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Sample records for level iii concurrent

  1. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with S-1 in patients with stage III-IV oral squamous cell carcinoma: A retrospective analysis of nodal classification based on the neck node level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Ryuji; Semba, Akiko; Kawahara, Kenta; Matsuyama, Keiya; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Nagata, Masashi; Toya, Ryo; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo; Nakayama, Hideki

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the treatment outcomes of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine anticancer agent, for advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The study population consisted of 47 patients with clinical stage III or IV oral SCC, who underwent CCRT with S-1. Pretreatment variables, including patient age, clinical stage, T classification, midline involvement of the primary tumor and nodal status, were analyzed as predictors of survival. In addition to the N classification (node-positive, multiple and contralateral), the prognostic impact of the level of nodal involvement was assessed. Nodal involvement was mainly observed at levels Ib and II; involvement at levels Ia and III-V was considered to be anterior and inferior extension, respectively, and was recorded as extensive nodal involvement (ENI). The 3-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 37 and 27%, respectively. A finding of ENI was a significant factor for OS [hazard ratio (HR)=2.16; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-4.55; P=0.038] and PFS (HR=2.65; 95% CI: 1.32-5.33; P=0.005); the 3-year OS and PFS rates in patients with vs. those without ENI were 23 vs. 50% and 9 vs. 43%, respectively. The other variables were not significant. Therefore, CCRT with S-1 may be an alternative treatment for advanced oral SCC; favorable outcomes are expected in patients without ENI.

  2. Phase III trial of low-level laser therapy to prevent oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Heliton S.; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Small, Isabele A.; Araújo, Carlos M.M.; Viégas, Celia Maria Pais; Cabral, Elida; Rampini, Mariana P.; Rodrigues, Pedro C.; Silva, Tereza G.P.; Ferreira, Elza M.S.; Dias, Fernando L.; Ferreira, Carlos G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oral mucositis (OM) is a complication of chemoradiotherapy treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients with no effective therapy. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of preventive low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in reducing the incidence of grade 3–4 OM. Material and methods: From June 2007 to December 2010, 94 HNSCC patients entered a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional radiotherapy plus concurrent cisplatin every 3 weeks. A diode InGaAlP (660 nm–100 mW–1 J–4 J/cm 2 ) was used. OM evaluation was performed by WHO and OMAS scales and quality of life by EORTC questionnaires (QLQ). Results: A six-fold decrease in the incidence of grades 3–4 OM was detected in the LLLT group compared to the placebo; (6.4% versus 40.5%). LLLT impacted the incidence of grades 3–4 OM to a relative risk ratio of 0.158 (CI 95% 0.050–0.498). After treatment QLQ-C30 showed, differences favoring LLLT in physical, emotional functioning, fatigue, and pain; while the QLQ-H and N35 showed improvements in LLLT arm for pain, swallowing, and trouble with social eating. Conclusion: Preventive LLLT in HNSCC patients receiving chemoradiotherapy is an effective tool for reducing the incidence of grade 3–4 OM. Efficacy data were corroborated by improvements seen in quality of life

  3. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouvêa de Lima, Aline; Villar, Rosângela Correa; Castro, Gilberto de; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral; Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moisés Longo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm 2 or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60–70 Gy (range, 1.8–2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might

  4. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

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    Gouvea de Lima, Aline [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Villar, Rosangela Correa [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, Gilberto de, E-mail: gilberto.castro@usp.br [Department of Clinical Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Antequera, Reynaldo [Divisao de Odontologia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might

  5. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I. A.; Choi, I. B.; Kang, K. M.; Jang, J. Y.; Song, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Kuak, M. S.; Shinn, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    This study was tried to evaluate the potential benefits of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Between April 1992 and March 1994, 32 patients who had stage III non-small cell lung cancer were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Historical control group consisted of 32 patients who had stage III non-small cell lung cancer were received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy alone. Total radiation dose ranged from 5580 cGy to 7000 cGy with median of 5940 cGy. Complete response rate was higher in chemoradiation therapy (CRT) group than radiation therapy (RT) group. In subgroup analyses for patients with good performance status, CRT group showed significantly higher overall survival rate compared with RT group. The prognostic factors affecting survival rate were performance status and pathologic subtype in CRT group. In RT alone group, performance status and stage (IIIa vs IIIb) were identified as a prognostic factors. The incidence of RTOG/EORTC grade 3-4 pulmonary toxicity ahd no significant differences in between CRT group and RT group (16% vs. 6%). The incidence of WHO grade 3-4 pulmonary fibrosis also had no significant differences in both group (38% vs. 25%). In analyses for relationship of field size and pulmonary toxicity, the patients who treated with field size beyond 200 cm 2 had significantly higher rates of pulmonary toxicities. The CRT group showed significantly higher local control rate than RT group. There were no significant differences of survival rate in status showed higher overall survival rate in CRT group than RT group. In spite of higher incidence of acute toxicities with concurrent chemoradiation therapy, the survival gain in subgroup of patients with good performance status were encouraging. CRT group showed higher rate of early death within 1 year, higher 2 year survival rate compared with RT group. Therefore, to evaluate the accurate effect on survival of concurrent chemoradiation therapy, systematic follow-up for long term

  6. Oral Assessment Kit, Levels II & III. Draft.

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    Agrelo-Gonzalez, Maria; And Others

    The assessment packet includes a series of oral tests to help develop speaking as an integral part of second language instruction at levels II and III. It contains: 8 mini-tests for use at level II; 9 mini-tests for use at level III; a rating scale and score sheet masters for evaluating performance on these tests; and a collection of suggested…

  7. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

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    Inoue, Ryuji; Takada, Yoshiki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Kado, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yasushi; Mimura, Fumitoshi [Hyogo Medical Center for Adult Disease, Akashi (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    In patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we performed chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Thirty-five registered patients were intravenously treated with cisplatin (80mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and vindesine (3mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1, 3 and were irradiated from days 1 to 10 with single doses of 2.5 Gy up to a total dosage of 20 Gy. Each course lasted 28 days. Patients received 3 courses, and a total dosage of 60 Gy was delivered. Response to this treatment was evaluable in terms of results in 35 patients. Twenty-two patients showed partial response (response rate 62.9%), 10 had no change, and 3 cases had progressive disease. In 7.5 to 37.8 months observation, three PR patients are alive for more than 24 months without recurrence, but eight PR patients died of local relapse, and the median survival time was 15.7 months. Throughout this treatment course, grade 4 leukopenia was noted in 66% and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 3%. However all were reversible condition and no treatment-related death was observed. However, two cases died due to complications of pulmonary abscess, which occurred in the area of radiation pulmonary fibrosis about one year later after treatment. Although this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a tolerable treatment for non-small cell lung cancer and obtained a good response rate, it did not improve the survival rate. (author).

  8. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Takada, Yoshiki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Kado, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yasushi; Mimura, Fumitoshi

    1994-01-01

    In patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we performed chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Thirty-five registered patients were intravenously treated with cisplatin (80mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vindesine (3mg/m 2 ) on days 1, 3 and were irradiated from days 1 to 10 with single doses of 2.5 Gy up to a total dosage of 20 Gy. Each course lasted 28 days. Patients received 3 courses, and a total dosage of 60 Gy was delivered. Response to this treatment was evaluable in terms of results in 35 patients. Twenty-two patients showed partial response (response rate 62.9%), 10 had no change, and 3 cases had progressive disease. In 7.5 to 37.8 months observation, three PR patients are alive for more than 24 months without recurrence, but eight PR patients died of local relapse, and the median survival time was 15.7 months. Throughout this treatment course, grade 4 leukopenia was noted in 66% and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 3%. However all were reversible condition and no treatment-related death was observed. However, two cases died due to complications of pulmonary abscess, which occurred in the area of radiation pulmonary fibrosis about one year later after treatment. Although this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a tolerable treatment for non-small cell lung cancer and obtained a good response rate, it did not improve the survival rate. (author)

  9. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON PREOPERATIVE CONCURRENT CHEMORADIATION WITH CAPECITABINE IN STAGE II/III CARCINOMA OF RECTUM

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    Anish Kuttappan Soman

    2017-09-01

    events. CONCLUSION Chemoradiation with concurrent Capecitabine in Stage II and III Ca rectum results in good clinical response and modest pathologic response. It provides good surgical outcome in terms of complete resection and conversion to operability and results in sphincter-sparing resection for low lying tumours. Treatment is well tolerated with good patient compliance and acceptable levels of toxicity and also facilitates treatment on an outpatient basis.

  10. S-1 plus cisplatin with concurrent radiotherapy versus cisplatin alone with concurrent radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Lei; Xu, Shidong; Xu, Jianyu; Yang, Chaoyang; Wang, Junfeng; Sun, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of S-1 and cisplatin with concurrent thoracic radiation (SCCR) over cisplatin alone plus concurrent thoracic radiation (CCR) for unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between January 2009 and November 2011, 40 eligible patients with NSCLC were included and divided randomly into two groups. Twenty patients received SCCR with S-1 (orally at 40 mg/m 2 per dose, b.i.d.) on days 1 through 14, cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 on day 1) every 4 weeks for two cycles, and radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions over 6 weeks) beginning on day 1. Twenty subjects received CCR (cisplatin and radiotherapy, the same as for SCCR). The 3-year overall response rate was 59.3% and 52.4% for the SCCR and CCR groups, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant, while the median overall survival was 33 months (range, 4–41 months) and 24 months (range, 2–37 months), respectively (P = 0.048). The median progression-free survival was 31 months for SCCR (range, 5–39 months), whereas it was 20 months (range, 2–37 months) for CCR (P = 0.037). The toxicity profile was similar in both groups. In summary, we demonstrated that S-1 and cisplatin with concurrent thoracic radiation was more effective than cisplatin plus radiotherapy in NSCLC patients with acceptable toxicity

  11. A phase I study of postoperative concurrent radiotherapy and oral doxifluridine and leucovorin for II/III stage rectal cancer

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    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Tang Yuan; Wang Weihu; Wang Shulian; Song Yongwen; Liu Yueping; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A phase I study was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) and the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of chemotherapy of oral doxifluridine (5-dFUR) and leucovorin with concurrent standard radiotherapy(RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: Patients aged 18-75 years old, Kamofsky scored ≥70%, stage II/III rectal cancer after curative surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in the fraction of 2.0 Gy per day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. 5-dFUR was administered concurrently with radiotherapy in escalating doses, and oral leucovorin was administered in a fixed dose of 30 mg/(m 2 ·d), both 3 times daily, from the 1 st day of RT to the last day. The DLTs included grade 3 or grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologie toxicity. Results: From Aug. 2005 to Mar. 2007, 16 patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 450 mg/(m 2 ·d) (3 patients), 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (6 patients) and 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) (7 patients). Diarrhea, neutropenia and nausea/vomit were the most common side effects although all neutropenia was less grade 3. The DLT was observed in 1 patient at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) (grade 4 diarrhea), but none in the following 3 patients at the same dose level. At 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) level, the first patient quitted the study due to a severe abdominal cramp pain in the 3rd week of RT. In the following 3 enrolled patients, one suffered grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, diarrhea, fatigue, nausea/vomit and grade 2 neutropenia and fever. Grade 3 diarrhea was also observed in all the additional 3 patients at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level. So the dose escalation was ended up to 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). Four of 16 patients didn't complete the scheduled concurrent chemoradiotherapy due to severe side effects, including 1 at 550 mg/(m 2 ·d) dose level, and 3 at 650 mg/(m 2 ·d). The DLTs were observed as grade 3/4 diarrhea, grade 3 abdominal cramp pain, fatigue and nausea/vomit. Conclusions: Diarrhea is the most common and

  12. Can concurrent chemoradiotherapy replace surgery and postoperative radiation for locally advanced stage III/IV tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma?

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    Park, Geumju; Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Sang Yoon; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sung-Bae; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Kim, Su Ssan; Park, Jin-Hong; Kim, Young Seok; Yoon, Sang Min; Song, Si Yeol; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung; DO Ahn, Seung

    2013-03-01

    To compare surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) with the non-surgical combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CCRT) for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tonsil by measuring treatment outcomes and treatment-related complications. The records of 114 patients with non-metastatic stage III/IV tonsillar SCC treated between July, 1998 and December, 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Among the 114 patients, 65 received PORT and 49 received CCRT. In the PORT group, treatment included wide surgical resection of the tumor with neck dissection and administration of PORT to the primary tumor bed with a median dose of 60 Gy. In the CCRT group, a median dose of 70 Gy was delivered to the gross tumor, and 46 patients received concurrent chemotherapy with i.v. cisplatin. The median follow-up time was 58 months in the PORT group and 44 months in the CCRT group. There was no significant difference between PORT and CCRT in terms of 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (88.4% vs. 91.4%, p=0.68), distant metastasis-free survival (88.9% vs. 92.3%, p=0.60), disease-free survival (79.5% vs. 84.2%, p=0.63) or overall survival (78.9% vs. 88.9%, p=0.45). More CCRT patients than PORT patients experienced grade 3 (or higher) hematological toxicities and grade 2 pharyngitis during treatment. Chronic toxicity, manifested as swallowing difficulty, dry mouth and trismus, was similar between the two treatment groups. CCRT provides similar levels of local and distant control in patients with locally advanced tonsillar SCC as PORT, yet fails to show any superiority in preserving functions such as swallowing, saliva production, and mastication.

  13. A Model of Computation for Bit-Level Concurrent Computing and Programming: APEC

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    Ajiro, Takashi; Tsuchida, Kensei

    A concurrent model of computation and a language based on the model for bit-level operation are useful for developing asynchronous and concurrent programs compositionally, which frequently use bit-level operations. Some examples are programs for video games, hardware emulation (including virtual machines), and signal processing. However, few models and languages are optimized and oriented to bit-level concurrent computation. We previously developed a visual programming language called A-BITS for bit-level concurrent programming. The language is based on a dataflow-like model that computes using processes that provide serial bit-level operations and FIFO buffers connected to them. It can express bit-level computation naturally and develop compositionally. We then devised a concurrent computation model called APEC (Asynchronous Program Elements Connection) for bit-level concurrent computation. This model enables precise and formal expression of the process of computation, and a notion of primitive program elements for controlling and operating can be expressed synthetically. Specifically, the model is based on a notion of uniform primitive processes, called primitives, that have three terminals and four ordered rules at most, as well as on bidirectional communication using vehicles called carriers. A new notion is that a carrier moving between two terminals can briefly express some kinds of computation such as synchronization and bidirectional communication. The model's properties make it most applicable to bit-level computation compositionally, since the uniform computation elements are enough to develop components that have practical functionality. Through future application of the model, our research may enable further research on a base model of fine-grain parallel computer architecture, since the model is suitable for expressing massive concurrency by a network of primitives.

  14. Tumor cavitation in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy: incidence and outcomes.

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    Phernambucq, Erik C J; Hartemink, Koen J; Smit, Egbert F; Paul, Marinus A; Postmus, Pieter E; Comans, Emile F I; Senan, Suresh

    2012-08-01

    Commonly reported complications after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) include febrile neutropenia, radiation esophagitis, and pneumonitis. We studied the incidence of tumor cavitation and/or "tumor abscess" after CCRT in a single-institutional cohort. Between 2003 and 2010, 87 patients with stage III NSCLC underwent cisplatin-based CCRT and all subsequent follow-up at the VU University Medical Center. Diagnostic and radiotherapy planning computed tomography scans were reviewed for tumor cavitation, which was defined as a nonbronchial air-containing cavity located within the primary tumor. Pulmonary toxicities scored as Common Toxicity Criteria v3.0 of grade III or more, occurring within 90 days after end of radiotherapy, were analyzed. In the entire cohort, tumor cavitation was observed on computed tomography scans of 16 patients (18%). The histology in cavitated tumors was squamous cell (n = 14), large cell (n = 1), or adenocarcinoma (n = 1). Twenty patients (23%) experienced pulmonary toxicity of grade III or more, other than radiation pneumonitis. Eight patients with a tumor cavitation (seven squamous cell carcinoma) developed severe pulmonary complications; tumor abscess (n = 5), fatal hemorrhage (n = 2), and fatal embolism (n = 1). Two patients with a tumor abscess required open-window thoracostomy post-CCRT. The median overall survival for patients with or without tumor cavitation were 9.9 and 16.3 months, respectively (p = 0.09). With CCRT, acute pulmonary toxicity of grade III or more developed in 50% of patients with stage III NSCLC, who also had radiological features of tumor cavitation. The optimal treatment of patients with this presentation is unclear given the high risk of a tumor abscess.

  15. Effect of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the influence of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFX RT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy for Stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred sixty-nine patients treated in a randomized study were retrospectively analyzed. Group I patients were treated by HFX RT with 1.2 Gy twice daily with a total dose of 64.8 Gy in 27 treatment days, while Groups II and III patients were treated by the same HFX RT and concurrent chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide (every week in Group II and every other week in Group III). Interfraction intervals of either 4.5-5 h or 5.5-6 h were used for each patient. Results: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) had a better prognosis than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h) (median survival: 22 vs. 7 months; 5-year survival rate: 27% vs. 0%, p = 0.00000). This phenomenon was observed in all treatment groups. Patients ≥ 60 years of age, with Stage IIIA disease, or with previous weight loss ≤ 5% were treated more often with the shorter intervals than those 5%, respectively, but in all of these subgroups of patients, the shorter intervals were associated with a better prognosis. Multivariate analysis showed that the interfraction interval was an independent prognostic factor, together with sex, age, performance status, and stage. The shorter intervals were associated with an increased incidence of acute high grade toxicity, but not with an increase in late toxicity. Conclusion: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) appeared to have a better survival than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h). Prospective randomized studies are warranted to further investigate the influence of interfraction interval in HFX RT

  16. Integrated System-Level Optimization for Concurrent Engineering With Parametric Subsystem Modeling

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    Schuman, Todd; DeWeck, Oliver L.; Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of concurrent design practices to the aerospace industry has greatly increased the productivity of engineers and teams during design sessions as demonstrated by JPL's Team X. Simultaneously, advances in computing power have given rise to a host of potent numerical optimization methods capable of solving complex multidisciplinary optimization problems containing hundreds of variables, constraints, and governing equations. Unfortunately, such methods are tedious to set up and require significant amounts of time and processor power to execute, thus making them unsuitable for rapid concurrent engineering use. This paper proposes a framework for Integration of System-Level Optimization with Concurrent Engineering (ISLOCE). It uses parametric neural-network approximations of the subsystem models. These approximations are then linked to a system-level optimizer that is capable of reaching a solution quickly due to the reduced complexity of the approximations. The integration structure is described in detail and applied to the multiobjective design of a simplified Space Shuttle external fuel tank model. Further, a comparison is made between the new framework and traditional concurrent engineering (without system optimization) through an experimental trial with two groups of engineers. Each method is evaluated in terms of optimizer accuracy, time to solution, and ease of use. The results suggest that system-level optimization, running as a background process during integrated concurrent engineering sessions, is potentially advantageous as long as it is judiciously implemented.

  17. Gender difference in treatment outcomes in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori; Tanai, Chiharu; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Tamura, Tomohide

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify any gender differences in the outcomes of concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A comparative retrospective review of the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between female and male NSCLC patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. Of a total of 204 patients, 44 (22%) were females and 160 (78%) were males. There was no difference in age, body weight loss, performance status or disease stage between the sexes, whereas never-smokers and adenocarcinoma were more common in female patients (55% vs. 3%, P 80% of the patients, respectively, of both sexes. Grade 3-4 neutropenia was observed in 64% of the female patients and 63% of the male patients. Severe esophagitis was encountered in <10% of the patients, irrespective of the sex. The response rate was higher in the female than in the male patients (93% vs. 79%, P=0.028), but the median progression-free survival did not differ between the sexes. The median survival time in the female and male patients was 22.3 and 24.3 months, respectively (P=0.64). This study failed to show any gender differences in the survival or toxicity among patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy. These results contrast with the better survival in female patients undergoing surgery for localized disease or chemotherapy for metastatic disease. (author)

  18. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Unascertainable Non Small Cell Lung Cancer : Preliminary Report for Response and Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Chang, Hye Sook

    1995-01-01

    Lung cancer study group at Asan Medical Center has conducted the second prospective study to determine the efficacy and feasibility of MVP chemotherapy with concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). All eligible patients with stage III unresectable NSCLC were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy( 120 cGy/fx BID, 6480 cGY/54fx) and concurrent 2 cycles of MVP(Motomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Vinblastin 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Cisplatin 6 mg/m 2 , d1 and d28) chemotherapy. Between Aug. 1993 and Nov. 1994, 62 patients entered this study ; 6(10%) had advanced stage IIIa and 56(90%) had IIIb disease including 1 with pleural effusion and 10 with supraclavicular metastases. Among 62 Patients, 48(77%) completed planned therapy. Fourteen patients refused further treatment during chemoradiotherapy. Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 34(74%) showed major response including 10(22%) with complete and 24(52%) with partial responses. Of 48 patients evaluable for toxicity, 13(27%) showed grade IV hematologic toxicity but treatment delay did not exceed 5 days. Two patients died of sepsis during chemoradiotherapy. Server weight(more than 10%) occurred in 9 patients(19%) during treatment. Nine patients(19%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Six of these patients had grad I(mild) pneumonitis with radiographic changes within the treatment fields. Three other patients had grade II pneumonitis, but none of theses patients had continuous symptoms after steroid treatment. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with advanced NSCLC was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and achieved higher response rates than the first study, but rather low compliance rate(7%) in this study is worrisome. We need to improve nutritional support during treatment and to use G-CSF to improve leukopenia and if necessary, supportive care will given as in patients. Longer follow-up and larger sample size is needed to

  19. Concurrent immunomodulator therapy is associated with higher adalimumab trough levels during scheduled maintenance therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Ashley; Dodd, Susanna; Fisher, Gareth; Skouras, Thomas; Subramanian, Sreedhar

    2017-02-01

    Combination therapy with infliximab and immunomodulators is superior to monotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and higher trough levels of infliximab. The role of concurrent immunomodulatory therapy on adalimumab trough levels has not been adequately investigated. We evaluated the impact of concomitant immunomodulation on adalimumab trough levels in patients on scheduled maintenance therapy. We conducted a prospective observational, cross-sectional study of all inflammatory bowel disease patients on maintenance therapy who had adalimumab trough levels measured between January 2013 and January 2016. Drug level and anti-drug antibody measurements were performed on sera using a solid phase assay. Pairwise comparison of means was used to compare trough levels in patients with and without concomitant immune modulator therapy. In total, 79 patients were included. Twenty-three patients (29.1%) were on weekly dosing whereas 56 (70.9%) were on alternate weeks. Median adalimumab trough levels were comparable in patients with and without clinical remission (6.8 μg/ml (IQR 5.6-8.1) versus 6.7 μg/ml (IQR 3.9-8.1), respectively. Patients with an elevated faecal calprotectin >250 μg/g had lower adalimumab trough levels (median 6.7, IQR 3.9-8) compared to patients with faecal calprotectin <250 μg/g (median 7.7, IQR 6.1-8.1) though this did not achieve statistical significance (p = .062). Median adalimumab trough levels among patients on concurrent immunomodulators was 7.2 μg/ml (IQR 5.7-8.1) compared to those not on concurrent immunomodulator, 6.1 μg/ml (IQR 2.7-7.7, p = .0297). Adalimumab trough levels were significantly higher in patients on concurrent immunomodulators during maintenance therapy. There was a trend towards a lower adalimumab trough level in patients with elevated calprotectin.

  20. Concurrent nitrate and Fe(III) reduction during anaerobic biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette; Crouzet, C.; Arvin, Erik

    2000-01-01

    The biodegradation of phenols (similar to 5, 60, 600 mg 1(-1)) under anaerobic conditions (nitrate enriched and unamended) was studied in laboratory microcosms with sandstone material and groundwater from within an anaerobic ammonium plume in an aquifer, The aqueous phase was sampled and analyzed...... for phenols and selected redox sensitive parameters on a regular basis. An experiment with sandstone material from specific depth intervals from a vertical profile across the ammonium plume was also conducted. The miniature microcosms used in this experiment were sacrificed for sampling for phenols...... and selected redox sensitive parameters at the end of the experiment. The sandstone material was characterized with respect to oxidation and reduction potential and Fe(II) and Fe(III) speciation prior to use for all microcosms and at the end of the experiments for selected microcosms. The redox conditions...

  1. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix: a phase I/II prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, One Chul; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Jong Hoon; Chang, Hye Sook; Kim, Yong Man; Kim, Young Tak; Nam, Joo Hyun; Mok, Jung Eun; Lee, Moo Song

    1998-01-01

    Prospective, single arm. Phase I/II clinical trial was performed to assess the efficacy and toxicity of the concurrent chemotherapy and definitive radiotherapy (RT) in patients with previously untreated locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix. From May 1992 to January 1997, a total of 73 patients with advanced cervical carcinoma were entered on the protocol but 5 patients were excluded in analysis because of patients' refusal of treatment. Their ages ranged from 31 to 77 years, median 58 years. The international Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage distribution was as follows: IIB 46, IIIA 2, IIIB 15 and IVA 5. RT consisted of external beam irradiation to 4, 140-5, 040 cGy/23-28 fractions plus high dose rate intracavitary treatments to deliver a dose of 30-35 Gy to point A in 6-7 fractions. During the intracavitary treatments parametrial boost was delivered for point B dose of 60 Gy in stage IIB and 65 Gy in stage IIIB. Two cycles of concurrent 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin (FP) chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m 2 /day continuous infusion for 4 days, day 1-4, 29-32 and cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 /dy intravenous bolus for 3 days, day 1-3, 29-31) administered starting on day 1 of 1 of RT. The median follow-up was 24 months (range 4-68+). Sixty-four patients were evaluable for survival rate in this protocol: The 5-year actuarial and disease-free survival rate were 52% and 64%, respectively. The 5-year actuarial survival for stage IIB and II+IVA patients were 58% and 36%, respectively. The 5-year disease-free survival rate for stage IIB and III+IVA patients were 71% and 46%, respectively. Of the 68 patients evaluated for patterns of failure, overall recurrence rate was 27.9% (19/68): local failure in 5.9% (4/68), distant metastasis in 10.3% (7/68) and both in 11.8% (8/68). Of the 64 patients evaluated for response at one month after the completion of treatment, the complete response rate was 78% (50/64). Concurrent chemoradiation appear to be a

  2. ACRIM III Level 2 Daily Mean Data V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM) III Level 2 Daily Mean Data product consists of Level 2 total solar irradiance in the form of daily means...

  3. Hyperfractionated 3D conformal radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, E.K.; Ahn, S.D.; Yi, B.Y.; Chang, H.S.; Lee, J.H.; Suh, C.W.; Lee, J.S.; Kim, S.H.; Koh, Y.S.; Kim, W.S.; Kim, D.S.; Kim, W.D.; Sohn, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This phase II study has been conducted to determine the feasibility, toxicity, response rate, local control, distant metastasis, and survival of hyperfractionated 3D conformal radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy with mitomycin C, vinblastine, and cisplatin in unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and also to find the most ideal 3D conformal radiotherapy technique. Materials and Methods: From Aug 1993, 173 patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC were entered into this trial and 146 (84%) completed the treatment. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy was given to a total dose of 65-70 Gy (120 cGy/fx, bid) with concurrent 2 cycles of MVP chemotherapy (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m 2 d2 and d29, Vinblastine 6 mg/m 2 d2 and d29, Cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 d1 and d28). Of these 146 patients who completed the treatment, 78 received noncoplanar 3D conformal radiotherapy using 4-6 fields and 17 received coplanar segmented conformal radiotherapy. Clinical tumor response was assessed one month after the completion of radiotherapy by computerized tomography (CT) scan. Toxicity was graded by RTOG and SWOG criteria. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for lung was calculated to find the correlation with radiation pneumonitis. Results: Nineteen (13%) had stage IIIa and 127 (87%) had IIIb disease including 16 with pleural effusion and 20 with supraclavicular lymph node metastases. Response rate was 74%, including 20% complete response and 54% partial response. With a minimum follow up of 12 months, overall survival was 60% at 1 year, 30% at 2 years and median survival was 15 months. Patients achieving a complete response (n=29) had a 2-year overall survival of 46.5% compared to 28.7% for partial responders (n=79) (p=.001). Actuarial local control was 66.7% at 1 year and 43.7% at 2 years. Actuarial distant free survival was 52.3% at 1 year and 39.8% at 2 years. Major hematologic toxicity (Gr 3-4) occurred in 33% of the patients but treatment delay

  4. Level III and IV Ecoregions of the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information and downloadable maps and datasets for Level III and IV ecoregions of the continental United States. Ecoregions are areas of general similarity in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources.

  5. Level III Reliability methods feasible for complex structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarts, P.H.; Boer, A. de

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the comparison between three types of reliability methods: code type level I used by a designer, full level I and a level III method. Two cases that are typical for civil engineering practise, a cable-stayed subjected to traffic load and the installation of a soil retaining sheet

  6. Randomized phase III trial of concurrent chemoradiotherapy vs accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitapanarux, Imjai; Kamnerdsupaphon, Pimkhuan; Pukanhapan, Nantaka; Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit; Vongtama, Roy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) vs accelerated hyperfractionation with concomitant boost (CCB) as a primary treatment for patients with Stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN). A total of 85 non-metastatic advanced SCCHN patients were accrued from January 2003 to December 2007. Of these, 48 and 37 patients received CCRT and CCB, respectively. The patients were randomized to receive either three cycles of carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil plus conventional radiotherapy (CCRT, 66 Gy in 6.5 weeks) or hybrid accelerated radiotherapy (CCB, 70 Gy in 6 weeks). The primary endpoint was determined by locoregional control rate. The secondary endpoints were overall survival and toxicity. With a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 3-102), the 5-year locoregional control rate was 69.6% in the CCRT arm vs 55.0% in the CCB arm (P = 0.184). The 5-year overall survival rate was marginally significantly different (P = 0.05): 76.1% in the CCRT arm vs 63.5% in the CCB arm. Radiotherapy treatment interruptions of more than three days were 60.4% and 40.5% in the CCRT arm and CCB arm, respectively. The median total treatment time was 55.5 days in the CCRT arm and 49 days in the CCB arm. The rate of Grade 3 - 4 acute mucositis was significantly higher in the CCB arm (67.6% vs 41.7%, P = 0.01), but no high grade hematologic toxicities were found in the CCB arm (27.2% vs 0%). CCRT has shown a trend of improving outcome over CCB irradiation in locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer. (author)

  7. Phase I study of cisplatin, vinorelbine, and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    To determine the recommended phase II dose of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 18 patients received cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vinorelbine (20 mg/m 2 in level 1, and 25 mg/m 2 in level 2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. TRT consisted of a single dose of 2 Gy once daily for 3 weeks followed by a rest of 4 days, and then the same TRT for 3 weeks to a total dose of 60 Gy. Fifteen (83%) patients received 60 Gy of TRT and 14 (78%) patients received 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten (77%) of 13 patients at level 1 and all 5 patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 neutropenia. Four (31%) patients at level 1 and 3 (60%) patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 infection. None developed ≥grade 3 esophagitis or lung toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 33% of the patients in level 1 and in 60% of the patients in level 2. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 83% (59-96%) with 15 partial responses. The median survival time was 30.4 months, and the 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were 72%, 61%, and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, the recommended dose is the level 1 dose, and this regimen is feasible and promising in patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  8. SPRINT: A Tool to Generate Concurrent Transaction-Level Models from Sequential Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Stahl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-level concurrent model such as a SystemC transaction-level model can provide early feedback during the exploration of implementation alternatives for state-of-the-art signal processing applications like video codecs on a multiprocessor platform. However, the creation of such a model starting from sequential code is a time-consuming and error-prone task. It is typically done only once, if at all, for a given design. This lack of exploration of the design space often leads to a suboptimal implementation. To support our systematic C-based design flow, we have developed a tool to generate a concurrent SystemC transaction-level model for user-selected task boundaries. Using this tool, different parallelization alternatives have been evaluated during the design of an MPEG-4 simple profile encoder and an embedded zero-tree coder. Generation plus evaluation of an alternative was possible in less than six minutes. This is fast enough to allow extensive exploration of the design space.

  9. Retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy for stage III and IV oral cancer: Analysis of therapeutic results in 112 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsudo, Kenji; Koizumi, Toshiyuki; Iida, Masaki; Iwai, Toshinori; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Oguri, Senri; Kioi, Mitomu; Hirota, Makoto; Koike, Izumi; Hata, Masaharu; Tohnai, Iwai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results and rate of organ preservation in patients with stage III or IV oral cancer treated with retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy. Materials and methods: One hundred and twelve patients with stage III and IV oral squamous cell carcinoma underwent intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy. Catheterization from the superficial temporal and occipital arteries was performed. Treatment consisted of superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy (docetaxel, total 60 mg/m 2 , cisplatin, total 150 mg/m 2 ) and daily concurrent radiotherapy (total of 60 Gy) for 6 weeks. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 46.2 months (range, 10–76 months). After intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy, primary site complete response was achieved in 98 (87.5%) of 112 cases. Five-year survival and local control rates were 71.3% and 79.3%, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 toxicities included mucositis in 92.0%, neutropenia in 30.4%, dermatitis in 28.6%, anemia in 26.8%, and thrombocytopenia in 7.1% of patients. Grade 3 toxicities included dysphagia in 72.3%, nausea/vomiting in 21.4%, fever in 8.0%, and renal failure in 0.9% of patients. Conclusion: Retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy and daily concurrent radiotherapy for stage III and IV oral cancer provided good overall survival and local control

  10. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledano, Alain H.; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair (κ = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis

  11. Early tumor shrinkage served as a prognostic factor for patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Min; Ye, Qingqing; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Men; Hu, Yan; Yang, Yonghua; Yang, Jiyuan; Cai, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death. About 80% of patients are diagnosed at stage III in the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is extremely important to understand the progression of this disease which has low survival times despite the advancing treatment modalities. We aimed to investigate the relationship between early tumor shrinkage (ETS) after initial concurrent chemoradiotherapy (C-CRT) and survival outcome in patients with stage III (NSCLC). A retrospective review of 103 patients with stage III NSCLC who had received C-CRT from January 2006 to October 2011 was performed. Patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy regimen of Cisplatin/Vp-16 and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy at a median dose of 66 Gy (range 60-70 Gy). All patients received a computed tomography (CT) examination before treatment. Also subsequently, chest CT scans were performed with the same imaging parameters at approximately 5 weeks after the initiation of treatment. ETS is here stratified by a decrease in tumor size ≥30% and cancer-related death (P < .05) in stage IIINSCLC. ETS may be served as a useful prognostic factor to predict the outcome of stage III NSCLC patients treated with CCRT.

  12. Crosstalk in concurrent repeated games impedes direct reciprocity and requires stronger levels of forgiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Johannes G; Hilbe, Christian; Rand, David G; Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Nowak, Martin A

    2018-02-07

    Direct reciprocity is a mechanism for cooperation among humans. Many of our daily interactions are repeated. We interact repeatedly with our family, friends, colleagues, members of the local and even global community. In the theory of repeated games, it is a tacit assumption that the various games that a person plays simultaneously have no effect on each other. Here we introduce a general framework that allows us to analyze "crosstalk" between a player's concurrent games. In the presence of crosstalk, the action a person experiences in one game can alter the person's decision in another. We find that crosstalk impedes the maintenance of cooperation and requires stronger levels of forgiveness. The magnitude of the effect depends on the population structure. In more densely connected social groups, crosstalk has a stronger effect. A harsh retaliator, such as Tit-for-Tat, is unable to counteract crosstalk. The crosstalk framework provides a unified interpretation of direct and upstream reciprocity in the context of repeated games.

  13. Risk and predictors for early radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent or sequential chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Jun; Li, Guang; Zang, Shuang; Zhang, Shuo; Yao, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The rate of radiation pneumonitis (RP) for patients receiving chemoradiotherapy has been various across studies. Whether it is related to different chemotherapy schedules used in combination with radiation therapy were evaluated in this study. New factors associated with RP were also investigated. A total of 369 consecutive patients with Stage III non small cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy were followed after radiotherapy (RT). Among them 262 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy and 107 patients received only sequential chemotherapy after RT. RP was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. The rate of grade ≥ 2 were 39.7%, 31% and 33.6% in the concurrent DP (docetaxel/cisplatin), concurrent NP (vinorelbine/cisplatin) and sequential group, and grade ≥ 3 RP were 18.4%, 9.5%, and 11.2% respectively. The rate of grade ≥ 3 RP was significantly higher in concurrent DP group than that in concurrent NP group (p = 0.04). RP occurred earlier in concurrent DP group than that in the other two groups. There were no significant differences in response rate among the three groups. In the multivariate analysis, age (OR = 1.99, p = 0.038 and OR = 8.90, p < 0.001), chemotherapy schedule (OR = 1.45, p = 0.041 and OR = 1.98, p = 0.013), mean lung dose(OR = 1.42, p < 0.001 and OR = 1.64, p < 0.001), and planning target volume(OR = 1.004, p = 0.001 and OR = 1.005, p = 0.021) were predictors for both grade ≥ 2 and grade ≥ 3 RP. Response to treatment was a new predictor for grade ≥ 3 RP only (OR = 4.39, p = 0.034). Response to treatment was found to be a new predictor for grade ≥ 3 RP. Compared to concurrent NP schedule, concurrent DP schedule achieved similar response to treatment but resulted in a higher risk of grade ≥ 3 RP

  14. Results of induction chemotherapy followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and concurrent weekly paclitaxel for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weihua; Bao Yong; Chen Ming; Zhang Li; Xu Guangchuan; Li Kaixin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plus concurrent weekly paclitaxel for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Patients with stage III NSCLC in favorable conditions were treated with 2 to 4 cycles of carboplatin (AUC=5-6, d1) combined with paclitaxel (175 mg/m 2 , d1), then followed by weekly paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) and concurrent 3DCRT within 34 weeks. The prescription dose of radiotherapy was given as high as possible while total lung V 20 ≤31% and total dose of the spinal cord ≤50 Gy. Results: ICT was well tolerated. During the concurrent chemoradiotherapy,the treatment of 4 patients was ended ahead of the schedule because of severe pulmonary and cardiac toxicities; the treatment of 2 patients was delayed for 7 and 12 days because of fatigue. Leucopenia(33/56) was in grade 1-2 except 1 patient in grade 3. Lymphocytopenia was severe (54/56,42 in grade 3). Three patients developed grade 3 acute radiation-induced esophagitis, and 3 developed grade 3-4 radiation-induced pneumonitis. There was one patients each who developed grade 2,3, and 4 late esophageal damage, respectively. Nine developed grade 2 pulmonary fibrosis. The overall response rate was 69.7%. The 1-year overall survival rate was 72.3%. The 1-year local progression-free survival rate was 62.7%. Conclusions: The schedule of ICT followed by weekly paclitaxel and concurrent 3DCRT can be well tolerated by most of the favorable patients with stage III NSCLC, and the toxicity is tolerable. Results of this study are encouraging, though long-term results should be followed up. (authors)

  15. Long-term outcomes after proton therapy, with concurrent chemotherapy, for stage II–III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Ly, Ngoc Bui; Komaki, Ritsuko; Levy, Lawrence B.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Chang, Joe Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Mehran, Reza J.; Lu, Charles; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Cox, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We report long-term disease control, survival, and toxicity for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer prospectively treated with concurrent proton therapy and chemotherapy on a nonrandomized case-only observational study. Methods: All patients received passive-scatter proton therapy, planned with 4D-CT–based simulation; all received proton therapy concurrent with weekly chemotherapy. Endpoints were local and distant control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: The 134 patients (21 stage II, 113 stage III; median age 69 years) had a median gross tumor volume (GTV) of 70 cm 3 (range, 5–753 cm 3 ); 77 patients (57%) received 74 Gy(RBE), and 57 (42%) received 60–72 Gy(RBE) (range, 60–74.1 Gy(RBE)). At a median follow-up time of 4.7 years, median OS times were 40.4 months (stage II) and 30.4 months (stage III). Five-year DFS rates were 17.3% (stage II) and 18.0% (stage III). OS, DFS, and local and distant control rates at 5 years did not differ by disease stage. Age and GTV were related to OS and DFS. Toxicity was tolerable, with 1 grade 4 esophagitis and 16 grade 3 events (2 pneumonitis, 6 esophagitis, 8 dermatitis). Conclusion: This report of outcomes after proton therapy for 134 patients indicated that this regimen produced excellent OS with tolerable toxicity

  16. Randomised phase III trial of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with extended nodal irradiation and erlotinib in patients with inoperable oesophageal squamous cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shi-Xiu; Wang, Lv-Hua; Luo, Hong-Lei; Xie, Cong-Ying; Zhang, Xue-Bang; Hu, Wei; Zheng, An-Ping; Li, Duo-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Xie, Cong-Hua; Lian, Xi-Long; Du, De-Xi; Chen, Ming; Bian, Xiu-Hua; Tan, Bang-Xian; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jian-Hua; Jing, Zhao; Xia, Bing; Zhang, Ni; Zhang, Ping; Li, Wen-Feng; Zhao, Fu-Jun; Tian, Zhi-Feng; Liu, Hui; Huang, Ke-Wei; Hu, Jin; Xie, Rui-Fei; Du, Lin; Li, Gang

    2018-04-01

    This randomised phase III study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of extended nodal irradiation (ENI) and/or erlotinib in inoperable oesophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). Patients with histologically confirmed locally advanced ESCC or medically inoperable disease were randomly assigned (ratio 1:1:1:1) to one of four treatment groups: group A, radiotherapy adoption of ENI with two cycles of concurrent TP chemotherapy (paclitaxel 135 mg/m 2  day 1 and cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 days 1-3, every 4 weeks) plus erlotinib (150 mg per day during chemoradiotherapy); group B, radiotherapy adoption of ENI with two cycles of concurrent TP; group C, radiotherapy adoption of conventional field irradiation (CFI) with two cycles of concurrent TP plus erlotinib; group D, radiotherapy adoption of CFI with two cycles of concurrent TP. A total of 352 patients (88 assigned to each treatment group) were enrolled. The 2-year overall survival rates of group A, B, C and D were 57.8%, 49.9%, 44.9% and 38.7%, respectively (P = 0.015). Group A significantly improved 2-year overall survival compared with group D. The ENI significantly improved overall survival in patients with inoperable ESCC (P = 0.014). The addition of erlotinib significantly decreased loco-regional recurrence (P = 0.042). Aside from rash and radiation oesophagitis, the incidence of grade 3 or greater toxicities did not differ among 4 groups. Chemoradiotherapy with ENI and erlotinib might represent a substantial improvement on the standard of care for inoperable ESCC. ENI alone should be adopted in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for ESCC patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiotherapy versus concurrent 5-day cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Long-term results of a Phase III randomized trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Viorica; Coza, Ovidiu; Ghilezan, Nicolae [' Ion Chiricuta' Cancer Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; ' Iuliu Hatieganu' Univ. of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ordeanu, Claudia; Todor, Nicolae [' Ion Chiricuta' Cancer Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Traila, Alexandru [' Ion Chiricuta' Cancer Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania). Dept. of Surgery; Rancea, Alin [' Iuliu Hatieganu' Univ. of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); ' Ion Chiricuta' Cancer Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania). Dept. of Surgery

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To prove the superiority of concurrent radiochemotherapy (RTCT) over radiotherapy (RT) alone in locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Patients and Methods: In this randomized monocentric phase III study, 566 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were included: 284 in arm A (RT) and 282 in arm B (concurrent RTCT with cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} x 5 days). 238 patients (42%) were in stage IIB, 209 (37%) in stage IIIA, and 119 (21%) in stage IIIB. The median follow-up was 62.8 months. RT to the pelvis was delivered to a dose of 46 Gy/23 fractions. A cervical boost was given using the X-ray arch technique or high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy at a dose of 10 Gy. Thereafter, patients were evaluated: those with good response optionally underwent surgery and the others continued RT until 64 Gy/pelvis (with or without CT according to randomization) and 14 Gy/central tumor volume. Results: The 5-year survival rate was statistically significantly superior in the concurrent RTCT group (74%) versus the RT group (64%; p < 0.05). In patients undergoing surgery after RT or RTCT, superior results were obtained, compared to the nonoperated patients: 5-year survival rate 86% versus 53% (p < 0.01). 192 failures were recorded: 109 (38%) after RT alone versus 83 (29%) after concurrent RTCT (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The results of this study prove the obvious superiority of concurrent RTCT with 5-day cisplatin compared to RT alone in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma, regarding local control (78% vs. 67%) and 5-year survival rates (74% vs. 64%). (orig.)

  18. Bi-Level Integrated System Synthesis (BLISS) for Concurrent and Distributed Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Altus, Troy D.; Phillips, Matthew; Sandusky, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The paper introduces a new version of the Bi-Level Integrated System Synthesis (BLISS) methods intended for optimization of engineering systems conducted by distributed specialty groups working concurrently and using a multiprocessor computing environment. The method decomposes the overall optimization task into subtasks associated with disciplines or subsystems where the local design variables are numerous and a single, system-level optimization whose design variables are relatively few. The subtasks are fully autonomous as to their inner operations and decision making. Their purpose is to eliminate the local design variables and generate a wide spectrum of feasible designs whose behavior is represented by Response Surfaces to be accessed by a system-level optimization. It is shown that, if the problem is convex, the solution of the decomposed problem is the same as that obtained without decomposition. A simplified example of an aircraft design shows the method working as intended. The paper includes a discussion of the method merits and demerits and recommendations for further research.

  19. Phase I/II trial of concurrent use of S-1 and radiation therapy for T2 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Meijin; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Okamoto, Makito; Niibe, Yuzuru; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Kotani, Shouko

    2010-01-01

    A Phase I/II study of S-1 combined radiation therapy was conducted in patients with Stage II (T2N0) glottic cancer. The purpose of the Phase I study was to identify the maximum tolerated dose, the recommended dose and the dose limiting toxicity. The objectives in the phase II study were to estimate the local control and the overall survival, and the incidence of adverse events. In Phase I, S-1 was administered orally in a split-course fashion as two doses of 40 mg/m 2 , for a total daily dose of 80 mg/m 2 . The course involved a 2-week rest after a 2-week administration (Level 1) and a 1-week rest after a 3-week administration (Level 2). Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily (total 60-Gy) standard fractionation. Seven patients were enrolled in the Phase I, and 19 in the Phase II study. Mucositis was the most common toxicity encountered. All 26 patients completed radiation therapy without delay. The overall response rate was 100% (26/26) with all patients showing a complete response. One patient developed a local recurrence 28 months after the treatment. The 3-year local control and overall survival rates were 94.7 and 85.4%, respectively (limited to 22 patients from Level 2). The use of S-1 at 80 mg/m 2 per day in a split-course with 1-week rest during the course of radiation therapy was safe and effective for Stage II glottic cancer. The treatment strategy employing orally available S-1 proved to be beneficial over the conventional injection of antitumor agents for maintaining the patients' quality of life. (author)

  20. Is Intermediate Radiation Dose Escalation With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Beneficial? A Multi-Institutional Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, George, E-mail: george.rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Oberije, Cary [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tsujino, Kayoko [Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Wiersma, Terry [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Moreno-Jimenez, Marta [Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gy eonggi (Korea, Republic of); Marks, Lawrence B. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); De Petris, Luigi [Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramella, Sara [Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); DeRuyck, Kim [Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Dios, Núria Rodriguez [Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Warner, Andrew [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Palma, David A. [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical benefits and risks of dose escalation (DE) for stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain uncertain despite the results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0617. There is significant heterogeneity of practice, with many clinicians prescribing intermediate dose levels between the 0617 study arms of 60 and 74 Gy. This study investigated whether this strategy is associated with any survival benefits/risks by analyzing a large multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: An individual patient database of stage III NSCLC patients treated with radical intent concurrent chemoradiation therapy was created (13 institutions, n=1274 patients). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on tumor Biological Effective Dose at 10 Gy (BED 10): those receiving standard dose (SD; n=552), consisting of 72Gy ≤ BED 10 ≤ 76.8 Gy (eg 60-64 Gy/30-32 fractions [fr]), and those receiving intermediate dose (ID; n=497), consisting of 76.8Gy < BED 10 < 100.8 Gy (eg >64 Gy/32 fr and <74 Gy/37 fr), with lower-dose patients (n=225) excluded from consideration. Patients were then matched using propensity scores, leading to 2 matched groups of 196 patients. Outcomes were compared using various statistics including interquartile range (IQR), Kaplan-Meier curves, and adjusted Cox regression analysis. Results: Matched groups were found to be balanced except for N stage (more N3 disease in SD), median treatment year (SD in 2003; ID in 2007), platinum and taxane chemotherapy (SD in 28%; ID in 39%), and median follow-up (SD were 89 months; ID were 40 months). Median dose fractionation was 60 Gy/30 fr in SD (BED 10 IQR: 72.0-75.5 Gy) and 66 Gy/33 fr (BED 10 IQR: 78.6-79.2 Gy) in ID. Survival curves for SD and ID matched cohorts were statistically similar (P=.27); however, a nonstatistically significant trend toward better survival for ID was observed after 15 months (median survival SD: 19.3 months; ID: 21.0

  1. Phase II trial of recombinant human endostatin in combination with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Yong; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Qi-Chao; Yu, Zhong-Hua; Li, Jian-Cheng; Cheng, Zhi-Bin; Chen, Long; Hu, Xiao; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yan; Ma, Hong-Lian; Xu, Zu-Min; Lu, Ru-Biao; Deng, Xiao-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Endostar combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC were treated with Endostar (7.5 mg/m 2 /d) for 7 days at weeks 1, 3, 5, and 7, while two cycles of docetaxel (65 mg/m 2 ) and cisplatin (65 mg/m 2 ) were administered on days 8 and 36, with concurrent thoracic radiation to a dose of 60–66 Gy. Primary end points were short-term efficacy and treatment-related toxicity. Results: Fifty patients were enrolled into the study, and 48 were assessable. Of the 48 patients, 83% had stage IIIB and 65% had N3 disease. Median follow-up was 25.0 months. Overall response rate was 77%. The estimated median progression-free survival (PFS) was 9.9 months, and the estimated median overall survival (OS) was 24.0 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local control rates were 75%, 67%, and 51%, PFS rates were 48%, 27%, and 16%, and OS rates were 81%, 50%, and 30%, respectively. All toxicities were tolerable with proper treatment. Conclusions: The combination of Endostar with CCRT for locally advanced NSCLC patients was feasible and showed promising survival and local control rates

  2. A phase I/II study of gemcitabine-concurrent proton radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer without distant metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Kazuki; Demizu, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Jin, Dongcun; Mima, Masayuki; Fujii, Osamu; Niwa, Yasue; Takatori, Kento; Kitajima, Naoto; Sirakawa, Sachiyo; Yonson, Ku; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Sugimura, Kazuro; Murakami, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We conducted the study to assess the feasibility and efficacy of gemcitabine-concurrent proton radiotherapy (GPT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: Of all 50 patients who participated in the study, 5 patients with gastrointestinal (GI)-adjacent LAPC were enrolled in P-1 (50 Gy equivalent [GyE] in 25 fractions) and 5 patients with non-GI-adjacent LAPC in P-2 (70.2 GyE in 26 fractions), and 40 patients with LAPC regardless of GI-adjacency in P-3 (67.5 GyE in 25 fractions using the field-within-a-field technique). In every protocol, gemcitabine (800 mg/m 2 /week for 3 weeks) was administered concurrently. Every patient received adjuvant chemotherapy including gemcitabine after GPT within the tolerable limit. Results: The median follow-up period was 12.5 months. The scheduled GPT was feasible for all except 6 patients (12%) due to acute hematologic or GI toxicities. Grade 3 or greater late gastric ulcer and hemorrhage were seen in 5 patients (10%) in P-2 and P-3. The one-year freedom from local-progression, progression-free, and overall survival rates were 81.7%, 64.3%, and 76.8%, respectively. Conclusion: GPT was feasible and showed high efficacy. Although the number of patients and the follow-up periods are insufficient, the clinical results seem very encouraging.

  3. The prognostic role of hemoglobin levels in patients undergoing concurrent chemo-radiation for anal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; Montagnani, Francesco; Arcadipane, Francesca; Casadei, Chiara; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Martini, Stefania; Iorio, Giuseppe Carlo; Scartozzi, Mario; Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Fornaro, Lorenzo; Cassoni, Paola; Cascinu, Stefano; Ricardi, Umberto; Casadei Gardini, Andrea

    2018-05-02

    Concurrent chemo-radiation (CT-RT) is a standard therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of anal canal. Different clinical and biological factors may potentially affect outcome. We investigated the prognostic role of baseline hemoglobin (Hb) in a cohort of anal cancer patients submitted to CT-RT with 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. Up to 161 patients with clinical stage T1-T4/N0-N3/M0 were treated. Response was assessed at 6 weeks and thereafter at 3, 6 and 12 months. Two different approaches were used:a)simultaneous integrated boost following RTOG 05-29 indications;b)first sequence of 45Gy/25 fractions to the pelvis followed by 9-14.4 Gy/5-8 fractions to the macroscopic disease. Primary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). On multivariate analysis, pre-treatment Hb level had a significant correlation to OS (HR:0.53;95% CI:0.33-0.87; p = 0.001), but not to PFS (HR:0.78;95% CI:0.53-1.15; p = 0.12) Patients with pre-treatment Hb ≥ 12 g/dl had 5-year PFS and OS of 82.2%, compared to 29.3% and 32.8% for those below the threshold. The likelihood to achieve a complete remission increased by 5.6% for every single-unit (g/dl) increase in baseline Hb level over 11 g/dl. On multivariate analysis, response to treatment had a significant correlation to PFS (incomplete vs complete response - HR:5.43;95% CI:2.75-10.7; p < 0.0001) and OS (HR: 6.96;95% CI:2.96-16.5; p < 0.0001). We showed that baseline Hb level is a strong indicator for poor response to RT-CT in anal cancer patients. A close clinical monitoring for incomplete response to treatment should be advised in patients with low pre-treatment Hb. The hypothesis that the preservation of adequate Hb level during treatment may lead to a better outcome needs prospective evaluation.

