibit a characteristic form distinct from that of homogeneous, soil-mantled hillslopes; linear-to-concave up slopes developed on soft underlying rock typically display a thin, non-uniform layer of mobile regolith and are armored by debris derived from the resistant layers. Feedbacks between weathering and transport of both easily eroded rock and embedded resistant material can explain this general form where debris is dominated by large resistant blocks. In the more general case, however, relationships between the size distribution of the resistant material, relative weathering rates, and boundary condition history are not well-understood. Here we use a 1-D numerical model to explore the evolution of two end-member landforms: a hogback associated with a tilted sandstone bed, and a symmetrical ridge associated with a vertical basalt dike, both bounded by shale bedrock. The first, modeled after the Dakota Hogback near Boulder, Colorado, produces large sandstone blocks that both armor the underlying slope from weathering and stall regolith motion. The vertical dike, modeled after Shiprock, New Mexico, produces both large blocks and small basalt chips that armor the bounding slopes. We show that in both settings, feedbacks between armor and soft rock lead to autogenic processes that modulate base level signals, alter hillslope form, and increase relief over time when compared to a control case with no armor. We explore a variety of boundary conditions in which the presence of these feedbacks leads to a quasi-steady state hillslope form that differs both quantitatively and qualitatively from that expected of a traditional parabolic

  10. Petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the early Mesozoic Xitian granitic pluton in the middle Qin-Hang Belt, South China: Constraints from zircon U-Pb ages and bulk-rock trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qianhong; Cao, Jingya; Kong, Hua; Shao, Yongjun; Li, Huan; Xi, Xiaoshuang; Deng, Xuantong

    2016-10-01

    The Xitian pluton in southeast Hunan province is one of the early Mesozoic (Indosinian) granitic plutons in the South China Block. It is composed of biotite adamellite with K-feldspar megacrysts, biotite adamellite, and biotite granite that have U-Pb zircon ages of 229.9 ± 1.4 Ma, 223.6 ± 1.3 Ma, and 224.0 ± 1.4 Ma, respectively. The Indosinian granitoids in the Xitian pluton belong to S-type granites, with highly radiogenic initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.71397-0.71910), negative εNd(t) values ranging from -10.1 to -9.4, and old Nd model ages (1858-1764 Ma). They are enriched in radiogenic Pb isotopes, with (206Pb/204Pb)t ranging from 18.130 to 18.903, (207Pb/204Pb)t from 15.652 to 15.722, and (208Pb/204Pb)t from 38.436 to 39.037, respectively. These features indicate that the granitoidswithin the Xitian pluton were formed from magmas generated by remelting of metapelite and metapsammite of the Paleoproterozoic metamorphic basement at temperatures of ca. 800 °C, with low oxygen fugacity. The Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the rocks from Xitian pluton indicate that the granitic magmas were mixed with less than 10% mantle-derived magmas. We suggest that the Xitian pluton was emplaced in an extensional tectonic setting related to release of compressional stresses within the thickened crust during the early Mesozoic.

  11. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (3-D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin. Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy. The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks. As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography to identify rocks and

  12. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (False Color)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin. Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy. The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks. As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography to identify rocks and

  13. Impact of fluid-rock chemical interactions on tracer transport in fractured rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Liu, H-H; Spycher, N; Kennedy, B M

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of chemical interactions, in the form of mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions, on tracer transport in fractured rocks. When a tracer is introduced in fractured rocks, it moves through the fracture primarily by advection and it also enters the stagnant water of the surrounding rock matrix through diffusion. Inside the porous rock matrix, the tracer chemically interacts with the solid materials of the rock, where it can precipitate depending on the local equilibrium conditions. Alternatively, it can be dissolved from the solid phase of the rock matrix into the matrix pore water, diffuse into the flowing fluids of the fracture and is advected out of it. We show that such chemical interactions between the fluid and solid phases have significant impact on tracer transport in fractured rocks. We invoke the dual-porosity conceptualization to represent the fractured rocks and develop a semi-analytical solution to describe the transient transport of tracers in interacting fluid-rock systems. To test the accuracy and stability of the semi-analytical solution, we compare it with simulation results obtained with the TOUGHREACT simulator. We observe that, in a chemically interacting system, the tracer breakthrough curve exhibits a pseudo-steady state, where the tracer concentration remains more or less constant over a finite period of time. Such a pseudo-steady condition is not observed in a non-reactive fluid-rock system. We show that the duration of the pseudo-state depends on the physical and chemical parameters of the system, and can be exploited to extract information about the fractured rock system, such as the fracture spacing and fracture-matrix interface area.

