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Sample records for leukocyte colony-stimulating activity

  1. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor-Activated Eosinophils Promote Interleukin-23 Driven Chronic Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griseri, Thibault; Arnold, Isabelle C.; Pearson, Claire; Krausgruber, Thomas; Schiering, Chris; Franchini, Fanny; Schulthess, Julie; McKenzie, Brent S.; Crocker, Paul R.; Powrie, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Summary The role of intestinal eosinophils in immune homeostasis is enigmatic and the molecular signals that drive them from protective to tissue damaging are unknown. Most commonly associated with Th2 cell-mediated diseases, we describe a role for eosinophils as crucial effectors of the interleukin-23 (IL-23)-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) axis in colitis. Chronic intestinal inflammation was characterized by increased bone marrow eosinopoiesis and accumulation of activated intestinal eosinophils. IL-5 blockade or eosinophil depletion ameliorated colitis, implicating eosinophils in disease pathogenesis. GM-CSF was a potent activator of eosinophil effector functions and intestinal accumulation, and GM-CSF blockade inhibited chronic colitis. By contrast neutrophil accumulation was GM-CSF independent and dispensable for colitis. In addition to TNF secretion, release of eosinophil peroxidase promoted colitis identifying direct tissue-toxic mechanisms. Thus, eosinophils are key perpetrators of chronic inflammation and tissue damage in IL-23-mediated immune diseases and it suggests the GM-CSF-eosinophil axis as an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26200014

  2. Drugs elevating extracellular adenosine administered in vivo induce serum colony-stimulating activity and interleukin-6 in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiterová, Lenka; Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Znojil, V.; Štreitová, Denisa

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2007), s. 463-473 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP305/03/D050 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : extracellular adenosine * serum colony-stimulating activity * interleukin-6 Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.505, year: 2007

  3. Long-active granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization.

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    Martino, Massimo; Laszlo, Daniele; Lanza, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Peg-filgrastim (PEG-FIL), a polyethylene glycol-conjugated form of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), has been introduced in clinical practice and is effective in shortening the time of neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy. G-CSF has emerged as the preferred cytokine for hematopoietic progenitor cells' (HPC) mobilization. Nevertheless, data on the ability of PEG-FIL in this field have been published. We review publications in the field with the goal of providing an overview of this approach. PEG-FIL may be able to mobilize CD34(+) cells in a more timely fashion than G-CSF, with the advantages of only a single-dose administration, an earlier start and a reduction in the number of apheresis procedures. The main controversies concern the dosage of the drug and the optimal dose. In the context of chemo-mobilization, a single dose of 6 mg PEG-FIL seems effective in terms of HPC's mobilization and there is no increase in this effect if the dose is doubled to 12 mg. Steady-state mobilization requires higher doses of PEG-FIL and this approach is not cost-effective when compared with G-CSF. The experiences with PEG-FIL in the healthy donor setting are very limited.

  4. Relationship of colony-stimulating activity to apparent kill of human colony-forming cells by irradiation and hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxmeyer, H.E.; Galbraith, P.R.; Baker, F.L.

    1976-01-01

    Suspensions of human bone marrow cells were subjected to 137 Cs irradiation in vitro and then cultured in semisolid agar medium. Cultures of irradiated cells were stimulated with colony-stimulating activity (CSA) of different potencies, and it was found that the amount of stimulation applied to cultures influenced the apparent kill of colony-forming cells (CFC). It was also found that the effects of irradiation on colony formation were not confined to CFC kill since medium conditioned by cells during irradiation exhibited stimulatory and inhibitory properties after treatment by 600 and 1000 rads, respectively. Studies in which irradiated cells were pretreated with hydroxyurea indicated that CFC in the DNA synthetic phase of the cell cycle were particularly sensitive to low doses of irradiation. The proliferative capacity of CFC surviving 1000 rads was undiminished as judged by their ability to form large colonies. Estimates of CFC kill by hydroxyurea were also affected by the level of CSA

  5. Increased biological activity of deglycosylated recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor produced by yeast or animal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moonen, P.; Mermod, J.J.; Ernst, J.F.; Hirschi, M.; DeLamarter, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) produced by several recombinant sources including Escherichia coli, yeast, and animal cells was studied. Recombinant animal cells produced hGM-CSF in low quantities and in multiple forms of varying size. Mammalian hGM-CSF was purified 200,000-fold using immunoaffinity and lectin chromatography. Partially purified proteins produced in yeast and mammalian cells were assayed for the effects of deglycosylation. Following enzymatic deglycosylation, immunoreactivity was measured by radioimmunoassay and biological activity was measured in vitro on responsive human primary cells. Removal of N-linked oligosaccharides from both proteins increased their immunoreactivities by 4- to 8-fold. Removal of these oligosaccharides also increased their specific biological activities about 20-fold, to reach approximately the specific activity of recombinant hGM-CSF from E. coli. The E. coli produced-protein-lacking any carbohydrate- had by far the highest specific activity observed for the recombinant hGM-CSFs

  6. Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins with Potent Intrinsic Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed EnvGM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized EnvGM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric EnvGM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins. PMID:23565193

  7. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

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    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  8. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Extension of Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment Window by Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in a Thromboembolic Rat Model of Stroke

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    Ike C. dela Peña

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available When given beyond 4.5 h of stroke onset, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA induces deleterious side effects in the ischemic brain, notably, hemorrhagic transformation (HT. We examined the efficacy of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in reducing delayed tPA-induced HT, cerebral infarction, and neurological deficits in a thromboembolic (TE stroke model, and whether the effects of G-CSF were sustained for longer periods of recovery. After stroke induction, rats were given intravenous saline (control, tPA (10 mg/kg, or G-CSF (300 μg/kg + tPA 6 h after stroke. We found that G-CSF reduced delayed tPA-associated HT by 47%, decreased infarct volumes by 33%, and improved motor and neurological deficits by 15% and 25%, respectively. It also prevented delayed tPA treatment-induced mortality by 46%. Immunohistochemistry showed 1.5- and 1.8-fold enrichment of the endothelial progenitor cell (EPC markers CD34+ and VEGFR2 in the ischemic cortex and striatum, respectively, and 1.7- and 2.8-fold increases in the expression of the vasculogenesis marker von Willebrand factor (vWF in the ischemic cortex and striatum, respectively, in G-CSF-treated rats compared with tPA-treated animals. Flow cytometry revealed increased mobilization of CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood of rats given G-CSF. These results corroborate the efficacy of G-CSF in enhancing the therapeutic time window of tPA for stroke treatment via EPC mobilization and enhancement of vasculogenesis.

  10. Design of Recombinant Stem Cell Factor macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Fusion Proteins and their Biological Activity In Vitro

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    Chen, Tao; Yang, Jie; Wang, Yuelang; Zhan, Chenyang; Zang, Yuhui; Qin, Junchuan

    2005-05-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) can act in synergistic way to promote the growth of mononuclear phagocytes. SCF-M-CSF fusion proteins were designed on the computer using the Homology and Biopolymer modules of the software packages InsightII. Several existing crystal structures were used as templates to generate models of the complexes of receptor with fusion protein. The structure rationality of the fusion protein incorporated a series of flexible linker peptide was analyzed on InsightII system. Then, a suitable peptide GGGGSGGGGSGG was chosen for the fusion protein. Two recombinant SCF-M-CSF fusion proteins were generated by construction of a plasmid in which the coding regions of human SCF (1-165aa) and M-CSF (1-149aa) cDNA were connected by this linker peptide coding sequence followed by subsequent expression in insect cell. The results of Western blot and activity analysis showed that these two recombinant fusion proteins existed as a dimer with a molecular weight of 84 KD under non-reducing conditions and a monomer of 42 KD at reducing condition. The results of cell proliferation assays showed that each fusion protein induced a dose-dependent proliferative response. At equimolar concentration, SCF/M-CSF was about 20 times more potent than the standard monomeric SCF in stimulating TF-1 cell line growth, while M-CSF/SCF was 10 times of monomeric SCF. No activity difference of M-CSF/SCF or SCF/M-CSF to M-CSF (at same molar) was found in stimulating the HL-60 cell linear growth. The synergistic effect of SCF and M-CSF moieties in the fusion proteins was demonstrated by the result of clonogenic assay performed with human bone mononuclear, in which both SCF/M-CSF and M-CSF/SCF induced much higher number of CFU-M than equimolar amount of SCF or M-CSF or that of two cytokines mixture.

  11. Mechanism of interleukin-13 production by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

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    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes classically activated M1 macrophages. GM-CSF upregulates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) protein expression and activation of PAR-2 by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) regulates cytokine production. This study investigated the mechanism of PAR-2-mediated interleukin (IL)-13 production by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. After stimulation with HNE to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway, IL-13 mRNA and protein levels were assessed by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. PAR-2 protein was detected in GM-CSF-dependent macrophages by Western blotting. Unexpectedly, PD98059 (an ERK1 inhibitor) increased IL-13 production, even at higher concentrations. Interestingly, U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) reduced IL-13 production in a concentration-dependent manner. Neither SB203580 (a p38alpha/p38beta inhibitor) nor BIRB796 (a p38gamma/p38delta inhibitor) affected IL-13 production, while TMB-8 (a calcium chelator) diminished IL-13 production. Stimulation with HNE promoted the production of IL-13 (a Th2 cytokine) by GM-CSF-dependent M1 macrophages. PAR-2-mediated IL-13 production may be dependent on the Ca(2+)/ERK2 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhanced heterologous expression of biologically active human granulocyte colony stimulating factor in transgenic tobacco BY-2 cells by localization to endoplasmic reticulum.

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    Nair, Nisha R; Chidambareswaren, M; Manjula, S

    2014-09-01

    Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells, one of the best characterized cell lines is an attractive expression system for heterologous protein expression. However, the expression of foreign proteins is currently hampered by their low yield, which is partially the result of proteolytic degradation. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine. Recombinant hG-CSF is successfully being used for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in cancer patients. Here, we describe a simple strategy for producing biologically active hG-CSF in tobacco BY-2 cells, localized in the apoplast of BY-2 cells, as well as targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER targeting significantly enhanced recombinant production which scaled to 17.89 mg/l from 4.19 mg/l when expressed in the apoplasts. Southern blotting confirmed the stable integration of hG-CSF in the BY-2 nuclear genome, and the expression of hG-CSF was analysed by Western blotting. Total soluble protein containing hG-CSF isolated from positive calli showed proliferative potential when tested on HL-60 cell lines by MTT assay. We also report the potential of a Fluorescence-activated cell sorting approach for an efficient sorting of the hG-CSF-expressing cell lines, which will enable the generation of homogenous high-producing cell lines.

  13. Activation of human gingival epithelial cells by cell-surface components of black-pigmented bacteria: augmentation of production of interleukin-8, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, A; Uehara, A; Iki, K; Matsushita, K; Nakamura, R; Ogawa, T; Sugawara, S; Takada, H

    2002-01-01

    Black-pigmented anaerobic bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, are amongst the predominant bacteria in periodontal pockets and have been implicated in periodontal diseases. To elucidate the roles of gingival keratinocytes, which are the first cells encountered by oral bacteria in periodontal diseases, human gingival keratinocytes in primary culture were stimulated with cell-surface components of P gingivalis and Pr. intermedia. A glycoprotein fraction from Pr. intermedia (PGP) clearly augmented the release of interleukin-8, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This PGP also induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), as determined by flow cytometry. The augmentation of mRNA expression for these molecules was also confirmed by reverse transcription PCR. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Pr. intermedia and Escherichia coli was completely inactive in these assays. LPS fraction and purified fimbriae from P gingivalis exhibited weak activities. Cytokine production and ICAM-1 expression by gingival keratinocytes might cause accumulation and activation of neutrophils in the epithelium and, therefore, may be involved in the initiation and development of inflammation in periodontal tissues.

  14. Direct anti-inflammatory effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on activation and functional properties of human T cell subpopulations in vitro.

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    Malashchenko, Vladimir Vladimirovich; Meniailo, Maxsim Evgenievich; Shmarov, Viacheslav Anatolievich; Gazatova, Natalia Dinislamovna; Melashchenko, Olga Borisovna; Goncharov, Andrei Gennadievich; Seledtsova, Galina Victorovna; Seledtsov, Victor Ivanovich

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the direct effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on functionality of human T-cell subsets. CD3 + T-lymphocytes were isolated from blood of healthy donors by positive magnetic separation. T cell activation with particles conjugated with antibodies (Abs) to human CD3, CD28 and CD2 molecules increased the proportion of cells expressing G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR, CD114) in all T cell subpopulations studied (CD45RA + /CD197 + naive T cells, CD45RA - /CD197 + central memory T cells, CD45RA - /CD197 - effector memory T cells and CD45RA + /CD197 - terminally differentiated effector T cells). Upon T-cell activation in vitro, G-CSF (10.0 ng/ml) significantly and specifically enhanced the proportion of CD114 + T cells in central memory CD4 + T cell compartment. A dilution series of G-CSF (range, 0.1-10.0 ng/ml) was tested, with no effect on the expression of CD25 (interleukin-2 receptor α-chain) on activated T cells. Meanwhile, G-CSF treatment enhanced the proportion of CD38 + T cells in CD4 + naïve T cell, effector memory T cell and terminally differentiated effector T cell subsets, as well as in CD4 - central memory T cells and terminally differentiated effector T cells. G-CSF did not affect IL-2 production by T cells; relatively low concentrations of G-CSF down-regulated INF-γ production, while high concentrations of this cytokine up-regulated IL-4 production in activated T cells. The data obtained suggests that G-CSF could play a significant role both in preventing the development of excessive and potentially damaging inflammatory reactivity, and in constraining the expansion of potentially cytodestructive T cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor enhances the modulatory effect of cytokines on monocyte-derived multinucleated giant cell formation and fungicidal activity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

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    Magda Paula Pereira do Nascimento

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleated giant cells (MGC are cells present in characteristic granulomatous inflammation induced by intracellular infectious agents or foreign materials. The present study evaluated the modulatory effect of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF in association with other cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL-10 or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1 on the formation of MGC from human peripheral blood monocytes stimulated with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen (PbAg. The generation of MGC was determined by fusion index (FI and the fungicidal activity of these cells was evaluated after 4 h of MGC co-cultured with viable yeast cells of P. brasiliensis strain 18 (Pb18. The results showed that monocytes incubated with PbAg and GM-CSF plus IFN-γ had a significantly higher FI than in all the other cultures, while the addition of IL-10 or TGF-β1 had a suppressive effect on MGC generation. Monocytes incubated with both pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines had a higher induction of foreign body-type MGC rather than Langhans-type MGC. MGC stimulated with PbAg and GM-CSF in association with the other cytokines had increased fungicidal activity and the presence of GM-CSF also partially inhibited the suppressive effects of IL-10 and TGF-β1. Together, these results suggest that GM-CSF is a positive modulator of PbAg-stimulated MGC generation and on the fungicidal activity against Pb18.

  16. Colony stimulating factors and their clinical implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Shigetaka

    1989-01-01

    Granulocytes and macrophage are dependent for their production and/or functional activation in vitro on the presence of a family of glycoproteins. They are generally called colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) because of their capacity to stimulate colony formation in semi-solid cultures, and are currently classified into four distinct subtypes, that is, Multi-CSF, GM-CSF, G-CSF and M-CSF, according to the cell type of colonies formed under their stimulation or their target cell specificity. All of the murine and human CSF subtypes and the genes for them have become available in a purified form and in a large scale, and now allow us to investigate their interactions, the mechanisms for their actions, the cell-cell interactions leading to their production and secretion, and their actions in vivo. Furthermore, the preclinical and/or clinical studies which were carried out using the purified CSFs strongly indicate that human CSFs will be effective strategies for preventing and treating opportunistic bacterial and fungal infection as a major cause of death in granulocytopenic patients. (author)

  17. Proliferation-stimulating effect of colony stimulating factor 2 on porcine trophectoderm cells is mediated by activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

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    Wooyoung Jeong

    Full Text Available Colony-stimulating factor 2 (CSF2, also known as granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, facilitates mammalian embryonic development and implantation. However, biological functions and regulatory mechanisms of action of porcine endometrial CSF2 in peri-implantation events have not been elucidated. The aim of present study was to determine changes in cellular activities induced by CSFs and to access CSF2-induced intracellular signaling in porcine primary trophectoderm (pTr cells. Differences in expression of CSF2 mRNA in endometrium from cyclic and pregnant gilts were evaluated. Endometrial CSF2 mRNA expression increases during the peri-implantation period, Days 10 to 14 of pregnancy, as compared to the estrous cycle. pTr cells obtained in Day 12 of pregnancy were cultured in the presence or absence of CSF2 (20 ng/ml and LY294002 (20 µM, U0126 (20 µM, rapamycin (20 nM, and SB203580 (20 µM. CSF2 in pTr cell culture medium at 20 ng/ml significantly induced phosphorylation of AKT1, ERK1/2, MTOR, p70RSK and RPS6 protein, but not STAT3 protein. Also, the PI3K specific inhibitor (LY294002 abolished CSF2-induced increases in p-ERK1/2 and p-MTOR proteins, as well as CSF2-induced phosphorylation of AKT1. Changes in proliferation and migration of pTr cells in response to CSF2 were examined in dose- and time-response experiments. CSF2 significantly stimulated pTr cell proliferation and, U0126, rapamycin and LY294002 blocked this CSF2-induced proliferation of pTr cells. Collectively, during the peri-implantation phase of pregnancy in pigs, endometrial CSF2 stimulates proliferation of trophectoderm cells by activation of the PI3K-and ERK1/2 MAPK-dependent MTOR signal transduction cascades.

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and leukemogenesis

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    Lorena Lobo de Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF plays an important role in normal granulopoiesis. Its functions are mediated by specific receptors on the surface of responsive cells and, upon ligand binding, several cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases are activated. The cytoplasmic region proximal to the membrane of the G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R transduces proliferative and survival signals, whereas the distal carboxy-terminal region transduces maturation signals and suppresses the receptor's proliferative signals. Mutations in the G-CSF-R gene resulting in truncation of the carboxy-terminal region have been detected in a subset of patients with severe congenital neutropenia who developed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. In addition, the AML1-ETO fusion protein, expressed in leukemic cells harboring the t(8;21, disrupt the physiological function of transcription factors such as C/EBPα and C/EBPε, which in turn deregulate G-CSF-R expression. The resulting high levels of G-CSF-R and G-CSF-dependent cell proliferation may be associated with pathogenesis of AML with t(8;21. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that G-CSF may act as a co-stimulus augmenting the response of PML-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia cells to all-trans-retinoic acid treatment. Finally, in the PLZF-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia transgenic model, G-CSF deficiency suppressed leukemia development. Altogether, these data suggest that the G-CSF signaling pathway may play a role in leukemogenesis.

  19. Selective binding and oligomerization of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor by a low molecular weight, nonpeptidyl ligand.

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    Doyle, Michael L; Tian, Shin-Shay; Miller, Stephen G; Kessler, Linda; Baker, Audrey E; Brigham-Burke, Michael R; Dillon, Susan B; Duffy, Kevin J; Keenan, Richard M; Lehr, Ruth; Rosen, Jon; Schneeweis, Lumelle A; Trill, John; Young, Peter R; Luengo, Juan I; Lamb, Peter

    2003-03-14

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor regulates neutrophil production by binding to a specific receptor, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor, expressed on cells of the granulocytic lineage. Recombinant forms of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor are used clinically to treat neutropenias. As part of an effort to develop granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mimics with the potential for oral bioavailability, we previously identified a nonpeptidyl small molecule (SB-247464) that selectively activates murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor signal transduction pathways and promotes neutrophil formation in vivo. To elucidate the mechanism of action of SB-247464, a series of cell-based and biochemical assays were performed. The activity of SB-247464 is strictly dependent on the presence of zinc ions. Titration microcalorimetry experiments using a soluble murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor construct show that SB-247464 binds to the extracellular domain of the receptor in a zinc ion-dependent manner. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies demonstrate that SB-247464 induces self-association of the N-terminal three-domain fragment in a manner that is consistent with dimerization. SB-247464 induces internalization of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor on intact cells, consistent with a mechanism involving receptor oligomerization. These data show that small nonpeptidyl compounds are capable of selectively binding and inducing productive oligomerization of cytokine receptors.

  20. Protective, restorative, and therapeutic properties of recombinant colony-stimulating factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talmadge, J.E.; Tribble, H.; Pennington, R.; Bowersox, O.; Schneider, M.A.; Castelli, P.; Black, P.L.; Abe, F.

    1989-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with recombinant murine (rM) colony-stimulating factor-granulocyte-macrophage (CSF-gm) or recombinant human (rH) CSF-g provides partial protection from the lethal effects of ionizing radiation or the alkylating agent cyclophosphamide (CTX). In addition, these agents can significantly prolong survival if administered following lethal doses of irradiation or CTX. To induce protective activity, cytokines were injected 20 hours before lethal irradiation or CTX administration. To accelerate recovery from lethal irradiation, the cytokines must be administered shortly following irradiation, and the induction of maximal levels of activity is dependent on chronic administration. In contrast, because of their longer half-lives, accelerated recovery from alkylating agents requires a delay of at least 24 to 48 hours to allow complete clearance of CTX before administration of a CSF. Studies quantitating peripheral blood leukocytes and bone marrow cellularity as well as colony-forming units per culture (CFU-C) frequency and CFU-C per femur revealed a significant correlation between these parameters and the ability to survive lethal irradiation

  1. Propofol pretreatment attenuates LPS-induced granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production in cultured hepatocytes by suppressing MAPK/ERK activity and NF-κB translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawan, Bruno; Kao, Y.-H.; Goto, Shigeru; Pan, M.-C.; Lin, Y.-C.; Hsu, L.-W.; Nakano, Toshiaki; Lai, C.-Y.; Sun, C.-K.; Cheng, Y.-F.; Tai, M.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Propofol (PPF), a widely used intravenous anesthetic for induction and maintenance of anesthesia during surgeries, was found to possess suppressive effect on host immunity. This study aimed at investigating whether PPF plays a modulatory role in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine expression in a cell line of rat hepatocytes. Morphological observation and viability assay showed that PPF exhibits no cytotoxicity at concentrations up to 300 μM after 48 h incubation. Pretreatment with 100 μM PPF for 24 h prior to LPS stimulation was performed to investigate the modulatory effect on LPS-induced inflammatory gene production. The results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that PPF pretreatment significantly suppressed the LPS-induced toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, CD14, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene expression. Western blotting analysis showed that PPF pretreatment potentiated the LPS-induced TLR-4 downregulation. Flow cytometrical analysis revealed that PPF pretreatment showed no modulatory effect on the LPS-upregulated CD14 expression on hepatocytes. In addition, PPF pretreatment attenuated the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) and IκBα, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-κB primed by LPS. Moreover, addition of PD98059, a MAPK kinase inhibitor, significantly suppressed the LPS-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and GM-CSF production, suggesting that the PPF-attenuated GM-CSF production in hepatocytes may be attributed to its suppressive effect on MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. In conclusion, PPF as an anesthetic may clinically benefit those patients who are vulnerable to sepsis by alleviating sepsis-related inflammatory response in livers

  2. Recurrent spleen enlargement during cyclic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy for myelodysplastic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmer, A.; Karmochkine, M.; Cadiou, M.; Gerhartz, H.; Zittoun, R.

    1990-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman with refractory anemia with excess of blasts received sequential courses of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy (GM-CSF) and low-dose cytosine arabinoside. Each course of GM-CSF induced a rapid and tremendous increase in leukocyte count as well as in spleen size, 111-indium chloride scanning suggested a myeloid metaplasia of the spleen. This observation suggests that in some patients the granulopoietic response to the myeloid growth factor stimulation may be predominant in the spleen

  3. Aggressive cutaneous vasculitis in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukemia following granulocyte colony stimulating factor injection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Husseiny Noha M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vasculitis has been reported in a few cases of chronic lymphatic leukemia and with granulocytic colony-stimulating factor therapy. Those with granulocytic colony-stimulating factor occurred after prolonged therapy and there was a rise in total leukocyte count unlike that in our patient who received just a single injection for the first time. Case presentation We report the case of a 64-year-old Egyptian man with chronic lymphatic leukemia who developed progressive cutaneous vasculitic lesions following injection of a single dose of a granulocytic colony stimulating factor before a third cycle of chemotherapy to improve neutropenia. This is an unusual case and the pathogenesis is not fully understood. Our patient was not on any medical treatment except for bisoprolol for ischemic heart disease. Although aggressive management with steroids, anticoagulation and plasmapheresis had been carried out, the condition was aggressive and the patient's consciousness deteriorated. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of his brain revealed multiple ischemic foci that could be attributed to vasculitis of the brain. Conclusion The aim of this case report is to highlight the importance of monitoring patients on granulocytic colony-stimulating factor therapy, especially in the context of other conditions (such as a hematological malignancy that may lead to an adverse outcome.

  4. Plasma macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels during cardiopulmonary bypass with extracorporeal circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Denizot

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocytosis and thrombocytopenia occur during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB with extracorporeal circulation (ECC. Elevated circulating concentrations of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF are reported during thrombocytopenia and leukopenia of different origins. We have assessed M-CSF concentrations in 40 patients undergoing CPB with ECC. Plasma M-CSF concentrations were stable during ECC and increased at the 6th (7.3 ± 0.7 IU/μg protein and 24th (8.6 ± 0.8 IU/μg protein postoperative hour compared with pre-ECC values (4.9 ± 0.5 IU/μg protein. A deep thrombocytopenia was found during ECC and until the 24th postoperative hour. A drop of leukocyte counts was found during ECC followed by an increase after ECC weaning. While no correlation was found between M-CSF concentrations and the leukocyte counts, M-CSF values were positively correlated with platelet counts only before and during ECC. Thus, M-CSF is not implicated in the thrombocytopenia and the leukopenia generated during CPB with ECC. However the elevated levels of M-CSFa few hours after the end of ECC might play a role in the inflammatory process often observed after CPB.

  5. Activation of peripheral leukocytes in rat pregnancy and experimental preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, MM; Schuiling, GA; Linton, EA; Sargent, IL; Redman, CWG

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to search for activation markers of peripheral leukocytes in experimental preeclampsia in the rat. STUDY DESIGN: Experimental preeclampsia was induced in 14-day-pregnant rats by infusion of endotoxin (1.0 mu g/kg body weight). For comparison, rats with normal

  6. High level of expression of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic rice cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Yun-Ji; Hong, Shin-Young; Kwon, Tae-Ho

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) has been previously produced in tobacco cell suspension cultures. However, the amount of hGM-CSF accumulated in the culture medium dropped quickly from its maximum of 150 microg/L at 5 d after incubation. To overcome...... of recombinant hGM-CSF in transgenic rice cell suspension culture and protease activity of this culture medium was low compared to that of tobacco culture system....

  7. Procoagulant activity of leukocytes pretreated with radiodetoxified endotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, T; Csernyanszky, H; Gazdy, E [Debreceni Orvostudomanyi Egyetem (Hungary); Bertok, L [Orszagos Frederic Joliot-Curie Sugarbiologiai es Sugaregeszseguegyi Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary)

    1980-09-30

    Rabbits were treated with Escherichia coli 089 endotoxin detoxified by ionizing irradiation (/sup 60/Co-gamma). The leukocytes (PMNs in 90%) obtained from rabbits treated with the mother endotoxin elicited a well defined activity; those obtained from rabbits pretreated with detoxified endotoxin elicited a less pronounced, procoagulant activity. It is suggested that the procoagulant effect may play a part in the mechanism of the local Shwartzman phenomenon.

  8. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose splenic uptake from extramedullary hematopoiesis after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Dayem, H M; Rosen, G; El-Zeftawy, H; Naddaf, S; Kumar, M; Atay, S; Cacavio, A

    1999-05-01

    Two patients with sarcoma, one with recurrent osteosarcoma of the spine and the other with metastatic synovial cell sarcoma, were treated with high-dose chemotherapy that produced severe leukopenia. The patients received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to stimulate the bone marrow (480 mg given subcutaneously twice daily for 5 to 7 days); their responses were seen as a marked increase in peripheral leukocyte count with no change in the erythrocyte or platelet counts. The patients had fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) imaging 24 hours after the end of G-CSF treatment. Diffusely increased uptake of F-18 FDG was seen in the bone marrow in both patients. In addition, markedly increased uptake in the spleen was noted in both, indicating that the spleen was the site of extramedullary hematopoiesis. The patients had no evidence of splenic metastases. The first patient had a history of irradiation to the dorsal spine, which was less responsive to G-CSF administration than was the nonirradiated lumbar spine.

  9. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor protects mice during respiratory virus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Hermesh

    Full Text Available A burst in the production of pro-inflammatory molecules characterizes the beginning of the host response to infection. Cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors work in concert to control pathogen replication and activate innate and adaptive immune responses. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF mobilizes and activates hematopoietic cells from the bone marrow, and it has been shown to mediate the generation of effective immunity against bacterial and fungal infections. G-CSF is produced at high levels in the lungs during infection with influenza and parainfluenza viruses, but its role during these infections is unknown. Here we show that during infection of mice with a non-lethal dose of influenza or Sendai virus, G-CSF promotes the accumulation of activated Ly6G+ granulocytes that control the extent of the lung pro-inflammatory response. Remarkably, these G-CSF-mediated effects facilitate viral clearance and sustain mouse survival.

  10. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor induces in vitro lymphangiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ae Sin; Kim, Dal; Wagle, Susbin Raj; Lee, Jung Eun; Jung, Yu Jin; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •G-CSF induces tube formation, migration and proliferation of lymphatic cells. •G-CSF increases phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in lymphatic endothelial cells. •MAPK and Akt pathways are linked to G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis. •G-CSF increases sprouting of a lymphatic ring. •G-CSF produces peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. -- Abstract: Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is reported to induce differentiation in cells of the monocyte lineage and angiogenesis in vascular endothelial cells, but its effects on lymphangiogenesis is uncertain. Here we examined the effects and the mechanisms of G-CSF-induced lymphangiogenesis using human lymphatic endothelial cells (hLECs). Our results showed that G-CSF induced capillary-like tube formation, migration and proliferation of hLECs in a dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced sprouting of thoracic duct. G-CSF increased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in hLECs. Supporting the observations, specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase and MAPK suppressed the G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis and sprouting. Intraperitoneal administration of G-CSF to mice also stimulated peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. These findings suggest that G-CSF is a lymphangiogenic factor

  11. Recent Advances of Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) Kinase and Its Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Al-Ameen, Shahad K; Al-Koumi, Dania M; Hamad, Mawadda G; Jalal, Nouran A; Oh, Chang-Hyun

    2018-01-17

    Colony stimulation factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R), which is also known as FMS kinase, plays an important role in initiating inflammatory, cancer, and bone disorders when it is overstimulated by its ligand, CSF-1. Innate immunity, as well as macrophage differentiation and survival, are regulated by the stimulation of the CSF-1R. Another ligand, interlukin-34 (IL-34), was recently reported to activate the CSF-1R receptor in a different manner. The relationship between CSF-1R and microglia has been reviewed. Both CSF-1 antibodies and small molecule CSF-1R kinase inhibitors have now been tested in animal models and in humans. In this Perspective, we discuss the role of CSF-1 and IL-34 in producing cancer, bone disorders, and inflammation. We also review the newly discovered and improved small molecule kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies that have shown potent activity toward CSF-1R, reported from 2012 until 2017.

  12. Tissue localization and fate in mice of injected multipotential colony-stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, D.; Nicola, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    The hemopoietic regulator multipotential colony-stimulating factor [Multi-CSF (interleukin 3)] has proliferative effects on a wide range of hemopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo. Native or recombination Multi-CSF injected intravenoulsy into adult mice had an initial half-life of 3-5 min and a second phase of 50 min. Clear labeling of hemopoietic cells was observed in the bone marrow and spleen of mice injected intravenously with recombinant 125 I-labeled Multi-CSF showing that injected Multi-CSF can obtain access to such cells in situ. A high proportion of injected 125 I-labeled Multi-CSF of both types became localized in the liver and in the kidney (in cells of the Bowman's capsule and proximal renal tubules). The kidney appeared to be an active site of degradation of Multi-CSF with the early appearance of low molecular weight labeled material in the urine

  13. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor, CSF-1, and its proto-oncogene-encoded receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherr, C.J.; Rettenmier, C.W.; Roussel, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    The macrophage colony-stimulating factor, CSF-1, or M-CSF, is one of a family of hematopoietic growth factors that stimulates the proliferation of monocytes, macrophages, and their committed bone marrow progenitors. Unlike pluripotent hemopoietins such as granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-3 (IL-3 or multi-CSF), which affect the growth of myeloid cells of several different hematopoietic lineages, CSF-1 acts only on cells of the mononuclear phagocyte series to stimulate their growth and enhance their survival. Retroviral transduction of the feline c-fms gene in the Susan McDonough and Hardy Zuckerman-5 (HZ-5) strains of feline sarcoma virus (FeSV) led to genetic alterations that endowed the recombined viral oncogene (v-fms) with the ability to transform cells in culture morphologically and to induce firbrosarcomas and hematopoietic neoplasms in susceptible animals. The v-fms oncogene product differs from the normal CSF-1 receptor in certain of its cardinal biochemical properties, most notably in exhibiting constitutively high basal levels of tyrosine kinase activity in the absence of its ligand. Comparative studies of the c-fms and v-fms genes coupled with analyses of engineered mutants and receptor chimeras have begun to pinpoint pertinent genetic alterations in the normal receptor gene that unmask its latent oncogenic potential. In addition, the availability of biologically active c-fms, v-fms, and CSF-1 cDNAs has allowed these genes to be mobilized and expressed in naive cells, thereby facilitating assays for receptor coupling with downstream components of the mitogenic pathway in diverse cell types

  14. Activation of lysosomal cathepsins in pregnant bovine leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Md Abdus Shabur; Balboula, Ahmed Zaky; Shirozu, Takahiro; Kim, Sung Woo; Kunii, Hiroki; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Ito, Tsukino; Kimura, Koji; Takahashi, Masashi

    2018-06-01

    In ruminants, interferon-tau (IFNT) - mediated expression of interferon-stimulated genes in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) can indicate pregnancy. Recently, type 1 IFN-mediated activation of lysosomes and lysosomal cathepsins (CTSs) was observed in immune cells. This study investigated the status of lysosomal CTSs and lysosomes in PBLs collected from pregnant (P) and non-pregnant (NP) dairy cows, and conducted in vitro IFNT stimulation of NP blood leukocytes. Blood samples were collected 0, 7, 14 and 18 days post-artificial insemination, and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs) separated. The fluorescent activity of CTSB and CTSK in PMNs significantly increased with the progress of pregnancy, especially on day 18. In vitro supplementation of IFNT significantly increased the activities of CTSB and CTSK in NP PBMCs and PMNs. CTSB expression was significantly higher in PBMCs and PMNs collected from P day-18 cows than from NP cows, whereas there was no difference in CTSK expression. IFNT increased CTSB expression but did not affect CTSK expression. Immunodetection showed an increase of CTSB in P day-18 PBMCs and PMNs. In vitro stimulation of IFNT increased CTSB in NP PBMCs and PMNs. Lysosomal acidification showed a significant increase in P day-18 PBMCs and PMNs. IFNT also stimulated lysosomal acidification. Expressions of lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP) 1 and LAMP2 were significantly higher in P day-18 PBMCs and PMNs. The results suggest that pregnancy-specific activation of lysosomal functions by CTS activation in blood leukocytes is highly associated with IFNT during maternal and fetal recognition of pregnancy. © 2018 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  15. A STUDY OF INTERMEDIATES INVOLVED IN THE FOLDING PATHWAY FOR RECOMBINANT HUMAN MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR (M-CSF) - EVIDENCE FOR 2 DISTINCT FOLDING PATHWAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WILKINS, JA; CONE, J; RANDHAWA, ZI; WOOD, D; WARREN, MK; WITKOWSKA, HE

    The folding pathway for a 150-amino acid recombinant form of the dimeric cytokine human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) has been studied. All 14 cysteine residues in the biologically active homodimer are involved in disulfide linkages. The structural characteristics of folding

  16. Isolation, nucleotide sequence and expression of a cDNA encoding feline granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, S P; Onions, D E

    2001-06-21

    A cDNA encoding feline granulocyte colony stimulating factor (fG-CSF) was cloned from alveolar macrophages using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The cDNA is 949 bp in length and encodes a predicted mature protein of 174 amino acids. Recombinant fG-CSF was expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion and purified by affinity chromatography. Biological activity of the recombinant protein was demonstrated using the murine myeloblastic cell line GNFS-60, which showed an ED50 for fG-CSF of approximately 2 ng/ml. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Colony-stimulating factors for chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaskar, Rahul; Clark, Otavio Augusto Camara; Lyman, Gary; Engel Ayer Botrel, Tobias; Morganti Paladini, Luciano; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2014-10-30

    Febrile neutropenia is a frequent adverse event experienced by people with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy, and is a potentially life-threatening situation. The current treatment is supportive care plus antibiotics. Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), such as granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), are cytokines that stimulate and accelerate the production of one or more cell lines in the bone marrow. Clinical trials have addressed the question of whether the addition of a CSF to antibiotics could improve outcomes in individuals diagnosed with febrile neutropenia. However, the results of these trials are conflicting. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of adding G-CSF or GM-CSF to standard treatment (antibiotics) when treating chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in individuals diagnosed with cancer. We conducted the search in March 2014 and covered the major electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and SCI. We contacted experts in hematology and oncology and also scanned the citations from the relevant articles. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared CSF plus antibiotics versus antibiotics alone for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in adults and children. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We performed meta-analysis of the selected studies using Review Manager 5 software. Fourteen RCTs (15 comparisons) including a total of 1553 participants addressing the role of CSF plus antibiotics in febrile neutropenia were included. Overall mortality was not improved by the use of CSF plus antibiotics versus antibiotics alone (hazard ratio (HR) 0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 1.16) P = 0.19; 13 RCTs; 1335 participants; low quality evidence). A similar finding was seen for infection-related mortality (HR 0.75 (95% CI 0.47 to 1.20) P = 0.23; 10 RCTs; 897

  18. Development and characterization of antiserum to murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, D.Y.; Eisenman, J.R.; Conlon, P.J.; Park, L.S.; Urdal, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The expression in yeast of a cDNA clone encoding murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has made possible the purification of large quantities of this recombinant protein. Rabbits immunized with pure recombinant GM-CSF generated antibodies that were shown to be specific for both recombinant GM-CSF and GM-CSF isolated from natural sources. Other lymphokines, including IL 1β, IL 2, IL 3, and recombinant human GM-CSF did not react with the antiserum. The antiserum together with recombinant GM-CSF that had been radiolabeled with 125 I to high specific activity, formed the foundation for a rapid, sensitive, and quantitative radioimmunoassay specific for murine GM-CSF. Furthermore, the antiserum was found to inhibit the biologic activities of GM-CSF as measured in both a bone marrow proliferation assay and a colony assay, and thus should prove to be a useful reagent for dissecting the complex growth factor activities involved in murine hematopoiesis

  19. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2000-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 μg/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  20. Multipronged attenuation of macrophage-colony stimulating factor signaling by Epstein-Barr virus BARF1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Chang, Rhoda Ahn; Chen, Xiaoyan; Longnecker, Richard; He, Xiaolin [NWU

    2014-10-02

    The ubiquitous EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with several types of cancers. The EBV genome encodes an early gene product, BARF1, which contributes to pathogenesis, potentially through growth-altering and immune-modulating activities, but the mechanisms for such activities are poorly understood. We have determined the crystal structure of BARF1 in complex with human macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), a hematopoietic cytokine with pleiotropic functions in development and immune response. BARF1 and M-CSF form a high-affinity, stable, ring-like complex in both solution and the crystal, with a BARF1 hexameric ring surrounded by three M-CSF dimers in triangular array. The binding of BARF1 to M-CSF dramatically reduces but does not completely abolish M-CSF binding and signaling through its cognate receptor FMS. A three-pronged down-regulation mechanism is proposed to explain the biological effect of BARF1 on M-CSF:FMS signaling. These prongs entail control of the circulating and effective local M-CSF concentration, perturbation of the receptor-binding surface of M-CSF, and imposition of an unfavorable global orientation of the M-CSF dimer. Each prong may reduce M-CSF:FMS signaling to a limited extent but in combination may alter M-CSF:FMS signaling dramatically. The downregulating mechanism of BARF1 underlines a viral modulation strategy, and provides a basis for understanding EBV pathogenesis.

  1. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 {mu}g/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  2. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor controls neural and behavioral plasticity in response to cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calipari, Erin S; Godino, Arthur; Peck, Emily G; Salery, Marine; Mervosh, Nicholas L; Landry, Joseph A; Russo, Scott J; Hurd, Yasmin L; Nestler, Eric J; Kiraly, Drew D

    2018-01-16

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by dysfunction in reward-related brain circuits, leading to maladaptive motivation to seek and take the drug. There are currently no clinically available pharmacotherapies to treat cocaine addiction. Through a broad screen of innate immune mediators, we identify granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) as a potent mediator of cocaine-induced adaptations. Here we report that G-CSF potentiates cocaine-induced increases in neural activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex. In addition, G-CSF injections potentiate cocaine place preference and enhance motivation to self-administer cocaine, while not affecting responses to natural rewards. Infusion of G-CSF neutralizing antibody into NAc blocks the ability of G-CSF to modulate cocaine's behavioral effects, providing a direct link between central G-CSF action in NAc and cocaine reward. These results demonstrate that manipulating G-CSF is sufficient to alter the motivation for cocaine, but not natural rewards, providing a pharmacotherapeutic avenue to manipulate addictive behaviors without abuse potential.

  3. Expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor correlates with prognosis in oral and mesopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, H; Fujieda, S; Sunaga, H; Noda, I; Saito, H

    1998-02-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptors (G-CSFRs) have been observed on the surface of not only hematopoietic cells but also several cancer cells. The stimulation of G-CSF has been demonstrated to induce proliferation and activation of G-CSFR-positive cells. In this study, we investigated the expression of G-CSFR on the surface of tumor cells and G-CSF production in oral and mesopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by an immunohistochemical approach. Of 58 oral and mesopharyngeal SCCs, 31 cases (53.4%) and 36 cases (62.1%) were positive for G-CSFR and G-CSF, respectively. There was no association between G-CSFR expression and G-CSF staining. In the group positive for G-CSFR expression, relapse was significantly more likely after primary treatment (P = 0.0069), whereas there was no association between G-CSFR expression and age, sex, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and clinical stage. Also, the G-CSFR-positive groups had a significantly lower disease-free and overall survival rate than the G-CSFR-negative groups (P = 0.0172 and 0.0188, respectively). However, none of the clinical markers correlated significantly with G-CSF staining, nor did the status of G-CSF production influence the overall survival. The results imply that assessment of G-CSFR may prove valuable in selecting patients with oral and mesopharyngeal SCC for aggressive therapy.

  4. Structural analysis of the receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanazono, Y.; Hosoi, T.; Kuwaki, T.; Matsuki, S.; Miyazono, K.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F.

    1990-01-01

    We investigated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptors on neutrophils from three patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase, in comparison with four normal volunteers. Because we experienced some difficulties in radioiodinating intact recombinant human G-CSF, we developed a new derivative of human G-CSF termed YPY-G-CSF. It was easy to iodinate this protein using the lactoperoxidase method because of two additional tyrosine residues, and its radioactivity was higher than that previously reported. The biological activity of YPY-G-CSF as G-CSF was fully retained. Scatchard analysis demonstrated that CML neutrophils had a single class of binding sites (1400 +/- 685/cell) with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 245 +/- 66 pM. The number of sites and Kd value of CML neutrophils were not significantly different from those of normal neutrophils (p greater than 0.9). Cross-linking studies revealed two specifically labeled bands of [125I]YPY-G-CSF-receptor complexes with apparent molecular masses of 160 and 110 kd on both normal and CML neutrophils. This is the first report describing two receptor proteins on neutrophils. According to the analyses of the proteolytic process of these cross-linked complexes and proteolytic mapping, we assume that alternative splicing or processing from a single gene may generate two distinct receptor proteins that bind specifically to G-CSF but have different fates in intracellular metabolism

  5. Colony-stimulating factor (CSF) radioimmunoassay: detection of a CSF subclass stimulating macrophage production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, E.R.

    1979-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) stimulate the differentiation of immature precursor cells to mature granulocytes and macrophages. Purified 125 I-labeled murine L cell CSF has been used to develop a radioimmunoassay (RIA) that detects a subclass of CSFs that stimulates macrophage production. Murine CSF preparations that contain this subclass of CSF compete for all of the CSF binding sites on anti-L cell CSF antibody. With the exception of mouse serum, which can contain inhibitors of the bioassay, there is complete correspondence between activities determined by RIA and those determined by bioassay. The RIA is slightly more sensitive than the bioassay, detecting approximately 0.3 fmol of purified L cell CSF. It can also detect this subclass of CSF in chickens, rats, and humans. In the mouse, the subclass is distinguished from other CSFs by a murine cell bioassay dose-response curve in which 90% of the response occurs over a 10-fold (rather than a 100-fold) increase in concentration, by stimulating the formations of colonies contaning a high proportion of mononuclear (rather than granulocytic) cells, and by certain physical characteristics

  6. Prevention of myelosuppression by combined treatment with enterosorbent and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, O O; Posokhova, К А; Todor, I N; Lukianova, N Yu; Nikolaev, V G; Chekhun, V F

    2015-06-01

    Hematotoxicity and its complication are the prominent limiting factors for rational treatment of malignancies. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to increase granulocyte production. It has been shown previously that enterosorption causes prominent myeloprotective activity also. Still, no trial was performed to combine both of them. To study the influence of combination of enterosorption and pharmaceutical analogue of naturally occurring G-CSF (filgrastim) on bone marrow protection and the growth of grafted tumor in a case of injection of melphalan (Mel). Mel injections were used for promotion of bone marrow suppression in rats. Carbon granulated enterosorbent C2 (IEPOR) was used for providing of enteral sorption detoxifying therapy. Filgrastim was used to increase white blood cells (WBC) count. The simultaneous usage of enterosorption and filgrastim had maximum effectiveness for restoring of all types of blood cells. WBC count was higher by 138.3% compared with the Mel group. The increase of platelets count by 98.5% was also observed. In the group (Mel + C2 + filgrastim) the absolute neutrophils count was twofold higher, in comparison with rats of Mel group. Simultaneous administration of G-CSF-analogue and carbonic enterosorbent C2 is a perspective approach for bone marrow protection, when the cytostatic drug melphalan is used. Such combination demonstrates prominent positive impact on restoring of all types of blood cells and had no influence on the antitumor efficacy.

  7. Colonic localization of indium-111 labeled leukocytes in active Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harre, R.G.; Conrad, G.R.; Seabold, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    A patient with known Behcet's disease demonstrated intense colonic localization of In-111 labeled leukocytes. Gastrointestinal involvement had not been previously manifested, but extensive colonic inflammation was documented by endoscopy. This case illustrates the utility of In-111 labeled leukocyte imaging for detecting active bowel disease in a debilitated patient with documented Behcet's vasculitis

  8. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Concise Review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Komůrková, Denisa; Hoferová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2014), s. 4770-4778 ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0128 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : granulocyte colony-stimulating factor * radiation accident s * acute radiation syndrome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.416, year: 2014

  9. Leukocytes respiratory burst activity as indicator of innate immunity of pacu Piaractus mesopotamicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JD Biller-Takahashi

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the assay to quantify the respiratory burst activity of blood leukocytes of pacu as an indicator of the innate immune system, using the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT to formazan as a measure of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. In order to assess the accuracy of the assay, fish were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila and sampled one week after challenge. The A. hydrophila infection increased the leukocyte respiratory burst activity. The protocol showed a reliable and easy assay, appropriate to determine the respiratory burst activity of blood leukocytes of pacu, a neotropical fish, in the present experimental conditions.

  10. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces prolactin expression in rat pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Satoya; Kurotani, Reiko; Miyano, Yuki; Sakahara, Satoshi; Koike, Kanako; Maruyama, Minoru; Ishikawa, Fumio; Sakatai, Ichiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Takafumi

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the pituitary gland to understand the effect of M-CSF on pituitary hormones and the relationship between the endocrine and immune systems. When we attempted to establish pituitary cell lines from a thyrotropic pituitary tumor (TtT), a macrophage cell line, TtT/M-87, was established. We evaluated M-CSF-like activity in conditioned media (CM) from seven pituitary cell lines using TtT/M-87 cells. TtT/M-87 proliferation significantly increased in the presence of CM from TtT/GF cells, a pituitary folliculostellate (FS) cell line. M-CSF mRNA was detected in TtT/GF and MtT/E cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and its expression in TtT/GF cells was increased in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependent manner. M-CSF mRNA expression was also increased in rat anterior pituitary glands by LPS. M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR) mRNA was only detected in TtT/ M-87 cells and increased in the LPS-stimulated rat pituitary glands. In rat pituitary glands, M-CSF and M-CSFR were found to be localized in FS cells and prolactin (PRL)-secreting cells, respectively, by immunohistochemistry. The PRL concentration in rat sera was significantly increased at 24 h after M-CSF administration, and mRNA levels significantly increased in primary culture cells of rat anterior pituitary glands. In addition, TNF-α mRNA was increased in the primary culture cells by M-CSF. These results revealed that M-CSF was secreted from FS cells and M-CSF regulated PRL expression in rat pituitary glands.

  11. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF biological actions on human dermal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Montagnani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are involved in all pathologies characterized by increased ExtraCellularMatrix synthesis, from wound healing to fibrosis. Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF is a cytokine isolated as an hemopoietic growth factor but recently indicated as a differentiative agent on endothelial cells. In this work we demonstrated the expression of the receptor for GM-CSF (GMCSFR on human normal skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects (NFPC and on a human normal fibroblast cell line (NHDF and we try to investigate the biological effects of this cytokine. Human normal fibroblasts were cultured with different doses of GM-CSF to study the effects of this factor on GMCSFR expression, on cell proliferation and adhesion structures. In addition we studied the production of some Extra-Cellular Matrix (ECM components such as Fibronectin, Tenascin and Collagen I. The growth rate of fibroblasts from healthy donors (NFPC is not augmented by GM-CSF stimulation in spite of increased expression of the GM-CSFR. On the contrary, the proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF cell line seems more influenced by high concentration of GM-CSF in the culture medium. The adhesion structures and the ECM components appear variously influenced by GM-CSF treatment as compared to fibroblasts cultured in basal condition, but newly only NHDF cells are really induced to increase their synthesis activity. We suggest that the in vitro treatment with GM-CSF can shift human normal fibroblasts towards a more differentiated state, due or accompanied by an increased expression of GM-CSFR and that such “differentiation” is an important event induced by such cytokine.

  12. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor attenuates inflammation in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giniatullina Raisa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF is protective in animal models of various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether pegfilgrastim, GCSF with sustained action, is protective in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with manifestations of upper and lower motoneuron death and muscle atrophy accompanied by inflammation in the CNS and periphery. Methods Human mutant G93A superoxide dismutase (SOD1 ALS mice were treated with pegfilgrastim starting at the presymptomatic stage and continued until the end stage. After long-term pegfilgrastim treatment, the inflammation status was defined in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues including hematopoietic organs and muscle. The effect of GCSF on spinal cord neuron survival and microglia, bone marrow and spleen monocyte activation was assessed in vitro. Results Long-term pegfilgrastim treatment prolonged mutant SOD1 mice survival and attenuated both astro- and microgliosis in the spinal cord. Pegfilgrastim in SOD1 mice modulated the inflammatory cell populations in the bone marrow and spleen and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine in monocytes and microglia. The mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the circulation was restored back to basal level after long-term pegfilgrastim treatment in SOD1 mice while the storage of Ly6C expressing monocytes in the bone marrow and spleen remained elevated. After pegfilgrastim treatment, an increased proportion of these cells in the degenerative muscle was detected at the end stage of ALS. Conclusions GCSF attenuated inflammation in the CNS and the periphery in a mouse model of ALS and thereby delayed the progression of the disease. This mechanism of action targeting inflammation provides a new perspective of the usage of GCSF in the treatment of ALS.

  13. Transepithelial activation of human leukocytes by probiotics and commensal bacteria: Role of Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baeuerlein, Annette; Ackermann, Stefanie; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to clarify whether commercially available probiotics induce greater trans-epithelial activation of human leukocytes than do commensal, food-derived and pathogenic bacteria and to identify the compounds responsible for this activation. Eleven different bacterial...... Escherichia coli K12, probiotic E. coli Nissle, EPEC) induced basolateral production of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL 6, 8, and 10. Gram-positive probiotics (Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp.) had virtually no effect. In addition, commensals (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacteroides vulgatus) and food...... (polymyxin, colistin) completely abrogated transepithelial activation of leukocytes. Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin is a crucial factor in transepithelial stimulation of leukocytes, regardless of whether it is produced by probiotics or other bacteria. Hence, transepithelial stimulation of leukocytes...

  14. Identification of a second putative receptor of platelet activating factor on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    Due to multiple molecular species of platelet activating factor (PAF) and the existence of high affinity binding sites in a variety of cells and tissues, possible existence of PAF receptor subtypes has been suggested. This report shows differences between specific PAF receptors on human leukocytes and platelets. Human PMN leukocyte membranes showed high affinity binding sites for PAF with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 4.7 (+/- 1.4) x 10 -10 M. The maximal number (B/sub max/) of receptor sites was estimated to be 3.13 (+/- 1.4) x 10 -13 mol/mg protein. They compared the relative potencies of several PAF agonists and receptor antagonists between human platelet and human leukocyte membranes. One antagonist (Ono-6240) was found to be 8 times less potent at inhibiting the [ 3 H]PAF specific receptor binding to human leukocytes than to human platelets. Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and K + ions potentiated the [ 3 H]PAF specific binding in both systems. Na + ions inhibited the [ 3 H]PAF specific binding to human platelets but showed no effects in human leukocytes. K + ions decreased the Mg 2+ -potentiated [ 3 H]PAF binding in human leukocytes but showed no effects in human platelets. These results suggest that the PAF specific receptors in human leukocytes are different structurally and possibly functionally from the receptors identified in human platelets

  15. Observing a fictitious stressful event: haematological changes, including circulating leukocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Rubina; Shelton-Rayner, Graham; Harkin, Brendan; Williams, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of watching a psychological stressful event on the activation of leukocytes in healthy human volunteers. Blood samples were obtained from 32 healthy male and female subjects aged between 20 and 26 years before, during and after either watching an 83-minute horror film that none of the subjects had previously seen (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, 1974) or by sitting quietly in a room (control group). Total differential cell counts, leukocyte activation as measured by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test, heart rate and blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken at defined time points. There were significant increases in peripheral circulating leukocytes, the number of activated circulating leukocytes, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and haematocrit (Hct) in response to the stressor. These were accompanied by significant increases in heart rate, systolic and diastolic BP (P<0.05 from baseline). This is the first reported study on the effects of observing a psychologically stressful, albeit fictitious event on circulating leukocyte numbers and the state of leukocyte activation as determined by the nitrotetrazolium test.

  16. The Potential Role of Recombinant Hematopoietic Colony-Stimulating Factors in Preventing Infections in the Immunocompromised Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Rusthoven

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors coordinate the proliferation and maturation of bone marrow and peripheral blood cells during normal hematopoiesis. Most of these factors are now available as recombinant human colony-stimulating factors, and preclinical and clinical testing is proceeding rapidly. Granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors have been the most extensively studied to date. In human clinical trials, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves neutrophil counts and function, reduces episodes of febrile neutropenia, improves neutrophil recovery after disease- or treatment-induced myelosuppression, and reduces the number of serious infections in several neutropenic disease states. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor has similar biological properties but may also improve eosinophil proliferation and function, and platelet cell recovery after myelotoxic bone marrow injury, Interleukin-1 boosts the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, but also may promote the resolution of established infections in conjunction with antibiotics. The therapeutic realities and future therapeutic implications of these agents for the therapy of infections, cancer and hemopoietic disorders are discussed.

  17. Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) signaling in spinal microglia drives visceral sensitization following colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Lilian; Lapointe, Tamia K; Iftinca, Mircea; Marsters, Candace; Hollenberg, Morley D; Kurrasch, Deborah M; Altier, Christophe

    2017-10-17

    Pain is a main symptom of inflammatory diseases and often persists beyond clinical remission. Although we have a good understanding of the mechanisms of sensitization at the periphery during inflammation, little is known about the mediators that drive central sensitization. Recent reports have identified hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors as important regulators of tumor- and nerve injury-associated pain. Using a mouse model of colitis, we identify the proinflammatory cytokine granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF or Csf-3) as a key mediator of visceral sensitization. We report that G-CSF is specifically up-regulated in the thoracolumbar spinal cord of colitis-affected mice. Our results show that resident spinal microglia express the G-CSF receptor and that G-CSF signaling mediates microglial activation following colitis. Furthermore, healthy mice subjected to intrathecal injection of G-CSF exhibit pronounced visceral hypersensitivity, an effect that is abolished by microglial depletion. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that G-CSF injection increases Cathepsin S activity in spinal cord tissues. When cocultured with microglia BV-2 cells exposed to G-CSF, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) nociceptors become hyperexcitable. Blocking CX3CR1 or nitric oxide production during G-CSF treatment reduces excitability and G-CSF-induced visceral pain in vivo. Finally, administration of G-CSF-neutralizing antibody can prevent the establishment of persistent visceral pain postcolitis. Overall, our work uncovers a DRG neuron-microglia interaction that responds to G-CSF by engaging Cathepsin S-CX3CR1-inducible NOS signaling. This interaction represents a central step in visceral sensitization following colonic inflammation, thereby identifying spinal G-CSF as a target for treating chronic abdominal pain.

  18. Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (hG-CSF) Expression in Plastids of Lactuca sativa

    OpenAIRE

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. Methods: hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA ter...