  4. Dynamic load balancing in a concurrent plasma PIC code on the JPL/Caltech Mark III hypercube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liewer, P.C.; Leaver, E.W.; Decyk, V.K.; Dawson, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic load balancing has been implemented in a concurrent one-dimensional electromagnetic plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code using a method which adds very little overhead to the parallel code. In PIC codes, the orbits of many interacting plasma electrons and ions are followed as an initial value problem as the particles move in electromagnetic fields calculated self-consistently from the particle motions. The code was implemented using the GCPIC algorithm in which the particles are divided among processors by partitioning the spatial domain of the simulation. The problem is load-balanced by partitioning the spatial domain so that each partition has approximately the same number of particles. During the simulation, the partitions are dynamically recreated as the spatial distribution of the particles changes in order to maintain processor load balance

  5. Broncho-pulmonary toxicity in stage III non small cell lung cancer patients treated with taxol containing chemotherapy and concurrent preoperative or definitive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, M. Maddie; Gupta-Burt, Shalina; Recine, Diane C.; Faber, L. Penfield; Warren, William H.; LaFollette, Suzanne; Lincoln, Sarah T.; Bonomi, Philip D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The objective of this trial was to test the feasibility of taxol containing combination chemotherapy and concurrent radiation as preoperative or definitive treatment for stage III non small cell lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients were treated on this trial. The initial regimen was (Group 1 pts.): paraplatin (P) (AUC of 4) on day 2, etoposide (E) 50 mg po days 1-5 and 8-12, cisplatin (C) 50 mg/m2 on day 21 and taxol (T) 35 mg/m2 escalated to 45 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8, 24 hr. infusion. After treatment of 10 pts., the regimen was modified as follows (Group 2 pts.): P (AUC of 4) on day 1, E 40 mg/m2 IV daily and days 2-5, and T 80 mg/m2 escalated to 120 mg/m2 on day 1, 3 hr. infusion. After the next 16 pts., the regimen was modified again as follows (Group 3 pts.): P (AUC of 4) on day 1 and T 120 mg/m2 escalated to 140 mg/m2 on day 1, 3 hr. infusion. Seven patients were treated on the latest version of the regimen for a total of 33 pts. The radiation given was uniform throughout the 3 groups. A dose of 4000 cGy in 20 fxs was given in the surgical arm and 6000 cGy in 30 fxs in the non surgical arm. Treatments were given at 200 cGy/fx. once a day, on a 2 weeks on, 2 weeks off basis. The RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria was used to grade pneumonitis. Post-operative complications were defined as occurring early (less than or equal to 30 days) or late (greater than 30 days) following surgery. Results: Sixteen of the 33 patients went to surgery. Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis developed in 4 of the 33 patients (12%). There were no episodes of Grade 4 pneumonitis. Grade 3 pneumonitis occured in: One patient in Group 1, (RT dose 5800 cGy), 2 pts in Group 2 (RT dose 4000 cGy and 6000 cGy, respectively), and 1 pt in Group 3 (RT dose 6000 cGy). Major post-operative complications occurred in 6 of the 16 patients (37.5%) who went to surgery. In Group 1, 1 pt. required oxygen supplementation secondary to a significant

  6. Consolidation chemotherapy improves progression-free survival in stage III small-cell lung cancer following concurrent chemoradiotherapy: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen XR

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Xin-Ru Chen,1,* Jian-Zhong Liang,2,* Shu-Xiang Ma,1 Wen-Feng Fang,1 Ning-Ning Zhou,1 Hai Liao,1 De-Lan Li,1 Li-Kun Chen1 1Department of Medical Oncology, 2Department of Pathology, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT is the standard treatment for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC. However, the efficacy of consolidation chemotherapy (CCT in LD-SCLC remains controversial despite several studies that were performed in the early years of CCT use. The aim of this study was to reevaluate the effectiveness and toxicities associated with CCT. Methods: This retrospective analysis evaluated 177 patients with stage IIIA and IIIB small-cell lung cancer (SCLC who underwent CCRT from January 2001 to December 2013 at Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center (SYSUCC. Overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were analyzed using Kaplan–Meier methods. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to analyze patient prognosis factors. Results: Among the 177 patients, 72 (41% received CCT and 105 (59% did not receive CCT. PFS was significantly better for patients in the CCT group compared to that for patients in the non-CCT group (median PFS: 17.0 vs 12.9 months, respectively, P=0.031, whereas the differences in OS were not statistically significant (median OS: 31.6 vs 24.8 months, respectively, P=0.118. The 3- and 5-year OS rates were 33.3% and 20.8% for patients in the CCT group and 27.6% and 6.7% for patients in the non-CCT group, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that having a pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level <5 ng/mL (P=0.035, having undergone prophylactic cranial irradiation (P<0.001, and having received CCT (P=0.002 could serve as favorable independent prognostic factors

  7. Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouillet, T.; MOrere, J.F.; Piperno-Neuman, S.; Boaziz, C.; Breau, J.L.; Mazeron, J.J.; Haddad, E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the efficacy and safety of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and whether the response to induction chemotherapy can predict the response to subsequent chemoradiotherapy and survival. In conclusion, there is a statistically significant relationship not only between the response to ICT and the response to CCrt, but also between the response to ICT and the local outcome and survival. (authors)

  8. Daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion via superficial temporal artery. Preoperative therapy for stage III, IV oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Mitsudo, Kenji; Nishiguchi, Hiroaki; Fukui, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Ueda, Minoru; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2005-01-01

    Recently, daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy using new superselective intra-arterial infusion via superficial temporal arterial artery is attracting attention. The catheter with curved tip is inserted superselectively to the feeding artery of the tumor via the superficial temporal artery, allowing long-term catheterization. Forty-one patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy/4 weeks) and superselective intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy using docetaxel (total dose: 60 mg/m 2 , 15 mg/m 2 /week) and cisplatin (total dose: 100 mg/m 2 , 5 mg/m 2 /day) were concurrently performed daily, followed by surgery. In 35 patients, intra-arterial infusion was successful (success rate: 85.4%) and no major complication was observed. The clinical effects were complete response (CR) in 29 patients (82.9%), and pathological effects of resected tumor after surgery were pathological CR in 31 (88.6%). This method promises to be a new strategy of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  9. Comparison of toxicity and outcomes of concurrent radiotherapy with carboplatin/paclitaxel or cisplatin/etoposide in stage III non–small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liew, Mun Sem; Sia, Joseph; Starmans, Maud H W; Tafreshi, Ali; Harris, Sam; Feigen, Malcolm; White, Shane; Zimet, Allan; Lambin, Philippe; Boutros, Paul C; Mitchell, Paul; John, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) has become the standard of care for patients with unresectable stage III non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The comparative merits of two widely used regimens: carboplatin/paclitaxel (PC) and cisplatin/etoposide (PE), each with concurrent radiotherapy, remain largely undefined. Records for consecutive patients with stage III NSCLC treated with PC or PE and ≥60 Gy chest radiotherapy between 2000 and 2011 were reviewed for outcomes and toxicity. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox modeling with the Wald test. Comparison across groups was done using the student's t and chi-squared tests. Seventy-five (PC: 44, PE: 31) patients were analyzed. PC patients were older (median 71 vs. 63 years; P = 0.0006). Other characteristics were comparable between groups. With PE, there was significantly increased grade ≥3 neutropenia (39% vs. 14%, P = 0.024) and thrombocytopenia (10% vs. 0%, P = 0.039). Radiation pneumonitis was more common with PC (66% vs. 38%, P = 0.033). Five treatment-related deaths occurred (PC: 3 vs. PE: 2, P = 1.000). With a median follow-up of 51.6 months, there were no significant differences in relapse-free survival (median PC 12.0 vs. PE 11.5 months, P = 0.700) or overall survival (median PC 20.7 vs. PE 13.7 months; P = 0.989). In multivariate analyses, no factors predicted for improved survival for either regimen. PC was more likely to be used in elderly patients. Despite this, PC resulted in significantly less hematological toxicity but achieved similar survival outcomes as PE. PC is an acceptable CCRT regimen, especially in older patients with multiple comorbidities

  10. A phase ii study of concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide for elderly patients with stage iii non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta; Milicic, Biljana; Milisavljevic, Slobodan; Nikolic, Nebojsa; Dagovic, Aleksandar; Aleksandrovic, Jasna; Radosavljevic-Asic, Gordana

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy and concurrent carboplatin/oral etoposide in elderly (> 70 years) patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1988 and June 1993, a total of 58 patients entered a phase II study. Carboplatin (400 mg/m 2 ) was given intravenously on days 1 and 29, and etoposide (50 mg/m 2 ) was given orally on days 1-21 and 29-42. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered starting on day 1, with a total dose of 51 Gy in 34 fractions over 3.5 weeks. Results: In 55 evaluable patients, the complete response rate was 27% and the overall response rate was 65%. For the 55 patients, the median survival time was 10 months, and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 45%, 24%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time until relapse was 8 months and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year relapse-free survival rates were 45%, 20%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time to local recurrence was 14 months and the 5-year local control rate was 13%; the median time to distant metastasis was 18 months and the 5-year distant metastasis-free rate was 15%. Hematological, esophageal, and bronchopulmonary acute grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed in 22%, 7%, and 4% of the patients, respectively. There was no grade 5 toxicity or late grade ≥ 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide produced relatively low and acceptable toxicity. The survival results appeared to be comparable to those obtained in nonelderly patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated by full-dose radiation

  11. Concurrent Collections

    OpenAIRE

    Budimlić, Zoran; Burke, Michael; Cavé, Vincent; Knobe, Kathleen; Lowney, Geoff; Newton, Ryan; Palsberg, Jens; Peixotto, David; Sarkar, Vivek; Schlimbach, Frank; Taşırlar, Sağnak

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the Concurrent Collections (CnC) programming model. CnC supports flexible combinations of task and data parallelism while retaining determinism. CnC is implicitly parallel, with the user providing high-level operations along with semantic ordering constraints that together form a CnC graph. We formally describe the execution semantics of CnC and prove that the model guarantees deterministic computation. We evaluate the performance of CnC implementations on several applications an...

  12. Treatment Variation of Sequential versus Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients in the Netherlands and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraven, I; Damhuis, R A; Ten Berge, M G; Rosskamp, M; van Eycken, L; de Ruysscher, D; Belderbos, J S A

    2017-11-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is considered the standard treatment regimen in non-surgical locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and sequential chemoradiotherapy (SCRT) is recommended in patients who are unfit to receive CCRT or when the treatment volume is considered too large. In this study, we investigated the proportion of CCRT/SCRT in the Netherlands and Belgium. Furthermore, patient and disease characteristics associated with SCRT were assessed. An observational study was carried out with data from three independent national registries: the Belgian Cancer Registry (BCR), the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Dutch Lung Cancer Audit-Radiotherapy (DLCA-R). Differences in patient and disease characteristics between CCRT and SCRT were tested with unpaired t-tests (for continuous variables) and with chi-square tests (for categorical variables). A prognostic model was constructed to determine patient and disease parameters predictive for the choice of SCRT. This study included 350 patients from the BCR, 780 patients from the NCR and 428 patients from the DLCA-R. More than half of the stage III NSCLC patients in the Netherlands (55%) and in Belgium more than a third (35%) were treated with CCRT. In both the Dutch and Belgian population, higher age and more advanced N-stage were significantly associated with SCRT. Performance score, pulmonary function, comorbidities and tumour volume were not associated with SCRT. In this observational population-based study, a large treatment variation in non-surgical stage III NSCLC patients was observed between and within the Netherlands and Belgium. Higher age and N-stage were significantly associated with the choice for SCRT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Measuring and modelling concurrency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Larry

    2013-01-01

    This article explores three critical topics discussed in the recent debate over concurrency (overlapping sexual partnerships): measurement of the prevalence of concurrency, mathematical modelling of concurrency and HIV epidemic dynamics, and measuring the correlation between HIV and concurrency. The focus of the article is the concurrency hypothesis – the proposition that presumed high prevalence of concurrency explains sub-Saharan Africa's exceptionally high HIV prevalence. Recent surveys using improved questionnaire design show reported concurrency ranging from 0.8% to 7.6% in the region. Even after adjusting for plausible levels of reporting errors, appropriately parameterized sexual network models of HIV epidemics do not generate sustainable epidemic trajectories (avoid epidemic extinction) at levels of concurrency found in recent surveys in sub-Saharan Africa. Efforts to support the concurrency hypothesis with a statistical correlation between HIV incidence and concurrency prevalence are not yet successful. Two decades of efforts to find evidence in support of the concurrency hypothesis have failed to build a convincing case. PMID:23406964

  14. Long-term results and prognostic factors in patients with stage III-IVA squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy from a single institution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudaka, Wataru; Nagai, Yutaka; Toita, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the longer-term efficacy and safety of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) incorporating high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) with a lower cumulative radiotherapy (RT) protocol and analyzed prognostic risk factors for survival among patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage III-IVA squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the cervix. Ninety-nine patients with FIGO stage III-IVA SCC of the cervix between 1997 and 2008 were treated with CCRT using cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 for 5 days every 3 weeks or 40 mg/m 2 weekly. Acute and late toxicities were evaluated. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analysis. Median age was 53.5 years. Median follow-up period was 58 months (range 6-170 months). Pathologically complete response was achieved in 93 patients (96.9%). The 5-year OS and DFS were 72.0 and 69.3%, respectively. The 5-year local and distant DFS were 83.0 and 75.1%, respectively. Thirty-one patients (31.3%) experienced recurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size and pretreatment hemoglobin level remained an independent risk factor for OS and DFS. Acute toxicity was moderate. In terms of late adverse effects, 2 patients (2.0%) suffered from grade 4 late intestinal toxicity because of radiation enterocolitis, with both requiring intestinal surgery. Our study demonstrates that the CCRT schedule in patients with FIGO stage III-IVA SCC is efficacious and safe. In addition, the assessment of tumor size and pretreatment anemia can provide valuable prognostic information. (author)

  15. Phase 2 Study of Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and Concurrent Radiation for Technically Resectable Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inohara, Hidenori, E-mail: hinohara@ent.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Faculty of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Takenaka, Yukinori; Yoshii, Tadashi; Nakahara, Susumu; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Tomiyama, Yoichiro [Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Faculty of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Suzuki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Sumida, Iori; Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Faculty of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We investigated the efficacy and safety of weekly low-dose docetaxel and cisplatin therapy concurrent with conventionally fractionated radiation in patients with technically resectable stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and October 2011, we enrolled 117 patients, of whom 116 were analyzable (43 had oropharyngeal cancer, 54 had hypopharyngeal cancer, and 19 had laryngeal cancer), and 85 (73%) had stage IV disease. Radiation consisted of 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Docetaxel, 10 mg/m{sup 2}, followed by cisplatin, 20 mg/m{sup 2}, administered on the same day were given once a week for 6 cycles. The primary endpoint was overall complete response (CR) rate after chemoradiation therapy. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in oropharyngeal cancer was examined by PCR. Results: Of 116 patients, 82 (71%) completed treatment per protocol; 102 (88%) received the full radiation therapy dose; and 90 (78%) and 12 (10%) patients received 6 and 5 chemotherapy cycles, respectively. Overall CR rate was 71%. After median follow-up of 50.9 months (range: 15.6-113.9 months for surviving patients), 2-year and 4-year overall survival rates were 82% and 68%, respectively. Cumulative 2-year and 4-year local failure rates were 27% and 28%, respectively, whereas distant metastasis rates were 15% and 22%, respectively. HPV status in oropharyngeal cancer was not associated with treatment efficacy. Acute toxicity included grade 3 and 4 in-field mucositis in 73% and 5% of patients, respectively, whereas myelosuppression and renal injury were minimal. No patients died of toxicity. Feeding tube dependence in 8% and tracheostomy in 1% of patients were evident at 2 years postchemoradiation therapy in patients who survived without local treatment failure. Conclusions: Local control and survival with this regimen were satisfactory. Although acute toxicity, such as mucositis, was common, late toxicity, such as laryngoesophageal

  16. Phase I Study of Concurrent High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin and Vinorelbine for Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Ikuo, E-mail: isekine@ncc.go.jp [Division of Internal Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Horinouchi, Hidehito; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kubota, Kaoru; Tamura, Tomohide [Division of Internal Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose in concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with chemotherapy for unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Eligible patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC, age {>=}20 years, performance status 0-1, percent of volume of normal lung receiving 20 GY or more (V{sub 20}) {<=}30% received three to four cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1) and vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1 and 8) repeated every 4 weeks. The doses of 3D-CRT were 66 Gy, 72 Gy, and 78 Gy at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. Results: Of the 17, 16, and 24 patients assessed for eligibility, 13 (76%), 12 (75%), and 6 (25%) were enrolled at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. The main reasons for exclusion were V{sub 20} >30% (n = 10) and overdose to the esophagus (n = 8) and brachial plexus (n = 2). There were 26 men and 5 women, with a median age of 60 years (range, 41-75). The full planned dose of radiotherapy could be administered to all the patients. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were noted in 24 (77%) and 5 (16%) of the 31 patients, respectively. Grade 4 infection, Grade 3 esophagitis, and Grade 3 pulmonary toxicity were noted in 1 patient, 2 patients, and 1 patient, respectively. The dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 17% of the patients at each dose level. The median survival and 3-year and 4-year survival rates were 41.9 months, 72.3%, and 49.2%, respectively. Conclusions: 72 Gy was the maximum dose that could be achieved in most patients, given the predetermined normal tissue constraints.

  17. Building Safe Concurrency Abstractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent object-oriented programming in Beta is based on semaphores and coroutines and the ability to define high-level concurrency abstractions like monitors, and rendezvous-based communication, and their associated schedulers. The coroutine mechanism of SIMULA has been generalized into the no......Concurrent object-oriented programming in Beta is based on semaphores and coroutines and the ability to define high-level concurrency abstractions like monitors, and rendezvous-based communication, and their associated schedulers. The coroutine mechanism of SIMULA has been generalized...

  18. Gait parameters are differently affected by concurrent smartphone-based activities with scaled levels of cognitive effort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlotta Caramia

    Full Text Available The widespread and pervasive use of smartphones for sending messages, calling, and entertainment purposes, mainly among young adults, is often accompanied by the concurrent execution of other tasks. Recent studies have analyzed how texting, reading or calling while walking-in some specific conditions-might significantly influence gait parameters. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of different smartphone activities on walking, evaluating the variations of several gait parameters. 10 young healthy students (all smartphone proficient users were instructed to text chat (with two different levels of cognitive load, call, surf on a social network or play with a math game while walking in a real-life outdoor setting. Each of these activities is characterized by a different cognitive load. Using an inertial measurement unit on the lower trunk, spatio-temporal gait parameters, together with regularity, symmetry and smoothness parameters, were extracted and grouped for comparison among normal walking and different dual task demands. An overall significant effect of task type on the aforementioned parameters group was observed. The alterations in gait parameters vary as a function of cognitive effort. In particular, stride frequency, step length and gait speed show a decrement, while step time increases as a function of cognitive effort. Smoothness, regularity and symmetry parameters are significantly altered for specific dual task conditions, mainly along the mediolateral direction. These results may lead to a better understanding of the possible risks related to walking and concurrent smartphone use.

  19. Postoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Versus Postoperative Radiotherapy in High-Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: The Randomized Phase III TROG 05.01 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porceddu, Sandro Virgilio; Bressel, Mathias; Poulsen, Michael Geoffrey; Stoneley, Adam; Veness, Michael John; Kenny, Lizbeth Moira; Wratten, Chris; Corry, June; Cooper, Stephen; Fogarty, Gerald Blaise; Collins, Marnie; Collins, Michael Kevin; Macann, Andrew Martin John; Milross, Christopher Gerard; Penniment, Michael Gordon; Liu, Howard Yu-Hao; King, Madeleine Trudy; Panizza, Benedict James; Rischin, Danny

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To report the results of the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group randomized phase III trial designed to determine whether the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy (CRT) improved locoregional control in patients with high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients and Methods The primary objective was to determine whether there was a difference in freedom from locoregional relapse (FFLRR) between 60 or 66 Gy (6 to 6.5 weeks) with or without weekly carboplatin (area under the curve 2) after resection of gross disease. Secondary efficacy objectives were to compare disease-free survival and overall survival. Results Three hundred twenty-one patients were randomly assigned, with 310 patients commencing allocated treatment (radiotherapy [RT] alone, n = 157; CRT, n = 153). Two hundred thirty-eight patients (77%) had high-risk nodal disease, 59 (19%) had high-risk primary or in-transit disease, and 13 (4%) had both. Median follow-up was 60 months. Median RT dose was 60 Gy, with 84% of patients randomly assigned to CRT completing six cycles of carboplatin. The 2- and 5-year FFLRR rates were 88% (95% CI, 83% to 93%) and 83% (95% CI, 77% to 90%), respectively, for RT and 89% (95% CI, 84% to 94%) and 87% (95% CI, 81% to 93%; hazard ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.46 to 1.55; P = .58), respectively, for CRT. There were no significant differences in disease-free or overall survival. Locoregional failure was the most common site of first treatment failure, with isolated distant metastases as the first site of failure seen in 7% of both arms. Treatment was well tolerated in both arms, with no observed enhancement of RT toxicity with carboplatin. Grade 3 or 4 late toxicities were infrequent. Conclusion Although surgery and postoperative RT provided excellent FFLRR, there was no observed benefit with the addition of weekly carboplatin.

  20. Cisplatin and etoposide versus carboplatin and paclitaxel with concurrent radiotherapy for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: an analysis of Veterans Health Administration data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Davila, Rafael; Devisetty, Kiran; Szabo, Aniko; Sparapani, Rodney; Arce-Lara, Carlos; Gore, Elizabeth M; Moran, Amy; Williams, Christina D; Kelley, Michael J; Whittle, Jeffrey

    2015-02-20

    The optimal chemotherapy regimen to use with radiotherapy in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer is unknown. Here, we compare the outcome of patents treated within the Veterans Health Administration with either etoposide-cisplatin (EP) or carboplatin-paclitaxel (CP). We identified patients treated with EP and CP with concurrent radiotherapy from 2001 to 2010. Survival rates were compared using Cox proportional hazards regression models with adjustments for confounding provided by propensity score methods and an instrumental variables analysis. Comorbidities and treatment complications were identified through administrative data. A total of 1,842 patients were included; EP was used in 27% (n = 499). Treatment with EP was not associated with a survival advantage in a Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio [HR], 0.97; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.10), a propensity score matched cohort (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.24), or a propensity score adjusted model (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.10). In an instrumental variables analysis, there was no survival advantage for patients treated in centers where EP was used more than 50% of the time as compared with centers where EP was used in less than 10% of the patients (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.26). Patients treated with EP, compared with patients treated with CP, had more hospitalizations (2.4 v 1.7 hospitalizations, respectively; P kidney disease/dehydration (30.5% v 21.2%, respectively; P patients treated with EP versus CP had similar overall survival, but EP was associated with increased morbidity. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Antecedent and Concurrent Psychosocial Skills That Support High Levels of Achievement within Talent Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Subotnik, Rena F.; Worrell, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation and emotional regulation are important for the sustained focused study and practice required for high levels of achievement and creative productivity in adulthood. Using the talent development model proposed by the authors as a framework, the authors discuss several important psychosocial skills based on the psychological research…

  2. Dose-response relationship in locoregional control for patients with stage II-III esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhen; Liao Zhongxing; Jin Jing; Ajani, Jaffer; Chang, Joe Y.; Jeter, Melenda; Guerrero, Thomas; Stevens, Craig W.; Swisher, Stephen; Ho, Linus; Yao, James; Allen, Pamela; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between radiation dose and locoregional control (LRC) for patients with Stage II-III unresectable esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Methods and materials: The medical records of 69 consecutive patients with clinical Stage II or III esophageal cancer treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1990 and 1998 were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 69 patients, 43 had received ≤51 Gy (lower dose group) and 26 >51 Gy (higher dose group). The median dose in the lower and higher dose groups was 30 Gy (range, 30-51 Gy) and 59.4 Gy (range, 54-64.8 Gy), respectively. Two fractionation schedules were used: rapid fractionation, delivering 30 Gy at 3 Gy/fraction within 2 weeks, and standard fractionation, delivering ≥45 Gy at 1.8-2 Gy/fraction daily. Total doses of 5% (46.2% vs. 23.3%). The lower dose group had more N1 tumors, but the tumor classification and stage grouping were similar in the two groups. The median follow-up time for all patients was 22 months (range, 2-56 months). Patients in the higher dose group had a statistically significant better 3-year local control rate (36% vs. 19%, p = 0.011), disease-free survival rate (25% vs. 10%, p = 0.004), and overall survival rate (13% vs. 3%, p = 0.054). A trend toward a better distant-metastasis-free survival rate was noted in the higher dose group (72% vs. 59%, p = 0.12). The complete clinical response rate was significantly greater in the higher dose group (46% vs. 23%, p = 0.048). In both groups, the most common type of first failure was persistence of the primary tumor. Significantly fewer patients in the higher dose group had tumor persistence after treatment (p = 0.02). No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in the pattern of locoregional or distant failure. The long-term side effects of chemoradiotherapy were similar in the two groups, although

  3. Demonstration of a Concurrently Programmed Tactical Level Control Software for Autonomous Vehicles and the Interface to the Execution Level Code

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carroll, William

    2000-01-01

    .... One of the greatest challenges to the successful development of truly autonomous vehicles is the ability to link logically based high-level mission planning with low-level vehicle control software...

  4. U.S. Level III and IV Ecoregions (U.S. EPA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This map service displays Level III and Level IV Ecoregions of the United States and was created from ecoregion data obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection...

  5. The value of level III clearance in patients with axillary and sentinel node positive breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dillon, Mary F

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of level III axillary clearance is contentious, with great variance worldwide in the extent and levels of clearance performed. OBJECTIVE: To determine rates of level III positivity in patients undergoing level I-III axillary clearance, and identify which patients are at highest risk of involved level III nodes. METHODS: From a database of 2850 patients derived from symptomatic and population-based screening service, 1179 patients who underwent level I-III clearance between the years 1999-2007 were identified. The pathology, surgical details, and prior sentinel nodes biopsies of patients were recorded. RESULTS: Eleven hundred seventy nine patients had level I-III axillary clearance. Of the patients, 63% (n = 747) were node positive. Of patients with node positive disease, 23% (n = 168) were level II positive and 19% (n = 141) were level III positive. Two hundred fifty patients had positive sentinel node biopsies prior to axillary clearance. Of these, 12% (n = 30) and 9% (n = 22) were level II and level III positive, respectively. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of level III involvement in patients with node positive disease were tumor size (P < 0.001, OR = 1.36; 95% CI: 1.2-1.5), invasive lobular disease (P < 0.001, OR = 3.6; 95% CI: 1.9-6.95), extranodal extension (P < 0.001, OR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.18-0.4), and lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.04, OR = 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35-1). Lobular invasive disease (P = 0.049, OR = 4.1; 95% CI: 1-16.8), extranodal spread (P = 0.003, OR = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.06-0.57), and having more than one positive sentinel node (P = 0.009, OR = 4.9; 95% CI: 1.5-16.1) were predictive of level III involvement in patients with sentinel node positive disease. CONCLUSION: Level III clearance has a selective but definite role to play in patients who have node positive breast carcinoma. Pathological characteristics of the primary tumor are of particular use in identifying those who are at various risk of level III nodal

  6. Daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy with docetaxel (DOC) and cisplatin (CDDP) using superselective intra-arterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery for stage III and IV oral cancer. Possibility of organ preservation in advanced oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsudo, Kenji; Tohnai, Iwai; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2006-01-01

    Superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy via the superficial temporal artery has become feasible for daily concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head and neck cancer. This novel method was used for oral cancer, and its efficacy was evaluated. Treatment consisted of superselective intra-arterial infusions (Docetaxel (DOC) total 60 mg/m 2 , Cisplatin (CDDP) total 100 mg/m 2 ) and concurrent radiotherapy (total 40 Gy) for four weeks as preoperative therapy. Thirty-four patients with stage III and IV oral cancer received surgery after this treatment, and pathological CR was obtained in 31 patients (91%). The possibility of organ preservation for advanced oral cancer was evaluated from this result. Patients with oral cancer stage III and IV were treated for four-week daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the clinical response was evaluated after treatment. Clinical CR of primary sites was obtained in 15 patients, and the same treatment was continued one or two weeks. Thirteen patients (80%) were disease-free in the primary sites, and two (20%) relapsed. Two patients died of distant metastasis, and one died of local recurrence. This method can preserve organs and minimize functional disturbance, thus contributing to patient QOL. (author)

  7. Beam-foil level lifetimes in krypton III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coetzer, F.J.; Kotze, P.B.; Westhuizen, P. van der

    1982-01-01

    The radiative lifetimes of levels in doubly-ionized Krypton have been measured after foil excitation of a beam of Krypton particles in the wavelength range 120-500 nm. The results are compared with the experimental values obtained by Fink et al., as well as theoretical values resulting from Coulomb (C.A.) and single configuration Hartree-Fock (H.F.) calculations. (orig.)

  8. Plasma apolipoprotein C-III levels, triglycerides, and coronary artery calcification in type 2 diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Arman; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Khera, Amit V; Qasim, Atif; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P

    2015-08-01

    Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins have emerged as causal risk factors for developing coronary heart disease independent of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Apolipoprotein C-III (ApoC-III) modulates triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism through inhibition of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Mutations causing loss-of-function of ApoC-III lower triglycerides and reduce coronary heart disease risk, suggestive of a causal role for ApoC-III. Little data exist about the relationship of ApoC-III, triglycerides, and atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Here, we examined the relationships between plasma ApoC-III, triglycerides, and coronary artery calcification in patients with T2DM. Plasma ApoC-III levels were measured in a cross-sectional study of 1422 subjects with T2DM but without clinically manifest coronary heart disease. ApoC-III levels were positively associated with total cholesterol (Spearman r=0.36), triglycerides (r=0.59), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=0.16), fasting glucose (r=0.16), and glycosylated hemoglobin (r=0.12; Ptriglycerides (Tobit regression ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-2.18; P=0.086) and separately for very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (Tobit regression ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.71; P=0.53). In persons with T2DM, increased plasma ApoC-III is associated with higher triglycerides, less favorable cardiometabolic phenotypes, and higher coronary artery calcification, a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis. Therapeutic inhibition of ApoC-III may thus be a novel strategy for reducing plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and cardiovascular risk in T2DM. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Direct spectrophotometric analysis of low level Pu (III) in Pu(IV) nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mageswaran, P.; Suresh Kumar, K.; Kumar, T.; Gayen, J.K.; Shreekumar, B.; Dey, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Among the various methods demonstrated for the conversion of plutonium nitrate to its oxide, the oxalate precipitation process either as Pu (III) or Pu (IV) oxalate gained wide acceptance. Since uranous nitrate is the most successful partitioning agent used in the PUREX process for the separation of Pu from the bulk amount of U, the Pu (III) oxalate precipitation of the purified nitrate solution will not give required decontamination from U. Hence Pu IV oxalate precipitation process is a better option to achieve the end user's specified PuO 2 product. Prior to the precipitation process, ensuring of the Pu (IV) oxidation state is essential. Hence monitoring of the level of Pu oxidation state either Pu (III) or Pu (IV) in the feed solution plays a significant role to establish complete conversion of Pu (III). The method in vogue to estimate Pu(lV) content is extractive radiometry using Theonyl Trifluoro Acetone (TTA). As the the method warrants a sample preparation with respect to acidity, a precise measurement of Pu (IV) without affecting the Pu(III) level in the feed sample is difficult. Present study is focused on the exploration of direct spectrophotometry using an optic fiber probe of path length of 40mm to monitor the low level of Pu(III) after removing the bulk Pu(lV) which interfere in the Pu(III) absorption spectrum, using TTA-TBP synergistic mixture without changing the sample acidity

  10. Efficacy and safety of concurrent chemoradiation with weekly cisplatin ± low-dose celecoxib in locally advanced undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a phase II-III clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Razmjou-Ghalaei, Sasan; Shafizad, Amin; Ashouri-Taziani, Yaghoub; Khademi, Bijan; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Ansari, Mansour; Omidvari, Shapour; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin

    2011-01-01

    This is the first study that aimed to determine the efficacy and safety of concurrent chemoradiation with weekly cisplatin ± celecoxib 100 mg twice daily in locally advanced undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Eligible patients had newly diagnosed locally advanced (T3-T4, and/or N2-N3, M0) undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, no prior therapy, Karnofsky performance status ≥ 70, and normal organ function. The patients were assigned to receive 7 weeks concurrent chemoradiation (70 Gy) with weekly cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 with either celecoxib 100 mg twice daily, (study group, n = 26) or placebo (control group, n = 27) followed by adjuvant combined chemotherapy with cisplatin 70 mg/m 2 on day 1 plus 5-fluorouracil 750 mg/m 2 /d with 8-h infusion on days 1-3, 3-weekly for 3 cycles. Overall clinical response rate was 100% in both groups. Complete and partial clinical response rates were 64% and 36% in the study group and 44% and 56% in the control group, respectively (P > 0.25). The addition of celecoxib to concurrent chemoradiation was associated with improved 2-year locoregional control rate from 84% to 100% (P = 0.039). The addition of celecoxib 100 mg twice daily to concurrent chemoradiation improved 2-year locoregional control rate.

  11. Quantify entanglement by concurrence hierarchy

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Heng; Matsumoto, Keiji; Imai, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    We define the concurrence hierarchy as d-1 independent invariants under local unitary transformations in d-level quantum system. The first one is the original concurrence defined by Wootters et al in 2-level quantum system and generalized to d-level pure quantum states case. We propose to use this concurrence hierarchy as measurement of entanglement. This measurement does not increase under local quantum operations and classical communication.

  12. Concurrent gemcitabine and radiotherapy with and without neoadjuvant gemcitabine for locally advanced unresectable or resected pancreatic cancer: A phase I-II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brade, Anthony; Brierley, James; Oza, Amit; Gallinger, Steven; Cummings, Bernard; MacLean, Martha; Pond, Gregory R.; Hedley, David; Wong Shun; Townsley, Carol; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Moore, Malcolm

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of biweekly gemcitabine with concurrent radiotherapy (RT) for resected and locally advanced (LA) pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had either LA or resected pancreatic cancer. Between March 1999 and July 2001, 63 patients (31 with LA and 32 with resected disease) were treated. Of the 63 patients, 28 were enrolled in a Phase I study of increasing radiation doses (35 Gy [n = 7], 43.75 Gy [n = 11], and 52.5 Gy [n = 10] given within 4, 5, or 6 weeks, respectively, in 1.75-Gy fractions) concurrently with 40 mg/m 2 gemcitabine biweekly. Subsequently, 35 were enrolled in a Phase II study with the addition of induction gemcitabine 1000 mg/m 2 within 7 or 8 weeks to concurrent biweekly gemcitabine (40 mg/m 2 ) and 52.5 Gy RT within 6 weeks. Results: In the LA population, the best response observed was a complete response in 1, partial response in 3, stable disease in 10, and progressive disease in 17. In the phase II trial, gemcitabine plus RT was not delivered to 8 patients because of progression with induction gemcitabine alone (n = 5) or by patient request (n = 3). On intent-to-treat analysis, the median survival in the LA patients was 13.9 months and the 2-year survival rate was 16.1%. In the resected population, the median progression-free survival was 8.3 months, the median survival was 18.4 months, and the 2- and 5-year survival rate was 36% and 19.4%, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated; the median gemcitabine dose intensity was 96% of the planned dose in the neoadjuvant and concurrent portions of the Phase II study. No treatment-related deaths occurred. Conclusion: Biweekly gemcitabine (40 mg/m 2 ) concurrently with RT (52.5 Gy in 30 fractions of 1.75 Gy) with or without induction gemcitabine is safe and tolerable and shows efficacy in patients with LA and resected pancreatic cancer

  13. Pooled Analysis of Individual Patient Data on Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Elderly Patients Compared With Younger Patients Who Participated in US National Cancer Institute Cooperative Group Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Zhang, Ying; Vokes, Everett E; Schiller, Joan H; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Karen; Curran, Walter J; Schild, Steven E; Movsas, Benjamin; Clamon, Gerald; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Blumenschein, George R; Socinski, Mark A; Ready, Neal E; Akerley, Wallace L; Cohen, Harvey J; Pang, Herbert H; Wang, Xiaofei

    2017-09-01

    Purpose Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Elderly patients may experience increased rates of adverse events (AEs) or less benefit from concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Patients and Methods Individual patient data were collected from 16 phase II or III trials conducted by US National Cancer Institute-supported cooperative groups of concurrent chemoradiotherapy alone or with consolidation or induction chemotherapy for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer from 1990 to 2012. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and AEs were compared between patients age ≥ 70 (elderly) and those younger than 70 years (younger). Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for survival time and CIs were estimated by single-predictor and multivariable frailty Cox models. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratio (ORs) for AEs and CIs were obtained from single-predictor and multivariable generalized linear mixed-effect models. Results A total of 2,768 patients were classified as younger and 832 as elderly. In unadjusted and multivariable models, elderly patients had worse OS (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.31 and HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.29, respectively). In unadjusted and multivariable models, elderly and younger patients had similar progression-free survival (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.10 and HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.09, respectively). Elderly patients had a higher rate of grade ≥ 3 AEs in unadjusted and multivariable models (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.70 and OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.74, respectively). Grade 5 AEs were significantly higher in elderly compared with younger patients (9% v 4%; P < .01). Fewer elderly compared with younger patients completed treatment (47% v 57%; P < .01), and more discontinued treatment because of AEs (20% v 13%; P < .01), died during treatment (7.8% v 2.9%; P < .01), and refused further treatment (5.8% v 3.9%; P = .02). Conclusion Elderly patients in concurrent

  14. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Jun-Ichi, E-mail: junsaito@sannet.ne.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kudo, Shigehiro; Yoshida, Daisaku; Ichikawa, Akihiro [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Sakai, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Futoshi [Division of Respiratory Disease, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shibuya, Kei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  15. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Saito, Yoshihiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kudo, Shigehiro; Yoshida, Daisaku; Ichikawa, Akihiro; Sakai, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Futoshi; Kato, Shingo; Shibuya, Kei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m 2 , and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade ≥3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade ≥3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  16. Comparing the effect of resistance, aerobic, and concurrent exercise program on the level of resistin and high reactive protein C of overweight and obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Shafiee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History and Objective: Obesity is one of the health risks factors, and aerobic exercise is one of the means to prevent and control obesity. The research was designed to compare methods of resistance, aerobic, and concurrent exercises on resistin and C-reactive protein (CRP serum level of overweight and obese women. Research Methodology: In this semi-experimental research, 36 voluntary overweight or obese women were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 12 of aerobic, resistance, and concurrent exercise programs. The training included 8 weeks of exercise performed with 55%–75% of 1-repetition maximum weight lifting. The aerobic exercise was performed at 55%–75% of maximum oxygen consumption and concurrent training included both programs for 3 days/week. The resistin and CRP serum level of the participant was measured 48 h before the start and again 48 h after the termination of the exercise protocol. The statistical analysis was performed on data using SPSS 22.0 (Chicago, USA. One-way analysis of variance and paired t-test was employed to test the hypothesis at significance level set to 0.05. Results: The result indicated that exercise program significantly decreased CRP level of blood serum (P 0.05. Discussion: Aerobic exercise regardless of types has a beneficiary effect on CPR, but resistin level needs different types of exercise to change in overweight and obese women. Conclusion: Some aerobic exercises are beneficiary for overweight and obese women health.

  17. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Teacher's Edition: Investigating Variation. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of one of the eight units of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). This unit focuses on diversity in human populations, measurement, and data collection. Optional excursions are described for students who wish to study a topic in greater depth. An introduction describes…

  18. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Student Guide: Investigating Variation. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the student's text of one unit of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). This unit focuses on diversity in human populations, measurement, and data collection. Numerous activities are given and optional excursions encourage students to pursue a topic in greater depth. Data tables within the…

  19. A Statewide Collaboration: Ohio Level III Trauma Centers' Approach to the Development of a Benchmarking System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Carrie L; Simon, Diane; Kilgore, Jane

    The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma revised the Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient to include the criteria for trauma centers to participate in a risk-adjusted benchmarking system. Trauma Quality Improvement Program is currently the risk-adjusted benchmarking program sponsored by the American College of Surgeons, which will be required of all trauma centers to participate in early 2017. Prior to this, there were no risk-adjusted programs for Level III verified trauma centers. The Ohio Society of Trauma Nurse Leaders is a collaborative group made up of trauma program managers, coordinators, and other trauma leaders who meet 6 times a year. Within this group, a Level III Subcommittee was formed initially to provide a place for the Level III centers to discuss issues specific to the Level III centers. When the new requirement regarding risk-adjustment became official, the subcommittee agreed to begin reporting simple data points with the idea to risk adjust in the future.

  20. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Student Guide: What's Up? Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the student's text of one unit of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). The chapters contain basic information about rockets, space, and principles of physics, as well as activities related to the subject and optional excursions. A section of introductory notes to the student discusses how the…

  1. Changes in soluble CEA and TIMP-1 levels during adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Sölétormos, György

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antige...... (CEA) levels in patients with stage III colon cancer.......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen...

  2. Concurrent Models for Object Execution

    OpenAIRE

    Diertens, Bob

    2012-01-01

    In previous work we developed a framework of computational models for the concurrent execution of functions on different levels of abstraction. It shows that the traditional sequential execution of function is just a possible implementation of an abstract computational model that allows for the concurrent execution of functions. We use this framework as base for the development of abstract computational models that allow for the concurrent execution of objects.

  3. A Phase 2 Trial of Concurrent Chemotherapy and Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results and Reflections Following Early Closure of a Single-Institution Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Henderson, Randal [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Pham, Dat; Cury, James D.; Bajwa, Abubakr [Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); D' Agostino, Harry [Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Flampouri, Stella; Huh, Soon; Li, Zuofeng [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McCook, Barry [Department of Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Nichols, Romaine C. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Proton therapy has been shown to reduce radiation dose to organs at risk (OAR) and could be used to safely escalate the radiation dose. We analyzed outcomes in a group of phase 2 study patients treated with dose-escalated proton therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for stage 3 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From 2009 through 2013, LU02, a phase 2 trial of proton therapy delivering 74 to 80 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction with concurrent chemotherapy for stage 3 NSCLC, was opened to accrual at our institution. Due to slow accrual and competing trials, the study was closed after just 14 patients (stage IIIA, 9 patients; stage IIIB, 5 patients) were accrued over 4 years. During that same time period, 55 additional stage III patients were treated with high-dose proton therapy, including 7 in multi-institutional proton clinical trials, 4 not enrolled due to physician preference, and 44 who were ineligible based on strict entry criteria. An unknown number of patients were ineligible for enrollment due to insurance coverage issues and thus were treated with photon radiation. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 52 months. Results: Two-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 57% and 25%, respectively. Median lengths of overall survival and progression-free survival were 33 months and 14 months, respectively. There were no acute grade 3 toxicities related to proton therapy. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and pulmonary toxicity each occurred in 1 patient. Conclusions: Dose-escalated proton therapy with concurrent chemotherapy was well tolerated with encouraging results among a small cohort of patients. Unfortunately, single-institution proton studies may be difficult to accrue and consideration for pragmatic and/or multicenter trial design should be considered when developing future proton clinical trials.

  4. Standard thoracic radiotherapy with or without concurrent daily low-dose carboplatin in elderly patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A phase III trial of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG9812)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atagi, Shinji; Kawahara, Masaaki; Tamura, Tomohide

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether radiotherapy with carboplatin would result in longer survival than radiotherapy alone in elderly patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eligible patients were 71 years of age or older with unresectable stage III NSCLC. Patients were randomly assigned to the radiotherapy alone (RT) arm, irradiation with 60 Gy; or the chemoradiotherapy (CRT) arm, the same radiotherapy and additional concurrent use of carboplatin 30 mg/m 2 per fraction up to the first 20 fractions. This study was terminated early when 46 patients were registered from November 1999 to February 2001. Four patients (one in the RT arm, three in the CRT arm) were considered to have died due to treatment-related causes. The Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) Radiotherapy Committee assessed these treatment-related deaths (TRDs) and the compliance with radiotherapy in this trial. They found that 60% of the cases corresponded to protocol deviation and 7% were protocol violation in dose constraint to the normal lung, two of whom died due to radiation pneumonitis. As to the effectiveness for the 46 patients enrolled, the median survival time was 428 days [95% confidence interval (CI)=212-680 days]in the RT arm versus 554 days (95% CI=331 to not estimable) in the CRT arm. Due to the early termination of this study, the effectiveness of concurrent use of carboplatin remains unclear. We're-planned and started a study with an active quality control program which was developed by the JCOG Radiotherapy Committee. (author)

  5. Effects of induction docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B nasopharyngeal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy: Final results of 2 parallel phase 2 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lin; Zhang, Youwang; Hu, Chaosu; Guo, Ye; Lu, Jiade J

    2017-06-15

    The effects of docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil (TPF) induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) on locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) are unclear. This study examined the long-term outcomes of the addition of this regimen to CCRT for stage III and IVA/B NPC. Two parallel, single-arm phase 2 trials were performed synchronously to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of TPF-based induction chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B NPC. The induction chemotherapy, which preceded standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy/platinum-based chemoradiation, consisted of 3 cycles of docetaxel (75 mg/m 2 on day 1), cisplatin (75 mg/m 2 on day 1), and a continuous infusion of fluorouracil (500 mg/m 2 /d on days 1-5) every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint for both trials was 5-year overall survival (OS). Between January 2007 and July 2010, 52 eligible patients with stage III NPC and 64 eligible patients with nonmetastatic stage IV NPC were accrued to the 2 trials. With a median follow-up of 67 months, the 5-year OS, progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and local progression-free survival (LPFS) rates were all improved in comparison with historical benchmarks for patients with stage III or IVA/IVB NPC. Multivariate analyses indicated that T and N classifications (T1/T2 vs T3/T4 and N3 vs N0-N2) were the only significant prognosticators for OS. The number of induction chemotherapy cycles was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting LPFS. TPF-based induction chemotherapy appears to significantly improve outcomes in comparison with historical data when it is administered before CCRT for locoregionally advanced NPC. A phase 3 trial is currently being performed to confirm this benefit. Cancer 2017;123:2258-2267. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. The role of concurrent chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma among endemic population: a meta-analysis of the phase iii randomized trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li; Zhao, Chong; Ghimire, Bijesh; Hong, Ming-Huang; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Ying; Huang, Yi-Jun; Guan, Zhong-Zhen

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this meta-analysis was to determine the clinical benefit of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) compared with radiation alone (RT) in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients in endemic geographic areas. Using a prospective meta-analysis protocol, two independent investigators reviewed the publications and extracted the data. Published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which patients with NPC in endemic areas were randomly assigned to receive CCRT or RT alone were included. Seven trials (totally 1608 patients) were eligible. Risk ratios (RRs) of 0.63 (95% CI, 0.50 to 0.80), 0.76 (95% CI, 0.61 to 0.93) and 0.74 (95% CI, 0.62 to 0.89) were observed for 2, 3 and 5 years OS respectively in favor of the CCRT group. The RRs were larger than that detected in the previously reported meta-analyses (including both endemic and non-endemic), indicating that the relative benefit of survival was smaller than what considered before. This is the first meta-analysis of CCRT vs. RT alone in NPC treatment which included studies only done in endemic area. The results confirmed that CCRT was more beneficial compared with RT alone. However, the relative benefit of CCRT in endemic population might be less than that from previous meta-analyses

  7. A higher level language data acquisition system (III) - the user data acquisition program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, J.M.; Gulbranson, R.L.; Huang, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear physics group at the University of Illinois has implemented a data acquisition system using modified versions of the Concurrent Pascal and Sequential Pascal languages. The user, a physicist, develops a data acquisition ''operating system'', written in these higher level languages, which is tailored to the planned experiment. The user must include only those system functions which are essential to the task, thus improving efficiency. The user program is constructed from simple modules, mainly consisting of Concurrent Pascal PROCESSes, MONITORs, and CLASSes together with appropriate data type definitions. Entire programs can be put together using ''cut and paste'' techniques. Planned enhancements include the automating of this process. Systems written for the Perkin-Elmer 3220 using this approach can easily exceed 2 kHz data rates for event by event handling; 20 kHz data rates have been achieved by the addition of buffers in the interrupt handling software. These rates have been achieved without the use of special-purpose hardware such as micro-programmed branch drivers. With the addition of such devices even higher data rates should be possible

  8. A phase I/II study of external beam radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent chemotherapy in localized cancer of the esophagus (RTOG 9207)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, L.E.; Qian, C.; Kocha, W.I.; Coia, L.R.; Herskovic, A.; Graham, M.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: A multi-institutional, prospective study was designed to determine the feasibility and toxicity of chemotherapy, external beam irradiation and esophageal brachytherapy (EB) in a potentially curable group of patients with adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Methods: Planned treatment was 50 Gy external beam radiation (25 fractions/5 wks) followed 2 weeks later by EB (either HDR 5 Gy wks 8,9 and 10 for a total of 15 Gy or LDR 20 Gy wk 8). The protocol was later revised to delete the LDR alternative due to poor accrual and decrease the HDR dose to 10 Gy, ie 5 Gy wks 8 and 9. Chemotherapy was given wks 1,5,8 and 11 with DDP 75 mg/m2 and 5-FU 1000 mg/m2/24 hrs, 96 hour infusion. Data is available on 50 patients (46 squamous, 3 adenocarcinoma) treated on the HDR alternative (EB dose 15 Gy and 10 Gy in 40 and 10 patients, respectively. Results: Thirty-five patients (70%) were able to complete external beam, EB and at least 2 courses of chemotherapy. Estimated survival rate at 12 months is 48%. Life-threatening toxicity or death occurred in 13 (26%) and 4 (8%) patients, respectively. Treatment-related esophageal fistulas occurred in 6 patients (12%) at 0.5 to 6.2 months from the first day of brachytherapy, leading to death in 3. So far all treatment-related fistulas occurred in the 15 Gy EB group. Conclusions: Survival following this combination of chemotherapy, external beam radiation and EB does not appear to be different from survival seen following chemotherapy and external beam radiation only. Based on the high incidence of fistulas, we urge extreme caution in employing EB as a boost following concurrent chemotherapy and external beam radiation with the schema utilized in this prospective study

  9. A phase I/II trial of hydroxychloroquine in conjunction with radiation therapy and concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Ye, Xiaobu; Supko, Jeffrey G; Desideri, Serena; Grossman, Stuart A; Brem, Steven; Mikkelson, Tom; Wang, Daniel; Chang, Yunyoung C; Hu, Janice; McAfee, Quentin; Fisher, Joy; Troxel, Andrea B; Piao, Shengfu; Heitjan, Daniel F; Tan, Kay-See; Pontiggia, Laura; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Davis, Lisa E; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate autophagy inhibition with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) can augment the efficacy of DNA-damaging therapy. The primary objective of this trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of HCQ in combination with radiation therapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GB). A 3 + 3 phase I trial design followed by a noncomparative phase II study was conducted in GB patients after initial resection. Patients received HCQ (200 to 800 mg oral daily) with RT and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Quantitative electron microscopy and immunoblotting were used to assess changes in autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling enabled PK-pharmacodynamic correlations. Sixteen phase I subjects were evaluable for dose-limiting toxicities. At 800 mg HCQ/d, 3/3 subjects experienced Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, 1 with sepsis. HCQ 600 mg/d was found to be the MTD in this combination. The phase II cohort (n = 76) had a median survival of 15.6 mos with survival rates at 12, 18, and 24 mo of 70%, 36%, and 25%. PK analysis indicated dose-proportional exposure for HCQ. Significant therapy-associated increases in AV and LC3-II were observed in PBMC and correlated with higher HCQ exposure. These data establish that autophagy inhibition is achievable with HCQ, but dose-limiting toxicity prevented escalation to higher doses of HCQ. At HCQ 600 mg/d, autophagy inhibition was not consistently achieved in patients treated with this regimen, and no significant improvement in overall survival was observed. Therefore, a definitive test of the role of autophagy inhibition in the adjuvant setting for glioma patients awaits the development of lower-toxicity compounds that can achieve more consistent inhibition of autophagy than HCQ.

  10. Phase II Trial of Hyperfractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin for Stage III and IVa Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, Patrick D.; Papagikos, Michael; Hamann, Sue; Neal, Charles; Meyerson, Martin; Hayes, Neil; Ungaro, Peter; Kotz, Kenneth; Couch, Marion; Pollock, Hoke; Tepper, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a novel chemoradiation regimen designed to maximize locoregional control (LRC) and minimize toxicity for patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Patients received hyperfractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (HIMRT) in 1.25-Gy fractions b.i.d. to 70 Gy to high-risk planning target volume (PTV). Intermediate and low-risk PTVs received 60 Gy and 50 Gy, at 1.07, and 0.89 Gy per fraction, respectively. Concurrent cisplatin 33 mg/m 2 /week was started Week 1. Patients completed the Quality of Life Radiation Therapy Instrument pretreatment (PRE), at end of treatment (EOT), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Overall survival (OS), progression-free (PFS), LRC, and toxicities were assessed. Results: Of 39 patients, 30 (77%) were alive without disease at median follow-up of 37.5 months. Actuarial 3-year OS, PFS, and LRC were 80%, 82%, and 87%, respectively. No failures occurred in the electively irradiated neck and there were no isolated neck failures. Head and neck QOL was significantly worse in 18 of 35 patients (51%): mean 7.8 PRE vs. 3.9 EOT. By month 1, H and N QOL returned near baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 1.7). The most common acute Grade 3+ toxicities were mucositis (38%), fatigue (28%), dysphagia (28%), and leukopenia (26%). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated IMRT with low-dose weekly cisplatin resulted in good LRC with acceptable toxicity and QOL. Lack of elective nodal failures despite very low dose per fraction has led to an attempt to further minimize toxicity by reducing elective nodal doses in our subsequent protocol.