  14. Performance Assessment of Hard Rock TBM and Rock Boreability Using Punch Penetration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ho-Young; Cho, Jung-Woo; Jeon, Seokwon; Rostami, Jamal

    2016-04-01

    Rock indentation tests are often called punch penetration tests and are known to be related to penetration rates of drilling equipment and hard rock tunnel boring machines (TBMs). Various indices determined from analysis of the force-penetration plot generated from indentation tests have been used to represent the drillability, boreability, and brittleness of rocks. However, no standard for the punch penetration test procedure or method for calculating the related indices has been suggested or adopted in the rock mechanics community. This paper introduces new indices based on the punch test to predict the performance of hard rock TBMs. A series of punch tests was performed on rock specimens representing six rock formations in Korea with different dimensions, i.e., the core specimens had different lengths and diameters. Of the indices obtained from the punch tests, the peak load index and mean load index showed good correlations with the cutting forces measured in full-scale linear cutting machine tests on the same rock types. The indices also showed good linear correlations with the ratio of uniaxial strength to Brazilian tensile strength, which indicates the brittleness of rock. The scale effect of using core specimens was investigated, and a preferred dimension for the punch test specimens is proposed. This paper also discusses the results of the punch test and full-scale rock cutting tests using LCM. The results of this study confirm that the proposed indices from the punch tests can be used to provide a reliable prediction of the cutting forces that act on a disc cutter. The estimated cutting forces can then be used for optimization of cutter-head design and performance prediction of hard rock TBMs.

  15. Effectiveness of oral sucrose and simulated rocking on pain response in preterm neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, C C; Stremler, R L; Stevens, B J; Horton, L J

    1997-08-01

    Feeding and carrying have been interventions used by caregivers throughout history in relieving distress in infants. Recent studies on the food substance sucrose have elucidated the comforting effect of the taste component of feeding while studies of rocking have examined the comforting effect of the vestibular component of carrying. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of sucrose and simulated rocking alone and in combination on diminishing pain response in preterm neonates undergoing routine heelstick procedure in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Preterm infants (n = 85) between 25-34 weeks post-conceptual age (PCA) and 2-10 days postnatal age (PNA) were randomly assigned to one of four conditions for routine heelstick procedure. The conditions were (1) sucrose alone: 0.05 ml of 24% sucrose was placed on the anterior surface of the tongue just prior to the lancing of the heel; (2) simulated rocking alone: 15 min prior to and during the heelstick procedure, the infant was swaddled and put on an oscillating mattress; (3) combination of sucrose and simulated rocking; and (4) placebo: 0.05 ml sterile water administered just prior to heelstick. Physiological (heart rate) and behavioural (facial actions) responses from baseline across 90 s following heelstick were scored second-to-second. Facial actions were analysed with repeated measures MANCOVA and heart rate with repeated measures ANCOVA. Behavioural state and gestational age were covariates. The groups that received sucrose alone or in combination with simulated rocking showed less facial actions indicative of pain than the rocking alone or control group. The addition of rocking to the sucrose condition tended to further blunt the facial expression of pain, but this enhancement did not reach a significant level. Heart rate was not decreased by any intervention compared to the control condition. Although the simulated rocking did promote quiet sleep, which has been reported in

  16. The influence of microwave irradiation on rocks for microwave-assisted underground excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferri Hassani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Demand is growing for explosive-free rock breakage systems for civil and mining engineering, and space industry applications. This paper highlights the work being undertaken in the Geomechanics Laboratory of McGill University to make a real application of microwave-assisted mechanical rock breakage to full-face tunneling machines and drilling. Comprehensive laboratory tests investigated the effect of microwave radiation on temperature profiles and strength reduction in hard rocks (norite, granite, and basalt for a range of exposure times and microwave power levels. The heating rate on the surface of the rock specimens linearly decreased with distance between the sample and the microwave antenna, regardless of microwave power level and exposure time. Tensile and uniaxial compressive strengths were reduced with increasing exposure time and power level. Scanning electron micrographs (SEMs highlighted fracture development in treated basalt. It was concluded that the microwave power level has a strong positive influence on the amount of heat damage induced to the rock surface. Numerical simulations of electric field intensity and wave propagation conducted with COMSOL Multiphysics® software generated temperature profiles that were in close agreement with experimental results.