  19. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Receptor, Tissue Factor, and VEGF-R Bound VEGF in Human Breast Cancer In Loco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtukiewicz, Marek Z; Sierko, Ewa; Skalij, Piotr; Kamińska, Magda; Zimnoch, Lech; Brekken, Ralf A; Thorpe, Philip E

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin and docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimens used in breast cancer patients are associated with high risk of febrile neutropenia (FN). Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) are recommended for both treating and preventing chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Increased thrombosis incidence in G-CSF treated patients was reported; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The principal activator of blood coagulation in cancer is tissue factor (TF). It additionally contributes to cancer progression and stimulates angiogenesis. The main proangiogenic factor is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The aim of the study was to evaluate granulocyte-colony stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR), tissue factor (TF) expression and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF-R) bound VEGF in human breast cancer in loco. G-CSFR, TF and VEGFR bound VEGF (VEGF: VEGFR) were assessed in 28 breast cancer tissue samples. Immunohistochemical (IHC) methodologies according to ABC technique and double staining IHC procedure were employed utilizing antibodies against G-CSFR, TF and VEGF associated with VEGFR (VEGF: VEGFR). Expression of G-CSFR was demonstrated in 20 breast cancer tissue specimens (71%). In 6 cases (21%) the expression was strong (IRS 9-12). Strong expression of TF was observed in all investigated cases (100%). Moreover, expression of VEGF: VEGFR was visualized in cancer cells (IRS 5-8). No presence of G-CSFR, TF or VEGF: VEGFR was detected on healthy breast cells. Double staining IHC studies revealed co-localization of G-CSFR and TF, G-CSFR and VEGF: VEGFR, as well as TF and VEGF: VEGFR on breast cancer cells and ECs. The results of the study indicate that GCSFR, TF and VEGF: VEGFR expression as well as their co-expression might influence breast cancer biology, and may increase thromboembolic adverse events incidence.

  20. Stress-induced enhancement of leukocyte trafficking into sites of surgery or immune activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kavitha; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.

    2005-04-01

    Effective immunoprotection requires rapid recruitment of leukocytes into sites of surgery, wounding, infection, or vaccination. In contrast to immunosuppressive chronic stressors, short-term acute stressors have immunoenhancing effects. Here, we quantify leukocyte infiltration within a surgical sponge to elucidate the kinetics, magnitude, subpopulation, and chemoattractant specificity of an acute stress-induced increase in leukocyte trafficking to a site of immune activation. Mice acutely stressed before sponge implantation showed 200-300% higher neutrophil, macrophage, natural killer cell, and T cell infiltration than did nonstressed animals. We also quantified the effects of acute stress on lymphotactin- (LTN; a predominantly lymphocyte-specific chemokine), and TNF-- (a proinflammatory cytokine) stimulated leukocyte infiltration. An additional stress-induced increase in infiltration was observed for neutrophils, in response to TNF-, macrophages, in response to TNF- and LTN, and natural killer cells and T cells in response to LTN. These results show that acute stress initially increases trafficking of all major leukocyte subpopulations to a site of immune activation. Tissue damage-, antigen-, or pathogen-driven chemoattractants subsequently determine which subpopulations are recruited more vigorously. Such stress-induced increases in leukocyte trafficking may enhance immunoprotection during surgery, vaccination, or infection, but may also exacerbate immunopathology during inflammatory (cardiovascular disease or gingivitis) or autoimmune (psoriasis, arthritis, or multiple sclerosis) diseases. chemokine | psychophysiological stress | surgical sponge | wound healing | lymphotactin

  1. [The effect of lithium carbonate on the leukocyte count following ionizing radiation. 4. The effect of lithium carbonate on the activation of granulocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, G; Müller, G M; Kehrberg, G

    1989-01-01

    From numerous investigations it is known that lithium carbonate promotes granulocytopoiesis by stimulation of CSF (colony stimulating factor) in bone marrow. To prove if no immature, in their functions restricted cells are delivered from bone marrow, the activity of granulocytes was tested in vitro in patients with lithium therapy. It could be seen that granulocytes of peripheral blood show an increased in-vitro-activation after lithium influence in vivo.

  2. Transepithelial activation of human leukocytes by probiotics and commensal bacteria: role of Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäuerlein, A.; Ackermann, S.; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to clarify whether commercially available probiotics induce greater trans-epithelial activation of human leukocytes than do commensal, food-derived and pathogenic bacteria and to identify the compounds responsible for this activation. Eleven different bacterial...... Escherichia coli K12, probiotic E. coli Nissle, EPEC) induced basolateral production of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL 6, 8, and 10. Gram-positive probiotics (Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp.) had virtually no effect. In addition, commensals (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacteroides vulgatus) and food...... (polymyxin, colistin) completely abrogated transepithelial activation of leukocytes. Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin is a crucial factor in transepithelial stimulation of leukocytes, regardless of whether it is produced by probiotics or other bacteria. Hence, transepithelial stimulation ofleukocytes...

  3. The Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor has a dual role in neuronal and vascular plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eWallner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is a growth factor that has originally been identified several decades ago as a hematopoietic factor required mainly for the generation of neutrophilic granulocytes, and is in clinical use for that. More recently, it has been discovered that G-CSF also plays a role in the brain as a growth factor for neurons and neural stem cells, and as a factor involved in the plasticity of the vasculature. We review and discuss these dual properties in view of the neuroregenerative potential of this growth factor.

  4. Cloning and expression of porcine Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) and Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) and analysis of the species specificity of stimulation by CSF-1 and Interleukin 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Deborah J.; Garceau, Valerie; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Sester, David P.; Fici, Greg J.; Shelly, John A.; Wilson, Thomas L.; Hume, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (CSF-1) controls the survival, differentiation and proliferation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. A second ligand for the CSF-1R, Interleukin 34 (IL-34), has been described, but its physiological role is not yet known. The domestic pig provides an alternative to traditional rodent models for evaluating potential therapeutic applications of CSF-1R agonists and antagonists. To enable such studies, we cloned and expressed active pig CSF-1. To provide a bioassay, pig CSF-1R was expressed in the factor-dependent Ba/F3 cell line. On this transfected cell line, recombinant porcine CSF-1 and human CSF-1 had identical activity. Mouse CSF-1 does not interact with the human CSF-1 receptor but was active on pig. By contrast, porcine CSF-1 was active on mouse, human, cat and dog cells. IL-34 was previously shown to be species-specific, with mouse and human proteins demonstrating limited cross-species activity. The pig CSF-1R was equally responsive to both mouse and human IL-34. Based upon the published crystal structures of CSF-1/CSF-1R and IL34/CSF-1R complexes, we discuss the molecular basis for the species specificity. PMID:22974529

  5. Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administered enterally to neonates is not absorbed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Darlene A; Maheshwari, Akhil; Christensen, Robert D

    2003-08-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is present in liquids swallowed by the fetus and neonate; specifically, amniotic fluid, colostrum, and human milk. The swallowed G-CSF has local effects on enteric cells, which express the G-CSF receptor. However, some portion of the G-CSF ingested by the fetus and neonate might be absorbed into the circulation and have systemic actions, such as stimulating neutrophil production. To assess this possibility we sought to determine if circulating G-CSF concentrations of neonates increase after enteral administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). This was a single-center, prospective, blinded, randomized, 2 x 2 crossover study, with each infant receiving 1 dose of rhG-CSF (100 microg/kg) and 1 dose of placebo. Plasma G-CSF concentrations were measured at 2 and 4 hours after administration of the test solution. No significant change in plasma G-CSF concentration was observed after the enteral administration of rhG-CSF. On this basis, we conclude that orally administered rhG-CSF is not absorbed in significant quantities, and we speculate that the G-CSF swallowed by the fetus and neonate has local but not systemic effects.

  6. Lithium-stimulated recovery of granulopoiesis after sublethal irradiation is not mediated via increased levels of colony stimulating factor (CSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallicchio, V.S.; Chen, M.G.; Watts, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Lithium accelerates the recovery of granulopoiesis following sublethal (2 Gy) whole body x-irradiation. Studies are described that further define this Li-mediated recovery by measuring the levels of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) present in serum from mice administered 105 μg/mouse (total dose) of ultra-pure Li 2 CO 3 for 3 days following irradiation. On days 1-28 following the last lithium dose, the serum was tested for its CSF activity against both normal non-adherent derived bone marrow target cells and non-adherent marrow cells from mice administered cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg body weight). Serum was assayed at 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10% final concentration. No significant difference in the total number of CFU-GM was observed from normal marrow using either serum from irradiated mice or lithium-treated and irradiated mice, although the irradiation did produce a 300% rise in CFU-GM colonies compared to normal serum (days 4 and 10-15). From regenerating marrow, a significant difference (P <= 0.01) was observed in CFU-GM cultured with serum at 0.1% concentration from irradiated and lithium-treated mice compared to irradiated mice without lithium. The presence of CSF was confirmed by its reduced activity in the presence of anti-(CSF). (U.K.)

  7. Highly Expressed Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptor (G-CSFR) in Human Gastric Cancer Leads to Poor Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhisong; Li, Yong; Zhao, Qun; Fan, Liqiao; Tan, Bibo; Zuo, Jing; Hua, Kelei; Ji, Qiang

    2018-03-23

    BACKGROUND Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer (GC) patients has been the mainstay of therapy for many years. Although adding anti-angiogenic drugs to chemotherapy improves patient survival slightly, identifying anti-angiogenic therapy-sensitive patients remains challenging for oncologists. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis, which can be minimized with the anti-G-CSF antibody. Thus, G-CSF might be a potential tumor marker. However, the effects of G-CSF and G-CSFR expression on GC patient survival remain unclear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Seventy GC tissue samples were collected for G-CSF and G-CSFR detection by immunohistochemistry. A total of 40 paired GC tissues and matched adjacent mucosa were used to measure the G-CSF and G-CSFR levels by ELISA. Correlations between G-CSF/G-CSFR and clinical characteristics, VEGF-A levels and overall survival were analyzed. Biological function and underlying mechanistic investigations were carried out using SGC7901 cell lines, and the effects of G-CSF on tumor proliferation, migration, and tube formation were examined. RESULTS The levels of G-CSFR were upregulated in GC tissues compared to normal mucosa tissues. Higher G-CSF expression was associated with later tumor stages and higher tumor VEGF-A and serum CA724 levels, whereas higher G-CSFR expression was associated with lymph node metastasis. Patients with higher G-CSF expression had shorter overall survival times. In vitro, G-CSF stimulated SGC7901 proliferation and migration through the JAK2/STAT3 pathway and accelerated HUVEC tube formation. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that increased G-CSF and G-CSFR in tumors leads to unfavorable outcomes for GC patients by stimulating tumor proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis, indicating that these factors are potential tumor targets for cancer treatment.

  8. Colony stimulating factor 1 receptor inhibition delays recurrence of glioblastoma after radiation by altering myeloid cell recruitment and polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Jason H.; Hirai, Takahisa; Deng, Lei; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Urata, Kimiko; West, Brian L.; Brown, J. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) may initially respond to treatment with ionizing radiation (IR), but the prognosis remains extremely poor because the tumors invariably recur. Using animal models, we previously showed that inhibiting stromal cell–derived factor 1 signaling can prevent or delay GBM recurrence by blocking IR-induced recruitment of myeloid cells, specifically monocytes that give rise to tumor-associated macrophages. The present study was aimed at determining if inhibiting colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) signaling could be used as an alternative strategy to target pro-tumorigenic myeloid cells recruited to irradiated GBM. Methods To inhibit CSF-1 signaling in myeloid cells, we used PLX3397, a small molecule that potently inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity of the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R). Combined IR and PLX3397 therapy was compared with IR alone using 2 different human GBM intracranial xenograft models. Results GBM xenografts treated with IR upregulated CSF-1R ligand expression and increased the number of CD11b+ myeloid-derived cells in the tumors. Treatment with PLX3397 both depleted CD11b+ cells and potentiated the response of the intracranial tumors to IR. Median survival was significantly longer for mice receiving combined therapy versus IR alone. Analysis of myeloid cell differentiation markers indicated that CSF-1R inhibition prevented IR-recruited monocyte cells from differentiating into immunosuppressive, pro-angiogenic tumor-associated macrophages. Conclusion CSF-1R inhibition may be a promising strategy to improve GBM response to radiotherapy. PMID:26538619

  9. Simplified in vitro refolding and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor using protein folding cation exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Sandeep; Dedaniya, Akshay; Thunuguntla, Rahul; Mallu, Maheswara Reddy; Parupudi, Pavani; Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy

    2015-01-30

    Protein folding-strong cation exchange chromatography (PF-SCX) has been employed for efficient refolding with simultaneous purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). To acquire a soluble form of renatured and purified rhG-CSF, various chromatographic conditions, including the mobile phase composition and pH was evaluated. Additionally, the effects of additives such as urea, amino acids, polyols, sugars, oxidizing agents and their amalgamations were also investigated. Under the optimal conditions, rhG-CSF was efficaciously solubilized, refolded and simultaneously purified by SCX in a single step. The experimental results using ribose (2.0M) and arginine (0.6M) combination were found to be satisfactory with mass yield, purity and specific activity of 71%, ≥99% and 2.6×10(8)IU/mg respectively. Through this investigation, we concluded that the SCX refolding method was more efficient than conventional methods which has immense potential for the large-scale production of purified rhG-CSF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Affinity purification of human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha-chain. Demonstration of binding by photoaffinity labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, S.; Shibuya, K.; Miyazono, K.; Tojo, A.; Oka, Y.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F.

    1990-01-01

    The human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha-chain, a low affinity component of the receptor, was solubilized and affinity-purified from human placenta using biotinylated GM-CSF. Scatchard analysis of 125 I-GM-CSF binding to the placental membrane extract disclosed that the GM-CSF receptor had a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.5-0.8 nM, corresponding to the Kd value of the GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain on the intact placental membrane. Affinity labeling of the solubilized protein using a photoreactive cross-linking agent, N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB), demonstrated a single specific band of 70-95 kDa representing a ligand-receptor complex. Approximately 2 g of the placental membrane extract was subjected to a biotinylated GM-CSF-fixed streptavidin-agarose column, resulting in a single major band at 70 kDa on a silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate gel. The radioiodination for the purified material disclosed that the purified protein had an approximate molecular mass of 70 kDa and a pI of 6.6. Binding activity of the purified material was demonstrated by photoaffinity labeling using HSAB- 125 I-GM-CSF, producing a similar specific band at 70-95 kDa as was demonstrated for the crude protein

  11. Nuclear proteins interacting with the promoter region of the human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, M.F.; Gamble, J.R.; Vadas, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The gene for human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is expressed in a tissue-specific as well as an activation-dependent manner. The interaction of nuclear proteins with the promoter region of the GM-CSF gene that is likely to be responsible for this pattern of GM-CSF expression was investigated. The authors show that nuclear proteins interact with DNA fragments from the GM-CSF promoter in a cell-specific manner. A region spanning two cytokine-specific sequences, cytokine 1 (CK-1, 5', GAGATTCCAC 3') and cytokine 2 (CK-2, 5' TCAGGTA 3') bound two nuclear proteins from GM-CSF-expressing cells in gel retardation assays. NF-GMb was inducible with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and accompanied induction of GM-CSF message. NF-GMb was absent in cell lines not producing GM-CSF, some of which had other distinct binding proteins. NF-GMa and NF-GMb eluted from a heparin-Sepharose column at 0.3 and 0.6 M KCl, respectively. They hypothesize that the sequences CK-1 and CK-2 bind specific proteins and regulate GM-CSF transcription

  12. Phagocytic and bactericidal activities of leukocytes in whole blood from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, S.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Toyota, E.; Neriishi, S.; Yamakido, M.; Matsuo, M.; Hosoda, Y.; Finch, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluated the phagocytic and bactericidal activities of peripheral blood leukocytes from Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors for Staphylococcus aureus. The data were analyzed by multiple linear regression for age, sex, radiation exposure, city of exposure, and neutrophil counts. No significant radiation effect was observed for either blood phagocytic or bactericidal activities. The only significant variable for these functions was the neutrophil count

  13. Structural insights into the backbone-circularized granulocyte colony-stimulating factor containing a short connector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyafusa, Takamitsu; Shibuya, Risa; Honda, Shinya

    2018-06-02

    Backbone circularization is a powerful approach for enhancing the structural stability of polypeptides. Herein, we present the crystal structure of the circularized variant of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in which the terminal helical region was circularized using a short, two-amino acid connector. The structure revealed that the N- and C-termini were indeed connected by a peptide bond. The local structure of the C-terminal region transited from an α helix to 3 10 helix with a bend close to the N-terminal region, indicating that the structural change offset the insufficient length of the connector. This is the first-ever report of a crystal structure of the backbone of a circularized protein. It will facilitate the development of backbone circularization methodology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Increased macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Eriko; Sekiya, Akiko; Hayashi, Tomoe; Kadohira, Yasuko; Maekawa, Mio; Yamazaki, Masahide; Asakura, Hidesaku; Nakao, Shinji; Ohtake, Shigeki

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies have found markedly elevated serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines in patients with Graves' disease (GD). We investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in GD. We assayed concentrations of M-CSF in sera from 32 patients with GD (25 untreated; 7 receiving thiamazole therapy). We also studied 32 age-matched healthy subjects as controls. Relationships between serum M-CSF and both thyroid state and serum lipids were examined. Moreover, to examine the effect of thyroid hormone alone on serum M-CSF, T3 was administered orally to normal subjects. Serum concentrations of M-CSF in GD patients who were hyperthyroid were significantly increased compared with GD patients who were euthyroid (P oral T3 administered to 15 volunteers for 7 days produced significant increases in serum levels of M-CSF (P production of M-CSF in patients with GD.

  15. Hematologic improvement in dogs with parvovirus infection treated with recombinant canine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, A; Dow, S; Ogilvie, G; Rao, S; Hackett, T

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dogs with canine parvovirus-induced neutropenia have not responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). However, recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) has not been previously evaluated for treatment of parvovirus-induced neutropenia in dogs. We assessed the effectiveness of rcG-CSF in dogs with parvovirus-induced neutropenia with a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized clinical trial. Endpoints of our study were time to recovery of WBC and neutrophil counts, and duration of hospitalization. 28 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia were treated with rcG-CSF and outcomes were compared to those of 34 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia not treated with rcG-CSF. We found that mean WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (P parvovirus infection, but indicate the need for additional studies to evaluate overall safety of the treatment.

  16. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Concise Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Hofer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article concisely summarizes data on the action of one of the principal and best known growth factors, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, in a mammalian organism exposed to radiation doses inducing acute radiation syndrome. Highlighted are the topics of its real or anticipated use in radiation accident victims, the timing of its administration, the possibilities of combining G-CSF with other drugs, the ability of other agents to stimulate endogenous G-CSF production, as well as of the capability of this growth factor to ameliorate not only the bone marrow radiation syndrome but also the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. G-CSF is one of the pivotal drugs in the treatment of radiation accident victims and its employment in this indication can be expected to remain or even grow in the future.

  17. Activation of human leukocytes on tantalum trabecular metal in comparison to commonly used orthopedic metal implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildhauer, T A; Peter, E; Muhr, G; Köller, M

    2009-02-01

    We analyzed leukocyte functions and cytokine response of human leukocytes toward porous tantalum foam biomaterial (Trabecular Metaltrade mark, TM) in comparison to equally sized solid orthopedic metal implant materials (pure titanium, titanium alloy, stainless steel, pure tantalum, and tantalum coated stainless steel). Isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN) were cocultured with equally sized metallic test discs for 24 h. Supernatants were analyzed for cytokine content by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared to the other used test materials there was a significant increase in the release of IL (interleukin)-1ra and IL-8 from PMN, and of IL-1ra, IL-6, and TNF-alpha from PBMC in response to the TM material. The cytokine release correlated with surface roughness of the materials. In contrast, the release of IL-2 was not induced showing that mainly myeloid leukocytes were activated. In addition, supernatants of these leukocyte/material interaction (conditioned media, CM) were subjected to whole blood cell function assays (phagocytosis, chemotaxis, bacterial killing). There was a significant increase in the phagocytotic capacity of leukocytes in the presence of TM-conditioned media. The chemotactic response of leukocytes toward TM-conditioned media was significantly higher compared to CM obtained from other test materials. Furthermore, the bactericidal capacity of whole blood was enhanced in the presence of TM-conditioned media. These results indicate that leukocyte activation at the surface of TM material induces a microenvironment, which may enhance local host defense mechanisms.

  18. A novel dioxygenation product of arachidonic acid possesses potent chemotactic activity for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, S; Perez, H D; Goldstein, I M

    1983-12-25

    We have found that a novel dioxygenation product of arachidonic acid, 8(S),15(S)-dihydroxy-5,11-cis-9,13-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid (8,15-diHETE), possesses chemotactic activity for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes comparable to that of leukotriene B4. Authentic 8,15-diHETE, identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, was prepared by treating arachidonic acid with soybean lipoxygenase and was purified by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Using a "leading front" assay, 8,15-diHETE exhibited significant chemotactic activity at a concentration of 5.0 ng/ml. Maximum chemotactic activity was observed at a concentration of 30 ng/ml. The 8,15-diHETE generated by mixed human leukocytes after stimulation with arachidonic acid and the calcium ionophore, A23187, exhibited quantitatively similar chemotactic activity. Two synthetic all-trans conjugated isomers of 8,15-diHETE, however, were not chemotactic at concentrations up to 500 ng/ml. In contrast to its potent chemotactic activity, 8,15-diHETE (at concentrations up to 10 micrograms/ml) was relatively inactive with respect to its ability to provoke either degranulation or generation of superoxide anion radicals by cytochalasin B-treated leukocytes. Both leukotriene B4 and 8,15-diHETE may be important mediators of inflammation.

  19. Phosphatidylcholine Reverses Ethanol-Induced Increase in Transepithelial Endotoxin Permeability and Abolishes Transepithelial Leukocyte Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitzscherling, Katja; Volynets, Valentina; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse increases both intestinal bacterial overgrowth and intestinal permeability to macromolecules. Intestinal permeability of endotoxin, a component of the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, plays a crucial role in the development of alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD......). As impaired bile flow leads to endotoxemia and the bile component phosphatidylcholine (PC) is therapeutically active in ALD, we tested the hypothesis that conjugated primary bile salts (CPBS) and PC inhibit ethanol-enhanced transepithelial permeability of endotoxin and the subsequent transepithelial...... activation of human leukocytes. For this purpose, we used a model in which intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) were basolaterally cocultivated with mononuclear leukocytes. Cells were challenged apically with endotoxin from Escherichia coli K12 and were incubated with or without the addition of CPBS (1.5 m...

  20. Phosphatidylcholine reverses ethanol-induced increase in transepithelial endotoxin permeability and abolishes transepithelial leukocyte activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitscherling, K.; Volynets, V.; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic alcohol abuse increases both intestinal bacterial overgrowth and intestinal permeability to macromolecules. Intestinal permeability of endotoxin, a component of the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, plays a crucial role in the development of alcohol-induced liver...... disease (ALD). As impaired bile flow leads to endotoxemia and the bile component phosphatidylcholine (PC) is therapeutically active in ALD, we tested the hypothesis that conjugated primary bile salts (CPBS) and PC inhibit ethanol-enhanced transepithelial permeability of endotoxin and the subsequent...... transepithelial activation of human leukocytes. METHODS: For this purpose, we used a model in which intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) were basolaterally cocultivated with mononuclear leukocytes. Cells were challenged apically with endotoxin from Escherichia coli K12 and were incubated with or without...

  1. Leukocyte migration activity and proteolysis in malignant lymphomas during radiation and detoxication therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, I.A.; Yakhontov, N.E.; Serdyukov, A.S.; Pugachev, V.F.; Elistratova, N.B.; Sedova, L.A.; Mikhajlova, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    Study on changes in leukocyte migration activity (LMA) in malignant lymphomas during manifestation of body reactions to gamma-therapy has shown a considerable decrease of LMA. Detoxication therapy combined with antiproteolytic drugs (polydes + aminocapronic acid) during continued gamma-therapy has helped a considerable restoration of LMA. Study of LMA changes during radiotherapy may be used as an integral test for radiation toxemia, and for assessment of the therapy efficacy

  2. Effect of lithium carbonate on leukocyte number after influence of ionizing radiation. 2. Influence of lithium carbonate on peripheral leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, H.; Kehrberg, G.; Saul, G.; Pradel, I. (Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (German Democratic Republic). Bereich Medizin (Charite))

    1985-01-01

    The increase of leukocyte number in peripheral blood, found after application of lithium carbonate, is attributed to a rise in granulocytes first of all. The reduced period of acute leukopenia after whole-body irradiation, caused by lithium, is the result of the stimulating the myeloid progenitor cells. Increased syntheses of colony stimulating factor or influencing factors on the microecology of bone marrow are discussed.

  3. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor and its receptor signaling augment glycated albumin-induced retinal microglial inflammation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Chun H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglial activation and the proinflammatory response are controlled by a complex regulatory network. Among the various candidates, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF is considered an important cytokine. The up-regulation of M-CSF and its receptor CSF-1R has been reported in brain disease, as well as in diabetic complications; however, the mechanism is unclear. An elevated level of glycated albumin (GA is a characteristic of diabetes; thus, it may be involved in monocyte/macrophage-associated diabetic complications. Results The basal level of expression of M-CSF/CSF-1R was examined in retinal microglial cells in vitro. Immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot analyses revealed the up-regulation of CSF-1R in GA-treated microglial cells. We also detected increased expression and release of M-CSF, suggesting that the cytokine is produced by activated microglia via autocrine signaling. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that GA affects microglial activation by stimulating the release of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. Furthermore, the neutralization of M-CSF or CSF-1R with antibodies suppressed the proinflammatory response. Conversely, this proinflammatory response was augmented by the administration of M-CSF. Conclusions We conclude that GA induces microglial activation via the release of proinflammatory cytokines, which may contribute to the inflammatory pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. The increased microglial expression of M-CSF/CSF-1R not only is a response to microglial activation in diabetic retinopathy but also augments the microglial inflammation responsible for the diabetic microenvironment.

  4. The effect of long-term treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hematopoiesis in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Sørensen, T U; Aladdin, H

    2000-01-01

    This randomized, placebo-controlled trial examine the long-term effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on absolute numbers of CD34+ progenitor cells and progenitor cell function in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. G-CSF (300 microg filgrastim) or placebo was ...

  5. CHOP compared with CHOP plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduijn, JK; van der Holt, B; van Imhoff, GW; van der Hem, KG; Kramer, MHH; van Oers, MHJ; Ossenkoppele, GJ; Verdonck, LF; Verhoef, GEG; Steijaert, MMC; Buijt, I.; Uyl-de Groot, CA; van Agthoven, M; Mulder, AH; Sonneveld, P; Schaafsma, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose : To investigate whether the relative close-intensity of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy could be improved by prophylactic administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

  6. CHOP compared with CHOP plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduijn, J. K.; van der Holt, B.; van Imhoff, G. W.; van der Hem, K. G.; Kramer, M. H. H.; van Oers, M. H. J.; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Schaafsma, M. R.; Verdonck, L. F.; Verhoef, G. E. G.; Steijaert, M. M. C.; Buijt, I.; Uyl-de Groot, C. A.; van Agthoven, M.; Mulder, A. H.; Sonneveld, P.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether the relative dose-intensity of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy could be improved by prophylactic administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

  7. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF; filgrastim) treatment of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H

    1993-01-01

    After 10 weeks of treatment with clozapine, severe agranulocytosis was diagnosed in a 33-year-old female. The patient was treated with filgrastim (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF]) 5 micrograms kg-1 day-1. The neutrophil count was 0.234 x 10(9) l-1 on admission, with a further decrease...

  8. Stem cell mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for myocardial recovery after acute myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zohlnhofer, D.; Dibra, A.; Koppara, T.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of stem cell mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on myocardial regeneration on the basis of a synthesis of the data generated by randomized, controlled clinical trials of G-CSF after acute...

  9. Notch signaling mediates granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor priming-induced transendothelial migration of human eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L Y; Wang, H; Xenakis, J J; Spencer, L A

    2015-07-01

    Priming with cytokines such as granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhances eosinophil migration and exacerbates the excessive accumulation of eosinophils within the bronchial mucosa of asthmatics. However, mechanisms that drive GM-CSF priming are incompletely understood. Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that regulates cellular processes, including migration, by integrating exogenous and cell-intrinsic cues. This study investigates the hypothesis that the priming-induced enhanced migration of human eosinophils requires the Notch signaling pathway. Using pan Notch inhibitors and newly developed human antibodies that specifically neutralize Notch receptor 1 activation, we investigated a role for Notch signaling in GM-CSF-primed transmigration of human blood eosinophils in vitro and in the airway accumulation of mouse eosinophils in vivo. Notch receptor 1 was constitutively active in freshly isolated human blood eosinophils, and inhibition of Notch signaling or specific blockade of Notch receptor 1 activation during GM-CSF priming impaired priming-enhanced eosinophil transendothelial migration in vitro. Inclusion of Notch signaling inhibitors during priming was associated with diminished ERK phosphorylation, and ERK-MAPK activation was required for GM-CSF priming-induced transmigration. In vivo in mice, eosinophil accumulation within allergic airways was impaired following systemic treatment with Notch inhibitor, or adoptive transfer of eosinophils treated ex vivo with Notch inhibitor. These data identify Notch signaling as an intrinsic pathway central to GM-CSF priming-induced eosinophil tissue migration. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment at a low dose but for a long duration in patients with coronary heart disease. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Koji; Nagashima, Kenshi; Arai, Masazumi

    2006-01-01

    In animal models, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) improves post-infarct cardiac function. However, in pilot studies involving patients with angina and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), G-CSF at a high dose frequently induced coronary occlusion or restenosis, but those at a low dose showed no significant beneficial effect. We hypothesized that a low dose but long duration of G-CSF will have a beneficial effect without serious complications to patients with coronary heart disease. Forty-six patients with angina or AMI were randomly assigned into G-CSF and non-G-CSF control groups, respectively. Recombinant G-CSF was subcutaneously injected once a day for 10 days. The leukocyte counts in the peripheral blood were controlled at approximately 30,000/μl. One month later, a Thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography revealed the increased percentage uptake and the reduced extent and severity scores in the G-CSF angina group. In the G-CSF AMI group, the curve between the ejection fraction and peak creatine kinase shifted significantly upward, compared with that of the non-G-CSF AMI group. Serious complications were not observed during the 6 months of observation. A low dose but long duration of G-CSF treatment may have a beneficial effect without any serious complications in patients with coronary heart disease. (author)

  11. Association between objectively measured physical activity, chronic stress and leukocyte telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Känel, Roland; Bruwer, Erna J; Hamer, Mark; de Ridder, J Hans; Malan, Leoné

    2017-10-01

    Physical activity (PA) attenuates chronic stress and age-related and cardiovascular disease risks, whereby potentially slowing telomere shortening. We aimed to study the association between seven-day objectively measured habitual PA, chronic stress and leukocyte telomere length. Study participants were African (N.=96) and Caucasian (N.=107) school teachers of the Sympathetic activity and Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Africans study. All lifestyle characteristics (including PA) were objectively measured. The general health questionnaire and serum cortisol were assessed as psychological and physical measures of chronic stress. Leukocyte telomere length was measured using the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Africans had significantly shorter telomeres (Pstress or telomere length. However, more time spent with light intensity PA time was significantly and independently correlated with lower waist circumference (r=-0.21, P=0.004); in turn, greater waist circumference was significantly associated shorter telomeres (β=-0.17 [-0.30, -0.03], P=0.017). Habitual PA of different intensity was not directly associated with markers of chronic stress and leukocyte telomere length in this biethnic cohort. However, our findings suggest that light intensity PA could contribute to lowered age-related disease risk and healthy ageing by facilitating maintenance of a normal waist circumference.

  12. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium for in vitro fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebe, Søren; Loft, Anne; Povlsen, Betina B

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR).......To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR)....

  13. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C-C; Cole, S W

    2016-05-24

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1-4 (EGR1-4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators.

  14. Granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor mouthwashes heal oral ulcers during head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovirosa, Angeles; Ferre, Jorge; Biete, Albert

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor GM-CSF mouthwashes in the epithelization of radiation-induced oral mucosal ulceration, control of pain, and weight loss. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients received curative radiotherapy for head and neck carcinoma. All had oropharyngeal and/or oral mucosa irradiation, with a median dose of 72 Gy (range 50-74), with conventional fractionation. A total of 300 μg of GM-CSF in 250 cc of water for 1 h of mouthwashing was prescribed. The procedure started once oral ulceration in the irradiation field was detected. Patients, examined twice a week, were evaluated for oral ulceration, pain, and weight loss. Blood tests were taken weekly during GM-CSF administration. A comparison was carried out with 12 retrospective case-matched controls. Results: In the GM-CSF group, mucosa ulcerations healed in 9 of 12 (75%) of the patients during the course of the radiotherapy. Fifty percent of the patients said they felt less pain during the GM-CSF treatment; 30% needed morphine. The mean and median weight loss as a percentage of baseline weight in addition to the actual weight were 4.2% and 3%, respectively (variation ranged between a gain of 1% and a loss of 13%). No GM-CSF-related side effects were found. In the case control group, in the 12 cases, oral ulcerations increased during radiotherapy and two patients needed intubation intake and hospital admission, as opposed to the GM-CSF group. The mean and median percentage of weight loss were 5.8% and 5%, respectively. Sixty percent of patients needed morphine, as opposed to 30% in the GM-CSF group. Conclusions: Granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor was effective in curing mucosal ulcerations during the course of radiotherapy. This is the first time we have seen a drug with this capacity. Although the GM-CSF seems to be effective in the control of pain, oral intake, and weight loss, we need further studies with a greater number

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilizes functional endothelial progenitor cells in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Tiffany M; Paul, Jonathan D; Hill, Jonathan M; Thompson, Michael; Benjamin, Moshe; Rodrigo, Maria; McCoy, J Philip; Read, Elizabeth J; Khuu, Hanh M; Leitman, Susan F; Finkel, Toren; Cannon, Richard O

    2005-02-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) that may repair vascular injury are reduced in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We reasoned that EPC number and function may be increased by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) used to mobilize hematopoietic progenitor cells in healthy donors. Sixteen CAD patients had reduced CD34(+)/CD133(+) (0.0224+/-0.0063% versus 0.121+/-0.038% mononuclear cells [MNCs], P<0.01) and CD133(+)/VEGFR-2(+) cells, consistent with EPC phenotype (0.00033+/-0.00015% versus 0.0017+/-0.0006% MNCs, P<0.01), compared with 7 healthy controls. Patients also had fewer clusters of cells in culture, with out-growth consistent with mature endothelial phenotype (2+/-1/well) compared with 16 healthy subjects at high risk (13+/-4/well, P<0.05) or 14 at low risk (22+/-3/well, P<0.001) for CAD. G-CSF 10 microg/kg per day for 5 days increased CD34(+)/CD133(+) cells from 0.5+/-0.2/microL to 59.5+/-10.6/microL and CD133(+)/ VEGFR-2(+) cells from 0.007+/-0.004/microL to 1.9+/-0.6/microL (both P<0.001). Also increased were CD133(+) cells that coexpressed the homing receptor CXCR4 (30.4+/-8.3/microL, P<0.05). Endothelial cell-forming clusters in 10 patients increased to 27+/-9/well after treatment (P<0.05), with a decline to 9+/-4/well at 2 weeks (P=0.06). Despite reduced EPCs compared with healthy controls, patients with CAD respond to G-CSF with increases in EPC number and homing receptor expression in the circulation and endothelial out-growth in culture. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are reduced in coronary artery disease. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF) administered to patients increased: (1) CD133+/VEGFR-2+ cells consistent with EPC phenotype; (2) CD133+ cells coexpressing the chemokine receptor CXCR4, important for homing of EPCs to ischemic tissue; and (3) endothelial cell-forming clusters in culture. Whether EPCs mobilized into the circulation will be useful for the purpose of initiating vascular growth and myocyte repair

  16. The Effect of Physical Activity agains the Telomere Length in the Leukocytes Cells of KONI Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Purwaningsih

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are strands of non coding DNA at the ends of chromosomes that have the primary function to protect DNA from damage and maintain chromosomal stability. Physical exercise will increase the antioxidant activity can increase telomere proteins, lengthen telomeres and or protein networks associated with telomere so that the telomere remains long, or stopping telomere shortening. Telomere length was also associated with age. The purpose of the research was to determine telomere length of leukocyte cells in the KONI (Indonesian National Sports Committee athletes in Jakarta. The research method is descriptive, by measuring telomere length using quantitative PCR on leukocyte cells. Samples are KONI athletes from several sports, including men and women athletes, with ages between 15-20 years. Used a control group (not athletes is students of the Faculty of Medicine, University of YARSI. The results showed that there was no significant difference (p> 0.05 between telomere length group of athletes with the control group in both sexes. Similarly, telomere length between athlete male with female athletes also showed no significant difference (p> 0.05. It was concluded that physical exercise in athletes KONI at the age of 15- 20 years had no effect on telomere length in leukocytes. The results of this study provide information about the telomere length in Indonesian athletes at an early age.

  17. In vivo effect of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on megakaryocytopoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglietta, M.; Monzeglio, C.; Sanavio, F.; Apra, F.; Morelli, S.; Stacchini, A.; Piacibello, W.; Bussolino, F.; Bagnara, G.; Zauli, G.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on megakaryocytopoiesis and platelet production was investigated in patients with normal hematopoiesis. Three findings indicated that GM-CSF plays a role in megakaryocytopoiesis. During treatment with GM-CSF (recombinant mammalian, glycosylated; Sandoz/Schering-Plough, 5.5 micrograms protein/kg/d, subcutaneously for 3 days) the percentage of megakaryocyte progenitors (megakaryocyte colony forming unit [CFU-Mk]) in S phase (evaluated by the suicide technique with high 3H-Tdr doses) increased from 31% +/- 16% to 88% +/- 11%; and the maturation profile of megakaryocytes was modified, with a relative increase in more immature stage I-III forms. Moreover, by autoradiography (after incubation of marrow cells with 125I-labeled GM-CSF) specific GM-CSF receptors were detectable on megakaryocytes. Nevertheless, the proliferative stimulus induced on the progenitors was not accompanied by enhanced platelet production (by contrast with the marked granulomonocytosis). It may be suggested that other cytokines are involved in the regulation of the intermediate and terminal stages of megakaryocytopoiesis in vivo and that their intervention is an essential prerequisite to turn the GM-CSF-induced proliferative stimulus into enhanced platelet production

  18. Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) expression in plastids of Lactuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA terminator. The recombinant vector was coated on nanogold particles and transformed to lettuce chloroplasts through biolistic method. Callogenesis and regeneration of cotyledonary explants were obtained by Murashige and Skoog media containing 6-benzylaminopurine and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid hormones. The presence of hG-CSF gene in plastome was studied with four specific PCR primers and expression by Western immunoblotting. hG-CSF gene cloning was confirmed by digestion and sequencing. Transplastomic lettuce lines were regenerated and subjected to molecular analysis. The presence of hG-CSF in plastome was confirmed by PCR using specific primers designed from the plastid genome. Western immunoblotting of extracted protein from transplastomic plants showed a 20-kDa band, which verified the expression of recombinant protein in lettuce chloroplasts. This study is the first report that successfully express hG-CSF gene in lettuce chloroplast. The lettuce plastome can provide a cheap and safe expression platform for producing valuable biopharmaceuticals for research and treatment.

  19. The role of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in gastrointestinal immunity to salmonellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, C; Beagley, K W; Bao, S

    2009-08-01

    Human Salmonella infection, in particular, typhoid fever is a highly infectious disease that remains a major public health problem causing significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections depends on the host's immune response, particularly the actions of granulocytes and macrophages. Using a mouse model of human typhoid fever, with Salmonella typhimurium infection of wild type and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) knock out mice we show a delay in the onset of immune-mediated tissue damage in the spleens and livers of GM-CSF(-/-) mice. Furthermore, GM-CSF(-/-) mice have a prolonged sequestration of S. typhimurium in affected tissues despite an increased production of F4/80+ effector cells. Moreover in the absence of GM-CSF, a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-18 was found, which may alter the host's immune response to infection. GM-CSF appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Salmonellosis, and may contribute significantly to the development of protective gastrointestinal mucosal immune responses against oral pathogens.

  20. Radioprotective effect of colony-stimulating factor on mice irradiated with 60Co γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junning; Wang Tao; Xu Changshao; Wang Hongyun

    1995-01-01

    Adult male mice were irradiated with γ-rays 6 Gy once or 3 Gy three times in 7 days and intraperitoneally injected with colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in high doses or low doses. Mice of the control group were injected with normal saline only. Within 30 days after irradiation, the survival rate of mice irradiated with 6 Gy γ-rays once and treated with high dose CSF was 9/25, while that in the control group was 2/25. The survival rate of mice irradiated with 3 Gy three times and treated with high dose CSF was 10/13, while that in the control group was 4/13. Moreover, the survival times of both irradiated groups treated with high dose CSF were much longer than the control groups (p<0.01). This experiment also showed that CSF could reduce the lowering of peripheral blood white blood cell counts and promote their recovery. The number of CFU-S in mice treated with CSF was much higher (23.8 +- 4.82) than in the control group (9.4 +- 4.39) (p<0.01). Therefore, CSF could recover and reconstruct the hematopoietic function of bone marrow, and prolong the survival of irradiated mice

  1. Regulation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor-mediated granulocytic differentiation by C-mannosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Kei; Niwa, Yuki; Suzuki, Takehiro; Sato, Natsumi; Sasazawa, Yukiko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Simizu, Siro

    2018-04-06

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor (G-CSFR) is a type I cytokine receptor which is involved in hematopoietic cell maturation. G-CSFR has three putative C-mannosylation sites at W253, W318, and W446; however, it is not elucidated whether G-CSFR is C-mannosylated or not. In this study, we first demonstrated that G-CSFR was C-mannosylated at only W318. We also revealed that C-mannosylation of G-CSFR affects G-CSF-dependent downstream signaling through changing ligand binding capability but not cell surface localization. Moreover, C-mannosylation of G-CSFR was functional and regulated granulocytic differentiation in myeloid 32D cells. In conclusion, we found that G-CSFR is C-mannosylated at W318 and that this C-mannosylation has role(s) for myeloid cell differentiation through regulating downstream signaling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and drugs elevating extracellular adenosine synergize to enhance haematopoietic reconstitution in irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisil, M.; Hofer, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Vacek, A. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Inst. of Biophysics, Brno (Czech Republic); Znojil, V.; Vacha, J. [Masaryk Univ., Medical Faculty, Brno (Czech Republic)

    1998-03-01

    The activation of adenosine receptors has recently been demonstrated to stimulate haematopoiesis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine to influence curative effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice exposed to a sublethal dose of 4 Gy of {sup 60}Co radiation. Elevation of extracellular adenosine in mice was induced by the combined administration of dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), an adenosine prodrug. The effects of dipyridamole plus AMP, and G-CSF, administered either alone or in combination, were evaluated. The drugs were injected to mice in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on d 3 after irradiation and the haematopoietic response was evaluated on d 7, 10, 14, 18 and 24 after irradiation. While the effects of G-CSF on the late maturation stages of blood cells, appearing shortly after the completion of the treatment, were not influenced by dipyridamole plus AMP, positive effects of the combination therapy occurred in the post-irradiation recovery phase which is dependent on the repopulation of haematopoietic stem cells. This was indicated by the significant elevation of counts of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and granulocytic cells in the bone marrow (d 14), of GM-CFC (d 14), granulocytic and erythroid cells (d 14 and 18) in the spleen, and of neutrophils (d 18), monocytes (d 14 and 18) and platelets (d 18) in the peripheral blood. These effects suggest that the repopulation potential of the combination therapy lies in a common multi-lineage cell population. The results of this study implicate the promising possibility to enhance the curative effects of G-CSF under conditions of myelosuppressive state induced by radiation exposure. (au) 43 refs.

  3. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and drugs elevating extracellular adenosine synergize to enhance haematopoietic reconstitution in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, M.; Hofer, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Vacek, A.; Znojil, V.; Vacha, J.

    1998-01-01

    The activation of adenosine receptors has recently been demonstrated to stimulate haematopoiesis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine to influence curative effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice exposed to a sublethal dose of 4 Gy of 60 Co radiation. Elevation of extracellular adenosine in mice was induced by the combined administration of dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), an adenosine prodrug. The effects of dipyridamole plus AMP, and G-CSF, administered either alone or in combination, were evaluated. The drugs were injected to mice in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on d 3 after irradiation and the haematopoietic response was evaluated on d 7, 10, 14, 18 and 24 after irradiation. While the effects of G-CSF on the late maturation stages of blood cells, appearing shortly after the completion of the treatment, were not influenced by dipyridamole plus AMP, positive effects of the combination therapy occurred in the post-irradiation recovery phase which is dependent on the repopulation of haematopoietic stem cells. This was indicated by the significant elevation of counts of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and granulocytic cells in the bone marrow (d 14), of GM-CFC (d 14), granulocytic and erythroid cells (d 14 and 18) in the spleen, and of neutrophils (d 18), monocytes (d 14 and 18) and platelets (d 18) in the peripheral blood. These effects suggest that the repopulation potential of the combination therapy lies in a common multi-lineage cell population. The results of this study implicate the promising possibility to enhance the curative effects of G-CSF under conditions of myelosuppressive state induced by radiation exposure. (au)

  4. MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in the treatment of patients with moderate rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Frank; Tak, Paul P; Ostergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the safety, tolerability and signs of efficacy of MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Patients with active, moderate RA were enrolled in a randomised...... placebo and MOR103 0.3, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively). Treatment emergent adverse events (AEs) in the MOR103 groups were mild or moderate in intensity and generally reported at frequencies similar to those in the placebo group. The most common AE was nasopharyngitis. In two cases, AEs were classified...... with active RA. The data support further investigation of this monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF in RA patients and potentially in those with other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01023256....

  5. Effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide and X-irradiation on the production of colony-stimulating factor and the maintenance of granulopoiesis in bone marrow culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, H.; Miyanomae, T.; Tsurusawa, M.; Fujita, J.; Mori, K.

    1984-01-01

    Effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and X-irradiation on CSF production and granulopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures were studied. Levels of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) increased soon after the refeeding of the culture, but the activity was undetectable at day 7. Addition of LPS induced a significant increase in CSF levels in the culture, followed by an elevated granulopoiesis. The increase in CSF levels was suppressed when culture medium that had been harvested at refeeding on day 7 was added. Although irradiation did not increase CSF production, granulopoiesis was markedly stimulated shortly after irradiation. Thus granulopoiesis in long-term bone marrow culture may also be regulated by humoral factors such as CSF, and the culture system may represent the in vivo response to haemopoietic stimuli. (author)

  6. [Reversibility of the leukocyte activation state studied in a model of endogenous pyrogen formation by granulocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybakina, E G; Sorokin, A V

    1980-08-01

    The pyrogen-releasing capacity of rabbit exudate granulocytes can be temporarily suppressed during incubation in the whole plasma and then recovered during cell transfer into 0.15 M NaCl or stimulation with the bacterial lipopolysaccharide, pyrogenal. The inhibitors of protein synthesis added to the granulocytes when they are being transferred from plasma to 0.15 M NaCl do not suppress the pyrogen release. The inhibitory action of the whole plasma on the pyrogen release is due to the presence in it of potassium and calcium ions. The inhibitory factors of plasma reversibly suppress the pyrogen release but do not eliminate the leukocyte activation.

  7. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) for stroke: an individual patient data meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    England, Timothy J.; Sprigg, Nikola; Alasheev, Andrey M.; Belkin, Andrey A.; Kumar, Amit; Prasad, Kameshwar; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may enhance recovery from stroke through neuroprotective mechanisms if administered early, or neurorepair if given later. Several small trials suggest administration is safe but effects on efficacy are unclear. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCT) assessing G-CSF in patients with hyperacute, acute, subacute or chronic stroke, and asked Investigators to share individual patient data on baseline characteristics, stroke severity and typ...

  8. Effects of human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on fracture healing in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozlar, M.; Aslan, B.; Kalaci, A.; Yanat, Ahmet N.; Baktiroglu, L.; Tasci, A.

    2005-01-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulation factor (G-CSF) is generally used to prevent and cure the neutropenia associated with chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. In addition to its effects on neutrophil function, G-CSF was found to have the characteristic of modulating the cytokines in the inflammatory response. Then, the question to answer is whether it has any effect on fracture healing and to what extent? In this study, we test the effects of G-CSF on the healing of tibia fracture in a rat model. This study was performed at Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey between July 2003 and August 2004. Twenty female, healthy Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing between 250 and 300 gm were divided into 2 groups, and their tibiae broken. The rats in the G-CSF group were injected subcutaneous with 25ug/kg/day of recombinant human G-CSF for 7 days, and the ones in the control group with 0.9% sodium chloride. Rats were sacrificed 3 weeks after surgery and then radiological, histological and biomechanical evaluations were performed. Biomechanical tests were performed at the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey.The median radiographic scores for the control group were calculated as 4.1, and 6.1 for the G-CSF group (p = 0.016). Cortex remodeling, callus formation, bone union and marrow changes values did not differ significantly (p > 0.05). Mechanical parameter (mean max-Load) values for the control group were found to be 24.0 +/- 3.0 N, and 241.5 +/-75.7 N for the G-CSF group (p 0.001). We found that G-CSF has an important effect on fracture healing. However, this effect requires further study. (author)

  9. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in repeated IVF failure, a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleyasin, Ashraf; Abediasl, Zhila; Nazari, Atefeh; Sheikh, Mahdi

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed key roles for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) in embryo implantation process and maintenance of pregnancy, and some studies showed promising results by using local intrauterine infusion of GCSF in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). This multicenter, randomized, controlled trial included 112 infertile women with repeated IVF failure to evaluate the efficacy of systemic single-dose subcutaneous GCSF administration on IVF success in these women. In this study, the Long Protocol of ovarian stimulation was used for all participants. Sealed, numbered envelopes assigned 56 patients to receive subcutaneous 300 µg GCSF before implantation and 56 in the control group. The implantation (number of gestational sacs on the total number of transferred embryos), chemical pregnancy (positive serum β-HCG), and clinical pregnancy (gestational sac and fetal heart) rates were compared between the two groups. This trial is registered at www.irct.ir (IRCT201503119568N11). The successful implantation (18% vs 7.2%, P=0.007), chemical pregnancy (44.6% vs 19.6%, P=0.005), and clinical pregnancy (37.5% vs 14.3%, P=0.005) rates were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group. After adjustment for participants' age, endometrial thickness, good-quality oocyte counts, number of transferred embryos, and anti-Mullerian hormone levels, GCSF treatment remained significantly associated with successful implantation (OR=2.63, 95% CI=1.09-6.96), having chemical pregnancy (OR= 2.74, 95% CI=1.11-7.38) and clinical pregnancy (OR=2.94, 95% CI=1.23-8.33). In conclusion, administration of single-dose systemic subcutaneous GCSF before implantation significantly increases the IVF success, implantation, and pregnancy rates in infertile women with repeated IVF failure. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  10. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilizes dormant hematopoietic stem cells without proliferation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernitz, Jeffrey M; Daniel, Michael G; Fstkchyan, Yesai S; Moore, Kateri

    2017-04-06

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used clinically to treat leukopenia and to enforce hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization to the peripheral blood (PB). However, G-CSF is also produced in response to infection, and excessive exposure reduces HSC repopulation capacity. Previous work has shown that dormant HSCs contain all the long-term repopulation potential in the bone marrow (BM), and that as HSCs accumulate a divisional history, they progressively lose regenerative potential. As G-CSF treatment also induces HSC proliferation, we sought to examine whether G-CSF-mediated repopulation defects are a result of increased proliferative history. To do so, we used an established H2BGFP label retaining system to track HSC divisions in response to G-CSF. Our results show that dormant HSCs are preferentially mobilized to the PB on G-CSF treatment. We find that this mobilization does not result in H2BGFP label dilution of dormant HSCs, suggesting that G-CSF does not stimulate dormant HSC proliferation. Instead, we find that proliferation within the HSC compartment is restricted to CD41-expressing cells that function with short-term, and primarily myeloid, regenerative potential. Finally, we show CD41 expression is up-regulated within the BM HSC compartment in response to G-CSF treatment. This emergent CD41 Hi HSC fraction demonstrates no observable engraftment potential, but directly matures into megakaryocytes when placed in culture. Together, our results demonstrate that dormant HSCs mobilize in response to G-CSF treatment without dividing, and that G-CSF-mediated proliferation is restricted to cells with limited regenerative potential found within the HSC compartment. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Herpes Murine Model as a Biological Assay to Test Dialyzable Leukocyte Extracts Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohemí Salinas-Jazmín

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs are heterogeneous mixtures of low-molecular-weight peptides that are released on disruption of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy donors. DLEs improve clinical responses in infections, allergies, cancer, and immunodeficiencies. Transferon is a human DLE that has been registered as a hemoderivate by Mexican health authorities and commercialized nationally. To develop an animal model that could be used routinely as a quality control assay for Transferon, we standardized and validated a murine model of cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Using this model, we evaluated the activity of 27 Transferon batches. All batches improved the survival of HSV-1-infected mice, wherein average survival rose from 20.9% in control mice to 59.6% in Transferon-treated mice. The activity of Transferon correlated with increased serum levels of IFN-γ and reduced IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations. Our results demonstrate that (i this mouse model of cutaneous herpes can be used to examine the activity of DLEs, such as Transferon; (ii the assay can be used as a routine test for batch release; (iii Transferon is produced with high homogeneity between batches; (iv Transferon does not have direct virucidal, cytoprotective, or antireplicative effects; and (v the protective effect of Transferon in vivo correlates with changes in serum cytokines.

  12. Disintegrins: integrin selective ligands which activate integrin-coupled signaling and modulate leukocyte functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barja-Fidalgo C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix proteins and cell adhesion receptors (integrins play essential roles in the regulation of cell adhesion and migration. Interactions of integrins with the extracellular matrix proteins lead to phosphorylation of several intracellular proteins such as focal adhesion kinase, activating different signaling pathways responsible for the regulation of a variety of cell functions, including cytoskeleton mobilization. Once leukocytes are guided to sites of infection, inflammation, or antigen presentation, integrins can participate in the initiation, maintenance, or termination of the immune and inflammatory responses. The modulation of neutrophil activation through integrin-mediated pathways is important in the homeostatic control of the resolution of inflammatory states. In addition, during recirculation, T lymphocyte movement through distinct microenvironments is mediated by integrins, which are critical for cell cycle, differentiation and gene expression. Disintegrins are a family of low-molecular weight, cysteine-rich peptides first identified in snake venom, usually containing an RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp motif, which confers the ability to selectively bind to integrins, inhibiting integrin-related functions in different cell systems. In this review we show that, depending on the cell type and the microenvironment, disintegrins are able to antagonize the effects of integrins or to act agonistically by activating integrin-mediated signaling. Disintegrins have proven useful as tools to improve the understanding of the molecular events regulated by integrin signaling in leukocytes and prototypes in order to design therapies able to interfere with integrin-mediated effects.

  13. Defective chemokine signal integration in leukocytes lacking activator of G protein signaling 3 (AGS3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branham-O'Connor, Melissa; Robichaux, William G; Zhang, Xian-Kui; Cho, Hyeseon; Kehrl, John H; Lanier, Stephen M; Blumer, Joe B

    2014-04-11

    Activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3, gene name G-protein signaling modulator-1, Gpsm1), an accessory protein for G-protein signaling, has functional roles in the kidney and CNS. Here we show that AGS3 is expressed in spleen, thymus, and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, and is up-regulated upon leukocyte activation. We explored the role of AGS3 in immune cell function by characterizing chemokine receptor signaling in leukocytes from mice lacking AGS3. No obvious differences in lymphocyte subsets were observed. Interestingly, however, AGS3-null B and T lymphocytes and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exhibited significant chemotactic defects as well as reductions in chemokine-stimulated calcium mobilization and altered ERK and Akt activation. These studies indicate a role for AGS3 in the regulation of G-protein signaling in the immune system, providing unexpected venues for the potential development of therapeutic agents that modulate immune function by targeting these regulatory mechanisms.

  14. Short-term exposure of umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor early in culture improves ex vivo expansion of neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturana, Flavia; Timmins, Nicholas E; Nielsen, Lars K

    2011-03-01

    Despite the availability of modern antibiotics/antimycotics and cytokine support, neutropenic infection accounts for the majority of chemotherapy-associated deaths. While transfusion support with donor neutrophils is possible, cost and complicated logistics make such an option unrealistic on a routine basis. A manufactured neutrophil product could enable routine prophylactic administration of neutrophils, preventing the onset of neutropenia and substantially reducing the risk of infection. We examined the use of pre-culture strategies and various cytokine/modulator combinations to improve neutrophil expansion from umbilical cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HPC). Enriched UCB HPC were cultured using either two-phase pre-culture strategies or a single phase using various cytokine/modulator combinations. Outcome was assessed with respect to numerical expansion, cell morphology, granulation and respiratory burst activity. Pre-culture in the absence of strong differentiation signals (e.g. granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; G-CSF) failed to provide any improvement to final neutrophil yields. Similarly, removal of differentiating cells during pre-culture failed to improve neutrophil yields to an appreciable extent. Of the cytokine/modulator combinations, the addition of granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-colony-stimulating factor (CSF) alone gave the greatest increase. In order to avoid production of monocytes, it was necessary to remove GM-CSF on day 5. Using this strategy, neutrophil expansion improved 2.7-fold. Although all cytokines and culture strategies employed have been reported previously to enhance HPC expansion, we found that the addition of GM-CSF alone was sufficient to improve total cell yields maximally. The need to remove GM-CSF on day 5 to avoid monocyte differentiation highlights the context and time-dependent complexity of exogenous signaling in hematopoietic cell differentiation and growth.