  11. Apolipoprotein C-III Levels and Incident Coronary Artery Disease Risk: The EPIC-Norfolk Prospective Population Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Capelleveen, Julian C; Bernelot Moens, Sophie J; Yang, Xiaohong; Kastelein, John J P; Wareham, Nicholas J; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Stroes, Erik S G; Witztum, Joseph L; Hovingh, G Kees; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2017-06-01

    Apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) is a key regulator of triglyceride metabolism. Elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and apoC-III levels are causally linked to coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The mechanism(s) through which apoC-III increases CAD risk remains largely unknown. The aim was to confirm the association between apoC-III plasma levels and CAD risk and to explore which lipoprotein subfractions contribute to this relationship between apoC-III and CAD risk. Plasma apoC-III levels were measured in baseline samples from a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk study. The study comprised 2711 apparently healthy study participants, of whom 832 subsequently developed CAD. We studied the association of baseline apoC-III levels with incident CAD risk, lipoprotein subfractions measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and inflammatory biomarkers. ApoC-III levels were significantly associated with CAD risk (odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.48-2.48 for highest compared with lowest quintile), retaining significance after adjustment for traditional CAD risk factors (odds ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.94). ApoC-III levels were positively correlated with triglyceride levels, ( r =0.39), particle numbers of very-low-density lipoprotein ( r =0.25), intermediate-density lipoprotein ( r =0.23), small dense low-density lipoprotein ( r =0.26), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ( r =0.15), whereas an inverse correlation was observed with large low-density lipoprotein particle number ( r =-0.11), P C-reactive protein. ApoC-III levels are significantly associated with incident CAD risk. Elevated levels of remnant lipoproteins, small dense low-density lipoprotein, and low-grade inflammation may explain this association. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Phase 2 Randomized Controlled Trial of Radiation Therapy Plus Concurrent Interferon-Alpha and Retinoic Acid Versus Cisplatin for Stage III Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Partha, E-mail: BasuP@iarc.fr [Screening Group, Early Detection and Prevention Section, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Jenson, Alfred Bennett [James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Majhi, Tapas; Choudhury, Prabir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, Kolkata (India); Mandal, Ranajit; Banerjee, Dipanwita [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, Kolkata (India); Biswas, Jaydip [Department of Surgical Oncology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, Kolkata (India); Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh Nath; Ghim, Shin je; Miller, Donald [James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Because a combination of retinoic acid, interferon-alpha, and radiation therapy demonstrated synergistic action and effectiveness to treat advanced cervical cancers in earlier studies, we designed this randomized phase 2 open-label trial to assess efficacy and safety of interferon alpha-2b (IFN) and 13-cis-retinoic acid (RA) administered concomitantly with radiation therapy (IFN-RA-radiation) to treat stage III cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Stage III cervical cancer patients were randomized to study and control groups in a 1:1 ratio. All patients were treated with radiation therapy; study arm patients received IFN (3 × 10{sup 6} IU subcutaneously) 3 times a week for 4 weeks and daily RA (40 mg orally) for 30 days starting on day 1 of radiation, whereas control arm patients received weekly cisplatinum (40 mg/m{sup 2}) for 5 weeks during radiation. Patients were followed for 3 years. The primary endpoint was overall survival at 3 years. Results: Patients in the study (n=104) and control (n=105) groups were comparable for clinicopathological characteristics, radiation therapy–related variables and treatment response. Proportions of disease-free patients in the study and control groups were 38.5% and 44.8%, respectively, after median follow-up of 29.2 months. Hazard ratios were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.44-1.01) and 0.69 (95% CI: 0.44-1.06) for overall and disease-fee survival, respectively, comparing the study group to control, and demonstrated an inferior outcome with RA-IFN-radiation, although differences were statistically nonsignificant. Kaplan-Meier curves of disease-free and overall survival probabilities also showed inferior survival in the study group compared to those in the control. Acute toxicities of chemoradiation were significantly higher with 2 acute toxicity-related deaths. Conclusions: Treatment with RA-IFN-radiation did not demonstrate survival advantage over chemoradiation despite being less toxic. The

  13. The potential impact of microbial Fe(III) reduction on subsurface U(VI) mobility at a low level radioactive waste storage site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, M.J.; Livens, F.R.; Vaughan, D.J.; Lloyd, J.R.; Beadle, I.; Small, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides have the potential to be utilised as terminal electron acceptors by indigenous microbial communities in the British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) low level radioactive waste storage site at Drigg (Cumbria, UK) and these organisms may have a critical control on the biogeochemical cycling of several environmentally important radionuclides. In terms of radiological impact at Drigg, uranium is the most significant contributor to radiological impact and it is strongly influenced by biogeochemical processes. In terms of mass (moles) it is also the most abundant radionuclide in the Drigg inventory. Thus, the potential biotic and abiotic effects of Fe(III) reduction on U(VI) mobility in the Drigg subsurface are of interest. Culture-dependent and molecular techniques showed that the sediments in and around the Drigg site contained a diversity of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria. A series of microcosm experiments were utilised to create environmentally relevant experimental conditions. Microcosms set up using Drigg sediment and synthetic ground water were spiked with 100 μM U(VI) and acetate as an electron donor. U(VI) concentrations in groundwater were measured using a chemical assay while total U levels were determined using ICP-MS. Fe(II) levels were determined using the ferrozine method. Sediment surface areas were measured using BET analysis. The low surface area of the sediments resulted in only a small proportion of the 100 μM U(VI) spike sorbing onto mineral surfaces. The addition of ferri-hydrite to some microcosms resulted in an immediate lowering of soluble U(VI) concentrations, suggesting that the formation of soluble U(VI) complexes were not responsible for the minimal adsorption. The presence of biogenic Fe(II) in the microcosms did not affect the soluble U(VI) concentration. Similarly, soluble U(VI) levels remained unchanged when sediments were spiked with U(VI) post-microbial Fe(III) reduction. However, a lowering in

  14. Concurrent radiation, mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil in poor prognosis carcinoma of cervix: preliminary results of a Phase I-II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.; Dembo, A.; Beale, F.; Bean, H.; Bush, R.; Herman, J.; Pringle, J.; Rawlings, G.; Sturgeon, J.; Fine, S.

    1984-09-01

    Between July 1981 and June 1983, 27 patients with advanced primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of cervix and 8 with recurrent disease were treated using a pilot regimen of combination chemotherapy (CT): Mitomycin C (MIT), 5 Fluorouracil (5 FU), and radiation therapy (RT). CT and RT doses on this Phase I-II Study were escalated to the current regimen. A split course of RT was used, either pelvic RT alone or the same pelvic RT plus para-aortic RT. CT was given by continuous IV infusion days 1 through 4 of each half-course of RT. This was followed by one application of intrauterine /sup 137/Cs when possible. Three of the 8 patients with recurrence in the pelvis or para-aortic nodes had a complete response (CR) to CT-RT and are alive without disease at 19, 19 and 22 months after treatment, respectively. Twenty of the 27 (74%) primary patients had a CR. With a median duration of follow-up of 6 months 4/20 have relapsed, 1 in RT field, 2 at distant sites, and 1 in both. The acute toxicity of this regimen was tolerable: 2/35 developed transient leukopenia with one febrile episode, 9/35 developed transient thrombocytopenia without bleeding. Symptomatic sigmoid strictures developed in two patients, one requiring surgical intervention. Typically, near complete regression of tumor is noted on completion of the external RT, reproducing the dramatic responses that have been observed in SCC of the anal canal, esophagus and head and neck, with this CT-RT regimen.

  15. Correlation between serum levels of PC III and the degree of hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xue; Xu Yu; Li Wenjie; Zhang Jun; Yu Ying; Wang Kun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation between serum level of PC III and the degree of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases. Methods: Serum level of PC III was assayed with RIA and other markers of liver function (including ALT, AST, STB, SDB, TP, ALB, TBA) were assayed with automatic biochemical analyzer in 188 patients with various chronic liver diseases. PC III only were examined in 70 controls. Results: (1) The serum levels of PC III were in this order: chronic severe hepatitis (n=27, 501.17 ± 191.09) > liver cirrhosis from chronic hepatitis (n=27,334.52 ± 139.14) > chronic moderate hepatitis ( n = 32,298.02 ± 151.02) > primary liver cancer (n=39,281.42 ± 143.48) > normal controls (n=70,122.56 ± 92.94). (2) The serum levels of PC III were positively correlated with STB and SDB levels (P<0.05) in patients with chronic severe hepatitis and was significantly positively correlated with ALP levels (P<0.01). (3) The serum level of PC III were significantly positively correlated with STB, SDB, TBA and ALP in patients with cirrhosis from chronic hepatitis (P<0.01). (4) The serum levels of PC III were significantly positively correlated with AST and ALP levels in patients with chronic moderate hepatitis (P<0.01). (5) The serum levels of PC III were significantly positively correlated with STB, SDB, TBA, AST and ALP in patients with primary liver cancer (P<0.01). Conclusion: Serum level of PC III might adequately reflect the activity of the process of hepatic fibrosis, but did not necessarily reflect the degree of fibrosis already attained. (authors)

  16. Elevated levels of CXC chemokine connective tissue activating peptide (CTAP)-III in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gina; Gardner, Brian K; Elashoff, David A; Purcell, Colleen M; Sandha, Harpavan S; Mao, Jenny T; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Lee, Jay M; Dubinett, Steven M

    2011-05-15

    Despite advances in treatments, lung cancer has been the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States for the past several decades. Recent findings from the National Lung Screening Trial reveal that low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scan screening of high-risk individuals reduces lung cancer mortality. This suggests that early detection is of key importance to improving patient outcome. However, of those screened with CT scans, 25% had positive scans that require further follow-up studies which often involve more radiation exposure and invasive tests to reduce false positive results. The purpose of this study was to identify candidate plasma biomarkers to aid in diagnosis of lung cancer in at-risk individuals. We found increased expression of the CXC chemokine connective tissue-activating peptide (CTAP)-III from plasma specimens of lung cancer patients compared to at-risk control subjects. Identification of the peptide was confirmed by the addition of an anti-NAP-2 antibody that recognizes CTAP-III and NAP-2. We also quantified and verified the increased levels of plasma CTAP-III with ELISA in patients with lung cancer (mean ± SD, 1859 ± 1219 ng/mL) compared to controls (698 ± 434 ng/mL; Pcancer patients. Further studies are required to determine if this chemokine could be utilized in a blood-based biomarker panel for the diagnosis of lung cancer.

  17. Effects of parietal TMS on visual and auditory processing at the primary cortical level -- a concurrent TMS-fMRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitão, Joana; Thielscher, Axel; Werner, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    cortices under 3 sensory contexts: visual, auditory, and no stimulation. IPS-TMS increased activations in auditory cortices irrespective of sensory context as a result of direct and nonspecific auditory TMS side effects. In contrast, IPS-TMS modulated activations in the visual cortex in a state...... deactivations induced by auditory activity to TMS sounds. TMS to IPS may increase the responses in visual (or auditory) cortices to visual (or auditory) stimulation via a gain control mechanism or crossmodal interactions. Collectively, our results demonstrate that understanding TMS effects on (uni......Accumulating evidence suggests that multisensory interactions emerge already at the primary cortical level. Specifically, auditory inputs were shown to suppress activations in visual cortices when presented alone but amplify the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses to concurrent visual...

  18. Correlation between Interleukin-6 and Thrombin-Antithrombin III Complex Levels in Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Rita; Zahavi, Alon; Axer-Siegel, Ruth; Budnik, Ivan; Dreznik, Ayelet; Dahbash, Mor; Nisgav, Yael; Megiddo, Elinor; Kenet, Gili; Weinberger, Dov; Livnat, Tami

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate and correlate the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT) in the vitreous of patients with different vitreoretinal pathologies. Vitreous samples were collected from 78 patients scheduled for pars plana vitrectomy at a tertiary medical center. Patients were divided by the underlying vitreoretinal pathophysiology, as follows: macular hole (MH)/epiretinal membrane (ERM) (n = 26); rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) (n = 32); and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) (n = 20). Levels of IL-6 and TAT were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and compared among the groups. A significant difference was found in the vitreal IL-6 and TAT levels between the MH/ERM group and both the PDR and RRD groups (P Diabetes was associated with higher IL-6 levels in the RRD group. Different relationships between the IL-6 and TAT levels were revealed in patients with different ocular pathologies. Our results imply that variations in vitreal TAT level may be attributable not only to an inflammatory reaction or blood-retinal barrier breakdown, but also to intraocular tissue-dependent regulation of thrombin.

  19. Uric acid levels in plasma and urine in rats chronically exposed to inorganic As (III) and As(V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauge, P; Del-Razo, L M

    1985-07-01

    The effect of inorganic arsenic (III) and arsenic (V) on renal excretion and plasma levels of uric acid was examined in rats. Oral administration of 1200 micrograms As/kg/day for 6 weeks diminished uric acid levels in plasma by 67.1% and 26.5% of control after the administration of As(III) and As(V), respectively. Renal excretion of uric acid was significantly reduced during the first 3 weeks following As (III) administration, with a subsequent increase to approach control values at the end of the treatment. When As(V) was administered, the diminution in renal excretion was significant at 6 weeks.

  20. Leader-Member Exchange across two hierarchical levels of leadership: concurrent influences on work characteristics and employee psychological health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanika-Murray, Maria; Bartholomew, Kimberley J; Williams, Glenn A; Cox, Tom

    2015-01-02

    Leader-Member Exchange (LMX) theory suggests that the quality of the leader-employee relationship is linked to employee psychological health. Leaders who reside at different hierarchical levels have unique roles and spheres of influence and potentially affect employees' work experiences in different ways. Nevertheless, research on the impact of leadership on employee psychological health has largely viewed leaders as a homogeneous group. Expanding on LMX theory, we argue that (1) LMX sourced at the levels of the line manager (LM) and senior management (SM) team will be differentially linked to employee psychological health (assessed as worn-out) and that (2) these relationships will be mediated by perceived work characteristics (reward and recognition, workload management, quality of relationships with colleagues and physical environment). Structural equation modelling on data from 337 manual workers partially supported the hypotheses. Perceptions of the physical environment mediated the relationship between LMX at the LM level and employee psychological health, whereas perceptions of workload management mediated the relationship between LMX at the SM level and psychological health. These findings corroborate arguments that leaders are not a uniform group and as such the effects of LMX on employees will depend on leadership hierarchy. Implications for expanding leadership theory are discussed.

  1. Leader-Member Exchange across two hierarchical levels of leadership: concurrent influences on work characteristics and employee psychological health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanika-Murray, Maria; Bartholomew, Kimberley J.; Williams, Glenn A.; Cox, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Leader-Member Exchange (LMX) theory suggests that the quality of the leader–employee relationship is linked to employee psychological health. Leaders who reside at different hierarchical levels have unique roles and spheres of influence and potentially affect employees' work experiences in different ways. Nevertheless, research on the impact of leadership on employee psychological health has largely viewed leaders as a homogeneous group. Expanding on LMX theory, we argue that (1) LMX sourced at the levels of the line manager (LM) and senior management (SM) team will be differentially linked to employee psychological health (assessed as worn-out) and that (2) these relationships will be mediated by perceived work characteristics (reward and recognition, workload management, quality of relationships with colleagues and physical environment). Structural equation modelling on data from 337 manual workers partially supported the hypotheses. Perceptions of the physical environment mediated the relationship between LMX at the LM level and employee psychological health, whereas perceptions of workload management mediated the relationship between LMX at the SM level and psychological health. These findings corroborate arguments that leaders are not a uniform group and as such the effects of LMX on employees will depend on leadership hierarchy. Implications for expanding leadership theory are discussed. PMID:25999635

  2. Optimization of end-pumped, actively Q-switched quasi-III-level lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabczynski, Jan K; Gorajek, Lukasz; Kwiatkowski, Jacek; Kaskow, Mateusz; Zendzian, Waldemar

    2011-08-15

    The new model of end-pumped quasi-III-level laser considering transient pumping processes, ground-state-depletion and up-conversion effects was developed. The model consists of two parts: pumping stage and Q-switched part, which can be separated in a case of active Q-switching regime. For pumping stage the semi-analytical model was developed, enabling the calculations for final occupation of upper laser level for given pump power and duration, spatial profile of pump beam, length and dopant level of gain medium. For quasi-stationary inversion, the optimization procedure of Q-switching regime based on Lagrange multiplier technique was developed. The new approach for optimization of CW regime of quasi-three-level lasers was developed to optimize the Q-switched lasers operating with high repetition rates. Both methods of optimizations enable calculation of optimal absorbance of gain medium and output losses for given pump rate. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  3. A level III PSA for the inherently safe CAREM-25 nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, Jorge H.; Nunez McLeod, J.; Rivera, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    A Level III PSA has been performed for the inherently safe CAREM-25 nuclear power station, as a requirement for licensing according to argentinian regulations. The CAREM-25 project is still at a detailed design state, therefore only internal events have been considered, and a representative site has been assumed for dose estimations. Several conservative hypothesis have been formulated, but even so an overall core melt frequency of 2.3E -5 per reactor year has been obtained. The risk estimations comply with the regulations. The risk values obtained are compared to the 700MW(e) nuclear power plant Atucha II PSA result, showing an effective risk reduction not only in the severe accident probability but alto in the consequence component of the risk estimation. (author)

  4. Hospital-level Variation in Utilization of Surgery for Clinical Stage I-II Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Douglas S; Mulvihill, Sean J; Skarda, David E; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Stoddard, Gregory J; Ott, Mark J; Firpo, Matthew A; Scaife, Courtney L

    2017-07-11

    To (1) evaluate rates of surgery for clinical stage I-II pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), (2) identify predictors of not undergoing surgery, (3) quantify the degree to which patient- and hospital-level factors explain differences in hospital surgery rates, and (4) evaluate the association between adjusted hospital-specific surgery rates and overall survival (OS) of patients treated at different hospitals. Curative-intent surgery for potentially resectable PDAC is underutilized in the United States. Retrospective cohort study of patients ≤85 years with clinical stage I-II PDAC in the 2004 to 2014 National Cancer Database. Mixed effects multivariable models were used to characterize hospital-level variation across quintiles of hospital surgery rates. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the effect of adjusted hospital surgery rates on OS. Of 58,553 patients without contraindications or refusal of surgery, 63.8% underwent surgery, and the rate decreased from 2299/3528 (65.2%) in 2004 to 4412/7092 (62.2%) in 2014 (P < 0.001). Adjusted hospital rates of surgery varied 6-fold (11.4%-70.9%). Patients treated at hospitals with higher rates of surgery had better unadjusted OS (median OS 10.2, 13.3, 14.2, 16.5, and 18.4 months in quintiles 1-5, respectively, P < 0.001, log-rank). Treatment at hospitals in lower surgery rate quintiles 1-3 was independently associated with mortality [Hazard ratio (HR) 1.10 (1.01, 1.21), HR 1.08 (1.02, 1.15), and HR 1.09 (1.04, 1.14) for quintiles 1-3, respectively, compared with quintile 5] after adjusting for patient factors, hospital type, and hospital volume. Quality improvement efforts are needed to help hospitals with low rates of surgery ensure that their patients have access to appropriate surgery.

  5. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  6. BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes

  7. Congenital anomalies: 15 years of experience in a level III hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Félix

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital anomalies (CAs are a leading cause of fetal and infant mortality and morbidity worldwide. They may be identified prenatally, at the moment of birth or later in life.Purpose: To describe the cases of CAs registered over the last 15 years at a level III hospital, comparing individuals who were detected through prenatal (preN diagnosis with those detected through postnatal (postN diagnosis.Methods: All records were collected from the Registo Nacional de Anomalias Congénitas (RENAC online platform between 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2014, in a level III hospital, where cases of CAs were notified voluntarily (n = 1,222. We tested differences for selected variables between the years in study. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify potential factors associated to preN diagnosis.Results: We observed a total of 1,510 anomalies, being 493 (40.3% circulatory, 252 (20.6% chromosomal, 187 (15.3% musculoskeletal, 138 (11.3% digestive, 133 (10.9% urinary, 117 (9.6% nervous, 37 (3.0% respiratory, 35 (2.9% genital, 25 (2% anomalies of the eye, ear, face and neck, 20 (1.6% cleft lip/cleft palate and 73 (6.0% others. Time of diagnosis was known for all subjects: 770 (63.0% were diagnosed prenatally and 452 (37.0% were diagnosed at birth or during the first month of life. We found statistically significant differences between groups for several variables. Assisted reproduction techniques (p = 0.023, maternal medications during the first trimester of pregnancy (p = 0.004 and the number of anomalies per individual (p ≤ 0.001 had a statistically significant impact on receiving preN diagnosis.Conclusion: Our data confirm the importance of both RENAC national database and preN diagnosis in improving perinatal healthcare. However, in order to determine the national prevalence of CAs and understand any involved factors, it is desirable to enhance the notification in the whole country, facilitating the adjustment of national

  8. Concurrent weighted logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Bingtian; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Mardare, Radu Iulian

    2015-01-01

    We introduce Concurrent Weighted Logic (CWL), a multimodal logic for concurrent labeled weighted transition systems (LWSs). The synchronization of LWSs is described using dedicated functions that, in various concurrency paradigms, allow us to encode the compositionality of LWSs. To reflect these......-completeness results for this logic. To complete these proofs we involve advanced topological techniques from Model Theory....

  9. Ferrous Iron Oxidation under Varying pO2 Levels: The Effect of Fe(III)/Al(III) Oxide Minerals and Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunmei; Thompson, Aaron

    2018-01-16

    Abiotic Fe(II) oxidation by O 2 commonly occurs in the presence of mineral sorbents and organic matter (OM) in soils and sediments; however, this tertiary system has rarely been studied. Therefore, we examined the impacts of mineral surfaces (goethite and γ-Al 2 O 3 ) and organic matter [Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA)] on Fe(II) oxidation rates and the resulting Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides under 21 and 1% pO 2 at pH 6. We tracked Fe dynamics by adding 57 Fe(II) to 56 Fe-labeled goethite and γ-Al 2 O 3 and characterized the resulting solids using 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. We found Fe(II) oxidation was slower at low pO 2 and resulted in higher-crystallinity Fe(III) phases. Relative to oxidation of Fe(II) (aq) alone, both goethite and γ-Al 2 O 3 surfaces increased Fe(II) oxidation rates regardless of pO 2 levels, with goethite being the stronger catalyst. Goethite surfaces promoted the formation of crystalline goethite, while γ-Al 2 O 3 favored nano/small particle or disordered goethite and some lepidocrocite; oxidation of Fe(II) aq alone favored lepidocrocite. SRFA reduced oxidation rates in all treatments except the mineral-free systems at 21% pO 2 , and SRFA decreased Fe(III) phase crystallinity, facilitating low-crystalline ferrihydrite in the absence of mineral sorbents, low-crystalline lepidocrocite in the presence of γ-Al 2 O 3 , but either crystalline goethite or ferrihydrite when goethite was present. This work highlights that the oxidation rate, the types of mineral surfaces, and OM control Fe(III) precipitate composition.

  10. A report on high-level nuclear waste transportation: Prepared pursuant to assembly concurrent resolution No. 8 of the 1987 Nevada Legislature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-01

    This report has been prepared by the staff of the State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) in response to Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 8 (ACR 8), passed by the Nevada State Legislature in 1987. ACR 8 directed the NWPO, in cooperation with affected local governments and the Legislative committee on High-Level Radioactive Waste, to prepare this report which scrutinizes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) plans for transportation of high-level radioactive waste to the proposed yucca Mountain repository, which reviews the regulatory structure under which shipments to a repository would be made and which presents NWPO`s plans for addressing high-level radioactive waste transportation issues. The report is divided into three major sections. Section 1.0 provides a review of DOE`s statutory requirements, its repository transportation program and plans, the major policy, programmatic, technical and institutional issues and specific areas of concern for the State of Nevada. Section 2.0 contains a description of the current federal, state and tribal transportation regulatory environment within which nuclear waste is shipped and a discussion of regulatory issues which must be resolved in order for the State to minimize risks and adverse impacts to its citizens. Section 3.0 contains the NWPO plan for the study and management of repository-related transportation. The plan addresses four areas, including policy and program management, regulatory studies, technical reviews and studies and institutional relationships. A fourth section provides recommendations for consideration by State and local officials which would assist the State in meeting the objectives of the plan.

  11. A report on high-level nuclear waste transportation: Prepared pursuant to assembly concurrent resolution No. 8 of the 1987 Nevada Legislature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This report has been prepared by the staff of the State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) in response to Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 8 (ACR 8), passed by the Nevada State Legislature in 1987. ACR 8 directed the NWPO, in cooperation with affected local governments and the Legislative committee on High-Level Radioactive Waste, to prepare this report which scrutinizes the US Department of Energy's (DOE) plans for transportation of high-level radioactive waste to the proposed yucca Mountain repository, which reviews the regulatory structure under which shipments to a repository would be made and which presents NWPO's plans for addressing high-level radioactive waste transportation issues. The report is divided into three major sections. Section 1.0 provides a review of DOE's statutory requirements, its repository transportation program and plans, the major policy, programmatic, technical and institutional issues and specific areas of concern for the State of Nevada. Section 2.0 contains a description of the current federal, state and tribal transportation regulatory environment within which nuclear waste is shipped and a discussion of regulatory issues which must be resolved in order for the State to minimize risks and adverse impacts to its citizens. Section 3.0 contains the NWPO plan for the study and management of repository-related transportation. The plan addresses four areas, including policy and program management, regulatory studies, technical reviews and studies and institutional relationships. A fourth section provides recommendations for consideration by State and local officials which would assist the State in meeting the objectives of the plan

  12. Oscillator strengths for transitions among Fe III levels belonging to the three lowest configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, N C; Hibbert, A

    2008-01-01

    Accurate oscillator strengths and Einstein A-coefficients for some El and E2 transitions among 3d 6 , 3d 5 4s and 3d 5 4p levels of FeIII are presented and compared with other available results. The present results comprise by far the largest configuration interaction calculation for this astrophysically important ion, and include relativistic effects through the Breit-Pauli operator. The core-valence effects from a large number of 3d 6 and 3d 5 cores are carefully treated by optimising 4d, 4f, 5s, 5p, 5d, 5f and 6p orbitals either as a correction or as a correlation orbital while 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p and 3d Hartree-Fock functions are used. The 4s and 4p functions are optimised as spectroscopic orbitals. Fine-tuning of the ab initio energies was done through adjusting by a small amount some diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrix. It is found that for many of the relatively strong dipole transitions, our calculated oscillator strengths agree with available calculations, while for the weaker transitions our results often disagree with the previously determined results. We also present gA values for five E2 transitions for the multiplets 3d 6 5 DJ → 3d 5 ( 6 S)4s 5 S 2. The present results for these transitions show a 30-40% increase over the results previously published.

  13. Epidemiological Study of Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Conjunctivitis in a Level III Neonatal Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Dias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conjunctivitis is one of the most frequently occurring hospital-acquired infections among neonates, although it is less studied than potentially life-threatening infections, such as sepsis and pneumonia. Objectives. The aims of our work were to identify epidemiologic characteristics, pathogens, and susceptibility patterns of bacterial hospital-acquired conjunctivitis (HAC in a level III neonatal unit. Materials and Methods. Data were collected retrospectively from patient charts and laboratory databases. Hospital-acquired conjunctivitis was defined in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control/National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC/NHSN diagnostic criteria. Results. One or more episodes of HAC were diagnosed in 4,0% ( of 1492 neonates admitted during the study period. Most of the episodes involved premature (75,4% and low birth weight (75,4% neonates. Infection rates were higher among patients undergoing noninvasive mechanical ventilation (46,7%, parenteral nutrition (13,6%, and phototherapy (6,8%. Predominant pathogens included Serratia marcescens (27,9%, Escherichia coli (23%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (18%. Susceptibility patterns revealed bacterial resistances to several antibiotic classes. Gentamicin remains the adequate choice for empirical treatment of HAC in our NICU. Conclusion. It is important to know the local patterns of the disease in order to adjust prevention strategies. Our work contributes to the epidemiological characterization of a sometimes overlooked disease.

  14. Krill protein hydrolysate reduces plasma triacylglycerol level with concurrent increase in plasma bile acid level and hepatic fatty acid catabolism in high-fat fed mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie S. Ramsvik

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Krill powder, consisting of both lipids and proteins, has been reported to modulate hepatic lipid catabolism in animals. Fish protein hydrolysate diets have also been reported to affect lipid metabolism and to elevate bile acid (BA level in plasma. BA interacts with a number of nuclear receptors and thus affects a variety of signaling pathways, including very low density lipoprotein (VLDL secretion. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a krill protein hydrolysate (KPH could affect lipid and BA metabolism in mice. Method: C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat (21%, w/w diet containing 20% crude protein (w/w as casein (control group or KPH for 6 weeks. Lipids and fatty acid composition were measured from plasma, enzyme activity and gene expression were analyzed from liver samples, and BA was measured from plasma. Results: The effect of dietary treatment with KPH resulted in reduced levels of plasma triacylglycerols (TAG and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs. The KPH treated mice had also a marked increased plasma BA concentration. The increased plasma BA level was associated with induction of genes related to membrane canalicular exporter proteins (Abcc2, Abcb4 and to BA exporters to blood (Abcc3 and Abcc4. Of note, we observed a 2-fold increased nuclear farnesoid X receptor (Fxr mRNA levels in the liver of mice fed KPH. We also observed increased activity of the nuclear peroxiosme proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα target gene carnitine plamitoyltransferase 2 (CPT-2. Conclusion: The KPH diet showed to influence lipid and BA metabolism in high-fat fed mice. Moreover, increased mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and elevation of BA concentration may regulate the plasma level of TAGs and NEFAs.

  15. Level III baseline risk evaluation for Building 3505 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostella, W.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The Level III Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) for Building 3505, the ORNL Metal Recovery Facility, provides an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects, current or future, associated with the presence of hazardous substances in the building. The Metal Recovery Facility was used from 1952 through 1960 to process large quantities of radioactive material using the PUREX process for the recovery of uranium-238, plutonium-239, neptunium-237, and americium-241. The facility consists of seven process cells (A through G), a canal, a dissolver room, a dissolver pit, an office, locker room, storage area, control room, electrical gallery, shop, and makeup area. The cells were used to house the nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment, and the canal was constructed to be used as a water-shielded transfer canal. Currently, there are no known releases of radioactive contaminants from Building 3505. To perform the BRE, historical radiological survey data were used to estimate the concentration of alpha- and beta/gamma emitting radionuclides in the various cells, rooms, and other areas in Building 3505. Data from smear surveys were used to estimate the amount of transferable contamination (to which receptors can be exposed via inhalation and ingestion), and data from probe surveys were used to estimate the amount of both fixed and transferable contamination (from which receptors can receive external exposure). Two land use scenarios, current and future, and their subsequent exposure scenarios were explored in the BRE. Under the current land use scenario, two exposure scenarios were evaluated. The first was a worst-case industrial exposure scenario in which the receptor is a maintenance worker who works 8 hours/day, 350 days/year in the building for 25 years. In the second, more realistic exposure scenario, the receptor is a surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) worker who spends two 8-hour days/year in the building for 25 years

  16. A Phase I/II Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT) Dose Escalation With Concurrent Fixed-dose Rate Gemcitabine (FDR-G) in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Schipper, Mathew; Francis, Isaac R.; Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel; Simeone, Diane M.; Sonnenday, Christopher; Abrams, Ross; Leslie, William; Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of ≥1500/mm 3 , platelets ≥100,000/mm 3 , creatinine 2 /100 min intravenously) was given on days −22 and −15, 1, 8, 22, and 29. Intensity modulated radiation started on day 1. Dose levels were escalated from 50-60 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as gastrointestinal toxicity grade (G) ≥3, neutropenic fever, or deterioration in performance status to ≥3 between day 1 and 126. Dose level was assigned using TITE-CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Results: Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. Conclusions: High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local therapy.

  17. Low level laser therapy for concurrent chemoradiotherapy induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients – A triple blinded randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautam, Ajay Prashad; Fernandes, Donald J.; Vidyasagar, Mamidipudi S.; Maiya, Arun G.; Vadhiraja, Bejadi M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Oral mucositis (OM) is most cumbersome acute side effect of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). OM associated pain affects oral functions and nutrition of the patient that may result in discontinuity of treatment. Several modalities have been tried to prevent and treat OM, but none proved completely successful until date. We used prophylactic low level laser therapy (LLLT) for the prevention and treatment of CCRT induced OM. Materials and methods: In this triple blinded study, 221 HNC patients scheduled to undergo CCRT (Cisplatin (1, 22, 43 day) + RT = 66 Grays (2 Gy/fraction), 33 fractions, 5 fractions/week, for 45 days) were block randomized into laser (n = 111) and placebo (n = 110) group. Laser group received LLLT (HeNe, λ = 632.8 nm, power-density = 24 mW, dosage = 3.0 J/point, total dosage/session = 36–40 J, spot-size = 1 cm 2 , 5 sessions/week) while placebo received sham treatment daily prior to radiation. OM (RTOG/EORTC Scale), oral pain (VAS), dysphagia (FIS), weight loss and CCRT break were assessed. Data were analyzed using frequencies and percentage, generalized estimating equations (GEE) and odds ratio. Results: There was significant reduction in incidence of severe OM (F = 16.64, df = 8876, p < 0.0001) and its associated pain (F = 25.06, df = 8876, p < 0.0001), dysphagia (F = 20.17, df = 8876, p < 0.0001) and opioid analgesics use (p < 0.0001) in laser than placebo group patients. Conclusions: LLLT decreased the incidence of CCRT induced severe OM and its associated pain, dysphagia and opioid analgesics use.

  18. Relationships between models of concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Sassone, Vladimiro; Winskel, Glynn

    1994-01-01

    Models for concurrency can be classified with respect to the three relevant parameters: behaviour/system, interleaving/noninterleaving, linear/branching time. When modelling a process, a choice concerning such parameters corresponds to choosing the level of abstraction of the resulting semantics....

  19. Generalization of concurrence vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Changshui; Song Heshan

    2004-01-01

    In this Letter, based on the generalization of concurrence vectors for bipartite pure state with respect to employing tensor product of generators of the corresponding rotation groups, we generalize concurrence vectors to the case of mixed states; a new criterion of separability of multipartite pure states is given out, for which we define a concurrence vector; we generalize the vector to the case of multipartite mixed state and give out a good measure of free entanglement

  20. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Valencia Posso, Frank Dan

    2002-01-01

    The ntcc calculus is a model of non-deterministic temporal concurrent constraint programming. In this paper we study behavioral notions for this calculus. In the underlying computational model, concurrent constraint processes are executed in discrete time intervals. The behavioral notions studied...... reflect the reactive interactions between concurrent constraint processes and their environment, as well as internal interactions between individual processes. Relationships between the suggested notions are studied, and they are all proved to be decidable for a substantial fragment of the calculus...

  1. Nutritional strategies to support concurrent training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Schindler, Joaquin; Hamilton, D Lee; Moore, Daniel R; Baar, Keith; Philp, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent training (the combination of endurance exercise to resistance training) is a common practice for athletes looking to maximise strength and endurance. Over 20 years ago, it was first observed that performing endurance exercise after resistance exercise could have detrimental effects on strength gains. At the cellular level, specific protein candidates have been suggested to mediate this training interference; however, at present, the physiological reason(s) behind the concurrent training effect remain largely unknown. Even less is known regarding the optimal nutritional strategies to support concurrent training and whether unique nutritional approaches are needed to support endurance and resistance exercise during concurrent training approaches. In this review, we will discuss the importance of protein supplementation for both endurance and resistance training adaptation and highlight additional nutritional strategies that may support concurrent training. Finally, we will attempt to synergise current understanding of the interaction between physiological responses and nutritional approaches into practical recommendations for concurrent training.

  2. Voltammetric method to determine chromium (III) in potable water at level of ultra plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez B, Irene; Alvarado G, Ana L.

    2004-01-01

    It was established an analytical methodology to determine Cr (III) in drinking water using a voltammetric technique of Differential Pulse Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry with an Adsorptive Preconcentration of a complex Cr(III)-diethiltriaminpentaceticacid (Cr-DTPA) in a mercury drop. A dissolution of sodium nitrate was used as a supporting electrolyte. The optimized voltammetric parameters were: adsorption time, scan rate, absorption potential, p H, complex agent and sodium nitrate concentration. The linear range of the methodology is between 20 ng/L and 60 ng/L and the detection and quantification limits are 13 ng/L and 20 ng/L respectively. (Author) [es

  3. Increased Levels of Type I and III Collagen and Hyaluronan in Scleroderma Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Klaus; Heickendorff, Lene; L, Risteli

    1997-01-01

    The aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) and the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) and hyaluronan (HA) were measured in plasma and suction blister fluid from 13 systemic sclerosis patients and 11 healthy volunteers. Suction blisters and skin biopsies were...

  4. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Palamidessi, Catuscia; Valencia, Frank Dan

    2002-01-01

    The ntcc calculus is a model of non-deterministic temporal concurrent constraint programming. In this paper we study behavioral notions for this calculus. In the underlying computational model, concurrent constraint processes are executed in discrete time intervals. The behavioral notions studied...

  5. Impredicative concurrent abstract predicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Kasper; Birkedal, Lars

    2014-01-01

    We present impredicative concurrent abstract predicates { iCAP { a program logic for modular reasoning about concurrent, higher- order, reentrant, imperative code. Building on earlier work, iCAP uses protocols to reason about shared mutable state. A key novel feature of iCAP is the ability to dene...

  6. Comparing a combination of validated questionnaires and level III portable monitor with polysomnography to diagnose and exclude sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Effie J; Driver, Helen S; Stewart, Steven C; Fitzpatrick, Michael F

    2013-12-15

    Questionnaires have been validated as screening tools in adult populations at risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Portable monitors (PM) have gained acceptance for confirmation of OSA in some patients with a high pretest probability of the disorder. We evaluated the combined diagnostic utility of 3 validated questionnaires and a Level III PM in the diagnosis and exclusion of OSA, as compared with in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) derived apnea hypopnea index (AHI). Consecutive patients referred to the Sleep Disorders Clinic completed 3 testing components: (1) 3 questionnaires (Berlin, STOP-Bang, and Sleep Apnea Clinical Score [SACS]); (2) Level III at-home PM (MediByte) study; and (3) Level I in-laboratory PSG. The utility of individual questionnaires, the Level III device alone, and the combination of questionnaires and the Level III device were compared with the PSG. One hundred twenty-eight patients participated in the study (84M, 44F), mean ± SD age 50 ± 12.3years, BMI 31 ± 6.6 kg/m(2). At a PSG threshold AHI = 10, the PM derived respiratory disturbance index (RDI) had a sensitivity and specificity of 79% and 86%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for the other screening tools were: Berlin 88%, 25%; STOP-Bang 90%, 25%; SACS 33%, 75%. The sensitivity and specificity at a PSG AHI = 15 were: PM 77%, 95%; Berlin 91%, 28%; STOP-Bang 93%, 28%; SACS 35%, 78%. Questionnaires alone, possibly given a reliance on sleepiness as a symptom, cannot reliably rule out the presence of OSA. Objective physiological measurement is critical for the diagnosis and exclusion of OSA.

  7. Overall survival benefit for sequential doxorubicin-docetaxel compared with concurrent doxorubicin and docetaxel in node-positive breast cancer--8-year results of the Breast International Group 02-98 phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oakman, C; Francis, P A; Crown, J

    2013-01-01

    Background In women with node-positive breast cancer, the Breast International Group (BIG) 02-98 tested the incorporation of docetaxel (Taxotere) into doxorubicin (Adriamycin)-based chemotherapy, and compared sequential and concurrent docetaxel. At 5 years, there was a trend for improved disease...

  8. A Phase I/II Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT) Dose Escalation With Concurrent Fixed-dose Rate Gemcitabine (FDR-G) in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgar.ben-josef@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Simeone, Diane M.; Sonnenday, Christopher [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Abrams, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Leslie, William [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M. [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of {>=}1500/mm{sup 3}, platelets {>=}100,000/mm{sup 3}, creatinine <2 mg/dL, bilirubin <3 mg/dL, and alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase {<=}2.5 Multiplication-Sign upper limit of normal. FDR-G (1000 mg/m{sup 2}/100 min intravenously) was given on days -22 and -15, 1, 8, 22, and 29. Intensity modulated radiation started on day 1. Dose levels were escalated from 50-60 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as gastrointestinal toxicity grade (G) {>=}3, neutropenic fever, or deterioration in performance status to {>=}3 between day 1 and 126. Dose level was assigned using TITE-CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Results: Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. Conclusions: High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local

  9. Automata and concurrency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priese, L

    1983-07-01

    The author presents a precise notion of a realization (or simulation) of one concurrent system by another, and studies the relations of modular concurrent systems and non-persistent (i.e. With conflicts) concurrent systems in an automata theoretical style. He introduces a conception of realization that obeys three requirements: it allows for proper hierarchies in certain classes of concurrent systems; it allows for normal-form theorems, and the standard constructions of the literature remain realizations in formal concept; and it clarifies some counterintuitive examples. Further, although this realization conception is developed to translate the computational aspects of concurrent systems, it also gives a formal tool for the handling of synchronization problems. 38 references.

  10. Clinical significance of determination of serum MMP9 and P III P levels in patients with pulmonary interstitial fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Cuiying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of determination of serum matrix metallo-proteinase-9 (MMP 9 ) and type III pro-collagen peptide (PIIIP) levels in patients with pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. Methods: Serum MMP 9 (with ELISA) and PIIIP(with RIA) levels were determined in 46 patients with pulmonary interstitial fibrosis and 30 controls. Results: Serum MMP 9 and PIIIP levels in patients with pulmonary interstitial fibrosis were significantly higher than those in controls (P 9 and PIIIP might be used as clinical diagnostic markers for pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. (authors)

  11. Data refinement for true concurrency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Dongol

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The majority of modern systems exhibit sophisticated concurrent behaviour, where several system components modify and observe the system state with fine-grained atomicity. Many systems (e.g., multi-core processors, real-time controllers also exhibit truly concurrent behaviour, where multiple events can occur simultaneously. This paper presents data refinement defined in terms of an interval-based framework, which includes high-level operators that capture non-deterministic expression evaluation. By modifying the type of an interval, our theory may be specialised to cover data refinement of both discrete and continuous systems. We present an interval-based encoding of forward simulation, then prove that our forward simulation rule is sound with respect to our data refinement definition. A number of rules for decomposing forward simulation proofs over both sequential and parallel composition are developed.

  12. ppt level detection of samarium(III) with a coated graphite sensor based on an antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Rezapour, Morteza; Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Haghgoo, Soheila

    2004-07-01

    N-[2-[4-[[[(Cyclohexylamino)carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl]phenyl]ethyl]-5-methyl pyrazine carboxamide (glipizid) was explored as an electro-active material for preparing a polymeric membrane-based sensor selective to samarium ions. The membrane incorporated 30% poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), 53% benzyl acetate (BA), 11% glipizid and 6% sodium tetraphenyl borate. When coated on the surface of a graphite electrode, it exhibits Nernstian responses in the concentration range of 1.0 x 10(-5) to 1.0 x 10(-10) M, with a detection limit of 8.0 x 10(-11)M samarium. The electrode shows high selectivity towards samarium over several cations (alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions), and specially lanthanide ions. The proposed sensor has a very short response time (pH range for at least ten weeks. It was used as an indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of Sm(III) ions with an EDTA solution, and for determination of samarium in binary and ternary mixtures.

  13. Concurrent radiochemotherapy in advanced hypopharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukarski Dusko

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concurrent platinum-based radiochemotherapy has been recommended as a standard of care in patients with locally advanced squamous cell head and neck carcinomas. Unfortunately, there is a lack of level one evidence on best treatment approach for advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. This report aims to summarize the results of our study on concurrent radiochemotherapy in patients with advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. Methods A retrospective analysis of 41 patients with stage III-IV hypopharyngeal cancer was performed. All patients were treated with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy and received 70 Gy in 35 fractions (2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week. In dependence of the period when radiotherapy was realized, two different treatment techniques were used. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 30 mg/m2 given on a weekly basis. Results The median age was 52 years (range 29-70. Stage IV disease was recognized in 73.2% of the patients. Complete response rates at the primary site and at the metastatic neck lymph nodes were 68.3% and 36.6%, respectively. A complete composite response was present in 27 patients (65.9%. Median follow-up was 13 months (range 7-36. Distant metastases as initial failure occurred in 7 patients (46.7%. The 2-year local relapse-free survival and regional relapse-free survival rates were 55.2% and 75.8%, respectively. The 2-year locoregional relapse-free survival rate was 51.3%. The 2-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 29.3% and 32.8%, respectively. Confluent mucositis was developed in 46.3% of patients. Leucopenia grade 1 was the most frequent hematological toxicity. The median weight loss at the end of treatment was 12% (range 5-21. The worst grade of late toxicity was most commonly pronounced in the skin and in the subcutaneous tissue. Conclusions Based on unsatisfactory results in our study we suggest that the use of sequential radiochemotherapy or chemotherapy

  14. High-Level Waste Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team Final Report, Volumes I, II, and III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccolo, S.F.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the process used and results obtained by the High Level Waste Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team to select a primary and backup alternative salt disposition method for the Savannah River Site

  15. Channel's Concurrence and Quantum Teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Yin-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    Concurrence can measure the entanglement property of a system. If the channel is a pure state, positive concurrence state can afford the good performance in the teleportation process. If the channel ia a mixed state, positive concurrence state cannot assure the good performance in the teleportation. The conditions of the positive concurrence and the quantum teleportation in the Heisenberg spin ring is derived.

  16. Characterizing Distributed Concurrent Engineering Teams: A Descriptive Framework for Aerospace Concurrent Engineering Design Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Hihn, Jairus; Warfield, Keith

    2011-01-01

    As aerospace missions grow larger and more technically complex in the face of ever tighter budgets, it will become increasingly important to use concurrent engineering methods in the development of early conceptual designs because of their ability to facilitate rapid assessments and trades in a cost-efficient manner. To successfully accomplish these complex missions with limited funding, it is also essential to effectively leverage the strengths of individuals and teams across government, industry, academia, and international agencies by increased cooperation between organizations. As a result, the existing concurrent engineering teams will need to increasingly engage in distributed collaborative concurrent design. This paper is an extension of a recent white paper written by the Concurrent Engineering Working Group, which details the unique challenges of distributed collaborative concurrent engineering. This paper includes a short history of aerospace concurrent engineering, and defines the terms 'concurrent', 'collaborative' and 'distributed' in the context of aerospace concurrent engineering. In addition, a model for the levels of complexity of concurrent engineering teams is presented to provide a way to conceptualize information and data flow within these types of teams.

  17. Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development. III. Water level fluctuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-10-01

    Potential environmental impacts in reservoirs and downstream river reaches below dams that may be caused by the water level fluctuation resulting from development and operation of small scale (under 25MW) hydroelectric projects are identified. The impacts discussed will be of potential concern at only those small-scale hydroelectric projects that are operated in a store and release (peaking) mode. Potential impacts on physical and chemical characteristics in reservoirs resulting from water level fluctuation include resuspension and redistribution of bank and bed sediment; leaching of soluble organic matter from sediment in the littoral zone; and changes in water quality resulting from changes in sediment and nutrient trap efficiency. Potential impacts on reservoir biota as a result of water level fluctuation include habitat destruction and the resulting partial or total loss of aquatic species; changes in habitat quality, which result in reduced standing crop and production of aquatic biota; and possible shifts in species diversity. The potential physical effects of water level fluctuation on downstream systems below dams are streambed and bank erosion and water quality problems related to resuspension and redistribution of these materials. Potential biological impacts of water level fluctuation on downstream systems below dams result from changes in current velocity, habitat reduction, and alteration in food supply. These alterations, either singly or in combination, can adversely affect aquatic populations below dams. The nature and potential significance of adverse impacts resulting from water level fluctuation are discussed. Recommendations for site-specific evaluation of water level fluctuation at small-scale hydroelectric projects are presented.

  18. Algebraic topology and concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fajstrup, Lisbeth; Raussen, Martin; Goubault, Eric

    2006-01-01

    We show in this article that some concepts from homotopy theory, in algebraic topology,are relevant for studying concurrent programs. We exhibit a natural semantics of semaphore programs, based on partially ordered topological spaces, which are studied up to “elastic deformation” or homotopy...... differences between ordinary and directed homotopy through examples. We also relate the topological view to a combinatorial view of concurrent programs closer to transition systems, through the notion of a cubical set. Finally we apply some of these concepts to the proof of the safeness of a two...

  19. A Concurrent Logical Relation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Lars; Sieczkowski, Filip; Thamsborg, Jacob Junker

    2012-01-01

    We present a logical relation for showing the correctness of program transformations based on a new type-and-effect system for a concurrent extension of an ML-like language with higher-order functions, higher-order store and dynamic memory allocation. We show how to use our model to verify a number....... To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such result for a concurrent higher-order language with higher-order store and dynamic memory allocation....

  20. Frequency and pattern of skin diseases among uniformed personnel at united nations level iii hospital-darfur, sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, N.; Suhail, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the frequency and pattern of skin diseases among uniformed personnel at a United Nations peace-keeping mission Level III hospital at Darfur, Sudan. Design: A descriptive study Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at dermatology outpatient department of United Nations peace keeping mission (UNAMID) level III Hospital from Jan 2010-2011. Patients and Methods: All soldiers/ policemen of either gender reporting to dermatology department of the hospital for the first time during the study period were registered after informed consent. A specially designed proforma was filled for each patient separately. In addition to date of reporting, demographic profile and disease information were noted. The data was managed and analyzed using SPSS-14. Results: There were a total of 438 uniformed personnel of the age ranging from 20-52 years (mean of 34.30+6.43). Eczema in various forms was the most common disease (21.9%), followed by fungal infections (10%) and melasma (08.9%). One hundred and seventy five (40.0%) patients had the disease 02 months to >30 years before their deployment, whereas 263 (60%) developed the disease 03 days to 01 year after deployment. Conclusion: Eczema, fungal infections and melasma were the commonest skin problems among uniformed personnel. Forty percent of these had dermatological problems before deployment. (author)

  1. IDEAL-CRT: A Phase 1/2 Trial of Isotoxic Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Stage II/III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, David B., E-mail: david.landau@kcl.ac.uk [Guy' s & St. Thomas' NHS Trust, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Hughes, Laura [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Baker, Angela [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Bates, Andrew T. [Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Bayne, Michael C. [Poole Hospital, Poole (United Kingdom); Counsell, Nicholas [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Garcia-Alonso, Angel [North Wales Cancer Centre, Rhyl (United Kingdom); Harden, Susan V. [Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hicks, Jonathan D. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Hughes, Simon R. [Guy' s & St. Thomas' NHS Trust, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Illsley, Marianne C. [Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guilford (United Kingdom); Khan, Iftekhar [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Laurence, Virginia [Poole Hospital, Poole (United Kingdom); Malik, Zafar; Mayles, Helen; Mayles, William Philip M. [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Miles, Elizabeth [Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mohammed, Nazia [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ngai, Yenting [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Parsons, Emma [Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To report toxicity and early survival data for IDEAL-CRT, a trial of dose-escalated concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for non-small cell lung cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients received tumor doses of 63 to 73 Gy in 30 once-daily fractions over 6 weeks with 2 concurrent cycles of cisplatin and vinorelbine. They were assigned to 1 of 2 groups according to esophageal dose. In group 1, tumor doses were determined by an experimental constraint on maximum esophageal dose, which was escalated following a 6 + 6 design from 65 Gy through 68 Gy to 71 Gy, allowing an esophageal maximum tolerated dose to be determined from early and late toxicities. Tumor doses for group 2 patients were determined by other tissue constraints, often lung. Overall survival, progression-free survival, tumor response, and toxicity were evaluated for both groups combined. Results: Eight centers recruited 84 patients: 13, 12, and 10, respectively, in the 65-Gy, 68-Gy, and 71-Gy cohorts of group 1; and 49 in group 2. The mean prescribed tumor dose was 67.7 Gy. Five grade 3 esophagitis and 3 grade 3 pneumonitis events were observed across both groups. After 1 fatal esophageal perforation in the 71-Gy cohort, 68 Gy was declared the esophageal maximum tolerated dose. With a median follow-up of 35 months, median overall survival was 36.9 months, and overall survival and progression-free survival were 87.8% and 72.0%, respectively, at 1 year and 68.0% and 48.5% at 2 years. Conclusions: IDEAL-CRT achieved significant treatment intensification with acceptable toxicity and promising survival. The isotoxic design allowed the esophageal maximum tolerated dose to be identified from relatively few patients.

  2. The impact of concurrent granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: A double-blind placebo-controlled prospective Phase III study by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9901

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Janice K.; Swann, Suzanne; LeVeque, Francis; Scarantino, Charles W.; Johnson, Darlene J.; Chen, Allan; Fortin, Andre; Pollock, JonDavid; Kim, Harold; Ang, Kian K.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Based on early clinical evidence of potential mucosal protection by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the efficacy and safety of GM-CSF in reducing the severity and duration of mucosal injury and pain (mucositis) associated with curative radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with head-and-neck cancer with radiation ports encompassing >50% of oral cavity and/or oropharynx. Standard RT ports were used to cover the primary tumor and regional lymphatics at risk in standard fractionation to 60-70 Gy. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was allowed. Patients were randomized to receive subcutaneous injection of GM-CSF 250 μg/m 2 or placebo 3 times a week. Mucosal reaction was assessed during the course of RT using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and the protocol-specific scoring system. Results: Between October 2000 and September 2002, 130 patients from 36 institutions were accrued. Nine patients (7%) were excluded from the analysis, 3 as a result of drug unavailability. More than 80% of the patients participated in the quality-of-life endpoint of this study. The GM-CSF did not cause any increase in toxicity compared with placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in the average mean mucositis score in the GM-CSF and placebo arms by a t test (p = 0.4006). Conclusion: This placebo-controlled, randomized study demonstrated no significant effect of GM-CSF given concurrently compared with placebo in reducing the severity or duration of RT-induced mucositis in patients undergoing definitive RT for head-and-neck cancer

  3. Anatomy of a decision III: Evaluation of national disposal at sea program action level efficacy considering 2 chemical action levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apitz, Sabine E; Vivian, Chris; Agius, Suzanne

    2017-11-01

    The potential performance (i.e., ability to separate nontoxic from toxic sediments) of a range of international Disposal at Sea (DaS) chemical Action Levels (ALs) was compared using a sediment chemical and toxicological database. The use of chemistry alone (without the use of further lines of evidence) did not perform well at reducing costs and protecting the environment. Although some approaches for interpreting AL1 results are very effective at filtering out the majority of acutely toxic sediments, without subsequent toxicological assessment, a large proportion of nontoxic sediments would be unnecessarily subjected to treatment and containment, and a number of sublethally toxic sediments would be missed. Even the best tiered systems that collect and evaluate information sequentially resulted in the failure to catch at least some sublethally or acutely toxic sediments. None of the AL2s examined were particularly effective in distinguishing between non-, sublethally, or acutely toxic sediments. Thus, this review did not support the use of chemical AL2s to predict the degree to which sediments will be toxic. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:1086-1099.© 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC). © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC).