  17. Compact rock material gas permeability properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huanling, E-mail: whl_hm@163.com [Key Laboratory of Coastal Disaster and Defence, Ministry of Education, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); LML, University of Lille, Cite Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Xu, Weiya; Zuo, Jing [Institutes of Geotechnical Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Natural compact rocks, such as sandstone, granite, and rock salt, are the main materials and geological environment for storing underground oil, gas, CO{sub 2,} shale gas, and radioactive waste because they have extremely low permeabilities and high mechanical strengths. Using the inert gas argon as the fluid medium, the stress-dependent permeability and porosity of monzonitic granite and granite gneiss from an underground oil storage depot were measured using a permeability and porosity measurement system. Based on the test results, models for describing the relationships among the permeability, porosity, and confining pressure of rock specimens were analyzed and are discussed. A power law is suggested to describe the relationship between the stress-dependent porosity and permeability; for the monzonitic granite and granite gneiss (for monzonitic granite (A-2), the initial porosity is approximately 4.05%, and the permeability is approximately 10{sup −19} m{sup 2}; for the granite gneiss (B-2), the initial porosity is approximately 7.09%, the permeability is approximately 10{sup −17} m{sup 2}; and the porosity-sensitivity exponents that link porosity and permeability are 0.98 and 3.11, respectively). Compared with moderate-porosity and high-porosity rocks, for which φ > 15%, low-porosity rock permeability has a relatively lower sensitivity to stress, but the porosity is more sensitive to stress, and different types of rocks show similar trends. From the test results, it can be inferred that the test rock specimens’ permeability evolution is related to the relative particle movements and microcrack closure.

  18. Rockburst Generation in Discontinuous Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ben-Guo; Zelig, Ravit; Hatzor, Yossef H.; Feng, Xia-Ting

    2016-10-01

    We study rockburst generation in discontinuous rock masses using theoretical and numerical approaches. We begin by developing an analytical solution for the energy change due to tunneling in a continuous rock mass using linear elasticity. We show that the affected zone where most of the increase in elastic strain energy takes place is restricted to an annulus that extends to a distance of three diameters from the tunnel center, regardless of initial tunnel diameter, magnitude of in situ stress, and in situ stress ratio. By considering local elastic strain concentrations, we further delineate the Rockbursting Prone Zone found to be concentrated in an annulus that extends to one diameter from the tunnel center, regardless of original stress ratio, magnitude, and the stiffness of the rock mass. We proceed by arguing that in initially discontinuous rock masses shear stress amplification due to tunneling will inevitably trigger block displacements along preexisting discontinuities much before shear failure of intact rock elements will ensue, because of the lower shear strength of discontinuities with respect to intact rock elements, provided of course that the blocks are removable. We employ the numerical discrete element DDA method to obtain, quantitatively, the kinetic energy, the elastic strain energy, and the dissipated energy in the affected zone in a discontinuous rock due to tunneling. We show that the kinetic energy of ejected blocks due to strain relaxation increases with increasing initial stress and with decreasing frictional resistance of preexisting discontinuities. Finally, we demonstrate how controlled strain energy release by means of top heading and bench excavation methodology can assist in mitigating rockburst hazards due to stain relaxation.

  19. Rock glacier ice as a microbial habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentine, C. E.; Skidmore, M. L.; Montross, S. N.

    2010-12-01

    Rock glaciers are ubiquitous geomorphic features in alpine environments, recognizable by a talus mantle, steep-toe, lobate shape and that flow due to the inferred presence of internal ice. Rock glaciers consist of both ice and debris, and are abundant in mountain ranges such as the Rocky Mountains, the Andes and the European Alps. Rock glacier ice has not previously been considered as a microbial habitat. However, given recent research showing debris-rich basal layers in glaciers harbor viable microbes, the debris-rich ice in a rock glacier has potential as a microbial habitat. The glacier research has demonstrated increased cell numbers in the debris rich basal ice relative to the clean glacier ice, and the finely-ground debris is considered to be a source of nutrients for the microbes. In August 2009 3 m of surface talus was excavated from the Lone Peak rock glacier, one of ~ 380 in Southwest Montana, to expose the underlying rock glacier ice. The ice contained numerous large rocks making sampling difficult, but 25 cm thick blocks with layers of clean and amber (~ 0.01% debris) ice were sampled. The isotopic, microbiological, and geochemical composition of the clean and amber ice was analyzed. The isotopic data provides some relative age dating for the ice and the geochemical data information on nutrient availability. Differences were observed between the microbial communities in the clean and amber ice by both cell counts and culturing techniques suggesting that as in glacier ice the debris-rich (amber) ice is a more amenable habitat for microbes.