  15. Preparation of a high specific activity I-125 labeled styryl dye for leukocyte membrane labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, C.; Mease, R.C.; Le, T.; Sabet, H.; Avren, L.I.; McAfee, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a high specific activity radioiodinated cell membrane probe for tracking lymphocytes in-vivo to replace the nucleus localizing, cytotoxic lipophilic chelates (In-111 oxine and Tc-99m HMPAO) currently used. Alkylation of parent dye 4-[2-[-N,N-didecylamino]phenyl]ethenyl pyridine with E-1-tributylstannyl-3-tosylpropene (prepared form E-1-tributylstannyl-1-propene-3-ol), gave a tributyltin precursor 1. Radiolabeled 3-[4-[2-[4-(N,N-didecylamino)phenyl]ethenyl]pyridino] E-[I-125]-1-iodopropene (2), was prepared from 1 using peracetic acid in acetonitrile/water. Labeling yields and specific activities achieved were 26% (∼2170 Ci/mmol), 40% (1220 Ci/mmol), and 55% (200 Ci/mmol) for nca, 0.4, and 2 nanomole carrier iodide runs respectively. Canine mixed leukocytes (0.5-1.0 x 10 8 cells) were labeled with 2 (67% and 42% yields for 200 Ci/mol and 1220 Ci/mmol preparations) and showed blood clearance similar to In 111 oxine. Radioiodinated styryl dye 2 appears to be a promising leukocyte labeling agent. Imaging studies with I-131 labeled 2 are in progress

  16. Two New Monoterpene Glycosides from Qing Shan Lu Shui Tea with Inhibitory Effects on Leukocyte-Type 12-Lipoxygenase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Zhi Fang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the inhibitory effect of 12 Chinese teas on leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase (LOX activity. Tea catechins such as epigallocatechin gallate have been known to exhibit leukocyte-type 12-LOX inhibition. Qing Shan Lu Shui, which contains lower catechin levels than the other tested teas, suppressed leukocyte-type 12-LOX activity. To characterize the bioactive components of Qing Shan Lu Shui, leukocyte-type 12-LOX inhibitory activity–guided fractionation of the aqueous ethanol extract of the tea was performed, resulting in the isolation of two new monoterpene glycosides: liguroside A (1 and B (2. The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were characterized as (2E,5E-7-hydroperoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,5-octadienyl-O-(α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1″→3′-(4′″-O-trans-p-coumaroyl-β-D-glucopyranoside and (2E,5E-7-hydroperoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,5-octa-dienyl- O-(α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1″→3′-(4′″-O-cis-p-coumaroyl-β-D-glucopyranoside, respectively, based on spectral and chemical evidence. Ligurosides A (1 and B (2 showed inhibitory effects on leukocyte-type 12-LOX activity, with IC50 values of 1.7 and 0.7 μM, respectively.

  17. Regulation of wound healing by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor after vocal fold injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yol Lim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Vocal fold (VF scarring remains a therapeutic challenge. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF facilitates epithelial wound healing, and recently, growth factor therapy has been applied to promote tissue repair. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of GM-CSF on VF wound healing in vivo and in vitro. METHODS: VF scarring was induced in New Zealand white rabbits by direct injury. Immediately thereafter, either GM-CSF or PBS was injected into the VFs of rabbits. Endoscopic, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and biomechanical evaluations of VFs were performed at 3 months post-injury. Human vocal fold fibroblasts (hVFFs were cultured with GM-CSF. Production of type I and III collagen was examined immunocytochemically, and the synthesis of elastin and hyaluronic acids was evaluated by ELISA. The mRNA levels of genes related to ECM components and ECM production-related growth factors, such as HGF and TGF-ß1, were examined by real time RT-PCR. RESULTS: The GM-CSF-treated VFs showed reduced collagen deposition in comparison to the PBS-injected controls (P<0.05. Immunohistochemical staining revealed lower amounts of type I collagen and fibronectin in the GM-CSF-treated VFs (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively. Viscous and elastic shear moduli of VF samples were significantly lower in the GM-CSF group than in the PBS-injected group (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively. Mucosal waves in the GM-CSF group showed significant improvement when compared to the PBS group (P = 0.0446. GM-CSF inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen synthesis by hVFFs (P<0.05 and the production of hyaluronic acids increased at 72 hours post-treatment (P<0.05. The expressions of HAS-2, tropoelastin, MMP-1, HGF, and c-Met mRNA were significantly increased by GM-CSF, although at different time points (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: The present study shows that GM-CSF offers therapeutic potential for the remodeling of VF wounds and the promotion of VF

  18. Comparison of two strategies for the treatment of radiogenic leukopenia using granulocyte colony stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamietz, I.A.; Rosskopf, B.; Dapper, F.D.; Lieven, H. von; Boettcher, H.D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced leukopenia can cause a delay or discontinuation of radiotherapy. This complication can be overcome with the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, an uncertainty exists regarding the mode of application of G-CSF in patients treated with radiotherapy. For this reason, the efficacy of two strategies for the administration of G-CSF in irradiated patients was compared in a prospective randomized clinical study. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients who developed leukopenia ( 9 per liter) while undergoing radiotherapy were treated with G-CSF at a daily dose of 5 μg/kg. The first group received single injections of G-CSF as required (n = 21). The second group received G-CSF on at least 3 consecutive days (n = 20). An analysis was made of the changes in leucocyte counts, the number of days on which radiotherapy had to be interrupted, and the side effects of growth-factor treatment. Results: An increase in leucocyte values in the peripheral blood was observed in all patients treated with G-CSF. In the group which received G-CSF when required, two injections (range: 1-8) were administered in most cases. In the second group, most of the patients received three injections (range: 3-9). The average duration of therapy interruptions due to leukopenia was 4.8 days (0-28) in the first therapy arm and 2.5 (0-20) in the second arm. The variance in the duration of therapy interruptions between the two groups was not significant (p = 0.2). Radiotherapy had to be terminated in two patients due to thrombocytopenia but the application of G-CSF did not seem to be a reason of decreasing platelet counts. Conclusions: Our results reveal that G-CSF is safe and effective in the treatment of radiation-induced leukopenia regardless of the mode of application. Because the calculated difference related to radiation treatment interruptions has no clinical relevance, both approaches examined in our study appear reasonable.

  19. Timing of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor treatment after acute myocardial infarction and recovery of left ventricular function: results from the STEMMI trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Mikkel; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Wang, Yongzhong

    2010-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have not demonstrated impact on systolic recovery compared to placebo. However, recent studies suggest that timing of G-CSF therapy is crucial.......Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have not demonstrated impact on systolic recovery compared to placebo. However, recent studies suggest that timing of G-CSF therapy is crucial....

  20. Myeloprotective Action of Combined Application of Ukrainian Recombinant Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (r-GCSF and Enterosorbent С2 in Rats with Malignant Guerin Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor, I.M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to analyze myeloprotective effect of novel enterosorbents alone and in combination with two recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating factors: Neupogen (Switzerland and r- GCSF (Ukraine. It is proven that Ukrainian version of recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating factor r-GCSF does not concede officinal drug Neupogen (Switzerland by its experimental therapeutic action and combined use with enterosorbent C2 significantly increases myeloprotective effect of both GCSF versions.

  1. A Randomized Case-Controlled Study of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor for the Treatment of Sepsis in Preterm Neutropenic Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Aktaş, Doğukan; Demirel, Bilge; Gürsoy, Tuğba; Ovalı, Fahri

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to treat sepsis in neutropenic preterm infants. Methods: Fifty-six neutropenic preterm infants with suspected or culture-proven sepsis hospitalized in Zeynep Kamil Maternity and Children's Educational and Training Hospital, Kozyatağı/Istanbul, Turkey between January 2008 and January 2010 were enrolled. Patients were ...

  2. 111In-oxine labelled leukocyte scintigraphy in the detection and localization of active inflammation and sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, M.J.; Kalff, V.; Hicks, R.J.; Spicer, W.J.; Spelman, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Indium-111-oxine labelled leukocyte scintigraphy is a diagnostic technique which has recently become available for clinic evaluation within Australia. The technique was used to assess patients with suspected sepsis of inflammation after other commonly used investigations had failed to confirm a diagnosis. Four patient subgroups were evaluated: fever of unknown origin suspected abdominal or postoperative sepsis; suspected active inflammatory bowel disease; and suspected sepsis or inflammation of bones or joints. The course of all patients was followed for at least three months to establish the accuracy of the technique. The leukocyte labelling procedure took 90 min and imaging was carried out typically 3-6, 24 and occasionally 48 h after reinjection of the labelled leukocytes. Only in one patient labelling of leukocytes was unsuccessful. In the remaining 99 studies, the overall sensitivity of leukocyte scintigraphy was 88% (36 of 41 patients with a proved inflammatory or infective disease focus had positive scan findings);and the specificity was 95% (55 of 58 cases with no proved disease focus had normal scan findings). These results support the use of this method in nuclear medicine for the evaluation of suspected acute sepsis (symptoms less than four weeks' duration), of inflammatory bowel disease and of suspected infections involving appendicular bones which contain no active bone marrow. It is also a useful secondary scintigraphic procedure, after gallium-67-citrate scintigraphy, in patients with suspected infective disorders of more than four weeks' duration. 27 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  3. Prevention of alloimmunization by ultraviolet-B irradiation. Inactivation of leukocytes and the generation of active oxygen and radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Tsuneo; Mogi, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Sadayoshi; Akasaka, Junichi; Kamo, Naoki; Kuwabara, Mikinori.

    1994-01-01

    UV-B irradiation of platelet concentrates (PC) has been tried in several institutes to inactivate leukocytes in PC and prevent alloimmunization on platelet transfusion. However, the mechanism of inactivation of leukocytes contaminating PC has not been fully understood. It is known that UV-B light is absorbed by photosensitizers in cells and produces active oxygen and radicals, such as singlet oxygen, superioxide anions and hydroxyl radicals. These active oxygen or radicals should injure cellular components and this could cause the suppression of cellular functions. In this study, we investigated the relationships among UV-B irradiation, free radical generation and leukocyte inactivation. We found the evidence that active oxygen and radicals were produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by UV-B irradiation. UV-B irradiation suppressed the stimulatory function of leukocytes in a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), and the suppression depended on the dosage of UV-B. Even a low dosage of UV-B, 10 J/m 2 , could inhibit the MLR if the irradiated cells were incubated at 37degC for 24 hours before co-culture with responder cells. Treatments of cells with the exogenous singlet oxygen or superoxide anions also caused suppression of the stimulatory function in the MLR, inhibition of capping formation of HLA-DR antigens, and an increase of intracellular free Ca 2+ levels as did the UV-B treatment. These results indicate that the active oxygen or radicals generated in UV-B-irradiated leukocytes could be one of the causes of leukocyte inactivation. (author0

  4. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves motor recovery in the rat impactor model for spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanjew Dittgen

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves outcome after experimental SCI by counteracting apoptosis, and enhancing connectivity in the injured spinal cord. Previously we have employed the mouse hemisection SCI model and studied motor function after subcutaneous or transgenic delivery of the protein. To further broaden confidence in animal efficacy data we sought to determine efficacy in a different model and a different species. Here we investigated the effects of G-CSF in Wistar rats using the New York University Impactor. In this model, corroborating our previous data, rats treated subcutaneously with G-CSF over 2 weeks show significant improvement of motor function.

  5. Clinical outcome after stem cell mobilization with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus S; Jørgensen, Erik; Kastrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background. Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been investigated in trials aiming to promote recovery of myocardial function after myocardial infarction. Long-term safety-data have never been reported. A few studies indicated an increased risk of in-stent re-stenosis. We aimed to i.......8; 0.3). Conclusions. We found no indication of increased risk of adverse events up to 5 years after G-CSF treatment. These results support the continued investigation of G-CSF for cardiac therapy....

  6. The effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on rotator cuff healing after injury and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David; Maerz, Tristan; Kurdziel, Michael; Hein, Joel; Doshi, Shashin; Bedi, Asheesh; Anderson, Kyle; Baker, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    The failure rate of tendon-bone healing after repair of rotator cuff tears remains high. A variety of biologic- and cell-based therapies aimed at improving rotator cuff healing have been investigated, and stem cell-based techniques have become increasingly more common. However, most studies have focused on the implantation of exogenous cells, which introduces higher risk and cost. We aimed to improve rotator cuff healing by inducing endogenous stem cell mobilization with systemic administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). We asked: (1) Does G-CSF administration increase local cellularity after acute rotator cuff repair? (2) Is there histologic evidence that G-CSF improved organization at the healing enthesis? (3) Does G-CSF administration improve biomechanical properties of the healing supraspinatus tendon-bone complex? (4) Are there micro-MRI-based observations indicating G-CSF-augmented tendon-bone healing? After creation of full-thickness supraspinatus tendon defects with immediate repair, 52 rats were randomized to control or G-CSF-treated groups. G-CSF was administered for 5 days after repair and rats were euthanized at 12 or 19 postoperative days. Shoulders were subjected to micro-MR imaging, stress relaxation, and load-to-failure as well as blinded histologic and histomorphometric analyses. G-CSF-treated animals had significantly higher cellularity composite scores at 12 and 19 days compared with both control (12 days: 7.40 ± 1.14 [confidence interval {CI}, 5.98-8.81] versus 4.50 ± 0.57 [CI, 3.58-5.41], p = 0.038; 19 days: 8.00 ± 1.00 [CI, 6.75-9.24] versus 5.40 ± 0.89 [CI, 4.28-6.51], p = 0.023) and normal animals (12 days: p = 0.029; 19 days: p = 0.019). There was no significant difference between G-CSF-treated animals or control animals in ultimate stress (MPa) and strain, modulus (MPa), or yield stress (MPa) and strain at either 12 days (p = 1.000, p = 0.104, p = 1.000, p = 0.909, and p = 0.483, respectively) or 19 days (p = 0

  7. Cigarette smoke–induced induction of antioxidant enzyme activities in airway leukocytes is absent in active smokers with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Rosamund E.; Leong-Smith, Pheneatia; Roos-Engstrand, Ester; Pourazar, Jamshid; Shah, Mittal; Behndig, Annelie F.; Mudway, Ian S.; Blomberg, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative injury to the airway has been proposed as an important underlying mechanism in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). As the extent of oxidant-mediated damage is dependent on the endogenous antioxidant defences within the airways, we examined whether COPD was associated with deficiencies in the antioxidant network within the respiratory tract lining fluids (RTLFs) and resident airway leukocytes. We hypothesised that COPD would be associated with both basal depression of antioxidant defences and impaired adaptive antioxidant responses to cigarette smoke. Methods Low molecular weight and enzymatic antioxidants together with metal-handling proteins were quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and airway leukocytes, derived from current (n=9) and ex-smoking COPD patients (n=15), as well as from smokers with normal lung function (n=16) and healthy never smokers (n=13). Results Current cigarette smoking was associated with an increase in ascorbate and glutathione within peripheral RTLFs in both smokers with normal lung function compared with healthy never smokers and in COPD smokers compared with COPD ex-smokers. In contrast, intra-cellular antioxidant enzyme activities (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and catalase) were only up-regulated in smokers with normal lung function compared with healthy never smokers and not in actively smoking COPD patients relative to COPD ex-smokers. Conclusions We found no evidence of impaired basal antioxidant defences, within either the RTLFs or airway leukocytes in stable ex-smoking COPD patients compared with healthy never smoking controls. Current cigarette smoking induced an up-regulation of low molecular weight antioxidants in the RTLFs of both control subjects with normal lung function and patients with COPD. Importantly, the present data demonstrated a cigarette smoke–induced increase in intra-cellular antioxidant enzyme activities only within the smokers with

  8. Leukocyte Telomere Length in Healthy Caucasian and African-American Adolescents : Relationships with Race, Sex, Adiposity, Adipokines, and Physical Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Haidong; Wang, Xiaoling; Gutin, Bernard; Davis, Catherine L.; Keeton, Daniel; Thomas, Jeffrey; Stallmann-Jorgensen, Inger; Mooken, Grace; Bundy, Vanessa; Snieder, Harold; van der Harst, Pim; Dong, Yanbin

    Objective To examine the relationships of race, sex, adiposity, adipokines, and physical activity to telomere length in adolescents. Study design Leukocyte telomere length (T/S ratio) was assessed cross-sectionally in 667 adolescents (aged 14-18 years; 48% African-Americans; 51% girls) using a

  9. Evaluation of the nitrite and leukocyte esterase activity tests for the diagnosis of acute symptomatic urinary tract infection in men.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeijers, J.J.; Kessels, A.G.H.; Nys, S.; Bartelds, A.; Donker, G.; Stobberingh, E.; Verbon, A.

    2007-01-01

    For 422 male patients with symptoms indicative of a urinary tract infection, nitrite and leukocyte esterase activity dipstick test results were compared with results of culture of urine samples. The positive predictive value of a positive nitrite test result was 96%. Addition of results of the

  10. PET/CT with 18F-FDG- and 18F-FBEM-labeled leukocytes for metabolic activity and leukocyte recruitment monitoring in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondue, Benjamin; Sherer, Félicie; Van Simaeys, Gaetan; Doumont, Gilles; Egrise, Dominique; Yakoub, Yousof; Huaux, François; Parmentier, Marc; Rorive, Sandrine; Sauvage, Sébastien; Lacroix, Simon; Vosters, Olivier; De Vuyst, Paul; Goldman, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by a progressive and irreversible respiratory failure. Validated noninvasive methods able to assess disease activity are essential for prognostic purposes as well as for the evaluation of emerging antifibrotic treatments. C57BL/6 mice were used in a murine model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by an intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (control mice were instilled with a saline solution). At different times after instillation, PET/CT with (18)F-FDG- or (18)F-4-fluorobenzamido-N-ethylamino-maleimide ((18)F-FBEM)-labeled leukocytes was performed to assess metabolic activity and leukocyte recruitment, respectively. In bleomycin-treated mice, a higher metabolic activity was measured on (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans from day 7 to day 24 after instillation, with a peak of activity measured at day 14. Of note, lung mean standardized uptake values correlated with bleomycin doses, histologic score of fibrosis, lung hydroxyproline content, and weight loss. Moreover, during the inflammatory phase of the model (day 7), but not the fibrotic phase (day 23), bleomycin-treated mice presented with an enhanced leukocyte recruitment as assessed by (18)F-FBEM-labeled leukocyte PET/CT. Autoradiographic analysis of lung sections and CD45 immunostaining confirm the higher and early recruitment of leukocytes in bleomycin-treated mice, compared with control mice. (18)F-FDG- and (18)F-FBEM-labeled leukocyte PET/CT enable monitoring of metabolic activity and leukocyte recruitment in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis. Implications for preclinical evaluation of antifibrotic therapy are expected. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  11. Increased Frequency of Peripheral B and T Cells Expressing Granulocyte Monocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Makris

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesGranulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is currently considered a crucial inflammatory mediator and a novel therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, despite the fact that its precise cellular sources remain uncertain. We studied the expression of GM-CSF in peripheral lymphocytes from RA patients and its change with antirheumatic therapies.MethodsIntracellular GM-CSF expression was assessed by flow cytometry in stimulated peripheral B (CD19+ and T (CD3+ cells from RA patients (n = 40, disease (n = 31 including osteoarthritis n = 15, psoriatic arthritis n = 10, and systemic rheumatic diseases n = 6 and healthy (n = 16 controls. The phenotype of GM-CSF+ B cells was assessed as well as longitudinal changes in GM-CSF+ lymphocytes during methotrexate (MTX, n = 10 or anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF, n = 10 therapy.ResultsAmong untreated RA patients with active disease (Disease Activity Score 28-C-reactive protein = 5.6 ± 0.89 an expanded population of peripheral GM-CSF+ B (4.1 ± 2.2% and T (3.4 ± 1.6% cells was detected compared with both disease (1.7 ± 0.9%, p < 0.0001 and 1.7 ± 1.3%, p < 0.0001, respectively and healthy (0.3 ± 0.2%, p < 0.0001 and 0.6 ± 0.6%, p < 0.0001 controls. RA GM-CSF+ B cells displayed more commonly a plasmablast or transitional phenotype (37.12 ± 18.34% vs. 14.26 ± 9.46%, p = 0.001 and 30.49 ± 15.04% vs. 2.45 ± 1.84%, p < 0.0001, respectively and less a memory phenotype (21.46 ± 20.71% vs. 66.99 ± 16.63%, p < 0.0001 compared to GM-CSF− cells. GM-CSF expression in RA patients did not correlate to disease duration, activity or serological status. Anti-TNF treatment led to a statistically significant decrease in GM-CSF+ B and T cells while MTX had no significant effect.DiscussionThis is the first study showing an expanded population of GM-CSF+ B and T lymphocytes

  12. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Production by T Cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothchild, Alissa C; Stowell, Britni; Goyal, Girija; Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Yang, Qianting; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Sassetti, Christopher M; Dranoff, Glenn; Chen, Xinchun; Lee, Jinhee; Behar, Samuel M

    2017-10-24

    Mice deficient for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF -/- ) are highly susceptible to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis , and clinical data have shown that anti-GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies can lead to increased susceptibility to tuberculosis in otherwise healthy people. GM-CSF activates human and murine macrophages to inhibit intracellular M. tuberculosis growth. We have previously shown that GM-CSF produced by iNKT cells inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis However, the more general role of T cell-derived GM-CSF during infection has not been defined and how GM-CSF activates macrophages to inhibit bacterial growth is unknown. Here we demonstrate that, in addition to nonconventional T cells, conventional T cells also produce GM-CSF during M. tuberculosis infection. Early during infection, nonconventional iNKT cells and γδ T cells are the main source of GM-CSF, a role subsequently assumed by conventional CD4 + T cells as the infection progresses. M. tuberculosis -specific T cells producing GM-CSF are also detected in the peripheral blood of infected people. Under conditions where nonhematopoietic production of GM-CSF is deficient, T cell production of GM-CSF is protective and required for control of M. tuberculosis infection. However, GM-CSF is not required for T cell-mediated protection in settings where GM-CSF is produced by other cell types. Finally, using an in vitro macrophage infection model, we demonstrate that GM-CSF inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth requires the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Thus, we identified GM-CSF production as a novel T cell effector function. These findings suggest that a strategy augmenting T cell production of GM-CSF could enhance host resistance against M. tuberculosis IMPORTANCE Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, the leading cause of death by any infection worldwide. T cells are critical components of the immune

  13. Biological role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on cells of the myeloid lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushach, Irina; Zlotnik, Albert

    2016-01-01

    M-CSF and GM-CSF are 2 important cytokines that regulate macrophage numbers and function. Here, we review their known effects on cells of the macrophage-monocyte lineage. Important clues to their function come from their expression patterns. M-CSF exhibits a mostly homeostatic expression pattern, whereas GM-CSF is a product of cells activated during inflammatory or pathologic conditions. Accordingly, M-CSF regulates the numbers of various tissue macrophage and monocyte populations without altering their "activation" status. Conversely, GM-CSF induces activation of monocytes/macrophages and also mediates differentiation to other states that participate in immune responses [i.e., dendritic cells (DCs)]. Further insights into their function have come from analyses of mice deficient in either cytokine. M-CSF signals through its receptor (CSF-1R). Interestingly, mice deficient in CSF-1R expression exhibit a more significant phenotype than mice deficient in M-CSF. This observation was explained by the discovery of a novel cytokine (IL-34) that represents a second ligand of CSF-1R. Information about the function of these ligands/receptor system is still developing, but its complexity is intriguing and strongly suggests that more interesting biology remains to be elucidated. Based on our current knowledge, several therapeutic molecules targeting either the M-CSF or the GM-CSF pathways have been developed and are currently being tested in clinical trials targeting either autoimmune diseases or cancer. It is intriguing to consider how evolution has directed these pathways to develop; their complexity likely mirrors the multiple functions in which cells of the monocyte/macrophage system are involved. PMID:27354413

  14. Leukocyte telomere length and mortality among U.S. adults: Effect modification by physical activity behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and mortality (outcome variable), with consideration by physical activity behaviour. Data from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were employed (N = 6,611; 20-85 yrs), with follow-up mortality assessment through 31 December 2006. DNA was extracted from whole blood to assess LTL via quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared to those in the first LTL tertile, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality for those in the 2 nd and 3 rd LTL tertiles, respectively, was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.60-1.12; P = .22) and 0.76 (95% CI: 0.50-1.14; P = .18). However, after adjustments, LTL tertile 3 (vs. 1) was associated with all-cause mortality (HR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.14-0.93; P = .03) for those who engaged in moderate-intensity exercise. Similarly, LTL was associated with CVD-specific mortality for those who engaged in moderate-intensity exercise (HR = 0.17; 95% CI: 0.04-0.73; P = .02). Longer telomeres are associated with increased survival, particularly among men and those who are active, underscoring the importance of promotion of physical activity behaviour.

  15. Identifying the rules of engagement enabling leukocyte rolling, activation, and adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Tang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The LFA-1 integrin plays a pivotal role in sustained leukocyte adhesion to the endothelial surface, which is a precondition for leukocyte recruitment into inflammation sites. Strong correlative evidence implicates LFA-1 clustering as being essential for sustained adhesion, and it may also facilitate rebinding events with its ligand ICAM-1. We cannot challenge those hypotheses directly because it is infeasible to measure either process during leukocyte adhesion following rolling. The alternative approach undertaken was to challenge the hypothesized mechanisms by experimenting on validated, working counterparts: simulations in which diffusible, LFA1 objects on the surfaces of quasi-autonomous leukocytes interact with simulated, diffusible, ICAM1 objects on endothelial surfaces during simulated adhesion following rolling. We used object-oriented, agent-based methods to build and execute multi-level, multi-attribute analogues of leukocytes and endothelial surfaces. Validation was achieved across different experimental conditions, in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo, at both the individual cell and population levels. Because those mechanisms exhibit all of the characteristics of biological mechanisms, they can stand as a concrete, working theory about detailed events occurring at the leukocyte-surface interface during leukocyte rolling and adhesion experiments. We challenged mechanistic hypotheses by conducting experiments in which the consequences of multiple mechanistic events were tracked. We quantified rebinding events between individual components under different conditions, and the role of LFA1 clustering in sustaining leukocyte-surface adhesion and in improving adhesion efficiency. Early during simulations ICAM1 rebinding (to LFA1 but not LFA1 rebinding (to ICAM1 was enhanced by clustering. Later, clustering caused both types of rebinding events to increase. We discovered that clustering was not necessary to achieve adhesion as long as LFA1 and

  16. The recognition of adsorbed and denatured proteins of different topographies by β2 integrins and effects on leukocyte adhesion and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brevig, T.; Holst, B.; Ademovic, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte beta(2) integrins Mac-1 and p150,95 are promiscuous cell-surface receptors that recognise and mediate cell adhesion to a variety of adsorbed and denatured proteins. We used albumin as a model protein to study whether leukocyte adhesion and activation depended on the nm-scale topography...

  17. Heparin Interaction with the Primed Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte CD11b Induces Apoptosis and Prevents Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meital Cohen-Mazor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heparin is known to have anti-inflammatory effects, yet the mechanisms are not completely understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that heparin has a direct effect on activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, changing their activation state, and can explain its anti-inflammatory effect. To test our hypothesis, we designed both in vitro and ex vivo studies to elucidate the mechanism by which heparin modulates PMNL functions and therefore the inflammatory response. We specifically tested the hypothesis that priming of PMNLs renders them more susceptible to heparin. Amplified levels of CD11b and increased rate of superoxide release manifested PMNL priming. Increase in cell priming resulted in a dose-dependent increase in heparin binding to PMNLs followed by augmented apoptosis. Blocking antibodies to CD11b inhibited heparin binding and abolished the apoptotic response. Moreover, heparin caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in the rate of superoxide release from PMNLs, which was blunted by blocking antibodies to CD11b. Altogether, this study shows that the interaction of heparin with the PMNL CD11b results in cell apoptosis and explains heparin’s anti-inflammatory effects.

  18. Vaginal Fornix Discharge Cellularity and Its Leukocyte Esterase Activity for Diagnosis of Endometritis in Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl HAJIBEMANI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the application of some strip test markers (i.e., leukocyte esterase (LE activity, protein, nitrate and pH for diagnosis of endometritis in dairy cows using vaginal fornix discharge. Also, the total white blood cell count (t-WBC/l of this secretion and degenerative changes of neutrophils in cervical cytology were used as alternative methods to predict progression of the endometritis severity. Holstein cows (n=215 between 30-40 days in milk (DIM were included and examined. Giemsa-stained smear was prepared from cervical mucus. Cervical cytology test was considered as reference screening method for the detection of subclinical endometritis. The LE activity and t-WBC in the vaginal fornix discharge of subclinical endometritis cows were significantly higher than those from healthy cows. Sensitivity and specificity were 78% and 73% for LE10 activity (10 minutes after contacting with discharges and 60% and 69% for t-WBC (cut off point=210 cells/l for diagnosis of subclinical endometritis, respectively. There was a good agreement between LE10 activity, t-WBC and cervical cytology test with a Kappa coefficient of 0.4 and 0.42, respectively (P<0.0001. Total WBC count in discharge and degenerative neutrophils (DN percentages increase simultaneously with the degree and severity of endometritis. There was a highly significant (P<0.01 correlation between t-WBC and some reagent strip test markers (LE activity, protein and nitrate in clear discharge of studied cows. In conclusion, the present results suggest the LE activity and t-WBC in vaginal fornix discharge could be used as non-invasive reliable and valid methods for screening of subclinical endometritis in postpartum dairy herds.

  19. Platelet-rich preparations to improve healing. Part II: platelet activation and enrichment, leukocyte inclusion, and other selection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Vicki L; Abukabda, Alaeddin B; Radio, Nicholas M; Witt-Enderby, Paula A; Clafshenkel, William P; Cairone, J Vito; Rutkowski, James L

    2014-08-01

    Multiple platelet-rich preparations have been reported to improve wound and bone healing, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet rich fibrin (PRF). The different methods employed during their preparation are important, as they influence the quality of the product applied to a wound or surgical site. Besides the general protocol for preparing the platelet-rich product (discussed in Part 1 of this review), multiple choices need to be considered during its preparation. For example, activation of the platelets is required for the release and enmeshment of growth factors, but the method of activation may influence the resulting matrix, growth factor availability, and healing. Additionally, some methods enrich leukocytes as well as platelets, but others are designed to be leukocyte-poor. Leukocytes have many important roles in healing and their inclusion in PRP results in increased platelet concentrations. Platelet and growth factor enrichment reported for the different types of platelet-rich preparations are also compared. Generally, TGF-β1 and PDGF levels were higher in preparations that contain leukocytes compared to leukocyte-poor PRP. However, platelet concentration may be the most reliable criterion for comparing different preparations. These and other criteria are described to help guide dental and medical professionals, in large and small practices, in selecting the best procedures for their patients. The healing benefits of platelet-rich preparations along with the low risk and availability of simple preparation procedures should encourage more clinicians to incorporate platelet-rich products in their practice to accelerate healing, reduce adverse events, and improve patient outcomes.

  20. Radiolabeled leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, F.L.; Taylor, A.T.

    1986-01-01

    Leukocytes are a heterogeneous group of nucleated cells that follow similar patterns of differentiation in the bone marrow. Although the various leukocyte cell types perform somewhat different functions, they act as a group to protect the host from hazards of the internal and external environment, such as infection and neoplasia, and they assist in the repair of damaged tissue. Leukocytes spend a small fraction of their life in the peripheral blood, using it only for transportation to sites where they are needed to perform their defensive functions. In adults, the mature types of leukocytes are neutrophils (59 percent of the leukocyte population), lymphocytes (34 percent), monocytes (four percent), eosinophils (three percent), and basophils (0.5 percent). Neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils all contain nuclei with finitely granular, evenly distributed chromatin and are collectively called granulocytes. In addition to the main categories of leukocytes listed above, there are subsets of many of these classes of cells; for example, natural killer cells are a subset of lymphocytes

  1. Increased activity of 5-lipoxygenase in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from asthmatic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mita, H.; Yui, Y.; Taniguchi, N.; Yasueda, H.; Shida, T.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of 5-lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid, 5-HETE and 5,12-diHETE, was determined in 100,000 x g supernatant of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from 17 healthy subjects, 17 patients with extrinsic asthma and 15 patients with intrinsic asthma. After the supernatant was incubated with 14 C-arachidonic acid in the presence of calcium and indomethacin, the lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid were separated by thin layer chromatography. The results were expressed as the percentage conversion of 14 C-arachidonic acid into the product per 10 7 cells. The formation of 5,12-diHETE, but not of the 5-HETE, was significantly increased in the cells from the group of patients with extrinsic asthma (4.38 +/- 0.78%, mean +/- S.E.; p 14 C-arachidonic acid into 5-HETE and 5,12-diHETE. The percentage conversion in normal subjects was 4.19 +/- 0.39%, 6.24 +/- 0.84% for 17 patients with extrinsic asthma (p < 0.05), and 8.59 +/- 1.29% for 15 patients with intrinsic asthma (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference between these asthmatic groups. These results indicate that 5-lipoxygenase activity is increased in patients with bronchial asthma. 22 references, 3 figures

  2. Evaluation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule as a Biomarker for Breast Cancer in Egyptian Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shepiny, M.S.E.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, serum activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) levels were evaluated in 41 primary breast cancer patients and 20 healthy females, and its diagnostic value was quantified, and compared with those of carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Also, its prognostic value was examined. Serum ALCAM levels were also evaluated before and after surgical treatment. Serum levels of ALCAM and CA 15-3 were significantly higher in breast cancer patients than healthy controls (P=0.002, P=0.043 respectively), but the difference in serum CEA levels did not reach statistical significance. Serum ALCAM levels had significant area under the curve (AUC) (P=0.002), but serum levels of CA 15-3 and CEA had nonsignificant AUCs, and various combinations between them did not result in any improvement. A significant association was found between serum levels of ALCAM and CEA with age and menopausal status in breast cancer patients. Non-significant difference was shown in serum levels of ALCAM, CA 15-3 and CEA before and after surgical treatment. In conclusion, this study suggests that serum ALCAM may represent a novel diagnostic bio marker for breast cancer

  3. Sedentary behavior, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness on leukocyte telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Meghan K; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2017-01-01

    Background: Emerging work is starting to investigate the cumulative effects of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), sedentary behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness on health. The objective of this study was to examine the cumulative and independent associations of MVPA, sedentary behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness on leukocyte telomere length (LTL). Methods: Data from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were used (N = 1868 adults 20+ years); analyzed in 2016. Sedentary behavior and MVPA were subjectively assessed with cardiorespiratory fitness determined from a submaximal treadmill-based test; participants were classified as above or below the median values for each of these three parameters. A blood sample was obtained from each participant to assess LTL via quantitative polymerase chain reaction, with participants grouped into LTL tertiles. Results: Participants who engaged in higher MVPA, sat less and had higher cardiorespiratory fitness had an increased odds (ranging from 85% to 105%) of being in LTL tertile 3 (vs. 1). In an extended adjusted multinomial logistic regression model, only MVPA was positively associated with LTL (odds ration [OR] = 1.37; 95% CI: 0.99-1.90; P = 0.05). Conclusion: All three behavior characteristics, but particularly MVPA, may be important in preserving LTLs.

  4. Novel and known constituents from Buddleja species and their activity against leukocyte eicosanoid generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Y H; Houghton, P J; Hoult, J R

    1999-09-01

    We have undertaken a systematic survey of the genus Buddleja used in traditional Chinese medicine for antiinflammatory and other indications by testing extracts and isolated natural products for their activity against the enzymes of the arachidonate cascade. This was done by using elicited rat peritoneal leukocytes, a physiologically relevant established whole cell system that expresses both cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity. Lipophilic extracts of B. globosa roots and B. myriantha stem exhibited inhibitory activities in the 5-LOX and COX enzyme assays, whereas those of B. officinalis flowers, B. yunanesis stems, and B. asiatica stems showed inhibitory activities only against COX. The phytochemical investigation of these extracts, and consequent structure elucidation of isolated compounds using spectroscopic data, led to the isolation from B. globosa of three new terpenoid compounds named dihydrobuddledin A, buddledone A, and buddledone B and four known compounds-buddledins A, B, and C and zerumbone; 12 known compounds from B. officinalis-calceolarioside, campneoside, verbascoside, echinacoside, forsythoside B, angoroside A, crocetin monogentibiosyl ester, acacetin, acacetin-7-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, acacetin-7-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-6)[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1-2)]-beta-D-glucopyranoside, songarosaponin A, delta-amyrone; and eight known compounds fromB. yunanesis-11,14-dihydroxy-8,11, 13-abietatrien-7-one, beta-sitosterol, verbascoside, echinacoside, forsythoside B, angoroside A, methylcatapol, and sucrose. Tests on the isolated compounds for inhibition of eicosanoid synthesis showed that buddledin A, crocetin monogentibiosyl ester, and acacetin exhibited an inhibitory effect on COX with IC(50) values of 13.7 microM, 28.2 microM, and 77.5 microM, respectively, whereas buddledin A exhibited inhibitory effect on 5-LOX with an IC(50) value of 50.4 microM.

  5. Altered polymorphonuclear leukocyte Fc gamma R expression contributes to decreased candicidal activity during intraabdominal sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simms, H.H.; D'Amico, R.; Monfils, P.; Burchard, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the effects of untreated intraabdominal sepsis on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) candicidal activity. Two groups of swine were studied. Group I (n=6) underwent sham laparotomy, group II (n=7) underwent cecal ligation and incision. Untreated intraabdominal sepsis resulted in a progressive decrease in PMN candicidal activity. Concomitant rosetting and phagocytosis assays demonstrated a decrease in both the attachment and phagocytosis of Candida albicans opsonized with both normal and septic swine serum by PMNs in group II. Iodine 125-labeled swine immunoglobulin G (IgG) and fluorescein isothioalanate (FITC)-labeled swine IgG were used to investigate Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions. Scatchard analyses demonstrated a progressive decline in both the binding affinity constant and number of IgG molecules bound per PMN. Stimulation of the oxidative burst markedly reduced 125I-labeled IgG binding in both group I and group II, with a greater decrement being seen in animals with intraabdominal sepsis. Further, in group II, PMN recycling of the Fc gamma receptor to the cell surface after generation of the oxidative burst was reduced by postoperative day 4. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to Fc gamma receptor II, but not Fc gamma receptor I/III markedly reduced intracellular candicidal activity. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a homogeneous pattern of FITC-IgG uptake by nearly all group I PMNs, whereas by postoperative day 8 a substantial number of PMNs from group II failed to internalize the FITC-IgG. These studies suggest that untreated intraabdominal sepsis reduces PMN candicidal activity and that this is due, in part, to altered PMN Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions

  6. Nicotine can skew the characterization of the macrophage type-1 (MΦ1) phenotype differentiated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to the MΦ2 phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagita, Manabu; Kobayashi, Ryohei; Murakami, Shinya

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦs) exhibit functional heterogeneity and plasticity in the local microenvironment. Recently, it was reported that MΦs can be divided into proinflammatory MΦs (MΦ1) and anti-inflammatory MΦs (MΦ2) based on their polarized functional properties. Here, we report that nicotine, the major ingredient of cigarette smoke, can modulate the characteristics of MΦ1. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-driven MΦ1 with nicotine (Ni-MΦ1) showed the phenotypic characteristics of MΦ2. Like MΦ2, Ni-MΦ1 exhibited antigen-uptake activities. Ni-MΦ1 suppressed IL-12, but maintained IL-10 and produced high amounts of MCP-1 upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation compared with MΦ1. Moreover, we observed strong proliferative responses of T cells to lipopolysaccharide-stimulated MΦ1, whereas Ni-MΦ1 reduced T cell proliferation and inhibited IFN-γ production by T cells. These results suggest that nicotine can change the functional characteristics of MΦ and skew the MΦ1 phenotype to MΦ2. We propose that nicotine is a potent regulator that modulates immune responses in microenvironments.

  7. Platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte interaction in β-thalassemia/hemoglobin E patients with marked nucleated erythrocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keawvichit, Rassamon; Khowawisetsut, Ladawan; Chaichompoo, Porntip; Polsrila, Korakot; Sukklad, Suchana; Sukapirom, Kasama; Khuhapinant, Archrob; Fucharoen, Suthat; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit

    2012-11-01

    Patients with thalassemia, an inherited hemolytic anemia, have increased risk of hypercoagulable complications. A whole blood flow cytometric (FCM) method has been used for studies of platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation in these patients. However, this FCM method presents technical difficulties because of the high proportion of immature red blood cells (RBCs) in these patients. A protocol for the simultaneous measurement of platelet activation and their aggregation with leukocyte populations in whole blood using four-color FCM which excluded immature RBC was devised, and evaluated for the evaluation of platelet function in patients with β-thalassemia/hemoglobin E (HbE). Whole blood from these patients and from healthy volunteers was stained for platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregates using anti-CD42a, anti-CD62P, anti-CD45 and glycophorin A (GPA) conjugated with different fluorochromes. Our FCM method is simple, effective and based on the assumption that GPA is present on all immature RBCs, but is not expressed on CD45⁺ leukocytes. Results from the studies showed that blood samples from these patients contained a high frequency of circulating activated platelets (CD42a⁺/CD62P⁺) when compared to samples from healthy individuals. The percentage of platelet-neutrophil, platelet-monocyte-but not platelet-lymphocyte-aggregates were also elevated in both thalassemia genotypes with marked increase in patients who had undergone splenectomy. These findings suggest that platelets adhere to neutrophils and monocytes are activated which support the clinical observation that splenectomized thalassemia patients have an increased risk of arterial or venous thrombotic manifestations.

  8. Comparative effectiveness of colony-stimulating factors in febrile neutropenia prophylaxis: how results are affected by research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henk, Henry J; Li, Xiaoyan; Becker, Laura K; Xu, Hairong; Gong, Qi; Deeter, Robert G; Barron, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    To examine the impact of research design on results in two published comparative effectiveness studies. Guidelines for comparative effectiveness research have recommended incorporating disease process in study design. Based on the recommendations, we develop a checklist of considerations and apply the checklist in review of two published studies on comparative effectiveness of colony-stimulating factors. Both studies used similar administrative claims data, but different methods, which resulted in directionally different estimates. Major design differences between the two studies include: whether the timing of intervention in disease process was identified and whether study cohort and outcome assessment period were defined based on this temporal relationship. Disease process and timing of intervention should be incorporated into the design of comparative effectiveness studies.

  9. Application of microchip CGE for the analysis of PEG-modified recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Ji; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Kang Choon; Na, Dong Hee

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microchip CGE (MCGE) for the analysis of PEG-modified granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF) prepared with PEG-aldehydes. The unmodified and PEG-modified G-CSFs were analyzed by Protein 80 and 230 Labchips on the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer. The MCGE allowed size-based separation and quantitation of PEG-G-CSF. The Protein 80 Labchip was useful for PEG-5K-G-CSF, while the Protein 230 Labchip was more suitable for PEG-20K-G-CSF. The MCGE was also used to monitor a search for optimal PEG-modification (PEGylation) conditions to produce mono-PEG-G-CSF. This study demonstrates the usefulness of MCGE for monitoring and optimizing the PEGylation of G-CSF with the advantages of speed, minimal sample consumption, and automatic quantitation.

  10. Gallic Acid Attenuates Platelet Activation and Platelet-Leukocyte Aggregation: Involving Pathways of Akt and GSK3β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Sheng; Lee, Viola S. Y.; Tseng, Yu-Lun; Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Chen, Yuh-Lien; Li, Chi-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation and its interaction with leukocytes play an important role in atherothrombosis. Cardiovascular diseases resulted from atherothrombosis remain the major causes of death worldwide. Gallic acid, a major constituent of red wine and tea, has been believed to have properties of cardiovascular protection, which is likely to be related to its antioxidant effects. Nonetheless, there were few and inconsistent data regarding the effects of gallic acid on platelet function. Therefore, we designed this in vitro study to determine whether gallic acid could inhibit platelet activation and the possible mechanisms. From our results, gallic acid could concentration-dependently inhibit platelet aggregation, P-selectin expression, and platelet-leukocyte aggregation. Gallic acid prevented the elevation of intracellular calcium and attenuated phosphorylation of PKCα/p38 MAPK and Akt/GSK3β on platelets stimulated by the stimulants ADP or U46619. This is the first mechanistic explanation for the inhibitory effects on platelets from gallic acid. PMID:22811749

  11. Gallic Acid Attenuates Platelet Activation and Platelet-Leukocyte Aggregation: Involving Pathways of Akt and GSK3β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Sheng Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activation and its interaction with leukocytes play an important role in atherothrombosis. Cardiovascular diseases resulted from atherothrombosis remain the major causes of death worldwide. Gallic acid, a major constituent of red wine and tea, has been believed to have properties of cardiovascular protection, which is likely to be related to its antioxidant effects. Nonetheless, there were few and inconsistent data regarding the effects of gallic acid on platelet function. Therefore, we designed this in vitro study to determine whether gallic acid could inhibit platelet activation and the possible mechanisms. From our results, gallic acid could concentration-dependently inhibit platelet aggregation, P-selectin expression, and platelet-leukocyte aggregation. Gallic acid prevented the elevation of intracellular calcium and attenuated phosphorylation of PKCα/p38 MAPK and Akt/GSK3β on platelets stimulated by the stimulants ADP or U46619. This is the first mechanistic explanation for the inhibitory effects on platelets from gallic acid.

  12. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation and prognostic significance of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hairu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM is implicated in the prognosis of multiple cancers with low level expression associated with metastasis and early death in breast cancer. Despite this significance, mechanisms that regulate ALCAM gene expression and ALCAM's role in adhesion of pre-metastatic circulating tumor cells have not been defined. We studied ALCAM expression in 20 tumor cell lines by real-time PCR, western blot and immunochemistry. Epigenetic alterations of the ALCAM promoter were assessed using methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing. ALCAM's role in adhesion of tumor cells to the vascular wall was studied in isolated perfused lungs. Results A common site for transcription initiation of the ALCAM gene was identified and the ALCAM promoter sequenced. The promoter contains multiple cis-active elements including a functional p65 NF-κB motif, and it harbors an extensive array of CpG residues highly methylated exclusively in ALCAM-negative tumor cells. These CpG residues were modestly demethylated after 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment. Restoration of high-level ALCAM expression using an ALCAM cDNA increased clustering of MDA-MB-435 tumor cells perfused through the pulmonary vasculature of ventilated rat lungs. Anti-ALCAM antibodies reduced the number of intravascular tumor cell clusters. Conclusion Our data suggests that loss of ALCAM expression, due in part to DNA methylation of extensive segments of the promoter, significantly impairs the ability of circulating tumor cells to adhere to each other, and may therefore promote metastasis. These findings offer insight into the mechanisms for down-regulation of ALCAM gene expression in tumor cells, and for the positive prognostic value of high-level ALCAM in breast cancer.

  13. Primary granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis during the first two cycles only or throughout all chemotherapy cycles in patients with breast cancer at risk for febrile neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, M.J.; Peters, F.P.; Mandigers, C.M.P.W.; Dercksen, M.W.; Stouthard, J.M.; Nortier, H.J.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Warmerdam, L.J. van; Wouw, A.J. van de; Jacobs, E.M.G.; Mattijssen, V.; Rijt, C.C. van der; Smilde, T.J.; Velden, A.W. van der; Temizkan, M.; Batman, E.; Muller, E.W.; Gastel, S.M. van; Borm, G.F.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF

  14. Primary Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Prophylaxis During the First Two Cycles Only or Throughout All Chemotherapy Cycles in Patients With Breast Cancer at Risk for Febrile Neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Maureen J.; Peters, Frank P.; Mandigers, Caroline M.; Dercksen, M. Wouter; Stouthard, Jacqueline M.; Nortier, Hans J.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W.; van Warmerdam, Laurence J.; van de Wouw, Agnes J.; Jacobs, Esther M.; Mattijssen, Vera; van der Rijt, Carin C.; Smilde, Tineke J.; van der Velden, Annette W.; Temizkan, Mehmet; Batman, Erdogan; Muller, Erik W.; van Gastel, Saskia M.; Borm, George F.; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C. G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF

  15. Dose intensity of standard adjuvant CMF with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for premenopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deGraaf, H; Willemse, PHB; Bong, SB; Piersma, H; Tjabbes, T; vanVeelen, H; Coenen, JLLM; deVries, EGE

    1996-01-01

    The effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on total dose and dose intensity of standard oral adjuvant CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy were studied in premenopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer. Treatment consisted of standard CMF

  16. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on leucopenia in zidovudine-treated patients with AIDS and AIDS related complex, a phase I/II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouw, P. A.; van Leeuwen, R.; van Oers, R. H.; Lange, J. M.; Danner, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Twelve male patients, eight with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and four with AIDS related complex (ARC), who had zidovudine associated neutropenia (less than 1 x 10(9) neutrophils/l) were treated with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a phase I/II

  17. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in glycogen storage disease type 1b. Results of the European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G.; Rake, J.P.; Labrune, P.; Leonard, J.V.; Moses, S.; Ullrich, K.; Wendel, U.; Groenier, K.H.; Smit, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    Patients with glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD-1b) have neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction that predispose to frequent infections and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), for which granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) is given. To investigate the use and the value of GCSF treatment in

  18. Porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) delivered via replication-defective adenovirus induces a sustained increase in circulating peripheral blood neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of immunomodulators is a promising area for biotherapeutic, prophylactic, and metaphylactic use to prevent and combat infectious disease, particularly during periods of peak disease incidence. Cytokines, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), are one class of compounds that...

  19. Comparison of autologous cell therapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) injection vs. G-CSF injection alone for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome in a non-human primate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertho, Jean-Marc; Frick, Johanna; Prat, Marie; Demarquay, Christelle; Dudoignon, Nicolas; Trompier, Francois; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Thierry, Dominique; Gourmelon, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of autologous cell therapy after irradiation combined with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) injections with G-CSF treatment alone in a heterogeneous model of irradiation representative of an accidental situation. Material and Methods: Non-human primates were irradiated at 8.7 Gy whole-body dose with the right arm shielded to receive 4.8 Gy. The first group of animals received G-CSF (lenograstim) injections starting 6 h after irradiation, and a second group received a combination of G-CSF (lenograstim) injections and autologous expanded hematopoietic cells. Animals were followed up for blood cell counts, circulating progenitors, and bone marrow cellularity. Results: No significant differences were seen between the two treatment groups, whatever the parameter observed: time to leukocyte or platelet recovery and duration and severity of aplasia. Conclusion: Our results indicated that identical recovery kinetic was observed when irradiated animals are treated with G-CSF independently of the reinjection of ex vivo expanded autologous hematopoietic cells. Thus G-CSF injections might be chosen as a first-line therapeutic strategy in the treatment of accidental acute radiation victims

  20. Suppression of leukocyte inhibitory factor (LIF) production and [3H]thymidine incorporation by concanavalin A-activated mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomnitzer, R.; Rabson, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The capacity of human mononuclear (MN) cells pretreated with concanavalin A (Con A) to suppress the activity of fresh phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-pulsed mononuclear cells was assessed. Con A-pretreated MN cells suppressed leukocyte inhibitory factor (LIF) activity in supernatants of PHA-pulsed cell cultures and [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation by these cells. Suppression was obtained in both allogeneic and autologous systems with mitomycin-treated, irradiated, or untreated Con A-induced cells. Lymphocytes from two patients that, following treatment with Con A, did not suppress mitogen-induced proliferative response of normal cells also did not suppress LIF production

  1. Uptake and economic impact of first-cycle colony-stimulating factor use during adjuvant treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershman, Dawn L; Wilde, Elizabeth T; Wright, Jason D; Buono, Donna L; Kalinsky, Kevin; Malin, Jennifer L; Neugut, Alfred I

    2012-03-10

    In 2002, pegfilgrastim was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the benefits of dose-dense breast cancer chemotherapy, especially for hormone receptor (HR) -negative tumors, were reported. We examined first-cycle colony-stimulating factor use (FC-CSF) before and after 2002 and estimated US expenditures for dose-dense chemotherapy. We identified patients in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare greater than 65 years old with stages I to III breast cancer who had greater than one chemotherapy claim within 6 months of diagnosis(1998 to 2005) and classified patients with an average cycle length less than 21 days as having received dose-dense chemotherapy. The associations of patient, tumor, and physician-related factors with the receipt of any colony-stimulating factor (CSF) and FC-CSF use were analyzed by using generalized estimating equations. CSF costs were estimated for patients who were undergoing dose-dense chemotherapy. Among the 10,773 patients identified, 5,266 patients (48.9%) had a CSF claim. CSF use was stable between 1998 and 2002 and increased from 36.8% to 73.7% between 2002 and 2005, FC-CSF use increased from 13.2% to 67.9%, and pegfilgrastim use increased from 4.1% to 83.6%. In a multivariable analysis, CSF use was associated with age and chemotherapy type and negatively associated with black/Hispanic race, rural residence, and shorter chemotherapy duration. FC-CSF use was associated with high socioeconomic status but not with age or race/ethnicity. The US annual CSF expenditure for women with HR-positive tumors treated with dose-dense chemotherapy is estimated to be $38.8 million. A rapid increase in FC-CSF use occurred over a short period of time, which was likely a result of the reported benefits of dose-dense chemotherapy and the ease of pegfilgrastim administration. Because of the increasing evidence that elderly HR-positive patients do not benefit from dose-dense chemotherapy, limiting pegfilgrastim use would combat

  2. Activation of innate immune genes in caprine blood leukocytes after systemic endotoxin challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvesen, Øyvind; Reiten, Malin R; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2016-01-01

    observed peaking at 2 h, corroborating the increasing evidence that ISGs respond immediately to bacterial endotoxins. A slower response was manifested by four extrahepatic acute phase proteins (APP) (SAA3, HP, LF and LCN2) reaching maximum levels at 5 h. We report an immediate induction of ISGs...... insights into the dynamic regulation of innate immune genes, as well as raising new questions regarding the importance of ISGs and extrahepatic APPs in leukocytes after systemic endotoxin challenge....

  3. Immunophenotyping and activation status of maternal peripheral blood leukocytes during pregnancy and labour, both term and preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhong; Shynlova, Oksana; Sabra, Sally; Bang, Annie; Briollais, Laurent; Lye, Stephen J

    2017-10-01

    The onset of labour in rodents and in humans is associated with physiological inflammation which is manifested by infiltration of activated maternal peripheral leukocytes (mPLs) into uterine tissues. Here, we used flow cytometry to immunophenotype mPLs throughout gestation and labour, both term and preterm. Peripheral blood was collected from non-pregnant women and pregnant women in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd trimesters. Samples were also collected from women in active labour at term (TL) or preterm (PTL) and compared with women term not-in-labour (TNIL) and preterm not-in-labour (PTNIL). Different leukocyte populations were identified by surface markers such as CD45, CD14, CD15, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19 and CD56. Their activation status was measured by the expression levels of CD11b, CD44, CD55, CD181 and CD192 proteins. Of all circulating CD45+ leukocytes, we detected significant increases in CD15+ granulocytes (i) in pregnant women versus non-pregnant; (ii) in TL women versus TNIL and versus pregnant women in the 1st/2nd/3rd trimester; (iii) in PTL women versus PTNIL. TL was characterized by (iv) increased expressions of CD11b, CD55 and CD192 on granulocytes; (v) increased mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) of CD55 and CD192 on monocytes; (vi) increased CD44 MFI on CD3+ lymphocytes as compared to late gestation. In summary, we have identified sub-populations of mPLs that are specifically activated in association with gestation (granulocytes) or with the onset of labour (granulocytes, monocytes and lymphocytes). Additionally, beta regression analysis created a set of reference values to rank this association between immune markers of pregnancy and to identify activation status with potential prognostic and diagnostic capability. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  4. Location and activity of ulcerative and Crohn's colitis by 111In leukocyte scan. A prospective comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, D.T.; Gray, G.M.; Gregory, P.B.; Anderson, M.; Goodwin, D.A.; McDougall, I.R.

    1983-01-01

    A prospective blinded study comparing the 111 In leukocyte scan to barium enema, colonoscopy, or surgery or a combination of these, was carried out in 15 patients (10 with active ulcerative colitis and 5 with active Crohn's colitis). Correlation of disease location to colonic regions between indium scan and other diagnostic studies was excellent in 11 instances, good in 2, and poor in 3. In 2 of the 3 studies where major disagreement occurred, the comparative barium enema was performed greater than 2 mo after the indium scan. Disease activity, estimated by the intensity of radionuclide uptake, was compared to clinical disease activity assessed by the Crohn's Disease Activity Index for both forms of colitis. The relative degree of inflammation estimated by the indium scan correlated well with the independent clinical assessment (correlation coefficient . 0.81). The indium 111 leukocyte scan appears to be an accurate, noninvasive method for assessing the extent and the severity of the inflammation in patients with acute ulcerative or Crohn's colitis

  5. Mild episodes of tourniquet-induced forearm ischaemia-reperfusion injury results in leukocyte activation and changes in inflammatory and coagulation markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastawrous Salah S

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocytes and neutrophils are examples of phagocytic leukocytes, with neutrophils being considered as the 'chief' phagocytic leukocyte. Both monocytes and neutrophils have been implicated to play a key role in the development of ischaemia-reperfusion injury, where they are intrinsically involved in leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions. In this pilot study we hypothesised that mild episodes of tourniquet induced forearm ischaemia-reperfusion injury results in leukocyte activation and changes in inflammatory and coagulation markers. Methods Ten healthy human volunteers were recruited after informed consent. None had any history of cardiovascular disease with each subject volunteer participating in the study for a 24 hour period. Six venous blood samples were collected from each subject volunteer at baseline, 10 minutes ischaemia, 5, 15, 30, 60 minutes and 24 hours reperfusion, by means of a cannula from the ante-cubital fossa. Monocyte and neutrophil leukocyte sub-populations were isolated by density gradient centrifugation techniques. Leukocyte trapping was investigated by measuring the concentration of leukocytes in venous blood leaving the arm. The cell surface expression of CD62L (L-selectin, CD11b and the intracellular production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 were measured via flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (CRP was measured using a clinical chemistry analyser. Plasma concentrations of D-dimer and von Willebrand factor (vWF were measured using enzyme-linked fluorescent assays (ELFA. Results During ischaemia-reperfusion injury, there was a decrease in CD62L and an increase in CD11b cell surface expression for both monocytes and neutrophils, with changes in the measured parameters reaching statistical significance (p =2O2 production by leukocyte sub-populations, which was measured as a marker of leukocyte activation. Intracellular production of H2O2 in monocytes during ischaemia-reperfusion injury reached statistical

  6. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF on IVF outcomes in infertile women: An RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Eftekhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite major advances in assisted reproductive techniques, the implantation rates remain relatively low. Some studies have demonstrated that intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves implantation in infertile women. Objective: To assess the G-CSF effects on IVF outcomes in women with normal endometrial thickness. Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 infertile women with normal endometrial thickness who were candidate for IVF were evaluated in two groups. Exclusion criteria were positive history of repeated implantation failure (RIF, endocrine disorders, severe endometriosis, congenital or acquired uterine anomaly and contraindication for G-CSF (renal disease, sickle cell disease, or malignancy. In G-CSF group (n=50, 300 μg trans cervical intrauterine of G-CSF was administered at the oocyte retrieval day. Controls (n=50 were treated with standard protocol. Chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate were compared between groups. Results: Number of total and mature oocytes (MII, two pronuclei (2PN, total embryos, transferred embryos, quality of transferred embryos, and fertilization rate did not differ significantly between two groups. So there were no significant differences between groups in chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rate, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate Conclusion: our result showed in normal IVF patients with normal endometrial thickness, the intrauterine infusion of G-CSF did not improve pregnancy outcomes.