  4. Coalgebra, concurrency and control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.M.M. Rutten (Jan)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractCoalgebra is used to generalize notions and techniques from concurrency theory, in order to apply them to problems concerning the supervisory control of discrete event systems. The main ingredients of this approach are the characterization of controllability in terms of (a variant of)

  5. Correctness of concurrent processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.R. Olderog (Ernst-Rüdiger)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractA new notion of correctness for concurrent processes is introduced and investigated. It is a relationship P sat S between process terms P built up from operators of CCS [Mi 80], CSP [Ho 85] and COSY [LTS 79] and logical formulas S specifying sets of finite communication sequences as in

  6. III - Template Metaprogramming for massively parallel scientific computing - Templates for Iteration; Thread-level Parallelism

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Large scale scientific computing raises questions on different levels ranging from the fomulation of the problems to the choice of the best algorithms and their implementation for a specific platform. There are similarities in these different topics that can be exploited by modern-style C++ template metaprogramming techniques to produce readable, maintainable and generic code. Traditional low-level code tend to be fast but platform-dependent, and it obfuscates the meaning of the algorithm. On the other hand, object-oriented approach is nice to read, but may come with an inherent performance penalty. These lectures aim to present he basics of the Expression Template (ET) idiom which allows us to keep the object-oriented approach without sacrificing performance. We will in particular show to to enhance ET to include SIMD vectorization. We will then introduce techniques for abstracting iteration, and introduce thread-level parallelism for use in heavy data-centric loads. We will show to to apply these methods i...

  7. DNA topoisomerase III localizes to centromeres and affects centromeric CENP-A levels in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Norman-Axelsson

    Full Text Available Centromeres are specialized chromatin regions marked by the presence of nucleosomes containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes is intimately linked to DNA topology, and DNA topoisomerases have previously been implicated in the dynamics of canonical H3 nucleosomes. Here we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Top3 and its partner Rqh1 are involved in controlling the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1 at centromeres. Both top3 and rqh1 mutants display defects in chromosome segregation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarrays, we show that Top3, unlike Top1 and Top2, is highly enriched at centromeric central domains, demonstrating that Top3 is the major topoisomerase in this region. Moreover, centromeric Top3 occupancy positively correlates with CENP-A(Cnp1 occupancy. Intriguingly, both top3 and rqh1 mutants display increased relative enrichment of CENP-A(Cnp1 at centromeric central domains. Thus, Top3 and Rqh1 normally limit the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1 in this region. This new role is independent of the established function of Top3 and Rqh1 in homologous recombination downstream of Rad51. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Top3-Rqh1 complex has an important role in controlling centromere DNA topology, which in turn affects the dynamics of CENP-A(Cnp1 nucleosomes.

  8. Diagnostic efficiency of demographically corrected Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III and Wechsler Memory Scale-III indices in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury and lower education levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexandra J; Batchelor, Jennifer; Shores, E Arthur; Jones, Mike

    2009-11-01

    Despite the sensitivity of neuropsychological tests to educational level, improved diagnostic accuracy for demographically corrected scores has yet to be established. Diagnostic efficiency statistics of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III) indices that were corrected for education, sex, and age (demographically corrected) were compared with age corrected indices in individuals aged 16 to 75 years with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 12 years or less education. TBI participants (n = 100) were consecutive referrals to an outpatient rehabilitation service and met careful selection criteria. Controls (n = 100) were obtained from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample. Demographically corrected indices did not provide higher diagnostic efficiency than age corrected indices and this result was supported by reanalysis of the TBI group against a larger and unmatched control group. Processing Speed Index provided comparable diagnostic accuracy to that of combined indices. Demographically corrected indices were associated with higher cut-scores to maximize overall classification, reflecting the upward adjustment of those scores in a lower education sample. This suggests that, in clinical practice, the test results of individuals with limited education may be more accurately interpreted with the application of demographic corrections. Diagnostic efficiency statistics are presented, and future research directions are discussed.

  9. Long-term follow-up of a phase I/II trial of dose escalating three-dimensional conformal thoracic radiation therapy with induction and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel in unresectable stage IIIA/B non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Lee, Carrie B; Moore, Dominic T; Rivera, M Patricia; Halle, Jan; Limentani, Steven; Rosenman, Julian G; Socinski, Mark A

    2008-11-01

    We conducted a modified phase I/II trial investigating the incorporation of three-dimensional conformal thoracic radiation therapy (TCRT) into the treatment paradigm of induction and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with unresectable stage IIIA/B non-small cell lung cancer. Patients received 2 cycles of induction carboplatin (area under the curve of 6) and paclitaxel (225 mg/m) on days 1, and 22. On day 43 concurrent TCRT and weekly x6 of carboplatin (area under the curve = 2) and paclitaxel (45 mg/m) was initiated. The TCRT dose was escalated from 60 to 74 Gy in 4 cohorts (60, 66, 70, and 74 Gy), and the 74 Gy cohort was expanded into a phase II trial. Sixty-two patients were enrolled; the median age 57 years (range, 36-82), 39 were male (63%), 61 (98%) had a performance status of 0 or 1, 28 (45%) had stage IIIA disease, 21 (34%) had >5% weight loss, and the median forced expiratory volume 1 = 2.10 liters (range, 1.02-3.75). With a median follow-up for survivors of approximately 9 years (range, 7-11 years) the median progression-free survival, time to tumor progression, and overall survival (OS) (with 95% confidence intervals) were 10 (8.5-17), 15 (9-50), and 25 months (18-37), respectively. The 5-year progression-free survival and OS rates were 21% (12-32%) and 27% (17-39%), respectively. The 10-year OS rate was 14% (7-25%). The long term survival rate compares favorably to other treatment approaches for stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

  10. Comparison of survival and toxicities of concurrent radiotherapy with Carboplatin/Paclitaxel or Cisplatin/Etoposide in unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancers: retrospective analysis in the Department of Pneumology of CHU Nancy between 2008 and 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    In concomitant chemo-radiotherapy treatment for inoperable stage III NSCLC, different combinations of chemotherapies have been recommended. The objective of this study was to compare progression-free survival, overall survival, and tolerability of two treatment regimens: Cisplatin-etoposide concomitant radio-chemotherapy versus concomitant carboplatin-Paclitaxel based radio-chemotherapy in these patients. A retrospective analysis of 62 patients treated with concomitant radio-chemotherapy for inoperable stage III NSCLC has been carried out in the Department of Pneumology (University Hospital of Nancy). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the chemotherapy protocol, group 1: Cisplatin-etoposide (27 patients) and group 2: Carboplatin-Paclitaxel (35 patients). The two groups were comparable in terms of age and gender (mean age 58 in group 1 versus age 61 in group 2, and 85 pc of men in group 1 versus 80 pc in group 2). The median overall survival was 19 months in group 1 versus 15.3 months in group 2 (p = 0.22). The median progression-free survival was higher in group 1, 9 months versus 3.3 months in group 2 (p = 0.01). Hematologic toxicity was higher in group 1 than in group 2 (neutropenia 85.2 pc versus 54.3 pc, p = 0.01, anemia 92.3 pc versus 54.3 pc, p = 0.001). Radiation esophagitis and radiation pneumonitis rates were higher in group 1 than in group 2: 44.4 pc versus 11.4 pc (p = 0.01), and 44.4 pc versus 11.4 pc (p = 0.001) respectively. In this mono-centric and retrospective study, the Cisplatin-etoposide - thoracic radiotherapy combination to treat inoperable stage III NSCLC was associated with a significantly higher progression-free survival than the Carboplatin-Paclitaxel-radiotherapy combination. This increase in survival was accompanied by a significantly higher hematological and organ toxicity [fr

  11. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Operations, Level III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    A Level III pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator to evaluate pollution prevention (P2) options for various waste streams: The main objective of this study was to identify and evaluate options to reduce the quantities of each waste stream generated by the TSCA Incinerator operations to realize significant environmental and/or economic benefits from P2. For each of the waste streams, P2 options were evaluated following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hierarchy to (1) reduce the quantity of waste generated, (2) recycle the waste, and/or (3) use alternate waste treatment or segregation methods. This report provides process descriptions, identification and evaluation of P2 options, and final recommendations

  12. A phase I/II trial of intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G) in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Schipper, Mathew; Francis, Isaac R; Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel; Simeone, Diane M; Sonnenday, Christopher; Abrams, Ross; Leslie, William; Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M

    2012-12-01

    Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of ≥ 1,500/mm(3), platelets ≥ 100,000/mm(3), creatinine CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neonatal pleural effusions in a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Barbosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusions are rare in the newborn. Still, being familiar with this condition is relevant given its association with a wide range of disorders. Only two large series of cases on this matter have been published, with no solid conclusions established. The aim of this study is to determine the etiology, management and prognosis of pleural effusions in a population of high-risk neonates.The authors performed a retrospective study in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of "Hospital de São João", Porto (Portugal, between 1997 and 2014, of all newborns with the diagnosis of pleural effusion, chylothorax, hemothorax, empyema, fetal hydrops or leakage of total parenteral nutrition (TPN.Eighty-two newborns were included, 48 males and 34 females. Pleural effusions were congenital in 19 (23.2% newborns and acquired in 63 (76.8%. Fetal hydrops was the most frequent cause (15 cases, 78.9% of congenital effusions while postoperative after intrathoracic surgery was the most common cause (39 cases, 61.9% of acquired effusions, followed by leakage of TPN (13 cases, 20.6%. Chylothorax was the most common type of effusion (41.5% of cases. Pleural effusions after intrathoracic surgery were mainly (64.1% chylothoraces. Regarding use of octreotide for treatment of acquired chylous effusions, the comparative analysis showed no statistical differences between the group of alive newborns who received octreotide and the group who did not. Twenty-seven (32.9% newborns died; the causes of death were related to underlying diseases and not to the pleural effusion. Clinical outcome is generally good, except in hydropic neonates. Blood albumin level appears to be predictive of prognosis and further investigation on its clinical significance should be encouraged.

  14. Concurrent credit portfolio losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicking, Joachim; Guhr, Thomas; Schäfer, Rudi

    2018-01-01

    We consider the problem of concurrent portfolio losses in two non-overlapping credit portfolios. In order to explore the full statistical dependence structure of such portfolio losses, we estimate their empirical pairwise copulas. Instead of a Gaussian dependence, we typically find a strong asymmetry in the copulas. Concurrent large portfolio losses are much more likely than small ones. Studying the dependences of these losses as a function of portfolio size, we moreover reveal that not only large portfolios of thousands of contracts, but also medium-sized and small ones with only a few dozens of contracts exhibit notable portfolio loss correlations. Anticipated idiosyncratic effects turn out to be negligible. These are troublesome insights not only for investors in structured fixed-income products, but particularly for the stability of the financial sector. JEL codes: C32, F34, G21, G32, H81.

  15. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valencia, Frank Dan

    Concurrent constraint programming (ccp) is a formalism for concurrency in which agents interact with one another by telling (adding) and asking (reading) information in a shared medium. Temporal ccp extends ccp by allowing agents to be constrained by time conditions. This dissertation studies...... temporal ccp by developing a process calculus called ntcc. The ntcc calculus generalizes the tcc model, the latter being a temporal ccp model for deterministic and synchronouss timed reactive systems. The calculus is built upon few basic ideas but it captures several aspects of timed systems. As tcc, ntcc...... structures, robotic devises, multi-agent systems and music applications. The calculus is provided with a denotational semantics that captures the reactive computations of processes in the presence of arbitrary environments. The denotation is proven to be fully-abstract for a substantial fragment...

  16. Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, K.K.

    1985-01-01

    The principal objective of combining chemotherapy with radiotherapy (XRT) for the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer is to improve the therapeutic ratio through the enhancement of local control and reduction of distant metastases without excessively enhancing normal tissue effects. Improved tumour control can result from sole additivity of either therapy or direct interactions between drug and radiation leading to increased tumour cell kill. Chemotherapy may sensitize the cells to radiation, interfere with repair of sublethal or potentially lethal radiation damage, induce cell synchrony, and reduce tumour mass leading to reoxygenation and decreased fraction of resistant hypoxic cells. Radiation may improve drug accessibility to tumour cells and reduce tumour volume leading to increased cell proliferation and chemosensitivity. If the enhanced effects of combined therapy are purely additive, then the two modalities can be administered either sequentially or concurrently with the same results. However, if the enhanced effects result from the direct interaction between drug and radiation, it is necessary that the two modalities be administered concurrently and in close temporal proximity. This review summarizes the results of clinical studies in which chemotherapy was administered concurrently during the course of radiotherapy for patients with previously untreated advanced squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck

  17. High performance yellow organic electroluminescent devices by doping iridium(III) complex into host materials with stepwise energy levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Rongzhen; Zhou, Liang, E-mail: zhoul@ciac.ac.cn; Jiang, Yunlong; Li, Yanan; Zhao, Xuesen; Zhang, Hongjie, E-mail: hongjie@ciac.ac.cn

    2015-10-15

    In this work, we aim to further improve the electroluminescent (EL) performances of a yellow light-emitting iridium(III) complex by designing double light-emitting layers (EMLs) devices having stepwise energy levels. Compared with single-EML devices, these designed double-EML devices showed improved EL efficiency and brightness attributed to better balance in carriers. In addition, the stepwise distribution in energy levels of host materials is instrumental in broadening the recombination zone, thus delaying the roll-off of EL efficiency. Based on the investigation of carriers' distribution, device structure was further optimized by adjusting the thickness of deposited layers. Finally, yellow EL device (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.446, 0.542)) with maximum current efficiency, power efficiency and brightness up to 78.62 cd/A (external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 21.1%), 82.28 lm/W and 72,713 cd/m{sup 2}, respectively, was obtained. Even at the high brightness of 1000 cd/m{sup 2}, EL efficiency as high as 65.54 cd/A (EQE=17.6%) can be retained. - Highlights: • Yellow electroluminescent devices were designed and fabricated. • P-type and n-type materials having stepwise energy levels were chosen as host materials. • Better balance of holes and electrons causes the enhanced efficiencies. • Improved carriers' trapping suppresses the emission of host material.

  18. Two Dimensional Effective Electron Mass at the Fermi Level in Quantum Wells of III-V, Ternary and Quaternary Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, S; Chatterjee, B; Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the influence of strong electric field on the two dimensional (2D)effective electron mass (EEM) at the Fermi level in quantum wells of III-V, ternary and quaternary semiconductors within the framework of k x p formalism by formulating a new 2D electron energy spectrum. It appears taking quantum wells of InSb, InAs, Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te and In(1-x)Ga(x)As(1-y)P(y) lattice matched to InP as examples that the EEM increases with decreasing film thickness, increasing electric field and increases with increasing surface electron concentration exhibiting spikey oscillations because of the crossing over of the Fermi level by the quantized level in quantum wells and the quantized oscillation occurs when the Fermi energy touches the sub-band energy. The electric field makes the mass quantum number dependent and the oscillatory mass introduces quantum number dependent mass anisotropy in addition to energy. The EEM increases with decreasing alloy composition where the variations are totally band structure dependent. Under certain limiting conditions all the results for all the cases get simplified into the well-known parabolic energy bands and thus confirming the compatibility test. The content of this paper finds three applications in the fields of nano-science and technology.

  19. Patients survey after concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimane, Toshikazku; Egawa, Syunya; Mori, Tomoaki; Ono, Tomohiro; Monden, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Sei; Sanbe, Takeyuki; Suzaki, Harumi

    2010-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cancer of head and neck is becoming more popular as the treatment of choice. It is considered to maintain the quality of life (QOL) of patients better than operative treatments in terms of preserving the functions, organs, and figure, but recently we cannot necessarily say that it maintains the QOL of patients better than operative treatments because its complications after therapy disturb daily life. We report the results of a questionnaire survey about complications after therapy, problems during therapy, improvements, and satisfaction level directed at patients with cancer of the head and neck who received Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for the purpose of ascertaining if patients can actually maintain their QOL after therapy. As a result, the most controversial problem was mouth dryness, but the symptom improved as the follow-up duration got longer. As for the satisfaction level, 'very-satisfied' and 'almost-satisfied' were more than 90%, so we concluded that the QOL of patients is maintained after therapy, while there are still improvements to be made. We also concluded that we should continue to make improvement and try to improve the QOL of patients during and after therapy. (author)

  20. EPA Level III Ecoregions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The ecoregions shown here have been derived from Omernik (1987) and from refinements of Omernik's framework that have been made for other projects. These ongoing or...

  1. Concurrency in product realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael J.

    1994-03-01

    Technology per se does not provide a competitive advantage. Timely exploitation of technology is what gives the competitive edge, and this demands a major shift in the product development process and management of the industrial enterprise. `Teaming to win' is more than a management theme; it is the disciplined engineering practice that is essential to success in today's global marketplace. Teaming supports the concurrent engineering practices required to integrate the activities of people responsible for product realization through achievement of shorter development cycles, lower costs, and defect-free products.

  2. Domain Theory for Concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Mikkel

    and associated comonads, it highlights the role of linearity in concurrent computation. Two choices of comonad yield two expressive metalanguages for higher-order processes, both arising from canonical constructions in the model. Their denotational semantics are fully abstract with respect to contextual...... equivalence. One language, called HOPLA for Higher-Order Process LAnguage, derives from an exponential of linear logic. It can be viewed as an extension of the simply-typed lambda calculus with CCS-like nondeterministic sum and prefix operations, in which types express the form of computation path of which...

  3. Mastering concurrency in Go

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyra, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    A practical approach covering everything you need to know to get up and running with Go, starting with the basics and imparting increasingly more detail as the examples and topics become more complicated. The book utilizes a casual, conversational style, rife with actual code and historical anecdotes for perspective, as well as usable and extensible example applications. This book is intended for systems developers and programmers with some experience in either Go and/or concurrent programming who wish to become fluent in building high-performance applications that scale by leveraging single-c

  4. Morse Theory and Concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    2003-01-01

    The work is intended to provide some insight about concurrency theory using ideas from geometry and algebraic topology. We define a topological space containing all traces of execution of the computer program and the information about how time flows. This is the main difference with standard...... topological reasoning in which there is no information about relation "in time" among points. The main task is to define equivalence of paths reflecting execution of a program. We use the notion of homotopy history equivalence relation. The model space considered in this work is a differentiable manifold...

  5. Concurrency at work with Go

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    High Energy and Nuclear Physics (HENP) libraries are now required to be increasingly multi-thread-safe, if not multi-thread-friendly and multi-threaded. This is usually done using the new constructs and library components offered by the C++11 and C++14 standards. These components are however quite low-level (threads, mutexes, locks, ...) and hard to use and compose, or easy to misuse. However, Go -- a somewhat new language -- provides a set of better building blocks for tackling concurrency: goroutines and channels. This language is now used by the cloud industry at large; docker/moby, rkt, Kubernetes, OpenShift, etc... are obvious flagships for Go. It is also used in other interesting places like SpaceX's telemetry monitoring system and in the New York Times', YouTube's or Disney's content delivery infrastructures. In this talk, we will describe the building blocks of Go and see how they are combined to easily create concurrent programs that grow with grace, are fast to compile and deploy, but also easy to...

  6. Phase II Trial of Combined Modality Therapy With Concurrent Topotecan Plus Radiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy for Unresectable Stage III and Selected Stage IV Non-Small-Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seung, Steven K.; Ross, Helen J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) and the role of consolidation chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unknown. Topotecan is active against NSCLC, can safely be combined with RT at effective systemic doses, and can be given by continuous infusion, making it an attractive study agent against locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In this pilot study, 20 patients were treated with infusion topotecan 0.4 mg/m 2 /d with three-dimensional conformal RT to 63 Gy both delivered Monday through Friday for 7 weeks. Patients without progression underwent consolidation chemotherapy with etoposide and a platinum agent for one cycle followed by two cycles of docetaxel. The study endpoints were treatment response, time to progression, survival, and toxicity. Results: Of the 20 patients, 19 completed induction chemoradiotherapy and 13 completed consolidation. Of the 20 patients, 18 had a partial response and 1 had stable disease after induction chemoradiotherapy. The 3-year overall survival rate was 32% (median, 18 months). The local and distant progression-free survival rate was 30% (median, 21 months) and 58% (median, not reached), respectively. Three patients developed central nervous system metastases, 1 within 228 days, 1 within 252 days, and 1 within 588 days. Three patients had pulmonary emboli. Therapy was well tolerated with 1 of 20 developing Grade 4 lymphopenia. Grade 3 hematologic toxicity was seen in 17 of 20 patients but was not clinically significant. Other Grade 3 toxicities included esophagitis in 3, esophageal stricture in 2, fatigue in 8, and weight loss in 1. Grade 3 pneumonitis occurred in 6 of 20 patients. Conclusion: Continuous infusion topotecan with RT was well tolerated and active in the treatment of poor-risk patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC

  7. French multicenter phase III randomized study testing concurrent twice-a-day radiotherapy and cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (BiRCF) in unresectable pharyngeal carcinoma: Results at 2 years (FNCLCC-GORTEC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Benezery, Karen; Dassonville, Olivier; Magne, Nicolas; Poissonnet, Gilles; Ramaioli, Alain; Lemanski, Claire; Bourdin, Sylvain; Tortochaux, Jacques; Peyrade, Frederic; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Chamorey, Emmanuel Phar; Vallicioni, Jacques; Seng Hang; Alzieu, Claude; Gery, Bernard; Chauvel, Pierre; Schneider, Maurice; Santini, Jose; Demard, Francois; Calais, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Background: Unresectable carcinomas of the oropharynx and hypopharynx still have a poor long-term prognosis. Following a previous phase II study, this phase III multicenter trial was conducted between November 1997 and March 2002. Methods: Nontreated, strictly unresectable cases were eligible. Twice-daily radiation: two fractions of 1.2 Gy/day, 5 days per week, with no split (D1 → D46). Total tumor doses: 80.4 Gy/46 day (oropharynx), 75.6 Gy/44 day (hypopharynx). Chemotherapy (arm B): Cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 (D1, D22, D43); 5FU, continuous infusion (D1 → D5), 750 mg/m 2 /day cycle 1; 430 mg/m 2 /day cycles 2 and 3. Results: A total of 163 evaluable patients. Grade 3-4 acute mucositis 82.6% arm B/69.5% arm A (NS); Grade 3-4 neutropenia 33.3% arm B/2.4% arm A (p < 0.05). Enteral nutrition through gastrostomy tube was more frequent in arm B before treatment and at 6 months (p < 0.01). At 24 months, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and specific survival (SS) were significantly better in arm B. OS: 37.8% arm B vs. 20.1% arm A (p = 0.038); DFS: 48.2% vs. 25.2% (p = 0.002); SS: 44.5% vs. 30.2% (p 0.021). No significant difference between the two arms in the amount of side effects at 1 and 2 years. Conclusion: For these unresectable cases, chemoradiation provides better outcome than radiation alone, even with an 'aggressive' dose-intensity radiotherapy schedule

  8. Auditing of Monitoring and Respiratory Support Equipment in a Level III-C Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bergon-Sendin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Random safety audits (RSAs are a safety tool but have not been widely used in hospitals. Objectives. To determine the frequency of proper use of equipment safety mechanisms in relation to monitoring and mechanical ventilation by performing RSAs. The study also determined whether factors related to the patient, time period, or characteristics of the area of admission influenced how the device safety systems were used. Methods. A prospective observational study was conducted in a level III-C Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU during 2012. 87 days were randomly selected. Appropriate overall use was defined when all evaluated variables were correctly programmed in the audited device. Results. A total of 383 monitor and ventilator audits were performed. The Kappa coefficient of interobserver agreement was 0.93. The rate of appropriate overall use of the monitors and respiratory support equipment was 33.68%. Significant differences were found with improved usage during weekends, OR 1.85 (1.12–3.06, p=0.01, and during the late shift (3 pm to 10 pm, OR 1.59 (1.03–2.4, p=0.03. Conclusions. Equipment safety systems of monitors and ventilators are not properly used. To improve patient safety, we should identify which alarms are really needed and where the difficulties lie for the correct alarm programming.

  9. Evaluating the environmental fate of pharmaceuticals using a level III model based on poly-parameter linear free energy relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukowska, Barbara; Breivik, Knut; Wania, Frank

    2006-01-01

    We recently proposed how to expand the applicability of multimedia models towards polar organic chemicals by expressing environmental phase partitioning with the help of poly-parameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs). Here we elaborate on this approach by applying it to three pharmaceutical substances. A PP-LFER-based version of a Level III fugacity model calculates overall persistence, concentrations and intermedia fluxes of polar and non-polar organic chemicals between air, water, soil and sediments at steady-state. Illustrative modeling results for the pharmaceuticals within a defined coastal region are presented and discussed. The model results are highly sensitive to the degradation rate in water and the equilibrium partitioning between organic carbon and water, suggesting that an accurate description of this particular partitioning equilibrium is essential in order to obtain reliable predictions of environmental fate. The PP-LFER based modeling approach furthermore illustrates that the greatest mobility in aqueous phases may be experienced by pharmaceuticals that combines a small molecular size with strong H-acceptor properties

  10. Evaluating the environmental fate of pharmaceuticals using a level III model based on poly-parameter linear free energy relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zukowska, Barbara [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Faculty, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 G. Narutowicza St., 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Breivik, Knut [NILU- Norwegian Institute for Air Research, P.O. Box 100, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway)]. E-mail: knut.breivik@nilu.no; Wania, Frank [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Scarborough, Ontario, M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2006-04-15

    We recently proposed how to expand the applicability of multimedia models towards polar organic chemicals by expressing environmental phase partitioning with the help of poly-parameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs). Here we elaborate on this approach by applying it to three pharmaceutical substances. A PP-LFER-based version of a Level III fugacity model calculates overall persistence, concentrations and intermedia fluxes of polar and non-polar organic chemicals between air, water, soil and sediments at steady-state. Illustrative modeling results for the pharmaceuticals within a defined coastal region are presented and discussed. The model results are highly sensitive to the degradation rate in water and the equilibrium partitioning between organic carbon and water, suggesting that an accurate description of this particular partitioning equilibrium is essential in order to obtain reliable predictions of environmental fate. The PP-LFER based modeling approach furthermore illustrates that the greatest mobility in aqueous phases may be experienced by pharmaceuticals that combines a small molecular size with strong H-acceptor properties.

  11. Randomized Phase III Trial to Test Accelerated Versus Standard Fractionation in Combination With Concurrent Cisplatin for Head and Neck Carcinomas in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0129 Trial: Long-Term Report of Efficacy and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix; Zhang, Qiang; Ang, K. Kian; Weber, Randal S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Soulieres, Denis; Kim, Harold; Silverman, Craig; Raben, Adam; Galloway, Thomas J.; Fortin, André; Gore, Elizabeth; Westra, William H.; Chung, Christine H.; Jordan, Richard C.; Gillison, Maura L.; List, Marcie; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We tested the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin plus accelerated fractionation with a concomitant boost (AFX-C) versus standard fractionation (SFX) in locally advanced head and neck carcinoma (LA-HNC). Patients and Methods Patients had stage III to IV carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, or larynx. Radiation therapy schedules were 70 Gy in 35 fractions over 7 weeks (SFX) or 72 Gy in 42 fractions over 6 weeks (AFX-C). Cisplatin doses were 100 mg/m2 once every 3 weeks for two (AFX-C) or three (SFX) cycles. Toxicities were scored by using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by using the one-sided log-rank test. Locoregional failure (LRF) and distant metastasis (DM) rates were estimated by using the cumulative incidence method and Gray's test. Results In all, 721 of 743 patients were analyzable (361, SFX; 360, AFX-C). At a median follow-up of 7.9 years (range, 0.3 to 10.1 years) for 355 surviving patients, no differences were observed in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.96; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.18; P = .37; 8-year survival, 48% v 48%), PFS (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.24; P = .52; 8-year estimate, 42% v 41%), LRF (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.38; P = .78; 8-year estimate, 37% v 39%), or DM (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.24; P = .16; 8-year estimate, 15% v 13%). For oropharyngeal cancer, p16-positive patients had better OS than p16-negative patients (HR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.42; P < .001; 8-year survival, 70.9% v 30.2%). There were no statistically significant differences in the grade 3 to 5 acute or late toxicities between the two arms and p-16 status. Conclusion When combined with cisplatin, AFX-C neither improved outcome nor increased late toxicity in patients with LA-HNC. Long-term high survival

  12. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshab Rijal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC; they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  13. Parental social support, coping strategies, resilience factors, stress, anxiety and depression levels in parents of children with MPS III (Sanfilippo syndrome) or children with intellectual disabilities (ID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Sheena; Cross, Elaine; Wraith, James Edmond; Jones, Simon; Mahon, Louise; Lomax, Michelle; Bigger, Brian; Hare, Dougal

    2013-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III, Sanfilippo syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder, caused by a deficiency in one of four enzymes involved in the catabolism of the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulphate. It is a degenerative disorder, with a progressive decline in children's intellectual and physical functioning. There is currently no cure for the disorder. To date there is a paucity of research on how this disorder impacts parents psychological functioning. Specifically, research in the area has failed to employ adequate control groups to assess if the impact of this disorder on parents psychological functioning differs from parenting a child with intellectual disability (ID). The current study examined child behaviour and parental psychological functioning in 23 parents of children with MPS III and 23 parents of children with ID. Parents completed postal questionnaires about their child's behaviour and abilities and their own psychological functioning. Parents of children with MPS III reported fewer behavioural difficulties as their child aged, more severe level of intellectual disability, and similar levels of perceived social support, coping techniques, stress, anxiety and depression levels as parents of children with ID. Both groups of parents scored above the clinical cut off for anxiety and depression. Parents of children with MPS III rated themselves as significantly less future-orientated and goal directed than parents of children with ID. Services should develop support packages for parents of children with MPS III that incorporate an understanding of the unique stressors and current-difficulty approach of this population. Future research should examine gender differences between parental psychological functioning, using mixed qualitative and quantitative approaches, and utilise matched developmental level and typically developing control groups.

  14. Rethinking serializable multiversion concurrency control

    OpenAIRE

    Faleiro, Jose M.; Abadi, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-versioned database systems have the potential to significantly increase the amount of concurrency in transaction processing because they can avoid read-write conflicts. Unfortunately, the increase in concurrency usually comes at the cost of transaction serializability. If a database user requests full serializability, modern multi-versioned systems significantly constrain read-write concurrency among conflicting transactions and employ expensive synchronization patterns in their design....

  15. Economic explanations for concurrent sourcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mols, Niels Peter

    2010-01-01

    Concurrent sourcing is a phenomenon where firms simultaneously make and buy the same good, i.e. they simultaneously use the governance modes of market and hierarchy. Though concurrent sourcing seems to be widespread, few studies of sourcing have focused on this phenomenon. This paper reviews...... different economic explanations for why firms use concurrent sourcing. The distinctive features of the explanations are compared, and it is discussed how they may serve as a springboard for research on concurrent sourcing. Managerial implications are also offered....

  16. Concurrency Control for Transactional Drago

    OpenAIRE

    Patiño-Martinez, Marta; Jiménez-Peris, Ricardo; Kienzle, Jörg; Arévalo, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    The granularity of concurrency control has a big impact on the performance of transactional systems. Concurrency control granu- larity and data granularity (data size) are usually the same. The e ect of this coupling is that if a coarse granularity is used, the overhead of data access (number of disk accesses) is reduced, but also the degree of concurrency. On the other hand, if a ne granularity is chosen to achieve a higher degree of concurrency (there are less con icts), the cost of data ac...

  17. Iron-Mediated Homogeneous ICAR ATRP of Methyl Methacrylate under ppm Level Organometallic Catalyst Iron(III Acetylacetonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP is an important polymerization process in polymer synthesis. However, a typical ATRP system has some drawbacks. For example, it needs a large amount of transition metal catalyst, and it is difficult or expensive to remove the metal catalyst residue in products. In order to reduce the amount of catalyst and considering good biocompatibility and low toxicity of the iron catalyst, in this work, we developed a homogeneous polymerization system of initiators for continuous activator regeneration ATRP (ICAR ATRP with just a ppm level of iron catalyst. Herein, we used oil-soluble iron (III acetylacetonate (Fe(acac3 as the organometallic catalyst, 1,1′-azobis (cyclohexanecarbonitrile (ACHN with longer half-life period as the thermal initiator, ethyl 2-bromophenylacetate (EBPA as the initiator, triphenylphosphine (PPh3 as the ligand, toluene as the solvent and methyl methacrylate (MMA as the model monomer. The factors related with the polymerization system, such as concentration of Fe(acac3 and ACHN and polymerization kinetics, were investigated in detail at 90 °C. It was found that a polymer with an acceptable molecular weight distribution (Mw/Mn = 1.43 at 45.9% of monomer conversion could be obtained even with 1 ppm of Fe(acac3, making it needless to remove the residual metal in the resultant polymers, which makes such an ICAR ATRP process much more industrially attractive. The “living” features of this polymerization system were further confirmed by chain-extension experiment.

  18. Prevalence of alcohol among nonfatally injured road accident casualties in two level III trauma centers in northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsere-Derry, James; Palk, Gavan; King, Mark

    2018-02-17

    Alcohol use is pervasive among motorists on the road in Ghana; however, we do not know the extent to which this behavior is implicated in road accidents in this country. The main objective of this research was to establish the prevalence of alcohol in the blood of nonfatally injured casualties in the emergency departments (EDs) in northern Ghana. Participants were injured road traffic crash victims, namely, pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists, and drivers seeking treatment at an ED. The study sites were 2 level III trauma centers located in Wa and Bolgatanga. Participants were screened for alcohol followed by breath tests for positive participants using breathalyzers. Two hundred and sixty-two accident victims visited EDs, 58% of whom were in Wa. Among the victims, 41% were hospitalized and 57% experienced slight injuries. The vast majority (76%) of the casualties were motorcyclists, 13% were pedestrians, 8% were cyclists, and 2% were drivers. Casualties who had detectable alcohol in their blood were predominantly vulnerable road users. In all, 34% of participants had detectable blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) and the mean BAC for all casualties who tested positive and could give definitive BACs was 0.2265 (226 mg/dl). The prevalence of alcohol use was 53% among cyclists, 34% among motorcyclists, 21% among pedestrians, and 17% among drivers. Male casualties were more likely to test positive for alcohol than females. In addition, the prevalence of alcohol was significantly higher among injured casualties in Bolgatanga compared to Wa. There was a high prevalence of alcohol use among nonfatally injured casualties in northern Ghana and injury severity increased with BAC. AUDIT screening in the hospital, alcohol consumption guideline, road safety education with an emphasis on minimizing or eliminating alcohol consumption, and enhanced enforcement of the BAC limit among motorists are recommended.

  19. Comparing rankings of selected TRI organic chemicals for two environments using a level III fugacity model and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, F.G.; Egemen, E.; Nirmalakhandan, N.

    1998-01-01

    The Toxics Release Inventory, TRI (USEPA, 1995) is a comprehensive listing of chemicals, mass released, source of releases, and other related information for chemicals which are released into the environment in the US. These chemicals are then ranked according to the mass released as a indication of their environmental impact. Industries have been encouraged to adopt production methods to decrease the release of chemicals which are ranked highly in the TRI. Clearly, this ranking of the chemicals based upon the mass released fails to take into account very important environmental aspects. The first and most obvious aspect is the wide range of toxicity's of the chemicals released. Numerous researchers have proposed systems to rank chemicals according to their toxicity. The second aspect, which a mass released based ranking does not take into account, is the fate and transport of each chemical within the environment. Cohen and Ryan (1985) and Mackay and Paterson (1991) have proposed models to evaluate the fate and transport of chemicals released into the environment. Some authors have incorporated the mass released and toxicity with some fate and transport aspects to rank the impact of released chemicals. But, due to the complexities of modeling the environment, the lack of published data on properties of chemicals, and the lack of information on the speciation of chemicals in complex systems, modeling the fate and transport of toxic chemicals in the environment remains difficult. To provide an indication of the need to rank chemicals according to their environmental impact instead of the mass released, the authors have utilized a subset of 45 organic chemicals from the TRI, modeled the fate and transport of the chemicals using a Level III fugacity model, and compared those equilibrium concentrations with toxicity data to yield a hazard value for each chemical

  20. A survey on job satisfaction among nursing staff before and after introduction of the NIDCAP model of care in a level III NICU in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielenga, Joke M.; Smit, Bert J.; Unk, Karel A.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the effect of introduction of the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) on nursing staff job satisfaction. SUBJECTS: Registered nurses, with specialist neonatal qualifications or in training, in a level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in

  1. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilbride Seán M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2 and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1 are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  2. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilbride, Sean M

    2011-07-26

    Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1) are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington\\'s disease and Alzheimer\\'s disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  3. Measuring coherence with entanglement concurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xianfei; Gao, Ting; Yan, Fengli

    2017-07-01

    Quantum coherence is a fundamental manifestation of the quantum superposition principle. Recently, Baumgratz et al (2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 140401) presented a rigorous framework to quantify coherence from the view of theory of physical resource. Here we propose a new valid quantum coherence measure which is a convex roof measure, for a quantum system of arbitrary dimension, essentially using the generalized Gell-Mann matrices. Rigorous proof shows that the proposed coherence measure, coherence concurrence, fulfills all the requirements dictated by the resource theory of quantum coherence measures. Moreover, strong links between the resource frameworks of coherence concurrence and entanglement concurrence is derived, which shows that any degree of coherence with respect to some reference basis can be converted to entanglement via incoherent operations. Our work provides a clear quantitative and operational connection between coherence and entanglement based on two kinds of concurrence. This new coherence measure, coherence concurrence, may also be beneficial to the study of quantum coherence.

  4. Assessing the potential hydrological impact of the Gibe III Dam on Lake Turkana water level using multi-source satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, N. M.; Senay, G. B.

    2012-10-01

    Lake Turkana, the largest desert lake in the world, is fed by ungauged or poorly gauged river systems. To meet the demand of electricity in the East African region, Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies more than 80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa with a height of 241 m. However, the nature of interactions and potential impacts of regulated inflows to Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in situ datasets. In this study, we used 12 yr (1998-2009) of existing multi-source satellite and model-assimilated global weather data. We used a calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model evaluates the impact of the Gibe III dam using three different approaches - a historical approach, a rainfall based approach, and a statistical approach to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. All the approaches provided comparable and consistent results. Model results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam on Lake Turkana would vary with the magnitude and distribution of rainfall post-dam commencement. On average, the reservoir would take up to 8-10 months, after commencement, to reach a minimum operation level of 201 m depth of water. During the dam filling period, the lake level would drop up to 1-2 m (95% confidence) compared to the lake level modeled without the dam. The lake level variability caused by regulated inflows after the dam commissioning were found to be within the natural variability of the lake of 4.8 m. Moreover, modeling results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam would depend on the initial lake level at the time of dam commencement. Areas

  5. Complex I and complex III inhibition specifically increase cytosolic hydrogen peroxide levels without inducing oxidative stress in HEK293 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forkink, M.; Basit, F.; Teixeira, J.; Swarts, H.G.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Willems, P.H.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor studies with isolated mitochondria demonstrated that complex I (CI) and III (CIII) of the electron transport chain (ETC) can act as relevant sources of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we studied ROS generation and oxidative stress induction during chronic (24h) inhibition

  6. Laboratory determination of migration of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite–sand mixtures as buffer/backfill material for high-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Lang; Zhang, Huyuan; Yan, Ming; Chen, Hang; Zhang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    For the safety assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the migration of Eu(III) through compacted bentonite–sand mixtures was measured under expected repository conditions. Under the evaluated conditions, advection and dispersion is the dominant migration mechanism. The role of sorption on the retardation of migration was also evaluated. The hydraulic conductivities of compacted bentonite–sand mixtures were K=2.07×10 −10 –5.23×10 −10 cm/s, The sorption and diffusion of Eu(III) were examined using a flexible wall permeameter for a solute concentration of 2.0×10 −5 mol/l. The effective diffusion coefficients and apparent diffusion coefficients of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite–sand mixtures were in the range of 1.62×10 –12 –4.87×10 –12 m 2 /s, 1.44×10 –14 –9.41×10 –14 m 2 /s, respectively, which has a very important significance to forecast the relationship between migration length of Eu(III) in buffer/backfill material and time and provide a reference for the design of buffer/backfill material for HLW disposal in China. - Highlights: • The migration progress of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite–sand mixtures was researched. • The hydraulic conductivity of cominpacted bentonite–sand mixtures was measured. • The migration length of Eu(III) in buffer/backfill material after a certain period of time was forecasted

  7. Effects of cellulose degradation products on the mobility of Eu(III) in repositories for low and intermediate level radioactive waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesen, Veronica; Forsberg, Kerstin; Jonsson, Mats

    2017-10-15

    The deep repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste SFR in Sweden will contain large amounts of cellulosic waste materials contaminated with radionuclides. Over time the repository will be filled with water and alkaline conditions will prevail. In the present study degradation of cellulosic materials and the ability of cellulosic degradation products to solubilize and thereby mobilise Eu(III) under repository conditions has been investigated. Further, the possible immobilization of Eu(III) by sorption onto cement in the presence of degradation products has been investigated. The cellulosic material has been degraded under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in alkaline media (pH: 12.5) at ambient temperature. The degradation was followed by measuring the total organic carbon (TOC) content in the aqueous phase as a function of time. After 173days of degradation the TOC content is highest in the anaerobic artificial cement pore water (1547mg/L). The degradation products are capable of solubilising Eu(III) and the total europium concentration in the aqueous phase was 900μmol/L after 498h contact time under anaerobic conditions. Further it is shown that Eu(III) is adsorbed to the hydrated cement to a low extent (<9μmol Eu/g of cement) in the presence of degradation products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Concurrent LISP and its interpreter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, K; Sugimoto, S; Ohno, Y

    1981-01-01

    In the research field of artificial intelligence many languages have been developed based on LISP, such as Planner, Conniver and so on. They have been developed to give users many useful facilities, especially for describing flexible control structures. Backtracking and coroutine facilities are typical ones introduced into these languages. Compared with backtracking and coroutine facilities, multi-process description facilities are considered to be a better alternative for writing well-structured programs. This paper describes concurrent LISP, a new concurrent programming language based on LISP. Concurrent LISP is designed to provide simple and flexible facilities for multi-process description without changing the original language features of LISP. This paper also describes the concurrent LISP interpreter which has been implemented on a FACOM M-200 at the Data Processing Center of Kyoto University. 19 references.

  9. Reference Capabilities for Concurrency Control

    OpenAIRE

    Castegren, Elias; Wrigstad, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of shared mutable state in object-oriented programming complicates software development as two seemingly unrelated operations may interact via an alias and produce unexpected results. In concurrent programming this manifests itself as data-races. Concurrent object-oriented programming further suffers from the fact that code that warrants synchronisation cannot easily be distinguished from code that does not. The burden is placed solely on the programmer to reason ab...

  10. Using Molecular Biology to Maximize Concurrent Training

    OpenAIRE

    Baar, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Very few sports use only endurance or strength. Outside of running long distances on a flat surface and power-lifting, practically all sports require some combination of endurance and strength. Endurance and strength can be developed simultaneously to some degree. However, the development of a high level of endurance seems to prohibit the development or maintenance of muscle mass and strength. This interaction between endurance and strength is called the concurrent training effect. This revie...

  11. Concurrent engineering: effective deployment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unny Menon

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive insight into current trends and developments in Concurrent Engineering for integrated development of products and processes with the goal of completing the entire cycle in a shorter time, at lower overall cost and with fewer engineering design changes after product release. The evolution and definition of Concurrent Engineering are addressed first, followed by a concise review of the following elements of the concurrent engineering approach to product development: Concept Development: The Front-End Process, identifying Customer Needs and Quality Function Deployment, Establishing Product Specifications, Concept Selection, Product Architecture, Design for Manufacturing, Effective Rapid Prototyping, and The Economics of Product Development. An outline of a computer-based tutorial developed by the authors and other graduate students funded by NASA ( accessible via the world-wide-web . is provided in this paper. A brief discussion of teamwork for successful concurrent engineering is included, t'ase histories of concurrent engineering implementation at North American and European companies are outlined with references to textbooks authored by Professor Menon and other writers. A comprehensive bibliography on concurrent engineering is included in the paper.

  12. Concurrent paclitaxel and radiotherapy. Treatment feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, H.G.; Martin, T.; Kolotas, C.; Hey, S.; Schneider, L.; Templin, T.; Zamboglou, N.; Dornoff, W.; Kettner, H.

    1997-01-01

    Background: The anti-neoplastic effect of paclitaxel has been demonstrated in various clinical studies in different malignant diseases. Clinical studies have also demonstrated a greater efficacy for simultaneous radio-chemotherapy compared with radiotherapy alone when using radiosensitizing drugs. Based on these clinical and in-vitro data we initiated several pilot studies using paclitaxel as a radiosensitizing agent and we now present our initial experience in its use in a combined modality protocol, radiation and simultaneous chemotherapy with paclitaxel. Methods: I. Concurrent paclitaxel and radiation for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): In a phase-I-study we applicated paclitaxel (45 to 65 mg/m 2 ) as a 3-hour infusion weekly for 3 to 7 weeks simultaneously with primary radiotherapy in shrinking field technique with 5x1.8 Gy/week up to 59.4 Gy. - II. Concurrent paclitaxel and radiation for breast cancer as neoadjuvant or palliative: 50 mg/m 2 paclitaxel as a 3-hour infusion weekly for 6 weeks simultaneous with neoadjuvant or palliative radiotherapy of the breast/chest wall with 5x1.8 Gy/week up to 54.0 Gy. - III./IV. Concurrent paclitaxel/carboplatin and combined radiation (EBRT+brachytherapy) for locally advanced inoperable cancer of the cervix: 50 mg/m 2 paclitaxel as a 3-hour infusion weekly for 5 weeks, 50 mg/m 2 carboplatin at day 1 to 5 in week 1 and 5 simultaneously with external beam radiotherapy of the pelvis with 5x1.8 Gy/week up to 54.0 Gy and endocavitary LDR-brachytherapy (4x5 Gy). - V. Concurrent paclitaxel and radiation for locally advanced inoperable cancer of the bladder: 50 mg/m 2 paclitaxel as a 3-hour infusion weekly for 5 weeks simultaneous with radiotherapy of the pelvis with 5x1.8 Gy/week up to 50.4 Gy. VI. Concurrent paclitaxel and radiation in locally advanced inoperable head and neck cancer: 50 mg/m 2 paclitaxel as a 3-hour infusion weekly for 7 to 8 weeks simultaneous with radiotherapy in shrinking field technique

  13. Time concurrency/phase-time synchronization in digital communications networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Masami; Imaoka, Atsushi

    1990-01-01

    Digital communications networks have the intrinsic capability of time synchronization which makes it possible for networks to supply time signals to some applications and services. A practical estimation method for the time concurrency on terrestrial networks is presented. By using this method, time concurrency capability of the Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) digital communications network is estimated to be better than 300 ns rms at an advanced level, and 20 ns rms at final level.

  14. Authentic And Concurrent Evaluation-refining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Carina Ihlström; Åkesson, Maria; Kautz, Karlheinz

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for more detailed accounts for evaluation in design science research literature. By revisiting a design project regarding the future e-newspaper we give detailed descriptions of its authentic and concurrent evaluation approach by illustrating the what, why and how...... of all evaluation activities throughout the whole project. The project produced seven different design artifacts that were evaluated. The utility and theoretical outcomes of the evaluation activities clearly influenced design decisions regarding newspaper design, user value and business model design...... as well as decisions on strategic levels. We emphasize a holistic and concurrent approach to evaluation compared to the general design science research thinking and argue that reflecting on how to seek authenticity is important. By authenticity we refer to the notion of how closely an evaluation captures...

  15. Diminuição do teor de óxido de crômio (III usado como marcador externo Reduction in chromium (III oxide level as an external marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Bremer Neto

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A sensibilidade do método espectrofotométrico da s-difenilcarbazida de determinação do crômio permite que esse metal possa ser determinado em teores e em massas de amostras tão pequenas que as concentrações atualmente usadas de óxido de crômio (III como marcador externo em ensaios biológicos poderiam ser drasticamente diminuídas. Utilizando-se do piauçu (Leporinus macrocephalus para um estudo sobre o coeficiente de digestibilidade aparente (CDA da fração protéica, seis níveis de óxido de crômio (III - 0,01% - 0,02% - 0,03% - 0,05% - 0,1% e 0,2% - foram incorporados em dietas isoprotéica e isoenergética, objetivando-se verificar se o cálculo do CDA seria afetado pela variação do teor do marcador. Os seis tratamentos foram dispostos em um delineamento em blocos inteiramente casualisados, sendo as fezes coletadas durante 16 dias. Verificou-se que os resultados do coeficiente de digestibilidade aparente da fração protéica não apresentaram diferenças estatísticas significativas devidas aos teores incorporados do marcador à ração e aos dias de coleta. Conseqüentemente, e em experimentos dessa natureza, nada impede que seja reduzido o teor de óxido de crômio (III ao menos até 0,01%: além da economia relativa ao consumo do mesmo e da facilidade na manipulação de menor quantidade de amostras de fezes, o método espectrofotométrico da s-difenilcarbazida permite dosar esse nível (e até menor do que 0,01% de modo simples e rápido, com precisão e exatidão.The objective of this study was to reduce the level of the biological marker Cr2O3 in animal diets, due to the sensibility of the sdiphenylcarbazide spectrophotometric method for chromium determination in feces, recently developed. Six levels of marker, chromium (III oxide (0.01% - 0.02% - 0.03% - 0.05% - 0.1% and 0.2%, were incorporated into isoproteic and isoenergetic diets, for the apparent digestibility assay of the "piauçu" (Leporinus macrocephalus, in a

  16. Radiative lifetimes of the 2s2p2(4P) metastable levels of N III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative decay rates of N III 175 nm intersystem lines were measured in the laboratory by recording the time dependence of photon intensities emitted as the 2s2p2(4P) metastable term of N(2+) ions decay to the 2s22p(2P0) ground term. A cylindrical radio frequency ion trap was used to store the electron impact-produced N(2+) ions. The radiative decay signals were analyzed by multiexponential least-squares fits to the data. The measured radiative decay rates to the ground term are 1019(+/- 64)/s for 4P sub 1/2, 74.5(+/- 5.4)/s for 4P sub 3/2, and 308( +/- 22)/s for 4P sub 5/2. Comparisons of the measured values with theoretical values are presented.

  17. Radiological characterisation and its role in the efficient management of low-level radioactive material supporting concurrent reuse, recycling and disposal. WNA Statement - Towards Greater Efficiency in the Management of Low-Level Radioactive Material that Concurrently Supports Reuse, Recycling and Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townes, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    There are currently 435 operating civil nuclear power reactors in the world with an impressive number planned or already under construction as well as a range of associated nuclear fuel cycle and research facilities. Advances in the prior radiological characterisation of the materials which exist within these facilities and which are produced through their operation have enabled these materials to be characterised to a very high degree of precision and sensitivity with associated improvements in the limits of detection for radioactivity. This has enabled an accurate and reliable knowledge of their radiological properties to be gained along with an evaluation of the associated risks from radioactive components even down to very small values. Following their use, either at the end of an operational process or at the end of the facility's life, these materials, if they cannot be re-used, must be recycled or disposed of. The knowledge derived from characterisation has shown that the major volume of such materials (excluding used nuclear fuel) fall into a category which is amenable to re-cycling through the application of established survey and treatment techniques. Such materials contain valuable resources which, in a world committed to greater efficiency and sustainability, must be conserved through recycling in order to optimise the demand for fresh resources which must be found, extracted and processed as well as to conserve valuable space in national disposal facilities. Despite these advances irrationality concerning the reuse, recycling and disposal of materials containing low levels of radioactivity continues to prevail, even in countries with large nuclear power programmes. Should the facts about the true nature of the materials, gained and refined through advances in radiological characterisation, become more widely known then this could depolarise an often negatively charged debate. Combined with a knowledge of the safe and effective treatment techniques that

  18. Concurrent chemoradiation for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Bae; Seong, Jin Sil; Song, Si Young; Park, Seung Woo; Suh, Chang Ok

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the treatment results of concurrent chemoradiation with oral 5-FU plus Gemcitabine or Paclitaxel for unresectable pancreatic cancer. The patients, who were diagnosed by imaging modalities or by explo-laparotomy were treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Radiotherapy was delivered to primary tumor and regional lymph nodes, and the total dose was 45 Gy. Patients received Gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m 2 or Paclitaxel 50 mg/m 2 weekly and oral 5-FU daily. The total number of cycles of chemotherapy ranged from 1 to 39 (median, 11 cycles). The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 36 months. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Fifty-four patients between Jan. 1999 to Nov. 2001 were included in this study. Forty-two patients who completed the planned treatment were included in this analysis. The patients' age ranged from 37 to 73 years (median, 60 years) and the male to female ratio was 30:12. Treatment was interrupted for 12 patients due to; disease progression for 6 (50%), poor performance status for 4 (33.3%), intercurrent disease for 1 (8.3%), and refusal for 1 (8.3%). Response evaluation was possible for 40 patients. One patient gained complete remission and 24 patients gained partial remission, hence the response rate was 59%. The survival rates were 46.7% and 17.0% at 1 year and 2 years, respectively with a median survival time of 12 months. Patients treated with Paclitaxel showed superior outcomes compared to those patients treated with Gemcitabine, in terms of both response rate and survival rate although this difference was not statistically significant. Grade III or IV hematologic toxicity was shown in 8 patients (19%), while grade III or IV non-hematologic toxicity was shown in 5 patients (12%). Concurrent chemoradiation with oral 5-FU and Gemcitabine or Paclitaxel improves both the response rate and survival rate in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. A prospective study should be investigated in order to improve both the patient

  19. Modal abstractions of concurrent behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nanz, Sebastian; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2011-01-01

    We present an effective algorithm for the automatic construction of finite modal transition systems as abstractions of potentially infinite concurrent processes. Modal transition systems are recognized as valuable abstractions for model checking because they allow for the validation as well...... as refutation of safety and liveness properties. However, the algorithmic construction of finite abstractions from potentially infinite concurrent processes is a missing link that prevents their more widespread usage for model checking of concurrent systems. Our algorithm is a worklist algorithm using concepts...... from abstract interpretation and operating upon mappings from sets to intervals in order to express simultaneous over- and underapprox-imations of the multisets of process actions available in a particular state. We obtain a finite abstraction that is 3-valued in both states and transitions...