  20. RhoA/ROCK pathway is the major molecular determinant of basal tone in intact human internal anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Satish; Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-04-01

    The knowledge of molecular control mechanisms underlying the basal tone in the intact human internal anal sphincter (IAS) is critical for the pathophysiology and rational therapy for a number of debilitating rectoanal motility disorders. We determined the role of RhoA/ROCK and PKC pathways by comparing the effects of ROCK- and PKC-selective inhibitors Y 27632 and Gö 6850 (10(-8) to 10(-4) M), respectively, on the basal tone in the IAS vs. the rectal smooth muscle (RSM). Western blot studies were performed to determine the levels of RhoA/ROCK II, PKC-α, MYPT1, CPI-17, and MLC(20) in the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms, in the IAS vs. RSM. Confocal microscopic studies validated the membrane distribution of ROCK II. Finally, to confirm a direct relationship, we examined the enzymatic activities and changes in the basal IAS tone and p-MYPT1, p-CPI-17, and p-MLC(20), before and after Y 27632 and Gö 6850. Data show higher levels of RhoA/ROCK II and related downstream signal transduction proteins in the IAS vs. RSM. In addition, data show a significant correlation between the active RhoA/ROCK levels, ROCK enzymatic activity, downstream proteins, and basal IAS tone, before and after ROCK inhibitor. From these data we conclude 1) RhoA/ROCK and downstream signaling are constitutively active in the IAS, and this pathway (in contrast with PKC) is the critical determinant of the basal tone in intact human IAS; and 2) RhoA and ROCK are potential therapeutic targets for a number of rectoanal motility disorders for which currently there is no satisfactory treatment.

  1. Rock damage caused by underground excavation and meteorite impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Bäckström, Ann

    2008-01-01

    The intent of this thesis is to contribute to the understanding of the origin of fractures in rock. The man-made fracturing from engineering activities in crystalline rock as well as the fracturing induced by the natural process of meteorite impacts is studied by means of various characterization methods. In contrast to engineering induced rock fracturing, where the goal usually is to minimize rock damage, meteorite impacts cause abundant fracturing in the surrounding bedrock. In a rock mass ...

  2. Resources of Kaolinite Rocks in China Coal Measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The proved reserve of kaolinite rocks in China coal measures is about 1. 673 billion tons. The types of kaolinite rocks contain tonstein, flintclay and soft kaolin. Their origin modes include alteration of volcanic ash, terrigenous clay deposit and weathering of coal and adjacent rocks. The organic matter and organic acid play an important role in the formation of kaolinite rocks of coal measures. The difference in properties between kaolinite rock and traditional kaolin requires different processing technologies.

  3. Rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) replication in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) exposed for different time periods to susceptible water temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myung-Hwa; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Vinay, Tharabenahalli-Nagaraju; Lee, Jehee; Jung, Sung-Ju

    2017-09-15

    Rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) is a member of the Megalocytivirus genus that causes severe mortality to rock bream. Water temperature is known to affect the immune system and susceptibility of fish to RBIV infection. In this study, we evaluated the time dependent virus replication pattern and time required to completely eliminate virus from the rock bream body against RBIV infection at different water temperature conditions. The rock bream was exposed to the virus and held at 7 (group A1), 4 (group A2) and 2 days (group A3) at 23 °C before the water temperature was reduced to 17 °C. A total of 28% mortality was observed 24-35 days post infection (dpi) in only the 7 day exposure group at 23 °C. In all 23 °C exposure groups, virus replication peaked at 20 to 22 dpi (10(6)-10(7)/μl). In recovery stages (30-100 dpi), the virus copy number was gradually reduced, from 10(6) to 10(1) with faster decreases in the shorter exposure period group at 23 °C. When the water temperature was increased in surviving fish from 17 to 26 °C at 70 dpi, they did not show any mortality or signs of disease and had low virus copy numbers (below 10(2)/μl). Thus, fish need at least 50 days from peaked RBIV levels (approximately 20-25 dpi) to inhibit the virus. This indicates that maintaining the fish at low water temperature (17 °C) for 70 days is sufficient to eradicate RBIV from fish body. Thus, RBIV could be eliminated slowly from the fish body and the virus may be completely eliminated under the threshold of causing mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Strength Assessment of Broken Rock Postgrouting Reinforcement Based on Initial Broken Rock Quality and Grouting Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfa Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate postgrouting rock mass strength growth is important for engineering design. In this paper, using self-developed indoor pressure-grouting devices, 19 groups of test cubic blocks were made of the different water cement ratio grouting into the broken rock of three kinds of particle sizes. The shear strength parameters of each group under different conditions were tested. Then this paper presents a quantitative calculation method for predicting the strength growth of grouted broken rock. Relational equations were developed to investigate the relationship between the growth rates of uniaxial compressive strength (UCS, absolute value of uniaxial tensile strength (AUTS, internal friction angle, and cohesion for post- to pregrouting broken rock based on Mohr-Coulomb strength criterion. From previous test data, the empirical equation between the growth rate of UCS and the ratio of the initial rock mass UCS to the grout concretion UCS has been determined. The equations of the growth rates of the internal friction coefficient and UCS for grouting broken rock with rock mass rating (RMR and its increment have been established. The calculated results are consistent with the experimental results. These observations are important for engineered design of grouting reinforcement for broken rock mass.