  7. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Supplementation in Culture Media for Subfertile Women Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Technologies: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siristatidis, Charalampos; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Salamalekis, George; Creatsa, Maria; Vrachnis, Nikos; Glujovsky, Demián; Iliodromiti, Zoe; Chrelias, Charalampos

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine/growth factor produced by epithelial cells that exerts embryotrophic effects during the early stages of embryo development. We performed a systematic review, and six studies that were performed in humans undergoing assisted reproduction technologies (ART) were located. We wanted to evaluate if embryo culture media supplementation with GM-CSF could improve success rates. As the type of studies and the outcome parameters investigated were heterogeneous, we decided not to perform a meta-analysis. Most of them had a trend favoring the supplementation with GM-CSF, when outcomes were measured in terms of increased percentage of good-quality embryos reaching the blastocyst stage, improved hatching initiation and number of cells in the blastocyst, and reduction of cell death. However, no statistically significant differences were found in implantation and pregnancy rates in all apart from one large multicenter trial, which reported favorable outcomes, in terms of implantation and live birth rates. We propose properly conducted and adequately powered randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to further validate and extrapolate the current findings with the live birth rate to be the primary outcome measure. PMID:23509457

  8. Combined application of alginate dressing and human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor promotes healing in refractory chronic skin ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guobao; Sun, Tangqing; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Qiuhe; Zhang, Keyan; Tian, Qingfen; Huo, Ran

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical therapeutic effect of the combined application of alginate and recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on the healing of refractory chronic skin ulcers. A single center, three arm, randomized study was performed at Jinan Central Hospital (Jinan, Shandong, China). A total of 60 patients with refractory chronic skin ulcers, which persisted for >1 month, were enrolled and randomly assigned into one of the following three groups: alginate dressing/rhGM-CSF group (group A), rhGM-CSF only group (group B) and conventional (vaseline dressing) group (group C). The wound area rate was measured, granulation and color were observed and pain was evaluated. The data were summarized and statistical analysis was performed. The results demonstrated that group A exhibited a significantly faster wound healing rate and lower pain score compared with the other groups (PCSF for the treatment of refractory chronic skin ulcers demonstrated significant advantages. It promoted the growth of granulation tissue, accelerated re-epithelialization and also effectively reduced wound pain, and thus improved the quality of life for the patient. This suggests that the combined application of alginate and rhGM-CSF may be an effective therapeutic strategy for the clinical treatment of refractory chronic skin ulcers.

  9. Engineering a pharmacologically superior form of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor by fusion with gelatin-like-protein polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Shan; Wen, Xiao-Fang; Wu, Yi-Liang; Wang, Ye-Fei; Fan, Min; Yang, Zhi-Yu; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Lin-Fu

    2010-03-01

    The plasma half-life of therapeutic proteins is a critical factor in many clinical applications. Therefore, new strategies to prolong plasma half-life of long-acting peptides and protein drugs are in high demand. Here, we designed an artificial gelatin-like protein (GLK) and fused this hydrophilic GLK polymer to granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to generate a chimeric GLK/G-CSF fusion protein. The genetically engineered recombinant GLK/G-CSF (rGLK/G-CSF) fusion protein was purified from Pichia pastoris. In vitro studies demonstrated that rGLK/G-CSF possessed an enlarged hydrodynamic radius, improved thermal stability and retained full bioactivity compared to unfused G-CSF. Following a single subcutaneous administration to rats, the rGLK/G-CSF fusion protein displayed a slower plasma clearance rate and stimulated greater and longer lasting increases in circulating white blood cells than G-CSF. Our findings indicate that fusion with this artificial, hydrophilic, GLK polymer provides many advantages in the construction of a potent hematopoietic factor with extended plasma half-life. This approach could be easily applied to other therapeutic proteins and have important clinical applications. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The safety and clinical efficacy of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor injection for colon cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

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    Jie Chen

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate safety and efficacy of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF injection and whether this regimen could reduce the incidence of adverse events caused by chemotherapy. Method: A total of 100 patients with colon cancer who were treated with chemotherapy in our hospital from January 2011 to December 2014 were randomly divided into two groups, with 50 patients in each group. The patients in the treatment group received G-CSF 24 hours after chemotherapy for consecutive three days; the patients in the control group received the same dose of normal saline. Routine blood tests were performed 7 days and 14 days after chemotherapy. Results: Compared with the control group, the incidences of febrile neutropenia and leukocytopenia in the treatment group were significantly lower (p<0.05. In addition, the incidence of liver dysfunction in the treatment group was lower than that of the control group, without statistical significance. The incidence of myalgia in the treatment was higher than that of the control group without statistical significance. Conclusion: The present study indicated that G-CSF injection after chemotherapy is safe and effective for preventing adverse events in colon cancer patients with chemotherapy.

  11. The optimal use of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor in radiation induced mucositis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Patni Nidhi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluation of response of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF on acute radiation toxicity profile in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Thirty three patients with proven stage I or II head & neck carcinoma received conventional external beam radiation therapy. Out of these, six patients received postoperative adjuvant therapy while remaining 27 received definitive RT. Patients were given 100 mcg GM-CSF subcutaneously per day along with radiation after they developed grade 2 mucositis and /or grade 2 dysphagia and / or complained of moderate pain. GM-CSF was administered till there was a subjective relief or objective response. Patients were evaluated for oral ulceration, swallowing status, pain and weight loss. Response to the treatment and patient outcome was assessed. Results: There was a decreased severity of mucositis and dysphagia in the evaluated patients. None of the patients suffered severe pain or required opioids. The mean weight loss was only 1.94%. Minimal side effects were experienced with GM-CSF. Conclusions: GM-CSF reduces the severity of acute side effects of radiation therapy thereby allowing completion of the treatment without interruption. Its remarkable response needs to be evaluated further in large randomized trials. The time of initiation and cessation of GM-CSF during radiation therapy and the required dose needs to be established.

  12. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor priming chemotherapy is more effective than standard chemotherapy as salvage therapy in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; He, Aili; Wang, Fangxia; Bai, Ju; Wang, Jianli; Zhao, Wanhong; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Chen, Yinxia; Liu, Jie; Ma, Xiaorong; Chen, Hongli; Feng, Yuandong; Yang, Yun

    2017-12-29

    To improve the complete remission (CR) rate of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and alleviate the severe side effects of double induction chemotherapy, we combined a standard regimen with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming chemotherapy to compose a new double induction regimen for AML patients who failed to achieve CR after the first course. Ninety-seven patients with AML who did not achieve CR after the first course of standard chemotherapy were enrolled. Among them, 45 patients received G-CSF priming combined with low-dose chemotherapy during days 20-22 of the first course of chemotherapy, serving as priming group, 52 patients were administered standard chemotherapy again, serving as control group. Between the two groups there were no differences in the French-American-British (FAB) classification, risk status, the first course of chemotherapy, blood cell count or blasts percentage of bone marrow before the second course. But the CR rate was significantly higher and the adverse effect was much lower in the priming group than the control group. Cox multivariate regression analysis showed that WBC level before the second course and the selection of the second chemotherapy regimen were two independent factors for long survival of patients. These results elucidate that standard chemotherapy followed by G-CSF priming new double induction chemotherapy is an effective method for AML patients to improve CR rate and reduce adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Biological properties in vitro of a combination of recombinant murine interleukin-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riklis, I; Kletter, Y; Bleiberg, I; Fabian, I

    1989-04-01

    The effect of recombinant murine interleukin-3 (rIL-3) and recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) on in vitro murine myeloid progenitor cell (CFU-C) growth and on the function of murine resident peritoneal macrophages was investigated. Both rIL-3 and rGM-CSF are known to support the growth of CFU-C and, when combined, were found to act synergistically to induce the development of an increased number of CFU-C. The distribution pattern of myeloid colonies in the presence of these two growth factors was in general similar to that in the presence of rGM-CSF alone. Both rGM-CSF and rIL-3 enhanced the phagocytosis of Candida albicans (CA) by mature macrophages producing an increase in the percentage of phagocytosing cells as well as an increase in the number of yeast particles ingested per cell. No additive effect on the phagocytosis was observed when the two growth factors were added concurrently. rGM-CSF, but not rIL-3, enhanced the killing of CA by macrophages. This killing was inhibited by scavengers of oxygen radicals.

  14. Mobilization of stem cell with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor promotes recovery after traumatic brain injury in rat

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    Mohsen Marzban

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was designed to investigate the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF administration in rats for 6 weeks after traumatic brain injury (TBI. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats (n = 30 were injured with controlled cortical impact device and divided into four groups. The treatment groups (n = 10 each were injected subcutaneously with recombinant human G-CSF. Vehicle group (n=10 received phosphate buffered saline (PBS and only Brdu intraperitoneally. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU was used for mitotic labeling. Experimental rats were injected intraperitoneally with BrdU. Rats were killed at 6th week after traumatic brain injury. Neurological functional evaluation of animals was performed before and after injury using neurological severity scores (NSS. Animals were sacrificed 42 days after TBI and brain sections were stained using Brdu immunohistochemistry. Results: Statistically significant improvement in functional outcome was observed in treatment groups when compared with control (p<0.01. This benefit was visible 7 days after TBI and persisted until 42 days (end of trial. Histological analysis showed that Brdu cell positive was more in the lesion boundary zone at treatment animal group than all injected animals. Discussion: We believe that G-CSF therapeutic protocol reported here represents an attractive strategy for the development of a clinically significant noninvasive traumatic brain injury therapy.

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Chelsea & Westminster TEN management protocol [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sica-Chapman, A; Williams, G; Soni, N; Bunker, C B

    2010-04-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare but life-threatening, allergic drug reaction. Skin blistering with epidermal and mucosal necrolysis with subsequent detachment from an inflamed underlying dermis is a hallmark of the condition. The pathogenesis of TEN is not well understood, accounting for controversies about its management and significant delay in initiating potentially beneficial therapy. There are no management protocols based on a robust evidence base. Prompt recognition of the diagnosis and consensus on early management initiatives are necessary in order to improve outcomes and survival in TEN. To date, TEN management has been directed at arresting the allergic reaction and treating the complications. We have identified a need for specific medical interventions to accelerate wound regeneration. This approach has not previously been adopted in the management of TEN. We observed that in two cases of severe TEN, dramatic re-epithelialization and recovery coincided with the introduction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for neutropenia. We explain how addition of the G-CSF promotes recovery from TEN by enhanced bioregeneration of the damaged tissues through accelerated re-epithelialization. G-CSF has been used for severe neutropenia in TEN, but we recommend and explain why, as in our Chelsea and Westminster protocol, G-CSF should be considered in treating severe TEN irrespective of the severity of neutropenia.

  16. Intranasal Delivery of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Its Neuroprotective Effects Against Ischemic Brain Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao-Liang; He, Mei-Qing; Han, Xiang-Yu; Sun, Jing-Yi; Yang, Ming-Feng; Yuan, Hui; Fan, Cun-Dong; Zhang, Shuai; Mao, Lei-Lei; Li, Da-Wei; Zhang, Zong-Yong; Zheng, Cheng-Bi; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Li, Yang V; Stetler, R Anne; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor with strong neuroprotective properties. However, it has limited capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier and thus potentially limiting its protective capacity. Recent studies demonstrated that intranasal drug administration is a promising way in delivering neuroprotective agents to the central nervous system. The current study therefore aimed at determining whether intranasal administration of G-CSF increases its delivery to the brain and its neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in rat was induced with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Our resulted showed that intranasal administration is 8-12 times more effective than subcutaneous injection in delivering G-CSF to cerebrospinal fluid and brain parenchyma. Intranasal delivery enhanced the protective effects of G-CSF against ischemic injury in rats, indicated by decreased infarct volume and increased recovery of neurological function. The neuroprotective mechanisms of G-CSF involved enhanced upregulation of HO-1 and reduced calcium overload following ischemia. Intranasal G-CSF application also promoted angiogenesis and neurogenesis following brain ischemia. Taken together, G-CSF is a legitimate neuroprotective agent and intranasal administration of G-CSF is more effective in delivery and neuroprotection and could be a practical approach in clinic.

  17. Two protocols to treat thin endometrium with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during frozen embryo transfer cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Qiong; Hao, Jie; Xu, Dabao; Li, Yanping

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of two granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) protocols for thin endometrium were investigated. Eighty-two patients were diagnosed with thin endometrium (endometrial scratch subgroups. Compared with previous cycles, endometrial thickness increased from 5.7 ± 0.7 mm to 8.1 ± 2.1 mm after G-CSF treatment (P Endometrial thickness increases were not significantly different between the two subgroups. The G-CSF with endometrial scratch subgroup established nominally higher though non-significant clinical pregnancy and live birth rates than the G-CSF only subgroup (53.8 % versus 42.9% and 38.5% versus 28.6%, respectively). Fifty-two patients underwent FET despite edometrial thickness less than 7 mm, and were included as controls. Significantly higher embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were observed in the G-CSF group compared with the control group (31.5% versus 13.9%; P Endometrial scracth did not impair G-CSF treatment for thin endometrium and favoured pregnancy and live birth rates. For patients with thin endometrium, embryo transfer cancellation and G-CSF treatment in subsequent FET cycles is beneficial. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of buffy coat-derived granulocytes for clinical use: a comparison with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor/dexamethasone-pretreated donor-derived products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Geer, A; Gazendam, R P; Tool, A T J; van Hamme, J L; de Korte, D; van den Berg, T K; Zeerleder, S S; Kuijpers, T W

    2017-02-01

    Buffy coat-derived granulocytes have been described as an alternative to the apheresis product from donors pretreated with dexamethasone and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The latter is - dependent on the local and national settings - obtained following a demanding and time-consuming procedure, which is undesirable in critically ill septic patients. In contrast, buffy coat-derived products have a large volume and are often heavily contaminated with red cells and platelets. We developed a new pooled buffy coat-derived product with high purity and small volume, and performed a comprehensive functional characterization of these granulocytes. We pooled ten buffy coats following the production of platelet concentrates. Saline 0·9% was added to decrease the viscosity and the product was split into plasma, red cells and a 'super' buffy coat. Functional data of the granulocytes were compared to those obtained with granulocytes from healthy controls and G-CSF/dexamethasone-pretreated donors. Buffy coat-derived granulocytes showed adhesion, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species production, degranulation, NETosis and in vitro killing of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Aspergillus species comparable to control and G-CSF/dexamethasone-derived granulocytes. Candida killing was superior compared to G-CSF/dexamethasone-derived granulocytes. Immunophenotyping was normal; especially no signs of activation in the buffy coat-derived granulocytes were seen. Viability was reduced. Buffy coats are readily available in the regular blood production process and would take away the concerns around the apheresis product. The product described appears a promising alternative for transfusion purposes. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  19. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

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    Chang Rae Rho

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs. We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF. An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  20. Interleukin-6 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in apical periodontitis: correlation with clinical and histologic findings of the involved teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radics, T; Kiss, C; Tar, I; Márton, I J

    2003-02-01

    Apical periodontitis is characterized by the presence of immunocompetent cells producing a wide variety of inflammatory mediators. Releasing cytokines with long-range action, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), apical periodontitis may induce changes in remote organs of the host. This study quantified the levels of IL-6 and GM-CSF in symptomatic and asymptomatic human periradicular lesions. Lesions were also characterized by size and histologic findings. Tissue samples were homogenized and supernatants were assayed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations between cytokine levels and characteristic features (as single variables) of the lesions were analysed. There was a trend for higher levels of IL-6 and GM-CSF in symptomatic than in asymptomatic lesions, but the difference was not significant. Levels also tended to be higher in large than in small lesions, in polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell-rich than in PMN cell-poor samples, and in epithelialized than in non-epithelialized lesions. Significantly higher levels of IL-6 (778.1 +/- 220.5 pg/microg) and GM-CSF (363.3 +/- 98.4 pg/microg) were found in samples coincidentally possessing symptomatic and epithelialized features than in asymptomatic, small, PMN cell-poor, non-epithelialized lesions (IL-6: 45.2 +/- 13.1 pg/microg and GM-CSF: 135.1 +/- 26.4 pg/microg). These results suggest that symptomatic lesions containing epithelial cells represent an immunologically active stage of apical periodontitis, whereas asymptomatic, small, PMN cell-poor, non-epithelialized lesions represent healing apical lesions.

  1. Defibrotide in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor significantly enhances the mobilization of primitive and committed peripheral blood progenitor cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Di Nicola, Massimo; Magni, Michele; Longoni, Paolo; Milanesi, Marco; Stucchi, Claudio; Cleris, Loredana; Formelli, Franca; Gianni, Massimo A

    2002-11-01

    Defibrotide is a polydeoxyribonucleotide, which significantly reduces the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells. We investigated the activity of Defibrotide alone or in combination with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) in BALB/c mice. A 5-day treatment with Defibrotide alone (1-15 mg/mouse/day) had no effect on WBC counts, frequencies and absolute numbers of total circulating colony-forming cells (CFCs), i.e., granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units, erythroid burst-forming units, and multilineage colony-forming units. As compared with mock-injected mice, administration of rhG-CSF alone (5 micro g/mouse/day) for 5 days significantly (P Defibrotide (15 mg/mouse/day) and rhG-CSF significantly (P Defibrotide plus rhG-CSF resulted in a significant increase (P Defibrotide/rhG-CSF-mobilized mononuclear cells rescued 43% and 71% of recipient mice, respectively. Experiments of CFC homing performed in lethally irradiated or nonirradiated recipients showed that marrow homing of transplanted PBPCs was reduced by 3-fold in Defibrotide-treated animals as compared with mock-injected mice (P Defibrotide might be because of an effect on PBPC trafficking. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that Defibrotide synergizes with rhG-CSF and significantly increases the mobilization of a broad spectrum of PBPCs, including primitive and committed progenitor cells. These data might have relevant implications for autologous and allogeneic anticancer therapy in humans.

  2. Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) Is an Endogenous Activator of the MMP-9 Secreted by Placental Leukocytes: Implication in Human Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Pliego, Arturo; Espejel-Nuñez, Aurora; Castillo-Castrejon, Marisol; Meraz-Cruz, Noemi; Beltran-Montoya, Jorge; Zaga-Clavellina, Veronica; Nava-Salazar, Sonia; Sanchez-Martinez, Maribel; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Estrada-Gutierrez, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    The activity of matrix degrading enzymes plays a leading role in the rupture of the fetal membranes under normal and pathological human labor, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) it is considered a biomarker of this event. To gain further insight into local MMP-9 origin and activation, in this study we analyzed the contribution of human placental leukocytes to MMP-9 secretion and explored the local mechanisms of the pro-enzyme activation. Placental blood leukocytes were obtained from women at term gestation without labor and maintained in culture up to 72 h. MMP-9 activity in the culture supernatants was determined by zymography and using a specific substrate. The presence of a potential pro-MMP-9 activator in the culture supernatants was monitored using a recombinant biotin-labeled human pro-MMP-9. To characterize the endogenous pro-MMP-9 activator, MMP-1, -3, -7 and -9 were measured by multiplex assay in the supernatants, and an inhibition assay of MMP-9 activation was performed using an anti-human MMP-3 and a specific MMP-3 inhibitor. Finally, production of MMP-9 and MMP-3 in placental leukocytes obtained from term pregnancies with and without labor was assessed by immunofluorescence. Placental leukocytes spontaneously secreted pro-MMP-9 after 24 h of culture, increasing significantly at 48 h (P≤0.05), when the active form of MMP-9 was detected. Culture supernatants activated the recombinant pro-MMP-9 showing that placental leukocytes secrete the activator. A significant increase in MMP-3 secretion by placental leukocytes was observed since 48 h in culture (P≤0.05) and up to 72 h (P≤0.001), when concentration reached its maximum value. Specific activity of MMP-9 decreased significantly (P≤0.005) when an anti-MMP-3 antibody or a specific MMP-3 inhibitor were added to the culture media. Placental leukocytes from term labor produced more MMP-9 and MMP-3 compared to term non-labor cells. In this work we confirm that placental leukocytes from human term

  3. Cytokines, chemokines, and colony-stimulating factors in human milk: the 1997 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, R P; Goldman, A S

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies conducted over the past 30 years to investigate the protective functions of human milk strongly support the notion that breast-feeding prevents infantile infections, particularly those affecting the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. However, more recent clinical and experimental observations also suggest that human milk not only provides passive protection, but also can directly modulate the immunological development of the recipient infant. The study of this remarkable defense system in human milk has been difficult due to its biochemical complexity, the small concentration of certain bioactive components, the compartmentalization of some of these agents, the dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes of milk during lactation, and the lack of specific reagents to quantify these agents. Nevertheless, a host of bioactive substances including hormones, growth factors, and immunological factors such as cytokines have been identified in human milk. Cytokines are pluripotent polypeptides that act in autocrine/paracrine fashions by binding to specific cellular receptors. They operate in networks and orchestrate the development and functions of the immune system. Several different cytokines and chemokines have been discovered in human milk over the past years, and the list is growing very rapidly. This article will review the current knowledge about the increasingly complex network of chemoattractants, activators, and anti-inflammatory cytokines present in human milk and their potential role in compensating for the developmental delay of the neonate immune system.

  4. CD1 molecule expression on human monocytes induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinrerk, W; Baumruker, T; Majdic, O; Knapp, W; Stockinger, H

    1993-01-15

    In this paper we demonstrate that granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF) specifically induces the expression of CD1 molecules, CD1a, CD1b and CD1c, upon human monocytes. CD1 molecules appeared upon monocytes on day 1 of stimulation with rGM-CSF, and expression was up-regulated until day 3. Monocytes cultured in the presence of LPS, FMLP, PMA, recombinant granulocyte-CSF, rIFN-gamma, rTNF-alpha, rIL-1 alpha, rIL-1 beta, and rIL-6 remained negative. The induction of CD1 molecules by rGM-CSF was restricted to monocytes, since no such effect was observed upon peripheral blood granulocytes, PBL, and the myeloid cell lines Monomac1, Monomac6, MV4/11, HL60, U937, THP1, KG1, and KG1A. CD1a mRNA was detectable in rGM-CSF-induced monocytes but not in those freshly isolated. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analyses of CD1a mAb VIT6 immunoprecipitate from lysate of rGM-CSF-activated monocytes revealed an appropriate CD1a polypeptide band of 49 kDa associated with beta 2-microglobulin. Expression of CD1 molecules on monocytes complements the distribution of these structures on accessory cells, and their specific induction by GM-CSF strengthens the suggestion that CD1 is a family of crucial structures required for interaction between accessory cells and T cells.

  5. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for febrile neutropenia prophylaxis following chemotherapy: systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Stevenson Matt D

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Febrile neutropenia (FN occurs following myelosuppressive chemotherapy and is associated with morbidity, mortality, costs, and chemotherapy reductions and delays. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs stimulate neutrophil production and may reduce FN incidence when given prophylactically following chemotherapy. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the effectiveness of G-CSFs (pegfilgrastim, filgrastim or lenograstim in reducing FN incidence in adults undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumours or lymphoma. G-CSFs were compared with no primary G-CSF prophylaxis and with one another. Nine databases were searched in December 2009. Meta-analysis used a random effects model due to heterogeneity. Results Twenty studies compared primary G-CSF prophylaxis with no primary G-CSF prophylaxis: five studies of pegfilgrastim; ten of filgrastim; and five of lenograstim. All three G-CSFs significantly reduced FN incidence, with relative risks of 0.30 (95% CI: 0.14 to 0.65 for pegfilgrastim, 0.57 (95% CI: 0.48 to 0.69 for filgrastim, and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.88 for lenograstim. Overall, the relative risk of FN for any primary G-CSF prophylaxis versus no primary G-CSF prophylaxis was 0.51 (95% CI: 0.41 to 0.62. In terms of comparisons between different G-CSFs, five studies compared pegfilgrastim with filgrastim. FN incidence was significantly lower for pegfilgrastim than filgrastim, with a relative risk of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.98. Conclusions Primary prophylaxis with G-CSFs significantly reduces FN incidence in adults undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumours or lymphoma. Pegfilgrastim reduces FN incidence to a significantly greater extent than filgrastim.

  6. Interferon-alpha suppressed granulocyte colony stimulating factor production is reversed by CL097, a TLR7/8 agonist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tajuddin, Tariq

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Neutropenia, a major side-effect of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) therapy can be effectively treated by the recombinant form of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), an important growth factor for neutrophils. We hypothesized that IFN-alpha might suppress G-CSF production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), contributing to the development of neutropenia, and that a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist might overcome this suppression. METHODS: Fifty-five patients who were receiving IFN-alpha\\/ribavirin combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection were recruited. Absolute neutrophil counts (ANC), monocyte counts and treatment outcome data were recorded. G-CSF levels in the supernatants of PBMCs isolated from the patients and healthy controls were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay following 18 h of culture in the absence or presence of IFN- alpha or the TLR7\\/8 agonist, CL097. RESULTS: Therapeutic IFN-alpha caused a significant reduction in neutrophil counts in all patients, with 15 patients requiring therapeutic G-CSF. The reduction in ANC over the course of IFN-alpha treatment was paralleled by a decrease in the ability of PBMCs to produce G-CSF. In vitro G-CSF production by PBMCs was suppressed in the presence of IFN-alpha; however, co-incubation with a TLR7\\/8 agonist significantly enhanced G-CSF secretion by cells obtained both from HCV patients and healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: Suppressed G-CSF production in the presence of IFN-alpha may contribute to IFN-alpha-induced neutropenia. However, a TLR7\\/8 agonist elicits G-CSF secretion even in the presence of IFN-alpha, suggesting a possible therapeutic role for TLR agonists in treatment of IFN-alpha-induced neutropenia.

  7. Benefits of gene transduction of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in cancer vaccine using genetically modified dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Toshiyasu; Iwahashi, Makoto; Nakamura, Masaki; Matsuda, Kenji; Nakamori, Mikihito; Ueda, Kentaro; Naka, Teiji; Katsuda, Masahiro; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2007-10-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a key cytokine for the generation and stimulation of dendritic cells (DCs), and it may also play a pivotal role in promoting the survival of DCs. In this study, the feasibility of creating a cancer vaccine using DCs adenovirally transduced with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene and the GM-CSF gene was examined. In addition, the effect of the co-transduction of GM-CSF gene on the lifespan of these genetically modified DCs was determined. A cytotoxic assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was performed in a 4-h 51Cr release assay. The apoptosis of DCs was examined by TdT-mediated dUTP-FITC nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. CEA-specific CTLs were generated from PBMCs stimulated with genetically modified DCs expressing CEA. The cytotoxicity of these CTLs was augmented by co-transduction of DCs with the GM-CSF gene. Co-transduction of the GM-CSF gene into DCs inhibited apoptosis of these DCs themselves via up-regulation of Bcl-x(L) expression, leading to the extension of the lifespan of these DCs. Furthermore, the transduction of the GM-CSF gene into DCs also suppressed the incidence of apoptosis of DCs induced by transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta-1). Immunotherapy using these genetically modified DCs may therefore be useful with several advantages as follows: i) adenoviral toxicity to DCs can be reduced; ii) the lifespan of vaccinated DCs can be prolonged; and iii) GM-CSF may protect DCs from apoptosis induced by tumor-derived TGFbeta-1 in the regional lymph nodes.

  8. Annual patient and caregiver burden of oncology clinic visits for granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J Mark; Li, Xiaoyan; Reiner, Maureen; Tzivelekis, Spiros

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSFs) is indicated for chemotherapy patients with a significant risk of febrile neutropenia. This study estimates the annual economic burden on patients and caregivers of clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections in the US. Annual clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections (all cancers) were estimated from national cancer incidence, chemotherapy treatment and G-CSF utilization data, and G-CSF sales and pricing information. Patient travel times, plus time spent in the clinic, were estimated from patient survey responses collected during a large prospective cohort study (the Prospective Study of the Relationship between Chemotherapy Dose Intensity and Mortality in Early-Stage (I-III) Breast Cancer Patients). Economic models were created to estimate travel costs, patient co-pays and the economic value of time spent by patients and caregivers in G-CSF clinic visits. Estimated total clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections in the US were 1.713 million for 2015. Mean (SD) travel time per visit was 62 (50) min; mean (SD) time in the clinic was 41 (68) min. Total annual time for travel to and from the clinic, plus time at the clinic, is estimated at 4.9 million hours, with patient and caregiver time valued at $91.8 million ($228 per patient). The estimated cumulative annual travel distance for G-CSF visits is 60.2 million miles, with a total transportation cost of $28.9 million ($72 per patient). Estimated patient co-pays were $61.1 million, ∼$36 per visit, $152 per patient. The total yearly economic impact on patients and caregivers is $182 million, ∼$450 per patient. Data to support model parameters were limited. Study estimates are sensitive to the assumptions used. The burden of clinic visits for G-CSF therapy is a significant addition to the total economic burden borne by cancer patients and their families.

  9. Inhibition of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor early in disease ameliorates motor deficits in SCA1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wenhui; Johnson, Andrea; Kim, Joo Hyun; Lukowicz, Abigail; Svedberg, Daniel; Cvetanovic, Marija

    2017-05-25

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the protein Ataxin-1 (ATXN1) causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), a fatal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor deficits, cerebellar neurodegeneration, and gliosis. Currently, there are no treatments available to delay or ameliorate SCA1. We have examined the effect of depleting microglia during the early stage of disease by using PLX, an inhibitor of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSFR1), on disease severity in a mouse model of SCA1. Transgenic mouse model of SCA1, ATXN1[82Q] mice, and wild-type littermate controls were treated with PLX from 3 weeks of age. The effects of PLX on microglial density, astrogliosis, motor behavior, atrophy, and gene expression of Purkinje neurons were examined at 3 months of age. PLX treatment resulted in the elimination of 70-80% of microglia from the cerebellum of both wild-type and ATXN1[82Q] mice. Importantly, PLX ameliorated motor deficits in SCA1 mice. While we have not observed significant improvement in the atrophy or disease-associated gene expression changes in Purkinje neurons upon PLX treatment, we have detected reduced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and increase in the protein levels of wild-type ataxin-1 and post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) that may help improve PN function. A decrease in the number of microglia during an early stage of disease resulted in the amelioration of motor deficits in SCA1 mice.

  10. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and umbilical cord blood cell transplantation: Synergistic therapies for the treatment of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Liska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is now characterized as a progressive, degenerative disease and continues to stand as a prevalent cause of death and disability. The pathophysiology of TBI is complex, with a variety of secondary cell death pathways occurring which may persist chronically following the initial cerebral insult. Current therapeutic options for TBI are minimal, with surgical intervention or rehabilitation therapy existing as the only viable treatments. Considering the success of stem-cell therapies in various other neurological diseases, their use has been proposed as a potential potent therapy for patients suffering TBI. Moreover, stem cells are highly amenable to adjunctive use with other therapies, providing an opportunity to overcome the inherent limitations of using a single therapeutic agent. Our research has verified this additive potential by demonstrating the efficacy of co-delivering human umbilical cord blood (hUCB cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in a murine model of TBI, providing encouraging results which support the potential of this approach to treat patients suffering from TBI. These findings justify ongoing research toward uncovering the mechanisms which underlie the functional improvements exhibited by hUCB + G-CSF combination therapy, thereby facilitating its safe and effect transition into the clinic. This paper is a review article. Referred literature in this paper has been listed in the reference section. The datasets supporting the conclusions of this article are available online by searching various databases, including PubMed. Some original points in this article come from the laboratory practice in our research center and the authors' experiences.

  11. Characterization and molecular features of the cell surface receptor for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, S.; Tojo, A.; Kitamura, T.; Urabe, A.; Miyazono, K.; Takaku, F.

    1990-01-01

    The receptors for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the surfaces of normal and leukemic myeloid cells were characterized using 125I-labeled bacterially synthesized GM-CSF. The binding was rapid, specific, time dependent, and saturable. Scatchard analysis of the 125I-GM-CSF binding to peripheral blood neutrophils indicated the presence of a single class of binding site (Kd = 99 +/- 21 pM; 2,304 +/- 953 sites/cell). However, for peripheral blood monocytes and two GM-CSF-responsive myeloid cell lines (U-937 and TF-1), the Scatchard plots were biphasic curvilinear, which were best fit by curves derived from two binding site model: one with high affinity (Kd1 = 10-40 pM) and the other with low affinity (Kd2 = 0.9-2.0 nM). For U-937 cells, the number of high-affinity receptors was 1,058 +/- 402 sites/cell and that of low-affinity receptors was estimated to be 10,834 +/- 2,396 sites/cell. Cross-linking studies yielded three major bands with molecular masses of 150 kDa, 115 kDa, and 95 kDa, which were displaced by an excess amount of unlabeled GM-CSF, suggesting 135-kDa, 100-kDa, and 80-kDa species for the individual components of the human GM-CSF receptor. These bands comigrated for different cell types including peripheral blood neutrophils, U-937 cells and TF-1 cells. In experiments using U-937 cells, only the latter two bands appeared to be labeled in a dose-dependent manner in a low-affinity state. These results suggest that the human GM-CSF receptor possibly forms a multichain complex

  12. Effect of colony-stimulating factor and conventional- or high-dose chemotherapy on FDG uptake in bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Toshiki; Swanston, Nancy; Podoloff, Donald A.; Macapinlac, Homer A.

    2005-01-01

    Granulocyte or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (CSF), usually used in conjunction with chemotherapy, may interfere with the 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) reading. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of CSF, conventional-or high-dose chemotherapy on bone marrow FDG uptake. Two hundred and forty-one FDG PET scans obtained in 163 patients with lymphoma and no pathologically and radiologically proven bone marrow involvement were analyzed. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of each patient's spine was measured. Among patients with no recent history of CSF use, the average SUV in 36 patients with no history of chemotherapy was 1.60±0.34, that in 49 patients with a history of conventional-dose chemotherapy was 1.37±0.32, and that in 12 patients with a history of high-dose chemotherapy was 1.26±0.25 (P=0.008 and 0.002, respectively by Mann-Whitney U test). In 80 patients treated with conventional-dose chemotherapy and CSF, the average SUV after discontinuation of CSF was as follows: 0-7 days, 2.37±1.19; 8-14 days: 2.04±0.67; 15-21 days: 1.87±0.52; 22-30 days: 1.59±0.18; 31-90 days: 1.54±0.36. In 45 patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and CSF, no significant increase in bone marrow uptake was seen in most of them. Bone marrow FDG uptake may be increased by CSF treatment and may be decreased by chemotherapy. In patients treated with conventional-dose chemotherapy and CSF, increased marrow uptake will return to the pretreatment value approximately 1 month after discontinuation of CSF. (orig.)

  13. Role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-dependent macrophages in gastric ulcer healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Y; Nakase, Y; Isomoto, Y; Matsuda, N; Amagase, K; Kato, S; Takeuchi, K

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-dependent macrophages in the healing of gastric ulcers in mice. Male M-CSF-deficient (op/op) and M-CSF-expressing heterozygote (+/?) mice were used. Gastric ulcers were induced by thermal cauterization under ether anesthesia, and healing was observed for 14 days after ulceration. The numbers of macrophages and microvessels in the gastric mucosa were determined immunohistochemically with anti-CD68 and anti-CD31 antibodies, respectively. Expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA was determined via real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the mucosal content of prostaglandin (PG) E(2) was determined via enzyme immunoassay on day 10 after ulceration. The healing of gastric ulcers was significantly delayed in op/op mice compared with +/? mice. Further, significantly fewer macrophages were observed in the normal gastric mucosa of op/op mice than in +/? mice. Ulcer induction caused a marked accumulation of macrophages around the ulcer base in +/? mice, but this response was attenuated in op/op mice. The mucosal PGE(2) content as well as the expression of COX-2, VEGF, and TNF-α mRNA were all upregulated in the ulcerated area of +/? mice but significantly suppressed in op/op mice. The degree of vascularization in the ulcerated area was significantly lower in op/op mice than in +/? mice. Taken together, these results suggest that M-CSF-dependent macrophages play an important role in the healing of gastric ulcers, and that this action may be associated with angiogenesis promoted by upregulation of COX-2/PGE(2) production.

  14. [Macrophage colony stimulating factor enhances non-small cell lung cancer invasion and metastasis by promoting macrophage M2 polarization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y J; Yang, L; Wang, L P; Zhang, Y

    2017-06-23

    Objective: To investigate the key cytokine which polarizes M2 macrophages and promotes invasion and metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: After co-culture with A549 cells in vitro, the proportion of CD14(+) CD163(+) M2 macrophages in monocytes and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) levels in culture supernatant were detected by flow cytometry, ELISA assay and real-time qPCR, respectively. The effects of CD14(+) CD163(+) M2 macrophages on invasion of A549 cells and angiogenesis of HUVEC cells were measured by transwell assay and tubule formation assay, respectively. The clinical and prognostic significance of M-CSF expression in NSCLC was further analyzed. Results: The percentage of CD14(+) CD163(+) M2 macrophages in monocytes and the concentration of M-CSF in the supernatant followed by co-culture was (12.03±0.46)% and (299.80±73.76)pg/ml, respectively, which were significantly higher than those in control group [(2.80±1.04)% and (43.07±11.22)pg/ml, respectively, P macrophages in vitro . M2 macrophages enhanced the invasion of A549 cells (66 cells/field vs. 26 cells/field) and the angiogenesis of HUVEC cells (22 tubes/field vs. 8 tubes/field). The mRNA expression of M-CSF in stage Ⅰ-Ⅱ patients (16.23±4.83) was significantly lower than that in stage Ⅲ-Ⅳ (53.84±16.08; P macrophages, which can further promote the metastasis and angiogenesis of NSCLC. M-CSF could be used as a potential therapeutic target of NSCLC.

  15. The combined effect of erythropoietin and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor on liver regeneration after major hepatectomy in rats

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    Frangou Matrona

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The liver presents a remarkable capacity for regeneration after hepatectomy but the exact mechanisms and mediators involved are not yet fully clarified. Erythropoietin (EPO and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF have been shown to promote liver regeneration after major hepatectomy. Aim of this experimental study is to compare the impact of exogenous administration of EPO, GM-CSF, as well as their combination on the promotion of liver regeneration after major hepatectomy. Methods Wistar rats were submitted to 70% major hepatectomy. The animals were assigned to 4 experimental groups: a control group (n = 21 that received normal saline, an EPO group (n = 21, that received EPO 500 IU/kg, a GM-CSF group (n = 21 that received 20 mcg/kg of GM-CSF and a EPO+GMCSF group (n = 21 which received a combination of the above. Seven animals of each group were killed on the 1st, 3rd and 7th postoperative day and their remnant liver was removed to evaluate liver regeneration by immunochemistry for PCNA and Ki 67. Results Our data suggest that EPO and GM-CSF increases liver regeneration following major hepatectomy when administered perioperatively. EPO has a more significant effect than GM-CSF (p Conclusion EPO, GM-CSF and their combination enhance liver regeneration after hepatectomy in rats when administered perioperatively. However their combination has a weaker effect on liver regeneration compared to EPO alone. Further investigation is needed to assess the exact mechanisms that mediate this finding.

  16. Purity assessment of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in finished drug product by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benković, Goran; Skrlin, Ana; Madić, Tomislav; Debeljak, Zeljko; Medić-Šarić, Marica

    2014-09-01

    Current methods for determination of impurities with different charge-to-volume ratio are limited especially in terms of sensitivity and precision. The main goal of this research was to establish a quantitative method for determination of impurities with charges differing from that of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF, filgrastim) with superior precision and sensitivity compared to existing methods. A CZE method has been developed, optimized, and validated for a purity assessment of filgrastim in liquid pharmaceutical formulations. Optimal separation of filgrastim from the related impurities with different charges was achieved on a 50 μm id fused-silica capillary of a total length of 80.5 cm. A BGE that contains 100 mM phosphoric acid adjusted to pH 7.0 with triethanolamine was used. The applied voltage was 20 kV while the temperature was maintained at 25°C. UV detection was set to 200 nm. Method was validated in terms of selectivity/specificity, linearity, precision, LOD, LOQ, stability, and robustness. Linearity was observed in the concentration range of 6-600 μg/mL and the LOQ was determined to be 0.3% relative to the concentration of filgrastim of 0.6 mg/mL. Other validation parameters were also found to be acceptable; thus the method was successfully applied for a quantitative purity assessment of filgrastim in a finished drug product. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Is febrile neutropenia prophylaxis with granulocyte-colony stimulating factors economically justified for adjuvant TC chemotherapy in breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedgel, Chris; Rayson, Daniel; Younis, Tallal

    2016-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) during adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with morbidity, mortality risk, and substantial cost, and subsequent chemotherapy dose reductions may result in poorer outcomes. Patients at high risk of, or who develop FN, often receive prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF). We investigated whether different prophylaxis strategies with G-CSF offered favorable value-for-money. We developed a decision model to estimate the short- and long-term costs and outcomes of a hypothetical cohort of women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant taxotere + cyclophosphamide (TC) chemotherapy. The short-term phase estimated upfront costs and FN risks with adjuvant TC chemotherapy without G-CSF prophylaxis (i.e., chemotherapy dose reductions) as well as with secondary and primary G-CSF prophylaxis strategies. The long-term phase estimated the expected costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for patients who completed adjuvant TC chemotherapy with or without one or more episodes of FN. Secondary G-CSF was associated with lower costs and greater QALY gains than a no G-CSF strategy. Primary G-CSF appears likely to be cost-effective relative to secondary G-CSF at FN rates greater than 28%, assuming some loss of chemotherapy efficacy at lower dose intensities. The cost-effectiveness of primary vs. secondary G-CSF was sensitive to FN risk and mortality, and loss of chemotherapy efficacy following FN. Secondary G-CSF is more effective and less costly than a no G-CSF strategy. Primary G-CSF may be justified at higher willingness-to-pay thresholds and/or higher FN risks, but this threshold FN risk appears to be higher than the 20% rate recommended by current clinical guidelines.

  18. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Combined with Methylprednisolone Improves Functional Outcomes in Rats with Experimental Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Gemio Jacobsen Teixeira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of combined treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and methylprednisolone in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord injury. METHODS: Forty Wistar rats received a moderate spinal cord injury and were divided into four groups: control (no treatment; G-CSF (G-CSF at the time of injury and daily over the next five days; methylprednisolone (methylprednisolone for 24 h; and G-CSF/Methylprednisolone (methylprednisolone for 24 h and G-CSF at the time of injury and daily over the next five days. Functional evaluation was performed using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score on days 2, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 following injury. Motor-evoked potentials were evaluated. Histological examination of the spinal cord lesion was performed immediately after euthanasia on day 42. RESULTS: Eight animals were excluded (2 from each group due to infection, a normal Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score at their first evaluation, or autophagy, and 32 were evaluated. The combination of methylprednisolone and G-CSF promoted greater functional improvement than methylprednisolone or G-CSF alone (p<0.001. This combination also exhibited a synergistic effect, with improvements in hyperemia and cellular infiltration at the injury site (p<0.001. The groups displayed no neurophysiological differences (latency p=0.85; amplitude p=0.75. CONCLUSION: Methylprednisolone plus G-CSF promotes functional and histological improvements superior to those achieved by either of these drugs alone when treating spinal cord contusion injuries in rats. Combining the two drugs did have a synergistic effect.

  19. Cost-benefit analysis of prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during CHOP antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranitsaris, G; Altmayer, C; Quirt, I

    1997-06-01

    Several randomised comparative trials have shown that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces the duration of neutropenia, hospitalisation and intravenous antibacterial use in patients with cancer who are receiving high-dosage antineoplastic therapy. However, one area that has received less attention is the role of G-CSF in standard-dosage antineoplastic regimens. One such treatment that is considered to have a low potential for inducing fever and neutropenia is the CHOP regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We conducted a cost-benefit analysis from a societal perspective in order to estimate the net cost or benefit of prophylactic G-CSF in this patient population. This included direct costs for hospitalisation with antibacterial support, as well as indirect societal costs, such as time off work and antineoplastic therapy delays secondary to neutropenia. The findings were then tested by a comprehensive sensitivity analysis. The administration of G-CSF at a dosage of 5 micrograms/kg/day for 11 doses following CHOP resulted in an overall net cost of $Can1257. In the sensitivity analysis, lowering the G-CSF dosage to 2 micrograms/kg/day generated a net benefit of $Can6564, indicating a situation that was cost saving to society. The results of the current study suggest that the use of G-CSF in patients receiving CHOP antineoplastic therapy produces a situation that is close to achieving cost neutrality. However, low-dosage (2 micrograms/kg/day) G-CSF is an economically attractive treatment strategy because it may result in overall savings to society.

  20. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor marks and regulates a fetal myeloid-primed B-cell progenitor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zriwil, Alya; Böiers, Charlotta; Wittmann, Lilian; Green, Joanna C A; Woll, Petter S; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Sitnicka, Ewa

    2016-07-14

    Although it is well established that unique B-cell lineages develop through distinct regulatory mechanisms during embryonic development, much less is understood about the differences between embryonic and adult B-cell progenitor cells, likely to underpin the genetics and biology of infant and childhood PreB acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PreB-ALL), initiated by distinct leukemia-initiating translocations during embryonic development. Herein, we establish that a distinct subset of the earliest CD19(+) B-cell progenitors emerging in the E13.5 mouse fetal liver express the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), previously thought to be expressed, and play a lineage-restricted role in development of myeloid lineages, and macrophages in particular. These early embryonic CSF1R(+)CD19(+) ProB cells also express multiple other myeloid genes and, in line with this, possess residual myeloid as well as B-cell, but not T-cell lineage potential. Notably, these CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed ProB cells are uniquely present in a narrow window of embryonic fetal liver hematopoiesis and do not persist in adult bone marrow. Moreover, analysis of CSF1R-deficient mice establishes a distinct role of CSF1R in fetal B-lymphopoiesis. CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed embryonic ProB cells are relevant for infant and childhood PreB-ALLs, which frequently have a bi-phenotypic B-myeloid phenotype, and in which CSF1R-rearrangements have recently been reported. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Adrenaline administration promotes the efficiency of granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mediated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Cao, Jiang; Song, Xuguang; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Li, Yong; Xu, Kailin

    2013-01-01

    A high dose of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), but G-CSF is relatively inefficient and may cause adverse effects. Recently, adrenaline has been found to play important roles in HSPC mobilization. In this study, we explored whether adrenaline combined with G-CSF could induce HSPC mobilization in a mouse model. Mice were treated with adrenaline and either a high or low dose of G-CSF alone or in combination. Peripheral blood HSPC counts were evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of bone marrow SDF-1 were measured by ELISA, the transcription of CXCR4 and SDF-1 was measured by real-time RT-PCR, and CXCR4 protein was detected by Western blot. Our results showed that adrenaline alone fails to mobilize HSPCs into the peripheral blood; however, when G-CSF and adrenaline are combined, the WBC counts and percentages of HSPCs are significantly higher compared to those in mice that received G-CSF alone. The combined use of adrenaline and G-CSF not only accelerated HSPC mobilization, but also enabled the efficient mobilization of HSPCs into the peripheral blood at lower doses of G-CSF. Adrenaline/G-CSF treatment also extensively downregulated levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in mouse bone marrow. These results demonstrated that adrenaline combined with G-CSF can induce HSPC mobilization by down-regulating the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis, indicating that the use of adrenaline may enable the use of reduced dosages or durations of G-CSF treatment, minimizing G-CSF-associated complications.

  2. Total-hip arthroplasty: Periprosthetic indium-111-labeled leukocyte activity and complementary technetium-99m-sulfur colloid imaging in suspected infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palestro, C.J.; Kim, C.K.; Swyer, A.J.; Capozzi, J.D.; Solomon, R.W.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte images of 92 cemented total-hip arthroplasties were correlated with final diagnoses. Prostheses were divided into four zones: head (including acetabulum), trochanter, shaft, and tip. The presence (or absence) and intensity of activity in each zone was noted, and compared to the corresponding contralateral zone. Though present in all 23 infected arthroplasties, periprosthetic activity was also present in 77% of uninfected arthroplasties, and was greater than the contralateral zone 51% of the time. When analyzed by zone, head zone activity was the best criterion for infection (87% sensitivity, 94% specificity, 92% accuracy). Fifty of the arthroplasties were studied with combined labeled leukocyte/sulfur colloid imaging. Using incongruence of images as the criterion for infection, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the study were 100%, 97%, and 98%, respectively. While variable periprosthetic activity makes labeled leukocyte imaging alone unreliable for diagnosing hip arthroplasty infection, the addition of sulfur colloid imaging results in a highly accurate diagnostic procedure

  3. In Vivo Chemoprotective Activity of Bovine Dialyzable Leukocyte Extract in Mouse Bone Marrow Cells against Damage Induced by 5-Fluorouracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado-Cerda, Erika Evangelina; Franco-Molina, Moisés Armides; Mendoza-Gamboa, Edgar; Prado-García, Heriberto; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Zapata-Benavides, Pablo; Rodríguez-Salazar, María del Carmen; Caballero-Hernandez, Diana; Tamez-Guerra, Reyes Silvestre; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy treatments induce a number of side effects, such as leukopenia neutropenia, peripheral erythropenia, and thrombocytopenia, affecting the quality of life for cancer patients. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is wieldy used as myeloablative model in mice. The bovine dialyzable leukocyte extract (bDLE) or IMMUNEPOTENT CRP® (ICRP) is an immunomodulatory compound that has antioxidants and anti-inflammatory effects. In order to investigate the chemoprotection effect of ICRP on bone marrow cells in 5-FU treated mice, total bone marrow (BM) cell count, bone marrow colony forming units-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), cell cycle, immunophenotypification, ROS/superoxide and Nrf2 by flow cytometry, and histological and hematological analyses were performed. Our results demonstrated that ICRP increased BM cell count and CFU-GM number, arrested BM cells in G0/G1 phase, increased the percentage of leukocyte, granulocytic, and erythroid populations, reduced ROS/superoxide formation and Nrf2 activation, and also improved hematological levels and weight gain in 5-FU treated mice. These results suggest that ICRP has a chemoprotective effect against 5-FU in BM cells that can be used in cancer patients. PMID:27191003

  4. In Vivo Chemoprotective Activity of Bovine Dialyzable Leukocyte Extract in Mouse Bone Marrow Cells against Damage Induced by 5-Fluorouracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Evangelina Coronado-Cerda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy treatments induce a number of side effects, such as leukopenia neutropenia, peripheral erythropenia, and thrombocytopenia, affecting the quality of life for cancer patients. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is wieldy used as myeloablative model in mice. The bovine dialyzable leukocyte extract (bDLE or IMMUNEPOTENT CRP® (ICRP is an immunomodulatory compound that has antioxidants and anti-inflammatory effects. In order to investigate the chemoprotection effect of ICRP on bone marrow cells in 5-FU treated mice, total bone marrow (BM cell count, bone marrow colony forming units-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM, cell cycle, immunophenotypification, ROS/superoxide and Nrf2 by flow cytometry, and histological and hematological analyses were performed. Our results demonstrated that ICRP increased BM cell count and CFU-GM number, arrested BM cells in G0/G1 phase, increased the percentage of leukocyte, granulocytic, and erythroid populations, reduced ROS/superoxide formation and Nrf2 activation, and also improved hematological levels and weight gain in 5-FU treated mice. These results suggest that ICRP has a chemoprotective effect against 5-FU in BM cells that can be used in cancer patients.

  5. Involvement of activated leukocytes in the regulation of plasma levels of acute phase proteins in microgravity simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna; Turin-Kuzmin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Earth-based studies of microgravity effects showed the induction of the mechanisms of acute phase reaction (APR). APR comprises the transition of stress-sensitive protein kinases of macrophages and other responsive cells into the active state and the phosphorylation of transcription factors which in turn stimulate the production of acute-phase reaction cytokines. Leukocyte activation is accompanied by the acceleration of the formation of oxygen radicals which can serve a functional indice of leukocyte cell state. The series of events at acute phase response result in selective changes in the synthesis of a number of secretory blood proteins (acute phase proteins, APPs) in liver cells thus contributing the recovery of homeostasis state in the organism. Earlier experiment with head-down tilt showed the increase in plasma concentrations of two cytokine mediators of acute phase response, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) being the outcome of the activation of producer cells, foremost, leukocytes. In experiment with 4-day dry immersion chemiluminescent (ChL) reply of the whole blood samples to a test stimulus were studied along with the measurements of plasma levels of APPs, namely, alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT), alpha1-acid glycoprotein (alpha1-AGP), alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2-M), ceruloplasmin (Cer), haptoglobin (Hp), C3-complement component (C3), C-reactive protein (CRP). Eight individuals aged 21.2 ± 3.2 years were the test subjects in the investigation. Protein studies showed a noticeable increase in the mean plasma levels of all APPs measured in experiment thus producing the evidence of the activation of acute phase response mechanisms while individual patterns revealed variability during the immersion period. The overall trends were similar to these in the previous immersion series. The augment in the strength of signal in stimulated light emission tests was higher after 1- and 2-day of immersion exposure than before the

  6. Adjuvant therapy for melanoma in dogs: results of randomized clinical trials using surgery, liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwen, E G; Kurzman, I D; Vail, D M; Dubielzig, R R; Everlith, K; Madewell, B R; Rodriguez, C O; Phillips, B; Zwahlen, C H; Obradovich, J; Rosenthal, R C; Fox, L E; Rosenberg, M; Henry, C; Fidel, J

    1999-12-01

    Spontaneous canine oral melanoma (COM) is a highly metastatic cancer, resistant to chemotherapy, and can serve as a model for cancer immunotherapy. Liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide-phosphatidylethanolamine (L-MTP-PE) can activate the tumoricidal activity of the monocyte-macrophage system following i.v. injection. The objective of these studies was to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of L-MTP-PE administered alone and combined with recombinant canine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rcGM-CSF) in dogs undergoing surgery for oral melanoma. Ninety-eight dogs with histologically confirmed, clinically staged, oral melanoma were entered into two randomized, double-blind, surgical adjuvant trials. In trial 1, 50 dogs were stratified based on clinical stage and randomized to once a week L-MTP-PE or lipid equivalent (control). When all of the clinical stages were combined, no difference in disease-free survival or in survival time (ST) were detected. However, within stage I, dogs receiving L-MTP-PE had a significant increase in ST compared with control, with 80% of the dogs treated with L-MTP-PE still alive at >2 years. Within each stage II and stage III, there was no difference detected between the treatment groups. In trial 2, 48 dogs were stratified on the basis of clinical stage and extent of surgery (simple resection or radical excision), treated with L-MTP-PE two times a week, and randomized to rcGM-CSF or saline (placebo) given s.c. daily for 9 weeks. Within each stage and when all of the stages were combined, there was no difference between the treatment groups. In both studies, stage I COM is associated with a better prognosis. No effect on survival was observed with regard to tumor location in the oral cavity, sex, type/extent of surgery, or age. In a subset of dogs tested, pulmonary alveolar macrophage cytotoxicity was enhanced with combined rcGM-CSF and L-MTP-PE but not in dogs treated with L-MTP-PE alone. The present study

  7. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Use after Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Comparison of Two Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amrita D; Parmar, Sapna; Patel, Khilna; Shah, Shreya; Shore, Tsiporah; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; Phillips, Adrienne; Hsu, Jing-Mei; Niesvizky, Ruben; Mark, Tomer M; Pearse, Roger; Rossi, Adriana; van Besien, Koen

    2018-02-01

    Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) is generally recommended to reduce the duration of severe neutropenia; however, data regarding the optimal timing of G-CSFs post-transplantation are limited and conflicting. This retrospective study was performed at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center between November 5, 2013, and August 9, 2016, of adult inpatient autologous PBSCT recipients who received G-CSF empirically starting on day +5 (early) versus on those who received G-CSF on day +12 only if absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was ANC-driven). G-CSF was dosed at 300 µg in patients weighing ANC-driven (n = 50) G-CSF regimen. Patient and transplantation characteristics were comparable in the 2 groups. In the ANC-driven group, 24% (n = 12) received G-CSF on day +12 and 60% (n = 30) started G-CSF earlier due to febrile neutropenia or at the physician's discretion, 6% (n = 3) started after day +12 at the physician's discretion, and 10% (n = 5) did not receive any G-CSF. The median start day of G-CSF therapy was day +10 in the ANC-driven group versus day +5 in the early group (P ANC-driven group (P = .07). There were no significant between-group differences in time to platelet engraftment, 1-year relapse rate, or 1-year overall survival. The incidence of febrile neutropenia was 74% in the early group versus 90% in the ANC-driven group (P = .04); however, there was no significant between-group difference in the incidence of positive bacterial cultures or transfer to the intensive care unit. The duration of G-CSF administration until neutrophil engraftment was 6 days in the early group versus 3 days in the ANC-driven group (P ANC-driven group (P = .28). Our data show that early initiation of G-CSF (on day +5) and ANC-driven initiation of G-CSF following autologous PBSCT were associated with a similar time to neutrophil engraftment

  8. Effect of Aloe vera extract on the improvement of the respiratory activity of leukocytes of matrinxã during the transport stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Sabbadin Zanuzzo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of extract of Aloe vera in the transport water of matrinxã (Brycon amazonicus fish on stress response and leukocyte respiratory activity. Fish was transported for 4 h in water containing Aloe at levels 0; 0.02; 0.2 and 2 mg/L, and sampled before transport 2, 4, 24 and 96 h after for determination of plasma glucose and respiratory activity of leukocytes. An additional in vitro assay was conducted with another fish species, pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus, to test the respiratory burst of leukocytes exposed to Aloe extract (0.0, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS only at 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1 mg/L. Plasma glucose increased after 2 and 4 h of transport and returned to control levels within 24 h, but the addition of Aloe in the transport water did not affect the level of blood glucose. However, at 2 h of transport, Aloe enhanced the respiratory activity of leukocytes in a dose-dependent way. The highest value of respiratory burst activity of leukocytes was observed in the fish transported in water containing Aloe at 2 mg/L. The enhancing effect of the plant extract on the production of oxygen radicals was confirmed in vitro in leukocytes of pacu incubated in Aloe at concentrations 0.1 and 0.2 mg/L. The results suggest that Aloe vera is a modulator of the immune system in fish improving the innate immune response tested.