  20. Managing Complexity of Control Software through Concurrency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilderink, G.H.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, we are concerned with the development of concurrent software for embedded systems. The emphasis is on the development of control software. Embedded systems are concurrent systems whereby hardware and software communicate with the concurrent world. Concurrency is essential, which

  1. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hall, P. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3 (Canada); Anderson, S. F. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hamann, F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Pâris, I. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Petitjean, P. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, Universite Paris 6, F-75014 Paris (France); Ross, Nicholas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Shen, Yue [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); York, Don, E-mail: nfilizak@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-08-20

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

  2. Comparison of satellite imagery from LISS-III/Resourcesat-1 and TM/Landsat 5 to estimate stand-level timber volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Fernando Berra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After Landsat 5 activities were discontinued, sensors on board ResourceSat-1 satellite have been pointed as an option for Landsat series. The aim of this study is to estimate timber volume from a slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm. stand using images from both LISS-III/ResourceSat-1 and TM/Landsat 5 sensors, cross comparing their performances. Reflectance values from the four spectral bands considered equivalent for both sensors were compared regarding sensitivity to changes in timber volume. Trends were similar, with direct relationship in the near-infrared bands and inverse relationships in the visible and mid-infrared bands. Significant differences were only found in the equivalent band of green. Multiple linear regressions were used to select spectral bands that would better explain variations in timber volume. The best fit equations for each sensor were inverted to generate maps of timber volume, estimates which were compared at pixel and stand level. None of the scales showed significant differences between estimates generated from the two sensors. We concluded that LISS-III and TM have generally very similar performance for monitoring timber volume, and LISS-III could therefore be potentially used as a complement or substitute to Landsat series.

  3. Concurrency & Asynchrony in Declarative Workflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Slaats, Tijs

    2015-01-01

    of concurrency in DCR Graphs admits asynchronous execution of declarative workflows both conceptually and by reporting on a prototype implementation of a distributed declarative workflow engine. Both the theoretical development and the implementation is supported by an extended example; moreover, the theoretical....... In this paper, we pro- pose a notion of concurrency for declarative process models, formulated in the context of Dynamic Condition Response (DCR) graphs, and exploiting the so-called “true concurrency” semantics of Labelled Asynchronous Transition Systems. We demonstrate how this semantic underpinning...

  4. Molecular-level spectroscopic investigations of the complexation and photodegradation of catechol to/by iron(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abadleh, Hind; Tofan-Lazar, Julia; Situm, Arthur; Slikboer, Samantha

    2014-05-01

    Surface water plays a crucial role in facilitating or inhibiting surface reactions in atmospheric aerosols. Little is known about the role of surface water in the complexation of organic molecules to transition metals in multicomponent aerosol systems. We will show results from real time diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiments for the in situ complexation of catechol to Fe(III) and its photosensitized degradation under dry and humid conditions. Catechol was chosen as a simple model for humic-like substances (HULIS) in aerosols and aged polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It has also been detected in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with benzene. Given the importance of the iron content in aerosols and its biogeochemistry, our studies were conducted using FeCl3. For comparison, these surface-sensitive studies were complemented with bulk aqueous ATR-FTIR, UV-vis, and HPLC measurements for structural, quantitative and qualitative information about complexes in the bulk, and potential degradation products. The implications of our studies on understanding interfacial and condensed phase chemistry relevant to multicomponent aerosols, water thin islands on buildings, and ocean surfaces containing transition metals will be discussed.

  5. Reduction of Cr (VI) into Cr (III) by organelles of Chlorella vulgaris in aqueous solution: An organelle-level attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zunwei; Song, Shufang; Wen, Yuezhong

    2016-12-01

    The priority pollutant chromium (Cr) was ubiquitous and great efforts have been made to reduce Cr (VI) into less-toxic Cr (III) by alga for the convenient availability and low expense. However, the functional role of organelle inside the algal cell in Cr (VI) reduction was poorly understood. In this study, organelles in green algae Chlorella vulgaris were extracted and further decorated for Cr (VI) reduction tests. Results showed that the chloroplast exhibited not only adsorption ability of total Cr (21.18% comparing to control) but also reduction potential of Cr (VI) (almost 70% comparing to control), whose most suitable working concentration was at 17μg/mL. Furtherly, the isolated thylakoid membrane (ITM) showed better Cr (VI) reduction potential with the presence of sodium alginate (SA), even though the Hill reaction activity (HRA) was inhibited. As for photosystem II (PSII), the addition of mesoporous silica SBA-15 enhanced the reduction ability through improving the light-harvesting complex (LHC) II efficiency and electron transport rate. On the whole, the reduction ability order of the three kinds of materials based on chloroplast in C. vulgaris was PSII@SBA-15>Chloroplast>ITM@SA. The attempt made in this study to reduce the Cr (VI) with C. vulgaris organelles might not only offer basement to detect the potential action mechanism of Cr (VI) reduction by C. vulgaris but also provide a new sight for the scavenge of heavy metal with biological materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling Lake Turkana Hydrology: Evaluating the potential hydrological impact of Gibe III reservoir on the Lake Turkana water levels using multi-source satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, N.; Senay, G. B.

    2012-12-01

    Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies >80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana, Kenya. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa (height of 241 m) with a storage capacity of 14.5 billion m3. Arguably, this is one of the most controversial hydro-power projects in the region because the nature of interactions and potential impacts of the dam regulated flows on Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in situ hydrological datasets. In this research, we used a calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account 12 years (1998-2009) of satellite rainfall, model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model was used to evaluate the impact of the Gibe III dam using three different simple but robust approaches - a historical approach; a rainfall based sampling approach; and a non-parametric bootstrap resampling approach to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. Modelling results indicate that, on average, the reservoir would take up to 8-10 months to reach minimum operation level of 201 m (initial impoundment period). During this period, the dam would regulate the lake inflows up to 50% and as a result the lake level would drop up to 2 m. However, after the initial impoundment period, due to releases from the dam, the rate of lake inflows would be around 10 m3/s less when compared to the rate without Gibe III (650 m3/s). Due to this, the lake levels will decline on average 1.5 m (3 m). Over the entire modeling period including the initial period of impoundment, the average rate of lake inflows due to Gibe III dam was estimated to be 500 m3/s. Results indicated that dam would also moderate the seasonal fluctuations in the lake. Areas along the Lake Turkana shoreline that are vulnerable to

  7. A Model for Concurrent Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten U.

    1996-01-01

    We present a model for concurrent objects where obejcts interact by taking part in common events that are closely matched to form call-response pairs, resulting in resulting in rendez-vous like communications. Objects are built from primitive objects by parallel composition, encapsulation...

  8. Forward progress on GPU concurrency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donaldson, A.F.; Ketema, J.; Sorensen, T.; Wickerson, J.

    2017-01-01

    The tutorial at CONCUR will provide a practical overview of work undertaken over the last six years in the Multicore Programming Group at Imperial College London, and with collaborators internationally, related to understanding and reasoning about concurrency in software designed for acceleration on

  9. True Concurrency can be Traced

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Uffe Henrik

    1990-01-01

    In this paper sets of labelled partial orders are employed as fundamental mathematical entities for modelling nondeterministic and concurrent processes thereby obtaining so-called noninterleaving semantics. Based on closures of sets of labelled partial orders, a simple algebraic language with ref...

  10. Insulin and leptin levels in overweight and normal-weight Iranian adolescents: The CASPIAN-III study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Bahrami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study, we aim to compare insulin and leptin levels in adolescents with or without excess weight and in those with or without abdominal obesity. Materials and Methods : This case-control study was conducted among 486 samples. We randomly selected 243 overweight and an equal number of normal-weight adolescents from among participants of the third survey of a national surveillance program entitled "Childhood and Adolescence Surveillance and PreventIon of Adult Non-communicable diseases study." Serum insulin and leptin were compared between two groups and their correlation was determined with other variables. Results: The mean age and body mass index (BMI of participants were 14.10 ± 2.82 years and 22.12 ± 6.49 kg/m 2 , respectively. Leptin and insulin levels were higher in overweight than in normal-weight adolescents (P < 0.05. Leptin level was higher in children with abdominal obesity than in their other counterparts (P < 0.001. Leptin level was correlated with age, fasting blood glucose, BMI, and insulin level. Conclusion: Insulin and leptin levels were higher among overweight and obese children, which may reflect insulin and leptin-resistance. Given the complications of excess weight from early life, prevention and controlling childhood obesity should be considered as a health priority.

  11. The impact of synapsin III gene on the neurometabolite level alterations after single-dose methylphenidate in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Başay Ö

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ömer Başay,1 Burge Kabukcu Basay,1 Huseyin Alacam,2 Onder Ozturk,1 Ahmet Buber,1 Senay Gorucu Yilmaz,3 Yılmaz Kıroğlu,4 Mehmet Emin Erdal,5 Hasan Herken2 1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Pamukkale University, Denizli, 2Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Pamukkale University, Denizli, 3Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, 4Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Pamukkale University, Denizli, 5Department of Medical Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin University, Mersin, Turkey Objective: To investigate the neurometabolite level changes according to synapsin III gene rs133945G>A and rs133946C>G polymorphisms by using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS in patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD.Methods: Fifty-seven adults diagnosed with ADHD were recruited for the study. The participants were examined by single-voxel 1H MRS when medication naïve and 30 minutes after oral administration of 10 mg methylphenidate (Mph. Those who had been on a stimulant discontinued the medication 48 hours before MRS imaging. Spectra were taken from the anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, striatum, and cerebellum, and N-acetylaspartate (NAA, choline, and creatine levels were examined. For genotyping of the synapsin III gene polymorphisms, DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes. The effects of age, sex, and ADHD subtypes were controlled in the analyses.Results: After a single dose of Mph, choline levels increased significantly in the striatum of rs133945G>A polymorphism-GG genotypes (P=0.020 and NAA levels rose in the anterior cingulate cortex of rs133946C>G polymorphism-CG genotypes (P=0.014. Both rs133945G>A and rs133946C>G polymorphisms were found to statistically significantly affect the alteration of NAA levels in response to Mph in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex with

  12. Experimental determination of the energy levels of the antimony atom (Sb II), ions of the antimony (Sb II, Sb III), mercury (Hg IV) and cesium (Cs X)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcimowicz, B.

    1993-01-01

    The thesis concerns establishing the energy scheme of the electronic levels, obtained from the analysis of the investigated spectra of antimony atom and ions (Sb I, Sb II, Sb III) and higher ionized mercury (Hg IV) and cesium (Cs X) atoms. The experimental studies were performed with optical spectroscopy methods. The spectra of the elements under study obtained in the spectral range from visible (680 nm) to vacuum UV (40 nm) were analysed. The classification and spectroscopic designation of the experimentally established 169 energy levels were obtained on the basis of the performed calculations and the fine structure analysis. The following configurations were considered: 5s 2 5p 2 ns, 5s 2 5p 2 n'd, 5s5p 4 of the antimony atom, 5s 2 5pns, 5s 2 5pn'd, 5s5p 3 of the ion Sb II, 5s 2 ns, 5s 2 n'd, 5s5p 2 of the on Sb III, 5d 8 6p of the ion Hg IV 4d 9 5s and 4d 9 5p Cs X. A reclassification was performed and some changes were introduced to the existing energy level scheme of the antimony atom, with the use of the information obtained from the absorption spectrum taken in the VUV region by the ''flash pyrolysis'' technique. The measurements of the hyperfine splittings in 19 spectral lines belonging to the antimony atom and ions additionally confirmed the assumed classification of the levels involved in these lines. The energy level scheme, obtained for Sb III, was compared to the other ones in the isoelectronic sequence starting with In I. On the basis of the analysis of the Hg IV spectrum it was proved that ground configuration of the three times ionized mercury atom is 5d 9 not 5d 8 6s as assumed until now. The fine structure, established from the analysis of the spectra of the elements under study was examined in multiconfiguration approximation. As a result of the performed calculations the fine structure parameters and wavefunctions were determined for the levels whose energy values were experimentally established in the thesis. (author). 140 refs, 22 figs, 17

  13. A Concurrent Multiple Negotiation Protocol Based on Colored Petri Nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Lei; Ren, Fenghui; Zhang, Minjie; Bai, Quan

    2017-11-01

    Concurrent multiple negotiation (CMN) provides a mechanism for an agent to simultaneously conduct more than one negotiation. There may exist different interdependency relationships among these negotiations and these interdependency relationships can impact the outcomes of these negotiations. The outcomes of these concurrent negotiations contribute together for the agent to achieve an overall negotiation goal. Handling a CMN while considering interdependency relationships among multiple negotiations is a challenging research problem. This paper: 1) comprehensively highlights research problems of negotiations at concurrent negotiation level; 2) provides a graph-based CMN model with consideration of the interdependency relationships; and 3) proposes a colored Petri net-based negotiation protocol for conducting CMNs. With the proposed protocol, a CMN can be efficiently and concurrently processed and negotiation agreements can be efficiently achieved. Experimental results indicate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed protocol in terms of the negotiation success rate, the negotiation time and the negotiation outcome.

  14. Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Gemcitabine for Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinoto, Makoto, E-mail: shinoto@saga-himat.jp [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamada, Shigeru [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yasuda, Shigeo [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko [Hospital of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Saisho, Hiromitsu [Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Kaken Hospital, Chemotherapy Research Institute, Chiba (Japan); Asano, Takehide; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Amano, Hodaka; Ishihara, Takeshi; Otsuka, Masayuki; Matsuda, Masamichi; Kainuma, Osamu; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Furuse, Junji; Nakagori, Toshio; Okusaka, Takuji; and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To determine, in the setting of locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the maximum tolerated dose of carbon ion radiation therapy (C-ion RT) and gemcitabine dose delivered concurrently and to estimate local effect and survival. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of pancreatic invasive ductal carcinomas and radiographically unresectable disease without metastasis. Concurrent gemcitabine was administered on days 1, 8, and 15, and the dose levels were escalated from 400 to 1000 mg/m{sup 2} under the starting dose level (43.2 GyE) of C-ion RT. The dose levels of C-ion RT were escalated from 43.2 to 55.2 GyE at 12 fractions under the fixed recommended gemcitabine dose determined. Results: Seventy-six patients were enrolled. Among the 72 treated patients, dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 3 patients: grade 3 infection in 1 patient and grade 4 neutropenia in 2 patients. Only 1 patient experienced a late grade 3 gastric ulcer and bleeding 10 months after C-ion RT. The recommended dose of gemcitabine with C-ion RT was found to be 1000 mg/m{sup 2}. The dose of C-ion RT with the full dose of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}) was safely increased to 55.2 GyE. The freedom from local progression rate was 83% at 2 years using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. The 2-year overall survival rates in all patients and in the high-dose group with stage III (≥45.6 GyE) were 35% and 48%, respectively. Conclusions: Carbon ion RT with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine was well tolerated and effective in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  15. Direct profiling of III/V semiconductor nanostructures at the atomic level by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Bruls, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    By means of modern epitaxial growth techniques it is possible to fabricate semiconductor structures that are faster, cheaper and more complicated. They find their implementation in e.g. quantum dot or quantum well lasers. To obtain extra functionality, these devices have to be made so small, that within these structures charge carriers are confined in 2 or 3 dimensions. This results in discrete energy levels, which enable new applications and may solve several problems in the contemporary tec...

  16. Concurrent Product & Supply Chain Creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gubi, Ebbe

    it is a structural premise. We also know that logistics costs generally are estimated 15-20% of total product costs. Accordingly, it stands to reason that a company can reduce costs, and thereby gain an edge on its competitors, by tailoring the supply chain in question to an individual product or product family; i.......e. by creating Focused Supply Chains. At the same time, customer satisfaction can be increased. As a second means to achieving a better fit between product and supply chain, the firm can deploy Design for Logistics, the discipline of considering the supply chain during product creation. The thesis sets out...... and supply chains should be created concurrently and integrated. The concept of Concurrent Product & Supply Chain Creation is introduced, and the two main components Focused Supply Chains and Design For Logistics are explained and exemplified by use of Bang & Olufsen....

  17. Phase I trial of concurrent chemoradiotherapy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers with bi-weekly docetaxel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Simizu, Shigetaka

    2005-01-01

    Docetaxel (DOC) has radiation-sensitizing effects because it synchronizes with the most radiation-sensitive G2/M phase of the cell cycle. From the results of concurrent radiotherapy with weekly DOC administrations in a phase I trial, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was mucositis and the recommended dose was 10 mg/m 2 , but the administration schedule was a problem. We planned concurrent radiation therapy in a bi-weekly DOC phase I trial to improve the larynx preservation rate and to determine which schedule and dosage of DOC would yield its inherent cytotoxic effects. We decided the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and DLT to serve as an index of the appearance of adverse events. Patients with stage II or stage III T2N1 hypopharyngeal cancer or stage II or III laryngeal cancer were included in this study. DOC was administered on the days of initiation of bi-weekly radiation (day 1, day 15, day 29). Radiation was given (2 Gy/day: 5 days per week) for a total of 30 Fr, with a total of 60 Gy. The starting dose of DOC was 30 mg/m 2 (level 1) and the dosage was raised by 5 mg/m 2 at each level. DLT was observed due to mucositis and neutropenia at 40 mg/m 2 (level 3), the MTD was 40 mg/m 2 and the recommended dose (RD) was 35 mg/m 2 . Especially in hypopharyngeal cancer of Grade 3 or more, mucositis appeared, with swallowing difficulty in cases with a wide range of irradiation. At dosages of 35 mg/m 2 , the effectiveness was favorable and this was the suitable dosage recommended for the subsequent phase II trial. This clinical study was performed with permission of our IRB (Institutional Review Board). (author)

  18. Adding Concurrency to Smart Contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Dickerson, Thomas; Gazzillo, Paul; Herlihy, Maurice; Koskinen, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Modern cryptocurrency systems, such as Ethereum, permit complex financial transactions through scripts called smart contracts. These smart contracts are executed many, many times, always without real concurrency. First, all smart contracts are serially executed by miners before appending them to the blockchain. Later, those contracts are serially re-executed by validators to verify that the smart contracts were executed correctly by miners. Serial execution limits system throughput and fails ...

  19. Evaluation of concurrent peak responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.C.; Curreri, J.; Reich, M.

    1983-01-01

    This report deals with the problem of combining two or more concurrent responses which are induced by dynamic loads acting on nuclear power plant structures. Specifically, the acceptability of using the square root of the sum of the squares (SRSS) value of peak values as the combined response is investigated. Emphasis is placed on the establishment of a simplified criterion that is convenient and relatively easy to use by design engineers

  20. PyCSP - controlled concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinter, Brian; Friborg, Rune Møllegaard; Bjørndalen, John Markus

    2010-01-01

    Producing readable and correct programs while at the same time taking advantage of multi-core architectures is a challenge. PyCSP is an implementation of Communicating Sequential Processes algebra (CSP) for the Python programming language, that take advantage of CSP's formal and verifiable approach...... to controlling concurrency and the readability of Python source code. We describe PyCSP, demonstrate it through examples and demonstrate how PyCSP compares to Pthreads in a master-worker benchmark....

  1. PyCSP - controlled concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friborg, Rune Møllegaard; Vinter, Brian; Bjørndalen, John Markus

    Producing readable and correct programs while at the same time taking advantage of multi-core architectures is a challenge. PyCSP is an implementation of Communicating Sequential Processes algebra (CSP) for the Python programming language, taking advantage of CSP’s formal and verifiable approach...... to controlling concurrency and the readability of Python source code. We describe PyCSP, demonstrate it through examples and demonstrate how PyCSP compares to Pthreads using a benchmark....

  2. Computed oscillator strengths and energy levels for Fe III, Fe IV, Fe V, and Fe VI with calculated wavelengths and wavelengths derived from established data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawcett, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    Calculated weighted oscillator strengths are tabulated for spectral lines of Fe III, Fe IV, Fe V, and Fe VI. The lines belong to transition arrays 3d 6 -3d 5 4p and 3d 5 4s-3d 5 4p in Fe III, 3d 5 -3d 4 4p and 3d 4 4s-3d 4 4p in Fe IV, 3d 4 -3d 3 4p and 3d 3 4s-3d 3 4p in Fe V, and 3d 3 -3d 2 4p and 3d 2 4s-3d 2 4p in Fe VI. For the calculations, Slater parameters are optimized on the basis of minimizing the discrepancies between observed and computed wavelengths. Configuration interaction was included among the 3d n , 3d n-1 4s, 3d n-2 4s 2 , 3d n-1 4d, and 3d n-1 5s even configurations and among the 3d n-1 4p, 3d n-2 4s4p, and 3d n-1 5p odd configurations, with 3p 5 3d n+1 added for Fe VI. Calculated wavelengths are compared with observational data, and the compositions of energy levels are listed. This completes a series of similar computations for these complex configurations covering Fe I to Fe VI

  3. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing

  4. Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI) using a liquid core waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Richard E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Nitsche, Heino

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the aqueous chemistry of plutonium, in particular in environmental conditions, is often complicated by plutonium's complex redox chemistry. Because plutonium possesses four oxidation states, all of which can coexist in solution, a reliable method for the identification of these oxidation states is needed. The identification of plutonium oxidation states at low levels in aqueous solution is often accomplished through an indirect determination using series of liquid-liquid extraction procedures using oxidation state specific reagents such as HDEHP and TTA. While these methods, coupled with radioactive counting techniques provide superior limits of detection they may influence the plutonium redox equilibrium, are time consuming, waste intensive and costly. Other analytical methods such as mass spectrometry and radioactive counting as stand alone methods provide excellent detection limits but lack the ability to discriminate between the oxidation states of the plutonium ions in solution

  5. Concurrent chemoradiation for vaginal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T Miyamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is not known whether the addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy improves outcomes in primary vaginal cancer. Here, we review clinical outcomes in patients with primary vaginal cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT or concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT. METHODS: Seventy-one patients with primary vaginal cancer treated with definitive RT with or without concurrent chemotherapy at a single institution were identified and their records reviewed. A total of 51 patients were treated with RT alone; 20 patients were treated with CRT. Recurrences were analyzed. Overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: The median age at diagnosis was 61 years (range, 18-92 years and the median follow-up time among survivors was 3.0 years. Kaplan-Meier estimates for OS and DFS differed significantly between the RT and CRT groups (3-yr OS = 56% vs. 79%, log-rank p = 0.037; 3-yr DFS = 43% vs. 73%, log-rank p = 0.011. Twenty-three patients (45% in the RT group had a relapse at any site compared to 3 (15% in the CRT group (p = 0.027. With regard to the sites of first relapse, 10 patients (14% had local only, 4 (6% had local and regional, 9 (13% had regional only, 1 (1% had regional and distant, and 2 (3% had distant only relapse. On univariate analysis, the use of concurrent chemotherapy, FIGO stage, tumor size, and date of diagnosis were significant predictors of DFS. On multivariate analysis, the use of concurrent chemotherapy remained a significant predictor of DFS (hazard ratio 0.31 (95% CI, 0.10-0.97; p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: Vaginal cancer results in poor outcomes. Adequate radiation dose is essential to ensure curative management. Concurrent chemotherapy should be considered for vaginal cancer patients.

  6. Concurrence classes for general pure multipartite states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heydari, Hoshang

    2005-01-01

    We propose concurrence classes for general pure multipartite states based on an orthogonal complement of a positive operator-valued measure on quantum phase. In particular, we construct W m class, GHZ m , and GHZ m-1 class concurrences for general pure m-partite states. We give explicit expressions for W 3 and GHZ 3 class concurrences for general pure three-partite states and for W 4 , GHZ 4 and GHZ 3 class concurrences for general pure four-partite states

  7. Simple concurrent garbage collection almost without synchronization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Wim H.; Lali, M.I.

    We present two simple mark and sweep algorithms, A and B, for concurrent garbage collection by a single collector running concurrently with a number of mutators that concurrently modify shared data. Both algorithms are based on the ideas of Ben-Ari's classical algorithm for on-the-fly garbage

  8. Steps in Modular Specifications for Concurrent Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Rocha Pinto, Pedro; Dinsdale-Young, Thomas; Gardner, Philippa

    2015-01-01

    The specification of a concurrent program module is a difficult problem. The specifications must be strong enough to enable reasoning about the intended clients without reference to the underlying module implementation. We survey a range of verification techniques for specifying concurrent module......, in particular highlighting four key concepts: auxiliary state, interference abstraction, resource ownership and atomicity. We show how these concepts combine to provide powerful approaches to specifying concurrent modules.......The specification of a concurrent program module is a difficult problem. The specifications must be strong enough to enable reasoning about the intended clients without reference to the underlying module implementation. We survey a range of verification techniques for specifying concurrent modules...

  9. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, Joseph K.; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei; Morano, Karen; Bogart, Jeffrey A.; Crawford, Jeffrey C.; Socinski, Mark A.; Blackstock, A. William; Vokes, Everett E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  10. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Stinchcombe, Thomas E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei [CALGB Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Morano, Karen [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey A. [State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Crawford, Jeffrey C. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Blackstock, A. William [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  11. New hospital structure in the twenty-first century: the position of level III (tertiary) neurological and stroke care in a changing healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentes, Tamás; Kovács, László; Óváry, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the necessary capacity and number of neurology wards of level III progressivity that can be defined in the system of criteria detailed in this article and which possess optimal operating conditions in Hungarian terms. We used the National Health Insurance Company's database to calculate case numbers and capacity for different levels of neurological and stroke care. We also revised the allocation of advanced diagnostic and therapeutic technologies, and proposed changes, based on health insurance data. We also discussed these propositions with clinical experts to test their viability. We determined the adequate number of organisational units capable of providing special neurological healthcare services on the basis of the basic data of the Hungarian healthcare system, specifying this number as 6 instead of the current 11. In our study, we have identified significant bias in the nationwide level of neurological and stroke care organisation, which needs revised allocation of healthcare resources. Naturally, this can only be carried out through the restructuring of the emergency care system and the expansion of pre-hospital care.

  12. Specifying and Verifying Concurrent Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    for Verification and Specification of Concurrent Systems, held in La - Colle - Sur - Loup , France in October, 1984. Work Supported in part by the National...Proc. ACM Symposium on Princi- 0 ples of Programming Languages, Las Vegas, (January 1980), 251-261. [7] J. V. Guttag and J. J. Horning. An Introduction...names in ’V(S). However, the two formulas behave differently under a renaming mapping p. In particu- lar. p(Vv :A( LA )) equals Vv :p(A(v)), so the

  13. Multiprocessor systems and their concurrency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starke, P H

    1984-01-01

    A multiprocessor system can be considered as a collection of finite automata which communicate over channels or shared memory units. The behaviour of such a system can be described by a semilanguage. This approach allows to define a numerical measure for the concurrency of multiprocessor systems and of distributed systems. This measure is characterized algebraically and the reconfiguration problem asking for an algorithm to construct an l-processor system which is equivalent to a given n-processor system is solved in the paper. 6 references.

  14. High bandwidth concurrent processing on commodity platforms

    CERN Document Server

    Boosten, M; Van der Stok, P D V

    1999-01-01

    The I/O bandwidth and real-time processing power required for high- energy physics experiments is increasing rapidly over time. The current requirements can only be met by using large-scale concurrent processing. We are investigating the use of a large PC cluster interconnected by Fast and Gigabit Ethernet to meet the performance requirements of the ATLAS second level trigger. This architecture is attractive because of its performance and competitive pricing. A major problem is obtaining frequent high-bandwidth I/O without sacrificing the CPU's processing power. We present a tight integration of a user-level scheduler and a zero-copy communication layer. This system closely approaches the performance of the underlying hardware in terms of both CPU power and I/O capacity. (0 refs).

  15. A Phase I study of concurrent radiotherapy and capecitabine as adjuvant treatment for operable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Liu Yueping; Wang Weihu; Song Yongwen; Li Tao; Li Ning; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicity of capecitabine with standard radiotherapy (RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage II/III rectal cancer after surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in fractions of 2.0 Gy/day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. Capecitabine was administered concurrently with RT in escalating doses, twice daily with a 12-h interval, for two cycles of 14 days separated by a 7-day rest. Dose-limiting toxicity included Grade 3 or Grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity. Results: Twenty-four patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 1,000 (3 patients), 1,200 (3 patients), 1,400 (3 patients), 1,500 (3 patients), 1,600 (6 patients), and 1,700 mg/m 2 /day (6 patients). Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 patient at 1,600 mg/m 2 /day (Grade 3 diarrhea) and in 2 patients at 1,700 mg/m 2 /day (1 patient had Grade 3 and 1 Grade 4 diarrhea). Conclusion: The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of capecitabine given concurrently with RT was 1,600 mg/m 2 , daily from the 1st to the 14th day, with a 7-day rest, for two cycles

  16. Preoperative Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine, Bevacizumab, and Erlotinib for Rectal Cancer: A Phase 1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eng, Cathy [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Chang, George J.; Skibber, John M.; You, Y. Nancy [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Maru, Dipen M. [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Clemons, Marilyn V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kopetz, Scott E.; Garrett, Christopher R.; Shureiqi, Imad [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The goal of this phase 1 trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib with preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with clinical stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma, within 12 cm from the anal verge, were treated in 4 escalating dose levels, using the continual reassessment method. Patients received preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks), erlotinib, and capecitabine. Capecitabine dose was increased from 650 mg/m{sup 2} to 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the days of radiation therapy; erlotinib dose was increased from 50 mg orally daily in weeks 1 to 3, to 50 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6, to 100 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6. Patients underwent surgery at least 9 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Results: A total of 19 patients were enrolled, and 18 patients were considered evaluable. No patient had grade 4 acute toxicity, and 1 patient had grade 3 acute toxicity (hypertension). The MTD was not reached. All 18 evaluable patients underwent surgery, with low anterior resection in 7 (39%), proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis in 4 patients (22%), posterior pelvic exenteration in 1 (6%), and abdominoperineal resection in 6 (33%). Of the 18 patients, 8 (44%) had pathologic complete response, and 1 had complete response of the primary tumor with positive nodes. Three patients (17%) had grade 3 postoperative complications (ileus, small bowel obstruction, and infection). With a median follow-up of 34 months, 1 patient developed distant metastasis, and no patient had local recurrence or died. The 3-year disease-free survival was 94%. Conclusions: The combination of preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib was well tolerated. The pathologic complete response rate appears promising and may warrant further investigation.

  17. The Effect of Consolidation Chemotherapy for LA-NSCLC Patients Receiving Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelda Varol

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The efficacy and safety of consolidation chemotherapy (CCT following concurrent chemoradiotherapy are not adequately established for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC. In this context, the present study aims to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of CCT.Material and Method: We retrospectively analyzed the overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS of 83 LA-NSCLC patients treated with concurrent CRT as an initial treatment with (n:20 or without CCT (n:63. All patients were cytohistologically proven to have NSCLC and diagnosed with clinical Stage III (n:48 for IIIA and n:35 for IIIB according to the staging system published by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC in 2009. All patients received curative thoracic radiotherapy with concurrent platinum doublet chemotherapy. Results: The mean age of the lung cancer patients was 59 (±7.3; 89.2% were male (n:74,and there were only 9 female patients (10.8%.When we compared the outcome of LA-NSCLC patients treated with CCT (median 10.4 months to the patients treated without CCT (median 13.8 months, the log-rank analysis demonstrated a statistically significant difference for an inferior progression-free survival (p=0.046 in patients receiving CCT. However, no significant association was observed for overall survival (17.4, 21 months, respectively (p>0.05. Patients with CCT presented higher levels of hematological side effects compared with the patients without CCT (p

  18. Level III Ecoregions of Connecticut

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  19. Level III Ecoregions of Massachusetts

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  20. Level III Ecoregions of Nebraska

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  1. Level III Ecoregions of Arkansas

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  2. Level III Ecoregions of Vermont

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  3. Level III Ecoregions of Alabama

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  4. Level III Ecoregions of California

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  5. Level III Ecoregions of Missouri

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  6. Level III Ecoregions of Maryland

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  7. Level III Ecoregions of Wyoming

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  8. Level III Ecoregions of Texas

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  9. Level III Ecoregions of Oregon

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  10. Level III Ecoregions of Colorado

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  11. Level III Ecoregions of Arizona

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  12. Level III Ecoregions of Utah

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  13. Level III Ecoregions of Louisiana

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  14. Level III Ecoregions of Iowa

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  15. Level III Ecoregions of Delaware

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  16. Level III Ecoregions of Indiana

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  17. Level III Ecoregions of Virginia

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  18. Level III Ecoregions of Minnesota

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  19. Level III Ecoregions of Florida

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  20. Level III Ecoregions of Mississippi

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  1. Level III Ecoregions of Kentucky

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  2. Level III Ecoregions of Idaho

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  3. Level III Ecoregions of Georgia

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  4. Level III Ecoregions of Nevada

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  5. Level III Ecoregions of Kansas

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  6. Level III Ecoregions of Michigan

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  7. Level III Ecoregions of Alaska

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. The ecoregions of Alaska are a...

  8. Level III Ecoregions of Maine

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  9. Level III Ecoregions of Ohio

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  10. Level III Ecoregions of Washington

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  11. Level III Ecoregions of Pennsylvania

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  12. Level III Ecoregions of Illinois

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  13. Level III Ecoregions of Oklahoma

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  14. Precise Wavelengths and Energy Levels for the Spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn III, and Branching Fractions for the Spectra of Fe II and Cr II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, Gillian

    I propose to measure wavelengths and energy levels for the spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn III covering the wavelength range 80 nm to 5500 nm, and oscillator strengths for Fe II and Cr II in the region 120 nm to 2500 nm. I shall also produce intensity calibrated atlases and linelists of the iron-neon and chromium-neon hollow cathode lamps that can be compared with astrophysical spectra. The spectra will be obtained from archival data from spectrometers at NIST and Kitt Peak National Observatory and additional experimental observations as necessary from Fourier transform (FT) and grating spectrometers at NIST. The wavelength uncertainty of the strong lines will be better than 1 part in 10^7. The radiometric calibration of the spectra will be improved in order to reduce the uncertainty of measured oscillator strengths in the near UV region and extend the wavelength range of these measurements down to 120 nm. These will complement and support the measurements of lifetimes and branching fractions by J. E. Lawler in the near UV region. An intensive effort by NIST and Imperial College London that was partly funded by previous NASA awards has resulted in comprehensive analyses of the spectra of Fe II, Cr II and Cu II, with similar analyses of Mn II, Ni II, and Sc II underway. The species included in this proposal will complete the analysis of the first two ionization stages of the elements titanium through nickel using the same techniques, and add the spectrum of Mn III - one of the most important doubly-ionized elements. The elements Cr I and Mn I give large numbers of spectral lines in spectra of cool stars and important absorption lines in the interstellar medium. The spectrum of Mn III is important in chemically peculiar stars and can often only be studied in the UV region. Analyses of many stellar spectra depend on comprehensive analyses of iron-group elements and are hampered by incomplete spectroscopic data. As a result of many decades of work by the group at the

  15. Concurrent systems and time synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, Mark; Grathoff, Annette

    2018-05-01

    In the majority of scientific fields, system dynamics is described assuming existence of unique time for the whole system. However, it is established theoretically, for example, in relativity theory or in the system theory of time, and validated experimentally that there are different times and time scales in a variety of real systems - physical, chemical, biological, social, etc. In spite of this, there are no wide-ranging scientific approaches to exploration of such systems. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to study systems with this property. We call them concurrent systems because processes in them can go, events can happen and actions can be performed in different time scales. The problem of time synchronization is specifically explored.

  16. Distributed Management of Concurrent Web Service Transactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrifai, Mohammad; Dolog, Peter; Balke, Wolf-Tilo

    2009-01-01

    Business processes involve dynamic compositions of interleaved tasks. Therefore, ensuring reliable transactional processing of Web services is crucial for the success of Web service-based B2B and B2C applications. But the inherent autonomy and heterogeneity of Web services render the applicability...... of conventional ACID transaction models for Web services far from being straightforward. Current Web service transaction models relax the isolation property and rely on compensation mechanisms to ensure atomicity of business transactions in the presence of service failures. However, ensuring consistency...... in the open and dynamic environment of Web services, where interleaving business transactions enter and exit the system independently, remains an open issue. In this paper, we address this problem and propose an architecture that supports concurrency control on the Web services level. An extension...

  17. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  18. Rain VM: Portable Concurrency through Managing Code

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Neil C.C.

    2006-01-01

    A long-running recent trend in computer programming is the growth in popularity of virtual machines. However, few have included good support for concurrency - a natural mechanism in the Rain programming language. This paper details the design and implementation of a secure virtual machine with support for concurrency, which enables portability of concurrent programs. Possible implementation ideas of many-to-many threading models for the virtual machine kernel are discussed, and initial benchm...

  19. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles (mi)) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the ''Management Plan

  20. Concurrence of three Jaynes-Cummings systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Wen-Chao; Sun, Guo-Hua; Dong, Qian; Camacho-Nieto, Oscar; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2018-04-01

    We apply genuine multipartite concurrence to investigate entanglement properties of three Jaynes-Cummings systems. Three atoms are initially put in GHZ-like state and locally interact with three independent cavities, respectively. We present analytical concurrence expressions for various subsystems including three-atom, three-cavity and some atom-cavity mixed systems. We also examine the global system and illustrate the evolution of its concurrence. Except for the sudden death of entanglement, we find for some initial entanglement parameter θ , the concurrence of the global system may maintain unchanged in some time intervals.

  1. How does concurrent sourcing affect performance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mols, Niels Peter

    2010-01-01

    be modelled. The propositions and discussion offer researchers a starting-point for further research. Practical implications – The propositions that are developed suggest that managers should consider using concurrent sourcing when they face problems caused by volume uncertainty, technological uncertainty....../methodology/approach – Based on transaction cost, agency, neoclassical economic, knowledge-based, and resource-based theory, it is proposed to show how concurrent sourcing affects performance. Findings – The paper argues that concurrent sourcing improves performance when firms face a combination of volume uncertainty...... how concurrent sourcing affects performance of the market and the hierarchy....

  2. A Reference Framework for Concurrent Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Considering the diversity of methods and tools offered to concurrent engineering, the aspects playing important roles in the concurrent engineering c ontext have been pinpointed as being four core elements which are Activity, Meth od, Object and Information. Based on these four elements, a reference framework called AMOI is proposed to be the guideline for the systematic concurrent produc t design. Using the AMOI reference framework, concurrent product development sys tem can be structured into four function models (including the activity model, m ethod model, object model and information model) which are interconnected with e ach other.

  3. PARDISEKO III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, H.; Sack, C.

    1975-05-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the latest version of the PARDISEKO code, PARDISEKO III, with particular emphasis on the numerical and programming methods employed. The physical model and its relation to nuclear safety as well as a description and the results of confirming experiments are treated in detail in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre report KFK-1989. (orig.) [de

  4. Procollagen Type I and III Aminoterminal Propeptide Levels and Severity of Interstitial Lung Disease in Mexican Women With Progressive Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura; Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto D; Olivas-Flores, Eva M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Araceli; Peguero-Gómez, Ana R; Flores-Navarro, Juan; Villa-Manzano, Alberto I; Zavaleta-Muñiz, Soraya A; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Mejía, Mayra; Juárez-Contreras, Pablo; Vazquez-Del Mercado, Monica; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto G; Trujillo-Hernández, Benjamin; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo H; Gamez-Nava, Jorge I

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a frequent complication in progressive systemic sclerosis (SSc), being present in 25% to 90% of cases. To evaluate whether serum levels of procollagen typei and iii aminoterminal propeptide (PINP and PIIINP) correlate with severity and patterns of ILD in Mexican women with SSc. Thirty three SSc patients were assessed for disease characteristics and anti-topoisomerase antibodies (topoi), and also underwent pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Nineteen patients had ILD+SSc, and 14 had no lung involvement (no ILD-SSc); data were compared with those from 45 healthy controls. PINP and PIIINP were assessed in all 3 groups. Patients with SSc had higher PINP and PIIINP vs controls (P=.001, P<.001, respectively). Compared to no ILD-SSc patients, those with ILD+SSc had longer disease duration in years (P=.005), higher modified Rodnan skin score (P<.001), higher Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability-Index scores (P<.001), higher topoi U/mL (P<.001), PINP (49.28±28.63 vs. 32.12±18.58μg/L, P=.05), and PIIINP (4.33±1.03 vs. 2.67±1.26μg/L, P<.001) levels. ILD severity based on total HRCT correlated with PINP (r=.388, P=.03) and PIIINP (P=.594, P<.001). On adjusted analysis, ILD severity was associated with disease duration (P=.037), PIIINP (P=.038), and topoi (P=.045). PINP and PIIINP are useful markers for severe ILD+SSc, suggesting they could play a role in the follow-up of this complication in SSc. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Business Case Analysis of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center Medical/Surgical Prime Vendor Generation III Service Level Electron Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Markot, Peter B

    2007-01-01

    ...) staffing and medical/surgical services offered under the Prime Vendor (PV) Generation III contract would provide the best supply chain management solution for Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC...

  6. Plant management in concurrent engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubensack, D.; Malvache, P.; Valleix, P.

    1997-01-01

    The ImagIn project consist in a method and a set of computer tools apt to bring perceptible and assessable improvements in the operational safety of a nuclear plant. Its aim is to design an information system that would maintain a highly detailed computerised representation of a nuclear plant, in its initial state and throughout its in-service life. It is not a tool to drive or help driving the nuclear plant, but a tool that manages concurrent operations that modify the plant configuration in a very general way (maintenance for example). The configuration of the plant, as well as rules and constraints about it, are described in a object-oriented, knowledge database, which is built using a generic ImagIn meta-model based on the semantical network theory. An inference engine works on this database and is connected to reality through interfaces to operators and captors on the installation; it verifies constantly in real-time the consistency of the database according to its inner rules, and reports eventual problems to concerned operators. A special effort is made on interfaces to provide natural and intuitive tools (using virtual reality, natural language, voice recognition and synthesis). A laboratory application on a fictive but realistic installation already exist and is used to simulate various test and scenari. A real application is being constructed on SILOE, an experimental reactor of the CEA. (authors)

  7. Multiparty Compatibility for Concurrent Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roly Perera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objects and actors are communicating state machines, offering and consuming different services at different points in their lifecycle. Two complementary challenges arise when programming such systems. When objects interact, their state machines must be "compatible", so that services are requested only when they are available. Dually, when objects refine other objects, their state machines must be "compliant", so that services are honoured whenever they are promised. In this paper we show how the idea of multiparty compatibility from the session types literature can be applied to both of these problems. We present an untyped language in which concurrent objects are checked automatically for compatibility and compliance. For simple objects, checking can be exhaustive and has the feel of a type system. More complex objects can be partially validated via test cases, leading to a methodology closer to continuous testing. Our proof-of-concept implementation is limited in some important respects, but demonstrates the potential value of the approach and the relationship to existing software development practices.

  8. Verified compilation of Concurrent Managed Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Communications Division Information Directorate This report is published in the interest of scientific and technical information exchange, and its...271, 2007. [85] Viktor Vafeiadis. Modular fine-grained concurrency verification. Technical Report UCAM-CL-TR- 726, University of Cambridge, Computer...VERIFIED COMPILATION OF CONCURRENT MANAGED LANGUAGES PURDUE UNIVERSITY NOVEMBER 2017 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE

  9. Ecological association between HIV and concurrency point ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ecological association between HIV and concurrency point-prevalence in South Africa's ethnic groups. Chris Kenyon. Abstract. HIV prevalence between different ethnic groups within South Africa exhibits considerable variation. Numerous authors believe that elevated sexual partner concurrency rates are important in the ...

  10. A Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming Calculus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palamidessi, Catuscia; Valencia Posso, Frank Darwin

    2001-01-01

    The tcc model is a formalism for reactive concurrent constraint programming. In this paper we propose a model of temporal concurrent constraint programming which adds to tcc the capability of modeling asynchronous and non-deterministic timed behavior. We call this tcc extension the ntcc calculus...

  11. New concurrent iterative methods with monotonic convergence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Qingchuan [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper proposes the new concurrent iterative methods without using any derivatives for finding all zeros of polynomials simultaneously. The new methods are of monotonic convergence for both simple and multiple real-zeros of polynomials and are quadratically convergent. The corresponding accelerated concurrent iterative methods are obtained too. The new methods are good candidates for the application in solving symmetric eigenproblems.

  12. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  13. Fermilab III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding.

  14. Concurrent sexual partnerships among married Zimbabweans – implications for HIV prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugweni E

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Esther Mugweni,1 Stephen Pearson,2 Mayeh Omar2 1UCL Department of Infection and Population Health, University College London, London, 2The Nuffield Centre for International Health and Development, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Background: Concurrent sexual partnerships play a key role in sustaining the HIV epidemic in Zimbabwe. Married couples are at an increased risk of contracting HIV from sexual networks produced by concurrent sexual partnerships. Addressing these partnerships is an international HIV prevention priority. Methods: Our qualitative study presents the socioeconomic factors that contribute to the occurrence of concurrent sexual partnerships among married people in Zimbabwe. We conducted 36 in-depth interviews and four focus group discussions with married men and women in Zimbabwe in 2008 to understand the organizations of concurrent sexual partnerships. Data were analyzed using framework analysis. Results: Our study indicates that relationship dissatisfaction played a key role in the engagement of concurrent sexual partnerships. Depending on the source of the dissatisfaction, there were four possible types of concurrent sexual relationships that were formed: sex worker, casual partner, regular girlfriend or informal polygyny which was referred to as “small house”. These relationships had different levels of intimacy, which had a bearing on practicing safer sex. Participants described three characteristics of hegemonic masculinity that contributed to the sources of dissatisfaction leading to concurrent sexual activity. Similarly, various aspects of emphasized femininity were described as creating opportunities for the occurrence of concurrent sexual relationships. Economic status was also listed as a factor that contributed to the occurrence of concurrent sexual partnerships. Conclusion: Marital dissatisfaction was indicated as a contributing factor to the occurrence of concurrent sexual relationships. There were several

  15. Intramuscular depot formulations of leuprolide acetate suppress testosterone levels below a 20 ng/dL threshold: a retrospective analysis of two Phase III studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spitz A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aaron Spitz,1 Marc Gittelman,2 Lawrence I Karsh,3 Sanja Dragnic,4 Ahmed M Soliman,5 Aditya Lele,6 Damian Gruca,7 Michael Norton4 1Orange County Urology Associates, Laguna Beach, CA, 221st Century Oncology/UroMedix-Aventura Division, Aventura, FL, 3The Urology Center of Colorado, Denver, CO, 4US Medical Affairs, 5Health Economics and Outcomes Research, 6Data and Statistical Sciences, AbbVie Inc., North Chicago, IL, USA; 7Global Medical Affairs, AbbVie Deutschland, Ludwigshafen, Germany Introduction: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH analogs is a standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer. GnRH analog therapy can reduce testosterone to “castrate” levels, historically defined as <50 ng/dL. With the advent of newer assays, a lower threshold of <20 ng/dL has recently been proposed. We report the results of a retrospective analysis of two Phase III trials of 4- and 6-month depot microsphere formulations of leuprolide acetate (LA, a GnRH agonist that has previously demonstrated efficacy in testosterone suppression to <50 ng/dL in patients on ADT. This analysis investigates the ability of these LA formulations to suppress to ≤20 ng/dL levels.Methods: In two of five AbbVie/Abbott clinical trials of microsphere formulations of LA for ADT, analytic technology permitting testosterone detection as low as 3 ng/dL was used and thus was selected for this analysis. Both trials were open-label, fixed-dose studies in prostate cancer patients, naïve to ADT. Patients received either 30 mg (4-month formulation; n=49 or 45 mg (6-month formulation; n=151 depot injections of LA microspheres. Treatment duration was up to 32 weeks for the 4-month formulation and 48 weeks for the 6-month formulation. The proportion of patients achieving the 20 ng/dL threshold was determined every 4 weeks.Results: Pooled analysis showed that 152 of 193 (79% of patients achieved serum testosterone levels of ≤20 ng/dL at 4 weeks, and

  16. Partnership duration, concurrency, and HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Larry; Isaac, Alan

    2017-07-01

    A widely accepted explanation for the exceptionally high HIV prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa is the practice of long-term overlapping heterosexual partnering. This article shows that long-duration concurrent partnering can be protective against HIV transmission rather than promoting it. Monogamous partnering prevents sexual transmission to anyone outside the partnership and, in an initially concordant-seronegative partnership, prevents sexual acquisition of HIV by either partner. Those protections against transmission and acquisition last as long as the partnership persists without new outside partnerships. Correspondingly, these two protective effects characterise polygynous partnerships, whether or not the polygyny is formal or informal, until a partner initiates a new partnership. Stable and exclusive unions of any size protect against HIV transmission, and more durable unions provide a longer protective effect. Survey research provides little information on partnership duration in sub-Saharan Africa and sheds no light on the interaction of duration, concurrency, and HIV. This article shows how assumptions about partnership duration in individual-based sexual-network models affect the contours of simulated HIV epidemics. Longer mean partnership duration slows the pace at which simulated epidemics grow. With plausible assumptions about partnership duration and at levels of concurrency found in the region, simulated HIV epidemics grow slowly or not at all. Those results are consistent with the hypothesis that long-duration partnering is protective against HIV and inconsistent with the hypothesis that long-term concurrency drives the HIV epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa.

  17. Determinants of overweight with concurrent stunting among Ghanaian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsu, Benedicta K; Guure, Chris; Laar, Amos K

    2017-07-27

    Malnutrition (undernutrition and overnutrition) is a major public health problem in Ghana -affecting growth and development of individuals and the nation. Stunting and overweight are of particular interest, as recent national surveys show a rising trend of overnutrition and stubbornly high burden of stunting among Ghanaian children. There are currently no data on the simultaneous occurrence of overweight and stunting within individuals in Ghana. This paper presents the burden, the individual-level, and contextual determinants of overweight with concurrent stunting among Ghanaian children. This study analyzed data set of the fourth round of the Ghana Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS4). Bivariate analyses were used to describe selected characteristics of survey respondents and their children. Hierarchical modelling approach facilitated identification of significant distal, intermediate and proximal factors/determinants of concurrent stunting and overweight. Both crude and adjusted prevalence ratios via a multivariable Poison regression model with their corresponding 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) are reported. Variables with p ≤ 0.25 at the bivariate level were included in the multivariable analysis. An alpha value of 5% was used to indicate significance. Of 7550 cases (children) analyzed, the prevalence of stunting was 27.5%; underweight was 17.3%; and wasting was 7.7%. The prevalence of overweight and concurrent overweight and stunting were respectively 2.4% and 1.2%. Children who belonged to the fourth wealth quintile, were more likely to be overweight and concurrently stunted as against children belonging to the poorest quintile (aPR = 1.010; 95% CI, 1.003-1.017). Compared to religious (Christians/Muslim/Traditionalist) household heads, children whose household heads did not belong to any religion had 2 times the rates of the Overweight with concurrent stunting (PR = 2.024; 95% CI, 1.016-4.034). Children with mothers aged 20-34 and 35-49 had an

  18. Prognostic value of fasting versus nonfasting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels on long-term mortality: insight from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES-III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Bethany; Guo, Yu; Xu, Jinfeng; Weintraub, Howard; Mora, Samia; Maron, David J; Bangalore, Sripal

    2014-08-12

    National and international guidelines recommend fasting lipid panel measurement for risk stratification of patients for prevention of cardiovascular events. However, the prognostic value of fasting versus nonfasting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is uncertain. Patients enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES-III), a nationally representative cross-sectional survey performed from 1988 to 1994, were stratified on the basis of fasting status (≥8 or fasting and nonfasting cohorts with similar baseline characteristics. The risk of outcomes as a function of LDL-C and fasting status was assessed with the use of receiver operating characteristic curves and bootstrapping methods. The interaction between fasting status and LDL-C was assessed with Cox proportional hazards modeling. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcome was cardiovascular mortality. One-to-one matching based on propensity score yielded 4299 pairs of fasting and nonfasting individuals. For the primary outcome, fasting LDL-C yielded prognostic value similar to that for nonfasting LDL-C (C statistic=0.59 [95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.61] versus 0.58 [95% confidence interval, 0.56-0.60]; P=0.73), and LDL-C by fasting status interaction term in the Cox proportional hazards model was not significant (Pinteraction=0.11). Similar results were seen for the secondary outcome (fasting versus nonfasting C statistic=0.62 [95% confidence interval, 0.60-0.66] versus 0.62 [95% confidence interval, 0.60-0.66]; P=0.96; Pinteraction=0.34). Nonfasting LDL-C has prognostic value similar to that of fasting LDL-C. National and international agencies should consider reevaluating the recommendation that patients fast before obtaining a lipid panel. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Zwitterion-functionalized polymer microspheres as a sorbent for solid phase extraction of trace levels of V(V), Cr(III), As(III), Sn(IV), Sb(III) and Hg(II) prior to their determination by ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaoyu; Gong, Dirong; Zhao, Junyi; Ren, Hongyun; Wang, Jiani; Zhang, Xian

    2018-03-19

    This paper describes the preparation of zwitterion-functionalized polymer microspheres (ZPMs) and their application to simultaneous enrichment of V(V), Cr(III), As(III), Sn(IV), Sb(III) and Hg(II) from environmental water samples. The ZPMs were prepared by emulsion copolymerization of ethyl methacrylate, 2-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate and triethylene glycol dimethyl acrylate followed by modification with 1,3-propanesultone. The components were analyzed by elemental analyses as well as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The ZPMs were packed into a mini-column for on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) of the above metal ions. Following extraction with 40 mM NH 4 NO 3 and 0.5 M HNO 3 solution, the ions were quantified by ICP-MS. Under the optimized conditions, the enrichment factors (from a 40 mL sample) are up to 60 for the ions V(V), As(III), Sb(III) and Hg(II), and 55 for Cr(III) and Sn(IV). The detection limits are 1.2, 3.4, 1.0, 3.7, 2.1 and 1.6 ng L -1 for V(V), Cr(III), As(III), Sn(IV), Sb(III) and Hg(II), respectively, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) are below 5.2%. The feasibility and accuracy of the method were validated by successfully analyzing six certified reference materials as well as lake, well and river waters. Graphical abstract Zwitterion-functionalized polymer microspheres (ZPMs) were prepared and packed into a mini-column for on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) via pump 1. Then V(V), Cr(III), As(III), Sn(IV), Sb(III) and Hg(II) ions in environmental waters were eluted and submitted to ICP-MS via pump 2.