  5. Heterogeneity of Parent Rocks and Its Constraints on Geochemical Criteria in Weathering Crusts of Carbonate Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shijie; FENG Zhigang

    2004-01-01

    Owing to the low contents of their acid-insoluble components, carbonate rocks tend to decrease sharply in volume in association with the formation of weathering crust. The formation of a 1 m-thick weathering crust would usually consume more than ten meters to several tens of meters of thickness of parent rocks. The knowledge of how to identify the homogeneity of parent rocks is essential to understand the formation mechanism of weathering crust in karst regions,especially that of thick-layered red weathering crust. In this work the grain-size analyses have demonstrated that the three profiles studied are the residual weathering crust of carbonate rocks and further showed that there objectively exists the heterogeneity of parent rocks in the three studied weathering crusts. The heterogeneity of parent rocks can also be reflected in geochemical parameters of major elements, just as the characteristics of frequency plot of grain-size distribution.Conservative trace element ratios Zr/Hf and Nb/Ta are proven to be unsuitable for tracing the heterogeneity of parent rocks of weathering crust, but its geochemical mechanism is unclear. The authors strongly suggest in this paper that the identification of the homogeneity of parent rocks of weathering crust in karst regions is of prime necessity.

  6. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The TASS-tunnel. Geological mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardenby, Carljohan (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB (Sweden)); Sigurdsson, Oskar (HAskGeokonsult AB (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    The project entitled 'Sealing of tunnel at great depth' (Fintaetning av tunnel paa stort djup) needed a new tunnel in an area as undisturbed as possible and with cross-cutting water-bearing structures. The new tunnel, which was given the name TASS, was excavated on the -450 m level of SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (Aespoe HRL). The length of the tunnel is approximately 80 m and the theoretical tunnel area 19 m2. As is the case with all the other tunnels of the Aespoe HRL, the new tunnel has been geologically mapped. In addition, laser scanning combined with digital photography has been carried out. The tunnel was also used to test various types of explosives, borehole layouts and drilling techniques. The geological mapping of tunnel floor, walls and roof took place on four major occasions when a halt was made in tunnel excavation to allow for various tests. Before the mapping started on these occasions, laser scanning took place. The tunnel faces were mapped after each round (drilling, blasting and unloading). The present report describes the geological features of the tunnel and briefly how the laser scanning was performed. Water-bearing structures have been compared to similar structures in the neighbouring tunnels. The rock type names used here follow the old established Aespoe HRL nomenclature. Narrow (<0.1 m wide) dykes are normally mapped as fracture fillings. The dominating rock type is Aespoe diorite, which constitutes some 90 % of the rock mass. It is mostly mapped as fresh rock. . Minor constituents of the rock mass are fine-grained granite, hybrid rock, pegmatite, quartz veins/lenses and undifferentiated mafic rock. The mapping of fractures and deformation zones considers a number of parameters such as number of fractures, open/healed, width, length, description of fracture surfaces (roughness, planarity, etc), fracture filling, alteration and water. The deformation zones are discriminated into two main categories (&apos

  7. Acid rock drainage and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    Rainfall events cause both increases and decreases in acid and metals concentrations and their loadings from mine wastes, and unmined mineralized areas, into receiving streams based on data from 3 mines sites in the United States and other sites outside the US. Gradual increases in concentrations occur during long dry spells and sudden large increases are observed during the rising limb of the discharge following dry spells (first flush). By the time the discharge peak has occurred, concentrations are usually decreased, often to levels below those of pre-storm conditions and then they slowly rise again during the next dry spell. These dynamic changes in concentrations and loadings are related to the dissolution of soluble salts and the flushing out of waters that were concentrated by evaporation. The underlying processes, pyrite oxidation and host rock dissolution, do not end until the pyrite is fully weathered, which can take hundreds to thousands of years. These observations can be generalized to predict future conditions caused by droughts related to El Ni??o and climate change associated with global warming. Already, the time period for dry summers is lengthening in the western US and rainstorms are further apart and more intense when they happen. Consequently, flushing of inactive or active mine sites and mineralized but unmined sites will cause larger sudden increases in concentrations that will be an ever increasing danger to aquatic life with climate change. Higher average concentrations will be observed during longer low-flow periods. Remediation efforts will have to increase the capacity of engineered designs to deal with more extreme conditions, not average conditions of previous years.