  9. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for hematopoietic stem cell donation from healthy female donors during pregnancy and lactation: what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessach, Ilias; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) are mostly used as supportive measures to reduce infectious complications associated with neutropenia. Over the past decade, the use of HGFs became a common method for mobilizing human CD34+ stem cells, either for autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, since their introduction the long-term safety of the procedure has become a major focus of discussion and research. Most information refers to healthy normal donors and data concerning pregnant and lactating women are scarce. The clinical question, which is the core of this review, is whether stem cell donation, preceded by administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization, is a safe procedure for pregnant donors. METHODS Literature searches were performed in Pubmed for English language articles published before the end of May 2012, focusing on G-CSF administration during pregnancy, lactation and hematopoietic stem cell donation. Searches included animal and human studies. RESULTS Data from animals (n = 15 studies) and women (n = 46 studies) indicate that G-CSF crosses the placenta, stimulates fetal granulopoiesis, improves neonatal survival mostly for very immature infants, promotes trophoblast growth and placental metabolism and has an anti-abortive role. Granulocyte macrophage-CSF is a key cytokine in the maternal immune tolerance towards the implanted embryo and exerts protective long-term programming effects to preimplantation embryos. The available data suggest that probably CSFs should not be administered during the time of most active organogenesis (first trimester), except perhaps for the first week during which implantation takes place. Provided CSF is administered during the second and third trimesters, it appears to be safe, and pregnant women receiving the CSF treatment can become hematopoietic stem cell donors. There are also risks related to the anesthesia, which is required for the bone marrow aspiration. During

  10. Efficacy, safety and proper dose analysis of PEGylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as support for dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy in node positive Chinese breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Fan; LingHu, RuiXia; Zhan, XingYang; Li, Ruisheng; Feng, Fan; Gao, Xudong; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Junlan

    2017-01-01

    For high-risk breast cancer patients with positive axillary lymph nodes, dose-dense every-two-week epirubicin/cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel (ddEC-P) regimen is the optimal postoperative adjuvant therapy. However, this regimen is limited by the grade 3/4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia (FN). There is an urgent need to explore the efficacy, safety and proper dosage of PEGylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF) as support for ddEC-P in Chinese breast cancer patients with posit...

  11. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on murine thymic emigration and subsets reconstitution after a sublethal dose of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongxia; Guo Mei; Sun Xuedong; Ai Huisheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on murine thymic emigration and subsets reconstitution after a sublethal dose of irradiation. Methods: Female BALB/c mice were irradiated with a 6.0 Gy of γ-ray total-body irradiation and then randomly divided into GCSF group and control group. For mice in the GCSF group, recombinant human G-CSF 100 μg · kg -1 · d -1 was injected subcutaneously once daily for 14 continuous days and mice in the control group were given the same volume of phosphate buffered solution (PBS). At 7, 14, 21 and 28 days later, mice were killed and thymus mononuclear cell suspension were analyzed by flow cytometry for the percentage of the four stages of thymic CD4 - CD8 - double negative cells (DN1-4) and the CD4 + CD8 + double positive ( CD4 + CD8 + DP), CD4 + CD8 - single positive (CD4 + SP), CD4 - CD8 + single positive cells (CD8 + SP).Real-time PCR was used for detection and quantitation of murine T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs) of the thymic cells of 30 and 60 d after irradiation. Results: The percentage of thymic DN1 cells in GCSF group was significantly higher than that of the control group 7 d after irradiation (t=9.59, P<0.05). 21 d later, the proportion of thymic DN3 and DN4 cells were higher than those of the control group (t=16.37, 7.6, P<0.05). The percentage of thymic CD4 + CD8 + DP cells decreased 7 d after irradiation,increased at 14 d, decreased again at 21 days,and then got a permanent recover. The percentage of thymic CD4 + CD8 + DP cells in the GCSF group recovered to normal and was significantly higher than that of the control group 28 days after irradiation (t=12.22, P<0.05). The percentage of thymic CD8 + SP cells of the GCSF group was significantly higher than that of the control group 21 d after irradiation (t=3.77, P<0.05), while G-CSF had no obvious influence on the percentage of the thymic CD4 + SP cells. The sjTRECs copies in the

  12. [Effect of lipopolysaccharides from Porphyromonas endodontalis on the expression of macrophage colony stimulating factor in mouse osteoblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yaqiong; Qiu, Lihong; Guo, Jiajie; Qu, Liu; Xu, Liya; Zhong, Ming

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effects of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from Porphyromonas endodontalis (Pe) on the expression of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) mRNA and protein in MC3T3-E1 cells and the role of nucler factor-κB (NF-κB) in the process. MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pe-LPS (0-50 mg/L) and 10 mg/L Pe-LPS for different hours (0-24 h). The expression of M-CSF mRNA and protein was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunoadsordent assay (ELISA). The cells untreated by Pe-LPS served as control. The expression of M- CSF mRNA and protein was also detected in 10 mg/L Pe- LPS treated MC3T3-E1 cells after pretreated with BAY 11-7082 for 1 h, a special NF-κB inhibitor. The groups were divided as follows, control group, BAY group (10 µmol/L BAY 11-7082 treated alone MC3T3-E1 cells), Pe-LPS group (10 mg/L Pe-LPS stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells for 6 h), BAY combine with Pe-LPS group (10 µmol/L BAY 11-7082 pretreated cells for 1 h and 10 mg/L of Pe-LPS stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells for 6 h). The level of M- CSF mRNA and protein increased significantly after treatment with different concentrations of Pe-LPS (0-50 mg/L), which indicated that Pe-LPS induced osteoblasts to express M-CSF mRNA and protein in dose dependent manners. The expression of M-CSF protein increased from (35 ± 2) ng/L (control group) to (170 ± 8) ng/L (50 mg/L group). Maximal induction of M-CSF mRNA expression was found in the MC3T3- E1 cells treated with 10 mg/L Pe-LPS for 6 h. After 6 h, the expression of M-CSF mRNA decreased gradually. The expression of M-CSF protein also increased with the treatment of 10 mg/L Pe-LPS for 10 h [(122 ± 4) ng/L]. After 10 h, the expression of M-CSF protein decreased gradually. The mRNA and proteins of M-CSF decreased significantly after pretreatment with 10 µmol/L BAY 11-7082 for 1 h. There was no significant difference between BAY group and the control. Pe-LPS may induce

  13. Hsp27 regulates Akt activation and polymorphonuclear leukocyte apoptosis by scaffolding MK2 to Akt signal complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui; Kausar, Hina; Johnson, Paul; Montoya-Durango, Diego E; Merchant, Michael; Rane, Madhavi J

    2007-07-27

    We have shown previously that Akt exists in a signal complex with p38 MAPK, MAPK-activated protein kinase-2 (MK2), and heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) and MK2 phosphorylates Akt on Ser-473. Additionally, dissociation of Hsp27 from Akt, prior to Akt activation, induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) apoptosis. However, the role of Hsp27 in regulating Akt activation was not examined. This study tested the hypothesis that Hsp27 regulates Akt activation and promotes cell survival by scaffolding MK2 to the Akt signal complex. Here we show that loss of Akt/Hsp27 interaction by anti-Hsp27 antibody treatment resulted in loss of Akt/MK2 interaction, loss of Akt-Ser-473 phosphorylation, and induced PMN apoptosis. Transfection of myristoylated Akt (AktCA) in HK-11 cells induced Akt-Ser-473 phosphorylation, activation, and Hsp27-Ser-82 phosphorylation. Cotransfection of AktCA with Hsp27 short interfering RNA, but not scrambled short interfering RNA, silenced Hsp27 expression, without altering Akt expression in HK-11 cells. Silencing Hsp27 expression inhibited Akt/MK2 interaction, inhibited Akt phosphorylation and Akt activation, and induced HK-11 cell death. Deletion mutagenesis studies identified acidic linker region (amino acids 117-128) on Akt as an Hsp27 binding region. Deletion of amino acids 117-128 on Akt resulted in loss of its interaction with Hsp27 and MK2 but not with Hsp90 as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase pulldown studies. Co-transfection studies demonstrated that constitutively active MK2 (MK2EE) phosphorylated Aktwt (wild type) on Ser-473 but failed to phosphorylate Akt(Delta117-128) mutant in transfixed cells. These studies collectively define a novel role of Hsp27 in regulating Akt activation and cellular apoptosis by mediating interaction between Akt and its upstream activator MK2.

  14. [Mechanisms of leukocyte formation of endogenous pyrogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybakina, E G; Sorokin, A V

    1982-06-01

    A study was made of the kinetics of endogenous pyrogen production by rabbit blood and exudate leukocytes and possible role played by the products of activated leukocytes in autoregulation of the process. It was established that accumulation of endogenous pyrogen in the cell precedes its release by stimulated cells. Then the processes of active pyrogen formation and release gel interdependent: pyrogen formed releases from the cell; the lowering of pyrogen concentration in the cell is accompanied by the decrease of its content in the medium. No stimulating effect of the products activated during leukocyte inflammation on pyrogen formation by blood leukocytes was discovered.

  15. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isik, Gözde; van Montfort, Thijs; Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env

  16. Native low-density lipoprotein uptake by macrophage colony-stimulating factor-differentiated human macrophages is mediated by macropinocytosis and micropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzinger, Joshua J; Chang, Janet; Xu, Qing; Buono, Chiara; Li, Yifu; Leyva, Francisco J; Park, Bum-Chan; Greene, Lois E; Kruth, Howard S

    2010-10-01

    To examine the pinocytotic pathways mediating native low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake by human macrophage colony-stimulating factor-differentiated macrophages (the predominant macrophage phenotype in human atherosclerotic plaques). We identified the kinase inhibitor SU6656 and the Rho GTPase inhibitor toxin B as inhibitors of macrophage fluid-phase pinocytosis of LDL. Assessment of macropinocytosis by time-lapse microscopy revealed that both drugs almost completely inhibited macropinocytosis, although LDL uptake and cholesterol accumulation by macrophages were only partially inhibited (approximately 40%) by these agents. Therefore, we investigated the role of micropinocytosis in mediating LDL uptake in macrophages and identified bafilomycin A1 as an additional partial inhibitor (approximately 40%) of macrophage LDL uptake that targeted micropinocytosis. When macrophages were incubated with both bafilomycin A1 and SU6656, inhibition of LDL uptake was additive (reaching 80%), showing that these inhibitors target different pathways. Microscopic analysis of fluid-phase uptake pathways in these macrophages confirmed that LDL uptake occurs through both macropinocytosis and micropinocytosis. Our findings show that human macrophage colony-stimulating factor-differentiated macrophages take up native LDL by macropinocytosis and micropinocytosis, underscoring the importance of both pathways in mediating LDL uptake by these cells.

  17. A randomized case-controlled study of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor for the treatment of sepsis in preterm neutropenic infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktaş, Doğukan; Demirel, Bilge; Gürsoy, Tuğba; Ovalı, Fahri

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to treat sepsis in neutropenic preterm infants. Fifty-six neutropenic preterm infants with suspected or culture-proven sepsis hospitalized in Zeynep Kamil Maternity and Children's Educational and Training Hospital, Kozyatağı/Istanbul, Turkey between January 2008 and January 2010 were enrolled. Patients were randomized either to receive rhG-CSF plus empirical antibiotics (Group I) or empirical antibiotics alone (Group II). Clinical features were recorded. Daily complete blood count was performed until neutropenia subsided. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5. Thirty-three infants received rhG-CSF plus antibiotic treatment and 23 infants received antibiotic treatment. No drug-related adverse event was recorded. Absolute neutrophil count values were significantly higher on the 2(nd) study day and 3(rd) study day in Group I. Short-term mortality did not differ between the groups. Treatment with rhG-CSF resulted in a more rapid recovery of ANC in neutropenic preterm infants. However, no reduction in short-term mortality was documented. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule expression in oral squamus cell carcinoma and its association with clinical and histopathologic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Mirmohammadkhani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the present research was to study the expression of activated-leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM in oral squamus cell carcinoma (OSCC and its association with histopathological and prognostic parameters.Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, samples of OSCC tumors from tongue and oral mucosa available in Institute of Cancer of Imam Hospital in Tehran were simultaneously studied in term of tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and differentiation and ALCAM expression. Analysis was performed using multiple logistic regression models. Results: 39 samples of tongue and 19 samples of oral medusa belonged to 35 men and 23 women with mean (Standard deviation of age 58(15.69 years of old were studied. More than half of lesions had good differentiation and lymph node metastasis. From all, 42 (72.4% of samples were positive of ALCAM. Odds of ALCAM total expression in tumors with size of at least 20 mm was more (OR=3.9, p=0.001. Odds ratios for membranous and cytoplasmic expression of ALCAM in positive samples of lymph node metastasis (OR=0.4, p=0.03 and in patients with age 40 and more (OR=2.7, p=0.002 were respectively significant.Conclusion: The study confirmed positive relationship between ALCAM expression and tumor size as while as ambiguity of ALCAM role as a "Paradox" indicator. Next researches may make the role of ALCAM in different phases of tumor developing clearer

  19. Purification of the active C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes as a receptor - G sub i complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollins, T.E.; Siciliano, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Cianciarulo, D.N.; Bonilla-Argudo, V.; Collier, K.; Springer, M.S. (Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Lab., Rahway, NJ (United States))

    1991-02-01

    The authors have isolated, in an active state, the C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The purification was achieved in a single step using a C5a affinity column in which the C5a molecule was coupled to the resin through its N terminus. The purified receptor, like the crude solubilized molecule, exhibited a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a K{sub d} of 30 pM. Further, the binding of C5a retained its sensitivity to guanine nucleotides, implying that the purified receptor contained a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). SDS/PAGE revealed the presence of three polypeptides with molecular masses of 42, 40, and 36 kDa, which were determined to be the C5a-binding subunit and the {alpha} and {beta} subunits of G{sub i}, respectively. The 36- and 40-kDa polypeptides were identified by immunoblotting and by the ability of pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate the 40-kDa molecule. These results confirm their earlier hypothesis that the receptor exists as a complex with a G protein in the presence or absence of C5a. The tight coupling between the receptor and G protein should make possible the identification of the G protein(s) involved in the transduction pathways used by C5a to produce its many biological effects.

  20. Purification of the active C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes as a receptor - Gi complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollins, T.E.; Siciliano, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Cianciarulo, D.N.; Bonilla-Argudo, V.; Collier, K.; Springer, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have isolated, in an active state, the C5a receptor from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The purification was achieved in a single step using a C5a affinity column in which the C5a molecule was coupled to the resin through its N terminus. The purified receptor, like the crude solubilized molecule, exhibited a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a K d of 30 pM. Further, the binding of C5a retained its sensitivity to guanine nucleotides, implying that the purified receptor contained a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). SDS/PAGE revealed the presence of three polypeptides with molecular masses of 42, 40, and 36 kDa, which were determined to be the C5a-binding subunit and the α and β subunits of G i , respectively. The 36- and 40-kDa polypeptides were identified by immunoblotting and by the ability of pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate the 40-kDa molecule. These results confirm their earlier hypothesis that the receptor exists as a complex with a G protein in the presence or absence of C5a. The tight coupling between the receptor and G protein should make possible the identification of the G protein(s) involved in the transduction pathways used by C5a to produce its many biological effects

  1. Identification of a new adapter protein that may link the common beta subunit of the receptor for granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin (IL)-3, and IL-5 to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jücker, M; Feldman, R A

    1995-11-17

    Binding of human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) to its receptor induces the rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI 3-kinase). As hGM-CSF receptor (hGMR) does not contain a consensus sequence for binding of PI 3-kinase, hGMR must use a distinct mechanism for its association with and activation of PI 3-kinase. Here, we describe the identification of a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein of 76-85 kDa (p80) that associates with the common beta subunit of hGMR and with the SH2 domains of the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase in hGM-CSF-stimulated cells. Src/Yes and Lyn were tightly associated with the p80.PI 3-kinase complex, suggesting that p80 and other phosphotyrosyl proteins present in the complex were phosphorylated by Src family kinases. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p80 was only detected in hGM-CSF or human interleukin-3-stimulated cells, suggesting that activation of p80 might be specific for signaling via the common beta subunit. We postulate that p80 functions as an adapter protein that may participate in linking the hGM-CSF receptor to the PI 3-kinase signaling pathway.

  2. A leukocyte activation test identifies food items which induce release of DNA by innate immune peripheral blood leucocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martinez, Irma; Weiss, Theresa R; Yousaf, Muhammad N; Ali, Ather; Mehal, Wajahat Z

    2018-01-01

    Leukocyte activation (LA) testing identifies food items that induce a patient specific cellular response in the immune system, and has recently been shown in a randomized double blinded prospective study to reduce symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We hypothesized that test reactivity to particular food items, and the systemic immune response initiated by these food items, is due to the release of cellular DNA from blood immune cells. We tested this by quantifying total DNA concentration in the cellular supernatant of immune cells exposed to positive and negative foods from 20 healthy volunteers. To establish if the DNA release by positive samples is a specific phenomenon, we quantified myeloperoxidase (MPO) in cellular supernatants. We further assessed if a particular immune cell population (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) was activated by the positive food items by flow cytometry analysis. To identify the signaling pathways that are required for DNA release we tested if specific inhibitors of key signaling pathways could block DNA release. Foods with a positive LA test result gave a higher supernatant DNA content when compared to foods with a negative result. This was specific as MPO levels were not increased by foods with a positive LA test. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors resulted in inhibition of positive food stimulated DNA release. Positive foods resulted in CD63 levels greater than negative foods in eosinophils in 76.5% of tests. LA test identifies food items that result in release of DNA and activation of peripheral blood innate immune cells in a PKC dependent manner, suggesting that this LA test identifies food items that result in release of inflammatory markers and activation of innate immune cells. This may be the basis for the improvement in symptoms in IBS patients who followed an LA test guided diet.

  3. A Metabolic Biofuel Cell: Conversion of Human Leukocyte Metabolic Activity to Electrical Currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui X Tracy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC for biofuel cell (BFC applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient, a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL, and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents.

  4. One-year follow-up of the phagocytic activity of leukocytes after exposure of rats to asbestos and basalt fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurbánková, M

    1994-01-01

    The phagocytic activity of leukocytes in peripheral blood was investigated after 2, 24, and 48 hr; 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks; and 6 and 12 months following intraperitoneal administration of asbestos and basalt fibers to Wistar rats. Asbestos and basalt fibers differed in their effects on the parameters studied. Both granulocyte count and phagocytic activity of leukocytes during the 1-year dynamic follow-up in both dust-exposed groups of animals changed in two phases, characterized by the initial stimulation of the acute phase I, followed by the suppression of the parameters in the chronic phase II. Exposure to asbestos and basalt fibers led, in phase II, to impairment of the phagocytic activity of granulocytes. Asbestos fibers also significantly decreased phagocytic activity of monocytes. Exposure to basalt fibers did not affect the phagocytic activity of monocytes in phase II. Results suggest that the monocytic component of leukocytes plays an important role in the development of diseases caused by exposure to fibrous dusts, but basalt fibers have lesser biological effects than asbestos fibers. PMID:7882931

  5. Leukocyte adhesion deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vijver, Edith; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2013-01-01

    During inflammation, leukocytes play a key role in maintaining tissue homeostasis through elimination of pathogens and removal of damaged tissue. Leukocytes migrate to the site of inflammation by crawling over and through the blood vessel wall, into the tissue. Leukocyte adhesion deficiencies (ie,

  6. Recombinant Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (rGM-CSF) : A Review of its Pharmacological Properties and Prospective Role in the Management of Myelosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Susan M; Heel, Rennie C

    1992-04-01

    their use remain to be clarified. Nonetheless, as one of a small group of novel agents rGM-CSF has major potential in the management of myelosuppression secondary to cytoreductive therapy with or without bone marrow transplantation, and in amelioration of disturbed myelopoiesis. It represents an important application of biotechnology to a difficult area of therapeutics. Endogenous GM-CSF is produced by T-lymphocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, and participates both in the complex regulation of blood cell formation and in activation of mature leucocytes. It is a polypeptide which is variably glycosylated in its native state although the carbohydrate content is not essential for its biological effects, and the 3 available recombinant forms (which differ in extent of glycosylation) are similarly active in vivo. Proliferative activity and priming of mature cells are manifest at similar picomolar concentrations of GM-CSF, and it is the programming of the cell which appears to determine the response to binding of GM-CSF to its cell surface receptor. In concert with other colony-stimulating factors, GM-CSF facilitates lineage commitment and subsequently supports or amplifies the clonogenic activity of lineage-restricted factors, with the strongest effect seen on the granulocyte-macrophage lineage. A biphasic response was seen when rGM-CSF was administered in doses up to 1000 µg/m 2 /day or 60 µg/kg/day by subcutaneous or intravenous routes in phase I/II trials. Peripheral blood leucocyte counts decreased rapidly and profoundly secondary to sequestration within the lungs. Re-entry of these cells into the circulation restores counts to baseline in 2 to 4 hours and thereafter an increase in the proliferative fraction of haematopoietic cells in bone marrow probably accounts for the progressive rise in the number of neutrophils, eosinophils and monocytes. This effect is dose-proportional. GM-CSF stimulates proliferation of leukaemic progenitors from patients

  7. Ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract (UPLE, IMUNOR) potentiates hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of G-CSF in vitro and improves the outcome of treatment of hematopoietic radiation damage in mice with G-CSF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacek, Antonín; Hofer, Michal; Schneiderová, H.; Svoboda, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 4 (2005), s. 647-659 ISSN 0892-3973 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS5004009; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK5011112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract * Imunor * granulocyte colony-stimulating factor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.557, year: 2005

  8. Silicon-carbide coated coronary stents have low platelet and leukocyte adhesion during platelet activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monnink, SHJ; van Boven, AJ; Tigchelaar, [No Value; de Kam, PJ; Crijns, HJGM; van Oeveren, W

    Background: Stent thrombosis and restenosis are of great clinical significance. We constructed a closed loop in vitro heparinized whole human blood circulation model for testing hemocompatibility of coronary stents, This model allows evaluation of human blood activation by blood-stent interaction in

  9. Decreased plasma levels of soluble CD18 link leukocyte infiltration with disease activity in spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Jalilian, Babak; Hvid, Malene

    2014-01-01

    of arthritis patients to have anti-inflammatory functions. Here, we study the mechanisms for these alterations and their association with SpA disease activity. METHODS: Plasma levels of sCD18 in a study population with 84 SpA patients and matched healthy controls were analyzed with a time resolved......A patients compared with healthy volunteers (P levels in the HLA-B27-positive subgroup (P levels exhibited an inverse correlation with the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) (P level of morning...... immunoflourometric assay (TRIFMA). Binding of sCD18 to endothelial cells and fibroblast-like synovial cells (FLS) was studied with confocal microscopy. Shedding of CD18 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was studied with flow cytometry and TRIFMA. RESULTS: Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in Sp...

  10. Assay of the β-glucosidase activity with natural labelled and artificial substrates in leukocytes from homozygotes and heterozygotes with the Norrbottnian type (Type 3) of Gaucher disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svennerholm, L.; Haakansson, G.; Dreborg, S.

    1980-01-01

    Leukocytes were isolated from 14 patients (7 males and 7 females) with Gaucher disease of the Norrbottnian type (Type 3), 32 obligate heterozygotes (16 males and 16 females) for this disease and 20 controls (10 males and 10 females). After collection, the cells were transported in dry ice to the laboratory, where they were assayed. The assays were repeated after the cells had been stored for 12 months. β-Glucosidase activity was assayed with D-[glucose-U- 14 C]glucosylceramide at pH 5.8 with Cutscum-Na-cholate as a detergent and 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-glucoside at pH 4.1 with Triton-Na-taurocholate as a detergent. The activities of two marker enzymes, 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-galactosidase and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, were assayed in aliquots of the same leukocyte samples. (Auth.)

  11. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Aparecida de Brito Eid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G- CSF for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 µg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 µg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods: Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 - patients who received a single daily dose of 10 µg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 - patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 µg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results: Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3% for Group 10 and 36 (24.7% for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1-7 leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59 were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1-3 and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95. A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001. Conclusions: To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 µg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed.

  12. Expression Levels of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM/CD166 in Primary Breast Carcinoma and Distant Breast Cancer Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ihnen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM/CD166 gained increasing attention regarding tumorprogression and metastatic spread in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine ALCAM expression levels in primary breast cancer and distant metastases of the same patient within 29 autopsy cases to better understand the underlying mechanisms of metastases and the role of adhesion molecules in this process.

  13. Influence of indicators for thiotriazolin phagocytic activity of leukocytes in the blood in the later period of development of stomach ulcers against pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Furdychko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Important for the pathogenesis of pneumonia and gastric ulcers should state phagocytic activity of leukocytes (PHAL in the blood. In fact the state of nonspecific resistance factors to some extent depends on the disease, the development of complications, prognosis and therapy. Materials and methods. The study was conducted on 49 male guinea pigs. The experimental pneumonia caused by the method Shlyapnykova V. N., Solodova T. L., gastric ulcer simulated method Komarov V. I. Nonspecific resistance of animals we evaluated, examining the phagocytic activity of leukocytes (PHAL, nitroblue tetrazolium test (NST- test. Phagocytic activity of leukocytes (PHAL in blood were studied in terms phagocytic index (PHI and the phagocytic number (PHN and determined by the method Menshikov V. V. NST - test method Vyksmana M. E., Mayanskoho A. H. The figures research results processed by statistical method Student. Results and discussion. For the experiment, we selected two models of disease: experimental pneumonia (EP and peptic ulcer (PU. State PHAL determined by the level of phagocytic number (PHN, phagocytic index (PHI, NST-test levels in the ЕP+ PU. Found that in the 10-th and 18-th day of development of pathological process both in the stomach and the lungs of guinea pigs, there was reduction of PHI respectively 15,8% (P

  14. Nicotine can skew the characterization of the macrophage type-1 (M{Phi}1) phenotype differentiated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to the M{Phi}2 phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagita, Manabu; Kobayashi, Ryohei [Department of Periodontology, Division of Oral Biology and Disease Control, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Murakami, Shinya, E-mail: ipshinya@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Division of Oral Biology and Disease Control, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-10-09

    Macrophages (M{Phi}s) exhibit functional heterogeneity and plasticity in the local microenvironment. Recently, it was reported that M{Phi}s can be divided into proinflammatory M{Phi}s (M{Phi}1) and anti-inflammatory M{Phi}s (M{Phi}2) based on their polarized functional properties. Here, we report that nicotine, the major ingredient of cigarette smoke, can modulate the characteristics of M{Phi}1. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-driven M{Phi}1 with nicotine (Ni-M{Phi}1) showed the phenotypic characteristics of M{Phi}2. Like M{Phi}2, Ni-M{Phi}1 exhibited antigen-uptake activities. Ni-M{Phi}1 suppressed IL-12, but maintained IL-10 and produced high amounts of MCP-1 upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation compared with M{Phi}1. Moreover, we observed strong proliferative responses of T cells to lipopolysaccharide-stimulated M{Phi}1, whereas Ni-M{Phi}1 reduced T cell proliferation and inhibited IFN-{gamma} production by T cells. These results suggest that nicotine can change the functional characteristics of M{Phi} and skew the M{Phi}1 phenotype to M{Phi}2. We propose that nicotine is a potent regulator that modulates immune responses in microenvironments.

  15. Substance P enhances tissue factor release from granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent macrophages via the p22phox/β-arrestin 2/Rho A signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces procoagulant activity of macrophages. Tissue factor (TF) is a membrane-bound glycoprotein and substance P (SP) is a pro-inflammatory neuropeptide involved in the formation of membrane blebs. This study investigated the role of SP in TF release by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. SP significantly decreased TF levels in whole-cell lysates of GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. TF was detected in the culture supernatant by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after stimulation of macrophages by SP. Aprepitant (an SP/neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist) reduced TF release from macrophages stimulated with SP. Pretreatment of macrophages with a radical scavenger(pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) also limited the decrease of TF in whole-cell lysates after stimulation with SP. A protein kinase C inhibitor (rottlerin) partially blocked this macrophage response to SP, while it was significantly inhibited by a ROCK inhibitor (Y-27632) or a dynamin inhibitor (dinasore). An Akt inhibitor (perifosine) also partially blocked this response. Furthermore, siRNA targeting p22phox, β-arrestin 2, or Rho A, blunted the release of TF from macrophages stimulated with SP. In other experiments, visceral adipocytes derived from cryopreserved preadipocytes were found to produce SP. In conclusion, SP enhances the release of TF from macrophages via the p22phox/β-arrestin 2/Rho A signaling pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte interaction in dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Amelia; Leisewitz, Andrew L; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri

    2015-01-01

    EDTA as anticoagulant. Activated platelets and PLA formation were detected by measuring surface expression of P-selectin (CD62P) on platelets, monocytes and neutrophils. Of the Babesia-infected dogs, 29 survived and seven died. The percentage of CD62P-positive monocytes was significantly higher (P = 0.......036) in the Babesia-infected dogs (54%) than in healthy control dogs (35.3%). However, there were no significant differences between the Babesia-infected and control groups for CD62P-positive platelets (4.9% and 1.2%, respectively) and CD62P-positive neutrophils (28.3% and 17.9%, respectively). The percentage of CD62...... groups for the percentage of CD62P-positive platelets (survivors 4.8%; non-survivors 5.3%; controls 1.2%) or CD62P-positive neutrophils (survivors 31.6%; non-survivors 5.6%; controls 17.9%). In conclusion, Babesia-infected dogs, specifically dogs that survived, had a significantly increased percentage...

  17. Recycling of CR1 by phorbol ester-activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malbran, A.; Frank, M.M.; Fries, L.

    1986-01-01

    PMN CR1 is internalized when these cells are stimulated with phorbol esters. To elucidate the fate of these receptors and ligand bound to them, the authors studied the uptake and disposition of 125 I-C3b by phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu)-treated PMN. C3b monomers bind to PDBu-treated PMN with a K(d) of 4.75 +/- 1.06 x 1 -8 M at 0 0 C in reduced ionic strength. This C3b remains almost entirely dissociable by high ionic strength buffer unless the cells are warmed. At 37 0 C, PDBu-treated PMN internalize monomer C3b into a non-strippable pool, reaching a plateau level of approx. 50% of bound ligand. Exocytosis of the internalized C3b was studied by washing the PMN in cold PBS, then rewarming to 37 0 . A progressive release of internalized C3b is observed, with kinetics similar to internalization and reaching a plateau of 48 +/- 4.2% at 15 minutes. Released C3b is precipitable by 10% TCA, suggesting that release does not require passage through the lysosomal compartment. PMN preloaded with 1mM chloroquine behave identically in the exocytosis phase, supporting this hypothesis. The non-recycling pool of 125 I-C3b is stable for at least 30 minutes at 37 0 . Uptake of chemically cross-linked C3b dimers by PMN is followed by slower and less complete exocytosis of internal counts, suggesting diversion into the non-releaseable pool. Activated PMN CR1 is partially recycled via a prelysosomal compartment. Minimal cross-linking shifts receptor-ligand complexes into a non-recycling, possibly lysosomal, pool

  18. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF RECOMBINANT HUMAN GRANULOCYTIC COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR IN TREATMENT OF GRANULOCYTOPENIA DEVELOPED DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of patients with severe clinical course of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is difficult problem. During the last years genetically engineered biological drugs are used equally with traditional immunosuppressive agents in treatment of severe forms of juvenile arthritis. High effectiveness of these drugs can be accompanied with development of unfavorable effects, for example, febrile neutropenia. The article presents results of a study of effectiveness and safety of recombinant human granulocytic colony-stimulating factor — filgrastim (Leucostim — in treatment of granulocytopenia developed during immunosuppressive therapy in 16 patients with JRA. It was shown that administration of filgrastim arrests leucopenia in 100% of patients and granulocytopenia — in 93% of patients in 24 hours after first injection. High effectiveness of drug was combined with good tolerability and safety.Key words: children, treatment, granulocytopenia, filgrastim, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(4:94-100

  19. X-ray-induced production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by mouse spleen cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoda, M.; Shinoda, M.; Tsuneoka, K.; Shikita, M.

    1980-01-01

    Spleen cells were collected from normal mice and cultured in a medium containing 20% calf serum. Addition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the culture significantly increased the production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and a maximum induction was attained in 5 days. Irradiation of the spleen cells with 300 to 3000 R x rays also enhanced the production of GM-CSF, but there was a latent period of about 5 days before the factor appeared in the culture medium. The observed difference between LPS and x rays in the timing of inducing GM-CSF production in the spleen cell culture was consistent with the difference observed in animals. These results suggest that different mechanisms of GM-CSF production operate in the spleen in response to either LPS or x rays

  20. Febrile Neutropenia Risk Assessment and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Support in Patients with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Receiving R-CHOP Regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salar, Antonio; Haioun, Corinne; Rossi, Francesca Gaia

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ASCO and EORTC guidelines recommend granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) primary prophylaxis for cancer patients with a ≥20% overall risk of febrile neutropenia (FN), and to support delivery of dose-dense regimens. CHOP-like regimens (with rituximab [R]) are the current...... standard of care for the management of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but they are often associated with significant myelosuppression. Neutropenic events, particularly febrile neutropenia (FN), can be life-threatening and may lead to dose delays or reductions that compromise the efficacy......-CSF primary prophylaxis. Across all cycles, 29% of R-CHOP-21 patients had an unplanned hospitalization, with neutropenia/FN being the main reason. Subsequently, 67% of patients achieved a relative dose intensity (RDI) of ≥90% of their planned treatment (with respect to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin...

  1. Percutaneous implantation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells mobilized with granulocyte colony stimulating factor in osteoarthritis of the knee. First case reported in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baganet Cobas, Aymara Maria; Hernandez Ramirez, Porfirio; Fernandez Delgado, Norma

    2010-01-01

    The degenerative joint disease, also known as osteoarthrosis affects to 10% of elderlies aged 60. It is mainly characterized by pain in the involved joint, crepitation, morning stiff and a progressive limitation of movement of that joint leading to a partial or total wear of articular cartilage. The treatment of the knee osteoarthrosis is a great challenge. The recent advances in use of regenerative medicine suggest that adult stem cells could represent a promisor alternative in the treatment of this entity. In a female patient aged 61 presenting with knee osteoarthrosis authors placed a percutaneous implant of autologous mononuclear cells mobilized to peripheral blood by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor achieving a fast clinical and radiological improvement. This result suggests that the procedure used is a feasible, simple, safe and less expensive method for treatment of articular degenerative lesions

  2. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    KAUST Repository

    Sugumar, Thennarasu; Ganesan, Pugalenthi; Harishankar, Murugesan; Dhinakar Raj, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    KAUST Repository

    Sugumar, Thennarasu

    2013-06-25

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Biologic role of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule overexpression in breast cancer cell lines and clinical tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Sibyll; Müller, Volkmar; Köhler, Nadine; Wikman, Harriet; Krenkel, Sylke; Streichert, Thomas; Schweizer, Michaela; Riethdorf, Sabine; Assmann, Volker; Ihnen, Maike; Beck, Katrin; Issa, Rana; Jänicke, Fritz; Pantel, Klaus; Milde-Langosch, Karin

    2011-09-01

    The activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is overexpressed in many mammary tumors, but controversial results about its role and prognostic impact in breast cancer have been reported. Therefore, we evaluated the biologic effects of ALCAM expression in two breast cancer cell lines and a larger cohort of mammary carcinomas. By stable transfections, MCF7 cells with ALCAM overexpression and MDA-MB231 cells with reduced ALCAM levels were generated and analyzed in functional assays and cDNA microarrays. In addition, an immunohistochemical study on 347 patients with breast cancer with long-term follow-up and analysis of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) was performed. In both cell lines, high ALCAM expression was associated with reduced cell motility. In addition, ALCAM silencing in MDA-MB231 cells resulted in lower invasive potential, whereas high ALCAM expression was associated with increased apoptosis in both cell lines. Among genes which were differentially expressed in clones with altered ALCAM expression, there was an overlap of 15 genes between both cell lines, among them cathepsin D, keratin 7, gelsolin, and ets2 whose deregulation was validated by western blot analysis. In MDA-MB231 cells, we observed a correlation with VEGF expression which was validated by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). Our IHC results on primary breast carcinomas showed that ALCAM expression was associated with an estrogen receptor-positive phenotype. In addition, strong ALCAM immunostaining correlated with nodal involvement and the presence of tumor cells in bone marrow. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, strong ALCAM expression in ductal carcinomas correlated with shorter recurrence-free intervals (P=0.048) and overall survival (OAS, P=0.003). Our results indicate that the biologic role of ALCAM in breast cancer is complex, but overexpression might be relevant for outcome in ductal carcinomas.

  5. Neutrophil-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium is facilitated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of different cytokines that are present in tumour-conditioned medium on human neutrophil (PMN)-induced tumour cell transmigration. DESIGN: Laboratory study. SETTING: University hospital, Ireland. MATERIAL: Isolated human PMN and cultured human breast tumour cell line, MDA-MB-231. Interventions: Human PMN treated with either tumour-conditioned medium or different media neutralised with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), and MDA-MB-231 cells were plated on macrovascular and microvascular endothelial monolayers in collagen-coated transwells to assess migration of tumour cells. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cytokines present in tumour-conditioned medium, PMN cytocidal function and receptor expression, and tumour cell transmigration. RESULTS: tumour-conditioned medium contained high concentrations of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and interleukin 8 (IL-8), but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3). Anti-GM-CSF MoAb significantly reduced PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05), whereas anti-VEGF and anti-IL-8 MoAbs did not affect their migration. In addition, anti-GM-CSF MoAb, but not anti-VEGF or anti-IL-8 MoAb, reduced PMN CD11b and CD18 overexpression induced by tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the GM-CSF that is present in tumour-conditioned medium may be involved, at least in part, in alterations in PMN function mediated by the medium and subsequently PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells.

  6. A novel activating chicken IgY FcR is related to leukocyte receptor complex (LRC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viertlboeck, B.C.; Schmitt, R.; Hanczaruk, M.A.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Gobel, T.W.

    2009-01-01

    FcRs have multifaceted roles in the immune system. Chicken FcRs were demonstrated on macrophages decades ago; however, only recently the chicken Ig-like receptor AB1, encoded in the leukocyte receptor complex, was molecularly identified as a high-affinity FcR. The present study was initiated to

  7. Determining the specific activity of thymidine phosphorylase in leukocytes of patients with MNGIE and the plasma thymidine level by RP-HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaei Sh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Thymidine phosphorylase (TP catalyses the conversion of thymidine into thymine. Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE is an autosomal recessive disease which is caused by mutations in the nuclear gene encoding TP, bringing about severe impairment of TP-enzyme specific activity and accumulation of thymidine in plasma. The clinical manifestations of MNGIE are recognizable and homogenous, but not in the early stages of the disease. In patients who are suspected of having MNGIE, determination of TP-specific activity in leukocytes and thymidine levels in plasma are diagnostic. The methods that are usually used for the measurement of TP activity and plasma thymidine are not rapid or accurate enough and lack sensitivity."n "nMethods: The specific activity of TP was measured by RP-HPLC in leukocytes of both the controls and the patients exhibiting clinical features suggestive of MNGIE. Moreover, plasma thymidine was assessed by the same method."n "nResults: The patients had detectable plasma thymidine (>3 µmol/L but it was undetectable in the healthy controls. The patients' TP-specific activity decreased to less than 5% relative to the controls (14±4 nmol/h/mg vs. 525±165 nmol/h/mg, P<0.05. A diagnostic algorithm for the definitive diagnosis of MNGIE is suggestible based on the results of this study which relies on the measurement of plasma thymidine, TP-specific activity in leukocytes, or both."n "nConclusion: In this study, we set up a sensitive and rapid assay for the evaluation of TP-specific activity by using RP-HPLC in Iran. In addition, we established reference values for TP-specific activity and plasma thymidine in the Iranian patients.

  8. Chemotaxis of nurse shark leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenauf, S D; Smith, S H

    1985-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the ability of leukocytes from the nurse shark to migrate in an in vitro micropore filter chemotaxis assay and to determine optimal assay conditions and suitable attractants for such an assay. A migratory response was seen with several attractants: activated rat serum, activated shark plasma, and a pool of shark complement components. Only the response to activated rat serum was chemotactic, as determined by the checkerboard assay.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase content and activity in low-platelet, low-leukocyte and high-platelet, high-leukocyte platelet rich plasma (PRP) and the biologic response to PRP by human ligament fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifer, Matthew A; Maerz, Tristan; Baker, Kevin C; Anderson, Kyle

    2014-05-01

    Recent work has shown the presence of catabolic cytokines in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), but little is known about endogenous catabolic proteases such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Hypothesis/ To quantify MMP content in 2 commercially available PRP preparation systems: Arthrex Double Syringe System autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) and Biomet GPS (GPS). The hypothesis was that MMPs are actively secreted from PRP immediately after preparation. Controlled laboratory study. PRP was prepared using either ACP (low platelet, low leukocyte) or GPS (high platelet, high leukocyte). MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 concentrations were measured using multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for up to 6 days in 2 donors, and MMP activity was measured in 3 donors using kinetic activity kits able to detect the enzymatic cleavage of a fluorogenic peptide. Human ligament fibroblasts were cultured and exposed to both ACP and GPS from 1 donor each. MMP-2, -3, and -9 concentrations were assayed in culture media at 24 and 48 hours after exposure. GPS exhibited higher total MMP-2, -3, and -9 concentrations for up to 144 hours of release, while ACP had higher platelet-normalized MMP-2 and MMP-3 concentrations. GPS had significantly higher total and endogenous MMP-2 activity (P = .004 and .014, respectively), MMP-3 activity (P = .020 and .015, respectively), and MMP-9 activity (P = .004 and .002, respectively) compared with ACP. Once normalized to platelet count, differences in MMP activity were not significant between ACP and GPS. Compared with controls, cells stimulated with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and treated with ACP showed significantly higher fold changes of MMP-2 (P = .001) and MMP-3 (P = .003) concentrations at 24 hours than did cells treated with GPS. Total MMP-9 content was higher in the media of GPS-treated, IL-1β-stimulated cells compared with ACP-treated cells (P = .001). At 48 hours, IL-1β-stimulated cells treated with GPS exhibited higher fold changes of MMP-2

  10. Morus alba and active compound oxyresveratrol exert anti-inflammatory activity via inhibition of leukocyte migration involving MEK/ERK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ching; Tien, Yin-Jing; Chen, Chun-Houh; Beltran, Francesca N; Amor, Evangeline C; Wang, Ran-Juh; Wu, Den-Jen; Mettling, Clément; Lin, Yea-Lih; Yang, Wen-Chin

    2013-02-23

    Morus alba has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat inflammatory diseases; however, the scientific basis for such usage and the mechanism of action are not well understood. This study investigated the action of M. alba on leukocyte migration, one key step in inflammation. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and cluster analyses of supercritical CO2 extracts of three Morus species were performed for chemotaxonomy-aided plant authentication. Phytochemistry and CXCR4-mediated chemotaxis assays were used to characterize the chemical and biological properties of M. alba and its active compound, oxyresveratrol. fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and Western blot analyses were conducted to determine the mode of action of oxyresveratrol. Chemotaxonomy was used to help authenticate M. alba. Chemotaxis-based isolation identified oxyresveratrol as an active component in M. alba. Phytochemical and chemotaxis assays showed that the crude extract, ethyl acetate fraction and oxyresveratrol from M. alba suppressed cell migration of Jurkat T cells in response to SDF-1. Mechanistic study indicated that oxyresveratrol diminished CXCR4-mediated T-cell migration via inhibition of the MEK/ERK signaling cascade. A combination of GC-MS and cluster analysis techniques are applicable for authentication of the Morus species. Anti-inflammatory benefits of M. alba and its active compound, oxyresveratrol, may involve the inhibition of CXCR-4-mediated chemotaxis and MEK/ERK pathway in T and other immune cells.

  11. Increased production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in Crohn's disease--a possible target for infliximab treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agnholt, Jørgen; Kelsen, Jens; Brandsborg, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    The presence of neutrophils among epithelial cells is one of the major features of the inflammation in Crohn's disease, and has been used to indicate disease activity. The survival of neutrophils outside the blood vessels is limited and their longevity is influenced by granulocyte-macrophage colo...

  12. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor-primed Bone Marrow: An Excellent Stem-cell Source for Transplantation in Acute Myelocytic Leukemia and Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steady-state bone marrow (SS-BM and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor-primed BM/peripheral blood stem-cell (G-BM/G-PBSC are the main stem-cell sources used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Here, we evaluated the treatment effects of SS-BM and G-BM/G-PBSC in human leucocyte antigen (HLA-identical sibling transplantation. Methods: A total of 226 patients (acute myelogenous leukemia-complete remission 1, chronic myelogenous leukemia-chronic phase 1 received SS-BM, G-BM, or G-PBSC from an HLA-identical sibling. Clinical outcomes (graft-versus-host disease [GVHD], overall survival, transplant-related mortality [TRM], and leukemia-free survival [LFS] were analyzed. Results: When compared to SS-BM, G-BM gave faster recovery time to neutrophil or platelet (P 0.05. Conclusions: G-CSF-primed bone marrow shared the advantages of G-PBSC and SS-BM. We conclude that G-BM is an excellent stem-cell source that may be preferable to G-PBSC or SS-BM in patients receiving HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  13. The Effect of Recombinant Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor on Oral and Periodontal Manifestations in a Patient with Cyclic Neutropenia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Matarasso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic Neutropenia (CN is characterized by recurrent infections, fever, oral ulcerations, and severe periodontitis as result of the reduced host defences. The previous studies have established the effectiveness of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF to increase the number and the function of neutrophils in the peripheral blood in this disease. In a 20-year-old Caucasian female with a diagnosis of cyclic neutropenia, oral clinical examination revealed multiple painful ulcerations of the oral mucosa, poor oral hygiene conditions, marginal gingivitis, and moderate periodontitis. The patient received a treatment with G-CSF (Pegfilgrastim, 6 mg/month in order to improve her immunological status. Once a month nonsurgical periodontal treatment was carefully performed when absolute neutrophil count (ANC was ≥500/L. The treatment with G-CSF resulted in a rapid increase of circulating neutrophils that, despite its short duration, leaded to a reduction in infection related events and the resolution of the multiple oral ulcerations. The disappearance of oral pain allowed an efficacy nonsurgical treatment and a normal tooth brushing that determined a reduction of probing depth (PD≤4 mm and an improvement of the oral hygiene conditions recorded at 6-month follow-up.

  14. Effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin 6 on the growth of leukemic blasts in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, C J; Cheng, T Y; Chang, S L; Su, W J; Tseng, J Y

    1992-05-01

    We examined the stimulatory effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 6 (IL)-6 on the in vitro proliferation of leukemic blast cells from patients with acute leukemia. Bone marrow or peripheral blood leukemic blast cells were obtained from 21 patients, including 14 cases of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), four cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), two cases of acute undifferentiated leukemia, and one case of acute mixed-lineage leukemia. The proliferation of leukemic blast cells was evaluated by measuring the incorporation of 3H-thymidine into cells incubated with various concentrations of cytokines for 3 days. GM-CSF stimulated the DNA synthesis (with greater than 2.0 stimulation index) of blast cells in 9 of 14 (64%) AML cases, two cases of acute undifferentiated leukemia and one case of acute mixed-lineage leukemia. Only two cases of AML blasts responded to IL-6 to grow in the short-term suspension cultures. GM-CSF and IL-6 did not display a synergistic effect on the growth of leukemic cells. Moreover, GM-CSF and IL-6 did not stimulate the proliferation of ALL blast cells. Binding study also revealed the specific binding of GM-CSF on the blast cells of acute undifferentiated leukemia and acute mixed-lineage leukemia. Our results indicated that leukemic blast cells of acute undifferentiated leukemia and acute mixed-lineage leukemia possessed functional GM-CSF receptors.

  15. Hematological remission and long term hematological control of acute myeloblastic leukemia induced and maintained by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Luciana; Cunha, Manuel; Gonçalves, Cristina; Teixeira, Maria dos Anjos; Coutinho, Jorge; Ribeiro, António Carlos Pinto; Lima, Margarida

    2003-12-01

    We describe a case of a patient with CD34+, TdT+, CD13-, CD33-, MPO- undifferentiated acute leukemia who refused chemotherapy and who achieved complete hematological remission 14 months after the diagnosis, during a short course of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for neutropenia and life threatening infection. Relapse occurred approximately one year later and G-CSF was reintroduced, being maintained for 4 months, at a dose and frequency adapted to maintain normal blood counts, a complete hematological remission being achieved again. Five months after withdrawing the G-CSF therapy a second relapse was observed; G-CSF was tried again with success, resulting in a very good hematological response that was sustained by G-CSF maintenance therapy. One year latter there was the need of increasing the doses of G-CSF in order to obtain the same hematological effect, at same time blast cells acquired a more mature CD34+, TdT-, CD13+, CD33-, MPO+ myeloid phenotype. Finally, the patient developed progressive neutropenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute leukemia in spite of G-CSF therapy, dying 64 months after initial diagnosis (50 months after starting G-CSF therapy) with overt G-CSF resistant acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), after failure of conventional induction chemotherapy.

  16. A pilot cohort study of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of unresponsive thin endometrium resistant to standard therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleicher, N; Kim, A; Michaeli, T; Lee, H-J; Shohat-Tal, A; Lazzaroni, E; Barad, D H

    2013-01-01

    Is thin endometrium unresponsive to standard treatments expandable by intrauterine perfusion with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)? This cohort study is supportive of the effectiveness of G-CSF in expanding chronically unresponsive endometria. In a previous small case series, we reported the successful off-label use of G-CSF in four consecutive patients, who had previously failed to expand their endometria beyond 6.9 mm with the use of standard treatments. In a prospective observational cohort pilot study over 18 months, we described 21 consecutive infertile women with endometria women had, based on age-specific FSH and anti-Müllerian hormone, an objective diagnosis of diminished ovarian reserve and had failed 2.0 ± 2.1 prior IVF cycles elsewhere. With 5.2 ± 1.9 days between G-CSF perfusions and embryo transfers, endometrial thickness increased from 6.4 ± 1.4 to 9.3 ± 2.1 mm (P inventors on a number of awarded and still pending U.S. patents, none related to the materials presented here. N.G. is on the board of a medically related company, not in any way associated with the data presented here.

  17. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating EPC on cardiac function and myocardial energy expenditure in patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zilin; Luo, Jianchun; Ma, Lixian; Luo, Xia; Huang, Liangyan

    2015-01-01

    To study the changes of cardiac function and myocardial energy expenditure following treatment with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction. Thirty-eight patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction were randomized into G-CSF treatment group and control group. All the patients received conventional treatment (medication and interventional therapy), and the patients in treatment group were given additional G-CSF (600 μg/day) for 7 consecutive days. The plasma level of brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the number of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) in the peripheral blood were detected before and at 7 days and 4 months after the treatment. The cardiac functions (LVEF, FS, LVIDs, PWTs, EDV, SV, ET) was evaluated by ultrasonic imaging before and at 2 weeks and 4 months after the treatment. The MEE and circumferential end-systolic wall stress (cESS) were calculated by correlation formula. The number of EPC was significantly higher in the treatment group than in the control group after the treatment especially at 7 days (Pexpenditure were improved in all the patients at 2 weeks and 4 months after the treatment, and the improvement was more obvious in the treatment group (Pexpenditure in patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction.

  18. Erythropoietin plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes. Identification of a subgroup of responders. The Spanish Erythropathology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacha, A F; Arrizabalaga, B; Villegas, A; Manteiga, R; Calvo, T; Julià, A; Fernández Fuertes, I; González, F A; Font, L; Juncà, J; del Arco, A; Malcorra, J J; Equiza, E P; de Mendiguren, B P; Romero, M

    1999-12-01

    Anemia leading to transfusion is probably the most important problem in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEpo) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) have been used to treat patients with anemia of MDS, but fewer than 50% respond. The aim of this work was to evaluate the benefit of rHuEpo +/- G-CSF treatment and to isolate the response predictive variables in a group of selected patients with MDS. A non-randomized multicenter trial was carried out in 32 patients with MDS. The inclusion criteria were age >= 18 years, refractory anemia (RA) or refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, Hb +1 (77% of cases responded). In contrast, when this score was <= 1 only 15 % of the cases responded. Use of the Scandinavian-American response score is to be recommended in a patient-oriented approach to treating MDS cases with the Epo and G-CSF. Treatment with rHuEpo and G-CSF is safe, its main drawback being its cost. However, a long-term study evaluating the regimen's cost-benefit ratio is warranted.

  19. Identification and in vitro characterization of novel nanobodies against human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor to provide inhibition of G-CSF function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakherad, Hamid; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Aghamollaei, Hossein; Taheri, Ramezan Ali; Torshabi, Maryam; Yazdi, Mojtaba Tabatabaei; Ebrahimizadeh, Walead; Setayesh, Neda

    2017-09-01

    It has been shown that Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has a higher expression in malignant tumors, and anti-G-CSF therapy considerably decreases tumor growth, tumor vascularization and metastasis. Thus, blocking the signaling pathway of G-CSF could be beneficial in cancer therapy. This study is aimed at designing and producing a monoclonal nanobody that could act as an antagonist of G-CSF receptor. Nanobodies are the antigen binding fragments of camelid single-chain antibodies, also known as VHH. These fragments have exceptional properties which makes them ideal for tumor imaging and therapeutic applications. We have used our previously built nanobody phage libraries to isolate specific nanobodies to the G-CSF receptor. After a series of cross-reactivity and affinity experiments, two unique nanobodies were selected for functional analysis. Proliferation assay, real-time PCR and immunofluorescence assays were used to characterize these nanobodies. Finally, VHH26 nanobody that was able to specifically bind G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R) on the surface of NFS60 cells and efficiently block G-CSF-R downstream signaling pathway in a dose-dependent manner was selected. This nanobody could be further developed into a valuable tool in tumor therapy and it forms a basis for additional studies in preclinical animal models. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Systemic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhances wound healing in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB): Results of a pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Jo-David; Manes, Becky; Frangoul, Haydar

    2015-07-01

    Chronic nonhealing wounds are the norm in patients with inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB), especially those with dystrophic EB (DEB). A possible benefit in wound healing after subcutaneous treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was suggested from an anecdotal report of a patient given this during stem cell mobilization before bone-marrow transplantation. We sought to determine whether benefit in wound healing in DEB skin might result after 6 daily doses of G-CSF and to confirm its safety. Patients were assessed for changes in total body blister and erosion counts, surface areas of selected wounds, and specific symptomatology after treatment. Seven patients with DEB (recessive, 6; dominant, 1) were treated daily with subcutaneous G-CSF (10 μg/kg/dose) and reevaluated on day 7. For all patients combined, median reductions of 75.5% in lesional size and 36.6% in blister/erosion counts were observed. When only the 6 responders were considered, there were median reductions of 77.4% and 38.8% of each of these measured parameters, respectively. No adverse side effects were noted. Limitations include small patient number, more than 1 DEB subtype included, and lack of untreated age-matched control subjects. Subcutaneous G-CSF may be beneficial in promoting wound healing in some patients with DEB when conventional therapies fail. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An Epstein-Barr virus encoded inhibitor of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 signaling is an important determinant for acute and persistent EBV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ohashi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection is the most common cause of Infectious Mononucleosis. Nearly all adult humans harbor life-long, persistent EBV infection which can lead to development of cancers including Hodgkin Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, and lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients. BARF1 is an EBV replication-associated, secreted protein that blocks Colony Stimulating Factor 1 (CSF-1 signaling, an innate immunity pathway not targeted by any other virus species. To evaluate effects of BARF1 in acute and persistent infection, we mutated the BARF1 homologue in the EBV-related herpesvirus, or lymphocryptovirus (LCV, naturally infecting rhesus macaques to create a recombinant rhLCV incapable of blocking CSF-1 (ΔrhBARF1. Rhesus macaques orally challenged with ΔrhBARF1 had decreased viral load indicating that CSF-1 is important for acute virus infection. Surprisingly, ΔrhBARF1 was also associated with dramatically lower virus setpoints during persistent infection. Normal acute viral load and normal viral setpoints during persistent rhLCV infection could be restored by Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced immunosuppression prior to oral inoculation with ΔrhBARF1 or infection of immunocompetent animals with a recombinant rhLCV where the rhBARF1 was repaired. These results indicate that BARF1 blockade of CSF-1 signaling is an important immune evasion strategy for efficient acute EBV infection and a significant determinant for virus setpoint during persistent EBV infection.

  2. The receptor for Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is expressed in radial glia during development of the nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krüger Carola

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte colony-stimulating (G-CSF factor is a well-known hematopoietic growth factor stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors. Recently, we uncovered that G-CSF acts also as a neuronal growth factor in the brain, which promotes adult neural precursor differentiation and enhances regeneration of the brain after insults. In adults, the receptor for G-CSF is predominantly expressed in neurons in many brain areas. We also described expression in neurogenic regions of the adult brain, such as the subventricular zone and the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus. In addition, we found close co-localization of the G-CSF receptor and its ligand G-CSF. Here we have conducted a systematic expression analysis of G-CSF receptor and its ligand in the developing embryo. Results Outside the central nervous system (CNS we found G-CSF receptor expression in blood vessels, muscles and their respective precursors and neurons. The expression of the G-CSF receptor in the developing CNS was most prominent in radial glia cells. Conclusion Our data imply that in addition to the function of G-CSF and its receptor in adult neurogenesis, this system also has a role in embryonic neurogenesis and nervous system development.