  20. Voltammetric determination of ultratrace levels of cerium(III) using a carbon paste electrode modified with nano-sized cerium-imprinted polymer and multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, Taher; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Akhoundian, Maede; Norouzi, Parviz

    2016-01-01

    A carbon paste electrode was modified with a Ce(III)-imprinted polymer (Ce-IP) and used for voltammetric determination of Ce(III) ions in real water samples. Precipitation polymerization was used for synthesis of the nano-sized Ce-IP from vinylpyridine and methacrylic acid (acting as the complexing ligands and functional monomers), divinylbenzene (cross-linker) and AIBN as the radical starter. The Ce-IP was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and zeta potentials. A carbon paste electrode (CPE) was then impregnated with the Ce-IP and used for the extraction and subsequent determination of Ce(III). Oxidative square wave voltammetry showed the electrode to give a significantly better response than an electrode modified with the non-imprinted polymer. The addition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes to the Ce-IP-modified electrode further improves the signal, thereby increasing the sensitivity of the method. The effects of electrode composition, extraction pH value, volume and time were optimized. The electrode, if operated at a voltage of 1.05 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), displays a linear response to Ce(III) in the 1.0 μM to 25 pM concentration range, and the detection limit is 10 pM (at an S/N ratio of 3). The relative standard deviation of 5 separate determinations is 3.1 %. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Ce(III) in the spiked samples of drinking water and sea water. (author)

  1. The Caltech Concurrent Computation Program - Project description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, G.; Otto, S.; Lyzenga, G.; Rogstad, D.

    1985-01-01

    The Caltech Concurrent Computation Program wwhich studies basic issues in computational science is described. The research builds on initial work where novel concurrent hardware, the necessary systems software to use it and twenty significant scientific implementations running on the initial 32, 64, and 128 node hypercube machines have been constructed. A major goal of the program will be to extend this work into new disciplines and more complex algorithms including general packages that decompose arbitrary problems in major application areas. New high-performance concurrent processors with up to 1024-nodes, over a gigabyte of memory and multigigaflop performance are being constructed. The implementations cover a wide range of problems in areas such as high energy and astrophysics, condensed matter, chemical reactions, plasma physics, applied mathematics, geophysics, simulation, CAD for VLSI, graphics and image processing. The products of the research program include the concurrent algorithms, hardware, systems software, and complete program implementations.

  2. MLIP: A Concurrent Approach for Clipping Indexing

    OpenAIRE

    Majoju Ravinder; R.Vijay Prakash

    2011-01-01

    Multidimensional databases are beginning to be used in a wide range of applications. To meet this fast-growing demand, the R-tree family is being applied to support fast access to multidimensional data, for which the R+-tree exhibits outstanding search performance. In order to support efficient concurrent access in multi-user environments, concurrency control mechanisms for multidimensional indexing have been proposed. However, these mechanisms cannot be directly applied to the R+-tree becaus...

  3. Prostatic Adenocarcinoma with Concurrent Sertoli Cell Tumor in a Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    A case of metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma with concurrent Sertoli cell tumor is presented in an old, miniature Schnauzer dog. The prostatic neoplasm was highly anaplastic and had metastasized widely. Clinical signs were compatible with increased estrogen production. It is interesting to note that the prostatic carcinoma, usually considered to be androgen dependent, developed and metastasized, despite the presence of apparently increased estrogen levels. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:7340923

  4. Short-term Mobility and Increased Partnership Concurrency among Men in Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Cassels

    Full Text Available Migration has long been understood as an underlying factor for HIV transmission, and sexual partner concurrency has been increasingly studied as an important component of HIV transmission dynamics. However, less work has examined the role of short-term mobility in sexual partner concurrency using a network approach. Short-term mobility may be a risk for HIV for the migrant's partner as well either through the partner's risk behaviors while the migrant is away, such as the partner having additional partners, or via exposure to the return migrant.Using data from the 2010-11 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey, weighted generalized linear regression models were used to investigate the associations between short-term mobility and partnership concurrency at the individual and partnership levels.At the individual level, we find strong evidence of an association between short-term mobility and concurrency. Men who traveled were more likely to have concurrent partnerships compared to men who did not travel and the relationship was non-linear: each trip was associated with a 2% higher probability of concurrency, with a diminishing risk at 60 trips (p<0.001. At the partnership level, short-term mobility by the male only or both partners was associated with male concurrency. Couples in which the female only traveled exhibited less male concurrency.Short-term mobility has the ability to impact population-level transmission dynamics by facilitating partnership concurrency and thus onward HIV transmission. Short-term migrants may be an important population to target for HIV testing, treatment, or social and behavioral interventions to prevent the spread of HIV.

  5. Prognostic value of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen and squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels for patients with stage I-III non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiation therapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yoshihiro; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    1998-01-01

    Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC Ag) levels have been reported to be useful as prognostic factors, indicators of clinical response, and predictors for recurrence in patients with lung cancer treated by surgery or chemotherapy. We investigated whether pretreatment serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were useful as independent prognostic factors in patients with stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with radiation therapy alone. The serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were measured in 158 and 47 patients, respectively, before radiation therapy. Serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were measured by sandwich radioimmunoassay using the CEA-RIA (radioimmunoassay) kit and the SCC-RIA kit. Serum CEA and SCC Ag levels were above reference values in 19% and 30% of the patients, respectively. The 5-year survival rates were significantly better for patients with a negative SCC Ag result than for those with positive SCC Ag levels (p=0.0001), though no significant difference in survival rates was seen by CEA positivity (p=0.25). SCC Ag positivity (p=0.0006) and stage (p=0.04) were the important prognostic factors, as determined by multivariate analyses. Pretreatment serum SCC Ag level may be useful as an independent prognostic factor in patients with stage I to III non-small cell lung cancer who are treated with radiation therapy alone. (author)

  6. Exploiting communication concurrency on high performance computing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaimov, Nicholas [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Ibrahim, Khaled Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Samuel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Iancu, Costin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Although logically available, applications may not exploit enough instantaneous communication concurrency to maximize hardware utilization on HPC systems. This is exacerbated in hybrid programming models such as SPMD+OpenMP. We present the design of a "multi-threaded" runtime able to transparently increase the instantaneous network concurrency and to provide near saturation bandwidth, independent of the application configuration and dynamic behavior. The runtime forwards communication requests from application level tasks to multiple communication servers. Our techniques alleviate the need for spatial and temporal application level message concurrency optimizations. Experimental results show improved message throughput and bandwidth by as much as 150% for 4KB bytes messages on InfiniBand and by as much as 120% for 4KB byte messages on Cray Aries. For more complex operations such as all-to-all collectives, we observe as much as 30% speedup. This translates into 23% speedup on 12,288 cores for a NAS FT implemented using FFTW. We also observe as much as 76% speedup on 1,500 cores for an already optimized UPC+OpenMP geometric multigrid application using hybrid parallelism.

  7. (III) chloride

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were possibly higher as volatile solid (VS) degradation increased in all ADs during the dosing period. ... level before it reaches electric generators, gas storage units ..... A disadvantage is the iron consumption by other reactions in the liquid ...

  8. Concurrent sourcing and external supplier opportunism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mols, Niels Peter

    costs of opportunism are determined as a product of four factors. The four factors are: likelihood of discovering supplier opportunism, buyer’s internalized quantity as reaction to supplier opportunism, asset specificity of external supplier’s investments, and multiplicator effects. Each......When a firm simultaneously makes and buys the same components then the firm uses concurrent sourcing. This paper presents an agency model for explaining how and when concurrent sourcing reduces the likelihood of external supplier opportunism. In the proposed model, the external supplier’s expected...... of these factors are explained and discussed in the paper. The paper ends by offering a number of theoretical and managerial implications....

  9. Notes on Timed Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Valencia, Frank D.

    2004-01-01

    and program reactive systems. This note provides a comprehensive introduction to the background for and central notions from the theory of tccp. Furthermore, it surveys recent results on a particular tccp calculus, ntcc, and it provides a classification of the expressive power of various tccp languages.......A constraint is a piece of (partial) information on the values of the variables of a system. Concurrent constraint programming (ccp) is a model of concurrency in which agents (also called processes) interact by telling and asking information (constraints) to and from a shared store (a constraint...

  10. Emotion as Opportunity: Reflections on Multiple Concurrent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Partner reduction has been shown to be one of the most important aspects of any programme that seeks to contain the spread of HIV. In South Africa, however, multiple concurrent sexual partnerships are a common feature of township life for young people, especially young men. Following on from XXXXX's (2009) study on ...

  11. Declarative interpretations of session-based concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cano, Mauricio; Rueda, Camilo; López-Acosta, Hugo-Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Session-based concurrency is a type-based approach to the analysis of communication-intensive systems. Correct behavior in these systems may be specified in an operational or declarative style: the former defines how interactions are structured; the latter defines governing conditions...

  12. Integrated concurrent utilization quality review, Part one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterinicchio, R P

    1987-01-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series which argues for the concurrent management of the appropriateness, necessity, and quality of patient care. Intensifying scrutiny by the credentialing groups, the PROs and all third-party payors underscores the vital need to implement cost-effective information systems which integrate the departmentalized functions of patient-physician profiling, DRG case-mix analyses, length of stay monitoring, pre-admission/admission and continued stay review, discharge planning, risk management, incident reporting and quality review. In the domain of physician performance regarding admitting and practice patterns, the ability to exercise concurrent utilization-quality review means early detection and prevention of events which would otherwise result in denials of payment and/or compromised patient care. Concurrent utilization-quality review must, by definition, be managerially invasive and focused; hence, it is integral to maintaining the integrity of the services and product lines offered by the provider. In fact, if PPO status is a marketing agenda, then the institutional objectives of cost-effectiveness, productivity, value, and competitiveness can only be achieved through concurrent utilization-quality review.

  13. An Evaluation of Concurrent Priority Queue Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    path pronlem are testedi A! -S7 ?o An Evaluation of Concurrent Priority Queue Algorithms bv Qin Huang BS. Uiversity - of Science andi Technology of China...who have always supported me through my entire career and made my life more enjoyable. This research was supported in part by the Advanced Research

  14. Concurrent Engineering in seafood product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsdottir, Stella; Vesterager, Johan; Børresen, Torger

    1998-01-01

    benefit from the CE approach which can support product developers to provide concurrent specifications for raw materials, ingredients, packaging, and production methods. The approach involves the use of product models from which line extensions are more easily generated than by use of customary stepwise...... techniques. it is anticipated that other food industries also can benefit from the more simultaneous approach...

  15. Concurrency meets probability: theory and practice (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katoen, Joost P.

    Treating random phenomena in concurrency theory has a long tradition. Petri nets [18, 10] and process algebras [14] have been extended with probabilities. The same applies to behavioural semantics such as strong and weak (bi)simulation [1], and testing pre-orders [5]. Beautiful connections between

  16. On run-time exploitation of concurrency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzenspies, P.K.F.

    2010-01-01

    The `free' speed-up stemming from ever increasing processor speed is over. Performance increase in computer systems can now only be achieved through parallelism. One of the biggest challenges in computer science is how to map applications onto parallel computers. Concurrency, seen as the set of

  17. Concurrent Design of Embedded Control Software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, M.A.; Frijns, Raymond; Voeten, Jeroen; Broenink, Johannes F.; Margaria, T.; Padberg, J.; Taentzer, G.; Levendovszky, T.; Lengyel, L.; Karsai, G.; Hardebolle, C.

    2009-01-01

    Embedded software design for mechatronic systems is becoming an increasingly time-consuming and error-prone task. In order to cope with the heterogeneity and complexity, a systematic model-driven design approach is needed, where several parts of the system can be designed concurrently. There is

  18. Angelic semantics of fine-grained concurrency

    OpenAIRE

    Dan R. Ghica; Andrzej S. Murawski

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a game model for an Algol-like programming language with primitives for parallel composition and synchronization on semaphores. The semantics is based on a simplified version of Hyland–Ong-style games and it emphasizes the intuitive connection between the concurrent nature of games and that of computation. The model is fully abstract for may-equivalence.

  19. A body sensor platform for concurrent applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, T.V.; Verhoeven, R.; Lukkien, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a Body Sensor Platform supporting concurrent applications that share resources and data. Concerns are application isolation, data privacy and platform trustworthiness in view of dynamic loading of applications. A prototype has been built on commercial-off-the-shelf hardware. The

  20. 29 CFR 502.17 - Concurrent actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Concurrent actions. 502.17 Section 502.17 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS ENFORCEMENT OF CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS FOR TEMPORARY ALIEN AGRICULTURAL WORKERS ADMITTED UNDER SECTION 218 OF THE IMMIGRATION...

  1. 29 CFR 501.17 - Concurrent actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Concurrent actions. 501.17 Section 501.17 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS ENFORCEMENT OF CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS FOR TEMPORARY ALIEN AGRICULTURAL WORKERS ADMITTED UNDER SECTION 218 OF THE IMMIGRATION...

  2. Concurrent analysis: towards generalisable qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Austyn; Martin, Colin R

    2011-10-01

    This study develops an original method of qualitative analysis coherent with its interpretivist principles. The objective is to increase the likelihood of achieving generalisability and so improve the chance of the findings being translated into practice. Good qualitative research depends on coherent analysis of different types of data. The limitations of existing methodologies are first discussed to justify the need for a novel approach. To illustrate this approach, primary evidence is presented using the new methodology. The primary evidence consists of a constructivist grounded theory of how mental health nurses with prescribing authority integrate prescribing into practice. This theory is built concurrently from interviews, reflective accounts and case study data from the literature. Concurrent analysis. Ten research articles and 13 semi-structured interviews were sampled purposively and then theoretically and analysed concurrently using constructivist grounded theory. A theory of the process of becoming competent in mental health nurse prescribing was generated through this process. This theory was validated by 32 practising mental health nurse prescribers as an accurate representation of their experience. The methodology generated a coherent and generalisable theory. It is therefore claimed that concurrent analysis engenders consistent and iterative treatment of different sources of qualitative data in a manageable manner. This process supports facilitation of the highest standard of qualitative research. Concurrent analysis removes the artificial delineation of relevant literature from other forms of constructed data. This gives researchers clear direction to treat qualitative data consistently raising the chances of generalisability of the findings. Raising the generalisability of qualitative research will increase its chances of informing clinical practice. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Concurrent sexual partnerships among men who have sex with men in Shenzhen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Toan H; Liu, Hongjie; Liu, Hui; Cai, Yumao; Feng, Tiejian

    2010-08-01

    The HIV epidemic spreads among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. The objective of this study was to examine and compare HIV/AIDS knowledge and sexual risk for HIV between MSM who engaged in concurrent sexual partnerships and MSM who did not. A cross-sectional study using respondent driven sampling was conducted among 351 MSM in Shenzhen, China. About half (49%) of respondents reported having concurrent sexual partnerships during the past 6 months. Among MSM with concurrent sexual partnerships, 62% had only male partners and 38% had both male and female partners. The proportion of inconsistent condom use was 42% among MSM with concurrent partners and 30% among MSM without. These 2 groups reported a similar level of self-perceived risk for HIV. Compared to MSM without concurrent sexual partners, those with such partners were more likely to work in entertainment venues and had a lower level of HIV/AIDS knowledge. The large number of MSM engaging in concurrent sexual partnerships and the high prevalence of bisexuality could accelerate the spread of HIV to the general population unless effective HIV interventions for MSM are implemented in China.

  4. Analysis of Item-Level Bias in the Bayley-III Language Subscales: The Validity and Utility of Standardized Language Assessment in a Multilingual Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Shaun K Y; Tham, Elaine K H; Magiati, Iliana; Sim, Litwee; Sanmugam, Shamini; Qiu, Anqi; Daniel, Mary L; Broekman, Birit F P; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne

    2017-09-18

    The purpose of this study was to improve standardized language assessments among bilingual toddlers by investigating and removing the effects of bias due to unfamiliarity with cultural norms or a distributed language system. The Expressive and Receptive Bayley-III language scales were adapted for use in a multilingual country (Singapore). Differential item functioning (DIF) was applied to data from 459 two-year-olds without atypical language development. This involved investigating if the probability of success on each item varied according to language exposure while holding latent language ability, gender, and socioeconomic status constant. Associations with language, behavioral, and emotional problems were also examined. Five of 16 items showed DIF, 1 of which may be attributed to cultural bias and another to a distributed language system. The remaining 3 items favored toddlers with higher bilingual exposure. Removal of DIF items reduced associations between language scales and emotional and language problems, but improved the validity of the expressive scale from poor to good. Our findings indicate the importance of considering cultural and distributed language bias in standardized language assessments. We discuss possible mechanisms influencing performance on items favoring bilingual exposure, including the potential role of inhibitory processing.

  5. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rice, Jarret A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-10-03

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  6. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L.; Rice, Jarret A.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2017-01-01

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  7. Trace elements studies on Karachi populations, part III: blood copper, zinc, magnesium and lead levels in psychiatric patients with disturbed behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manser, W.T.

    1989-01-01

    Blood levels of copper, zinc, magnesium and lead were determined in 29 males and 15 females suffering from disturbed behavior. As far as we could ascertain they were under no medication and belong to low income groups. Male patients had significantly higher levels than female patients for zinc but there was no sexual difference for magnesium or cooper. In patients copper and lead levels were higher than for normals, but no difference could be found for Mg and Zn. At least one metal abnormality was observed in 19 of the males and 9 (60.0%) of the female patients. (author)

  8. Transactions Concurrency Control in Web Service Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrifai, Mohammad; Dolog, Peter; Nejdl, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    an engineering point of view as it does not change the way consumers or clients of web services have to be programmed. Furthermore, it avoids direct communication between transaction coordinators which preserves security by keeping the information about business transactions restricted to the coordinators which......Business transactions in web service environments run with relaxed isolation and atomicity property. In such environments, transactions can commit and roll back independently on each other. Transaction management has to reflect this issue and address the problems which result for example from...... concurrent access to web service resources and data. In this paper we propose an extension to the WS-Transaction Protocol which ensures the consistency of the data when independent business transactions access the data concurrently under the relaxed transaction properties. Our extension is based...

  9. IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational–vibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy levels and transition wavenumbers for H216O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Bernath, Peter F.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Császár, Attila G.; Daumont, Ludovic; Gamache, Robert R.; Hodges, Joseph T.; Naumenko, Olga V.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Vandaele, Ann Carine; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Al Derzi, Afaf R.; Fábri, Csaba; Fazliev, Alexander Z.; Furtenbacher, Tibor

    2013-01-01

    This is the third of a series of articles reporting critically evaluated rotational–vibrational line positions, transition intensities, and energy levels, with associated critically reviewed labels and uncertainties, for all the main isotopologues of water. This paper presents experimental line positions, experimental-quality energy levels, and validated labels for rotational–vibrational transitions of the most abundant isotopologue of water, H 2 16 O. The latest version of the MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational–Vibrational Energy Levels) line-inversion procedure is used to determine the rovibrational energy levels of the electronic ground state of H 2 16 O from experimentally measured lines, together with their self-consistent uncertainties, for the spectral region up to the first dissociation limit. The spectroscopic network of H 2 16 O containstwo components, an ortho (o) and a para (p) one. For o-H 2 16 O and p-H 2 16 O, experimentally measured, assigned, and labeled transitions were analyzed from more than 100 sources. The measured lines come from one-photon spectra recorded at room temperature in absorption, from hot samples with temperatures up to 3000 K recorded in emission, and from multiresonance excitation spectra which sample levels up to dissociation. The total number of transitions considered is 184 667 of which 182 156 are validated: 68 027 between para states and 114 129 ortho ones. These transitions give rise to 18 486 validated energy levels, of which 10 446 and 8040 belong to o-H 2 16 O and p-H 2 16 O, respectively. The energy levels, including their labeling with approximate normal-mode and rigid-rotor quantum numbers, have been checked against ones determined from accurate variational nuclear motion computations employing exact kinetic energy operators as well as against previous compilations of energy levels. The extensive list of MARVEL lines and levels obtained are deposited in the supplementary data of this paper, as well as in a

  10. Maternal obesity (Class I-III), gestational weight gain and maternal leptin levels during and after pregnancy : a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Carlhäll, Sara; Bladh, Marie; Brynhildsen, Jan; Claesson, Ing-Marie; Josefsson, Ann; Sydsjö, Gunilla; Thorsell, Annika; Blomberg, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Maternal obesity is accompanied by maternal and fetal complications during and after pregnancy. The risks seem to increase with degree of obesity. Leptin has been suggested to play a role in the development of obesity related complications. Whether maternal leptin levels differ between obese and morbidly obese women, during and after pregnancy, have to our knowledge not been previously described. Neither has the association between maternal leptin levels and gestational weight gain...

  11. Micro-transactions for concurrent data structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meawad, Fadi; Iyer, Karthik; Schoeberl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    implementation of transactional memory that we call micro-transactions. In particular, we argue that hardware support for micro-transactions allows us to efficiently implement certain data structures. Those data structures are difficult to realize with the atomic operations provided by stock hardware and provide......, atomic instructions, and micro-transactions. Our results suggest that transactional memory is an interesting alternative to traditional concurrency control mechanisms....

  12. Continuous Activity Monitoring During Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin, E-mail: ohri.nitin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Bodner, William R.; Mehta, Keyur J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Shankar, Viswanathan [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Halmos, Balazs; Haigentz, Missak [Department of Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Rapkin, Bruce [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To perform a prospective trial testing the feasibility and utility of acquiring activity data as a measure of health status during concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ambulatory patients who were planned for treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with curative intent for cancers of the head and neck, lung, or gastrointestinal tract were provided with activity monitors before treatment initiation. Patients were asked to wear the devices continuously throughout the radiation therapy course. Step count data were downloaded weekly during radiation therapy and 2 and 4 weeks after radiation therapy completion. The primary objective was to demonstrate feasibility, defined as collection of step counts for 80% of the days during study subjects' radiation therapy courses. Secondary objectives included establishing step count as a dynamic predictor of unplanned hospitalization risk. Results: Thirty-eight enrolled patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Primary diagnoses included head and neck cancer (n=11), lung cancer (n=13), and a variety of gastrointestinal cancers (n=14). Step data were collected for 1524 of 1613 days (94%) during patients' radiation therapy courses. Fourteen patients were hospitalized during radiation therapy or within 4 weeks of radiation therapy completion. Cox regression modeling demonstrated a significant association between recent step counts (3-day average) and hospitalization risk, with a 38% reduction in the risk of hospitalization for every 1000 steps taken each day (hazard ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.83, P=.002). Inferior quality of life scores and impaired performance status were not associated with increased hospitalization risk. Conclusion: Continuous activity monitoring during concurrent chemoradiotherapy is feasible and well-tolerated. Step counts may serve as powerful, objective, and dynamic indicators of hospitalization risk.

  13. Continuous Activity Monitoring During Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohri, Nitin; Kabarriti, Rafi; Bodner, William R.; Mehta, Keyur J.; Shankar, Viswanathan; Halmos, Balazs; Haigentz, Missak; Rapkin, Bruce; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a prospective trial testing the feasibility and utility of acquiring activity data as a measure of health status during concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ambulatory patients who were planned for treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with curative intent for cancers of the head and neck, lung, or gastrointestinal tract were provided with activity monitors before treatment initiation. Patients were asked to wear the devices continuously throughout the radiation therapy course. Step count data were downloaded weekly during radiation therapy and 2 and 4 weeks after radiation therapy completion. The primary objective was to demonstrate feasibility, defined as collection of step counts for 80% of the days during study subjects' radiation therapy courses. Secondary objectives included establishing step count as a dynamic predictor of unplanned hospitalization risk. Results: Thirty-eight enrolled patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Primary diagnoses included head and neck cancer (n=11), lung cancer (n=13), and a variety of gastrointestinal cancers (n=14). Step data were collected for 1524 of 1613 days (94%) during patients' radiation therapy courses. Fourteen patients were hospitalized during radiation therapy or within 4 weeks of radiation therapy completion. Cox regression modeling demonstrated a significant association between recent step counts (3-day average) and hospitalization risk, with a 38% reduction in the risk of hospitalization for every 1000 steps taken each day (hazard ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.83, P=.002). Inferior quality of life scores and impaired performance status were not associated with increased hospitalization risk. Conclusion: Continuous activity monitoring during concurrent chemoradiotherapy is feasible and well-tolerated. Step counts may serve as powerful, objective, and dynamic indicators of hospitalization risk.

  14. Concurrent semantics for structured design methods

    OpenAIRE

    Nixon, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    Also in Jelly, I., Gordon, I., & Groll, P. Software Engineering for Parallel and Distributed Systems. London: Chapman Hall. Design methods can be ambiguous due to di#11;erent interpretations of symbols or concepts. This paper presents a formal semantics for the Ward/Mellor Structured Analysis Method for Real Time systems. These semantics ensures that an unambiguous meaning can be attributed to a particular design. Speci#12;cally, it ensures that concurrent and real-time propert...

  15. Salivary gland function after concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Kenichiro; Shimane, Toshikazu; Uzuki, Aya; Sugimoto, Akane; Mori, Tomoaki; Akiyama, Rio; Gomibuchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Sei; Sanbe, Takeyuki

    2011-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cancer of head and neck is becoming more and more prevalent. In fact, it is considered to better maintain quality of life (QOL) of patients than operative treatment in terms of preserving the functions, organs, and structures, but recently I seems that it does not maintain the QOL of patients better than operative treatment because its complications after therapy disturb daily life. We previously conducted a questionnaire survey that investigated the complications experienced by patients who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and reported that xerostomia was markedly reduced QOL in these patients. In this study, we divided patients who were exposed to radiation in both major salivary glands into two groups: 20 patients who received a 36 Gy dose of radiation (36 Gy group) and 15 patients who underwent radiation therapy alone at a dose of 40 Gy (radiotherapy (RT) group). The gum test was conducted with the following results (mean volume of saliva): 11.2 ml in the 36 Gy group, 6.0 ml in the RT group. There was no significant difference between the 36 Gy group and RT group. Our findings suggest that there is no significant difference in the extent of salivary gland dysfunction even after chemotherapy is carried out concurrently with radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Paclitaxel and concurrent radiation for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safran, Howard; Wanebo, Harry J.; Hesketh, Paul J.; Akerman, Paul; Ianitti, David; Cioffi, William; Di Petrillo, Thomas; Wolf, Brian; Koness, James; McAnaw, Robert; Moore, Todd; Chen, M.-H.; Radie-Keane, Kathy

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the activity and toxicity of paclitaxel and concurrent radiation for gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients were studied. Twenty-five had proximal gastric cancers, two had distal cancers. Eight had esophageal extension, 6 had celiac adenopathy, and 7 had retroperitoneal adenopathy. Patients received paclitaxel, 50 mg/m 2 by 3-hour intravenous (IV) infusion, weekly, on days 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29. Radiation was administered concurrently to a total dose of 45.0 Gy, in 1.80 Gy fractions, for 25 treatments. Patients who were medically or surgically inoperable received a sixth week of paclitaxel with a radiation boost to 50.4 Gy. Results: Esophagitis and gastritis were the most important toxicities, Grade 3 in four patients (15%), and Grade 4 in three patients (11%). Five patients (19%) had Grade 3 nausea. The overall response rate was 56%, including three patients (11%) with a complete response. The 2-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 29% and 31%, respectively. Conclusion: Concurrent paclitaxel and radiation demonstrates substantial local-regional activity in gastric cancer. Future investigations combining paclitaxel and radiation with other local-regional and systemic treatments are warranted

  17. Managing Asynchronous Data in ATLAS's Concurrent Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Baines, John; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In order to be able to make effective use of emerging hardware, where the amount of memory available to any CPU is rapidly decreasing as the core count continues to rise, ATLAS has begun a migration to a concurrent, multi-threaded software framework, known as AthenaMT. Significant progress has been made in implementing AthenaMT - we can currently run realistic Geant4 simulations on massively concurrent machines. the migration of realistic prototypes of reconstruction workflows is more difficult, given the large amounts of legacy code and the complexity and challenges of reconstruction software. These types of workflows, however, are the types that will most benefit from the memory reduction features of a multi-threaded framework. One of the challenges that we will report on in this paper is the re-design and implementation of several key asynchronous technologies whose behaviour is radically different in a concurrent environment than in a serial one, namely the management of Conditions data and the Detector D...

  18. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Wakako; Ogino, Takashi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    To investigate factors influencing response and survival for patients with squamous cell cancer of the esophagus. Forty-nine patients with squamous cell cancer of the esophagus, classified by guidelines for the clinical and pathologic studies on carcinoma of the esophagus published by the Japanese Society for Esophageal Disease, were treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy using chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil with definitive irradiation of 60 Gy concurrently. Endoscopic findings and biopsy were used for evaluating the response. Nurse charts recording patient's feeding status were adopted to estimate severity of dysphagia. Complete response (CR) rate was 69.4%, median survival time (MST) was 12.3 months, and median local failure-free survival time 7.3 months. Patients in early stage (= 32.4 months, 20.4 months, 20.4 months, 15.7 months, respectively). Patients in A3 stage were often suffered from severe dysphagia both before and after treatment (81.5%, 70.4%), respectively. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy was effective treatment for esophageal cancer. Degree of dysphagia was considered to be a good prognosticator of patients' survival. (author)

  19. Planning sentences while doing other things at the same time: effects of concurrent verbal and visuospatial working memory load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Jana; Mädebach, Andreas; Oppermann, Frank; Jescheniak, Jörg D

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated to what extent advance planning during sentence production is affected by a concurrent cognitive load. In two picture-word interference experiments in which participants produced subject-verb-object sentences while ignoring auditory distractor words, we assessed advance planning at a phonological (lexeme) and at an abstract-lexical (lemma) level under visuospatial or verbal working memory (WM) load. At the phonological level, subject and object nouns were found to be activated before speech onset with concurrent visuospatial WM load, but only subject nouns were found to be activated with concurrent verbal WM load, indicating a reduced planning scope as a function of type of WM load (Experiment 1). By contrast, at the abstract-lexical level, subject and object nouns were found to be activated regardless of type of concurrent load (Experiment 2). In both experiments, sentence planning had a more detrimental effect on concurrent verbal WM task performance than on concurrent visuospatial WM task performance. Overall, our results suggest that advance planning at the phonological level is more affected by a concurrently performed verbal WM task than advance planning at the abstract-lexical level. Also, they indicate an overlap of resources allocated to phonological planning in speech production and verbal WM.

  20. Nano-level monitoring of Yb(III) by fabrication of coated graphite electrode based on newly synthesized hexaaza macrocyclic ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ashok K., E-mail: akscyfcy@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology-Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Singh, Prerna [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology-Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2009-06-08

    The two macrocyclic ligands 2,12-(2-methoxyaniline){sub 2}-4,14-Me{sub 2}-[20]-1,4,11,14-tetraene-1,5,8,11,15,18-N{sub 6} (L{sub 1}) and 2,12-(2-methoxyaniline){sub 2}-4,14-Me{sub 2}-8,18-dimethylacrylate-[20] -1,4,11,14-tetraene-1,5,8,11,15,18-N{sub 6} (L{sub 2}) have been synthesized and explored as neutral ionophores for preparing poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) based membrane sensors selective to Yb(III) ions. Effects of various plasticizers and anion excluders were studied in detail and improved performance was observed. The best performance was obtained for the membrane sensor having a composition of L{sub 2}:PVC:BA:NaTPB in the ratio of 5: 40: 52: 3 (w/w; mg). The performance of the membrane based on L{sub 2} was compared with polymeric membrane electrode (PME) as well as with coated graphite electrode (CGE). The electrodes exhibit Nernstian slope for Yb{sup 3+} ions with limits of detection of 4.3 x 10{sup -8} M for PME and 5.8 x 10{sup -9} M for CGE. The response time for PME and CGE was found to be 10 s and 8 s, respectively. The potentiometric responses are independent of the pH of the test solution in the pH range 3.0-8.0 for PME and 2.5-8.5 for CGE. The CGE has found to work satisfactorily in partially non-aqueous media upto 30% (v/v) content of methanol, ethanol and 20% (v/v) content of acetonitrile and could be used for a period of 5 months. The CGE was used as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Yb{sup 3+} ions with EDTA and in determination of fluoride ions in mouthwash samples. It can be used for determination of sulfite in red and white wine samples and also in determination of Yb{sup 3+} in various binary mixtures with quantitative results.

  1. Nano-level monitoring of Yb(III) by fabrication of coated graphite electrode based on newly synthesized hexaaza macrocyclic ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ashok K.; Singh, Prerna

    2009-01-01

    The two macrocyclic ligands 2,12-(2-methoxyaniline) 2 -4,14-Me 2 -[20]-1,4,11,14-tetraene-1,5,8,11,15,18-N 6 (L 1 ) and 2,12-(2-methoxyaniline) 2 -4,14-Me 2 -8,18-dimethylacrylate-[20] -1,4,11,14-tetraene-1,5,8,11,15,18-N 6 (L 2 ) have been synthesized and explored as neutral ionophores for preparing poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) based membrane sensors selective to Yb(III) ions. Effects of various plasticizers and anion excluders were studied in detail and improved performance was observed. The best performance was obtained for the membrane sensor having a composition of L 2 :PVC:BA:NaTPB in the ratio of 5: 40: 52: 3 (w/w; mg). The performance of the membrane based on L 2 was compared with polymeric membrane electrode (PME) as well as with coated graphite electrode (CGE). The electrodes exhibit Nernstian slope for Yb 3+ ions with limits of detection of 4.3 x 10 -8 M for PME and 5.8 x 10 -9 M for CGE. The response time for PME and CGE was found to be 10 s and 8 s, respectively. The potentiometric responses are independent of the pH of the test solution in the pH range 3.0-8.0 for PME and 2.5-8.5 for CGE. The CGE has found to work satisfactorily in partially non-aqueous media upto 30% (v/v) content of methanol, ethanol and 20% (v/v) content of acetonitrile and could be used for a period of 5 months. The CGE was used as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Yb 3+ ions with EDTA and in determination of fluoride ions in mouthwash samples. It can be used for determination of sulfite in red and white wine samples and also in determination of Yb 3+ in various binary mixtures with quantitative results.

  2. Reliability and Concurrent Validity of the International Personality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reliability and Concurrent Validity of the International Personality item Pool (IPIP) Big-five Factor Markers in Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Psychiatry ... Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the internal consistency and concurrent validity ...

  3. Preliminary Proceedings 15th International Workshop on Expressiveness in Concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The EXPRESS workshops aim at bringing together researchers interested in the relations between various formal systems, particularly in the field of Concurrency. More specifically, they focus on the comparison between programming concepts (such as concurrent, functional, imperative, logic and obje...

  4. Children Who Desperately Want To Read, but Are Not Working at Grade Level: Use Movement Patterns as "Windows" To Discover Why. Part III: The Frontal Midline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Marjorie

    A longitudinal research study observed 30 children between the ages of infancy and elementary age to determine if using large muscle motor patterns to master the three identified midlines that concur with the body planes used in anatomy is reflected in academic classroom learning levels. This third part of the study focused on the frontal midline.…

  5. Effects of resveratrol, grape juice or red wine consumption Irisin levels and fibronectin type III domain containing protein 5 and uncoupoling protein gene expression modulation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle de Souza Rocha

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: Resveratrol and grape juice were able to increase muscle tissue FNDC5 gene expression, and high-fat diet, red wine and resveratrol, increased UCP2 gene expression in this tissue. Grape juice was capable of increasing adipose tissue UCP2 gene expression. High-fat diet, isolated or associated to beverages rich in polyphenols, have decreased FNDC5 gene expression in adipose tissue. Nevertheless, the interventions did not affect irisin levels.

  6. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: interrater reliability and concurrent validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    Research into the pathophysiology and treatment of hypertrophic scar (HSc) remains limited by the heterogeneity of scar and the imprecision with which its severity is measured. The objective of this study was to test the interrater reliability and concurrent validity of the Cutometer measurement of elasticity, the Mexameter measurement of erythema and pigmentation, and total thickness measure of the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar, and HSc. Three independent investigators evaluated 128 sites (severe HSc, moderate or mild HSc, donor site, and normal skin) on 32 burn survivors using all of the above measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient, which was used to measure interrater reliability, reflects the inherent amount of error in the measure and is considered acceptable when it is >0.75. Interrater reliability of the totals of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS fell below the acceptable limit ( congruent with0.50). The individual subscales of the mVSS fell well below the acceptable level (0.89) for each study site with the exception of severe scar. Mexameter and DermaScan C reliability measurements were acceptable for all sites (>0.82). Concurrent validity correlations with the mVSS were significant except for the comparison of the mVSS pliability subscale and the Cutometer maximum deformation measure comparison in severe scar. In conclusion, the Mexameter and DermaScan C measurements of scar color and thickness of all sites, as well as the Cutometer measurement of elasticity in all but the most severe scars shows high interrater reliability. Their significant concurrent validity with the mVSS confirms that these tools are measuring the same traits as the mVSS, and in a more objective way.

  7. Phase I Results of Vinorelbine With Concurrent Radiotherapy in Elderly Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: West Japan Thoracic Oncology Group (WJTOG3005-DI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Hideyuki, E-mail: h.harada@scchr.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Seto, Takashi [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Kyushu Cancer Center, Fukuoka (Japan); Igawa, Satoshi [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Tsuya, Asuka [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Wada, Mayuko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Kaira, Kyoichi; Naito, Tateaki [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Nishimura, Tetsuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Masuda, Noriyuki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Yamamoto, Nobuyuki [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of concurrent vinorelbine and thoracic radiotherapy in elderly patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were 71 years of age or older with unresectable Stage III NSCLC. Patients were treated with thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy) and concurrent vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} in Level 1 and 25 mg/m{sup 2} in Level 2) on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for two cycles, followed by adjuvant vinorelbine (25 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for two cycles. Results: Four patients were enrolled at Level 1. One patient experienced Grade 3 febrile neutropenia at Level 1 and the dose was escalated to Level 2. At Level 2, 2 of 6 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities (Grade 4 neutropenia in 1 patient and Grade 3 infection in another). Three of 6 patients developed late Grade 2 or 3 pneumonitis. Therefore, the dose was de-escalated to Level 1. An additional 6 patients were enrolled at Level 1, 4 of whom experienced dose-limiting toxicities (incomplete radiotherapy because of Grade 2 pneumonitis in 1 patient and Grade 3 infection in 1, Grade 3 febrile neutropenia in 1, and Grade 3 esophagitis in 1). Moreover, late Grade 3 pneumothorax and Grade 5 pneumonitis occurred in 1 and 1 patient, respectively. Overall, Grade 2, 3 and 5 pneumonitis occurred in 3, 3, and 1 among 16 patients, respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent vinorelbine and thoracic radiotherapy resulted in a high incidence of severe pneumonitis when the standard dose of this agent was used for elderly patients. We therefore recommend caution in the use of this regimen and schedule for elderly patients.

  8. Relaxation of helium levels excited by heavy ion impact: III.- Orientation by anisotropic relaxation of excited atoms in previously aligned states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamoun, E.; Lombardi, M.; Carre, M.; Gaillard, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    In the last paper of this series devoted to relaxation phenomena in a low pressure cell of helium excited by an accelerated ion beam, experimental evidence is given for a new mechanism of transfer between alignment and orientation through anisotropic relaxation of initially aligned excited states. The theory predicting this effect is briefly outlined and then description is given of the exact experimental conditions to detect the circularly polarized component of the light emitted by the target excited in the 4 1 D level of He I by Na + impact [fr

  9. High orbital angular momentum states in H2 and D2. III. Singlet--triplet splittings, energy levels, and ionization potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungen, C.; Dabrowski, I.; Herzberg, G.; Vervloet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 5g--4 f Rydberg groups of H 2 and D 2 first studied in paper I have been obtained with a tenfold increase in resolution which made it possible to resolve the singlet from the triplet components. As a result we can now establish separately precise values for the energy levels in the triplet and singlet systems. For this purpose we have remeasured a number of transitions between the lower energy levels for which at present only old measurements are available. In particular we obtain accurate values for the energies of the lowest (stable) triplet state a 3 Σ + g relative to the singlet ground state, as well as of the ionization potential. The values obtained for the former are more accurate than obtained from singlet--triplet anticrossings while the latter are of similar accuracy as those reported recently by McCormack et al. [Phys. Rev. A 39, 2260 (1989)] and fit well within this accuracy with the most recent ab initio values

  10. Concurrent conditional clustering of multiple networks: COCONETS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Kleessen

    Full Text Available The accumulation of high-throughput data from different experiments has facilitated the extraction of condition-specific networks over the same set of biological entities. Comparing and contrasting of such multiple biological networks is in the center of differential network biology, aiming at determining general and condition-specific responses captured in the network structure (i.e., included associations between the network components. We provide a novel way for comparison of multiple networks based on determining network clustering (i.e., partition into communities which is optimal across the set of networks with respect to a given cluster quality measure. To this end, we formulate the optimization-based problem of concurrent conditional clustering of multiple networks, termed COCONETS, based on the modularity. The solution to this problem is a clustering which depends on all considered networks and pinpoints their preserved substructures. We present theoretical results for special classes of networks to demonstrate the implications of conditionality captured by the COCONETS formulation. As the problem can be shown to be intractable, we extend an existing efficient greedy heuristic and applied it to determine concurrent conditional clusters on coexpression networks extracted from publically available time-resolved transcriptomics data of Escherichia coli under five stresses as well as on metabolite correlation networks from metabolomics data set from Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to eight environmental conditions. We demonstrate that the investigation of the differences between the clustering based on all networks with that obtained from a subset of networks can be used to quantify the specificity of biological responses. While a comparison of the Escherichia coli coexpression networks based on seminal properties does not pinpoint biologically relevant differences, the common network substructures extracted by COCONETS are supported by

  11. Concurrent Dynamics of Category Learning and Metacognitive Judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valnea Žauhar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In two experiments, we examined the correspondence between the dynamics of metacognitive judgments and classification accuracy when participants were asked to learn category structures of different levels of complexity, i.e., to learn tasks of types I, II and III according to Shepard, Hovland, and Jenkins (1961. The stimuli were simple geometrical figures varying in the following three dimensions: color, shape, and size. In Experiment 1, we found moderate positive correlations between confidence and accuracy in task type II and weaker correlation in task type I and III. Moreover, the trend analysis in the backward learning curves revealed that there is a non-linear trend in accuracy for all three task types, but the same trend was observed in confidence for the task type I and II but not for task type III. In Experiment 2, we found that the feeling-of-warmth judgments (FOWs showed moderate positive correlation with accuracy in all task types. Trend analysis revealed a similar non-linear component in accuracy and metacognitive judgments in task type II and III but not in task type I. Our results suggest that FOWs are a more sensitive measure of the progress of learning than confidence because FOWs capture global knowledge about the category structure, while confidence judgments are given at the level of an individual exemplar.

  12. Relaxed Operational Semantics of Concurrent Programming Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Petri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel, operational framework to formally describe the semantics of concurrent programs running within the context of a relaxed memory model. Our framework features a "temporary store" where the memory operations issued by the threads are recorded, in program order. A memory model then specifies the conditions under which a pending operation from this sequence is allowed to be globally performed, possibly out of order. The memory model also involves a "write grain," accounting for architectures where a thread may read a write that is not yet globally visible. Our formal model is supported by a software simulator, allowing us to run litmus tests in our semantics.

  13. Moments analysis of concurrent Poisson processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBeth, G.W.; Cross, P.

    1975-01-01

    A moments analysis of concurrent Poisson processes has been carried out. Equations are given which relate combinations of distribution moments to sums of products involving the number of counts associated with the processes and the mean rate of the processes. Elimination of background is discussed and equations suitable for processing random radiation, parent-daughter pairs in the presence of background, and triple and double correlations in the presence of background are given. The theory of identification of the four principle radioactive series by moments analysis is discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Amplitude modulation detection with concurrent frequency modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Naveen K

    2016-09-01

    Human speech consists of concomitant temporal modulations in amplitude and frequency that are crucial for speech perception. In this study, amplitude modulation (AM) detection thresholds were measured for 550 and 5000 Hz carriers with and without concurrent frequency modulation (FM), at AM rates crucial for speech perception. Results indicate that adding 40 Hz FM interferes with AM detection, more so for 5000 Hz carrier and for frequency deviations exceeding the critical bandwidth of the carrier frequency. These findings suggest that future cochlear implant processors, encoding speech fine-structures may consider limiting the FM to narrow bandwidth and to low frequencies.

  15. Concurrency control in distributed database systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cellary, W; Gelenbe, E

    1989-01-01

    Distributed Database Systems (DDBS) may be defined as integrated database systems composed of autonomous local databases, geographically distributed and interconnected by a computer network.The purpose of this monograph is to present DDBS concurrency control algorithms and their related performance issues. The most recent results have been taken into consideration. A detailed analysis and selection of these results has been made so as to include those which will promote applications and progress in the field. The application of the methods and algorithms presented is not limited to DDBSs but a

  16. Weekly paclitaxel with concurrent radiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Wei; Ding Weijun; Yang Haihua; Shao Minghai; Wang Biyun; Wang Jianhua; Wu Sufang; Wu Shixiu; Jin Lihui; Ma, Charlie C.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of weekly paclitaxel with concurrent radiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and materials: Between 2004 and 2007, 54 patients with locally advanced NPC were included in this protocol. Patient characteristics: median age 48; 69% male; 52% World Health Organization (WHO) III; 50% stage III, 50% stage IV. The patients underwent a course of definitive conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 7 weeks with 2 Gy/fraction), with concurrent weekly paclitaxel 35 mg/m 2 from the first to the sixth week of radiation. AC was started 4 weeks after the end of the radiotherapy (RT), paclitaxel 135 mg/m 2 on day 1 and cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 on days 1-3 were administered every 4 weeks for two cycles. Results: Median follow-up was 32 months. Eighty-five percentage of complete response and 15% partial response were achieved at the time of one month after AC. The 3-year actuarial rate of local regional control was 86%; distant metastases-free survival, progression-free survival and overall survival at 3 years were 81%, 69% and 76%, respectively. Forty-nine (91%) patients completed six courses of concurrent chemotherapy with weekly paclitaxel, and 4 (7%) patients delayed at the second cycle of AC. No patient developed severe acute toxicities. Conclusions: Weekly paclitaxel with concurrent RT followed by AC is a potentially effective and toxicity tolerable method for locally advanced NPC. Further studies are needed to identify the optimal dose of weekly paclitaxel in this strategy.

  17. Determining the Probability of Violating Upper-Level Wind Constraints for the Launch of Minuteman III Ballistic Missiles at Vandenberg Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.; Brock, Tyler M.

    2012-01-01

    The 30th Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) provides comprehensive weather services to the space program at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. One of their responsibilities is to monitor upper-level winds to ensure safe launch operations of the Minuteman Ill ballistic missile. The 30 OSSWF tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to analyze VAFB sounding data with the goal of determining the probability of violating (PoV) their upper-level thresholds for wind speed and shear constraints specific to this launch vehicle, and to develop a tool that will calculate the PoV of each constraint on the day of launch. In order to calculate the probability of exceeding each constraint, the AMU collected and analyzed historical data from VAFB. The historical sounding data were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory archive for the years 1994-2011 and then stratified into four sub-seasons: January-March, April-June, July-September, and October-December. The AMU determined the theoretical distributions that best fit the maximum wind speed and maximum wind shear datasets and applied this information when calculating the averages and standard deviations needed for the historical and real-time PoV calculations. In addition, the AMU included forecast sounding data from the Rapid Refresh model. This information provides further insight for the launch weather officers (LWOs) when determining if a wind constraint violation will occur over the next few hours on the day of launch. The AMU developed an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) in Microsoft Excel using Visual Basic for Applications. The GUI displays the critical sounding data easily and quickly for LWOs on day of launch. This tool will replace the existing one used by the 30 OSSWF, assist the LWOs in determining the probability of exceeding specific wind threshold values, and help to improve the overall upper winds forecast for

  18. Business Case Analysis of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center Medical/Surgical Prime Vendor Generation III Service Level Electron Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-25

    SUpv 02 03566 US C Y Y Y 64770062 KP DM 4 3 YZ YB 󈨊C 11 CUST U SUpv 02 03566 WE C Y Y Y 44770062KaIUp MON 1 YZ Ys 𔃺G 12 CUST MS m 02 03546 WE Y Y...M1IN SP E3 91GI0 1 0 Y y 647700S3 An HDH 1 1722 06 MED RCDS ADMIN 13 00469 GS C Y Y Y 34770053 An 1SD0 1 1?2;! Cy MED RCOS DM SP" 13 00669 0 C Y Y Y T47...seleW Stodden servime __ Prime Vendor Service Level Election Program 84 Sw= LeW~ EWWt Form A BCD E 1 ______ S10.0004100,000 AmWWWesCommitmeit Plus

  19. Antithrombin III blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003661.htm Antithrombin III blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of AT III present ...

  20. GLobal Integrated Design Environment (GLIDE): A Concurrent Engineering Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Melissa L.; Kunkel, Matthew R.; Smith, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The GLobal Integrated Design Environment (GLIDE) is a client-server software application purpose-built to mitigate issues associated with real time data sharing in concurrent engineering environments and to facilitate discipline-to-discipline interaction between multiple engineers and researchers. GLIDE is implemented in multiple programming languages utilizing standardized web protocols to enable secure parameter data sharing between engineers and researchers across the Internet in closed and/or widely distributed working environments. A well defined, HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) based Application Programming Interface (API) to the GLIDE client/server environment enables users to interact with GLIDE, and each other, within common and familiar tools. One such common tool, Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation), paired with its add-in API for GLIDE, is discussed in this paper. The top-level examples given demonstrate how this interface improves the efficiency of the design process of a concurrent engineering study while reducing potential errors associated with manually sharing information between study participants.

  1. Optimisation of resistant starch II and III levels in durum wheat pasta to reduce in vitro digestibility while maintaining processing and sensory characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Nisha; Sissons, Mike; Fellows, Christopher M; Blazek, Jaroslav; Gilbert, Elliot P

    2013-01-15

    Foods with elevated levels of resistant starch (RS) may have beneficial effects on human health. Pasta was enriched with commercial resistant starches (RSII, Hi Maize™ 1043; RSIII, Novelose 330™) at 10%, 20% and 50% substitution of semolina for RSII and 10% and 20% for RSIII and compared with pasta made from 100% durum wheat semolina to investigate technological, sensory, in vitro starch digestibility and structural properties. The resultant RS content of pasta increased from 1.9% to ∼21% and was not reduced on cooking. Significantly, the results indicate that 10% and 20% RSII and RSIII substitution of semolina had no significant effects on pasta cooking loss, texture and sensory properties, with only a minimal reduction in pasta yellowness. Both RS types lowered the extent of in vitro starch hydrolysis compared to that of control pasta. X-ray diffraction and small-angle scattering verified the incorporation of RS and, compared to the control sample, identified enhanced crystallinity and a changed molecular arrangement following digestion. These results can be contrasted with the negative impact on pasta resulting from substitution with equivalent amounts of more traditional dietary fibre such as bran. The study suggests that these RS-containing formulations may be ideal sources for the preparation of pasta with reduced starch digestibility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An Assessment of Direct Restorative Material Use in Posterior Teeth by American and Canadian Pediatric Dentists: III. Preferred Level of Participation in Decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Rae E; Andrews, Paul; Sigal, Michael J; Azarpazhooh, Amir

    2016-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess Canadian and American pediatric dentists' preferred level of participation in clinical decision-making. A web-based survey was used to collect the opinions of all active Royal College of Dentists of Canada members and American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry members on the use of direct restorative materials in posterior teeth (n equals 4,648; 19.3 percent response rate). The main survey also included a domain to elicit participants' preferred role in clinical decision-making, ranging from an active role (the dentist takes the primary role in decision-making while considering patients/caregivers opinions) to a passive role (the dentist prefers to have the patient guide the decision-making). Bivariate and multivariate analyses for the preferred role and its predictor were performed (two-tailed Pparticipants preferred an active role. The passive role was chosen three times more by those who worked in a hospital-based setting (odds ratio [OR] equals 3.15, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] equals 1.13 to 8.79) or a university-based setting versus a combined setting (OR equals 3.61, 95 percent CI equals 1.11 to 11.77). The majority of participants preferred an active role in decision-making, a role that may not be consistent with a patient-centered practice that emphasizes patient autonomy in decision-making.

  3. High levels of the type III inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 (SLC20A1) can confer faster cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsfelt, Iben Boutrup; Byskov, Kristina; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup

    2014-01-01

    overexpression led to faster cell spreading. The final total numbers of attached cells did, however, not differ between cultures of PiT1 overexpressing cells and control cells of neither cell type. We suggest that the PiT1-mediated fast adhesion potentials allow the cells to go faster out of G0/G1 and thereby......The inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 (SLC20A1) is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian cells. We recently showed that overexpression of human PiT1 was sufficient to increase proliferation of two strict density-inhibited cell lines, murine fibroblastic NIH3T3 and pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells......, and allowed the cultures to grow to higher cell densities. In addition, upon transformation NIH3T3 cells showed increased ability to form colonies in soft agar. The cellular regulation of PiT1 expression supports that cells utilize the PiT1 levels to control proliferation, with non-proliferating cells showing...

  4. A concurrent multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shaofan; Tong, Qi

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have derived a multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) from first principle to extend the (Andersen)-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to mesoscale and continuum scale. The multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics is a con-current three-scale dynamics that couples a fine scale molecular dynamics, a mesoscale micromorphic dynamics, and a macroscale nonlocal particle dynamics together. By choosing proper statistical closure conditions, we have shown that the original Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics is the homogeneous and equilibrium case of the proposed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics. In specific, we have shown that the Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics can be rigorously formulated and justified from first principle, and its general inhomogeneous case, i.e., the three scale con-current multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics can take into account of macroscale continuum mechanics boundary condition without the limitation of atomistic boundary condition or periodic boundary conditions. The discovered multiscale scale structure and the corresponding multiscale dynamics reveal a seamless transition from atomistic scale to continuum scale and the intrinsic coupling mechanism among them based on first principle formulation

  5. Note on specifying and verifying concurrent processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holenderski, L.