  8. Fungal rock phosphate solubilization using sugarcane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Gilberto O; Dias, Carla S; Silva, Ivo R; Júnior, José Ivo Ribeiro; Pereira, Olinto L; Costa, Maurício D

    2013-01-01

    The effects of different doses of rock phosphate (RP), sucrose, and (NH(4))(2)SO(4) on the solubilization of RP from Araxá and Catalão (Brazil) by Aspergillus niger, Penicillium canescens, Eupenicillium ludwigii, and Penicillium islandicum were evaluated in a solid-state fermentation (SSF) system with sugarcane bagasse. The factors evaluated were combined following a 2(3) + 1 factorial design to determine their optimum concentrations. The fitted response surfaces showed that higher doses of RP promoted higher phosphorus (P) solubilization. The addition of sucrose did not have effects on P solubilization in most treatments due to the presence of soluble sugars in the bagasse. Except for A. niger, all the fungi required high (NH(4))(2)SO(4) doses to achieve the highest level of P solubilization. Inversely, addition of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) was inhibitory to P solubilization by A. niger. Among the fungi tested, A. niger stood out, showing the highest solubilization capacity and for not requiring sucrose or (NH(4))(2)SO(4) supplementation. An additional experiment with A. niger showed that the content of soluble P can be increased by adding higher RP doses in the medium. However, P yield decreases with increasing RP doses. In this experiment, the maximal P yield (approximately 60 %) was achieved with the lower RP dose (3 g L(-1)). Our results show that SSF can be used to obtain a low cost biofertilizer rich in P combining RP, sugarcane bagasse, and A. niger. Moreover, sugarcane bagasse is a suitable substrate for SSF aiming at RP solubilization, since this residue can supply the C and N necessary for the metabolism of A. niger within a range that favors RP solubilization.

  9. Argillaceous rock as host rock for final storage of radioactive waste in Germany; Tongesteine als Wirtsgesteine fuer die Endlagerung radioaktiver Abfaelle in Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeuer, V.; Hoth, P. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    On behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Economics and Technology (BMWi), the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Raw Materials (BGR) in a study described argillaceous rock formations as potential host rock for repositories in some areas of Germany, and evaluated them. The study was based on available and usable data derived from maps, archives, and approx. 25,000 drillings. No additional field tests or laboratory examinations were conducted. The study was published in April 2007 under the title of 'Untersuchung und Bewertung von Tongesteinsformationen' (www.bgr.bund.de). The exclusion criteria and minimum requirements recommended by the Working Group on Repository Sites (AkEnd) in 2002 served as a basis for defining the subareas eligible for further study. In addition, internationally acknowledged selection criteria as well as weighting criteria to be taken into account especially under German conditions were applied. The result of the study is not a representation of repository sites. However, the investigations show that argillaceous rock meeting host rock requirements occurs in the Lower Cretacious as well as in rock formations of the Lower and Middle Jurassic of Northern Germany. In Southern Germany, rock of the Middle Jurassic was found to be worthy of examination. The clay formations of the Tertiary are not considered in the study because of their relatively adverse mechanical properties in Germany. The areas highlighted are situated mainly in Lower Saxony, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Saxony-Anhalt, Baden-Wuerttemberg and, to a lesser extent, also im Bavaria, Brandenburg, and North Rhine-Westphalia. Other regional restrictions are mentioned in the study. Any further assessment of the argillaceous rock in the study would require an extensive program of investigations with a view to selecting sites for the final storage of high-level radioactive waste. (orig.)

  10. Effects of gas supersaturation on lethality and avoidance responses in juvenile rock carp (Procypris rabaudi Tchang)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang; Li, Ke-feng; Du, Jun; Li, Ran

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effects of total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation on acute lethality and avoidance responses in juvenile rock carp (Procypris rabaudi Tchang). The juvenile rock carp were exposed to water with different levels of supersaturation (105%, 115%, 120%, 125%, 130%, 135%, 140%, and 145%) and depth of 0.20 m at 25 °C for 60 h. Median lethal time (LT50) was used to assess the lethal responses corresponding to different levels of gas supersaturation. The results show that half of the juvenile rock carp died at the 120%, 125%, 130%, 135%, 140%, and 145% levels of supersaturation, and the LT50 corresponding to different levels of supersaturation was 18.7, 15.4, 8.2, 6.6, 3.5, and 1.7 h. When the level of supersaturated water is below 115%, the mortality is negligible. Avoidance responses were observed 5 min after the fish were put into equilibrated water (99%, 0.08 m deep) and water with different supersaturated levels (105%, 115%, 125%, 135%, and 145%, 0.08 m deep) at 25 °C. The fish exhibited strong avoidance responses in supersaturated water when the gas supersaturation was above 135%. However, they exhibited an obvious preference to supersaturated water when the gas supersaturation was below 115%. Thus, the juvenile rock carp can likely survive in water with a supersaturated level of 115%. PMID:20872989