  3. Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor is a central component of the foreign body response to biomaterial implants in rodents and non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doloff, Joshua C.; Veiseh, Omid; Vegas, Arturo J.; Tam, Hok Hei; Farah, Shady; Ma, Minglin; Li, Jie; Bader, Andrew; Chiu, Alan; Sadraei, Atieh; Aresta-Dasilva, Stephanie; Griffin, Marissa; Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Webber, Matthew; Siebert, Sean; Tang, Katherine; Chen, Michael; Langan, Erin; Dholokia, Nimit; Thakrar, Raj; Qi, Meirigeng; Oberholzer, Jose; Greiner, Dale L.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2017-06-01

    Host recognition and immune-mediated foreign body response to biomaterials can compromise the performance of implanted medical devices. To identify key cell and cytokine targets, here we perform in-depth systems analysis of innate and adaptive immune system responses to implanted biomaterials in rodents and non-human primates. While macrophages are indispensable to the fibrotic cascade, surprisingly neutrophils and complement are not. Macrophages, via CXCL13, lead to downstream B cell recruitment, which further potentiated fibrosis, as confirmed by B cell knockout and CXCL13 neutralization. Interestingly, colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) is significantly increased following implantation of multiple biomaterial classes: ceramic, polymer and hydrogel. Its inhibition, like macrophage depletion, leads to complete loss of fibrosis, but spares other macrophage functions such as wound healing, reactive oxygen species production and phagocytosis. Our results indicate that targeting CSF1R may allow for a more selective method of fibrosis inhibition, and improve biomaterial biocompatibility without the need for broad immunosuppression.

  4. The impact of donor characteristics on the immune cell composition of mixture allografts of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-mobilized marrow harvests and peripheral blood harvests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Tong; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yu; Liu, Kai-Yan; Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    The association of donor characteristics with immune cell composition in allografts remains poorly understood. In this retrospective study, the effects of donor characteristics on immune cell composition in allografts were investigated. The correlations of donor characteristics with the immune cell composition in mixture allografts of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-mobilized marrow harvests and peripheral blood harvests of 390 healthy donors (male, 240; female, 150; median age, 40 years old) were analyzed. The median doses of CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD3+CD4-CD8- T cells, and monocytes in mixture allografts were 160.57 × 10(6), 89.29 × 10(6), 56.16 × 10(6), 10.87 × 10(6), and 137.94 × 10(6)/kg, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that younger donor age was associated with a higher dose of CD3+ T cells (p = 0.006), CD3+CD8+ T cells (p donor weight with CD3+ T cells (p blood lymphocyte pre-peripheral blood apheresis was correlated with the yield of CD3+ T cells (p blood monocyte count before marrow harvest predicted the monocyte dose (p = 0.002). The results suggested that older and overweight donors should not be chosen. The monocyte and lymphocyte counts before harvest could predict the yield of immune cells in allografts. © 2015 AABB.

  5. Co-expression of HIV-1 virus-like particles and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor by GEO-D03 DNA vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellerstein, Michael; Xu, Yongxian; Marino, Tracie; Lu, Shan; Yi, Hong; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Robinson, Harriet L.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report on GEO-D03, a DNA vaccine that co-expresses non-infectious HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) and the human cytokine, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The virus-like particles display the native gp160 form of the HIV-1 Envelope glycoprotein (Env) and are designed to elicit antibody against the natural form of Env on virus and virus-infected cells. The DNA-expressed HIV Gag, Pol and Env proteins also have the potential to elicit virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. The purpose of the co-expressed GM-CSF is to target a cytokine that recruits, expands and differentiates macrophages and dendritic cells to the site of VLP expression. The GEO-D03 DNA vaccine is currently entered into human trials as a prime for a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost. In preclinical studies in macaques using an SIV prototype vaccine, this vaccination regimen elicited both anti-viral T cells and antibody, and provided 70% protection against acquisition during 12 weekly rectal exposures with a heterologous SIV. Higher avidity of the Env-specific Ab for the native form of the Env in the challenge virus correlated with lower likelihood of SIV infection. PMID:23111169

  6. Just-in-time rescue plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Veronica R; Popat, Uday; Ciurea, Stefan; Nieto, Yago; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard; Hosing, Chitra

    2013-09-01

    Plerixafor, a recently approved peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilizing agent, is often added to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with lymphoma or myeloma who cannot mobilize enough CD34+ cells with G-CSF alone to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. However, data are lacking regarding the feasibility and efficacy of just-in-time plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and G-CSF. We reviewed the peripheral blood stem cell collection data of 38 consecutive patients with lymphoma (Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's) and multiple myeloma who underwent chemomobilization and high-dose G-CSF and just-in-time plerixafor to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment combination. All patients with multiple myeloma and all but one patient with lymphoma collected the minimum required number of CD34+ cells to proceed with autologous stem cell transplantation (>2 × 10(6) /kg of body weight). The median CD34+ cell dose collected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was 4.93 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. The median CD34+ cell dose collected for patients with multiple myeloma was 8.81 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. Plerixafor was well tolerated; no grade 2 or higher non-hematologic toxic effects were observed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. High pH solubilization and chromatography-based renaturation and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Fan, Hua; Liu, Jiahua; Wang, Minhong; Wang, Lili; Wang, Chaozhan

    2012-03-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is a very efficient therapeutic protein drug which has been widely used in human clinics to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. In this study, rhG-CSF was solubilized from inclusion bodies by using a high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea. It was found that solubilization of the rhG-CSF inclusion bodies greatly depended on the buffer pH employed; alkalic pH significantly favored the solubilization. In addition, when small amount of urea was added to the solution at high pH, the solubilization was further enhanced. After solubilization, the rhG-CSF was renatured with simultaneous purification by using weak anion exchange, strong anion exchange, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, separately. The results indicated that the rhG-CSF solubilized by the high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea had much higher mass recovery than the one solubilized by 8 M urea when using anyone of the three refolding methods employed in this work. In the case of weak anion exchange chromatography, the high pH solubilized rhG-CSF could get a mass recovery of 73%. The strategy of combining solubilization of inclusion bodies at high pH with refolding of protein using liquid chromatography may become a routine method for protein production from inclusion bodies.

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of Iranian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirzagar, Nasibeh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Tafakhori, Abbas; Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Amirzargar, Aliakbar; Ghaffarpour, Majid; Siroos, Bahaddin; Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Forty subjects with ALS were randomly assigned to two groups, which received either subcutaneous G-CSF (5 μg/kg/q12h) or placebo for 5 days. The subjects were then followed up for 3 months using the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R), manual muscle testing, ALS Assessment Questionnaire-40, and nerve conduction studies. CD34+/CD133+ cell count and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were evaluated at baseline. The rate of disease progression did not differ significantly between the two groups. The reduction in ALSFRS-R scores was greater in female subjects in the G-CSF group than in their counterparts in the placebo group. There was a trend toward a positive correlation between baseline CSF MCP-1 levels and the change in ALSFRS-R scores in both groups (Spearman's ρ=0.370, p=0.070). With the protocol implemented in this study, G-CSF is not a promising option for the treatment of ALS. Furthermore, it may accelerate disease progression in females.

  9. Evaluating the effects of buffer conditions and extremolytes on thermostability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor using high-throughput screening combined with design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablinger, Elisabeth; Hellweger, Monika; Leitgeb, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    In this study, we combined a high-throughput screening method, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), with design of experiments (DoE) methodology to evaluate the effects of several formulation components on the thermostability of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). First we performed a primary buffer screening where we tested thermal stability of G-CSF in different buffers, pH values and buffer concentrations. The significance of each factor and the two-way interactions between them were studied by multivariable regression analysis. pH was identified as most critical factor regarding thermal stability. The most stabilizing buffer, sodium glutamate, and sodium acetate were determined for further investigations. Second we tested the effect of 6 naturally occurring extremolytes (trehalose, sucrose, ectoine, hydroxyectoine, sorbitol, mannitol) on the thermal stability of G-CSF, using a central composite circumscribed design. At low pH (3.8) and low buffer concentration (5 mM) all extremolytes led to a significant increase in thermal stability except the addition of ectoine which resulted in a strong destabilization of G-CSF. Increasing pH and buffer concentration led to an increase in thermal stability with all investigated extremolytes. The described systematic approach allowed to create a ranking of stabilizing extremolytes at different buffer conditions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Enhancement of the grafting efficiency of transplanted marrow cells by preincubation with interleukin-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

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    Tavassoli, M.; Konno, M.; Shiota, Y.; Omoto, E.; Minguell, J.J.; Zanjani, E.D.

    1991-04-01

    To improve the grafting efficiency of transplanted murine hematopoietic progenitors, we briefly preincubated mouse bone marrow cells with interleukin-3 (IL-3) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) ex vivo before their transplantation into irradiated recipients. This treatment was translated into an increase in the seeding efficiency of colony-forming unit-spleen (CFU-S) and CFU-GM after transplantation. Not only was the concentration of CFU-S in the tibia increased 2 and 24 hours after transplantation, but the total cell number and CFU-S and CFU-GM concentrations were persistently higher in IL-3- and GM-CSF-treated groups 1 to 3 weeks after transplantation. In addition, the survival of animals as a function of transplanted cell number was persistently higher in IL-3- and GM-CSF-treated groups compared with controls. The data indicate that the pretreatment of marrow cells with IL-3 and GM-CSF before transplantation increases the seeding efficiency of hematopoietic stem cells and probably other progenitor cells after transplantation. This increased efficiency may be mediated by upward modulation of homing receptors. Therefore, ex vivo preincubation of donor marrow cells with IL-3 and GM-CSF may be a useful tactic in bone marrow transplantation.

  11. Diagnostic Power of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor in Breast Cancer Patients Based on ROC Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Zajkowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is the most common malignancy in women. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been described as an important regulator of angiogenesis which plays a vital role in the progression of tumor. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF is a cytokine whose functions include regulation of hematopoietic lineages cells growth, proliferation, and differentiation. We investigated the diagnostic significance of these parameters in comparison to CA15-3 in BC patients and in relation to the control group (benign breast tumor and healthy women. Plasma levels of the tested parameters were determined by ELISA and CA15-3 was determined by CMIA. VEGF was shown to be comparable to CA15-3 values of sensitivity in BC group and, what is more important, higher values in early stages of BC. VEGF was also the only parameter which has statistically significant AUC in all stages of cancer. M-CSF has been shown to be comparable to CA15-3 and VEGF, specificity, and AUC values only in stages III and IV of BC. These results indicate the usefulness and high diagnostic power of VEGF in the detection of BC. Also, it occurred to be the best candidate for cancer diagnostics in stages I and II of BC and in the differentiation between BC and benign cases.

  12. Promotive effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabaya, Koji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kusaka, Masaru; Seki, Masatoshi (Kirin Brewery Co., Ltd., Gunma (Japan). Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory); Fushiki, Masato

    1994-08-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on the recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated whole-body irradiation was investigated in mice. Male 7-week old C3H/HeN mice received a total of ten exposures of 0.25 Gy/day from day 1 to 5 and from day 8 to 12. Peripheral neutropenia with a nadir on day 17 was caused by the fractionated irradiation. Daily subcutaneous injections of rhG-CSF at 0.25 and 2.5 [mu]g/body/day from day from day 1 to 21 promoted the recovery of neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. The kinetics of morphologically identifiable bone marrow cells were studied to clarify the mechanism behind the promotive effect of this factor. A slight decrease in mitotic immature granulocytes, such as myeloblasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes on day 5, and a drastic decrease in metamyelocytes and marrow neutrophils on days 5, 9, and 17 were seen in the femur of irradiated mice. Treatment using rhG-CSF caused an increase in immature granulocytes of all differential stages in the femur. Microscopic findings of the femurs and spleens also reveals an increase in immature granulocytes in these organs in mice injected with rhG-CSF. These results indicate that rhG-CSF accelerates granulopoiesis in the femur and spleen, thereby promoting recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation. (author).

  13. Promotive effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabaya, Koji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kusaka, Masaru; Seki, Masatoshi; Fushiki, Masato.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on the recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated whole-body irradiation was investigated in mice. Male 7-week old C3H/HeN mice received a total of ten exposures of 0.25 Gy/day from day 1 to 5 and from day 8 to 12. Peripheral neutropenia with a nadir on day 17 was caused by the fractionated irradiation. Daily subcutaneous injections of rhG-CSF at 0.25 and 2.5 μg/body/day from day from day 1 to 21 promoted the recovery of neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. The kinetics of morphologically identifiable bone marrow cells were studied to clarify the mechanism behind the promotive effect of this factor. A slight decrease in mitotic immature granulocytes, such as myeloblasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes on day 5, and a drastic decrease in metamyelocytes and marrow neutrophils on days 5, 9, and 17 were seen in the femur of irradiated mice. Treatment using rhG-CSF caused an increase in immature granulocytes of all differential stages in the femur. Microscopic findings of the femurs and spleens also reveals an increase in immature granulocytes in these organs in mice injected with rhG-CSF. These results indicate that rhG-CSF accelerates granulopoiesis in the femur and spleen, thereby promoting recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation. (author)

  14. Both systemic and local application of Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is neuroprotective after retinal ganglion cell axotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietz Gunnar PH

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hematopoietic Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF plays a crucial role in controlling the number of neutrophil progenitor cells. Its function is mediated via the G-CSF receptor, which was recently found to be expressed also in the central nervous system. In addition, G-CSF provided neuroprotection in models of neuronal cell death. Here we used the retinal ganglion cell (RGC axotomy model to compare effects of local and systemic application of neuroprotective molecules. Results We found that the G-CSF receptor is robustly expressed by RGCs in vivo and in vitro. We thus evaluated G-CSF as a neuroprotectant for RGCs and found a dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of G-CSF on axotomized RGCs when given subcutaneously. As stem stell mobilization had previously been discussed as a possible contributor to the neuroprotective effects of G-CSF, we compared the local treatment of RGCs by injection of G-CSF into the vitreous body with systemic delivery by subcutaneous application. Both routes of application reduced retinal ganglion cell death to a comparable extent. Moreover, G-CSF enhanced the survival of immunopurified RGCs in vitro. Conclusion We thus show that G-CSF neuroprotection is at least partially independent of potential systemic effects and provide further evidence that the clinically applicable G-CSF could become a treatment option for both neurodegenerative diseases and glaucoma.

  15. The effect of interleukin-8 and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor on the response of neutrophils to formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, M; Llewellyn-Jones, C G; Stockley, R A

    1998-08-14

    Neutrophils isolated from patients with chronic bronchitis and emphysema have been shown to have enhanced responses to formyl peptides when assessed in vitro compared to age, sex matched controls. It is currently unclear whether the observed differences are due to a 'priming' effect by a second agent in vivo, or whether this is a primary difference in the neutrophils. We have studied the effects of interleukin-8, which is thought to be one of the major pro-inflammatory cytokines in chronic lung disease and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF), in order to assess their effects on neutrophil chemotaxis and connective tissue degradation. In addition, we have assessed the effect of preincubation of these agents with neutrophils for 30 min followed by stimulation with F-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) to investigate any possible 'priming' effect that may be relevant to our clinical data. We report suppression of neutrophil chemotaxis to FMLP following incubation of the neutrophils with both IL-8 and GMCSF. However, we have observed an additive effect of IL-8 and FMLP for neutrophil degranulation leading to fibronectin degradation. The results suggest that IL-8 does not 'prime' neutrophils for subsequent FMLP stimulation as observed in vivo. Although the results for GMCSF were similar for the chemotactic response, the agent also had a synergistic effect on connective tissue degradation. However, it is concluded that neither agent could explain the enhanced neutrophil responses seen in our patients.

  16. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves B-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Marshall W; Riegman, Adriaan R A; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg(-/-) mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin(-)) cells or Il2rg(-/-) Lin(-) cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning.

  17. Adaptive T cell responses induced by oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus-granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor therapy expanded by dendritic cell and cytokine-induced killer cell adoptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun; Gwin, William R; Zhou, Xinna; Wang, Xiaoli; Huang, Hongyan; Jiang, Ni; Zhou, Lei; Agarwal, Pankaj; Hobeika, Amy; Crosby, Erika; Hartman, Zachary C; Morse, Michael A; H Eng, Kevin; Lyerly, H Kim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose : Although local oncolytic viral therapy (OVT) may enhance tumor lysis, antigen release, and adaptive immune responses, systemic antitumor responses post-therapy are limited. Adoptive immunotherapy with autologous dendritic cells (DC) and cytokine-induced killer cells (DC-CIK) synergizes with systemic therapies. We hypothesized that OVT with Herpes Simplex Virus-granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (HSV-GM-CSF) would induce adaptive T cell responses that could be expanded systemically with sequential DC-CIK therapy. Patients and Methods : We performed a pilot study of intratumoral HSV-GM-CSF OVT followed by autologous DC-CIK cell therapy. In addition to safety and clinical endpoints, we monitored adaptive T cell responses by quantifying T cell receptor (TCR) populations in pre-oncolytic therapy, post-oncolytic therapy, and after DC-CIK therapy. Results : Nine patients with advanced malignancy were treated with OVT (OrienX010), of whom seven experienced stable disease (SD). Five of the OVT treated patients underwent leukapheresis, generation, and delivery of DC-CIKs, and two had SD, whereas three progressed. T cell receptor sequencing of TCR β sequences one month after OVT therapy demonstrates a dynamic TCR repertoire in response to OVT therapy in the majority of patients with the systematic expansion of multiple T cell clone populations following DC-CIK therapy. This treatment was well tolerated and long-term event free and overall survival was observed in six of the nine patients. Conclusions : Strategies inducing the local activation of tumor-specific immune responses can be combined with adoptive cellular therapies to expand the adaptive T cell responses systemically and further studies are warranted.

  18. Cardiotoxicity of combined administration of adriamycin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in rats. With special reference to 125I-MIBG cardioautoradiography and histopathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, Nozomi; Yamazaki, Junichi; Serizawa, Isao; Misaizu, Tadashi; Sato, Masanori.

    1995-01-01

    We studied whether adriamycin (ADM)-induced myocardial damage in rats is advanced when recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is administered. Rats were divided into three groups: ADM group, ADM+G-CSF group and vehicle-treated control group. ADM (2 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered for the first 2 days in each cycle and 10 days administration of G-CSF (50lμg/kg, s.c.) was started two days after the second administration of ADM in each cycle. The administration cycle was repeated 3 times. One day after the last administration, following parameters were analyzed: hematological examination including peripheral blood and bone marrow cells, electrocardiogram (ECG) and histopathological findings. At 4 hr after an intravenous administration of 125 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 125 I-MIBG), accumulation of 125 I-MIBG in some organs and findings of autoradiography (ARG) of the heart was examined. ECG revealed an extended ventricular activation (VAT) time in the ADM and ADM+G-CSF groups. In the histopathological analysis, vacuolar degeneration of the myocardium was observed in both the ADM and ADM+G-CSF groups. The severity of the change was equivalent in those groups. The accumulation of 125 I-MIBG in the heart was lower in both the ADM and ADM+G-CSF groups than in the control group. The same tendency was observed in ARG, but the difference between the ADM group and the ADM+G-CSF group was not significant. These results suggest that administration of G-CSF in the standard clinical dosage does not aggravate ADM-induced myocardial damage. However, because this disorder may be more clearly manifested by treatment with higher doses of ADM, it is necessary to conduct further studies on the methods of administration. (author)

  19. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D

    1991-01-01

    by up to 43-fold. rhGM-CSF treatment did not affect degranulation of the neutrophils as measured by release of vitamin B12 binding protein. Degree of modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by rhGM-CSF was independent of rhGM-CSF dosages administered. These data suggest that phagocytic defence...... and chemiluminescence responses to f-Met-Leu-Phe, zymosan activated serum (ZAS) and opsonized zymosan (OZ) were determined. It was observed that chemotactic response of neutrophils to f-Met-Leu-Phe and ZAS was reduced, whereas the chemiluminescence response of both cell types to f-Met-Leu-Phe and zymosan was enhanced...

  20. Evaluation of technetium 99m-HMPAO leukocyte scanning in the assessment of disease extent and activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morelec, I.; Bracquemart, P.; Beades, E.; Bouvard, G.; Fellous, F.; Piquet, M.A.; Dao, T.; Verwaerde, J.C.; Coste, J.

    1993-01-01

    We have studied prospectively the usefulness of HMPAO 99m Tc leucocytes scan in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Abdominal scans were performed 1 h and 2 h 30 after injection of an autologous leukocyte preparation containing 100-200 MBq of Technetium 99m. The extent of bowel involvement, evaluated on the 2 h 30 scan, was compared to X-rays and endoscopic findings. The disease activity was quantified by the intensity of intestinal radionuclide uptake on the 2 h 30 scan and compared with the Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) sedimentation rate. Forty-five examinations were performed in 40 patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The correlation of the number of locations between leukocyte scan and other diagnosis procedures was good in 40 cases. CDAI was significantly correlated with radionuclide index. Two fistulae and one abscess and small bowel involvement were correctly visualized. This technique provides images of excellent quality, superior to those obtained with indium 111. Therefore, we believe that this test can be useful in the follow-up of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis

  1. Inflammation, leukocytes and menstruation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jemma; Salamonsen, Lois A

    2012-12-01

    Menstruation has many of the features of an inflammatory process. The complexity and sequence of inflammatory-type events leading to the final tissue breakdown and bleeding are slowly being unravelled. Progesterone has anti-inflammatory properties, and its rapidly declining levels (along with those of estrogen) in the late secretory phase of each non-conception cycle, initiates a sequence of interdependent events of an inflammatory nature involving local inter-cellular interactions within the endometrium. Intracellular responses to loss of progesterone (in decidualized stromal, vascular and epithelial cells) lead to decreased prostaglandin metabolism and loss of protection from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased ROS results in release of NFκB from suppression with activation of target gene transcription and increased synthesis of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins, cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). The resultant leukocyte recruitment, with changing phenotypes and activation, provide further degradative enzymes and MMP activators, which together with a hypoxic environment induced by prostaglandin actions, lead to the tissue breakdown and bleeding characteristic of menstruation. In parallel, at sites where shedding is complete, microenvironmentally-induced changes in phenotypes of neutrophils and macrophages from pro- to anti-inflammatory, in addition to induction of growth factors, contribute to the very rapid re-epithelialization and restoration of tissue integrity.

  2. Synthesis of endogenous pyrogen by rabbit leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D M; Murphy, P A; Chesney, P J; Wood, W B

    1973-05-01

    Rabbit ieukocytes from peritoneal exudates and from blood were stimulated to form leukocyte pyrogen in the presence of radiolabeled amino acids. The stimuli used were endotoxin, phagocytosis, and tuberculin. The crude leukocyte pyrogen samples were purified; pyrogen from exudate cells was rendered homogeneous; pyrogen from blood cells was still contaminated with other proteins. All the purified pyrogens were radioactive; and for all it was shown that radioactivity and pyrogenic activity coincided on electrophoresis at pH 3.5 and pH 9 in acrylamide and on isoelectric focusing in acrylamide. Furthermore, pyrogens obtained from exudate cells stimulated in different ways, or from blood cells and exudate cells stimulated with endotoxin, appeared to be identical. These results suggest that leukocyte pyrogen was synthesized de novo from amino acid precursors and that leukocytes made the same pyrogen whatever the stimulus used to activate them.

  3. Sunlight Triggers Cutaneous Lupus through a Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) Dependent Mechanism in MRL-Faslpr mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Julia; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Byrne, Katelyn T.; Lucas, Julie A.; Rabacal, Whitney A.; Croker, Byron P.; Zong, Xiao-Hua; Stanley, E. Richard; Kelley, Vicki R.

    2008-01-01

    Sunlight (UVB) triggers cutaneous (CLE) and systemic lupus through an unknown mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that UVB triggers CLE through a CSF-1-dependent, macrophage (Mø) -mediated mechanism in MRL-Faslpr mice. By constructing mutant MRL-Faslpr strains expressing varying levels of CSF-1 (high, intermediate, none), and use of an ex-vivo gene transfer to deliver CSF-1 intra-dermally, we determined that CSF-1 induces CLE in lupus-susceptible, MRL-Faslpr mice, but not in lupus-resistant, BALB/c mice. Notably, UVB incites an increase in Mø, apoptosis in the skin and CLE in MRL-Faslpr, but not in CSF-1-deficient MRL-Faslpr mice. Furthermore, UVB did not induce CLE in BALB/c mice. Probing further, UVB stimulates CSF-1 expression by keratinocytes leading to recruitment and activation of Mø that, in turn, release mediators, which induce apoptosis in keratinocytes. Thus, sunlight triggers a CSF-1-dependent, Mø-mediated destructive inflammation in the skin leading to CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Faslpr, but not lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. Taken together, we envision CSF-1 as the “match” and lupus-susceptibility as the “tinder” leading to CLE. PMID:18981160

  4. Chemokines in the corpus luteum: Implications of leukocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liptak Amy R

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chemokines are small molecular weight peptides responsible for adhesion, activation, and recruitment of leukocytes into tissues. Leukocytes are thought to influence follicular atresia, ovulation, and luteal function. Many studies in recent years have focused attention on the characterization of leukocyte populations within the ovary, the importance of leukocyte-ovarian cell interactions, and more recently, the mechanisms of ovarian leukocyte recruitment. Information about the role of chemokines and leukocyte trafficking (chemotaxis during ovarian function is important to understanding paracrine-autocrine relationships shared between reproductive and immune systems. Recent advances regarding chemokine expression and leukocyte accumulation within the ovulatory follicle and the corpus luteum are the subject of this mini-review.

  5. [3H]52770 RP, a platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist, and tritiated platelet-activating factor label a common specific binding site in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquis, O.; Robaut, C.; Cavero, I.

    1988-01-01

    In human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), the tritiated platelet activating factor ([ 3 H]PAF) labels in a saturable manner a single class of binding sites with a Kd of 3.5 +/- 0.5 nM (n = 7) and a maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of 206 +/- 13 fmol/2.5 X 10(6) PMNs (n = 7). 52770 RP, a nonphospholipid antagonist of PAF receptors, fully and competitively displaced the [ 3 H]PAF from its binding sites with a Ki of 7.0 +/- 0.7 nM (n = 4). The high potency and the low solubility in cellular membranes of this compound led us to prepare [ 3 H]52770 RP. This ligand was characterized by a binding which was rapid, reversible, confined to a single site, saturable, specific and stereoselective. Its Kd and Bmax were 4.2 +/- 0.3 nM and 181 +/- 11 fmol/2.5 X 10(6) PMNs, respectively. The stereoselectivity of the binding was suggested by the 600- and 1050-fold higher potency of the d-enantiomer with respect to l-52770 RP in displacing [ 3 H]52770 RP or [ 3 H]PAF, respectively. Several PAF analogs (e.g., lyso-PAF, 2-O-methyl-lyso-PAF), which are poorly active as PAF receptor agonists in functional tests, were weak displacers of [ 3 H]PAF and [ 3 H]52770 RP. Furthermore, for a series of 14 known PAF receptor agonists or antagonists belonging to different chemical families, there was an excellent correlation (r = 0.98) between their ability to displace [ 3 H]PAF and [ 3 H]52770 RP. Thus, [ 3 H]52770 RP and [ 3 H]PAF appear to interact with the same binding site on human PMNs which is proposed to be the PAF receptor mediating functional responses

  6. Stem cell mobilization induced by subcutaneous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to improve cardiac regeneration after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: result of the double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled stem cells in myocardial infarction (STEMMI) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, RS; Jorgensen, E; Wang, Y

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase 1 clinical trials of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment after myocardial infarction have indicated that G-CSF treatment is safe and may improve left ventricular function. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial aimed to assess the efficacy of......: Bone marrow stem cell mobilization with subcutaneous G-CSF is safe but did not lead to further improvement in ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction compared with the recovery observed in the placebo group...

  7. Transplanted Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Mobilized by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Promoted Hindlimb Functional Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Koda, Masao; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Kei; Okawa, Akihiko; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) derived from bone marrow. We hypothesized that intraspinal transplantation of PBSCs mobilized by G-CSF could promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Spinal cords of adult nonobese diabetes/severe immunodeficiency mice were injured using an Infinite Horizon impactor (60 kdyn). One week after the injury, 3.0 µl of G-CSF-mobilized human mononuclear cells (MNCs; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), G-CSF-mobilized human CD34-positive PBSCs (CD34; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), or normal saline was injected to the lesion epicenter. We performed immunohistochemistry. Locomotor recovery was assessed by Basso Mouse Scale. The number of transplanted human cells decreased according to the time course. The CD31-positive area was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups compared with the vehicle group. The number of serotonin-positive fibers was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups than in the vehicle group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of apoptotic oligodendrocytes was significantly smaller in cell-transplanted groups, and the areas of demyelination in the MNC- and CD34-transplanted mice were smaller than that in the vehicle group, indicating that cell transplantation suppressed oligodendrocyte apoptosis and demyelination. Both the MNC and CD34 groups showed significantly better hindlimb functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. There was no significant difference between the two types of transplanted cells. Intraspinal transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized MNCs or CD34-positive cells promoted angiogenesis, serotonergic fiber regeneration/sparing, and preservation of myelin, resulting in improved hindlimb function after spinal cord injury in comparison with vehicle-treated control mice. Transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized PBSCs has advantages for treatment of spinal cord injury in the ethical and immunological viewpoints, although further exploration

  8. Advantages of concurrent biochemotherapy modified by decrescendo interleukin-2, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and tamoxifen for patients with metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, S J; Gammon, G; Boasberg, P D; Martin, M A; Kristedja, T S; Guo, M; Stern, S; Edwards, S; Fournier, P; Weisberg, M; Cannon, M; Fawzy, N W; Johnson, T D; Essner, R; Foshag, L J; Morton, D L

    1999-09-01

    Concurrent biochemotherapy results in high response rates but also significant toxicity in patients with metastatic melanoma. We attempted to improve its efficacy and decrease its toxicity by using decrescendo dosing of interleukin-2 (IL-2), posttreatment granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and low-dose tamoxifen. Forty-five patients with poor prognosis metastatic melanoma were treated at a community hospital inpatient oncology unit affiliated with the John Wayne Cancer Institute (Santa Monica, CA) between July 1995 and September 1997. A 5-day modified concurrent biochemotherapy regimen of dacarbazine, vinblastine, cisplatin, decrescendo IL-2, interferon alfa-2b, and tamoxifen was repeated at 21-day intervals. G-CSF was administered beginning on day 6 for 7 to 10 days. The overall response rate was 57% (95% confidence interval, 42% to 72%), the complete response rate was 23%, and the partial response rate was 34%. Complete remissions were achieved in an additional 11% of patients by surgical resection of residual disease after biochemotherapy. The median time to progression was 6.3 months and the median duration of survival was 11.4 months. At a maximum follow-up of 36 months (range, 10 to 36 months), 32% of patients are alive and 14% remain free of disease. Decrescendo IL-2 dosing and administration of G-CSF seemed to reduce toxicity, length of hospital stay, and readmission rates. No patient required intensive care unit monitoring, and there were no treatment-related deaths. The data from this study indicate that the modified concurrent biochemotherapy regimen reduces the toxicity of concurrent biochemotherapy with no apparent decrease in response rate in patients with poor prognosis metastatic melanoma.

  9. Efficacy, safety and proper dose analysis of PEGylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as support for dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy in node positive Chinese breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; LingHu, RuiXia; Zhan, XingYang; Li, Ruisheng; Feng, Fan; Gao, Xudong; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Junlan

    2017-10-03

    For high-risk breast cancer patients with positive axillary lymph nodes, dose-dense every-two-week epirubicin/cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel (ddEC-P) regimen is the optimal postoperative adjuvant therapy. However, this regimen is limited by the grade 3/4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia (FN). There is an urgent need to explore the efficacy, safety and proper dosage of PEGylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF) as support for ddEC-P in Chinese breast cancer patients with positive axillary lymph nodes. Prospectively, 40 women with stage IIIA to IIIC breast cancer received ddEC-P ± trastuzumab as adjuvant treatment. PEG-G-CSF was injected subcutaneously in a dose of 6 mg or 3 mg on the 2 th day of each treatment cycle. With administration of PEG-G-CSF, all of the 40 patients completed 8 cycles of ddEC-P ± trastuzumab regimen without dose reductions or treatment delays. Moreover, no FN cases were observed. Further analysis showed that the proper dosage of PEG-G-CSF was 6 mg for ddEC treatment, and 3 mg for ddP treatment. PEG-G-CSF exhibits advantages compared with G-CSF in convenient of administration and tolerance for high risk Chinese breast cancer patients. More importantly, the proper dose of PEG-G-CSF for high risk Chinese breast cancer patients during ddEC-P chemotherapy may be 6 mg for ddEC treatment and 3 mg for ddP treatment.

  10. Topical granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for the treatment of oral and genital ulcers of patients with Behçet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacanli, A; Yerebakan Dicle, O; Parmaksizoglu, B; Yilmaz, E; Alpsoy, E

    2006-09-01

    Recurrent and painful ulcers of the oral mucosa and genital skin/mucosa are the most commonly observed manifestations in patients with Behçet's disease (BD). They affect patients' quality of life. Because of the effectiveness of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in wound healing, it may also be useful for the treatment of oral ulcers (OU) and genital ulcers (GU) of BD. We aimed to determine the efficacy of topically applied G-CSF in the treatment of OU and GU of BD. Seven patients with BD diagnosed according to the criteria of the International Study Group for Behçet's Disease were involved in the study. The patients were observed for 3 months before the study, and all occurrences were recorded during this period. Patients were given topical G-CSF for OU (4 x 120 microg/day, for 5 days) and/or GU (4 x 30 microg/day, for 5 days) and followed-up for 3 months after treatment. No concurrent disease-specific or immunosuppressive topical or systemic drugs were given during the study period. G-CSF treatment decreased the healing time and pain of OU and GU in six of seven patients compared with the pretreatment period. However, the effectiveness of the G-CSF treatment on OU and GU healing time and pain severity did not continue during the post-treatment period. G-CSF has beneficial effects on the healing duration and pain severity of OU and GU of patients with BD. However, given the high cost, impractical preparation and inability to cure the disease, G-CSF treatment should be chosen only in selected patients.

  11. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor decreases the Th1/Th2 ratio in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Fei; Zhang, Zhuo; Hou, Jinxiao; Cao, Fenglin; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Ping; Wei, Hong; Zhou, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Chronic immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease that exhibits an abnormally high Th1/Th2 ratio. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to decrease the Th1/Th2 ratio in healthy donors. In this study, we investigated the effects of G-CSF treatment on the Th1/Th2 cells and the underlying mechanisms in patients with ITP in vitro. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients with ITP and healthy controls were treated with G-CSF. Expression levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and IL-13 in supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The expression of IFN-γ, IL-4, and G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) on Th1 and Th2 cells were examined by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The mRNA expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13, and T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet) and GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3) in PBMCs was evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that G-CSF could significantly reduce the Th1/Th2 ratio in PBMCs from patients with ITP in vitro. As the concentration of G-CSF increased, Th1/Th2 ([IFN-γ+IL-2]/[IL-4+IL-13]) cytokine ratios and T-bet/GATA-3 mRNA ratios decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. Th1 cells and Th2 cells both expressed G-CSFR. These results suggest that G-CSF could decrease the Th1/Th2 ratio in the context of ITP, and elucidate the direct and indirect immunomodulatory mechanisms underlying G-CSF functions in Th1/Th2 cells, thus supporting the therapeutic potential of G-CSF in the treatment of patients with ITP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on differentiation and apoptosis of the human osteosarcoma cell line SaOS-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Postiglione

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of human granulocyte macrophage- colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF on the relation between differentiation and apoptosis in SaOS-2 cells, an osteoblast-like cell line. To determine the relationship between these cellular processes, SaOS-2 cells were treated in vitro for 1, 7 and 14 days with 200 ng/mL GM-CSF and compared with untreated cells. Five nM insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I and 30 nM okadaic acid were used as negative and positive controls of apoptosis, respectively. Effects on cell differentiation were determined by ECM (extracellular matrix mineralization, morphology of some typical mature osteoblast differentiation markers, such as osteopontin and sialoprotein II (BSP-II, and production of bone ECM components such as collagen I. The results showed that treatment with GM-CSF caused cell differentiation accompanied by increased production of osteopontin and BSP-II, together with increased ECM deposition and mineralization. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V and propidium iodide incorporation showed that GM-CSF up-regulated apoptotic cell death of SaOS-2 cells after 14 days of culture in contrast to okadaic acid, which stimulated SaOS-2 apoptosis only during the early period of culture. Endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA, detected by “laddering analysis”, confirmed these data. The results suggest that GM-CSF induces osteoblastic differentiation and long-term apoptotic cell death of the SaOS-2 human osteosarcoma cell line, which in turn suggests a possible in vivo physiological role for GM-CSF on human osteoblast cells.

  13. Primary granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis during the first two cycles only or throughout all chemotherapy cycles in patients with breast cancer at risk for febrile neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Maureen J; Peters, Frank P; Mandigers, Caroline M; Dercksen, M Wouter; Stouthard, Jacqueline M; Nortier, Hans J; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W; van Warmerdam, Laurence J; van de Wouw, Agnes J; Jacobs, Esther M; Mattijssen, Vera; van der Rijt, Carin C; Smilde, Tineke J; van der Velden, Annette W; Temizkan, Mehmet; Batman, Erdogan; Muller, Erik W; van Gastel, Saskia M; Borm, George F; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2013-12-01

    Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF during the first cycles of chemotherapy lead to questions about the effectiveness of continued use of G-CSF throughout later cycles of chemotherapy. In a multicenter study, patients with breast cancer who were considered fit enough to receive 3-weekly polychemotherapy, but also had > 20% risk for FN, were randomly assigned to primary G-CSF prophylaxis during the first two chemotherapy cycles only (experimental arm) or to primary G-CSF prophylaxis throughout all chemotherapy cycles (standard arm). The noninferiority hypothesis was that the incidence of FN would be maximally 7.5% higher in the experimental compared with the standard arm. After inclusion of 167 eligible patients, the independent data monitoring committee advised premature study closure. Of 84 patients randomly assigned to G-CSF throughout all chemotherapy cycles, eight (10%) experienced an episode of FN. In contrast, of 83 patients randomly assigned to G-CSF during the first two cycles only, 30 (36%) had an FN episode (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.54), with a peak incidence of 24% in the third cycle (ie, first cycle without G-CSF prophylaxis). In patients with early breast cancer at high risk for FN, continued use of primary G-CSF prophylaxis during all chemotherapy cycles is of clinical relevance and thus cannot be abandoned.

  14. Interleukin-6 production by human monocytes treated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the presence of lipopolysaccharide of oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqui, A A; Meiller, T F; Chon, J J; Turng, B F; Falkler, W A

    1998-06-01

    This study focused on the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and lipopolysaccharide of the putative periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum on IL-6 production by THP-1 cells (a human monocytic cell line). Resting THP-1 cells were alternatively treated with GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) and lipopolysaccharide of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum, in varying concentrations for varying time periods. IL-6 production in supernatant fluids of treated cells was evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to evaluate gene expression. Untreated THP-1 cells did not produce IL-6 as determined by ELISA. RT-PCR also failed to detect IL-6 mRNA in untreated THP-1 cells, indicating that IL-6 was not constitutively produced. After stimulation of THP-1 cells with lipopolysaccharide of F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis, IL-6 was produced, peaking at 4 h (200-300 pg/ml) and thereafter sharply declining by 8 h. When GM-CSF was added together with lipopolysaccharide of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum, there was a synergistic quantitative increase in production of IL-6 as measured by ELISA as compared with lipopolysaccharide alone. IL-6 mRNA was detected by RT-PCR, 15 min after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide of either P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum. GM-CSF supplementation with lipopolysaccharide of P. gingivalis shortened the transcription of IL-6 mRNA to 5 min, a shift which was not observed with lipopolysaccharide of F. nucleatum, possibly indicating a different mechanism of initiation of transcription. Production of IL-6 by GM-CSF-treated THP-1 cells in the presence of lipopolysaccharide of oral microorganisms may provide a model for studying the role of macrophages in acute and chronic periodontal diseases, including the clinical periodontal exacerbation as observed in chemotherapy patients receiving GM-CSF for bone marrow recovery.

  15. Inhibition of colony-stimulating-factor-1 signaling in vivo with the orally bioavailable cFMS kinase inhibitor GW2580.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, James G; McDonald, Brad; Parham, Janet; Keith, Barry; Rusnak, David W; Shaw, Eva; Jansen, Marilyn; Lin, Peiyuan; Payne, Alan; Crosby, Renae M; Johnson, Jennifer H; Frick, Lloyd; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine; Depee, Scott; Tadepalli, Sarva; Votta, Bart; James, Ian; Fuller, Karen; Chambers, Timothy J; Kull, Frederick C; Chamberlain, Stanley D; Hutchins, Jeff T

    2005-11-01

    Colony-stimulating-factor-1 (CSF-1) signaling through cFMS receptor kinase is increased in several diseases. To help investigate the role of cFMS kinase in disease, we identified GW2580, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of cFMS kinase. GW2580 completely inhibited human cFMS kinase in vitro at 0.06 microM and was inactive against 26 other kinases. GW2580 at 1 microM completely inhibited CSF-1-induced growth of mouse M-NFS-60 myeloid cells and human monocytes and completely inhibited bone degradation in cultures of human osteoclasts, rat calvaria, and rat fetal long bone. In contrast, GW2580 did not affect the growth of mouse NS0 lymphoblastoid cells, human endothelial cells, human fibroblasts, or five human tumor cell lines. GW2580 also did not affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF, IL-6, and prostaglandin E2 production in freshly isolated human monocytes and mouse macrophages. After oral administration, GW2580 blocked the ability of exogenous CSF-1 to increase LPS-induced IL-6 production in mice, inhibited the growth of CSF-1-dependent M-NFS-60 tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity, and diminished the accumulation of macrophages in the peritoneal cavity after thioglycolate injection. Unexpectedly, GW2580 inhibited LPS-induced TNF production in mice, in contrast to effects on monocytes and macrophages in vitro. In conclusion, GW2580's selective inhibition of monocyte growth and bone degradation is consistent with cFMS kinase inhibition. The ability of GW2580 to chronically inhibit CSF-1 signaling through cFMS kinase in normal and tumor cells in vivo makes GW2580 a useful tool in assessing the role of cFMS kinase in normal and disease processes.

  16. Therapy with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the chronic stage, but not in the acute stage, improves experimental autoimmune myocarditis in rats via nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kana; Okabe, Taka-aki; Mikami, Yu; Hattori, Miki; Fujita, Masatoshi; Kishimoto, Chiharu

    2010-09-01

    We systematically investigated serial efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy upon experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in rats treated with and without the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) with the analyses of tissue regeneration. G-CSF could mobilize multipotent progenitor cells of bone marrow into the peripheral blood and may improve ventricular function. A rat model of porcine myosin-induced EAM was used. After the immunization of myosin, G-CSF (10 microg/kg/day) or saline was injected intraperitoneally on days 0-21 in experiment 1 and on days 21-42 in experiment 2. Additional myosin-immunized rats were orally given 25 mg/kg/day of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), in each experiment (each group; n=8-21). Serum cytokines and peripheral blood cell counts were measured in each group. In experiment 1, G-CSF treatment aggravated cardiac pathology associated with increased macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels and enhanced superoxide production. In experiment 2, G-CSF treatment reduced the severity of myocarditis with increased capillary density and improved left ventricular ejection fraction. In the rats with EAM treated with G-CSF associated with oral L-NAME treatment in experiment 2, the severity of myocarditis was not reduced. Myocardial c-kit(+) cells were demonstrated only in G-CSF-treated group in experiment 2 but not in other groups. G-CSF has differential effects on EAM in rats associated with the modulation of cytokine network. The overwhelming superoxide production by G-CSF administration in the acute stage may worsen the disease. G-CSF therapy improved cardiac function via NO system in a rat model of myocarditis in the chronic stage, but not in the acute stage, possibly through the myocardial regeneration and acceleration of healing process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High Expression of Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor Associates with Unfavorable Cancer-Specific Survival of Patients with Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Liu, Yidong; An, Huimin; Chang, Yuan; Zhang, Weijuan; Zhu, Yu; Xu, Le; Xu, Jiejie

    2016-03-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R), a single-pass type III transmembrane tyrosine-protein kinase, is mainly involved in inflammation and immune regulation to facilitate the progression of solid tumors. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of CSF-1R expression on clinical outcome of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) after surgery. We retrospectively enrolled 268 patients with ccRCC undergoing nephrectomy between 2001 and 2004. Clinicopathologic features and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were collected. Western blot analysis was performed in the pairwise comparisons of CSF-1R expression in peritumor and tumor tissues of patients with ccRCC. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to determine CSF-1R expression level in tumor specimens. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression models were used to evaluate the impact of prognostic factors on CSS. A concordance index was calculated to measure prognostic accuracy. A prognostic nomogram was constructed on the basis of the identified independent prognostic factors. CSF-1R expression in tumor tissues was higher than in peritumor tissues in 71.4% (5 of 7) patients. CSF-1R expression of tumor tissues was positively associated with metastasis, tumor, node, metastasis classification system (TNM) stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score and poor CSS. CSF-1R expression was determined as an independent prognostic factor for CSS in patients with ccRCC. Furthermore, extension of the well-established prognostic models with CSF-1R expression presented significantly improved prognostic accuracy. An efficient prognostic nomogram was constructed on the basis of the independent prognostic factors. High CSF-1R expression is a potential independent adverse prognostic factor for CSS in patients with ccRCC.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-Hsing; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Shun-Ping; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), as administered in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION). Using laser-induced photoactivation of intravenously administered Rose Bengal in the optic nerve head of 60 adult male Wistar rats, an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION) was inducted. Rats either immediately received G-CSF (subcutaneous injections) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 5 consecutive days. Rats were euthanized at 4 weeks post infarct. Density of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was counted using retrograde labeling of Fluoro-gold. Visual function was assessed by flash visual-evoked potentials (FVEP) at 4 weeks. TUNEL assay in the retinal sections and immunohistochemical staining of ED1 (marker of macrophage/microglia) were investigated in the optic nerve (ON) specimens. The RGC densities in the central and mid-peripheral retinas in the G-CSF treated rats were significantly higher than those of the PBS-treated rats (survival rate was 71.4% vs. 33.2% in the central retina; 61.8% vs. 22.7% in the mid-peripheral retina, respectively; both p optic nerve sections of G-CSF-treated rats (16 ± 6/HPF vs. 35 ± 10/HPF; p = 0.016). In conclusion, administration of G-CSF is neuroprotective in the rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, as demonstrated both structurally by RGC density and functionally by FVEP. G-CSF may work via the dual actions of anti-apoptosis for RGC surviving as well as anti-inflammation in the optic nerves as evidenced by less infiltration of ED1-povitive cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inductive potential of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to mature neutrophils from X-irradiated human peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumori, Takeo; Yoshino, Hironori; Hayashi, Masako; Takahashi, Kenji; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) has been used for treatment of neutropenia. Filgrastim, Nartograstim, and Lenograstim are clinically available in Japan. However, the differences in potential benefit for radiation-induced disorder between these types of rhG-CSFs remain unknown. Therefore, the effects of three different types of rhG-CSFs on granulocyte progenitor cells and expansion of neutrophils from nonirradiated or 2 Gy X-irradiated human CD34 + hematopoietic progenitor cells were examined. For analysis of granulocyte colony-forming units (CFU-G) and a surviving fraction of CFU-G, nonirradiated or X-irradiated CD34 + cells were cultured in methylcellulose containing rhG-CSF. These cells were cultured in serum-free medium supplemented with rhG-CSF, and the expansion and characteristics of neutrophils were analyzed. All three types of rhG-CSFs increased the number of CFU-G in a dose-dependent manner; however, Lenograstim is superior to others because of CFU-G-derived colony formation at relatively low doses. The surviving fraction of CFU-G was independent of the types of rhG-CSFs. Expansion of neutrophils by rhG-CSF was largely attenuated by X-irradiation, though no significant difference in neutrophil number was observed between the three types of rhG-CSFs under both nonirradiation and X-irradiation conditions. In terms of functional characteristics of neutrophils, Lenograstim-induced neutrophils produced high levels of reactive oxygen species compared to Filgrastim, when rhG-CSF was applied to nonirradiated CD34 + cells. In conclusion, different types of rhG-CSFs lead to different effects when rhG-CSF is applied to nonirradiated CD34 + cells, though Filgrastim, Nartograstim, and Lenograstim show equal effects on X-irradiated CD34 + cells. (author)

  20. Administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor accompanied with a balanced diet improves cardiac function alterations induced by high fat diet in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daltro, Pâmela Santana; Alves, Paula Santana; Castro, Murilo Fagundes; Azevedo, Carine M; Vasconcelos, Juliana Fraga; Allahdadi, Kyan James; de Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues; de Freitas Souza, Bruno Solano; Dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; Macambira, Simone Garcia

    2015-12-03

    High fat diet (HFD) is a major contributor to the development of obesity and cardiovascular diseases due to the induction of cardiac structural and hemodynamic abnormalities. We used a model of diabetic cardiomyopathy in C57Bl/6 mice fed with a HFD to investigate the effects of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a cytokine known for its beneficial effects in the heart, on cardiac anatomical and functional abnormalities associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Groups of C57Bl/6 mice were fed with standard diet (n = 8) or HFD (n = 16). After 36 weeks, HFD animals were divided into a group treated with G-CSF + standard diet (n = 8) and a vehicle control group + standard diet (n = 8). Cardiac structure and function were assessed by electrocardiography, echocardiography and treadmill tests, in addition to the evaluation of body weight, fasting glicemia, insulin and glucose tolerance at different time points. Histological analyses were performed in the heart tissue. HFD consumption induced metabolic alterations characteristic of type 2 diabetes and obesity, as well as cardiac fibrosis and reduced exercise capacity. Upon returning to a standard diet, obese mice body weight returned to non-obese levels. G-CSF administration accelerated the reduction in of body weight in obese mice. Additionally, G-CSF treatment reduced insulin levels, diminished heart fibrosis, increased exercise capacity and reversed cardiac alterations, including bradycardia, elevated QRS amplitude, augmented P amplitude, increased septal wall thickness, left ventricular posterior thickening and cardiac output reduction. Our results indicate that G-CSF administration caused beneficial effects on obesity-associated cardiac impairment.

  1. Donor body mass index is an important factor that affects peripheral blood progenitor cell yield in healthy donors after mobilization with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Burns, Kevin M; Babic, Aleksandar; Carrum, George; Kennedy, Martha; Segura, Francisco J; Garcia, Salvador; Potts, Sandra; Leveque, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The use of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation has rapidly expanded in recent years. Currently, several sources of HPCs are available for transplantation including peripheral blood HPCs (PBPCs), cord blood cells, and marrow cells. Of these, PBPC collection has become the major source of HPCs. An important variable in PBPC collection is the response to PBPC mobilization, which varies significantly and sometime causes mobilization failure. A retrospective study of 69 healthy donors who underwent PBPC donation by leukapheresis was performed. All of these donors received 10 μg/kg/day or more granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for 5 days before PBPC harvest. Donor factors were evaluated and correlated with mobilization responses, as indicated by the precollection CD34 count (pre-CD34). Donors with a pre-CD34 of more than 100 × 10(6) /L had higher body mass index (BMI) compared with donors whose pre-CD34 was 38 × 10(6) to 99 × 10(6) /L or less than 38 × 10(6) /L (32.0 ± 1.04 kg/m(2) vs. 28.7 ± 0.93 kg/m(2) vs. 25.9 ± 1.27 kg/m(2) , respectively; p donors with high BMIs had higher pre-CD34 on a per-kilogram-of-body-weight basis compared with donors with low BMIs. BMI is an important factor that affects donor's response to mobilization and consequently the HPC yield. This effect may be due to a relatively high dose of G-CSF administered to donors with higher BMI or due to the presence of unknown intrinsic factors affecting mobilization that correlate with the amount of adipose tissue in each donor. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  2. The role of donor characteristics and post-granulocyte colony-stimulating factor white blood cell counts in predicting the adverse events and yields of stem cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Huey; Yang, Shang-Hsien; Chu, Sung-Chao; Su, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Chu-Yu; Chiu, Ya-Wen; Kao, Ruey-Ho; Li, Dian-Kun; Yang, Kuo-Liang; Wang, Tso-Fu

    2011-05-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is now widely used for stem cell mobilization. We evaluated the role of post-G-CSF white blood cell (WBC) counts and donor factors in predicting adverse events and yields associated with mobilization. WBC counts were determined at baseline, after the third and the fifth dose of G-CSF in 476 healthy donors. Donors with WBC ≥ 50 × 10(3)/μL post the third dose of G-CSF experienced more fatigue, myalgia/arthralgia, and chills, but final post-G-CSF CD34(+) cell counts were similar. Although the final CD34(+) cell count was higher in donors with WBC ≥ 50 × 10(3)/μL post the fifth G-CSF, the incidence of side effects was similar. Females more frequently experienced headache, nausea/anorexia, vomiting, fever, and lower final CD34(+) cell count than did males. Donors with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 showed higher incidences of sweat and insomnia as well as higher final CD34(+) cell counts. Donor receiving G-CSF ≥ 10 μg/kg tended to experience bone pain, headache and chills more frequently. Multivariate analysis indicated that female gender is an independent factor predictive of the occurrence of most side effects, except for ECOG > 1 and chills. Higher BMI was also an independent predictor for fatigue, myalgia/arthralgia, and sweat. Higher G-CSF dose was associated with bone pain, while the WBC count post the third G-CSF was associated with fatigue only. In addition, one donor in the study period did not complete the mobilization due to suspected anaphylactoid reaction. Observation for 1 h after the first injection of G-CSF is required to prevent complications from unpredictable side effects.

  3. Hematopoietic properties of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor/immunoglobulin (G-CSF/IgG-Fc fusion proteins in normal and neutropenic rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George N Cox

    Full Text Available Previously we showed that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF in vitro bioactivity is preserved when the protein is joined via a flexible 7 amino acid linker to an immunoglobulin-1 (IgG1-Fc domain and that the G-CSF/IgG1-Fc fusion protein possessed a longer circulating half-life and improved hematopoietic properties compared to G-CSF in normal rats. We have extended this analysis by comparing the relative hematopoietic potencies of G-CSF/IgG1-Fc to G-CSF in normal mice and to G-CSF and polyethylene glycol (PEG -modified G-CSF in neutropenic rats. Mice were treated for 5 days using different doses and dosing regimens of G-CSF/IgG1-Fc or G-CSF and circulating neutrophil levels in the animals measured on Day 6. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc stimulated greater increases in blood neutrophils than comparable doses of G-CSF when administered using daily, every other day or every third day dosing regimens. In rats made neutropenic with cyclophosphamide, G-CSF/IgG1-Fc accelerated recovery of blood neutrophils to normal levels (from Day 9 to Day 5 when administered as 5 daily injections or as a single injection on Day 1. By contrast, G-CSF accelerated neutrophil recovery when administered as 5 daily injections, but not when administered as a single injection. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc was as effective as PEG-G-CSF at accelerating neutrophil recovery following a single injection in neutropenic rats. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc and G-CSF/IgG4-Fc fusion proteins in which the 7 amino acid linker was deleted also were effective at accelerating neutrophil recovery following a single injection in neutropenic rats. These studies confirm the enhanced in vivo hematopoietic properties of G-CSF/IgG-Fc fusion proteins.

  4. Evaluation of Dutch guideline for just-in-time addition of plerixafor to stem cell mobilization in patients who fail with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Yavuz M; Visser, Otto; Beckers, Erik A M; te Boome, Liane C J; Huisman, Cynthia; Ypma, Paula F; Croockewit, Alexandra J; Netelenbos, Tanja; Kramer, Ellen P A; de Greef, Georgine E

    2015-05-01

    Plerixafor in combination with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is approved for the use of stem cell collection in patients who fail to mobilize on G-CSF. In 2009 the Stem Cell Working Party of the Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial group for Hematology Oncology (HOVON) composed a guideline for the use of plerixafor. According to this guideline it is recommended to add plerixafor to G-CSF in patients with circulating CD34+ cell counts of fewer than 20 × 10(6) /L on 2 consecutive days accompanied by increasing white blood cells. In this analysis we evaluated retrospectively the outcome of the use of this guideline in the Netherlands. In total 111 patients received plerixafor with a median one administration (range, one to four administrations). Of these patients 55.8% had non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 31.5% multiple myeloma, 8.1% Hodgkin lymphoma, and 4.5% nonhematologic malignancies. In 63.9% patients sufficient numbers of CD34+ cells were collected. In patients with multiple myeloma more successful mobilizations with plerixafor were observed compared to patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (71.4% vs. 61.3%). In patients with circulating CD34+ cell counts of at least 2.0 × 10(6) /L before administration of plerixafor a successful mobilization was achieved in 76.5%, and in the patients with very low (0-1 × 10(6) /L) circulating CD34+ cell counts the success rate was 44.2%. Application of the HOVON guideline on the just-in-time administration of plerixafor is effective for mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells in the majority of patients. Stem cell yield in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was lower compared to patients with multiple myeloma. Also patients with very low circulating CD34+ cells before addition of plerixafor might benefit from this approach. © 2014 AABB.