    1984-02-28

    To represent sequential processes, sets of finite sequences of symbols from a finite alphabet are used in this approach, alphabet symbols denote events occurring when a process is being executed, a sequence of symbols is a record of one execution of the process, and a set of such sequences represents the process itself by combining all its possible executions together. Although this model turned out adequate for specifying concurrent processes and allows proving their properties, there are two reasons, at least, why this note takes the same subject up again. First, by analogy to shuffle and its closure, which express parallel combination and parallel iteration of non-interacting processes, there is a need for a similar operation describing the behaviour of interaction processes. A new extension of shuffle is proposed as a generalization. The closure of this operation provides a tool for specification of parallelly iterated processes. Moreover, the closure makes mutually recursive specification unnecessary. Second, when this model was used to prove properties of concurrent computations, only flow-of-control schemes were considered (thus, only some general properties were proved). When applied to concrete programs using variables that have values, such schemes had to be interpreted. In contrast to such a schematic approach, the usefulness of the same method for concrete programs is argued. This is shown using an example of a correctness proof of an implementation of unbounded semaphore by binary semaphores. 8 references.

  6. National energy peak leveling program (NEPLP). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    This multisectioned three-Volume report is responsive to the requirements of Contract E (04-3)-1152 to provide a detailed methodology, to include management, technology, and socio-economic aspects, of a voluntary community program of computer-assisted peak load leveling and energy conservation in commercial community facilities. The demonstration project established proof-of-concept in reducing the kW-demand peak by the unofficial goal of 10%, with concurrent kWh savings. This section of volume III contains appendixes of information on load shedding determination, analysis, socio-economic study, contractual cross references, and definitions.

  7. National energy peak leveling program (NEPLP). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    This three-volume report is responsive to the requirements of contract E (04-3)-1152 to provide a detailed methodology, to include management, technology, and socio-economic aspects, of a voluntary community program for computer-assisted peak load leveling and energy conservation in commercial community facilities. The demonstration project established proof-of-concept in reducing the kW-demand peak by the unofficial goal of 10%, with concurrent kWh savings. The report consists of the following three volumes: Volume I: management overview; Volume II: methodology and technology; and Volume III; appendices.

  8. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a containment level-III laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Kym S; Burdz, Tamara V; Turenne, Christine Y; Sharma, Meenu K; Kabani, Amin M; Wolfe, Joyce N

    2005-01-24

    In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3) laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating/chemical fixation) may not consistently kill MTB organisms. An inclusive viability study (n = 226) was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7%) of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80 degrees C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18), resulting in 0% viability. This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation) or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a CL3 laboratory. This process is vital to establish in

  9. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a Containment Level-III Laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabani Amin M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3 laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating /chemical fixation may not consistently kill MTB organisms. Methods An inclusive viability study (n = 226 was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Results Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7% of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80°C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18, resulting in 0% viability. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a

  10. Concurrent Engineering Working Group White Paper Distributed Collaborative Design: The Next Step in Aerospace Concurrent Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hihn, Jairus; Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Karpati, Gabriel; McGuire, Melissa; Panek, John; Warfield, Keith; Borden, Chester

    2011-01-01

    As aerospace missions grow larger and more technically complex in the face of ever tighter budgets, it will become increasingly important to use concurrent engineering methods in the development of early conceptual designs because of their ability to facilitate rapid assessments and trades of performance, cost and schedule. To successfully accomplish these complex missions with limited funding, it is essential to effectively leverage the strengths of individuals and teams across government, industry, academia, and international agencies by increased cooperation between organizations. As a result, the existing concurrent engineering teams will need to increasingly engage in distributed collaborative concurrent design. The purpose of this white paper is to identify a near-term vision for the future of distributed collaborative concurrent engineering design for aerospace missions as well as discuss the challenges to achieving that vision. The white paper also documents the advantages of creating a working group to investigate how to engage the expertise of different teams in joint design sessions while enabling organizations to maintain their organizations competitive advantage.

  11. Analyzing and designing object-oriented missile simulations with concurrency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randorf, Jeffrey Allen

    2000-11-01

    A software object model for the six degree-of-freedom missile modeling domain is presented. As a precursor, a domain analysis of the missile modeling domain was started, based on the Feature-Oriented Domain Analysis (FODA) technique described by the Software Engineering Institute (SEI). It was subsequently determined the FODA methodology is functionally equivalent to the Object Modeling Technique. The analysis used legacy software documentation and code from the ENDOSIM, KDEC, and TFrames 6-DOF modeling tools, including other technical literature. The SEI Object Connection Architecture (OCA) was the template for designing the object model. Three variants of the OCA were considered---a reference structure, a recursive structure, and a reference structure with augmentation for flight vehicle modeling. The reference OCA design option was chosen for maintaining simplicity while not compromising the expressive power of the OMT model. The missile architecture was then analyzed for potential areas of concurrent computing. It was shown how protected objects could be used for data passing between OCA object managers, allowing concurrent access without changing the OCA reference design intent or structure. The implementation language was the 1995 release of Ada. OCA software components were shown how to be expressed as Ada child packages. While acceleration of several low level and other high operations level are possible on proper hardware, there was a 33% degradation of 4th order Runge-Kutta integrator performance of two simultaneous ordinary differential equations using Ada tasking on a single processor machine. The Defense Department's High Level Architecture was introduced and explained in context with the OCA. It was shown the HLA and OCA were not mutually exclusive architectures, but complimentary. HLA was shown as an interoperability solution, with the OCA as an architectural vehicle for software reuse. Further directions for implementing a 6-DOF missile modeling

  12. Modal Profiles for the WISC-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, David A.; Livingston, Ronald B.; Reynolds, Cecil R.; Moses, James A., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a normative typology for classifying the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III) factor index profiles according to profile shape. Current analyses indicate that overall profile level accounted for a majority of the variance in WISC-III index scores, but a considerable proportion of the variance was because of…

  13. High rate of severe radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy with concurrent cetuximab in head and neck cancer: Results of a survey in EORTC institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giro, Christian; Berger, Bernhard; Boelke, Edwin; Ciernik, I. Frank; Duprez, Frederic; Locati, Laura; Maillard, Sophie; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Pfeffer, Raphael; Robertson, A. Gerry; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Budach, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Examination of the rate of grade III or grade IV radiation dermatitis during treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) with radiotherapy (RT) and concurrent cetuximab in EORTC centres. Materials and method: A questionnaire was sent to all members of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group and Head and Neck Group (111 institutions) to evaluate the widespread use of cetuximab and radiotherapy in HNC and to estimate the frequency of grades III and IV skin reactions in the radiation portals associated with this protocol. Co-morbidities, RT schedules and co-medications were also recorded. Results: We received responses from 28 institutions in 11 countries. A total of 125 HNC patients from 15 institutions were treated with cetuximab and concurrent RT. Information about the skin reactions was available from 71 patients. Of these 36 had no grade III/IV adverse effects in the RT field, 15 had a grade III and 20 had grade IV radiation dermatitis. No detectable relation of grades III and IV radiation dermatitis with co-morbidities such as liver insufficiency or renal dysfunction was found. Conclusion: According to the results of the questionnaire, grade III/IV radiation dermatitis is observed in 49% of HNC patients treated with cetuximab and concurrent RT. A systematic clinical monitoring of cutaneous side effects during RT plus cetuximab is advised to ensure the safety of this protocol

  14. Concurrent hypokalemic periodic paralysis and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lin Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary periodic paralysis is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of ion-channel dysfunction, manifested by episodic flaccid paresis secondary to abnormal sarcolemma excitability. Membrane destabilization involving Na, K-ATPase has been hypothesized to be a biological etiology of the bipolar disorder (BD and the mechanisms underlying lithium therapy have been linked to it. To date, there has been only one reported case of BD comorbid with periodic paralysis. Herein, we reported another case of concurrent bipolar mania and hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP, one special form of periodic paralysis. Consistent with the previous case, our patient responded well to lithium treatment for both bipolar mania and HPP. This might provide some support to the hypothesis that the therapeutic effects of lithium in both BD and HPP could be due to the correction of the underlying common pathophysiology.

  15. An unusual case of concurrent insulinoma and nesidioblastosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Elizabeth; Garcea, Giuseppe; Ong, Seok L; Madira, Webster; Berry, David P; Dennison, Ashley R

    2008-09-02

    Endogenous hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia in adults is most commonly caused by an insulinoma. Adult nesidioblastosis is rarely reported. To the best of our knowledge the presence of both insulinoma and nesidioblastosis has not been reported before. We report a case of a 35-year-old female presenting with neuroglycaemic symptoms. A supervised 72-hour fast confirmed hypoglycaemia in the presence of hyperinsulinaemia. Thorough pre-operative biochemical and radiological investigations, including selective splenic, superior mesenteric and portal venous sampling inferred a tentative diagnosis of adult nesidioblastosis. However, a grossly elevated insulin level within the splenic vein on a second set of venous sampling produced a high index of suspicion for the presence of an insulinoma. At surgical exploration both an insulinoma and nesidioblastosis were identified and confirmed by histological examination. We report an even rarer entity of concurrent insulinoma and nesidioblastosis.

  16. MACHINE PROTECTION SYSTEM FOR CONCURRENT OPERATION OF RHIC AND BLIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILINSKI, M.; BELLAVIA, S.; GLENN, J.W.; MAUSNER, L.F.; UNGER, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    The Brookhaven 200MeV linac is a multipurpose machine used to inject low intensity polarized protons for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), as well as to inject high intensity protons to BLIP (Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer), a medical isotope production facility. If high intensity protons were injected to RHIC by mistake, administrative radiation limits could be exceeded or sensitive electronics could be damaged. In the past, the changeover from polarized proton to high intensity proton operation has been a lengthy process, thereby never allowing the two programs to run simultaneously. To remedy this situation and allow concurrent operation of RHIC and BLIP, an active interlock system has been designed to monitor current levels in the AGS using two current transformers with fail safe circuitry and associated electronics to inhibit beam to RHIC if high intensity currents are detected

  17. Machine Protection System for Concurrent Operation of RHIC and BLIP

    CERN Document Server

    Wilinski, Michelle; Glenn, Joseph; Mausner, Leonard; Unger, Kerry

    2005-01-01

    The Brookhaven 200 MeV linac is a multipurpose machine used to inject low intensity polarized protons ultimately ending up in RHIC as well as to inject high intensity protons to BLIP, a medical isotope production facility. If high intensity protons were injected to RHIC by mistake, administrative radiation limits could be exceeded or sensitive electronics could be damaged. In the past, the changeover from polarized proton to high intensity proton operation has been a lengthy process, thereby never allowing the two programs to run simultaneously. To remedy this situation and allow for concurrent operation of RHIC and BLIP, an active interlock system has been designed to monitor current levels in the AGS using two current transformers with fail safe circuitry and associated electronics to inhibit beam to RHIC if high intensity is detected.

  18. Fine-grained Information Flow for Concurrent Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ximeng

    and reference monitors, have been proposed in the context of programming languages and process calculi, to enforce such properties. The most widely used definitions of information flow security are noninterference-like properties. For concurrent systems where processes communicate with each other to accomplish...... computational tasks, fine-grained security policies can be formulated by distinguishing between whether communication can happen, and what is communicated. As the first contribution of this PhD thesis, we formulate a noninterference-like property that takes all combinations of sensitivity levels for “whether...... to a classical one when the two dimensions are intentionally blurred. As the second contribution, we focus on the “what” dimension and further allow the flow policy to vary under different contents stored and communicated. This is the area of content-dependent (or conditional) information flow, which has...

  19. Holledge gauge failure testing using concurrent information processing algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, G.E.; Daniel, W.E.; Edwards, R.E.; Jannarone, R.J.; Joshi, S.N.; Palakodety, S.S.; Qian, D.

    1996-01-01

    For several decades, computerized information processing systems and human information processing models have developed with a good deal of mutual influence. Any comprehensive psychology text in this decade uses terms that originated in the computer industry, such as ''cache'' and ''memory'', to describe human information processing. Likewise, many engineers today are using ''artificial intelligence''and ''artificial neural network'' computing tools that originated as models of human thought to solve industrial problems. This paper concerns a recently developed human information processing model, called ''concurrent information processing'' (CIP), and a related set of computing tools for solving industrial problems. The problem of focus is adaptive gauge monitoring; the application is pneumatic pressure repeaters (Holledge gauges) used to measure liquid level and density in the Defense Waste Processing Facility and the Integrated DWPF Melter System

  20. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  1. Level III Ecoregions of North Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  2. Level III Ecoregions of New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  3. Level III Ecoregions of New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  4. Level III Eco Regions for New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  5. Level III Ecoregions of New Hampshire

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  6. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  7. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  8. Level III Ecoregions of West Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  9. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions for EPA Administrative Regions were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the...

  10. Level III Ecoregions of New York

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  11. Level III Ecoregions of North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  12. Level III Ecoregions of Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  13. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  14. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  15. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions for EPA Administrative Regions were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the...

  16. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  17. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  18. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  19. Level III Ecoregions of South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  20. Erlang Programming A Concurrent Approach to Software Development

    CERN Document Server

    Cesarini, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    This book offers you an in-depth explanation of Erlang, a programming language ideal for any situation where concurrency, fault-tolerance, and fast response is essential. You'll learn how to write complex concurrent programs in this language, regardless of your programming background or experience. Erlang Programming focuses on the language's syntax and semantics, and explains pattern matching, proper lists, recursion, debugging, networking, and concurrency, with exercises at the end of each chapter.

  1. High rate of severe radiation dermatitis during radiation therapy with concurrent cetuximab in head and neck cancer : Results of a survey in EORTC institutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giro, Christian; Berger, Bernhard; Boelke, Edwin; Ciernik, I. Frank; Duprez, Frederic; Locati, Laura; Maillard, Sophie; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Pfeffer, Raphael; Robertson, A. Gerry; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Budach, Wilfried

    Objective: Examination of the rate of grade III or grade IV radiation dermatitis during treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) with radiotherapy (RT) and concurrent cetuximab in EORTC centres. Materials and method: A questionnaire was sent to all members of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group and

  2. A Highly Concurrent Replicated Data Structure EAI Endorsed Transactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Well defined concurrent replicated data structure is very important to design collaborative editing system, particularly, certain properties like out-of-order execution of concurrent operations and data convergence. In this paper, we introduce novel linear data structure based on unique identifier scheme required for indexed communication. These identifiers are real numbers holding specific pattern of precision. Based on the uniqueness and the total order of these identifiers, here, we present two concurrency control techniques to achieve high degree of concurrency according to strong and lazy happened-before relations. Our data structure preserves data convergence, yields better performance and avoids overheads as compared to existing approaches.

  3. Race-ethnic differences in the association of genetic loci with HbA1c levels and mortality in U.S. adults: the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsby, Jonna L; Porneala, Bianca C; Vassy, Jason L; Yang, Quanhe; Florez, José C; Dupuis, Josée; Liu, Tiebin; Yesupriya, Ajay; Chang, Man-Huei; Ned, Renee M; Dowling, Nicole F; Khoury, Muin J; Meigs, James B

    2012-04-27

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels diagnose diabetes, predict mortality and are associated with ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in white individuals. Genetic associations in other race groups are not known. We tested the hypotheses that there is race-ethnic variation in 1) HbA1c-associated risk allele frequencies (RAFs) for SNPs near SPTA1, HFE, ANK1, HK1, ATP11A, FN3K, TMPRSS6, G6PC2, GCK, MTNR1B; 2) association of SNPs with HbA1c and 3) association of SNPs with mortality. We studied 3,041 non-diabetic individuals in the NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) III. We stratified the analysis by race/ethnicity (NHW: non-Hispanic white; NHB: non-Hispanic black; MA: Mexican American) to calculate RAF, calculated a genotype score by adding risk SNPs, and tested associations with SNPs and the genotype score using an additive genetic model, with type 1 error = 0.05. RAFs varied widely and at six loci race-ethnic differences in RAF were significant (p differed by race-ethnicity (NHW: 10.4, NHB: 11.0, MA: 10.7, p race-ethnic heterogeneity. The combined impact of common HbA1c-associated variants on HbA1c levels varied by race-ethnicity, but did not influence mortality.

  4. Weighted f-values, A-values, and line strengths for the E1 transitions among 3d6, 3d54s, and 3d54p levels of Fe III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, Narayan C.; Hibbert, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Weighted oscillator strengths, weighted radiative rates, and line strengths for all the E1 transitions between 285 fine-structure levels belonging to the 3d 6 , 3d 5 4s, and 3d 5 4p configurations of Fe III are presented, in ascending order of wavelength. Calculations have been undertaken using the general configuration interaction (CI) code CIV3. The large configuration set is constructed by allowing single and double replacements from any of 3d 6 , 3d 5 4s, 3d 5 4p, and 3d 5 4d configurations to nl orbitals with n≤5,l≤3 as well as 6p. Additional selective promotions from 3s and 3p subshells are also included in the CI expansions to incorporate the important correlation effects in the n=3 shell. Results of some strong transitions between levels of 3d 6 , 3d 5 4s, and 3d 5 4p configurations are also presented and compared with other available calculations. It is found that large disagreements occur in many transitions among the existing calculations

  5. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced lung carcinoma: present results and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboul, F.; Vincent, P.; Brewer, Y.; Taulelle, M.

    1997-01-01

    The prognosis of locally advanced lung cancer is reportedly poor in all histologic types. In non-small cell lung cancer, radiation therapy alone results in disappointing long-term survival. Three recent randomized trials, however, have shown a limited but significant improvement of survival with induction chemotherapy, though local control remained poor in these studies as well as in small-cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy and late radiotherapy. Tow randomized trials focusing on small-cell lung cancer have recently shown significant benefit due to the combination of early concurrent mediastinal irradiation and chemotherapy, with major improvement in local control and a more than 40% 2-year survival rate. The concept of concurrent chemoradiotherapy has also been studied in non-small cell carcinoma with several pilot studies leading to both encouraging results and improved survival rate (up to 40% at 2 years). Ongoing phase III trials are comparing sequential versus concurrent chemoradiotherapy and will define the role of radical surgery after chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. (authors)

  6. Race-ethnic differences in the association of genetic loci with HbA1c levels and mortality in U.S. adults: the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimsby Jonna L

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels diagnose diabetes, predict mortality and are associated with ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in white individuals. Genetic associations in other race groups are not known. We tested the hypotheses that there is race-ethnic variation in 1 HbA1c-associated risk allele frequencies (RAFs for SNPs near SPTA1, HFE, ANK1, HK1, ATP11A, FN3K, TMPRSS6, G6PC2, GCK, MTNR1B; 2 association of SNPs with HbA1c and 3 association of SNPs with mortality. Methods We studied 3,041 non-diabetic individuals in the NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. We stratified the analysis by race/ethnicity (NHW: non-Hispanic white; NHB: non-Hispanic black; MA: Mexican American to calculate RAF, calculated a genotype score by adding risk SNPs, and tested associations with SNPs and the genotype score using an additive genetic model, with type 1 error = 0.05. Results RAFs varied widely and at six loci race-ethnic differences in RAF were significant (p ATP11A, the SNP RAF was 54% in NHB, 18% in MA and 14% in NHW (p 1c in NHW (β = 0.012 HbA1c increase per risk allele, p = 0.04 and MA (β = 0.021, p = 0.005 but not NHB (β = 0.007, p = 0.39. The genotype score was not associated with mortality in any group (NHW: OR (per risk allele increase in mortality = 1.07, p = 0.09; NHB: OR = 1.04, p = 0.39; MA: OR = 1.03, p = 0.71. Conclusion At many HbA1c loci in NHANES III there is substantial RAF race-ethnic heterogeneity. The combined impact of common HbA1c-associated variants on HbA1c levels varied by race-ethnicity, but did not influence mortality.

  7. Race-ethnic differences in the association of genetic loci with HbA1c levels and mortality in U.S. adults: the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels diagnose diabetes, predict mortality and are associated with ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in white individuals. Genetic associations in other race groups are not known. We tested the hypotheses that there is race-ethnic variation in 1) HbA1c-associated risk allele frequencies (RAFs) for SNPs near SPTA1, HFE, ANK1, HK1, ATP11A, FN3K, TMPRSS6, G6PC2, GCK, MTNR1B; 2) association of SNPs with HbA1c and 3) association of SNPs with mortality. Methods We studied 3,041 non-diabetic individuals in the NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) III. We stratified the analysis by race/ethnicity (NHW: non-Hispanic white; NHB: non-Hispanic black; MA: Mexican American) to calculate RAF, calculated a genotype score by adding risk SNPs, and tested associations with SNPs and the genotype score using an additive genetic model, with type 1 error = 0.05. Results RAFs varied widely and at six loci race-ethnic differences in RAF were significant (p HbA1c in NHW (β = 0.012 HbA1c increase per risk allele, p = 0.04) and MA (β = 0.021, p = 0.005) but not NHB (β = 0.007, p = 0.39). The genotype score was not associated with mortality in any group (NHW: OR (per risk allele increase in mortality) = 1.07, p = 0.09; NHB: OR = 1.04, p = 0.39; MA: OR = 1.03, p = 0.71). Conclusion At many HbA1c loci in NHANES III there is substantial RAF race-ethnic heterogeneity. The combined impact of common HbA1c-associated variants on HbA1c levels varied by race-ethnicity, but did not influence mortality. PMID:22540250

  8. Concurrency and climate change signal in Scottish flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, A. E.; Butler, A.; Goody, N.; Bertram, D.; Baggaley, N.; Tett, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    The Scottish Environment Protection Agency maintains a database of river gauging stations and intensity rain-gauges with a 3-hourly resolution that covers the majority of Scotland. Both SEPA and a number of other Scottish agencies are invested in climate change attribution in this data set. SEPA's main interest lies in trend detection and changes in river level (';stage') data throughout Scotland. Emergency response teams are more concerned with the concurrency of multiple flood events that might stretch their ability to respond effectively. Unfortunately, much of the rainfall signal within SEPA's river-gauge data is altered by land use changes, modified by artificial interventions such as reservoirs, compromised by tidal flow, or obscured by measurement issues. Data reduction techniques, indices of extreme rainfall, and hydrology-driven discrimination have been employed to produce a reduced set of flood-relevant information for 24-hour ';flashy' events. Links between this set and North Atlantic circulation have been explored, as have patterns of mutual occurrence across Scotland and location- and seasonally- dependent trends through time. Both frontal systems and summer convective storms have been characterised in terms of subsequent flood-inducing flow regime, their changing behaviour over the last fifty years, and their spatial extent. This is the first stage of an ongoing project that will intelligently expand to take less robust river and rain-gauge stations into account through statistical analysis and hydrological modelling. It is also the first study of its type to analyse a nation-scale dataset of both rainfall and river flow from multiple catchments for flood event concurrency. As rainfall events are expected to intensify across much of Europe, this kind of research is likely to have an increasing degree of relevance for policy-makers. This project demonstrates that productive, policy-relevant and mutually-rewarding partnerships are already underway.

  9. Concurrent applicative implementations of nondeterministic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salter, R

    1983-01-01

    The author introduces a methodology for utilizing concurrency in place of backtracking in the implementation of nondeterministic algorithms. This is achieved in an applicative setting through the use of the Friedman-Wise multiprogramming primitive frons, and a paradigm which views the action of nondeterministic algorithms as one of data structure construction. The element by element nondeterminism arising from a linearized search is replaced by a control structure which is oriented towards constructing sets of partial computations. This point of view is facilitated by the use of suspensions, which allow control disciplines to be embodied in the form of conceptual data structures that in reality manifest themselves only for purposes of control. He applies this methodology to the class of problems usually solved through the use of simple backtracking (e.g. 'eight queens'), and to a problem presented by Lindstrom (1979) to illustrate the use of coroutine controlled backtracking, to produce backtrack-free solutions. The solution to the latter illustrates the coroutine capability of suspended structures, but also demonstrates a need for further investigations into resolving problems of process communication in applicative languages. 14 references.

  10. Creatine and Caffeine: Considerations for Concurrent Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E

    2015-12-01

    Nutritional supplementation is a common practice among athletes, with creatine and caffeine among the most commonly used ergogenic aids. Hundreds of studies have investigated the ergogenic potential of creatine supplementation, with consistent improvements in strength and power reported for exercise bouts of short duration (≤ 30 s) and high intensity. Caffeine has been shown to improve endurance exercise performance, but results are mixed in the context of strength and sprint performance. Further, there is conflicting evidence from studies comparing the ergogenic effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous supplementation. Previous research has identified independent mechanisms by which creatine and caffeine may improve strength and sprint performance, leading to the formulation of multi-ingredient supplements containing both ingredients. Although scarce, research has suggested that caffeine ingestion may blunt the ergogenic effect of creatine. While a pharmacokinetic interaction is unlikely, authors have suggested that this effect may be explained by opposing effects on muscle relaxation time or gastrointestinal side effects from simultaneous consumption. The current review aims to evaluate the ergogenic potential of creatine and caffeine in the context of high-intensity exercise. Research directly comparing coffee and caffeine anhydrous is discussed, along with previous studies evaluating the concurrent supplementation of creatine and caffeine.

  11. Concurrent Oxytocin in Women Needing Second Dinoprostone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, Z.; Ashraf, M.; Irum, N.; Bashir, S.; Khaliq, N.; Yaqub, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To reduce average induction delivery internal in patients with poor Bishop score without compromising fetomaternal outcome (in terms of birth weight, NICU admission, maternal complications and mode of delivery). Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) General Hospital, Islamabad, from February to December 2009. Methodology: All patients needing 2nd dinoprostone pessary for induction of labour were included in the study. Patients with gestation below 37 weeks, those with intra-uterine growth restriction, bad obstetric history, previous uterine scar and patients in whom Bishop score improved for amniotomy after 1st dinoprostone pessary, were excluded. Data was collected on a special proforma where all variables were defined. Results:Out of 90 patients, 44 (48.8 percentage) had spontaneous vertex deliveries and 12 (13.3 percentage) had instrumental deliveries so a total vaginal deliveries occurred in 56 (62.2 percentage) patients. Thirty four patients (37.8 percentage) had emergency caesarean sections. Main indication for cesarean was failure to progress in 1st stage of labour followed by fetal distress. There were 3 failed inductions. Only 2 patients had hyperstimulation. NICU admission were 8 and all babies were discharged healthy from nursery with no case of early neonatal death. Conclusion:Concurrent oxytocin with 2nd dinoprostone in patients with poor Bishop scores (initial scores 2 and 3) resulted in more vaginal birth and comparatively shorter induction delivery time with almost negligible fetomaternal complications. (author)

  12. The Negotiation of Basel III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Sine Nørholm

    2015-01-01

    While the Basel Accords of 1988 and 2004 (Basel I and Basel II) ostensibly set out to regulate bank risk at the international level, they were effectively in the grip of neoliberal beliefs in the self-regulating potential of free markets. In 2009–2011, the Basel Accords were revised once more wit...... agency, the empirical argument is substantiated through textual–intertextual analysis of the rhetorical circulation of affective signs in the Basel III negotiations....

  13. 39 CFR 273.7 - Concurrence of Attorney General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Concurrence of Attorney General. 273.7 Section 273... PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 273.7 Concurrence of Attorney General. (a) The Attorney General is... the Attorney General or his designee approves such action in a written statement which specifies: (1...

  14. Transactions on Petri Nets and Other Models of Concurrency V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    submission track of ToPNoC. The 12 papers cover a diverse range of topics including model checking and system verification, synthesis, foundational work on specific classes of Petri nets, and innovative applications of Petri nets and other models of concurrency. Thus, this volume gives a good view of ongoing...... concurrent systems and Petri nets research...

  15. Gender asymmetry in concurrent partnerships and HIV prevalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, Ka Yin; Powers, Kimberly A.; Kretzschmar, Mirjam

    The structure of the sexual network of a population plays an essential role in the transmission of HIV. Concurrent partnerships, i.e. partnerships that overlap in time, are important in determining this network structure. Men and women may differ in their concurrent behavior, e.g. in the case of

  16. Gender asymmetry in concurrent partnerships and HIV prevalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, Ka Yin; Powers, Kimberly A.; Kretzschmar, Mirjam

    2017-01-01

    The structure of the sexual network of a population plays an essential role in the transmission of HIV. Concurrent partnerships, i.e. partnerships that overlap in time, are important in determining this network structure. Men and women may differ in their concurrent behavior, e.g. in the case of

  17. Dynamic Frames Based Verification Method for Concurrent Java Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a verification method for concurrent Java programs based on the concept of dynamic frames. We build on our earlier work that proposes a new, symbolic permission system for concurrent reasoning and we provide the following new contributions. First, we describe our approach

  18. Association of HIV prevalence and concurrency of sexual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association of HIV prevalence and concurrency of sexual partnerships in South Africa's language groups: An ecological analysis. C Kenyon. Abstract. Background. There is considerable variation in HIV prevalence between different language groups in South Africa (SA). Sexual partner concurrency has been linked to the ...

  19. Metallothionein (MT)-III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco, J; Giralt, M; Molinero, A

    1999-01-01

    Metallothionein-III is a low molecular weight, heavy-metal binding protein expressed mainly in the central nervous system. First identified as a growth inhibitory factor (GIF) of rat cortical neurons in vitro, it has subsequently been shown to be a member of the metallothionein (MT) gene family...... injected rats. The specificity of the antibody was also demonstrated in immunocytochemical studies by the elimination of the immunostaining by preincubation of the antibody with brain (but not liver) extracts, and by the results obtained in MT-III null mice. The antibody was used to characterize...... the putative differences between the rat brain MT isoforms, namely MT-I+II and MT-III, in the freeze lesion model of brain damage, and for developing an ELISA for MT-III suitable for brain samples. In the normal rat brain, MT-III was mostly present primarily in astrocytes. However, lectin staining indicated...

  20. Known-Groups and Concurrent Validity of the Mandarin Tone Identification Test (MTIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufeng Zhu

    Full Text Available The Mandarin Tone Identification Test (MTIT is a new test designed to assess the tone identification abilities of children with hearing impairment (HI. Evidence for reliability and sensitivity has been reported. The present study aimed to evaluate the known-groups and concurrent validity of the MTIT.The MTIT and Mandarin Pediatric Speech Intelligibility test (MPSI were administered in quiet and in noise conditions. The known-groups validity was evaluated by comparing the performance of the MTIT on children with two different levels of HI. The MPSI was included to evaluate the concurrent validity of the MTIT.81 children with HI were recruited in the present study. They were Mandarin-speaking children with profound HI (mean age = 9; 0, n = 41 and with moderate to severe HI (mean age = 8; 9, n = 40.Scores on the MTIT differed between the two groups with different hearing levels suggesting good known-groups validity. A strong relationship between tone and sentence perception both in quiet and in noise provided preliminary evidence for concurrent validity.The present study confirmed that the MTIT has good known-groups validity and provided preliminary evidence for concurrent validity. The MTIT could be used to evaluate tone identification ability in children with HI with confidence.

  1. Phase I study of cisplatin analogue nedaplatin, paclitaxel, and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori

    2007-01-01

    The standard treatment of unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer is concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients in good general condition, but where the optimal chemotherapeutic regimen has not been determined. Patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer received nedaplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) and paclitaxel on day 1 every 4 weeks for 3-4 cycles and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions for 6 weeks) starting on day 1. The dose of paclitaxel was escalated from 120 mg/m 2 in level 1, 135 mg/m 2 in level 2 to 150 mg/m 2 in level 3. A total of 18 patients (14 males and 4 females, with a median age of 62.5 years) were evaluated in this study. Full cycles of chemotherapy were administered in 83% of patients in level 1, and in 50% of patients in levels 2 and 3. No more than 50% of patients developed grade 4 neutropenia. Transient grade 3 esophagitis and infection were noted in one patient, and unacceptable pneumonitis was noted in three (17%) patients, two of whom died of the toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), evaluated in 15 patients, noted in one of the six patients in level 1, three of the six patients in level 2 and one of the three patients in level 3. One DLT at level 2 developed later as radiation pneumonitis. Thus, the maximum tolerated dose was determined to be level 1. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 67% (41-87%) with 12 partial responses. The doses of paclitaxel and nedaplatin could not be escalated as a result of severe pulmonary toxicity. (author)

  2. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, Hassan Ali; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-01-01

    as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites (III V q) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites (V I I I

  3. Concurrent Electroconvulsive Therapy and Bupropion Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takala, Christopher R; Leung, Jonathan G; Murphy, Lauren L; Geske, Jennifer R; Palmer, Brian A

    2017-09-01

    Bupropion is associated with a dose-dependent increased risk of seizures. Use of concomitant bupropion and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains controversial because of an increased risk of prolonged seizures. This is the first systematic evaluation of the effect of bupropion on ECT. A case group (n = 119), patients treated with concomitant ECT and bupropion, was compared with an age and gender frequency-matched control group (n = 261), treated with only ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy treatment data including seizure length, number of treatments, and concurrent medications were extracted. Longitudinal mixed models examined ECT versus ECT + bupropion group differences over the course of treatments measured by seizure duration (electroencephalogram [EEG] and motor). Multivariable models examined the total number of treatments and first and last seizure duration. All models considered group differences with ECT treatment measures adjusted for age, gender, benzodiazepine treatment, lead placement, and setting. Electroconvulsive therapy treatment with bupropion led to shorter motor seizure duration (0.047) and EEG seizure duration (P = 0.001). The number of ECT treatments (7.3 vs 7.0 treatments; P = 0.23), respectively, or the probability of a prolonged seizure (P = 0.15) was not significantly different. Benzodiazepine use was significantly more common in control subjects (P = 0.01). This is a retrospective analysis limited in part by unavailable variables (seizure threshold, nature of EEG and motor seizure monitoring, type of ECT device, dosing and formulation of bupropion, and duration of the current depressive illness). This study revealed a significantly shorter duration in seizure length with ECT + concomitant bupropion, but not in the number of required treatments in those treated compared with ECT without bupropion. There remains a critical need to reevaluate the efficacy of concomitant use of psychotropic medications + ECT.

  4. Controlled Owicki-Gries Concurrency: Reasoning about the Preemptible eChronos Embedded Operating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Andronick

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a controlled concurrency framework, derived from the Owicki-Gries method, for describing a hardware interface in detail sufficient to support the modelling and verification of small, embedded operating systems (OS's whose run-time responsiveness is paramount. Such real-time systems run with interrupts mostly enabled, including during scheduling. That differs from many other successfully modelled and verified OS's that typically reduce the complexity of concurrency by running on uniprocessor platforms and by switching interrupts off as much as possible. Our framework builds on the traditional Owicki-Gries method, for its fine-grained concurrency is needed for high-performance system code. We adapt it to support explicit concurrency control, by providing a simple, faithful representation of the hardware interface that allows software to control the degree of interleaving between user code, OS code, interrupt handlers and a scheduler that controls context switching. We then apply this framework to model the interleaving behavior of the eChronos OS, a preemptible real-time OS for embedded micro-controllers. We discuss the accuracy and usability of our approach when instantiated to model the eChronos OS. Both our framework and the eChronos model are formalised in the Isabelle/HOL theorem prover, taking advantage of the high level of automation in modern reasoning tools.

  5. Safety effects of exclusive and concurrent signal phasing for pedestrian crossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaohua; Mamun, Sha A; Ivan, John N; Ravishanker, Nalini; Haque, Khademul

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the estimation of pedestrian crash count and vehicle interaction severity prediction models for a sample of signalized intersections in Connecticut with either concurrent or exclusive pedestrian phasing. With concurrent phasing, pedestrians cross at the same time as motor vehicle traffic in the same direction receives a green phase, while with exclusive phasing, pedestrians cross during their own phase when all motor vehicle traffic on all approaches is stopped. Pedestrians crossing at each intersection were observed and classified according to the severity of interactions with motor vehicles. Observation intersections were selected to represent both types of signal phasing while controlling for other physical characteristics. In the nonlinear mixed models for interaction severity, pedestrians crossing on the walk signal at an exclusive signal experienced lower interaction severity compared to those crossing on the green light with concurrent phasing; however, pedestrians crossing on a green light where an exclusive phase was available experienced higher interaction severity. Intersections with concurrent phasing have fewer total pedestrian crashes than those with exclusive phasing but more crashes at higher severity levels. It is recommended that exclusive pedestrian phasing only be used at locations where pedestrians are more likely to comply. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The MEOW lunar project for education and science based on concurrent engineering approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roibás-Millán, E.; Sorribes-Palmer, F.; Chimeno-Manguán, M.

    2018-07-01

    The use of concurrent engineering in the design of space missions allows to take into account in an interrelated methodology the high level of coupling and iteration of mission subsystems in the preliminary conceptual phase. This work presents the result of applying concurrent engineering in a short time lapse to design the main elements of the preliminary design for a lunar exploration mission, developed within ESA Academy Concurrent Engineering Challenge 2017. During this program, students of the Master in Space Systems at Technical University of Madrid designed a low cost satellite to find water on the Moon south pole as prospect of a future human lunar base. The resulting mission, The Moon Explorer And Observer of Water/Ice (MEOW) compromises a 262 kg spacecraft to be launched into a Geostationary Transfer Orbit as a secondary payload in the 2023/2025 time frame. A three months Weak Stability Boundary transfer via the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrange point allows for a high launch timeframe flexibility. The different aspects of the mission (orbit analysis, spacecraft design and payload) and possibilities of concurrent engineering are described.

  7. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2018.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  8. NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table III. Tuberculosis - 2017.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  9. Workshop 96. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.).

  10. Workshop 96. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.)

  11. Data-centric concurrency control on the java programming language

    OpenAIRE

    Parreira, Daniel Luis Landeiroto

    2013-01-01

    Dissertação para obtenção do Grau de Mestre em Engenharia Informática The multi-core paradigm has propelled shared-memory concurrent programming to an important role in software development. Its use is however limited by the constructs that provide a layer of abstraction for synchronizing access to shared resources. Reasoning with these constructs is not trivial due to their concurrent nature. Data-races and deadlocks occur in concurrent programs, encumbering the programmer and furth...

  12. A Concurrent Distributed System for Aircraft Tactical Decision Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, John W.

    1990-01-01

    A research program investigating the use of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to aid in the development of a Tactical Decision Generator (TDG) for Within Visual Range (WVR) air combat engagements is discussed. The application of AI programming and problem solving methods in the development and implementation of a concurrent version of the Computerized Logic For Air-to-Air Warfare Simulations (CLAWS) program, a second generation TDG, is presented. Concurrent computing environments and programming approaches are discussed and the design and performance of a prototype concurrent TDG system are presented.

  13. CONCURRENT VALIDITY OF THE STUDENT TEACHER PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Živković

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of study was to examine concurrent validity of the Student Teachers Professional Identity Scale–STPIS (Fisherman and Abbot, 1998 that was for the first time used in Serbia. Indicators of concurrent validity was established by correlation with student teacher self-reported well-being, self-esteem, burnout stress and resilience. Based on the results we can conclude that the STPIS meets the criterion of concurrent validity. The implications of these results are important for researchers and decisions makers in teacher education

  14. Computational simulation of concurrent engineering for aerospace propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1992-01-01

    Results are summarized of an investigation to assess the infrastructure available and the technology readiness in order to develop computational simulation methods/software for concurrent engineering. These results demonstrate that development of computational simulations methods for concurrent engineering is timely. Extensive infrastructure, in terms of multi-discipline simulation, component-specific simulation, system simulators, fabrication process simulation, and simulation of uncertainties - fundamental in developing such methods, is available. An approach is recommended which can be used to develop computational simulation methods for concurrent engineering for propulsion systems and systems in general. Benefits and facets needing early attention in the development are outlined.

  15. Computational simulation for concurrent engineering of aerospace propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Results are summarized for an investigation to assess the infrastructure available and the technology readiness in order to develop computational simulation methods/software for concurrent engineering. These results demonstrate that development of computational simulation methods for concurrent engineering is timely. Extensive infrastructure, in terms of multi-discipline simulation, component-specific simulation, system simulators, fabrication process simulation, and simulation of uncertainties--fundamental to develop such methods, is available. An approach is recommended which can be used to develop computational simulation methods for concurrent engineering of propulsion systems and systems in general. Benefits and issues needing early attention in the development are outlined.

  16. Iron and Arsenic Speciation During As(III) Oxidation by Manganese Oxides in the Presence of Fe(II): Molecular-Level Characterization Using XAFS, Mössbauer, and TEM Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yun [Environmental Soil Chemistry Research Group, Delaware Environmental Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, United States; Kukkadapu, Ravi K. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Livi, Kenneth J. T. [The High-Resolution Analytical Electron Microbeam Facility, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, United States; Xu, Wenqian [Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, New York 11796, United States; Li, Wei [Environmental Soil Chemistry Research Group, Delaware Environmental Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, United States; Key Laboratory of Surficial Geochemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046, People’s Republic of China; Sparks, Donald L. [Environmental Soil Chemistry Research Group, Delaware Environmental Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, United States

    2018-01-17

    The redox state and speciation of metalloid arsenic (As) determine its toxicity and mobility. Knowledge of biogeochemical processes influencing the As redox state is therefore important to understand and predict its environmental behavior. Many previous studies examined As(III) oxidation by various Mn-oxides, but little is known the environmental influences (e.g. co-existing ions) on such process. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of As(III) oxidation by a poorly crystalline hexagonal birnessite (δ-MnO2) in the presence of Fe(II) using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Mössbauer spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). As K-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis revealed that, at low Fe(II) concentration (100 μM), As(V) was the predominant As species on the solid phase, while at higher Fe(II) concentration (200-1000 μM), both As(III) and As(V) were sorbed on the solid phase. As K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) analysis showed an increasing As-Mn/Fe distance over time, indicating As prefers to bind with the newly formed Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides. As adsorbed on Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides as a bidentate binuclear corner-sharing complex. Both Mössbauer and TEM-EDS investigations demonstrated that the oxidized Fe(III) products formed during Fe(II) oxidation by δ-MnO2 were predominantly ferrihydrite, goethite, and ferric arsenate like compounds. However, Fe EXAFS analysis also suggested the formation of a small amount of lepidocrocite. The Mn K-edge XANES data indicated that As(III) and Fe(II) oxidation occurs as a two electron transfer with δ-MnO2 and the observed Mn(III) is due to conproportionation of surface sorbed Mn(II) with Mn(IV) in δ-MnO2 structure. This study reveals that the mechanisms of As(III) oxidation by δ-MnO2 in the presence of Fe(II) are very complex, involving many simultaneous reactions, and the formation of

  17. Proton Beam Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Steven H., E-mail: shlin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Myles, Bevan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guo Xiaomao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a promising modality for the management of thoracic malignancies. We report our preliminary experience of treating esophageal cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy (CChT) and PBT (CChT/PBT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of 62 esophageal cancer patients enrolled on a prospective study evaluating normal tissue toxicity from CChT/PBT from 2006 to 2010. Patients were treated with passive scattering PBT with two- or three-field beam arrangement using 180 to 250 MV protons. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to assess time-to-event outcomes and compared the distributions between groups using the log-rank test. Results: The median follow-up time was 20.1 months for survivors. The median age was 68 years (range, 38-86). Most patients were males (82%) who had adenocarcinomas (76%) and Stage II-III disease (84%). The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (RBE [relative biologic equivalence]) (range, 36-57.6). The most common grade 2 to 3 acute toxicities from CChT/PBT were esophagitis (46.8%), fatigue (43.6%), nausea (33.9%), anorexia (30.1%), and radiation dermatitis (16.1%). There were two cases of grade 2 and 3 radiation pneumonitis and two cases of grade 5 toxicities. A total of 29 patients (46.8%) received preoperative CChT/PBT, with one postoperative death. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for the surgical cohort was 28%, and the pCR and near CR rates (0%-1% residual cells) were 50%. While there were significantly fewer local-regional recurrences in the preoperative group (3/29) than in the definitive CChT/PBT group (16/33) (log-rank test, p = 0.005), there were no differences in distant metastatic (DM)-free interval or overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Conclusions: This is the first report of patients treated with PBT/CChT for esophageal cancer. Our data suggest that this modality is associated with a few severe toxicities, but the pathologic response and clinical

  18. Proton Beam Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Steven H.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing; Wei, Caimiao; Myles, Bevan; Guo Xiaomao; Palmer, Matthew; Mohan, Radhe; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a promising modality for the management of thoracic malignancies. We report our preliminary experience of treating esophageal cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy (CChT) and PBT (CChT/PBT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of 62 esophageal cancer patients enrolled on a prospective study evaluating normal tissue toxicity from CChT/PBT from 2006 to 2010. Patients were treated with passive scattering PBT with two- or three-field beam arrangement using 180 to 250 MV protons. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to assess time-to-event outcomes and compared the distributions between groups using the log–rank test. Results: The median follow-up time was 20.1 months for survivors. The median age was 68 years (range, 38–86). Most patients were males (82%) who had adenocarcinomas (76%) and Stage II-III disease (84%). The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (RBE [relative biologic equivalence]) (range, 36–57.6). The most common grade 2 to 3 acute toxicities from CChT/PBT were esophagitis (46.8%), fatigue (43.6%), nausea (33.9%), anorexia (30.1%), and radiation dermatitis (16.1%). There were two cases of grade 2 and 3 radiation pneumonitis and two cases of grade 5 toxicities. A total of 29 patients (46.8%) received preoperative CChT/PBT, with one postoperative death. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for the surgical cohort was 28%, and the pCR and near CR rates (0%–1% residual cells) were 50%. While there were significantly fewer local-regional recurrences in the preoperative group (3/29) than in the definitive CChT/PBT group (16/33) (log–rank test, p = 0.005), there were no differences in distant metastatic (DM)-free interval or overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Conclusions: This is the first report of patients treated with PBT/CChT for esophageal cancer. Our data suggest that this modality is associated with a few severe toxicities, but the pathologic response and

  19. A case for evaluating sensor network protocols concurrently

    KAUST Repository

    Gnawali, Omprakash; Guibas, Leonidas; Levis, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Researchers typically evaluate and compare protocols on the testbeds by running them one at a time. This methodology ignores the variation in link qualities and wireless environment across these experiments. These variations can introduce significant noise in the results. Evaluating two protocols concurrently, however, suffers from inter-protocol interactions. These interactions can perturb performance even under very light load, especially timing and timing sensitive protocols. We argue that the benefits of running protocols concurrently greatly outweigh the disadvantages. Protocols rarely run in isolation in real networks, and so considering such interactions is valuable. Although the wireless environment is still uncontrolled, concurrent evaluations make comparisons fair and more statistically sound. Through experiments on two testbeds, we make the case for evaluating and comparing low data-rate sensor network protocols by running them concurrently. Copyright 2010 ACM.

  20. Concurrency-Induced Transitions in Epidemic Dynamics on Temporal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaga, Tomokatsu; Gleeson, James P; Masuda, Naoki

    2017-09-08

    Social contact networks underlying epidemic processes in humans and animals are highly dynamic. The spreading of infections on such temporal networks can differ dramatically from spreading on static networks. We theoretically investigate the effects of concurrency, the number of neighbors that a node has at a given time point, on the epidemic threshold in the stochastic susceptible-infected-susceptible dynamics on temporal network models. We show that network dynamics can suppress epidemics (i.e., yield a higher epidemic threshold) when the node's concurrency is low, but can also enhance epidemics when the concurrency is high. We analytically determine different phases of this concurrency-induced transition, and confirm our results with numerical simulations.

  1. Concurrency-Induced Transitions in Epidemic Dynamics on Temporal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaga, Tomokatsu; Gleeson, James P.; Masuda, Naoki

    2017-09-01

    Social contact networks underlying epidemic processes in humans and animals are highly dynamic. The spreading of infections on such temporal networks can differ dramatically from spreading on static networks. We theoretically investigate the effects of concurrency, the number of neighbors that a node has at a given time point, on the epidemic threshold in the stochastic susceptible-infected-susceptible dynamics on temporal network models. We show that network dynamics can suppress epidemics (i.e., yield a higher epidemic threshold) when the node's concurrency is low, but can also enhance epidemics when the concurrency is high. We analytically determine different phases of this concurrency-induced transition, and confirm our results with numerical simulations.

  2. Concurrent control system for the JAERI tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanashima, Susumu; Shozi, Tokio; Shiozaki, Yasuo; Saito, Motoi; Oogane, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Satoshi.

    1994-01-01

    A new control system for the JAERI tandem accelerator is constructed. The system utilizes concurrent processing technology with multiprocessor. Transputers are used both for central processor and I/O front end processors. (author)

  3. Love, lust and the emotional context of multiple and concurrent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Love, lust and the emotional context of multiple and concurrent sexual partnerships among young Swazi adults. Allison Ruark, Lunga Dlamini, Nonhlanhla Mazibuko, Edward C Green, Caitlin Kennedy, Amy Nunn, Timothy Flanigan, Pamela J Surkan ...

  4. Partial Orders and Fully Abstract Models for Concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Uffe Henrik

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis sets of labelled partial orders are employed as fundamental mathematical entities for modelling nondeterministic and concurrent processes thereby obtaining so-called noninterleaving semantics. Based on different closures of sets of labelled partial orders, simple algebraic language...

  5. Poverty and sexual concurrency: a case study of STI risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Emma K; Leonard, Lori; Lenoir, Chavonne; Ellen, Jonathan M

    2008-08-01

    This paper is about sexual concurrency, or maintaining multiple sexual partnerships that overlap in time. Sexual concurrency is a concept that is used in the field of public health to explain the spread of sexually transmitted diseases. Sexual concurrency has also been proposed as a site of intervention to reduce sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates, particularly among those populations who carry the heaviest STI burden: adolescents and African Americans. In this paper, we use ethnographic data collected from a group of African American adolescents living in Baltimore to examine the socially produced configurations of risks and relationships that are obscured by the term sexual concurrency. The data we present show the limits of this concept, and suggest that structural reforms, including improvements to education, drug treatment, and work opportunities, are necessary to reduce racial disparities in STI rates.

  6. Prototyping of concurrent control systems implemented in FPGA devices

    CERN Document Server

    Wiśniewski, Remigiusz

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on prototyping aspects of concurrent control systems and their further implementation and partial reconfiguration in programmable devices. Further, it lays out a full prototyping flow for concurrent control systems. Based on a given primary specification, a system is described with an interpreted Petri net, which naturally reflects the concurrent and sequential relationships of the design. The book shows that, apart from the traditional option of static configuration of the entire system, the latest programmable devices (especially FPGAs) offer far more sophistication. Partial reconfiguration allows selected parts of the system to be replaced without having to reprogram the entire structure of the device. Approaches to dynamic and static partial reconfiguration of concurrent control systems are presented and described in detail.< The theoretical work is illustrated by examples drawn from various applications, with a milling machine and a traffic-light controller highlighted as representat...

  7. Service-Oriented Synthesis of Distributed and Concurrent Protocol Specifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehad Al Dallal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Several methods have been proposed for synthesizing computer communication protocol specifications from service specifications. Some protocol synthesis methods based on the finite state machine (FSM model assume that primitives in the service specifications cannot be executed simultaneously. Others either handle only controlled primitive concurrency or have tight restrictions on the applicable FSM topologies. As a result, these synthesis methods are not applicable to an interesting variety of inherently concurrent applications, such as the Internet and mobile communication systems. This paper proposes a concurrent-based protocol synthesis method that eliminates the restrictions imposed by the earlier methods. The proposed method uses a synthesis method to obtain a sequential protocol specification (P-SPEC from a given service specification (S-SPEC. The resulting P-SPEC is then remodeled to consider the concurrency behavior specified in the S-SPEC, while guaranteeing that P-SPEC provides the specified service.

  8. Reliability and concurrent validity of an alternative method of lateral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 University of Northern Iowa, Division of Athletic Training, 003C Human. Performance Center, Cedar ... concurrent validity of the fingertip-to-floor distance test (FFD) ... in these protocols are spinal and extremity range of motion, pelvic control ...

  9. Context Aware Concurrent Execution Framework for Web Browser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Aamir; Erbad, Aiman Mahmood; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein

    Computing hungry multimedia web applications need to efficiently utilize the device resources. HTML5 web workers is a non-sharing concurrency platform that enables multimedia web application to utilize the available multi-core hardware. HTML5 web workers are implemented by major browser vendors...... to facilitate concurrent execution in web clients and enhance the quality of ambitious web applications. The concurrent execution in web workers allows parallel processing using available cores at the expense of communication overhead and extra computation. The benefits of concurrent execution can be maximized...... by balancing load across workers/CPU cores. This work presents load-balancing algorithms between web workers using parameters such as scheduler throughput, computation priority and game entity locality. An award-winning web-based multimedia game (raptjs.com) is used to test the performance of the load balance...