  11. Effects of gas supersaturation on lethality and avoidance responses in juvenile rock carp (Procypris rabaudi Tchang).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang; Li, Ke-feng; Du, Jun; Li, Ran

    2010-10-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effects of total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation on acute lethality and avoidance responses in juvenile rock carp (Procypris rabaudi Tchang). The juvenile rock carp were exposed to water with different levels of supersaturation (105%, 115%, 120%, 125%, 130%, 135%, 140%, and 145%) and depth of 0.20 m at 25 °C for 60 h. Median lethal time (LT(50)) was used to assess the lethal responses corresponding to different levels of gas supersaturation. The results show that half of the juvenile rock carp died at the 120%, 125%, 130%, 135%, 140%, and 145% levels of supersaturation, and the LT(50) corresponding to different levels of supersaturation was 18.7, 15.4, 8.2, 6.6, 3.5, and 1.7 h. When the level of supersaturated water is below 115%, the mortality is negligible. Avoidance responses were observed 5 min after the fish were put into equilibrated water (99%, 0.08 m deep) and water with different supersaturated levels (105%, 115%, 125%, 135%, and 145%, 0.08 m deep) at 25 °C. The fish exhibited strong avoidance responses in supersaturated water when the gas supersaturation was above 135%. However, they exhibited an obvious preference to supersaturated water when the gas supersaturation was below 115%. Thus, the juvenile rock carp can likely survive in water with a supersaturated level of 115%.

  12. Monitoring and analysis of nonlinear dynamic damage of transport roadway supported by composite hard rock materials in Linglong Gold Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The study concentrates mainly on the development of failure process in composite rock mass. By use of acoustic emission(AE), convergence inspection, pressure monitoring, level measurement techniques and the modem signal analysis technology, as wellas scan electron microscopy (SEM) experiment, various aspects of nonlinear dynamic damage of composite rock mass surroundingthe transport roadway in Linglong gold mine are discussed. According to the monitoring results, the stability of the rock mass can besynthetically evaluated, and the intrinsic relation between the damage and the characteristic parameters of acoustic emission can bedetermined. The location of the damage of rock mass can also be detected based on the acoustic emission couple monitoring signals.Finally, the key factors which influence the stability of the transport roadway supported by composite hard rock materials are foundout.

  13. NEW THEORY IN TUNNEL STABLILITY CONTROL OF SOFT ROCK ——MECHANICS OF SOFT ROCK ENGINEERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何满朝

    1996-01-01

    Tunnel stability control is a world-wide difficult problem. For the sake of solving it,the new theory of soft rock engineering mechanics has been estabilished. Some key points,such as the definition and classification of soft rock, mechanical deformation mechanism of a soft rock tunnel, the critical support technique of soft rock tunnel and the new theory of the soft rock tunnel stability control are proposed in this paper.

  14. ROCK1 and ROCK2 are Required for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Anchorage-Independent Growth and Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Vigil, Dominico; Kim, Tai Young; Plachco, Ana; Garton, Andrew J.; Castaldo, Linda; Pachter, Jonathan A.; Dong, Hanqing; Chen, Xin; Tokar, Brianna; Campbell, Sharon L.; Der, Channing J.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that the closely related ROCK1 and ROCK2 serine/threonine kinases support the invasive and metastatic growth of a spectrum of human cancer types. Therefore, inhibitors of ROCK are under preclinical development. However, a key step in their development involves the identification of genetic biomarkers that will predict ROCK inhibitor anti-tumor activity. One identified mechanism for ROCK activation in cancer involves the loss of function of the DLC1 tumor suppressor gene, ...

  15. Field investigations of high stress soft surrounding rocks and deformation control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijian Yu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Field investigations of high stress soft rock deformations show that the high stress soft rock roadway can slide with large deformation. Severe extrusion and floor heave can also be subsequently observed. The supported roadway can be locally damaged or completely fail, where the floor has a large deformation and/or is seriously damaged. The factors inducing large deformation of surrounding rocks in deep roadway are rock strengths, structure face cutting types, stress states, stress release, support patterns, and construction methods. Based on the deformation characteristics of high stress soft rock roadway, a comprehensive support scheme is proposed. The overall support technology of “step-by-step and joint, hierarchical reinforcement” for roadway is presented, and the anchor cable and bolt parameters to check the design methods are also given. Finally, the proposed comprehensive support method “bolt + metal mesh + U-steel arch + shortcrete + grouting and cable” is used in the extension section of east main haulage roadway at −850 m level of Qujiang coal mine. The 173-day monitoring results show that the average convergence of sidewalls reaches 208 mm, and the average relative convergence of roof and floor reaches 448 mm, suggesting that this kind of support technology for controlling large deformation of high stress soft surrounding rock roadway is effective.