  5. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on central and peripheral T lymphocyte reconstitution after sublethal irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongxia; Guo Mei; Sun Xuedong; Ai Huisheng; Sun Wanjun; Hu Hailan; Wei Li

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is one of the most critical cytokines used for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). In addition to the hematopoietic effects of G-CSF on the differentiation and proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells, G-CSF is also known to have immunomodulatory effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether G-CSF could accelerate central and peripheral T lymphocyte recovery after a sublethal dose of irradiation. Female BALB/c mice were subjected to 6 Gy of total body irradiation and then were treated with either 100 μg/kg G-CSF or an equal volume of PBS once daily for 14 days. Percentages of thymocyte subpopulations including CD4- CD8-, CD4+ CD8+, CD4+ CD8- and CD4- CD8+ T cells, peripheral CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific to the 257-bp T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs). The proliferative capacity of splenic mononuclear cells upon exposure to ConA was measured by using the Cell Count Kit-8 (CCK-8). G-CSF treatment promoted thymocyte regeneration, accelerated the recovery of CD4+ CD8+ cells and increased the frequency of thymocyte sjTRECs. These effects were more prominent at early time points (Day 28) after irradiation. G-CSF also increased the rate of recovery of peripheral CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells and shortened the period of severe lymphopenia following irradiation. G-CSF also increased the splenic mononuclear cell mitotic responsiveness to ConA more than control-treated cells. Our results show that G-CSF accelerates T cell recovery through both thymic-dependent and thymic-independent pathways, which could be used to increase the rate of immune reconstitution after sublethal irradiation. (author)

  6. Efficacy of polyethylene glycol-conjugated bovine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for reducing the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis in periparturient dairy cows and heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassfurther, Renee L; TerHune, Terry N; Canning, Peter C

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate effects of various doses of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated bovine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (bG-CSF) on the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis in periparturient dairy cattle. 211 periparturient Holstein cows and heifers. Approximately 7 days before the anticipated date of parturition (day of parturition = day 0), healthy cattle received SC injections of sterile saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control treatment) or PEG-bG-CSF at 5, 10, or 20 μg/kg. Cattle were commingled and housed in a pen with dirt flooring, which was kept wet to maximize the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis. Within 24 hours after parturition, each animal again received the assigned treatment. Mammary glands and milk were visually scored for abnormalities twice daily for 28 days after parturition. Milk samples were aseptically collected from mammary glands with an abnormal appearance or abnormal milk and submitted for microbial culture. Daily milk production was recorded, and milk composition was assessed on days 3, 5, 7, and 10. Cattle treated with PEG-bG-CSF at 10 and 20 μg/kg had significantly fewer cases of clinical mastitis (9/54 and 5/53, respectively), compared with control cattle (18/53). Administration of PEG -bG-CSF did not significantly affect daily milk production or milk composition. Results suggested that PEG-bG-CSF was effective for reducing the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis in periparturient dairy cattle. Further investigations of the use of PEG-bG-CSF as a potential preventative intervention should be conducted.

  7. Mobilization of primitive and committed hematopoietic progenitors in nonhuman primates treated with defibrotide and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Di Nicola, Massimo; Longoni, Paolo; Milani, Raffaella; Milanesi, Marco; Guidetti, Anna; Haanstra, Krista; Jonker, Margaret; Cleris, Loredana; Magni, Michele; Formelli, Franca; Gianni, Alesssandro M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of defibrotide in enhancing cytokine-induced hematopoietic mobilization in rhesus monkeys. Animals received recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF, 100 microg/kg/day SC for 5 days) and, after a 4- to 6-week washout period, were remobilized with defibrotide (15 mg/kg/hour continuous intravenous for 5 days) plus rhG-CSF. Hematopoietic mobilization was evaluated by complete blood counts, differential counts, as well as frequency and absolute numbers of colony-forming cells (CFCs), high-proliferative potential CFCs (HPP-CFCs), and long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs). Compared to baseline values, rhG-CSF increased circulating CFCs, HPP-CFCs, and LTC-ICs by 158-, 125-, and 67-fold, respectively; the same figures for defibrotide/rhG-CSF were 299-, 1452-, and 295-fold, respectively. Defibrotide/rhG-CSF treatment compared to rhG-CSF alone increased CFCs, HPP-CFCs, and LTC-ICs by 1.4- (35,089 vs 25,825, pdefibrotide treatment associated with a 5-day rhG-CSF treatment. Compared to rhG-CSF, defibrotide/rhG-CSF increased the mobilization of CFCs, HPP-CFCs, and LTC-ICs by 2- (31,128 vs 15,527, pdefibrotide enhances rhG-CSF-elicited mobilization of primitive and committed progenitors; and 2) a 2-day defibrotide injection is as effective as a 5-day injection.

  8. Pichia pastoris versus Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a case study on the recombinant production of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Anh-Minh; Nguyen, Thanh-Thao; Nguyen, Cong-Thuan; Huynh-Thi, Xuan-Mai; Nguyen, Cao-Tri; Trinh, Minh-Thuong; Tran, Linh-Thuoc; Cartwright, Stephanie P; Bill, Roslyn M; Tran-Van, Hieu

    2017-04-04

    Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) is a glycoprotein that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of neutropenia and leukemia in combination with chemotherapies. Recombinant hGM-CSF is produced industrially using the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by large-scale fermentation. The methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, has emerged as an alternative host cell system due to its shorter and less immunogenic glycosylation pattern together with higher cell density growth and higher secreted protein yield than S. cerevisiae. In this study, we compared the pipeline from gene to recombinant protein in these two yeasts. Codon optimization in silico for both yeast species showed no difference in frequent codon usage. However, rhGM-CSF expressed from S. cerevisiae BY4742 showed a significant discrepancy in molecular weight from those of P. pastoris X33. Analysis showed purified rhGM-CSF species with molecular weights ranging from 30 to more than 60 kDa. Fed-batch fermentation over 72 h showed that rhGM-CSF was more highly secreted from P. pastoris than S. cerevisiae (285 and 64 mg total secreted protein/L, respectively). Ion exchange chromatography gave higher purity and recovery than hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Purified rhGM-CSF from P. pastoris was 327 times more potent than rhGM-CSF from S. cerevisiae in terms of proliferative stimulating capacity on the hGM-CSF-dependent cell line, TF-1. Our data support a view that the methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris is an effective recombinant host for heterologous rhGM-CSF production.

  9. Cytotoxic activity of the neurotoxin anatoxin-a on fish leukocytes in vitro and in vivo studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rymuszka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the potential cytotoxic effects of different concentrations (0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 µg/ml medium of pure anatoxin-a on carp immune cells (in vitro study. Furthermore, changes in the cell immune functions isolated from 10 carp exposed by immersion to anatoxin-a (25 µg/l for 5 days have been examined. Cytotoxicity of the toxin to leukocytes was determined by measuring intracellular adenosine triphosphate and glutathione concentrations. Lymphocyte proliferation was determined by measurement of bromodeoxyuridine incorporation during DNA synthesis. The phagocytes were assayed for intracellular production of reactive oxygen species. The in vitro results showed that pure toxin induced adverse effects on immune cells only after application of the higher concentrations (0.05, 0.1 and 1 µg/ml. Phagocytes exposed to anatoxin-a exhibited a significant (P < 0.05 reduction in glutathione concentration. The lymphocyte proliferation was decreased by the toxin, and B cells were more sensitive than T cells. The present study showed for the first time that anatoxin-a administered to fish by immersion, had suppressive effects on lymphocyte proliferation and the antioxidant potential of phagocytes.

  10. Positive correlation between blood pressure or heart rate and chymase-dependent angiotensin II-forming activity in circulating mononuclear leukocytes measured by new ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Keisuke; Okuda, Tetsu; Shirai, Kazuyuki; Urata, Hidenori

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish a convenient clinically applicable assay method for chymase-dependent angiotensin II forming activity of circulating mononuclear leukocytes (CML), which was potentially a marker of tissue chymase activity. Using this method, association between CML chymase activity and clinical parameters was determined. Cardiovascular outpatients (n = 170) without taking antihypertensive medication were recruited. An ELISA for chymase-dependent angiotensin II-forming activity in CML was established using Nma /Dnp-modified angiotensin I. Logistic regression analysis revealed that age and male gender were significant independent determinants of the increased CML chymase activity. After adjustment by age and gender, the CML chymase activity was positively correlated with systolic blood pressure, pulse rate, and the brain natriuretic peptide level. The relation between blood pressure and CML chymase activity suggests that it might reflect that increased tissue chymase activity contributes to systemic high blood pressure and heart rate because plasma chymase is inactive due to inhibitory plasma inhibitors.

  11. The role of regulatory T cells during the attenuation of graft-versus-leukemia activity following donor leukocyte infusion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi-Sun; Lim, Ji-Young; Cho, Byung-Sik; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Jeong, Dae Chul; Youn, Hyewon; Lee, Chulbom; Choi, Eun Young; Min, Chang-Ki

    2011-12-01

    We investigated how the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect is attenuated in the tumor microenvironment using a murine model of non-myeloablative allo-HSCT (NM-HSCT) plus delayed donor leukocyte infusion (DLI) in a haploidentical B6→F1 strain combination. In-line with aggravated leukemia growth, the proportions of effector T cells expressing IFN-γ (Teffs) in spleen were reduced and attenuated GVL activity was found to be accompanied by a rebound in CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tumor-draining lymph nodes and tumor tissues. DLI-derived Tregs and Teffs may be potential indicators of presence of leukemic progression after DLI in this GVL model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cytotoxic, antitumor and leukocyte migration activities of resveratrol and sitosterol present in the hidroalcoholic extract of Cissus sicyoides L., Vitaceae, leaves

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    Flávia R. S. Lucena

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cissus sicyoides L. pertains to the Vitaceae family. It is popularly known as "insulina, cipo-pucá, bejuco caro, puci, anil trepador". A vasoconstrictor effect and an antibacterial activity have also been allocated to it. In Brazil, C. sicyoides was evaluated for its anticonvulsant and anti-diabetc properties. Phytochemistry studies identified and isolated sitosterol and resveratrol compounds from its aerial parts which are pointed out as having antitumor activities. The goal of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic and antitumor activities of Cissus sicyoides hydroalcoholic extract as well as its ability to repair leukocytes cells to injured tissue. Cissus sicyoides did not demonstrate cytotoxic activity but showed an inhibition of tumor growth in face of the tumors tested. The extract had a strong chemotactic effect on the twenty four hours period after treatment. The hidroalchoolic extract of Cissus sicyoides presented antitumor activity which was prompted by T lymphocytes recruitment to the local lesion and suggests a new pathway to antitumor activity by activation of lymphoid lineage.

  13. Anandamide inhibits Theiler's virus induced VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells and reduces leukocyte transmigration in a model of blood brain barrier by activation of CB1 receptors

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    Loría Frida

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background VCAM-1 represents one of the most important adhesion molecule involved in the transmigration of blood leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB that is an essential step in the pathogenesis of MS. Several evidences have suggested the potential therapeutic value of cannabinoids (CBs in the treatment of MS and their experimental models. However, the effects of endocannabinoids on VCAM-1 regulation are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of anandamide (AEA in the regulation of VCAM-1 expression induced by Theiler's virus (TMEV infection of brain endothelial cells using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Methods i in vitro: VCAM-1 was measured by ELISA in supernatants of brain endothelial cells infected with TMEV and subjected to AEA and/or cannabinoid receptors antagonist treatment. To evaluate the functional effect of VCAM-1 modulation we developed a blood brain barrier model based on a system of astrocytes and brain endothelial cells co-culture. ii in vivo: CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/- infected with TMEV were treated with the AEA uptake inhibitor UCM-707 for three days. VCAM-1 expression and microglial reactivity were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results Anandamide-induced inhibition of VCAM-1 expression in brain endothelial cell cultures was mediated by activation of CB1 receptors. The study of leukocyte transmigration confirmed the functional relevance of VCAM-1 inhibition by AEA. In vivo approaches also showed that the inhibition of AEA uptake reduced the expression of brain VCAM-1 in response to TMEV infection. Although a decreased expression of VCAM-1 by UCM-707 was observed in both, wild type and CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-, the magnitude of VCAM-1 inhibition was significantly higher in the wild type mice. Interestingly, Cnr1-/- mice showed enhanced microglial reactivity and VCAM-1 expression following TMEV infection, indicating that the lack of CB1 receptor

  14. Purification and molecular cloning of SH2- and SH3-containing inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase, which is involved in the signaling pathway of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, erythropoietin, and Bcr-Abl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odai, H; Sasaki, K; Iwamatsu, A; Nakamoto, T; Ueno, H; Yamagata, T; Mitani, K; Yazaki, Y; Hirai, H

    1997-04-15

    Grb2/Ash and Shc are the adapter proteins that link tyrosine-kinase receptors to Ras and make tyrosine-kinase functionally associated with receptors and Ras in fibroblasts and hematopoietic cells. Grb2/Ash and Shc have the SH3, SH2, or phosphotyrosine binding domains. These domains bind to proteins containing proline-rich regions or tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and contribute to the association of Grb2/Ash and Shc with other signaling molecules. However, there could remain unidentified signaling molecules that physically and functionally interact with these adapter proteins and have biologically important roles in the signaling pathways. By using the GST fusion protein including the full length of Grb2/Ash, we have found that c-Cbl and an unidentified 135-kD protein (pp135) are associated with Grb2/Ash. We have also found that they become tyrosine-phosphorylated by treatment of a human leukemia cell line, UT-7, with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We have purified the pp135 by using GST-Grb2/Ash affinity column and have isolated the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the pp135 using a cDNA probe, which was obtained by the degenerate polymerase chain reaction based on a peptide sequence of the purified pp135. The cloned cDNA has 3,958 nucleotides that contain a single long open reading frame of 3,567 nucleotides, encoding a 1,189 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of approximately 133 kD. The deduced amino acid sequence reveals that pp135 is a protein that has one SH2, one SH3, and one proline-rich domain. The pp135, which contains two motifs conserved among the inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase proteins, was shown to have the inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase activity. The pp135 was revealed to associate constitutively with Grb2/Ash and inducibly with Shc using UT-7 cells stimulated with GM-CSF. In the cell lines derived from human chronic myelogenous leukemia, pp135 was constitutively tyrosine

  15. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor amplification of interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha production in THP-1 human monocytic cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide of oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqui, A A; Meiller, T F; Chon, J J; Turng, B F; Falkler, W A

    1998-05-01

    Cytokines, including granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), are used to assist in bone marrow recovery during cancer chemotherapy. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) play important roles in inflammatory processes, including exacerbation of periodontal diseases, one of the most common complications in patients who undergo this therapy. A human monocyte cell line (THP-1) was utilized to investigate IL-1beta and TNF-alpha production following GM-CSF supplementation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from two oral microorganisms, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. LPS of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum was prepared by a phenol-water extraction method and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and determination of total protein and endotoxin contents. Resting THP-1 cells were treated with LPS of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum and/or GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) by using different concentrations for various time periods. Production of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in THP-1 cells was measured by solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to evaluate the gene expression of resting and treated THP-1 cells. IL-1beta was not detected in untreated THP-1 cells. IL-1beta production was, however, stimulated sharply at 4 h. GM-CSF amplified IL-1beta production in THP-1 cells treated with LPS from both oral anaerobes. No IL-1beta-specific mRNA transcript was detected in untreated THP-1 cells. However, IL-1beta mRNA was detected by RT-PCR 2 h after stimulation of THP-1 cells with LPS from both organisms. GM-CSF did not shorten the IL-1beta transcriptional activation time. GM-CSF plus F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis LPS activated THP-1 cells to produce a 1.6-fold increase in TNF-alpha production at 4 h over LPS stimulation alone. These investigations with the in vitro THP-1 model indicate that there may be an increase in the cellular immune response to oral

  16. Early applications of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can stabilize the blood-optic-nerve barrier and ameliorate inflammation in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yao-Tseng; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Sung-Ping; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2016-10-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was reported to have a neuroprotective effect in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION model). However, the therapeutic window and anti-inflammatory effects of G-CSF in a rAION model have yet to be elucidated. Thus, this study aimed to determine the therapeutic window of G-CSF and investigate the mechanisms of G-CSF via regulation of optic nerve (ON) inflammation in a rAION model. Rats were treated with G-CSF on day 0, 1, 2 or 7 post-rAION induction for 5 consecutive days, and a control group were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Visual function was assessed by flash visual evoked potentials at 4 weeks post-rAION induction. The survival rate and apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells were determined by FluoroGold labeling and TUNEL assay, respectively. ON inflammation was evaluated by staining of ED1 and Iba1, and ON vascular permeability was determined by Evans Blue extravasation. The type of macrophage polarization was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The protein levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were analyzed by western blotting. A therapeutic window during which G-CSF could rescue visual function and retinal ganglion cell survival was demonstrated at day 0 and day 1 post-infarct. Macrophage infiltration was reduced by 3.1- and 1.6-fold by G-CSF treatment starting on day 0 and 1 post-rAION induction, respectively, compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). This was compatible with 3.3- and 1.7-fold reductions in ON vascular permeability after G-CSF treatment compared with PBS treatment (P<0.05). Microglial activation was increased by 3.8- and 3.2-fold in the early (beginning treatment at day 0 or 1) G-CSF-treated group compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). Immediate (within 30 mins of infarct) treatment with G-CSF also induced M2 microglia/macrophage activation. The cytokine levels were lower in the group that received immediate G-CSF treatment compared to

  17. Mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells by chemotherapy and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor for hematologic support after high-dose intensification for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, A D; Ayash, L; Anderson, K C; Hunt, M; Wheeler, C; Schwartz, G; Tepler, I; Mazanet, R; Lynch, C; Pap, S

    1992-06-01

    High-dose therapy with autologous marrow support results in durable complete remissions in selected patients with relapsed lymphoma and leukemia who cannot be cured with conventional dose therapy. However, substantial morbidity and mortality result from the 3- to 6-week period of marrow aplasia until the reinfused marrow recovers adequate hematopoietic function. Hematopoietic growth factors, particularly used after chemotherapy, can increase the number of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) present in systemic circulation. The reinfusion of PBPCs with marrow has recently been reported to reduce the time to recovery of adequate marrow function. This study was designed to determine whether granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-mobilized PBPCs alone (without marrow) would result in rapid and reliable hematopoietic reconstitution. Sixteen patients with metastatic breast cancer were treated with four cycles of doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, and methotrexate (AFM induction). Patients responding after the first two cycles were administered GM-CSF after the third and fourth cycles to recruit PBPCs for collection by two leukapheresis per cycle. These PBPCs were reinfused as the sole source of hematopoietic support after high doses of cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and carboplatin. No marrow or hematopoietic cytokines were used after progenitor cell reinfusion. Granulocytes greater than or equal to 500/microL was observed on a median of day 14 (range, 8 to 57). Transfusion independence of platelets greater than or equal to 20,000/microL occurred on a median day of 12 (range, 8 to 134). However, three patients required the use of a reserve marrow for slow platelet engraftment. In retrospect, these patients were characterized by poor baseline bone marrow cellularity and poor platelet recovery after AFM induction therapy. When compared with 29 historical control patients who had received the same high-dose intensification chemotherapy using autologous

  18. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not mitigate disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlink, Sarah N; Lager, Kelly M; Brockmeier, Susan L; Loving, Crystal L; Miller, Laura C; Vorwald, Ann C; Yang, Han-Chun; Kehrli, Marcus E; Faaberg, Kay S

    2016-10-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is responsible for one of the most economically important diseases in swine worldwide. It causes reproductive failure in sows and pneumonia in pigs that predisposes them to secondary bacterial infections. Methods to control PRRSV and/or limit secondary bacterial infections are desired to reduce the impact of this virus on animal health. Neutrophils play a major role in combatting infection; they can act as phagocytes as well as produce and release lytic enzymes that have potent antimicrobial effects leading to the destruction and clearance of bacterial pathogens. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that controls the production, differentiation and function of granulocytes (including neutrophils) from the bone marrow. Recent work from our laboratory has shown that encoding porcine G-CSF in a replication-defective adenovirus (Ad5-G-CSF) and delivering a single dose to pigs induced a neutrophilia lasting more than two weeks. As secondary bacterial infection is a common occurrence following PRRSV infection, particularly following challenge with highly pathogenic (HP)-PRRSV, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a single prophylactic dose of adenovirus-encoded G-CSF to mitigate secondary bacterial disease associated with HP-PRRSV infection. Administration of Ad5-G-CSF induced a significant neutrophilia as expected. However, between 1 and 2days following HP-PRRSV challenge the number of circulating neutrophils decreased dramatically in the HP-PRRSV infected group, but not the non-infected Ad5-G-CSF group. Ad5-G-CSF administration induced monocytosis as well, which was also reduced by HP-PRRSV challenge. There was no difference in the progression of disease between the Ad5-G-CSF and Ad5-empty groups following HP-PRRSV challenge, with pneumonia and systemic bacterial infection occurring in both treatment groups. Given the impact of HP-PRRSV infection on the

  19. Enhanced interleukin-8 production in THP-1 human monocytic cells by lipopolysaccharide from oral microorganisms and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqui, A A; Meiller, T F; Falkler, W A

    1999-10-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been used to assist in bone marrow recovery during cancer chemotherapy. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays an important role in macrophage mediated inflammatory processes including exacerbation of periodontal diseases, one of the most common complications in GM-CSF receiving cancer patients. The effect of GM-CSF supplementation on IL-8 production was investigated in a human monocyte cell line THP-1, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide extracted from two oral microorganisms, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Resting THP-1 cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (1 microgram/ml) of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum and/or GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) for varying time periods. The production of IL-8 in THP-1 cells was measured by a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A very low level of the cytokine IL-8 was produced constitutive in THP-1 cells. Starting from 8 h of treatment and afterwards GM-CSF alone significantly increased IL-8 production in THP-1 cells. Lipopolysaccharide (1 microgram/ml) extracts from either F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis amplified IL-8 production 500-800 times in comparison to resting THP-1 cells. When lipopolysaccharide of F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis was supplemented with 50 IU/ml of GM-CSF, there was a statistically significant enhanced production of IL-8 by THP-1 cells after 1 day to 7 days of treatment as compared with lipopolysaccharide treatment alone. GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) also significantly increased IL-8 production from 2-7 days of treatment of THP-1 cells when supplemented with a positive control, phorbol-12-myristate-13 acetate (PMA), as compared to PMA treatment alone. These investigations using the in vitro THP-1 human monocyte cell model indicate that there may be an increase in the response on a cellular level to oral endotoxin following GM-CSF therapy as evidenced by enhanced production of the tissue-reactive inflammatory cytokine, IL-8.

  20. Multimodal Approaches for Regenerative Stroke Therapies: Combination of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells is Not Superior to G-CSF Alone

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    Adrian Tudor Balseanu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Attractive therapeutic strategies to enhance post-stroke recovery of aged brains include methods of cellular therapy that can enhance the endogenous restorative mechanisms of the injured brain. Since stroke afflicts mostly the elderly, it is highly desirable to test the efficacy of cell therapy in the microenvironment of aged brains that is generally refractory to regeneration. In particular, stem cells from the bone marrow allow an autologous transplantation approach that can be translated in the near future to the clinical practice. Such a bone marrow-derived therapy includes the grafting of stem cells as well as the delayed induction of endogenous stem cell mobilization and homing by the stem cell mobilizer granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF. We tested the hypothesis that grafting of bone marrow-derived pre-differentiated mesenchymal cells (BM-MSCs in G-CSF-treated animals improves the long-term functional outcome in aged rodents. To this end, G-CSF alone (50 μg/kg or in combination with a single dose (106 cells of rat BM MSCs was administered intravenously to Sprague-Dawley rats at 6 h after transient occlusion (90 min of the middle cerebral artery. Infarct volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 3 and 48 days post-stroke and additionally by immunhistochemistry at day 56. Functional recovery was tested during the entire post-stroke survival period of 56 days. Daily treatment for post-stroke aged rats with G-CSF led to a robust and consistent improvement of neurological function after 28 days. The combination therapy also led to robust angiogenesis in the formerly infarct core and beyond in the “islet of regeneration.” However, G-CSF + BM MSCs may not impact at all on the spatial reference-memory task or infarct volume and therefore did not further improve the post-stroke recovery. We suggest that in a real clinical practice involving older post-stroke patients, successful regenerative therapies

  1. Mapping of monoclonal antibody- and receptor-binding domains on human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) using a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laricchia-Robbio, L; Liedberg, B; Platou-Vikinge, T; Rovero, P; Beffy, P; Revoltella, R P

    1996-10-01

    An automated surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor system has been used for mapping antibody and receptor-binding regions on the recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) molecule. A rabbit antimouse IgG1-Fc antibody (RAM.Fc) was coupled to an extended carboxymethylated-hydrogel matrix attached to a gold surface in order to capture an anti-rhGM-CSF monoclonal antibody (MAb) injected over the sensing layer. rhGM-CSF was subsequently injected and allowed to bind to this antibody. Multisite binding assays were then performed, by flowing sequentially other antibodies and peptides over the surface, and the capacity of the latter to interact with the entrapped rhGM-CSF in a multimolecular complex was monitored in real time with SPR. Eleven MAb (all IgG1K), were analyzed: respectively, four antipeptide MAb raised against three distinct epitopes of the cytokine (two clones against residues 14-24, that includes part of the first alpha-helix toward the N-terminal region; one clone against peptide 30-41, an intrahelical loop; and one clone against residues 79-91, including part of the third alpha-helix) and seven antiprotein MAbs raised against the entire rhGM-CSF, whose target native epitopes are still undetermined. In addition, the binding capacity to rhGM-CSF of a synthetic peptide, corresponding to residues 238-254 of the extracellular human GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain, endowed with rhGM-CSF binding activity, was tested. The results from experiments performed with the biosensor were compared with those obtained by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using the same reagents. The features of the biosensor technology (fully automated, measure in real time, sharpened yes/no response, less background disturbances, no need for washing step or labeling of the reagent) offered several advantages in these studies of MAb immunoreactivity and epitope mapping, giving a much better resolution and enabling more distinct

  2. Indium-111 leukocyte imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, K.; Matsui, N.; Nohira, K.

    1986-01-01

    This study evaluates the usefulness of labeled leukocyte imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In 33 patients, the incidence of pain and swelling in 66 wrist joints and 66 knee joints was compared with the accumulation of [ 111 In]leukocytes. No accumulation of [ 111 In]leukocytes was seen in any of the patients' wrists (0/12) or knee joints (0/14) when both pain and swelling were absent. In contrast, 93% (25/27) of wrist joints and 80% (24/30) of knee joints with both pain and swelling were positive by [ 111 In]leukocyte scintigraphy. There was little correlation between the stage of the disease, as determined by radiography, and [ 111 In]leukocyte accumulation. This study suggests that [ 111 In]leukocyte imaging may be a reliable procedure for monitoring the activity of rheumatoid arthritis, especially for confirming the lack of an ongoing inflammatory response

  3. Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are increased and exert immunosuppressive activity together with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesarina Giallongo

    Full Text Available Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell population, including myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, able to inhibit T cells activity. We identified a significantly expanded MDSCs population in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients at diagnosis that decreased to normal levels after imatinib therapy. In addition, expression of arginase 1 (Arg1 that depletes microenvironment of arginine, an essential aminoacid for T cell function, resulted in an increase in patients at diagnosis. Purified CML CD11b+CD33+CD14-HLADR- cells markedly suppressed normal donor T cell proliferation in vitro. Comparing CML Gr-MDSCs to autologous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs we observed a higher Arg1 expression and activity in PMNs, together with an inhibitory effect on T cells in vitro. Our data indicate that CML cells create an immuno-tolerant environment associated to MDSCs expansion with immunosuppressive capacity mediated by Arg1. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time also an immunosuppressive activity of CML PMNs, suggesting a strong potential immune escape mechanism created by CML cells, which control the anti-tumor reactive T cells. MDSCs should be monitored in imatinib discontinuation trials to understand their importance in relapsing patients.

  4. The effect of core and lanthanide ion dopants in sodium fluoride-based nanocrystals on phagocytic activity of human blood leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sojka, Bartlomiej; Liskova, Aurelia; Kuricova, Miroslava; Banski, Mateusz; Misiewicz, Jan; Dusinska, Maria; Horvathova, Mira; Ilavska, Silvia; Szabova, Michaela; Rollerova, Eva; Podhorodecki, Artur; Tulinska, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Sodium fluoride-based β-NaLnF4 nanoparticles (NPs) doped with lanthanide ions are promising materials for application as luminescent markers in bio-imaging. In this work, the effect of NPs doped with yttrium (Y), gadolinium (Gd), europium (Eu), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb) and terbium (Tb) ions on phagocytic activity of monocytes and granulocytes and the respiratory burst was examined. The surface functionalization of <10-nm NPs was performed according to our variation of patent pending ligand exchange method that resulted in meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) molecules on their surface. Y-core-based NCs were doped with Eu ions, which enabled them to be excited with UV light wavelengths. Cultures of human peripheral blood (n = 8) were in vitro treated with five different concentrations of eight NPs for 24 h. In summary, neither type of nanoparticles is found toxic with respect to conducted test; however, some cause toxic effects (they have statistically significant deviations compared to reference) in some selected doses tested. Both core types of NPs (Y-core and Gd-core) impaired the phagocytic activity of monocytes the strongest, having minimal or none whatsoever influence on granulocytes and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells. The lowest toxicity was observed in Gd-core, Yb, Tm dopants and near-infrared nanoparticles. Clear dose-dependent effect of NPs on phagocytic activity of leukocytes and respiratory burst of cells was observed for limited number of samples.

  5. The effect of core and lanthanide ion dopants in sodium fluoride-based nanocrystals on phagocytic activity of human blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Bartlomiej; Liskova, Aurelia; Kuricova, Miroslava; Banski, Mateusz; Misiewicz, Jan; Dusinska, Maria; Horvathova, Mira; Ilavska, Silvia; Szabova, Michaela; Rollerova, Eva; Podhorodecki, Artur; Tulinska, Jana

    2017-02-01

    Sodium fluoride-based β-NaLnF4 nanoparticles (NPs) doped with lanthanide ions are promising materials for application as luminescent markers in bio-imaging. In this work, the effect of NPs doped with yttrium (Y), gadolinium (Gd), europium (Eu), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb) and terbium (Tb) ions on phagocytic activity of monocytes and granulocytes and the respiratory burst was examined. The surface functionalization of toxic with respect to conducted test; however, some cause toxic effects (they have statistically significant deviations compared to reference) in some selected doses tested. Both core types of NPs (Y-core and Gd-core) impaired the phagocytic activity of monocytes the strongest, having minimal or none whatsoever influence on granulocytes and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells. The lowest toxicity was observed in Gd-core, Yb, Tm dopants and near-infrared nanoparticles. Clear dose-dependent effect of NPs on phagocytic activity of leukocytes and respiratory burst of cells was observed for limited number of samples.

  6. The effect of core and lanthanide ion dopants in sodium fluoride-based nanocrystals on phagocytic activity of human blood leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sojka, Bartlomiej [Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Department of Experimental Physics (Poland); Liskova, Aurelia; Kuricova, Miroslava [Slovak Medical University, Medical Faculty, Department of Immunology and Immunotoxicology (Slovakia); Banski, Mateusz; Misiewicz, Jan [Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Department of Experimental Physics (Poland); Dusinska, Maria [Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Health Effects Laboratory, Department of Environmental Chemistry (Norway); Horvathova, Mira; Ilavska, Silvia; Szabova, Michaela [Slovak Medical University, Medical Faculty, Department of Immunology and Immunotoxicology (Slovakia); Rollerova, Eva [Slovak Medical University, Faculty of Public Health, Department of Toxicology (Slovakia); Podhorodecki, Artur, E-mail: artur.p.podhorodecki@pwr.edu.pl [Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Department of Experimental Physics (Poland); Tulinska, Jana, E-mail: jana.tulinska@szu.sk [Slovak Medical University, Medical Faculty, Department of Immunology and Immunotoxicology (Slovakia)

    2017-02-15

    Sodium fluoride-based β-NaLnF4 nanoparticles (NPs) doped with lanthanide ions are promising materials for application as luminescent markers in bio-imaging. In this work, the effect of NPs doped with yttrium (Y), gadolinium (Gd), europium (Eu), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb) and terbium (Tb) ions on phagocytic activity of monocytes and granulocytes and the respiratory burst was examined. The surface functionalization of <10-nm NPs was performed according to our variation of patent pending ligand exchange method that resulted in meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) molecules on their surface. Y-core-based NCs were doped with Eu ions, which enabled them to be excited with UV light wavelengths. Cultures of human peripheral blood (n = 8) were in vitro treated with five different concentrations of eight NPs for 24 h. In summary, neither type of nanoparticles is found toxic with respect to conducted test; however, some cause toxic effects (they have statistically significant deviations compared to reference) in some selected doses tested. Both core types of NPs (Y-core and Gd-core) impaired the phagocytic activity of monocytes the strongest, having minimal or none whatsoever influence on granulocytes and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells. The lowest toxicity was observed in Gd-core, Yb, Tm dopants and near-infrared nanoparticles. Clear dose-dependent effect of NPs on phagocytic activity of leukocytes and respiratory burst of cells was observed for limited number of samples.

  7. Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Induced Overexpression of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM) Facilitates Trafficking of Infected Lymphocytes through the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curis, Céline; Percher, Florent; Jeannin, Patricia; Montange, Thomas; Chevalier, Sébastien A; Seilhean, Danielle; Cartier, Luis; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Gout, Olivier; Gessain, Antoine; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel; Afonso, Philippe V

    2016-08-15

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). This disease develops upon infiltration of HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes into the central nervous system, mostly the thoracic spinal cord. The central nervous system is normally protected by a physiological structure called the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists primarily of a continuous endothelium with tight junctions. In this study, we investigated the role of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, in the crossing of the BBB by HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes. We demonstrated that ALCAM is overexpressed on the surface of HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes, both in chronically infected cell lines and in primary infected CD4(+) T lymphocytes. ALCAM overexpression results from the activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway by the viral transactivator Tax. In contrast, staining of spinal cord sections of HAM/TSP patients showed that ALCAM expression is not altered on the BBB endothelium in the context of HTLV-1 infection. ALCAM blockade or downregulation of ALCAM levels significantly reduced the migration of HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes across a monolayer of human BBB endothelial cells. This study suggests a potential role for ALCAM in HAM/TSP pathogenesis. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). This disease is the consequence of the infiltration of HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes into the central nervous system (CNS), mostly the thoracic spinal cord. The CNS is normally protected by a physiological structure called the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists primarily of a continuous endothelium with tight junctions. The mechanism of migration of lymphocytes into the CNS is unclear

  8. Stem cell collection in unmanipulated HLA-haploidentical/mismatched related transplantation with combined granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilised blood and bone marrow for patients with haematologic malignancies: the impact of donor characteristics and procedural settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Chen, X-H; Zhang, X; Gao, L; Gao, L; Kong, P-Y; Peng, X-G; Sun, A-H; Gong, Y; Zeng, D-F; Wang, Q-Y

    2010-06-01

    Unmanipulated haploidentical/mismatched related transplantation with combined granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilised peripheral blood stem cells (G-PBSCs) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilised bone marrow (G-BM) has been developed as an alternative transplantation strategy for patients with haematologic malignancies. However, little information is available about the factors predicting the outcome of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection and bone marrow (BM) harvest in this transplantation. The effects of donor characteristics and procedure factors on CD34(+) cell yield were investigated. A total of 104 related healthy donors received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) followed by PBSC collection and BM harvest. Male donors had significantly higher yields compared with female donors. In multiple regression analysis for peripheral blood collection, age and flow rate were negatively correlated with cell yield, whereas body mass index, pre-aphaeresis white blood cell (WBC) and circulating immature cell (CIC) counts were positively correlated with cell yields. For BM harvest, age was negatively correlated with cell yields, whereas pre-BM collection CIC counts were positively correlated with cell yield. All donors achieved the final product of >or=6 x10(6) kg(-1) recipient body weight. This transplantation strategy has been shown to be a feasible approach with acceptable outcomes in stem cell collection for patients who received HLA-haploidentical/mismatched transplantation with combined G-PBSCs and G-BM. In donors with multiple high-risk characteristics for poor aphaeresis CD34(+) cell yield, BM was an alternative source.

  9. Crossing the Vascular Wall: Common and Unique Mechanisms Exploited by Different Leukocyte Subsets during Extravasation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schnoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte extravasation is one of the essential and first steps during the initiation of inflammation. Therefore, a better understanding of the key molecules that regulate this process may help to develop novel therapeutics for treatment of inflammation-based diseases such as atherosclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. The endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are known as the central mediators of leukocyte adhesion to and transmigration across the endothelium. Engagement of these molecules by their leukocyte integrin receptors initiates the activation of several signaling pathways within both leukocytes and endothelium. Several of such events have been described to occur during transendothelial migration of all leukocyte subsets, whereas other mechanisms are known only for a single leukocyte subset. Here, we summarize current knowledge on regulatory mechanisms of leukocyte extravasation from a leukocyte and endothelial point of view, respectively. Specifically, we will focus on highlighting common and unique mechanisms that specific leukocyte subsets exploit to succeed in crossing endothelial monolayers.

  10. Diminished ability of erythrocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus to limit opsonized immune complex deposition on leukocytes and activation of granulocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Rasmussen, J M; Voss, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the ability of normal erythrocytes and erythrocytes from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients to bind immune complexes (IC), thereby inhibiting IC deposition on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the consequent induction of a PMN respiratory burst (RB). METHODS...

  11. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Amplification of Interleukin-1β and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production in THP-1 Human Monocytic Cells Stimulated with Lipopolysaccharide of Oral Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Baqui, A. A. M. A.; Meiller, Timothy F.; Chon, Jennifer J.; Turng, Been-Foo; Falkler, William A.

    1998-01-01

    Cytokines, including granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), are used to assist in bone marrow recovery during cancer chemotherapy. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) play important roles in inflammatory processes, including exacerbation of periodontal diseases, one of the most common complications in patients who undergo this therapy. A human monocyte cell line (THP-1) was utilized to investigate IL-1β and TNF-α production following GM-CSF suppl...

  12. Stem cell mobilization induced by subcutaneous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to improve cardiac regeneration after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: result of the double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled stem cells in myocardial infarction (STEMMI) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Jørgensen, Erik; Wang, Yongzhong

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase 1 clinical trials of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment after myocardial infarction have indicated that G-CSF treatment is safe and may improve left ventricular function. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial aimed to assess the efficacy...... hours after symptom onset. Patients were randomized to double-blind treatment with G-CSF (10 microg/kg of body weight) or placebo for 6 days. The primary end point was change in systolic wall thickening from baseline to 6 months determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An independent core...

  13. Adsorption of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene, and glass: effect of solvent additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, T P

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of recombinant-derived proteins to glass and polymeric materials used in their packaging and delivery remains a problem. Loss of these very expensive proteins to surface adsorption not only results in reduced yields during purification and scale-up, but also to decreased therapeutic efficacy. The purpose of the present investigation was to inhibit/minimize adsorption of a model protein, namely, recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to glass, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polypropylene by inclusion of select solvent additives. Solvent additives used to inhibit/minimize surface adsorption included glycerin, U.S.P. (0.5%, 1%, 5%, and 25% v/v), Pluronic F-127 (0.005%, 0.05%, and 0.5% w/w), Pluronic F-68 (0.005%, 0.05%, and 0.5% w/w), Tween 80 (0.005% and 0.05% w/w) and Tween 20 (0.005%, 0.05%, and 0.5% w/w). Over the rhG-CSF concentration range of 0.0 ng/ml to 300 ng/ml, the amount of rhG-CSF bound per cm2 of PVC increased with an increase in the rhG-CSF concentration tested. At rhG-CSF equilibrium concentrations of 262 +/- 3.7 ng/ml and 136 +/- 1.9 ng/ml, the rhG-CSF bound/cm2 of PVC at 22 degrees C and 45 degrees C reached a maximum of 37.6 +/- 9.8 ng/cm2 and 165.2 +/- 11.7 ng/cm2, respectively. The adsorption isotherms determined at each temperature were described by the classic Freundlich equation. Moreover, the rate of adsorption of rhG-CSF to PVC was extremely rapid. The mean values of the percent of rhG-CSF bound to PVC after only 10 minutes of equilibration at 22 degrees C and 45 degrees C were 92.8 +/- 9.2 percent and 97.3 +/- 17.9 percent, respectively. The mean values of the percent of rhG-CSF bound to PVC at 22 degrees C and 45 degrees C after 24 hours were 52.4 +/- 10.9% and 70.0 +/- 9.7%, respectively, indicating that some desorption of rhG-CSF does occur during 24 hr. However, surface adsorption of rhG-CSF to PVC was shown to be irreversible over a 1 hr time period. Using viscometry, an estimate of the thickness

  14. Effect of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor With or Without Supervised Exercise on Walking Performance in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: The PROPEL Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Mary M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Tian, Lu; Guralnik, Jack M; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Kibbe, Melina R; Polonsky, Tamar S; Domanchuk, Kathryn; Stein, James H; Zhao, Lihui; Taylor, Doris; Skelly, Christopher; Pearce, William; Perlman, Harris; McCarthy, Walter; Li, Lingyu; Gao, Ying; Sufit, Robert; Bloomfield, Christina L; Criqui, Michael H

    2017-12-05

    Benefits of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for improving walking ability in people with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) are unclear. Walking exercise may augment the effects of GM-CSF in PAD, since exercise-induced ischemia enhances progenitor cell release and may promote progenitor cell homing to ischemic calf muscle. To determine whether GM-CSF combined with supervised treadmill exercise improves 6-minute walk distance, compared with exercise alone and compared with GM-CSF alone; to determine whether GM-CSF alone improves 6-minute walk more than placebo and whether exercise improves 6-minute walk more than an attention control intervention. Randomized clinical trial with 2 × 2 factorial design. Participants were identified from the Chicago metropolitan area and randomized between January 6, 2012, and December 22, 2016, to 1 of 4 groups: supervised exercise + GM-CSF (exercise + GM-CSF) (n = 53), supervised exercise + placebo (exercise alone) (n = 53), attention control  + GM-CSF (GM-CSF alone) (n = 53), attention control + placebo (n = 51). The final follow-up visit was on August 15, 2017. Supervised exercise consisted of treadmill exercise 3 times weekly for 6 months. The attention control consisted of weekly educational lectures by clinicians for 6 months. GM-CSF (250 μg/m2/d) or placebo were administered subcutaneously (double-blinded) 3 times/wk for the first 2 weeks of the intervention. The primary outcome was change in 6-minute walk distance at 12-week follow-up (minimum clinically important difference, 20 m). P values were adjusted based on the Hochberg step-up method. Of 827 persons evaluated, 210 participants with PAD were randomized (mean age, 67.0 [SD, 8.6] years; 141 [67%] black, 82 [39%] women). One hundred ninety-five (93%) completed 12-week follow-up. At 12-week follow-up, exercise + GM-CSF did not significantly improve 6-minute walk distance more than

  15. Distorted leukocyte migration, angiogenesis, wound repair and metastasis in Tspan8 and Tspan8/CD151 double knockout mice indicate complementary activities of Tspan8 and CD51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Erb, Ulrike; Hackert, Thilo; Zöller, Margot; Yue, Shijing

    2018-02-01

    The tetraspanin Tspan8 supports via associated integrins and proteases tumor progression and angiogenesis. To shed light on its activities in non-transformed cells, we generated a Tspan8 knockout (ko) mouse, comparing leukocyte migration, angiogenesis, wound healing and tumor growth with wild type, CD151ko and Tspan8/CD151ko (dbko) mice. CD151ko mice were included as CD151 activities resemble that of Tspan8, and dbko mice to exclude mutual substitution. Tspan8ko and dbko mice show no pathological phenotype. However, delayed type hypersensitivity reactions are mitigated in Tspan8ko mice, angiogenesis is severely impaired in Tspan8ko, CD151ko and dbko mice, with Tspan8 mostly affecting lymphangiogenesis. Distinct contributions of CD151 and Tspan8 to skin wound healing rely on preferentially CD151 anchoring basal keratinocytes and Tspan8 promoting motility. Proliferation of wounded skin keratinocytes is not affected. Metastasis formation of a melanoma and a Tspan8-expressing pancreatic cancer line was impaired in Tspan8ko and dbko mice, pointing towards a contribution of host Tspan8 to tumor progression. In line with the importance of tetraspanins in exosome-mediated intercellular communication, defects became mitigated by Tspan8/CD151-competent serum exosomes, which offers a most promising therapeutic option for chronic wounds and arteriosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The functional polymorphism rs73598374:G>A (p.Asp8Asn) of the ADA gene is associated with telomerase activity and leukocyte telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concetti, Fabio; Carpi, Francesco M; Nabissi, Massimo; Picciolini, Matteo; Santoni, Giorgio; Napolioni, Valerio

    2015-02-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated a relevant role of adenosine deaminase (ADA) in replicative senescence of T cells through its capacity to modulate telomerase activity (TA). Herein, we tested the impact of the functional polymorphism ADA rs73598374:G>A (c.22G>A, p.Asp8Asn) on telomere biology, by measuring TA and leukocyte telomere length (LTL) in healthy subjects selected according to rs73598374 genotype. rs73598374-A carriers showed lower TA (P=0.019) and shorter LTL (P=0.003), respectively, compared to G/G carriers. rs73598374-A carriers showed a stronger cross-sectional age reduction of LTL (r=-0.314, P=0.005) compared to G/G carriers (r=-0.243, P=0.022). The reduced ADA activity associated to rs73598374-A variant predisposes those carriers to display higher levels of adenosine compared to G/G carriers. Consequently, it may lead to an accelerated process of replicative senescence, causing a stronger reduction of TA and in turn shorter LTL. In conclusion, the crucial role played by replicative senescence of the immune system in several human diseases and in the aging process underscores the relevance of the present findings and also spurs interest into the possible involvement of rs73598374 in shaping the susceptibility to several age-related diseases.

  17. Leukocyte scintiscanning for the diagnosis of inflammations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, W.

    1988-01-01

    The value of leukocyte scintiscanning for clinical diagnostics is examined with regard to various areas of indications, and as a method of first examination, or as an alternative to, or additional method to be combined with, the other usual techniques. Leukocyte scintiscanning is indicated as a good first examination method in case of chronic enteritis in a highly active stage, stenosis of the colon, or when abscess is suspected, or infected renal cysts, or infection of angioplasty, osteomyelitis, or in case of fiever of unknown origin and impossible focal diagnosis. It also is applicable for follow-up diagnostics in chronic enteritis, suspected abdominal abscess, prosthetic valvular endocarditis, and infection of hip joint prothesis. The method also may yield additional information in case of renal graft rejection, coronary inflammations, for differential diagnosis of brain tumor or abcess, edematous or antodigestive pancreatitis, and in chronic polyarthritis. For leukocyte labelling, indium-111 and Tc-99m are primarily used. (ECB) [de

  18. Pathogenic triad in bacterial meningitis: pathogen invasion, NF-κB activation and leukocyte transmigration that occur at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-He eHuang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis remains the leading cause of disabilities worldwide. This life-threatening disease has a high mortality rate despite the availability of antibiotics and improved critical care. The interactions between bacterial surface components and host defense systems that initiate bacterial meningitis have been studied in molecular and cellular detail over the past several decades. Bacterial meningitis commonly exhibits triad hallmark features (THFs: pathogen penetration, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-B activation in coordination with type 1 interferon (IFN signaling and leukocyte transmigration that occur at the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which consists mainly of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC. This review outlines the progression of these early inter-correlated events contributing to the central nervous system (CNS inflammation and injury during the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis. A better understanding of these issues is not only imperative to elucidating the pathogenic mechanism of bacterial meningitis, but may also provide the in-depth insight into the development of novel therapeutic interventions against this disease.

  19. Inhibition of p38 MAPK during cellular activation modulate gene expression of head kidney leukocytes isolated from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fed soy bean oil or fish oil based diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holen, E; Winterthun, S; Du, Z-Y; Krøvel, A V

    2011-01-01

    Head kidney leukocytes isolated from Atlantic salmon fed either a diet based on fish oil (FO) or soy bean oil (VO) were used in order to evaluate if different lipid sources could contribute to cellular activation of the salmon innate immune system. A specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK, SB202190, was used to investigate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signalling in the head kidney leukocytes. The results show that LPS up regulate IL-1β, TNF-α, Cox2 expression in leukocytes isolated from fish fed either diet. The p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB202190, reduced the LPS induced expression of these genes in both dietary groups. In LPS stimulated leukocytes isolated from VO fed fish, SB202190 showed a clear dose dependent inhibitory effect on IL-1β, TNF-α and Cox2 expression. This effect was also observed for Cox2 in leukocytes isolated from FO fed fish. Furthermore, there was a stronger mean induction of Cox2 in LPS stimulated leucocytes isolated from the VO-group compared to LPS stimulated leukocytes isolated from the FO-group. In both dietary groups, LPS stimulation of salmon head kidney leukocytes increased the induction of CD83, a dendrite cell marker, while the inhibitor reduced CD83 expression in the VO fed fish only. The inhibitor also clearly reduced hsp27 expression in VO fed fish. Indicating a p38 MAPK feedback loop, LPS significantly inhibited the expression of p38MAPK itself in both diets, while SB202190 increased p38MAPK expression especially in the VO diet group. hsp70 expression was not affected by any treatment or feed composition. There were also differences in p38MAPK protein phosphorylation comparing treatment groups but no obvious difference comparing the two dietary groups. The results indicate that dietary fatty acids have the ability to modify signalling through p38 MAPK which may have consequences for the fish's ability to handle infections and stress. Signalling through p38MAPK is ligand dependent and affects gene and protein expression differently

  20. Peripheral Blood Leukocytes and Serum Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction Are Complementary Methods for Monitoring Active Cytomegalovirus Infection in Transplant Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PD Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human cytomegalovirus is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR has proven to be a sensitive and effective technique in defining active cytomegalovirus infection, in addition to having low cost and being a useful test for situations in which there is no need for quantification. Real-time PCR has the advantage of quantification; however, the high cost of this methodology makes it impractical for routine use.

  1. [Influence of granulocyte colony stimulating factor on distribution of bone marrow stem cells and its role in protecting brain in rats with cerebral ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-sheng; Liu, Jing-xia; Liu, Ke; Wang, Ding-chao; Ren, Wei-hong; Zhang, Xin-feng; Tian, Yu-shou

    2011-06-01

    To explore the influence of recombination granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rG-CSF) on mobilization and distribution of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) in blood and brain tissue, and its role in protecting brain in rats with cerebral ischemia. One hundred and six Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into sham-operated group (n=10),model group (n=48), rG-CSF group (n=48) according to the method of random digital table, and rats in model and rG-CSF groups were divided into four subgroups: i.e. 2, 3, 7 and 14 days subgroups, with 12 rats in each subgroup. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model was reproduced with nylon thread. In rats of rG-CSF group rG-CSF (10 μg/kg) was administered by subcutaneous injection 3 days before and 2 days after operation respectively, once a day. Rats in sham-operated and model groups were administered with normal saline in the same volume, once a day. At the corresponding time after operation, general neural function score (GNFS) of rats was measured. Blood was collected through abdominal aorta, then white blood cell (WBC) and CD34+ cells in peripheral blood were counted. Brain pathologic changes were observed, and expression of CD34+ cells in rats brain tissue was determined by using immunohistochemical method. (1) GNFS was lower obviously in 2-day model group compared with that in sham-operated group, and then increased gradually. At 7 days and 14 days after operation, GNFS in rG-CSF group was higher significantly than that in model group (7 days: 11.86±0.69 vs. 10.53±0.76, 14 days: 13.38±0.52 vs. 12.38±0.52, both P<0.01). (2) WBC and CD34+ cells in peripheral blood in model group increased obviously, with the highest level appeared at 3 days and lowered at 7 days and 14 days. Increase of WBC and CD34+ cells in rats of rG-CSF group was more obvious than that of model group at each time point except CD34+ in 14 days group [WBC (×10(9)/L) 2 days: 11.75±1.76 vs. 8.07±1.27, 3 days: 13.07±1.70 vs. 10.88±1.78, 7 days: 8

  2. Bid truncation, Bid/Bax targeting to the mitochondria, and caspase activation associated with neutrophil apoptosis are inhibited by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maianski, Nikolai A.; Roos, Dirk; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2004-01-01

    Neutrophil apoptosis constitutes a way of managing neutrophil-mediated reactions. It allows coping with infections, but avoiding overt bystander tissue damage. Using digitonin-based subcellular fractionation and Western blotting, we found that spontaneous apoptosis of human neutrophils (after

  3. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded BARF1 protein is a decoy receptor for macrophage colony stimulating factor and interferes with macrophage differentiation and activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebe, Eveline K.; Le Large, Tessa Y. S.; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Oosterhoff, Dinja; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Middeldorp, Jaap M.; Greijer, Astrid E.

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), like many other persistent herpes viruses, has acquired numerous mechanisms for subverting or evading immune surveillance. This study investigates the role of secreted EBV-encoded BARF1 protein (sBARF1) in creating an immune evasive microenvironment. Wild-type consensus

  4. Activation of adenosine A3 receptors supports hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in sublethally irradiated mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Šefc, L.; Dušek, L.; Vacek, Antonín; Holá, Jiřina; Hoferová, Zuzana; Štreitová, Denisa

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 8 (2010), s. 649-656 ISSN 0955-3002 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0158 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : ionising radiation * hematopoiesis * adenosine A3 receptors Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.861, year: 2010

  5. The Combination of Fosfomycin, Metronidazole, and Recombinant Human Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor is Stable in vitro and Has Maintained Antibacterial Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnes, Siv; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane; Gasbjerg, Lærke Smidt

    2017-01-01

    to the antibacterial effects of fosfomycin and metronidazole alone. CONCLUSION: The drug combination had neutral and stable pH, was iso-osmotic, and had stable concentrations during 24 h of storage. The antibacterial effect of fosfomycin and metronidazole were not altered when the drugs were mixed....

  6. Effect of diclofenac alone or in combination with alpha-tocopherol on the oxidative activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in healthy and osteoartheritic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Arfaj, Abdurahman S.; Alballa, Sulaiman R.; Mustafa, Ali A.; Al-Tuwajiri, Ali S.; Al-Humayyad, M.S.; Al-Dalaan, Abdullah N.

    2004-01-01

    To ivestigate the effects of diclofenac alone or when combined with alpha-tocopherol on the oxidative activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in healthy and osteoartheritic (OA) patients. The study was carried out at the College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, KIgdom of Saudi Arabia, over the period 1999 to 2000. 12 healthy controls and 12 osteoartheritic patients were recruited to the study. They were given diclofenac 50mg thricedaily orally, initially for 5 days then alpha-tocopherol at 200mg thrice daily orally, was added for another 5 days. Blood samples were drawn before the start of study and at 5 days following treatmentwith diclofenac alone and 10 days following treatment with diclophenac and alpha-tocopherol. Chemiluminescence (CL)reponse was measured for wohle blood and isolated (PMNs) on all samples. Diclofenac enhanced CL response of whole blood and PMNs of healthy controls when stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonized zymosan (OPZ). Cotreatment with alpha-tocopherol resulted in no appreciable change in the CL response of whole blood when stimulated with PMA or OPZ but a further significant enhancement of CL response of isolated PMNs when these cells were stimulated by either PMA or OPZ. In osteoartheritic patients, diclofenac alone and when combined with alpha-tocopherol showed no significant change in CL response of the whole blood.The CL response of PMNs from OA patients was decreased by diclofenac alone. However the inhibitory effect was not observed when alpha-tocopherol was used together with diclofenac. The effect of diclofenac alone or in combination with alpha-tocopherol did not produce a consistent effect on the CL response of whole blood or isolated PMNs of healthy or osteoartheritic patients. (author)

  7. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Hughes

    Full Text Available Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible.To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10-15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension.Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes.

  8. The expression and functional activity of membrane-bound human leukocyte antigen-G1 are influenced by the 3'-untranslated region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Signe Goul; Hantash, Basil M; Zhao, Longmei

    2013-01-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is an immunosuppressive molecule acting on both the innate and adaptive immune system. A 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs66554220) in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of the HLA-G gene has been associated with a number of diseases, pregnancy complication...

  9. Combined blockade of ADP receptors and PI3-kinase p110β fully prevents platelet and leukocyte activation during hypothermic extracorporeal circulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Krajewski

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal circulation (ECC and hypothermia are used to maintain stable circulatory parameters and improve the ischemia tolerance of patients in cardiac surgery. However, ECC and hypothermia induce activation mechanisms in platelets and leukocytes, which are mediated by the platelet agonist ADP and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K p110β. Under clinical conditions these processes are associated with life-threatening complications including thromboembolism and inflammation. This study analyzes effects of ADP receptor P(2Y(12 and P(2Y(1 blockade and PI3K p110β inhibition on platelets and granulocytes during hypothermic ECC. Human blood was treated with the P(2Y(12 antagonist 2-MeSAMP, the P(2Y(1 antagonist MRS2179, the PI3K p110β inhibitor TGX-221, combinations thereof, or PBS and propylene glycol (controls. Under static in vitro conditions a concentration-dependent effect regarding the inhibition of ADP-induced platelet activation was found using 2-MeSAMP or TGX-221. Further inhibition of ADP-mediated effects was achieved with MRS2179. Next, blood was circulated in an ex vivo ECC model at 28°C for 30 minutes and various platelet and granulocyte markers were investigated using flow cytometry, ELISA and platelet count analysis. GPIIb/IIIa activation induced by hypothermic ECC was inhibited using TGX-221 alone or in combination with P(2Y blockers (p<0.05, while no effect of hypothermic ECC or antiplatelet agents on GPIIb/IIIa and GPIbα expression and von Willebrand factor binding was observed. Sole P(2Y and PI3K blockade or a combination thereof inhibited P-selectin expression on platelets and platelet-derived microparticles during hypothermic ECC (p<0.05. P(2Y blockade alone or combined with TGX-221 prevented ECC-induced platelet-granulocyte aggregate formation (p<0.05. Platelet adhesion to the ECC surface, platelet loss and Mac-1 expression on granulocytes were inhibited by combined P(2Y and PI3K blockade (p<0.05. Combined blockade of P

  10. Combination Immunotherapy of B16 Melanoma Using Anti–Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte–Associated Antigen 4 (Ctla-4) and Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (Gm-Csf)-Producing Vaccines Induces Rejection of Subcutaneous and Metastatic Tumors Accompanied by Autoimmune Depigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elsas, Andrea; Hurwitz, Arthur A.; Allison, James P.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) blockade, alone or in combination with a granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)–expressing tumor cell vaccine, on rejection of the highly tumorigenic, poorly immunogenic murine melanoma B16-BL6. Recently established tumors could be eradicated in 80% (68/85) of the cases using combination treatment, whereas each treatment by itself showed little or no effect. Tumor rejection was dependent on CD8+ and NK1.1+ cells but occurred irrespective of the presence of CD4+ T cells. Mice surviving a primary challenge rejected a secondary challenge with B16-BL6 or the parental B16-F0 line. The same treatment regimen was found to be therapeutically effective against outgrowth of preestablished B16-F10 lung metastases, inducing long-term survival. Of all mice surviving B16-BL6 or B16-F10 tumors after combination treatment, 56% (38/68) developed depigmentation, starting at the site of vaccination or challenge and in most cases progressing to distant locations. Depigmentation was found to occur in CD4-depleted mice, strongly suggesting that the effect was mediated by CTLs. This study shows that CTLA-4 blockade provides a powerful tool to enhance T cell activation and memory against a poorly immunogenic spontaneous murine tumor and that this may involve recruitment of autoreactive T cells. PMID:10430624

  11. Sustained trilineage recovery and disappearance of abnormal chromosome clone in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome following combination therapy with cytokines (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and erythropoietin) and high-dose methylprednisolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Y; Fukuoka, T; Nakatani, A; Ohsaka, A; Takahashi, A

    1996-04-01

    We report a case of hypoplastic myelodyplastic syndrome (MDS) (refractory anemia (RA)) in which sustained trilineage haematological response and persistent disappearance of an abnormal chromosome clone were achieved after treatment with combination therapy of cytokines (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and erythropoietin (Epo)) and methylprednisolone (mPSL) pulse dose. The patient's haematological recovery was rapid and maintained even after cessation of the therapy. In addition, the predominant chromosome clone 13q- in bone marrow cells disappeared in the fourth week. The patient's improved bone marrow haemopoiesis and disappearance of the abnormal chromosome has continued to the present, 13 months after treatment. The occurrence of both trilineage response and abnormal chromosome disappearance in MDS patients treated with cytokine(s) or steroids is rare. Combination therapy might therefore be advantageous in MDS.