  10. The effects of sequential versus concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy on survival and toxicity in patients with newly diagnosed high-grade astrocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinberg, Lawrence; Grossman, Stuart A.; Piantadosi, Steven; Zeltzman, Michel; Wharam, Moody

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of sequential versus concurrent administration of cranial radiotherapy and cisplatin/carmustine (BCNU) chemotherapy on survival and toxicity in newly diagnosed high-grade astrocytomas. Methods and Materials: From 1988 to 1996, 101 patients were treated on 2 therapeutic protocols for malignant glioma that used the identical chemotherapy regimen but differed in the timing of cranial radiotherapy. The eligibility criteria for the 2 protocols were identical. In the first protocol (1988-1991, 52 patients), cisplatin 120 mg/BCNU 120 mg i.v. over 72 h, was given for 3 monthly cycles prior to cranial radiotherapy. After a response rate of 42%, with a median survival of 13 months was achieved with this sequential regimen, a successor protocol (1992-1996, 49 patients) was developed in which cranial radiotherapy began concurrently with the start of the identical chemotherapy regimen. Chemotherapy was delayed but not discontinued if prolonged grade III/IV hematologic toxicity was experienced, but protocol therapy was discontinued if disease progression or thromboembolic events occurred. Survival outcome and hematologic toxicity were compared for the patients treated on these protocols. Results: Seventy-seven percent of sequentially-treated patients and 68% of concurrently-treated patients completed all planned therapy. Kaplan-Meier survival was similar to concurrent or sequential administration of chemotherapy and radiotherapy (median 12.8 months vs. 13.8 months, respectively). Hematologic toxicity was significantly less in sequentially- versus concurrently-treated patients, with median nadir per cycle (2.9 vs. 1.8 x 10 3 /mm 3 ) (p < 0.001), and incidence of grade 3/4 leukopenia 40% versus 77% (p = 0.002). There was also an increase in platelet transfusion requirements in concurrently-treated patients, but no significant worsening of anemia. We postulate that the worsened leukopenia results from the effects of concurrent radiotherapy on

  11. Meningococcal polysaccharide A O-acetylation levels do not impact the immunogenicity of the quadrivalent meningococcal tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine: results from a randomized, controlled phase III study of healthy adults aged 18 to 25 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupisan, Socorro; Limkittikul, Kriengsak; Sosa, Nestor; Chanthavanich, Pornthep; Bianco, Véronique; Baine, Yaela; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we compared the immunogenicities of two lots of meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) that differed in serogroup A polysaccharide (PS) O-acetylation levels and evaluated their immunogenicities and safety in comparison to a licensed ACWY polysaccharide vaccine (Men-PS). In this phase III, partially blinded, controlled study, 1,170 healthy subjects aged 18 to 25 years were randomized (1:1:1) to receive one dose of MenACWY-TT lot A (ACWY-A) (68% O-acetylation), MenACWY-TT lot B (ACWY-B) (92% O-acetylation), or Men-PS (82% O-acetylation). Immunogenicity was evaluated in terms of serum bactericidal activity using rabbit complement (i.e., rabbit serum bactericidal activity [rSBA]). Solicited symptoms, unsolicited adverse events (AEs), and serious AEs (SAEs) were recorded. The immunogenicities, in terms of rSBA geometric mean titers, were comparable for both lots of MenACWY-TT. The vaccine response rates across the serogroups were 79.1 to 97.0% in the two ACWY groups and 73.7 to 94.1% in the Men-PS group. All subjects achieved rSBA titers of ≥1:8 for all serogroups. All subjects in the two ACWY groups and 99.5 to 100% in the Men-PS group achieved rSBA titers of ≥1:128. Pain was the most common solicited local symptom and was reported more frequently in the ACWY group (53.9 to 54.7%) than in the Men-PS group (36.8%). The most common solicited general symptoms were fatigue and headache, which were reported by 28.6 to 30.3% and 26.9 to 31.0% of subjects, respectively. Two subjects reported SAEs; one SAE was considered to be related to vaccination (blighted ovum; ACWY-B group). The level of serogroup A PS O-acetylation did not affect vaccine immunogenicity. MenACWY-TT (lot A) was not inferior to Men-PS in terms of vaccine response and was well tolerated.

  12. Insight into the Extraction Mechanism of Americium(III) over Europium(III) with Pyridylpyrazole: A Relativistic Quantum Chemistry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-He; Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Lan, Jian-Hui; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Nie, Chang-Ming; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2018-05-10

    Separation of trivalent actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)) is one of the most important steps in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. However, it is very difficult and challenging to separate them due to their similar chemical properties. Recently the pyridylpyrazole ligand (PypzH) has been identified to show good separation ability toward Am(III) over Eu(III). In this work, to explore the Am(III)/Eu(III) separation mechanism of PypzH at the molecular level, the geometrical structures, bonding nature, and thermodynamic behaviors of the Am(III) and Eu(III) complexes with PypzH ligands modified by alkyl chains (Cn-PypzH, n = 2, 4, 8) have been systematically investigated using scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT). According to the NBO (natural bonding orbital) and QTAIM (quantum theory of atoms in molecules) analyses, the M-N bonds exhibit a certain degree of covalent character, and more covalency appears in Am-N bonds compared to Eu-N bonds. Thermodynamic analyses suggest that the 1:1 extraction reaction, [M(NO 3 )(H 2 O) 6 ] 2+ + PypzH + 2NO 3 - → M(PypzH)(NO 3 ) 3 (H 2 O) + 5H 2 O, is the most suitable for Am(III)/Eu(III) separation. Furthermore, the extraction ability and the Am(III)/Eu(III) selectivity of the ligand PypzH is indeed enhanced by adding alkyl-substituted chains in agreement with experimental observations. Besides this, the nitrogen atom of pyrazole ring plays a more significant role in the extraction reactions related to Am(III)/Eu(III) separation compared to that of pyridine ring. This work could identify the mechanism of the Am(III)/Eu(III) selectivity of the ligand PypzH and provide valuable theoretical information for achieving an efficient Am(III)/Eu(III) separation process for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing.

  13. Reference Capabilities for Trait Based Reuse and Concurrency Control

    OpenAIRE

    Castegren, Elias; Wrigstad, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of shared mutable state in object-orientedprogramming complicates software development as two seeminglyunrelated operations may interact via an alias and produceunexpected results. In concurrent programming this manifestsitself as data-races. Concurrent object-oriented programming further suffers from thefact that code that warrants synchronisation cannot easily bedistinguished from code that does not. The burden is placed solelyon the programmer to reason about alias freedo...

  14. Concurrent object-oriented programming: The MP-Eiffel approach

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Miguel Augusto Mendes Oliveira e

    2004-01-01

    This article evaluates several possible approaches for integrating concurrency into object-oriented programming languages, presenting afterwards, a new language named MP-Eiffel. MP-Eiffel was designed attempting to include all the essential properties of both concurrent and object-oriented programming with simplicity and safety. A special care was taken to achieve the orthogonality of all the language mechanisms, allowing their joint use without unsafe side-effects (such as inh...

  15. Concurrent spinal cord and vertebral bone marrow radionecrosis 8 years after therapeutic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warscotte, L.; Sindic, C.J.M. [Department of Neurology, Universite Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Duprez, T.; Lecouvet, F.E. [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Lonneux, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Michaux, L. [Department of Hematology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Renard, L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium)

    2002-03-01

    Concurrent radionecrosis within the spinal cord and the bone marrow at the same thoracic level was observed 8 years after localized therapeutic irradiation in a patient who had undergone repeated cycles of radiotherapy, glucocorticoid treatment, and chemotherapy for a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Mechanisms combining radiotoxic potentialization by glucocorticoids/alkylating agents and delayed radiation-induced vasculitis involving the common arterial pathways to the spinal cord and to the vertebrae were speculated to have acted in a synergistic way. (orig.)

  16. Concurrent spinal cord and vertebral bone marrow radionecrosis 8 years after therapeutic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warscotte, L.; Sindic, C.J.M.; Duprez, T.; Lecouvet, F.E.; Lonneux, M.; Michaux, L.; Renard, L.

    2002-01-01

    Concurrent radionecrosis within the spinal cord and the bone marrow at the same thoracic level was observed 8 years after localized therapeutic irradiation in a patient who had undergone repeated cycles of radiotherapy, glucocorticoid treatment, and chemotherapy for a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Mechanisms combining radiotoxic potentialization by glucocorticoids/alkylating agents and delayed radiation-induced vasculitis involving the common arterial pathways to the spinal cord and to the vertebrae were speculated to have acted in a synergistic way. (orig.)

  17. Evidence for two concurrent inhibitory mechanisms during response preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Julie; Lew, David; Mazzocchio, Riccardo; Olivier, Etienne; Ivry, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitory mechanisms are critically involved in goal-directed behaviors. To gain further insight into how such mechanisms shape motor representations during response preparation, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and H-reflexes were recorded from left hand muscles during choice reaction time tasks. The imperative signal, which indicated the required response, was always preceded by a preparatory cue. During the post-cue delay period, left MEPs were suppressed when the left hand had been cued for the forthcoming response, suggestive of a form of inhibition specifically directed at selected response representations. H-reflexes were also suppressed on these trials, indicating that the effects of this inhibition extend to spinal circuits. In addition, left MEPs were suppressed when the right hand was cued, but only when left hand movements were a possible response option before the onset of the cue. Notably, left hand H-reflexes were not modulated on these trials, consistent with a cortical locus of inhibition that lowers the activation of task-relevant, but non-selected responses. These results suggest the concurrent operation of two inhibitory mechanisms during response preparation: one decreases the activation of selected responses at the spinal level, helping to control when selected movements should be initiated by preventing their premature release; a second, upstream mechanism helps to determine what response to make during a competitive selection process. PMID:20220014

  18. Mindful Parenting and Emotion Socialization Practices: Concurrent and Longitudinal Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Laura G; Parent, Justin; Zachary, Chloe R; Forehand, Rex

    2017-11-01

    Caregivers play a crucial role in the socialization of youth emotion understanding, competence, and regulation, which are implicated in youth social and emotional health; however, there is less understanding of parental psychosocial or cognitive factors, like mindful parenting, that may be associated with the use of particular emotion socialization (ES) strategies. This study tests a model of the cross-sectional and short-term longitudinal associations between mindful parenting and supportive and nonsupportive ES strategies in a community sample of parents (N = 246; 63.8% mothers) of youth ranging from ages 3-12. Caregivers reported on mindful parenting and ES strategies at two time points 4 months apart. The structural equation model indicated that higher levels of mindful parenting are positively related to supportive ES responses and negatively related to nonsupportive ES responses both concurrently and over time. The longitudinal association between mindful parenting and nonsupportive, but not supportive, ES was marginally larger for fathers as compared to mothers. Given the documented impact of ES strategies on youth emotional and behavioral outcomes and interventions emerging to educate parents about how to provide a healthy emotional atmosphere, incorporating a focus on mindful parenting strategies may provide one pathway to increase supportive responses and decrease nonsupportive ones. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  19. An automatic micro-sequential injection bead injection lab-on-valve (muSI-BI-LOV) assembly for speciation analysis of ultra trace levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) incorporating on-line chemical reduction and employing detection by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Xiangbao; Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2005-01-01

    and determination of trace levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in environmental samples. The method was validated by determination of chromium species in CRM and NIST standard reference materials, and by spike recoveries of surface waters. Statistical comparison of means between experimental results and the total chromium...... certified values for the CRM and NIST materials revealed the non-existence of significant differences at a 95% confidence level....

  20. An Automation-Assisted Empirical Study on Lock Usage for Concurrent Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Rui; Qi Zhengwei; Huang Shiqiu; Xiang Chengcheng; Zheng Yudi; Wang Yin; Guan Haibing

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays concurrent programs are becoming more and more important with the development of hardware and network technologies. However it is not easy for programmers to write reliable concurrent programs. Concurrency characteristics such as thread interleaving make it difficult to debug or maintain concurrent programs. Although there are lots of research work on concurrency such as multi thread testing tools concurrent program verification and data race detection all of them leave open problems...

  1. Concurrent eruptions at Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano: casualty or causality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Funiciello

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Anecdotes of concurrent eruptions at Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano (Southern Italy have persisted for more than 2000 years and volcanologists in recent and past times have hypothesized a causal link among these volcanoes. Here this hypothesis is tested. To introduce the problem and provide examples of the type of expected volcanic phenomena, narratives of the most notable examples of concurrent eruptions are provided. Then the frequency of eruptions at each individual volcano is analysed for about the last 300 years and the expected probability of concurrent eruptions is calculated to compare it to the observed probability. Results show that the occurrence of concurrent eruptions is often more frequent than a random probability, particularly for the Stromboli-Vulcano pair. These results are integrated with a statistical analysis of the earthquake catalogue to find evidence of linked seismicity in the Etnean and Aeolian areas. Results suggest a moderate incidence of non-random concurrent eruptions, but available data are temporally limited and do not allow an unequivocal identification of plausible triggers; our results, however, are the first attempt to quantify a more-than-2000-years-old curious observation and constitute a starting point for more sophisticated analyses of new data in the future. We look forward to our prediction of a moderate incidence of concurrent eruptions being confirmed or refuted with the passage of time and occurrence of new events.

  2. Risk factors for concurrent bacteremia in adult patients with dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein, Tun-Linn; Ng, Ee-Ling; Yeang, Ming S; Leo, Yee-Sin; Lye, David C

    2017-06-01

    Bacteremia in dengue may occur with common exposure to pathogens in association with severe organ impairment or severe dengue, which may result in death. Cohort studies identifying risk factors for concurrent bacteremia among patients with dengue are rare. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of adult patients with dengue who were admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore from 2004 to 2008. For each case of dengue with concurrent bacteremia (within the first 72 hours of admission), we selected four controls without bacteremia, who were matched on year of infection and dengue confirmation method. Conditional logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors for concurrent bacteremia. Among 9,553 patients with dengue, 29 (0.3%) had bacteremia. Eighteen of these patients (62.1%) had concurrent bacteremia. The predominant bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus, one of which was a methicillin-resistant strain. Dengue shock syndrome occurred more frequently and hospital stay was longer among cases than among controls. Three cases did not survive, whereas none of the controls died. In multivariate analysis, being critically ill at hospital presentation was independently associated with 15 times the likelihood of a patient with dengue having concurrent bacteremia. Concurrent bacteremia in adult patients with dengue is uncommon but presents atypically and results in more deaths and longer hospital stay. Given the associated mortality, collection of blood cultures and empiric antibiotic therapy may be considered in patients who are critically ill. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The HSE Management Standards Indicator Tool: concurrent and construct validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcatto, F; Colautti, L; Larese Filon, F; Luis, O; Ferrante, D

    2014-07-01

    The Health & Safety Executive Management Standards Indicator Tool (HSE-MS IT) is a questionnaire commonly used to assess work-related stress risks at an organizational level. A critical factor in determining whether this instrument is actually useful is that higher levels of stress risk in the work-design domains should predict higher levels of stress and stress-related outcomes in workers. Only a few studies, however, have addressed this issue. To test both the concurrent and construct validity of the HSE-MS IT, by relating it with another widely used instrument, the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), and by examining its relationships with a set of work-related stress outcomes. An anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire was administered to a sample of employees in an Italian municipality. The questionnaire included the HSE-MS IT, self-reported measures of job satisfaction, job motivation and stress at work, the Satisfaction with Life Scale and the reduced form of the JCQ. A total of 760 out of 779 employees completed the questionnaire. Results showed moderate to strong correlation among the corresponding HSE-MS IT and JCQ scales. Hierarchical regression highlighted the specific contribution of each of the HSE-MS IT scales in predicting three relevant work-related stress outcomes (self-reported stress, job satisfaction and job motivation), after controlling for gender, age and life satisfaction. Our findings consolidated the HSE-MS IT validity and showed the specific sensitivity of its scales to assess different aspects of work-related distress, including self-perception of stress at work. These results can have practical implications for the occupational well-being of employees. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Impact of high-intensity concurrent training on cardiovascular risk factors in persons with multiple sclerosis - pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keytsman, Charly; Hansen, Dominique; Wens, Inez; O Eijnde, Bert

    2017-10-27

    High-intensity concurrent training positively affects cardiovascular risk factors. Because this was never investigated in multiple sclerosis, the present pilot study explored the impact of this training on cardiovascular risk factors in this population. Before and after 12 weeks of high-intense concurrent training (interval and strength training, 5 sessions per 2 weeks, n = 16) body composition, resting blood pressure and heart rate, 2-h oral glucose tolerance (insulin sensitivity, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood glucose and insulin concentrations), blood lipids (high- and low-density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, triglyceride levels) and C-reactive protein were analyzed. Twelve weeks of high-intense concurrent training significantly improved resting heart rate (-6%), 2-h blood glucose concentrations (-13%) and insulin sensitivity (-24%). Blood pressure, body composition, blood lipids and C-reactive protein did not seem to be affected. Under the conditions of this pilot study, 12 weeks of concurrent high-intense interval and strength training improved resting heart rate, 2-h glucose and insulin sensitivity in multiple sclerosis but did not affect blood C-reactive protein levels, blood pressure, body composition and blood lipid profiles. Further, larger and controlled research investigating the effects of high-intense concurrent training on cardiovascular risk factors in multiple sclerosis is warranted. Implications for rehabilitation High-intensity concurrent training improves cardiovascular fitness. This pilot study explores the impact of this training on cardiovascular risk factors in multiple sclerosis. Despite the lack of a control group, high-intense concurrent training does not seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors in multiple sclerosis.

  5. Selective and sensitive speciation analysis of Cr(VI) and Cr(III), at sub-μgL-1 levels in water samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after electromembrane extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Zeinab; Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny

    2016-12-01

    In this work, electromembrane extraction in combination with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) was investigated for speciation, preconcentration and quantification of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in water samples through the selective complexation of Cr(VI) with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC) as a complexing agent. DPC reduces Cr(VI) to Cr(III) ions and then Cr(III) species are extracted based on electrokinetic migration of their cationic complex (Cr(III)-DPC) toward the negative electrode placed in the hollow fiber. Also, once oxidized to Cr(VI), Cr(III) ions in initial sample were determined by this procedure. The influence of extraction parameters such as pH, type of organic solvent, chelating agent concentration, stirring rate, extraction time and applied voltage were evaluated following a one-at-a-time optimization approach. Under optimized conditions, the extracted analyte was quantified by ETAAS, with an acceptable linearity in the range of 0.05-5ngmL -1 (R 2 value=0.996), and a repeatability (%RSD) between 3.7% and 12.2% (n=4) for 5.0 and 1.0ngmL -1 of Cr(VI), respectively. Also, we obtained an enrichment factor of 110 that corresponded to the recovery of 66%. The detection limit (S/N ratio of 3:1) was 0.02ngmL -1 . Finally, this new method was successfully employed to determine Cr(III) and Cr(VI) species in real water samples. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Pu(III), Am(III), and Cm(III) in geologic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Rao, Linfeng; Weger, H.T.; Felmy, A.R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, WA (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Florida State University, Florida (United States); Yui, Mikazu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    This report provides thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Pu(III), Am(III), and Cm(III) in geologic environments, and contributes to an integration of the JNC chemical thermodynamic database, JNC-TDB (previously PNC-TDB), for the performance analysis of geological isolation system for high-level radioactive wastes. Thermodynamic data for the formation of complexes or compounds with hydroxide, chloride, fluoride, carbonate, nitrate, sulfate and phosphate are discussed in this report. Where data for specific actinide(III) species are lacking, the data were selected based on chemical analogy to other trivalent actinides. In this study, the Pitzer ion-interaction model is mainly used to extrapolate thermodynamic constants to zero ionic strength at 25degC. (author)

  7. Cloud point extraction of iron(III) and vanadium(V) using 8-quinolinol derivatives and Triton X-100 and determination of 10(-7)moldm(-3) level iron(III) in riverine water reference by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Akira; Ito, Hiromi; Kanai, Chikako; Imura, Hisanori; Ohashi, Kousaburo

    2005-01-30

    The cloud point extraction behavior of iron(III) and vanadium(V) using 8-quinolinol derivatives (HA) such as 8-quinolinol (HQ), 2-methyl-8-quinolinol (HMQ), 5-butyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(4)Q), 5-hexyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(6)Q), and 2-methyl-5-octyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HMO(8)Q) and Triton X-100 solution was investigated. Iron(III) was extracted with HA and 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 in the pH range of 1.70-5.44. Above pH 4.0, more than 95% of iron(III) was extracted with HQ, HMQ, and HMO(8)Q. Vanadium(V) was also extracted with HA and 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 in the pH range of 2.07-5.00, and the extractability increased in the following order of HMQ HQ cloud point extraction was applied to the determination of iron(III) in the riverine water reference by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. When 1.25 x 10(-3)M HMQ and 1% (v/v) Triton X-100 were used, the found values showed a good agreement with the certified ones within the 2% of the R.S.D. Moreover, the effect of an alkyl group on the solubility of 5-alkyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol and 2-methyl-5-alkyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol in 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 at 25 degrees C was also investigated.

  8. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report

  9. Pseudomembranous colitis within radiotherapy field following concurrent chemoradiation therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen BJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bing-Jie Shen,1 Shih-Chiang Lin,2 Pei-Wei Shueng,1,3 Yueh-Hung Chou,4 Li-Ming Tseng,5 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,6,71Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Anatomical Pathology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 7Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Development of nonantibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis has been reported in patients receiving chemotherapy. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy after surgery for stage III pT3N1M0 rectal cancer. After completion of the therapy, the patient presented with a 2-week history of intermittent watery diarrhea (seven to nine times per day. However, the patient was afebrile and laboratory examination revealed no evidence of leukocytosis. Computed tomography disclosed inflammation of the sigmoid colon, infiltrative changes around the anastomotic site, and edematous changes straddling the serosal surface. Colonoscopic examination revealed multiple whitish patches within the radiation field, a finding suggestive of pseudomembranous colitis. No concomitant antibiotics were used during the period of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Empirical oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 hours was administrated for 2 weeks. At the end of this treatment, stool culture was negative for Clostridium difficile. Physicians should be aware of the potential for the development of

  10. A general concurrent algorithm for plasma particle-in-cell simulation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liewer, P.C.; Decyk, V.K.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a new algorithm for implementing plasma particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation codes on concurrent processors with distributed memory. This algorithm, named the general concurrent PIC algorithm (GCPIC), has been used to implement an electrostatic PIC code on the 33-node JPL Mark III Hypercube parallel computer. To decompose at PIC code using the GCPIC algorithm, the physical domain of the particle simulation is divided into sub-domains, equal in number to the number of processors, such that all sub-domains have roughly equal numbers of particles. For problems with non-uniform particle densities, these sub-domains will be of unequal physical size. Each processor is assigned a sub-domain and is responsible for updating the particles in its sub-domain. This algorithm has led to a a very efficient parallel implementation of a well-benchmarked 1-dimensional PIC code. The dominant portion of the code, updating the particle positions and velocities, is nearly 100% efficient when the number of particles is increased linearly with the number of hypercube processors used so that the number of particles per processor is constant. For example, the increase in time spent updating particles in going from a problem with 11,264 particles run on 1 processor to 360,448 particles on 32 processors was only 3% (parallel efficiency of 97%). Although implemented on a hypercube concurrent computer, this algorithm should also be efficient for PIC codes on other parallel architectures and for large PIC codes on sequential computers where part of the data must reside on external disks. copyright 1989 Academic Press, Inc

  11. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Treatment outcomes of a prospective, multicentric clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Fang; Wang, Rensheng; Lu, Heming; Wei, Bo; Feng, Guosheng; Li, Guisheng; Liu, Meilian; Yan, Haolin; Zhu, Jinxian; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate long-term outcome in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. Material and methods: Between January 2006 and August 2008, 249 patients with stage III–IVb NPC were treated by IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy in this multicenter prospective study. Results: With a mean follow-up of 54.1 months, the 5-year actuarial rates of overall survival (OS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), regional recurrence-free survival (RRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were 78.4%, 86.8%, 88.4%, 78.0%, respectively. There were 29 local recurrences, 25 regional recurrences and 52 distant metastases, respectively. Distant metastasis is the main cause of treatment failure. N-stage was an independent prognostic factor for LRFS, RRFS, DMFS and OS. Acute toxicity ⩾grade III mainly consisted of mucositis (34.9%), neutropenia (11.2%), xerostomia (5.6%), and dermatitis (5.2%). The main documented late toxicity was xerostomia, and the severity of xerostomia decreased over time. At 24 months after treatment, 13.2% of patients had grade 2 xerostomia, and none had grade 3 or 4 xerostomia. Conclusions: IMRT with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy resulted in encouraging rates of local and distant control and overall survival with acceptable rates of acute and limited rates of late toxicity in patients with locoregionally advanced NPC. Distant metastasis remained the main cause of failure. More effective systemic therapy should be explored for patients with advanced N-stage

  12. III-V microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Nougier, JP

    1991-01-01

    As is well known, Silicon widely dominates the market of semiconductor devices and circuits, and in particular is well suited for Ultra Large Scale Integration processes. However, a number of III-V compound semiconductor devices and circuits have recently been built, and the contributions in this volume are devoted to those types of materials, which offer a number of interesting properties. Taking into account the great variety of problems encountered and of their mutual correlations when fabricating a circuit or even a device, most of the aspects of III-V microelectronics, from fundamental p

  13. Evaluation bias in objective response rate and disease control rate between blinded independent central review and local assessment: a study-level pooled analysis of phase III randomized control trials in the past seven years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianrong; Zhang, Yiyin; Tang, Shiyan; Liang, Hengrui; Chen, Difei; Jiang, Long; He, Qihua; Huang, Yu; Wang, Xinyu; Deng, Kexin; Jiang, Shuhan; Zhou, Jiaqing; Xu, Jiaxuan; Chen, Xuanzuo; Liang, Wenhua; He, Jianxing

    2017-12-01

    In previous studies, complete-case implementation of blind independent central review has been considered unnecessary based on no sign of systematic bias between central and local assessments. In order to further evaluate its value, this study investigated evaluation status between both assessments in phase III trials of anti-cancer drugs for non-hematologic solid tumors. Eligible trials were searched in PubMed with the date of Jan 1, 2010 to Jun 30, 2017. We compared objective response rate (ORR) and disease control rate (DCR) between central and local assessments by study-level pooled analysis and correlation analysis. In pooled analysis, direct comparison was measured by the odds ratio (OR) of central-assessed response status to local-assessed response status; to investigate evaluation bias between central and local assessments, the above calculated OR between experimental (exp-) and control (con-) arms were compared, measured by the ratio of OR. A total of 28 included trials involving 17,466 patients were included (28 with ORR, 16 with DCR). Pooled analysis showed central assessment reported lower ORR and DCR than local assessment, especially in trials with open-label design, central-assessed primary endpoint, and positive primary endpoint outcome, respectively. However, this finding could be found in both experimental [exp-ORR: OR=0.81 (95% CI: 0.76-0.87), Pevaluation bias between two assessments was indicated through further analysis [ORR: ratio of OR=1.02 (0.97-1.07), P=0.42, I 2 =0%; DCR: ratio of OR=0.98 (0.93-1.03), P=0.37, I 2 =0%], regardless of mask (open/blind), sample size, tumor type, primary endpoint (central-assessed/local-assessed), and primary endpoint outcome (positive/negative). Correlation analysis demonstrated a high-degree concordance between central and local assessments (exp-ORR, con-ORR, exp-DCR, con-DCR: r>0.90, P<0.01). Blind independent central review remained irreplaceable to monitor local assessment, but its complete

  14. New players in the same old game: a system level in silico study to predict type III secretion system and effector proteins in bacterial genomes reveals common themes in T3SS mediated pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadarangani, Vineet; Datta, Sunando; Arunachalam, Manonmani

    2013-07-26

    Type III secretion system (T3SS) plays an important role in virulence or symbiosis of many pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria [CHM 2:291-294, 2007; Physiology (Bethesda) 20:326-339, 2005]. T3SS acts like a tunnel between a bacterium and its host through which the bacterium injects 'effector' proteins into the latter [Nature 444:567-573, 2006; COSB 18:258-266, 2008]. The effectors spatially and temporally modify the host signalling pathways [FEMS Microbiol Rev 35:1100-1125, 2011; Cell Host Microbe5:571-579, 2009]. In spite its crucial role in host-pathogen interaction, the study of T3SS and the associated effectors has been limited to a few bacteria [Cell Microbiol 13:1858-1869, 2011; Nat Rev Microbiol 6:11-16, 2008; Mol Microbiol 80:1420-1438, 2011]. Before one set out to perform systematic experimental studies on an unknown set of bacteria it would be beneficial to identify the potential candidates by developing an in silico screening algorithm. A system level study would also be advantageous over traditional laboratory methods to extract an overriding theme for host-pathogen interaction, if any, from the vast resources of data generated by sequencing multiple bacterial genomes. We have developed an in silico protocol in which the most conserved set of T3SS proteins was used as the query against the entire bacterial database with increasingly stringent search parameters. It enabled us to identify several uncharacterized T3SS positive bacteria. We adopted a similar strategy to predict the presence of the already known effectors in the newly identified T3SS positive bacteria. The huge resources of biochemical data [FEMS Microbiol Rev 35:1100-1125, 2011; Cell Host Microbe 5:571-579, 2009; BMC Bioinformatics 7(11):S4, 2010] on the T3SS effectors enabled us to search for the common theme in T3SS mediated pathogenesis. We identified few cellular signalling networks in the host, which are manipulated by most of the T3SS containing pathogens. We went on to look for

  15. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy improves survival outcome in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Sang Jun; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate survival rates and prognostic factors related to treatment outcomes after bladder preserving therapy including transurethral resection of bladder tumor, radiotherapy (RT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy in bladder cancer with a curative intent. We retrospectively studied 50 bladder cancer patients treated with bladder-preserving therapy at Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center from January 1999 to December 2010. Age ranged from 46 to 89 years (median, 71.5 years). Bladder cancer was the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage II, III, and IV in 9, 27, and 14 patients, respectively. Thirty patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and 20 patients with RT alone. Nine patients received chemotherapy prior to CCRT or RT alone. Radiation was delivered with a four-field box technique (median, 63 Gy; range, 48.6 to 70.2 Gy). The follow-up periods ranged from 2 to 169 months (median, 34 months). Thirty patients (60%) showed complete response and 13 (26%) a partial response. All patients could have their own bladder preserved. Five-year overall survival (OS) rate was 37.2%, and the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 30.2%. In multivariate analysis, tumor grade and CCRT were statistically significant in OS. Tumor grade was a significant prognostic factor related to OS. CCRT is also considered to improve survival outcomes. Further multi-institutional studies are needed to elucidate the impact of RT in bladder cancer

  16. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  17. Improvement in performance status after erythropoietin treatment in lung cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, Francesc; Vinolas, Nuria; Ferrer, Ferran; Farrus, Blanca; Gimferrer, Josep Maria; Agusti, Carles; Belda, Josep; Luburich, Patricio

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective Phase II trial was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of erythropoietin in improving or maintaining performance status as determined by the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score and hemoglobin (Hb) levels in lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation (CH-RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 51 patients with lung cancer (11 with small-cell, limited stage and 40 with non-small-cell disease, 17 with Stage IIIA and 23 with Stage IIIB), who underwent three different concurrent CH-RT protocols were enrolled. Baseline Hb and KPS values were recorded, as were the nadir Hb and KPS values before concurrent CH-RT. The final Hb and KPS values were recorded the last week of concurrent CH-RT. An Hb level of ≤11 g/dL before concurrent CH-RT was required before receiving erythropoietin. Prognostic factors for KPS improvement and survival were assessed by univariate and multivariate studies. Results: Of the 51 patients, 47 (92.3%) were men (mean age 63.6 years, range 40-75). The median baseline KPS score was 80, and the mean baseline Hb was 12.2 ± 1.76 g/dL (range 9-16.9). The mean nadir and final Hb value was 9.98±0.67 g/dL (range 8.6-11) and 11.33±1.59 g/dL (range 6.9-14.4), respectively. A significant increase was seen in the Hb and KPS score (p<0.05) in the final measurements. Differences were found between the final and nadir Hb in the predictive value for differences in performance status (p=0.001). On univariate study, pathologic findings (p=0.0234), weight loss (p=0.0049), baseline Hb (p=0.0057), and final Hb improvement (p=0.0237) were prognostic factors for survival. Nadir Hb (p=0.027), final Hb improvement (p=0.0069), pathologic findings (p = 0.0006), and weight loss (p=0.0001) had significant prognostic value for survival in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: In this study, erythropoietin appears to have a significant, beneficial impact on the KPS and Hb of patients undergoing concurrent CH-RT

  18. Antithrombin III in animal models of sepsis and organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickneite, G

    1998-01-01

    Antithrombin III (AT III) is the physiological inhibitor of thrombin and other serine proteases of the clotting cascade. In the development of sepsis, septic shock and organ failure, the plasma levels of AT III decrease considerably, suggesting the concept of a substitution therapy with the inhibitor. A decrease of AT III plasma levels might also be associated with other pathological disorders like trauma, burns, pancreatitis or preclampsia. Activation of coagulation and consumption of AT III is the consequence of a generalized inflammation called SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome). The clotting cascade is also frequently activated after organ transplantation, especially if organs are grafted between different species (xenotransplantation). During the past years AT III has been investigated in numerous corresponding disease models in different animal species which will be reviewed here. The bulk of evidence suggests, that AT III substitution reduces morbidity and mortality in the diseased animals. While gaining more experience with AT III, the concept of substitution therapy to maximal baseline plasma levels (100%) appears to become insufficient. Evidence from clinical and preclinical studies now suggests to adjust the AT III plasma levels to about 200%, i.e., doubling the normal value. During the last few years several authors proposed that AT III might not only be an anti-thrombotic agent, but to have in addition an anti-inflammatory effect.

  19. Summary of Session III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002

  20. Performance of particle in cell methods on highly concurrent computational architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, M.F.; Ethier, S.; Wichmann, N.

    2009-01-01

    Particle in cell (PIC) methods are effective in computing Vlasov-Poisson system of equations used in simulations of magnetic fusion plasmas. PIC methods use grid based computations, for solving Poisson's equation or more generally Maxwell's equations, as well as Monte-Carlo type methods to sample the Vlasov equation. The presence of two types of discretizations, deterministic field solves and Monte-Carlo methods for the Vlasov equation, pose challenges in understanding and optimizing performance on today large scale computers which require high levels of concurrency. These challenges arises from the need to optimize two very different types of processes and the interactions between them. Modern cache based high-end computers have very deep memory hierarchies and high degrees of concurrency which must be utilized effectively to achieve good performance. The effective use of these machines requires maximizing concurrency by eliminating serial or redundant work and minimizing global communication. A related issue is minimizing the memory traffic between levels of the memory hierarchy because performance is often limited by the bandwidths and latencies of the memory system. This paper discusses some of the performance issues, particularly in regard to parallelism, of PIC methods. The gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) is used for these studies and a new radial grid decomposition is presented and evaluated. Scaling of the code is demonstrated on ITER sized plasmas with up to 16K Cray XT3/4 cores.

  1. Performance of particle in cell methods on highly concurrent computational architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, M F; Ethier, S; Wichmann, N

    2007-01-01

    Particle in cell (PIC) methods are effective in computing Vlasov-Poisson system of equations used in simulations of magnetic fusion plasmas. PIC methods use grid based computations, for solving Poisson's equation or more generally Maxwell's equations, as well as Monte-Carlo type methods to sample the Vlasov equation. The presence of two types of discretizations, deterministic field solves and Monte-Carlo methods for the Vlasov equation, pose challenges in understanding and optimizing performance on today large scale computers which require high levels of concurrency. These challenges arises from the need to optimize two very different types of processes and the interactions between them. Modern cache based high-end computers have very deep memory hierarchies and high degrees of concurrency which must be utilized effectively to achieve good performance. The effective use of these machines requires maximizing concurrency by eliminating serial or redundant work and minimizing global communication. A related issue is minimizing the memory traffic between levels of the memory hierarchy because performance is often limited by the bandwidths and latencies of the memory system. This paper discusses some of the performance issues, particularly in regard to parallelism, of PIC methods. The gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) is used for these studies and a new radial grid decomposition is presented and evaluated. Scaling of the code is demonstrated on ITER sized plasmas with up to 16K Cray XT3/4 cores

  2. Concurrent topological design of composite structures and materials containing multiple phases of distinct Poisson's ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kai; Yuan, Philip F.; Xu, Shanqing; Xie, Yi Min

    2018-04-01

    Most studies on composites assume that the constituent phases have different values of stiffness. Little attention has been paid to the effect of constituent phases having distinct Poisson's ratios. This research focuses on a concurrent optimization method for simultaneously designing composite structures and materials with distinct Poisson's ratios. The proposed method aims to minimize the mean compliance of the macrostructure with a given mass of base materials. In contrast to the traditional interpolation of the stiffness matrix through numerical results, an interpolation scheme of the Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio using different parameters is adopted. The numerical results demonstrate that the Poisson effect plays a key role in reducing the mean compliance of the final design. An important contribution of the present study is that the proposed concurrent optimization method can automatically distribute base materials with distinct Poisson's ratios between the macrostructural and microstructural levels under a single constraint of the total mass.

  3. Graph-Based Decision Making for Task Scheduling in Concurrent Gaudi

    CERN Document Server

    Shapoval, Illya; Hegner, Benedikt; Funke, Daniel; Piparo, Danilo; Mato Vila, Pere

    2015-01-01

    The modern trend of extensive levels of hardware parallelism and heterogeneity pushes software to evolve through a paradigm shift towards concurrent data processing architectures. One such striking example in the domain of high-energy physics is represented by Gaudi – an experiment independent software framework, used in two of four major experiments of the Large Hadron Collider project, and in several others. The framework is responsible for event processing by means of hundreds of algorithms which have logical and data dependencies between each other. Historically, the framework was designed being inherently sequential, meaning that at any time of data processing there is only one event being processed and only one algorithm being executed on it. This allowed to respect the dependencies of algorithms by just organizing them in a well-defined execution path to be run on CPU. The evolution of the Gaudi framework into its concurrent incarnation, though, implies the necessity to split the execution path dynam...

  4. Concurrent cisplatin, infusional fluorouracil, and conventionally fractionated radiation therapy in head and neck cancer: Dose-limiting mucosal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, J.W.; Abbott, R.L. (Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia))

    1991-03-01

    After a preliminary dose-finding study involving 12 patients with advanced or locally recurrent head and neck cancer, 27 patients were treated on a phase II protocol, using fluorouracil 350 mg/m2/d by continuous intravenous (IV) infusion over 5 days, followed on the sixth day by a 2-hour IV infusion of cisplatin 50 mg/m2, administered during the first and fourth weeks of radiation therapy to total doses between 60 and 64 Gy, using 2 Gy daily fractions. Eight of these 27 patients had American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging (AJCC) stage III disease, and 12 had stage IV disease. Four had recurrent disease after surgery. Three-year follow-up is now available. Twenty-one (77.8%) remitted completely following treatment, and 11 remain free of local and regional relapse at 3 years. Four have developed systemic metastases. Following successful salvage treatment in two cases, estimated determinate survival at 3 years is 64%. Acute toxicity was manageable with this regime. Eleven instances of grade 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) mucositis were observed, which caused interruptions to radiotherapy in only four cases. No late sequelae have so far been recorded. It is concluded that the protocol described is tolerable but probably did not cause a greater number of locoregional cures than would have been expected following conventional radiotherapy alone in this group of patients. The use of infusional fluorouracil with concurrent conventionally fractionated radiation therapy and cisplatin infusion results in mucositis that limits the dose of fluorouracil to levels that are probably subtherapeutic.

  5. An Annotated Reading List for Concurrent Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    The seven tools are sometimes referred to as the seven old tools.) -9- Ishikawa , Kaoru , What is Total Quality Control? The Japanese Way, Prentice-Hall...some solutions. * Ishikawa (1982) presents a practical guide (with easy to use tools) for implementing qual- ity control at the working level...study of, :-, ieering for the last two years. Is..ikawa, Kaoru , Guide to Quality Control, Kraus International Publications, White Plains, NY, 1982. The

  6. Extraction behaviour of Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid medium in TEHDGA-HDEHP impregnated resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saipriya, G.; Kumar, T. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Facilities, Kalpakkam (India). Kalpakkam Reprocessing Plant; Kumaresan, R.; Nayak, P.K.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2016-07-01

    The extraction behaviour of Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid medium was studied in the solvent impregnated resins containing extractants such as tetra-bis(2-ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (TEHDGA) or bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) or mixture of TEHDGA+HDEHP. The rate of extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 M nitric acid and the effect of various parameters, such as the concentration of nitric acid in aqueous phase and concentration of TEHDGA and HDEHP in resin phase, on the distribution coefficient of Am(III) and Eu(III) was studied. The distribution coefficient of Am(III) and Eu(III) in HDEHP-impregnated resin decreased and that in TEHDGA-impregnated resin increased, with increase in the concentration of nitric acid. However, in (TEHDGA+HDEHP) - impregnated resin, synergic extraction was observed at lower nitric acid concentration and antagonism at higher nitric acid concentration. The mechanism of Am(III) and Eu(III) extraction in the combined resin was investigated by slope analysis method. The extraction of various metal ions present in the fast reactor simulated high-level liquid waste was studied. The separation factor of Am(III) over Eu(III) was studied using citrate-buffered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) solution.

  7. Degradation of cellulosic materials under the alkaline conditions of a cementitious repository for low- and intermediate level radioactive waste. Pt. III. Effect of degradation products on the sorption of radionuclides on feldspar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loon, L.R. van; Glaus, M.A.; Laube, A.; Stallone, S.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of degradation products of different cellulosic materials on the sorption behaviour of Th(IV), Eu(III) and Ni(II) on feldspar at pH 13.3 was studied. For all three metals, a decrease in sorption could be observed with increasing concentration of organics in solution. For Th(IV), α-ISA is the effective ligand present in the solutions of degraded cellulose, independent on the type of cellulose studied. For Eu(III), α-ISA is the effective ligand in the case of pure cellulose degradation. In the case of other cellulosic materials, unknown ligands cause the sorption reduction. For Ni(II), also unknown ligands cause sorption reduction, independent on the type of cellulose studied. These unknown ligands are not formed during alkaline degradation of cellulose, but are present as impurities in certain cellulosic materials. (orig.)

  8. Prognostic impact of concurrent MYC and BCL6 rearrangements and expression in de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Qing; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2016-01-01

    Double-hit B-cell lymphoma is a common designation for a group of tumors characterized by concurrent translocations of MYC and BCL2, BCL6, or other genes. The prognosis of concurrent MYC and BCL6 translocations is not well known. In this study, we assessed rearrangements and expression of MYC, BCL2...... frequent in activated B-cell like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma). In summary, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients with either MYC/BCL6 rearrangements or MYC/BCL6 co-expression did not always have poorer prognosis; MYC expression levels should be evaluated simultaneously; and double-hit B-cell lymphoma...

  9. Who would benefit from memory training? A pilot study examining the ceiling effect of concurrent cognitive stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok TCY

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Timothy CY Kwok1,2, Wai Wang Chau1, Kenneth SL Yuen1,3, Anita YM Wong4, Jessie CY Li1, Rebecca YY Shiu4, Florence KY Ho11Jockey Club Centre for Positive Ageing, Hong Kong; 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 3Laboratory of Neuropsychology, Department of Psychology, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong; 4The Hong Kong Chinese Women's Club Madam Wong Chan Sook Ying Memorial Care and Attention Home for the Aged, Hong KongAbstract: Diverse effects of memory training were observed in the literature. One possible factor is the amount of concurrent cognitive training received during the training program. In this pilot study, we recruited 24 elderly adults with or without concurrent cognitive stimulations to attend a memory-training program. Findings suggested that elderly people without concurrent cognitive stimulation could benefit from a memory-training program in the form of improved initiation and memory functioning. Self-rated quality of life measure also showed improvements alongside the cognitive benefits. Elderly people with regular concurrent cognitive stimulation, on the other hand, seemed to plateau in their level of performance and did not show any significant change. Our preliminary findings suggested nonlinear concurrent cognitive stimulation in the elderly.Keywords: memory training, cognitive training, dementia, Chinese, elderly 

  10. Locally-regionally advanced tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstevska, Valentina; Stojkovski, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective review of stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil managed by definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in order to analyze the patients’ outcome and to evaluate the acute and late toxic effects of this treatment modality. Material and methods: Between January 2005 and December 2010, 36 patients with locally and/or regionally advanced tonsillar cancer underwent three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The dose prescription of the planning target volume for gross tumor and low-risk subclinical disease was 70 Gy and 50 Gy, respectively. Conventional fractionation with a daily dose of 2.0 Gy, 5 times per week was used. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 30 mg/m2 given on a weekly basis. Acute and late radiotherapy-related toxicities were recorded using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (EORTC/RTOG) grading system. The 3-year locoregional relapse-free survival (LRRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 20.5 months (range, 5 to 90 months). The median followup of living patients was 59 months (range, 30 to 90 months). Complete response rates of the primary tumor and of the nodal disease were 72.2% and 64.0%, respectively. A complete composite response was present in 25 patients (69.4%). Treatment failure occurred in 15 out of 25 patients who achieved complete composite response following CCRT. The 3-year LRRFS, DFS, and OS rate was 38.8%, 27.8%, and 27.3%, respectively. Grade 3 mucositis occurred in 58.3% of patients. Xerostomia grade 2 was revealed in 72.2% of patients. Conclusion: Taking into account the low 3-year survival rates observed in our study and the high percentage of grade 2 xerostomia, it can be concluded that in the future, instead of 3DCRT with concurrent

  11. Concurrent weekly docetaxel and concomitant boost radiation therapy in the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishler, Roy B.; Posner, Marshall R.; Norris, Charles M.; Mahadevan, Anand; Sullivan, Christopher; Goguen, Laura; Wirth, Lori J.; Costello, Rosemary; Case, MaryAnn; Stowell, Sara; Sammartino, Dan; Busse, Paul M.; Haddad, Robert I.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In a Phase I/II trial, we investigated concurrent weekly docetaxel and concomitant boost radiation in patients with locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN) after induction chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: Patients presented with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III/IV and were treated initially with induction chemotherapy using cisplatinum/5-fluorouracil (PF), carboplatinum-5-FU, or docetaxel-PF. Patients then received docetaxel four times weekly with concomitant boost (CB) radiation (1.8 Gy once-daily X20, 1.8/1.5 Gy twice a day). Fifteen patients each received 20 mg/M 2 and 25 mg/M 2 . Results: Thirty-one patients were enrolled and 30 were evaluable for response and toxicity. Median follow-up was 42 months (range, 27-63 months). Primary sites were: oropharynx 19, oral cavity 2, larynx/hypopharynx 5, and unknown primary 4. Eighty-seven percent of patients had N2/N3 disease; 60% had T3/T4 disease. Twenty percent of patients had a complete response (CR) to induction chemotherapy. After chemoradiotherapy, 21 of 30 patients had a CR, 2 had progressive disease, and 7 had partial response (PR). Nineteen of 26 patients presenting with neck disease had neck dissections, and 7 of 19 were positive. Ninety-three percent of all patients were rendered disease-free after all planned therapy. Treatment failed in 8 patients, and 7 have died of disease. An additional patient died with no evidence of disease. Twenty-one patients (70%) are currently alive with no evidence of disease. No acute dose-limiting toxicity was observed at either dose level. Conclusions: This intensive treatment regimen of concurrent docetaxel/concomitant boost radiation and surgery after induction chemotherapy in poor prognosis patients yields good local regional control and survival. Docetaxel/CB chemoradiotherapy represents an aggressive alternative regimen to platinum-based chemoradiotherapy or surgery in patients who have a poor response to induction

  12. Determination of antithrombin III by radioimmunoassay and its clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, V; Chan, T K; Wong, V; Tso, S G; Todd, D [Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong

    1979-04-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) has been developed for the determination of antithrombin III (AT III) in man. The detection limit was 25 ..mu..g/dl. At III-RIA level and biological activity (anti-Xa) was significantly correlated (r = 0.737, P < 0.0001). Plasma levels in 36 healthy males (mean +- SD, 19.9 +- 2.5 mg/dl) and 21 healthy females (19.1 +- 2.4 mg/dl) were similiar. Serial AT III measurements in normal menstruating females showed lower levels during midcycle and higher concentrations during menstruation. In carcinomas, the AT III levels were lower than normal, particularly in hepatocellular carcinoma. In cirrhosis of liver, the levels were markedly decreased and in some patients were below that found in congenital AT III deficiency. Patients with deep vein thrombosis and patients with heart valve replacement had lower levels than normal, while patients with cerebral vascular occlusion had normal levels. The possible use of AT III as a diagnostic tool of post-operative deep vein thrombosis was demonstrated in one patient after hysterectomy. The increased sensitivity, specificity and precision of this type of assay offer distinct advantages over existing methods of AT III estimation.

  13. The SINTRAN III NODAL system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaali, T.B.

    1980-10-01

    NODAL is a high level programming language based on FOCAL and SNOBOL4, with some influence from BASIC. The language was developed to operate on the computer network controlling the SPS accelerator at CERN. NODAL is an interpretive language designed for interactive use. This is the most important aspect of the language, and is reflected in its structure. The interactive facilities make it possible to write, debug and modify programs much faster than with compiler based languages like FORTRAN and ALGOL. Apart from a few minor modifications, the basic part of the Oslo University NODAL system does not differ from the CERN version. However, the Oslo University implementation has been expanded with new functions which enable the user to execute many of the SINTRAN III monitor calls from the NODAL level. In particular the most important RT monitor calls have been implemented in this way, a property which renders possible the use of NODAL as a RT program administrator. (JIW)

  14. Concurrent sexual partners-A predictor of Chlamydia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marianne Johansson; Olesen, Frede; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen

    2013-01-01

    , but the significance of this compared with other well-known predictors has only been briefly described. Aim: The aim is to examine if concurrent partners isan independent predictor for C. trachomatis infection in young Danes aged 15-29 years. Methods: Detailed sexual behavior data were collected via a web......:These preliminary results suggest that concurrent sexual partners is an important predictor for C.trachomatis infections among young Danes aged 15-29. A more concise conclusion will be presented at the Ph.D day......Background:Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infection among young Danes and the spread is highly dependent on the population’s sexual behavior. Previous studies have found concurrent partnerships to be a possible predictor for C. trachomatis...

  15. Mathematical techniques for analyzing concurrent and probabilistic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rutten, J J M M; Panangaden, Prakash; Panangaden, Prakash; Breugel, Franck van

    2004-01-01

    The book consists of two sets of lecture notes devoted to slightly different methods of analysis of concurrent and probabilistic computational systems. The first set of lectures develops a calculus of streams (a generalization of the set of natural numbers) based on the coinduction principle coming from the theory of coalgebras. It is now well understood that the interplay between algebra (for describing structure) and coalgebra (for describing dynamics) is crucial for understanding concurrent systems. There is a striking analogy between streams and formula calculus reminiscent to those appearing in quantum calculus. These lecture notes will appeal to anyone working in concurrency theory but also to algebraists and logicians. The other set of lecture notes focuses on methods for automatically verifying probabilistic systems using techniques of model checking. The unique aspect of these lectures is the coverage of both theory and practice. The authors have been responsible for one of the most successful experi...

  16. How Formal Dynamic Verification Tools Facilitate Novel Concurrency Visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aananthakrishnan, Sriram; Delisi, Michael; Vakkalanka, Sarvani; Vo, Anh; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Kirby, Robert M.; Thakur, Rajeev

    With the exploding scale of concurrency, presenting valuable pieces of information collected by formal verification tools intuitively and graphically can greatly enhance concurrent system debugging. Traditional MPI program debuggers present trace views of MPI program executions. Such views are redundant, often containing equivalent traces that permute independent MPI calls. In our ISP formal dynamic verifier for MPI programs, we present a collection of alternate views made possible by the use of formal dynamic verification. Some of ISP’s views help pinpoint errors, some facilitate discerning errors by eliminating redundancy, while others help understand the program better by displaying concurrent even orderings that must be respected by all MPI implementations, in the form of completes-before graphs. In this paper, we describe ISP’s graphical user interface (GUI) capabilities in all these areas which are currently supported by a portable Java based GUI, a Microsoft Visual Studio GUI, and an Eclipse based GUI whose development is in progress.

  17. Contemporary considerations in concurrent endoscopic sinus surgery and rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Toby O; Gill, Amarbir; Tollefson, Travis T

    2018-06-11

    Characterize indications, perioperative considerations, clinical outcomes and complications for concurrent endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) and rhinoplasty. Chronic rhinosinusitis and septal deviation with or without inferior turbinate hypertrophy independently impair patient-reported quality of life. Guidelines implore surgeons to include endoscopy to accurately evaluate patient symptoms. Complication rates parallel those of either surgery (ESS and rhinoplasty) alone and are not increased when performed concurrently. Operative time is generally longer for joint surgeries. Patient satisfaction rates are high. Concurrent functional and/or cosmetic rhinoplasty and ESS is a safe endeavor to perform in a single operative setting and most outcomes data suggest excellent patient outcomes. Additional studies that include patient-reported outcome measures are needed.

  18. Engineering Bereitschaft as an enabler for Concurrent Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Kåre; Vesterager, Johan

    1999-01-01

    Industrial companies observe a general trend towards more customised products and shorter product life cycles. Furthermore, the market demands shorter lead-time and high-quality products at a competitive price. Concurrent Engineering address these challenges. Product modelling is a key aspect...... of the Concurrent Engineering literature. One problem with the product modelling literature is that it tends to assume that product development is revolutionary. Very often product development is evolutionary and it means that product modelling should have a major emphasis on reuse. In this paper it is suggested...... that industrial companies should develop an engineering development Bereitschaft (preparatory engineering knowledge) as an approach to Concurrent Engineering and product modelling. To develop such an engineering development Bereitschaft, a company must develop company generic product models.This paper...

  19. How Do Developers Use APIs? A Case Study in Concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Stefan; Kiniry, Joseph; Huisman, Marieke

    2013-01-01

    and functionalities of the Java concurrency library java. util. concurrent. It discusses the Histogram tool that we developed for this purpose, i.e., to efficiently analyse a large collection of bytecode classes. The Histogram tool is used on a representative benchmark set, the Qualitas Corpus. The paper discusses...... the results of the analysis of this benchmark set in detail. This covers both an analysis of the important classes and methods used by the current releases of the benchmark collection, as well as an analysis of the time it took for the Java concurrency library to start being used in released software....... of static analysis and verification tools this information is highly important, because it indicates where and how to put the most efficient effort in annotating APIs, to make them usable for the static analysis and verification tools. This paper presents an analysis of the usage of the routines...

  20. Concurrent negotiation and coordination for grid resource coallocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kwang Mong; Shi, Benyun

    2010-06-01

    Bolstering resource coallocation is essential for realizing the Grid vision, because computationally intensive applications often require multiple computing resources from different administrative domains. Given that resource providers and consumers may have different requirements, successfully obtaining commitments through concurrent negotiations with multiple resource providers to simultaneously access several resources is a very challenging task for consumers. The impetus of this paper is that it is one of the earliest works that consider a concurrent negotiation mechanism for Grid resource coallocation. The concurrent negotiation mechanism is designed for 1) managing (de)commitment of contracts through one-to-many negotiations and 2) coordination of multiple concurrent one-to-many negotiations between a consumer and multiple resource providers. The novel contributions of this paper are devising 1) a utility-oriented coordination (UOC) strategy, 2) three classes of commitment management strategies (CMSs) for concurrent negotiation, and 3) the negotiation protocols of consumers and providers. Implementing these ideas in a testbed, three series of experiments were carried out in a variety of settings to compare the following: 1) the CMSs in this paper with the work of others in a single one-to-many negotiation environment for one resource where decommitment is allowed for both provider and consumer agents; 2) the performance of the three classes of CMSs in different resource market types; and 3) the UOC strategy with the work of others [e.g., the patient coordination strategy (PCS )] for coordinating multiple concurrent negotiations. Empirical results show the following: 1) the UOC strategy achieved higher utility, faster negotiation speed, and higher success rates than PCS for different resource market types; and 2) the CMS in this paper achieved higher final utility than the CMS in other works. Additionally, the properties of the three classes of CMSs in