  16. Geochemistry of Eagle Ford group source rocks and oils from the first shot field area, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edman, Janell D.; Pitman, Janet K.; Hammes, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Total organic carbon, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, and vitrinite reflectance analyses performed on Eagle Ford Group core and cuttings samples from the First Shot field area, Texas demonstrate these samples have sufficient quantity, quality, and maturity of organic matter to have generated oil. Furthermore, gas chromatography and biomarker analyses performed on Eagle Ford Group oils and source rock extracts as well as weight percent sulfur analyses on the oils indicate the source rock facies for most of the oils are fairly similar. Specifically, these source rock facies vary in lithology from shales to marls, contain elevated levels of sulfur, and were deposited in a marine environment under anoxic conditions. It is these First Shot Eagle Ford source facies that have generated the oils in the First Shot Field. However, in contrast to the generally similar source rock facies and organic matter, maturity varies from early oil window to late oil window in the study area, and these maturity variations have a pronounced effect on both the source rock and oil characteristics. Finally, most of the oils appear to have been generated locally and have not experienced long distance migration. 

  17. Automated sliding susceptibility mapping of rock slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Günther

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a suite of extensions for ARCVIEW GIS™ (ESRI that allows to map the spatial distribution of first-order mechanical slope-properties in hard rock terrain, e.g. for large slope areas like water reservoir slopes. Besides digital elevation data, this expert-system includes regional continuous grid-based data on geological structures that might act as potential sliding or cutoff planes for rockslides. The system allows rapid automated mapping of geometrical and kinematical slope properties in hard rock, providing the basis for spatially distributed deterministic sliding-susceptibility evaluations on a pixel base. Changing hydrostatic slope conditions and rock mechanical parameters can be implemented and used for simple predictive static stability calculations. Application is demonstrated for a study area in the Harz Mts., Germany.

  18. Zapping Mars Rocks with Gamma Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    1999-12-01

    Because we do not know what deadly microorganisms might be lurking inside samples returned from Mars, the samples will either have to be sterilized before release or kept in isolation until biological studies declare them safe. One way to execute microorganisms is with radiation, such as gamma rays. Although quite effective in snuffing out bacteria and viruses, gamma rays might also affect the mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic compositions of the zapped rocks and soils. Carl Allen (Lockheed Martin Space Operations, Houston) and a team of 18 other analysts tested the effect of gamma rays on rock and mineral samples like those we expect on Mars. Except for some darkening of some minerals, high doses of gamma rays had no significant effect on the rocks, making gamma radiation a feasible option for sterilizing samples returned from Mars.

  19. Exposure histories of Bench Crater rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, D. S.; Drozd, R. J.; Morgan, C. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    A description is presented of the results of mass spectrometric analyses of the noble gases krypton and xenon, in eight Apollo 12 basaltic rocks. The significance of the results is evaluated. It is concluded that the Bench Crater rocks are not what they appear to be in their field relationships. They are not fragments ejected from bedrock by the Bench impact. Most, if not all, have had a previous history of regolith residence prior to the Bench impact. In retrospect, sampling of fresh ejecta from lunar craters during the Apollo missions turned out to be surprisingly difficult. Sampling was successful for Cone and North Ray craters where large boulders were available, but fresh South Ray ejecta was surprisingly elusive. The reported investigation shows that fresh ejecta was not obtained from Bench, and moreover, that the concept of 'radial sampling', in which the rocks sampled from a crater rim are supposed to represent the deepest material excavated, fails very badly for Bench.

  20. Do Bare Rocks Exist on the Moon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carlton; Bandfield, Joshua; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Hayne, Paul; Leader, Frank; Paige, David

    2017-01-01

    Astronaut surface observations and close-up images at the Apollo and Chang'e 1 landing sites confirm that at least some lunar rocks have no discernable dust cover. However, ALSEP (Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package) measurements as well as astronaut and LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) orbital observations and laboratory experiments possibly suggest that a fine fraction of dust is levitated and moves across and above the lunar surface. Over millions of years such dust might be expected to coat all exposed rock surfaces. This study uses thermal modeling, combined with Diviner (a Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter experiment) orbital lunar eclipse temperature data, to further document the existence of bare rocks on the lunar surface.