  12. Electrophoretic detection of protein p53 in human leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paponov, V.D.; Kupsik, E.G.; Shcheglova, E.G.; Yarullin, N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have found an acid-soluble protein with mol. wt. of about 53 kD in peripheral blood leukocytes of persons with Down's syndrome. It was present in different quantities in all 20 patients tested, but was virtually not discovered in 12 healthy blood donors. This paper determines the possible identity of this protein with protein p53 from mouse ascites carcinoma by comparing their electrophoretic mobilities, because the accuracy of electrophoretic determination of the molecular weight of proteins is not sufficient to identify them. The paper also describes experiments to detect a protein with electrophoretic mobility identical with that of a protein in the leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome in leukocytes of patients with leukemia. To discover if protein p53 is involved in cell proliferation, the protein composition of leukocytes from healthy blood donors, cultured in the presence and absence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), was compared. Increased incorporation of H 3-thymidine by leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome is explained by the presence of a population of immature leukocytes actively synthesizing DNA in the peripheral blood of these patients, and this can also explain the presence of protein p53 in the leukocytes of these patients

  13. Protective activities of a Chinese medicine, Hochu-ekki-to, to impairment of hematopoietic organs and to microbial infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Satoru; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kumazawa, Yoshio; Nishimura, Chiaki

    1990-01-01

    Effect of Hochu-ekki-to (HET) on the number of peripheral leukocytes (PL) and their functions in cyclophosphamide (CY)-treated or γ ray-irradiated mice was investigated. By treatment of mice with anticancer agent CY or γ ray irradiation, unfavorable side effects usually occurred to impair hematopoietic organs, causing bone marrow disorder. However, it was significantly protected by oral administration of HET (1 g/kg/d) to CY-treated or γ ray-irradiated mice. The numbers of neutrophils and monocytes in PL were restored to the normal level, and colony-stimulating factor (CSF) was induced in the sera of mice by HET in a dose-dependent manner. The induction of serum CSF reached a peak at 3 h after HET administration. Colony-forming unit of bone marrow cells in the spleen adoptively transfered into syngeneic mice, that is defined as CFU-S, was extremely reduced by CY-treatment. However, when HET was orally administered, CFU-S of CY-treated mice was markedly stimulated, suggesting that bone marrow cells were reactivated for further proliferation and mobilization. HET enhanced other leukocyte functions in CY-treated mice; i.e., superoxide production of neutrophils and phagocytic activity of macrophages. Thus, oral administration of HET to CY-treated mice enforced protection against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. (author)

  14. Serum activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in patients with gastric cancer: Can they be used as biomarkers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Kayhan; Tastekin, Didem; Bilgin, Elif; Serilmez, Murat; Bozbey, Hamza Ugur; Sakar, Burak

    2016-02-01

    Cellular adhesion molecules might be used as markers in diagnosis and prognosis in some types of malignant tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical significance of the serum levels of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule-1 (ALCAM) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in gastric cancer (GC) patients. Fifty-eight GC patients and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled into this study. Pretreatment serum markers were determined by the solid-phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The median age at diagnosis was 59.5 years (range 32-82 years). Tumor localizations of the majority of the patients were antrum (n=42, 72.4%) and tumor histopathologies of the majority of the patients were diffuse (n=43, 74.1%). The majority of the patients had stage IV disease (n=41, 70.7%). Thirty six (62.1%) patients had lymph node involvement. The median follow-up time was 66 months (range 1-97.2 months). At the end of the observation period, 26 patients (44.8%) were dead. The median survival for all patients was 21.4±5 months (%95 CI, 11.5-31.3). The 1-year survival rates were 66.2%. The baseline serum ALCAM levels of the patients were significantly higher than those of the controls (p=0.001). There was no significant difference in the serum levels of ICAM-1 between the patients and controls (p=0.232). No significant correlation was detected between the levels of the serum markers and other clinical parameters (p>0.05). Tumor localization (p=0.03), histopathology (p=0.05), and response to chemotherapy (p=0.003) had prognostic factors on survival. Neither serum ALCAM levels nor serum ICAM-1 levels were identified to have a prognostic role on overall survival (ICAM-1 p=0.6, ALCAM p=0.25). In conclusion, serum levels of ALCAM were found to have diagnostic value in GC patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Factor estimulante de colonias de granulocitos en pacientes con cáncer Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in patients with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Céspedes Quevedo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se efectuó un estudio descriptivo, longitudinal y prospectivo de 26 pacientes con cáncer en diferentes localizaciones asociado a leucopenia y neutropenia inducidas por citotóxicos, atendidos en el Servicio de Quimioterapia del Hospital Oncológico Docente "Conrado Benítez" de Santiago de Cuba, de mayo del 2011 a igual mes del 2012, con vistas a determinar el efecto del factor de colonias granulocítica recombinante Ior® LeukoCIM --producido por el Centro de Inmunología Molecular de Ciudad de La Habana-- en ellos mediante la realización de conteos globales de leucocitos y neutrófilos, antes y después de aplicar el tratamiento. En la serie predominaron el sexo femenino, el cáncer de mama y el estadio clínico II; también se obtuvo que 92,3 % de los pacientes respondieron satisfactoriamente a la terapia, el estadio clínico del cáncer no modificó el efecto mielodepresor de los citotóxicos ni el mieloestimulador de la hormona, y el cisplatino y la adriamicina se relacionaron con las neutropenias mayores y la falta de reacción al factor. Para finalizar, el Ior® LeukoCIM estimuló el sistema granulopoyético de la mayoría de los afectados.A descriptive, longitudinal and prospective study was conducted in 26 patients with cancer in different locations associated with leukopenia and neutropenia induced by cytotoxic drugs, treated at the Chemotherapy Department of "Conrado Benítez" Teaching Oncology Hospital of Santiago de Cuba, from May 2011 to the same month of 2012, with the purpose of determining the effect of the recombinant granulocyte-colony factor Ior® LeukoCIM --produced by the Center of Molecular Immunology in Havana city-- in them by means of global counts of leukocytes and neutrophils before and after applying the treatment. Female sex, breast cancer and clinical stage II prevailed in the series. It was also found that 92.3% of patients responded successfully to the therapy, the clinical stage of cancer did not modify the

  16. [Use of filgrastim, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), in radiotherapy to reduce drop-outs because of radiogenic leukopenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gava, A; Bertossi, L; Ferrarese, F; Coghetto, F; Marazzato, G; Andrulli, A D; Zorat, P L

    1998-03-01

    Radiotherapy patients are at risk of developing leukopenia, which risk depends on the irradiated volume, the rate of irradiated bone marrow and the radiation dose. Radiogenic leukopenia may cause radiotherapy drop-out, with consequent effects, on local tumor control and clinical outcome. The introduction of granulocyte growth factors, such as filgrastim, has permitted to accelerate normal neutrophil count recovery in irradiation-related neutropenia both in vitro and animal models; clinical experience in humans is still lacking, relative to both indications and scheduling. In the Oncologic Radiotherapy Department of Treviso Hospital, 31 patients irradiated for Hodgkin disease, rectal cancer and other malignancies, who presented leukopenia requiring treatment discontinuation, were given filgrastim to assess its actual effect in avoiding further drop-outs and to compare two administration schedules (2 or 3 vials, 30 MIU, weekly). Filgrastim treatment was continued throughout the radiotherapy cycles, for 1 to 5 weeks. Eighteen patients had received previous chemotherapy and 11 were undergoing concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy-irradiation. A mean 203% increase in leukocyte count was observed (136% in the patients treated with 2 vials/week and 274% in those receiving 3 vials/week); this increase was more apparent in women that in men (256% versus 91%) and slightly higher in patients 50 years old and with target volumes < 5000 ml. Filgrastin treatment was well tolerated by all patients, with no discontinuations due to adverse effects; 9 patients (29%) reported skeletal pain, which was marked in 2 of them only. Eighty percent of patients completed all the radiotherapy cycles with no discontinuation, while 6 patients dropped out because leukopenia persisted. Biweekly filgrastim administration was effective to prevent unscheduled radiotherapy discontinuation in 75% of patients and triweekly administration was effective in 86% of patients. In our experience, filgrastim

  17. Ketamine inhibits transcription factors activator protein 1 and nuclear factor-kappaB, interleukin-8 production, as well as CD11b and CD16 expression: studies in human leukocytes and leukocytic cell lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welters, I.D.; Hafer, G.; Menzebach, A.; Muhling, J.; Neuhauser, C.; Browning, P.; Goumon, Y.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent data indicate that ketamine exerts antiinflammatory actions. However, little is known about the signaling mechanisms involved in ketamine-induced immune modulation. In this study, we investigated the effects of ketamine on lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of transcription

  18. Soluble human leukocyte antigen G5 polarizes differentiation of macrophages toward a decidual macrophage-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheuk-Lun; Guo, YiFan; So, Kam-Hei; Vijayan, Madhavi; Guo, Yue; Wong, Vera H H; Yao, YuanQing; Lee, Kai-Fai; Chiu, Philip C N; Yeung, William S B

    2015-10-01

    What are the actions of soluble human leukocyte antigen G5 (sHLAG5) on macrophage differentiation? sHLAG5 polarizes the differentiation of macrophages toward a decidual macrophage-like phenotype, which could regulate fetomaternal tolerance and placental development. sHLAG5 is a full-length soluble isoform of human leukocyte antigen implicated in immune tolerance during pregnancy. Low or undetectable circulating level of sHLAG5 in first trimester of pregnancy is associated with pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia and spontaneous abortion. Decidual macrophages are located in close proximity to invasive trophoblasts, and are involved in regulating fetomaternal tolerance and placental development. Human peripheral blood monocytes were differentiated into macrophages by treatment with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the presence or absence of recombinant sHLAG5 during the differentiation process. The phenotypes and the biological activities of the resulting macrophages were compared. Recombinant sHLAG5 was produced in Escherichia coli BL21 and the protein identity was verified by tandem mass spectrometry. The expression of macrophage markers were analyzed by flow cytometry and quantitative PCR. Phagocytosis was determined by flow cytometry. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 expression and activity were measured by western blot analysis and kynurenine assay, respectively. Cell proliferation and cell cycling were determined by fluorometric cell proliferation assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Cytokine secretion was determined by cytokine array and ELISA kits. Intracellular cytokine expression was measured by flow cytometry. Cell invasion and migration were determined by trans-well invasion and migration assay, respectively. sHLAG5 drove the differentiation of macrophages with 'immuno-modulatory' characteristics, including reduced expression of M1 macrophage marker CD86 and increased expression of M2 macrophage marker CD163. sHLAG5-polarized

  19. MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in the treatment of patients with moderate rheumatoid arthritis: results of a phase Ib/IIa randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Frank; Tak, Paul P; Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoilov, Rumen; Wiland, Piotr; Huizinga, Thomas W; Berenfus, Vadym Y; Vladeva, Stoyanka; Rech, Juergen; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Korkosz, Mariusz; Rekalov, Dmitriy; Zupanets, Igor A; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Geiseler, Jens; Fresenius, Julia; Korolkiewicz, Roman P; Schottelius, Arndt J; Burkhardt, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the safety, tolerability and signs of efficacy of MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Patients with active, moderate RA were enrolled in a randomised, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial of intravenous MOR103 (0.3, 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg) once a week for 4 weeks, with follow-up to 16 weeks. The primary outcome was safety. Results Of the 96 randomised and treated subjects, 85 completed the trial (n=27, 24, 22 and 23 for pooled placebo and MOR103 0.3, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively). Treatment emergent adverse events (AEs) in the MOR103 groups were mild or moderate in intensity and generally reported at frequencies similar to those in the placebo group. The most common AE was nasopharyngitis. In two cases, AEs were classified as serious because of hospitalisation: paronychia in a placebo subject and pleurisy in a MOR103 0.3 mg/kg subject. Both patients recovered fully. In exploratory efficacy analyses, subjects in the MOR103 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg groups showed significant improvements in Disease Activity Score-28 scores and joint counts and significantly higher European League Against Rheumatism response rates than subjects receiving placebo. MOR103 1.0 mg/kg was associated with the largest reductions in disease activity parameters. Conclusions MOR103 was well tolerated and showed preliminary evidence of efficacy in patients with active RA. The data support further investigation of this monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF in RA patients and potentially in those with other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Trial registration number NCT01023256 PMID:24534756

  20. The Gottingen minipig is a model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome: G-colony stimulating factor stimulates hematopoiesis and enhances survival from lethal total-body γ-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D; Holt, Rebecca K; Whitnall, Mark H

    2013-08-01

    We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroni, Maria, E-mail: maria.moroni@usuhs.edu [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ngudiankama, Barbara F. [Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Christensen, Christine [Division of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Olsen, Cara H. [Biostatistics Consulting Center, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Owens, Rossitsa [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Lombardini, Eric D. [Veterinary Medicine Department, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok (Thailand); Holt, Rebecca K. [Veterinary Science Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Whitnall, Mark H. [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  2. Effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on empiric therapy with flomoxef sodium and tobramycin in febrile neutropenic patients with hematological malignancies. Kan-etsu Hematological Disease and Infection Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, M; Karasawa, M; Naruse, T; Fukuda, M; Hirashima, K; Oh, H; Ninomiya, H; Abe, T; Saito, K; Shishido, H; Moriyama, Y; Shibata, A; Motoyoshi, K; Nagata, N; Miura, Y

    1999-02-01

    The clinical effects of concomitant use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on empiric antibiotic therapy in febrile neutropenic patients were evaluated in a randomized fashion. Two hundred and fourteen neutropenic febrile episodes (neutrophil counts flomoxef sodium and tobramycin with or without G-CSF. The resolution of fever at day 4 (excellent response) or at day 7 (good response) was deemed effective. Among 157 evaluable episodes, the observed excellent responses were 31 (38.8%) and the good responses were 20 (25.0%) in the G-CSF group; those in the control group were 26 (33.8%) and 25 (32.5%), respectively. The overall efficacy rate was 63.8% (51/80) in the G-CSF group and 66.2% (51/77) in the control group (not significant). The initial neutrophil count was 0.186 +/- 0.249 x 10(9)/l in the G-CSF group and 0.235 +/- 0.290 x 10(9)/l in the control group, and rose to 2.889 +/- 4.198 x 10(9)/l and 0.522 +/- 0.844 x 10(9)/l, respectively, at day 7. These results indicate that G-CSF does not affect the rate of response to empiric antibiotic therapy in febrile neutropenic patients, although a significant effect of G-CSF was observed on neutrophil recovery.

  3. SEIFEM 2017: from real life to an agreement on the use of granulocyte transfusions and colony-stimulating factors for prophylaxis and treatment of infectious complications in patients with hematologic malignant disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busca, Alessandro; Cesaro, Simone; Teofili, Luciana; Delia, Mario; Cattaneo, Chiara; Criscuolo, Marianna; Marchesi, Francesco; Fracchiolla, Nicola Stefano; Valentini, Caterina Giovanna; Farina, Francesca; Di Blasi, Roberta; Prezioso, Lucia; Spolzino, Angelica; Candoni, Anna; Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Verga, Luisa; Nosari, Annamaria; Aversa, Franco; Pagano, Livio

    2018-02-01

    The rapid spread of severe infections mainly due to resistant pathogens, justifies the search for therapies aiming to restore immune functions severely compromised in patients with hematologic malignancies. Areas covered: The present review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of granulocyte transfusions and colony-stimulating factors as treatment strategy for hematologic patients with serious infectious complications. In addition, a survey among 21 hematologic centers, to evaluate the clinical practice for the use of G-CSF originator and biosimilars was performed. Expert commentary: Granulocyte transfusions with a target dose of at least 1.5-3 × 10 8 cells/kg, may be considered as an approach to bridge the gap between marrow suppression and recovery of granulocytes. G-CSF shortens the period of neutropenia, the hospitalization, the use of antibiotics and the rate of febrile neutropenia (FN) in adult and pediatric patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and in adults with acute myeloid leukemia where these advantages nevertheless, did not translate into a clinical benefit. G-CSF biosimilar showed equivalence or non-inferiority to filgrastim. There are no data supporting the use of GM-CSF, eltrombopag and erythropoietin for preventing or treating infectious complications in patients with hematologic disorders.

  4. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes

  5. Immune-enhancing effect of nano-DNA vaccine encoding a gene of the prME protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and BALB/c mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yongzhen; Zhou, Yan; Li, Ximei; Feng, Guohe

    2015-07-01

    Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM‑CSF) is an adjuvant for genetic vaccines; however, how GM-CSF enhances immunogenicity remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was demonstrated that injection of a plasmid encoding the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and mouse GM-CSF (pJME/GM-CSF) into mouse muscle recruited large and multifocal conglomerates of macrophages and granulocytes, predominantly neutrophils. During the peak of the infiltration, an appreciable number of immature dendritic cells (DCs) appeared, although no T and B-cells was detected. pJME/GM-CSF increased the number of splenic DCs and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) on splenic DC, and enhanced the antigenic capture, processing and presentation functions of splenic DCs, and the cell-mediated immunity induced by the vaccine. These findings suggested that the immune-enhancing effect by pJME/GM-CSF was associated with infiltrate size and the appearance of integrin αx (CD11c)+cells. Chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles, prepared by coacervation via intramuscular injection, outperformed standard pJME/GM-CSF administrations in DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. This revealed that muscular injection of chitosan‑pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles may enhance the immunoadjuvant properties of GM-CSF.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis in chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia among breast cancer and Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients under Taiwan's national health insurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tsun-Jen; Wen, Yu-Wen; Chien, Chun-Ru; Chiang, Shao-Chin; Hsu, William Wei-Yuan; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan

    2017-04-01

    The beneficial effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) prophylaxis on reducing the risk of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (CIFN) were well documented throughout the literature. However, existing data regarding its cost-effectiveness were conflicting. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of G-CSF prophylaxis in CIFN under Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) system. Data on clinical outcomes and direct medical costs were derived for 5179 newly diagnosed breast cancer and 629 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients from the NHI claims database. Patients were further categorized into three subgroups as "primary-", "secondary-" and "no -" prophylaxis based on their patterns of G-CSF use. Generalized estimating equations were applied to estimate the impact of G-CSF use on the incidence of CIFN. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of primary and secondary prophylactic G-CSF use were calculated and sensitivity analyses were performed. Primary prophylaxis of G-CSF decreased the incidence of CIFN by 27% and 83%, while secondary prophylaxis by 34% and 22% in breast cancer and NHL patients, respectively. Compared with those with no prophylaxis, the incremental cost per CIFN reduced in primary prophylaxis is $931 and $52 among patients with breast cancer and NHL, respectively. In contrast, secondary prophylaxis is dominated by no prophylaxis and primary prophylaxis in both cancer patients. Primary but not secondary prophylactic use of G-CSF was cost-effective in CIFN in breast cancer and NHL patients under Taiwan's NHI system. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The frequency of clinical pregnancy and implantation rate after cultivation of embryos in a medium with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with preceding failed attempts of ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevkin, S; Lokshin, V; Shishimorova, M; Polumiskov, V

    2014-10-01

    The application in IVF practice of modern techniques can improve positive outcome of each cycle in the assisted reproductive technology (ART) programs and the effectiveness of treatment as a whole. There are embryos in the female reproductive tract in physiological medium which contain various cytokines and growth factors. It plays an important role in the regulation of normal embryonic development, improve implantation and subsequently optimizing the development of the fetus and the placenta. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is one of the cytokines playing an important role in reproductive function. Addition of recombinant GM-CSF to the culture medium can makes closer human embryos culture to in vivo conditions and improve the efficacy ART cycles. The analysis of culture embryos in EmbryoGen medium has shown that fertilization rate embryo culture and transfer to patients with previous unsuccessful attempts increases clinical pregnancy rate compared to the control group 39.1 versus 27.8%, respectively. It is noted that the implantation rate (on 7 weeks' gestation) and progressive clinical pregnancy rate (on 12 weeks' gestation) were significantly higher in group embryos culture in EmbryoGen medium compared to standard combination of medium (ISM1+VA), and were 20.4 and 17.4% versus 11.6 and 9.1%, respectively.

  8. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor augments Tie2-expressing monocyte differentiation, angiogenic function, and recruitment in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Mary A; Voorhees, Jeffrey L; Cole, Sara L; Dakhlallah, Duaa; Patterson, Ivory L; Gross, Amy C; Moldovan, Leni; Mo, Xiaokui; Evans, Randall; Marsh, Clay B; Eubank, Tim D

    2014-01-01

    Reports demonstrate the role of M-CSF (CSF1) in tumor progression in mouse models as well as the prognostic value of macrophage numbers in breast cancer patients. Recently, a subset of CD14+ monocytes expressing the Tie2 receptor, once thought to be predominantly expressed on endothelial cells, has been characterized. We hypothesized that increased levels of CSF1 in breast tumors can regulate differentiation of Tie2- monocytes to a Tie2+ phenotype. We treated CD14+ human monocytes with CSF1 and found a significant increase in CD14+/Tie2+ positivity. To understand if CSF1-induced Tie2 expression on these cells improved their migratory ability, we pre-treated CD14+ monocytes with CSF1 and used Boyden chemotaxis chambers to observe enhanced response to angiopoietin-2 (ANG2), the chemotactic ligand for the Tie2 receptor. We found that CSF1 pre-treatment significantly augmented chemotaxis and that Tie2 receptor upregulation was responsible as siRNA targeting Tie2 receptor abrogated this effect. To understand any augmented angiogenic effect produced by treating these cells with CSF1, we cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with conditioned supernatants from CSF1-pre-treated CD14+ monocytes for a tube formation assay. While supernatants from CSF1-pre-treated TEMs increased HUVEC branching, a neutralizing antibody against the CSF1R abrogated this activity, as did siRNA against the Tie2 receptor. To test our hypothesis in vivo, we treated PyMT tumor-bearing mice with CSF1 and observed an expansion in the TEM population relative to total F4/80+ cells, which resulted in increased angiogenesis. Investigation into the mechanism of Tie2 receptor upregulation on CD14+ monocytes by CSF1 revealed a synergistic contribution from the PI3 kinase and HIF pathways as the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002, as well as HIF-1α-deficient macrophages differentiated from the bone marrow of HIF-1αfl/fl/LysMcre mice, diminished CSF1-stimulated Tie2 receptor expression.

  9. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor augments Tie2-expressing monocyte differentiation, angiogenic function, and recruitment in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary A Forget

    Full Text Available Reports demonstrate the role of M-CSF (CSF1 in tumor progression in mouse models as well as the prognostic value of macrophage numbers in breast cancer patients. Recently, a subset of CD14+ monocytes expressing the Tie2 receptor, once thought to be predominantly expressed on endothelial cells, has been characterized. We hypothesized that increased levels of CSF1 in breast tumors can regulate differentiation of Tie2- monocytes to a Tie2+ phenotype. We treated CD14+ human monocytes with CSF1 and found a significant increase in CD14+/Tie2+ positivity. To understand if CSF1-induced Tie2 expression on these cells improved their migratory ability, we pre-treated CD14+ monocytes with CSF1 and used Boyden chemotaxis chambers to observe enhanced response to angiopoietin-2 (ANG2, the chemotactic ligand for the Tie2 receptor. We found that CSF1 pre-treatment significantly augmented chemotaxis and that Tie2 receptor upregulation was responsible as siRNA targeting Tie2 receptor abrogated this effect. To understand any augmented angiogenic effect produced by treating these cells with CSF1, we cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs with conditioned supernatants from CSF1-pre-treated CD14+ monocytes for a tube formation assay. While supernatants from CSF1-pre-treated TEMs increased HUVEC branching, a neutralizing antibody against the CSF1R abrogated this activity, as did siRNA against the Tie2 receptor. To test our hypothesis in vivo, we treated PyMT tumor-bearing mice with CSF1 and observed an expansion in the TEM population relative to total F4/80+ cells, which resulted in increased angiogenesis. Investigation into the mechanism of Tie2 receptor upregulation on CD14+ monocytes by CSF1 revealed a synergistic contribution from the PI3 kinase and HIF pathways as the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002, as well as HIF-1α-deficient macrophages differentiated from the bone marrow of HIF-1αfl/fl/LysMcre mice, diminished CSF1-stimulated Tie2 receptor

  10. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: increase in numbers of naive CD4 cells and CD34 cells makes G-CSF a candidate for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Afzelius, P; Dam-Larsen, S

    1998-01-01

    The potential of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize CD4 cells and/or CD34 cells for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy was examined. Ten human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients were treated with G-CSF (300 microg/day) for 5 days. Numbers of CD4.......01/microL (P CSF induced increases in numbers of CD34 cells and CD4 cells in HIV-infected patients...

  11. Molecular cloning of a second subunit of the receptor for human granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF): Reconstitution of a high-affinity GM-CSF receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Toshio; Gorman, D.M.; Miyajima, Atsushi; Arai, Kenichi; Yokota, Takashi

    1990-01-01

    Using the mouse interleukin 3 (IL-3) receptor cDNA as a probe, the authors obtained a monologous cDNA (KH97) from a cDNA library of a human hemopoietic cell line, TF-1. The protein encoded by the KH97 cDNA has 56% amino acid sequence identity with the mouse IL-3 receptor and retains features common to the family of cytokine receptors. Fibroblasts transfected with the KH97 cDNA expressed a protein of 120 kDa but did not bind any human cytokines, including IL-3 and granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Interestingly, cotransfection of cDNAs for KH97 and the low-affinity human GM-CSF receptor in fibroblasts resulted in formation of a high-affinity receptor for GM-CSF. The dissociation rate of GM-CSF from the reconstituted high-affinity receptor was slower than that from the low-affinity site, whereas the association rate was unchanged. Cross-linking of 125 I-labeled GM-CSF to fibroblasts cotransfected with both cDNAs revealed the same cross-linking patterns as in TF-1 cells - i.e., two major proteins of 80 and 120 kDa which correspond to the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein, respectively. These results indicate that the high-affinity GM-CSF receptor is composed of at least two components in a manner analogous to the IL-2 receptor. They therefore propose to designate the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein as the α and β subunits of the GM-CSF receptor, respectively

  12. A pilot study of the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients during x-radiation therapy: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolatou, Ourania; Sotiropoulou-Lontou, Anastasia; Skarlatos, John; Kyprianou, Konstantinos; Kolitsi, Georgia; Dardoufas, Konstantinos

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in reduction of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients who were going to be irradiated with a total dose of 50-70 Gy for head and neck malignancies were included in the study. After the second week of radiotherapy, with the experience of oral pain, GM-CSF 400 μg was administered locally, once a day, until completion of radiotherapy. Patients were evaluated weekly for mucosal reaction and functional impairment. Results: Three patients with gross and functional mucositis grade I after the second week, completed the planned radiotherapy showing mucositis grade I. Eleven patients who experienced, after 2 weeks of radiotherapy, mucositis grade II and III, presented after the third week with gross mucositis grade I and II and functional impairment grade I. One of these 11 patients was then lost to follow-up and the remaining 10 completed their planned radiotherapy having an almost asymptomatic mucositis grade I. The 15th patient with gross mucositis grade III after the 2 weeks of radiotherapy, had a 2-day interruption because of painful mucositis and then continued and completed radiotherapy with gross and functional mucositis grade I. The 16th patient with mucositis grade III after the second week, did not show any improvement, and completed her planned radiotherapy with mucositis grade III which finally healed after the administration of acyclovir. The last, 17th patient discontinued radiotherapy at the third week because of mucositis grade IV and severe ulceration in apposition to an extensive gold prosthesis. Conclusion: The local administration of GM-CSF significantly reduced and almost healed radiation-induced oral mucositis in 14 of 17 patients during the radiotherapy, which was completed within the preplanned time and without any significant patient weight loss or functional impairment

  13. The use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and management of chemotherapy delivery during adjuvant treatment for early-stage breast cancer--further observations from the IMPACT solid study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäenpää, Johanna; Varthalitis, Ioannis; Erdkamp, Frans; Trojan, Andreas; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof; Lindman, Henrik; Bendall, Kate; Vogl, Florian D; Verma, Shailendra

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the use and impact of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) on chemotherapy delivery and neutropenia management in breast cancer in a clinical practice setting. IMPACT Solid was an international, prospective observational study in patients with a physician-assessed febrile neutropenia (FN) risk of ≥20%. This analysis focused on stages I-III breast cancer patients who received a standard chemotherapy regimen for which the FN risk was published. Chemotherapy delivery and neutropenia-related outcomes were reported according to the FN risk of the regimen and intent of G-CSF use. 690 patients received a standard chemotherapy regimen; 483 received the textbook dose/schedule with a majority of these regimens (84%) having a FN risk ≥10%. Patients receiving a regimen with a FN risk ≥10% were younger with better performance status than those receiving a regimen with a FN risk <10%. Patients who received higher-risk regimens were more likely to receive G-CSF primary prophylaxis (48% vs 22%), complete their planned chemotherapy (97% vs 88%) and achieve relative dose intensity ≥85% (93% vs 86%) than those receiving lower-risk regimens. Most first FN events (56%) occurred in cycles not supported with G-CSF primary prophylaxis. Physicians generally recommend standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimens and were more likely to follow G-CSF guidelines for younger, good performance status patients in the curative setting, and often modify standard regimens in more compromised patients. However, G-CSF support is not optimal, indicated by G-CSF primary prophylaxis use in <50% of high-risk patients and observation of FN without G-CSF support. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Studies on mechanism of treatment of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant human interleukin-11 and recombinant human interleukin-2 on hematopoietic injuries induced by 4.5 Gy γ-rays irradiation in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Ou Hongling; Xing Shuang; Huang Haixiao; Xiong Guolin; Xie Ling; Zhao Yanfang; Zhao Zhenhu; Wang Ning; Wang Jinxiang; Miao Jingcheng; Zhu Nankang; Luo Qingliang; Cong Yuwen; Zhang Xueguang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of treatment of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11) and recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) on hematopoietic injuries induced by 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray irradiation in beagles, and to provide experimental evidence for the clinical treatment of extremely severe myeloid acute radiation sickness (ARS). Methods: Sixteen beagle dogs were given 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray total body irradiation (TBI), then randomly assigned into irradiation control group, supportive care group or cytokines + supportive care (abbreviated as cytokines) group. In addition to supportive care, rhG-CSF, rhIL-11 and rhIL-2 were administered subcutaneously to treat dogs in cytokines group. The percentage of CD34 + cells, cell cycle and apoptosis of nucleated cells in peripheral blood were examined by Flow cytometry. Results: After 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray irradiation, the CD34 + cells in peripheral blood declined obviously (61.3% and 52.1% of baseline for irradiation control and supportive care group separately). The cell proportion of nucleated cells in G 0 /G 1 phase was increased notably notably (99.27% and 99.49% respectively). The rate of apoptosis (26.93% and 21.29% separately) and necrosis (3.27% and 4.14%, respectively) of nucleated cells were elevated significantly when compared with values before irradiation (P 0 /G 1 phase blockage of nucleated cells became more serious (99.71%). The rate of apoptosis (5.66%) and necrosis (1.60%) of nucleated cells were significantly lower than that of irradiation control and supportive care groups 1 d after exposure. Conclusions: Cytokines maybe mobilize CD34 + cells in bone marrow to peripheral blood, indce cell block at G 0 /G 1 phase and reduce apoptosis, and eventually cure hematopoietic injuries induced by irradiation. (authors)

  15. Increased mobilization and yield of stem cells using plerixafor in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis M Pelus

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Louis M Pelus1, Sherif S Farag21Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 2Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IndianaAbstract: Multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma remain the most common indications for high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell rescue. While a CD34+ cell dose of 1 × 106/kg is considered the minimum required for engraftment, higher CD34+ doses correlate with improved outcome. Numerous studies, however, support targeting a minimum CD34+ cell dose of 2.0 × 106/kg, and an “optimal” dose of 4 to 6 × 106/kg for a single transplant. Unfortunately, up to 40% of patients fail to mobilize an optimal CD34+ cell dose using myeloid growth factors alone. Plerixafor is a novel reversible inhibitor of CXCR4 that significantly increases the mobilization and collection of higher numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Two randomized multi-center clinical trials in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma have demonstrated that the addition of plerixafor to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor increases the mobilization and yield of CD34+ cells in fewer apheresis days, which results in durable engraftment. This review summarizes the pharmacology and evidence for the clinical efficacy of plerixafor in mobilizing hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and discusses potential ways to utilize plerixafor in a cost-effective manner in patients with these diseases.Keywords: plerixafor, mobilization, stem cells, lymphoma, myeloma

  16. The impact of concurrent granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: A double-blind placebo-controlled prospective Phase III study by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9901

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Janice K.; Swann, Suzanne; LeVeque, Francis; Scarantino, Charles W.; Johnson, Darlene J.; Chen, Allan; Fortin, Andre; Pollock, JonDavid; Kim, Harold; Ang, Kian K.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Based on early clinical evidence of potential mucosal protection by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the efficacy and safety of GM-CSF in reducing the severity and duration of mucosal injury and pain (mucositis) associated with curative radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with head-and-neck cancer with radiation ports encompassing >50% of oral cavity and/or oropharynx. Standard RT ports were used to cover the primary tumor and regional lymphatics at risk in standard fractionation to 60-70 Gy. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was allowed. Patients were randomized to receive subcutaneous injection of GM-CSF 250 μg/m 2 or placebo 3 times a week. Mucosal reaction was assessed during the course of RT using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and the protocol-specific scoring system. Results: Between October 2000 and September 2002, 130 patients from 36 institutions were accrued. Nine patients (7%) were excluded from the analysis, 3 as a result of drug unavailability. More than 80% of the patients participated in the quality-of-life endpoint of this study. The GM-CSF did not cause any increase in toxicity compared with placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in the average mean mucositis score in the GM-CSF and placebo arms by a t test (p = 0.4006). Conclusion: This placebo-controlled, randomized study demonstrated no significant effect of GM-CSF given concurrently compared with placebo in reducing the severity or duration of RT-induced mucositis in patients undergoing definitive RT for head-and-neck cancer

  17. Consistent bone marrow-derived cell mobilization following repeated short courses of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: results from a multicenter prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarella, Corrado; Rutella, Sergio; Gualandi, Francesca; Melazzini, Mario; Scimè, Rosanna; Petrini, Mario; Moglia, Cristina; Ulla, Marco; Omedé, Paola; Bella, Vincenzo La; Corbo, Massimo; Silani, Vincenzo; Siciliano, Gabriele; Mora, Gabriele; Caponnetto, Claudia; Sabatelli, Mario; Chiò, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the feasibility and safety of bone marrow-derived cell (BMC) mobilization following repeated courses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Between January 2006 and March 2007, 26 ALS patients entered a multicenter trial that included four courses of BMC mobilization at 3-month intervals. In each course, G-CSF (5 microg/kg b.i.d.) was administered for four consecutive days; 18% mannitol was also given. Mobilization was monitored by flow cytometry analysis of circulating CD34(+) cells and by in vitro colony assay for clonogenic progenitors. Co-expression by CD34(+) cells of CD133, CD90, CD184, CD117 and CD31 was also assessed. Twenty patients completed the four-course schedule. One patient died and one refused to continue the program before starting the mobilization courses; four discontinued the study protocol because of disease progression. Overall, 89 G-CSF courses were delivered. There were two severe adverse events: one prolactinoma and one deep vein thrombosis. There were no discontinuations as a result of toxic complications. Circulating CD34(+) cells were monitored during 85 G-CSF courses and were always markedly increased; the range of median peak values was 41-57/microL, with no significant differences among the four G-CSF courses. Circulating clonogenic progenitor levels paralleled CD34(+) cell levels. Most mobilized CD34(+) cells co-expressed stem cell markers, with a significant increase in CD133 co-expression. It is feasible to deliver repeated courses of G-CSF to mobilize a substantial number of CD34(+) cells in patients with ALS; mobilized BMC include immature cells with potential clinical usefulness.

  18. Purification of human recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramya

    2012-06-21

    Jun 21, 2012 ... Proteins expressed as inclusion bodies are currently solubilized by the use of high ... by dialyzing with buffer containing reducing and oxidizing agents. Renaturation of ... MATERIALS AND METHODS. Expression system and ...

  19. Effect of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes on chromosomal and plasmid DNA of Escherichia coli. Role of acid DNase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenberg-Arska, M.; van Strijp, J.A.; Hoekstra, W.P.; Verhoef, J.

    1984-01-01

    Phagocytosis and killing by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are important host resistance factors against invading microorganisms. Evidence showing that killing is rapidly followed by degradation of bacterial components is limited. Therefore, we studied the fate of Escherichia coli DNA following phagocytosis of E. coli by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes. [ 3 H]Thymidine-labeled, unencapsulated E. coli PC2166 and E. coli 048K1 were incubated in serum, washed, and added to leukocytes. Uptake and killing of the bacteria and degradation of DNA were measured. Although phagocytosis and killing by mononuclear leukocytes was less efficient than that by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, only mononuclear leukocytes were able to degrade E. coli PC2166 DNA. Within 2 h, 60% of the radioactivity added to mononuclear leukocytes was released into the supernate, of which 40% was acid soluble. DNA of E. coli 048K1 was not degraded. To further analyze the capacity of mononuclear leukocytes to degrade E. coli DNA, chromosomal and plasmid DNA was isolated from ingested bacteria and subjected to agarose gel-electrophoresis. Only chromosomal DNA was degraded after phagocytosis. Plasmid DNA of E. coli carrying a gene coding for ampicillin resistance remained intact for a 2-h period after ingestion, and was still able to transform recipient E. coli cells after this period. Although we observed no DNA degradation during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, lysates of both polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes contained acid-DNase activity with a pH optimum of 4.9. However, the DNase activity of mononuclear leukocytes was 20 times higher than that of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No difference was observed between DNase activity from polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes from a chronic granulomatous disease patient with DNase activity from control polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes

  20. Ion Channels in Leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    muscle k142), heart muscle (80), bo- are released. In recent years much has been learned vine pulmonar arter endothelial cells (251), and rat about the...b3 Zn or cytes from cystic fibrosis patients lack a Cl current that Ni (1 mM)-added to the cytoplasmic side of the mem- can be acti% ated b3 the...that at37’C hu- to be defectiv.- in cystic fibrosis (55, 277), and Chen et al. man T-cell CiL channels are active at rest, implies that (25) have shown

  1. Human leukocytic pyrogen: purification and development of a radioimmunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinarello, C A; Renfer, L; Wolff, S M

    1977-10-01

    Leukocytic pyrogen is a small endogenous protein that mediates fever. Because of the limitations of bioassays, circulating leukocytic pyrogen has not been demonstrated during fever in humans. The pyrogen was produced in vitro after phagocytosis of staphylococci by blood monocytes. Antibody against the pyrogen was obtained from rabbits immunized with leukocytic pyrogen and the antiserum was purified by solid-phase immunoadsorbants. Purified antibody to the pyrogen was attached to activated Sepharose 4B and used in conjunction with gel filtration to purify the pyrogen. The pyrogen was labeled with 125I and further purified by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. The final preparation of 125I-labeled pyrogen demonstrated a homogeneous band during isoelectric focusing and other separation procedures. With antibody to pyrogen attached to Sepharose, less than 0.1 of a rabbit pyrogenic dose of human leukocytic pyrogen inhibited the binding of 125I-labeled pyrogen to this immunoadsorbant, and this inhibition was not affected by the presence of human serum. Thus, a radioimmunoassay for human leukocytic pyrogen has been developed that may be used to detect circulating pyrogen during fever in humans.

  2. Leukocyte removal efficiency of cell-washed and unwashed whole blood: an in vitro study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinke, M. ten; Weerwind, P.W.; Teerenstra, S.; Feron, JC; Meer, W. van der; Brouwer, René

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte filtration of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) perfusate after cardiac surgery has evolved as an important technique to prevent effector functions mediated by activated leukocytes. However, little is known about the filtration efficiency. Therefore, an in vitro study was conducted to

  3. MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in the treatment of patients with moderate rheumatoid arthritis: results of a phase Ib/IIa randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Frank; Tak, Paul P; Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoilov, Rumen; Wiland, Piotr; Huizinga, Thomas W; Berenfus, Vadym Y; Vladeva, Stoyanka; Rech, Juergen; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Korkosz, Mariusz; Rekalov, Dmitriy; Zupanets, Igor A; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Geiseler, Jens; Fresenius, Julia; Korolkiewicz, Roman P; Schottelius, Arndt J; Burkhardt, Harald

    2015-06-01

    To determine the safety, tolerability and signs of efficacy of MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with active, moderate RA were enrolled in a randomised, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial of intravenous MOR103 (0.3, 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg) once a week for 4 weeks, with follow-up to 16 weeks. The primary outcome was safety. Of the 96 randomised and treated subjects, 85 completed the trial (n=27, 24, 22 and 23 for pooled placebo and MOR103 0.3, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively). Treatment emergent adverse events (AEs) in the MOR103 groups were mild or moderate in intensity and generally reported at frequencies similar to those in the placebo group. The most common AE was nasopharyngitis. In two cases, AEs were classified as serious because of hospitalisation: paronychia in a placebo subject and pleurisy in a MOR103 0.3 mg/kg subject. Both patients recovered fully. In exploratory efficacy analyses, subjects in the MOR103 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg groups showed significant improvements in Disease Activity Score-28 scores and joint counts and significantly higher European League Against Rheumatism response rates than subjects receiving placebo. MOR103 1.0 mg/kg was associated with the largest reductions in disease activity parameters. MOR103 was well tolerated and showed preliminary evidence of efficacy in patients with active RA. The data support further investigation of this monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF in RA patients and potentially in those with other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. NCT01023256. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Technetium-99m HMPAO labeled leukocytes in inflammation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Kimiichi; Yoshikawa, Kyousan; Imazeki, Keiko; Minoshima, Satoshi; Arimizu, Noboru

    1991-01-01

    Technetium-99m-HMPAO (Tc-99m-HMPAO) labeled leukocyte imaging was carried out in 19 patients at 3-5 hr after reinjection. There were no side effects noted. Tc-99m leukocyte images showed gall bladder, colon, kidney, and urinary bladder activity in normal distribution as a result of excretion of the eluted Tc-99m complex. They yielded a sensitivity of 93%, a specificity of 100% and an accuracy of 95%. They were correctly positive in 14 out of 19 cases. But one false negative case was seen in a patient with pyonephrosis showing a lack of renal function with decreased renal blood flow. It was concluded that they have some advantages over In-111 leukocyte images, but we have to consider the fact that the ureteral obstruction or the lack of renal function with decreased renal blood flow may result in a false positive or a false negative case. (author)

  5. Analysis of leukocyte binding to depletion filters: role of passive binding, interaction with platelets, and plasma components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschler, R; Rüster, B; Steimle, A; Hansmann, H L; Walker, W; Montag, T; Seifried, E

    2005-08-01

    Since limited knowledge exists on the mechanisms which regulate cell binding to leukocyte removal filter surfaces, we investigated the binding patterns of leukocytes to individual layers of leukocyte depletion filters. After passage of 1 unit of whole blood, blotting of isolated filter layers on glass slides or elution of cells from filter layers revealed that most leukocytes were located within the first 10 of a total of 28 filter layers, peaking at layers 6 to 8, with granulocytes binding on average to earlier filter layers than lymphocytes. Leukocytes preincubated with inhibitors of actin activation showed unchanged distribution between filter layers, suggesting that cytoskeletal activation does not significantly contribute to their binding. When leukocytes were directly incubated with single filter layers, binding of up to 30% of input cells was recorded in the absence of Ca(2+). Immunohistological analyses showed colocalization of platelets and leukocytes, with co-clustering of platelets and leukocytes. Monocytes and to some degree lymphocytes but not granulocytes competed with platelets for filter binding. Precoating of filter layers with individual plasma components showed that hyaluronic acid, plasma type fibronectin, and fibrinogen all increased the binding of leukocytes compared with albumin coating. In conclusion, leukocytes can bind passively to filters in a process which does not require Ca(2+), which is independent of cytoskeletal activation and which may depend on individual plasma components. These results are of importance when new selective cell enrichment or depletion strategies through specific filters are envisaged.

  6. Hug tightly and say goodbye: role of endothelial ICAM-1 in leukocyte transmigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Arshad; Fazal, Fabeha

    2009-04-01

    Stable adhesion of leukocytes to endothelium is crucial for transendothelial migration (TEM) of leukocytes evoked during inflammatory responses, immune surveillance, and homing and mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The basis of stable adhesion involves expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), an inducible endothelial adhesive protein that serves as a counter-receptor for beta(2)-integrins on leukocytes. Interaction of ICAM-1 with beta(2)-integrins enables leukocytes to adhere firmly to the vascular endothelium and subsequently, to migrate across the endothelial barrier. The emerging paradigm is that ICAM-1, in addition to firmly capturing leukocytes, triggers intracellular signaling events that may contribute to active participation of the endothelium in facilitating the TEM of adherent leukocytes. The nature, duration, and intensity of ICAM-1-dependent signaling events may contribute to the determination of the route (paracellular vs. transcellular) of leukocyte passage; these aspects of ICAM-1 signaling may in turn be influenced by density and distribution of ICAM-1 on the endothelial cell surface, the source of endothelial cells it is present on, and the type of leukocytes with which it is engaged. This review summarizes our current understanding of the "ICAM-1 paradigm" of TEM with an emphasis on the signaling events mediating ICAM-1 expression and activated by ICAM-1 engagement in endothelial cells.

  7. Basal CD34+ Cell Count Predicts Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Healthy Donors after Administration of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor: A Longitudinal, Prospective, Observational, Single-Center, Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Massimo; Gori, Mercedes; Pitino, Annalisa; Gentile, Massimo; Dattola, Antonia; Pontari, Antonella; Vigna, Ernesto; Moscato, Tiziana; Recchia, Anna Grazia; Barilla', Santina; Tripepi, Giovanni; Morabito, Fortunato

    2017-07-01

    A longitudinal, prospective, observational, single-center, cohort study on healthy donors (HDs) was designed to identify predictors of CD34 + cells on day 5 with emphasis on the predictive value of the basal CD34 + cell count. As potential predictors of mobilization, age, sex, body weight, height, blood volume as well as white blood cell count, peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells, platelet count, hematocrit, and hemoglobin levels were considered. Two different evaluations of CD34 + cell counts were determined for each donor: baseline (before granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF] administration) and in PB after G-CSF administration on the morning of the fifth day (day 5). A total of 128 consecutive HDs (66 males) with a median age of 43 years were enrolled. CD34 + levels on day 5 displayed a non-normal distribution, with a median value of 75.5 cells/µL. To account for the non-normal distribution of the dependent variable, a quantile regression analysis to predict CD34 + on day 5 using the baseline value of CD34 + as the key predictor was performed. On crude analysis, a baseline value of CD34 + ranging from .5 cells/µL to 1 cells/µL predicts a median value of 50 cells/µL on day 5; a value of 2 cells/µL predicts a median value of 70.7 cells/µL; a value of 3 cells/µL to 4 cells/µL predicts a median value of 91.3 cells/µL, and a value ≥ 5 predicts a median value of 112 cells/µL. In conclusion, the baseline PB CD34 + cell count correlates with the effectiveness of allogeneic PB stem cell mobilization and could be useful to plan the collection. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and sucralfate mouthwashes in the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis: a double-blind prospective randomized phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarilahti, Kauko; Kajanti, Mikael; Joensuu, Timo; Kouri, Mauri; Joensuu, Heikki

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To compare granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) mouthwashes with sucralfate mouthwashes in the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with radically operated head-and-neck cancer were randomly allocated to use either GM-CSF (n=21) or sucralfate (n=19) mouthwashes during postoperative radiotherapy (RT). All patients received conventionally fractionated RT to a total dose of 50-60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions during 5-6 weeks to the primary site and regional lymphatics. A minimum of 50% of the oral cavity and oropharyngeal mucosa was included in the clinical target volume. GM-CSF mouthwashes consisted of 37.5 μg GM-CSF and sucralfate mouthwashes of 1.0 g of sucralfate distilled in water. Both washes were used 4 times daily, beginning after the first week of RT and continued to the end of the RT course. Symptoms related to radiation mucositis and body weight, serum prealbumin level, and blood cell counts were monitored weekly. Results: Oral mucositis tended to be less severe in the GM-CSF group (p=0.072). Complete (n=1) or partial (n=4) healing of mucositis occurred during the RT course in 5 patients (24%) in the GM-CSF group and in none of the patients in the sucralfate group (p=0.049). Patients who received GM-CSF had less mucosal pain (p=0.058) and were less often prescribed opioids for pain (p=0.042). Three patients in the sucralfate group needed hospitalization for mucositis during RT compared with none in the GM-CSF group. Four patients (21%) in the sucralfate group and none in the GM-CSF group required an interruption in the RT course (p=0.042). No significant differences in weight, prealbumin level, or blood cell count were found between the groups, and both mouthwashes were well tolerated. Conclusion: GM-CSF mouthwashes may be moderately more effective than sucralfate mouthwashes in preventing radiation-induced mucositis and mucositis-related pain, and their use may lead to less frequent

  9. Efficacy and safety of talimogene laherparepvec versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with stage IIIB/C and IVM1a melanoma: subanalysis of the Phase III OPTiM trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrington KJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kevin J Harrington,1 Robert HI Andtbacka,2 Frances Collichio,3 Gerald Downey,4 Lisa Chen,5 Zsolt Szabo,6 Howard L Kaufman7 1The Institute of Cancer Research/The Royal Marsden Hospital NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK; 2Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3Division of Hematology and Oncology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 4Amgen Ltd, Cambridge, UK; 5Amgen Inc, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA; 6Amgen GmbH, Zug, Switzerland; 7Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USA Objectives: Talimogene laherparepvec is the first oncolytic immunotherapy to receive approval in Europe, the USA and Australia. In the randomized, open-label Phase III OPTiM trial (NCT00769704, talimogene laherparepvec significantly improved durable response rate (DRR versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF in 436 patients with unresectable stage IIIB–IVM1c melanoma. The median overall survival (OS was longer versus GM-CSF in patients with earlier-stage melanoma (IIIB–IVM1a. Here, we report a detailed subgroup analysis of the OPTiM study in patients with IIIB–IVM1a disease. Patients and methods: The patients were randomized (2:1 ratio to intralesional talimogene laherparepvec or subcutaneous GM-CSF and were evaluated for DRR, overall response rate (ORR, OS, safety, benefit–risk and numbers needed to treat. Descriptive statistics were used for subgroup comparisons. Results: Among 249 evaluated patients with stage IIIB–IVM1a melanoma, DRR was higher with talimogene laherparepvec compared with GM-CSF (25.2% versus 1.2%; P<0.0001. ORR was also higher in the talimogene laherparepvec arm (40.5% versus 2.3%; P<0.0001, and 27 patients in the talimogene laherparepvec arm had a complete response, compared with none in GM-CSF-treated patients. The incidence rates of exposure-adjusted adverse events (AE and serious AEs were similar with both treatments. Conclusion

  10. A phase I study of different doses and frequencies of pegylated recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (PEG rhG-CSF) in patients with standard-dose chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yan; Han, Xiaohong; Wang, Lin; Du, Ping; Yao, Jiarui; Wu, Di; Song, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shuxiang; Tang, Le; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-10-01

    The recommended dose of prophylactic pegylated recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (PEG rhG-CSF) is 100 μg/kg once per cycle for patients receiving intense-dose chemotherapy. However, few data are available on the proper dose for patients receiving less-intense chemotherapy. The aim of this phase I study is to explore the proper dose and administration schedule of PEG rhG-CSF for patients receiving standard-dose chemotherapy. Eligible patients received 3-cycle chemotherapy every 3 weeks. No PEG rhG-CSF was given in the first cycle. Patients experienced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia would then enter the cycle 2 and 3. In cycle 2, patients received a single subcutaneous injection of prophylactic PEG rhG-CSF on d 3, and received half-dose subcutaneous injection in cycle 3 on d 3 and d 5, respectively. Escalating doses (30, 60, 100 and 200 μg/kg) of PEG rhG-CSF were investigated. A total of 26 patients were enrolled and received chemotherapy, in which 24 and 18 patients entered cycle 2 and cycle 3 treatment, respectively. In cycle 2, the incidence of grade 3 or 4 neutropenia for patients receiving single-dose PEG rhG-CSF of 30, 60, 100 and 200 μg/kg was 66.67%, 33.33%, 22.22% and 0, respectively, with a median duration less than 1 (0-2) d. No grade 3 or higher neutropenia was noted in cycle 3 in all dose cohorts. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of PEG rhG-CSF used in cancer patients were similar to those reported, as well as the safety. Double half dose administration model showed better efficacy result than a single dose model in terms of grade 3 neutropenia and above. The single dose of 60 μg/kg, 100 μg/kg and double half dose of 30 μg/kg were recommended to the phase II study, hoping to find a preferable method for neutropenia treatment.

  11. Scintigraphy with In-111 labeled leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kazuo; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Furudate, Masayori; Saito, Chihoko.

    1987-01-01

    With increasing necessity for In-111 labeled leukocyte scintigraphy (ILLS) as a routine examination, a problem of complicated labeling of leukocytes has arisen. In this study, simplified labeling of leukocytes was examined with respect to its ability to detect abscesses. Simplified labeling method yielded significantly satisfactory results for recovery and labeling rates of leukocytes, as compared with conventional recommended method. Therefore, ILLS by simplified technique was clinically applied in 58 patients with suppurative or non-suppurative diseases who gave informed consent. In an analysis of ILLS for detecting suppurative region, the sensitivity, specificity, and corrected specificity were found to be 81 %, 75 %, and 82 %, respectively. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Effect of 30-Gy irradiation in conjunction with leukocyte reduction filter on platelet and transfusion efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojima, Hiromi; Sawada, Umihiko; Horie, Takashi; Itoh, Takeyoshi

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of 30-Gy irradiation in conjunction with leukocyte reduction filter on platelet and transfusion efficiency, we studied platelet recovery, leukocyte reduction rate, content of platelet factor 4 and β-thromboglobulin in platelet products, platelet functions, and positive rates of platelet surface membranes CD42 and CD62, prior to and after treatment. We also evaluated the efficiency of platelet transfusion by estimating post- transfusion (1 and 24 hour) corrected count increment (CCI), and transfusion side effects. Recovery of platelets was 91.8±6.5% and depletion rate of leukocytes was 1.7±1.1 log. There was no significant difference in platelet activation markers or function tests prior to and after the procedure. The mean post-transfusion CCI and 1 and 24 hours were 16,550 (n=114) and 13,310 (n=93), respectively, with 30-Gy irradiation and leukocyte reduction filter. Those treated solely with leukocyte reduction filter were 14,970 (n=114) and 10,880 (n=118), respectively. There was no increase in transfusion side effects after the treatment of platelet concentrate with 30-Gy irradiation combined with leukocyte reduction filter compared with treatment by leukocyte reduction filter alone. These results indicate that treatment with 30 Gy irradiation in conjunction with leukocyte reduction filter is safe and effective in platelet transfusion. (author)

  13. Effect of radiographic contrast agents on leukocyte metabolic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernanz-Schulman, M. [Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanholder, R.; Waterloos, M.A. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Nephrology Section, University Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Hakim, R.; Schulman, G. [Department of Nephrology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Barium, at clinical dilutions, causes a significant increase of baseline ''resting state'' phagocytic activity, which in turn leads to significant blunting of subsequent response to phagocytic challenge and adversely affects the response to all bacteria tested. There is no baseline activation of leukocytes by the water-soluble media, although there was some inhibition (rather than activation) of leukocyte metabolic activity. The effect of the water-soluble media in bacteria was more complex (although inhibition is minor compared to barium). Our data demonstrate that barium is a significat activator of phagocytic cells, which results in deactivation of phagocytic response when challenged; these dsata serve to explain the enhanced adverse effect of barium in cased of fecal peritonitis. (orig.)

  14. Effect of radiographic contrast agents on leukocyte metabolic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernanz-Schulman, M.; Vanholder, R.; Waterloos, M.A.; Hakim, R.; Schulman, G.

    2000-01-01

    Barium, at clinical dilutions, causes a significant increase of baseline ''resting state'' phagocytic activity, which in turn leads to significant blunting of subsequent response to phagocytic challenge and adversely affects the response to all bacteria tested. There is no baseline activation of leukocytes by the water-soluble media, although there was some inhibition (rather than activation) of leukocyte metabolic activity. The effect of the water-soluble media in bacteria was more complex (although inhibition is minor compared to barium). Our data demonstrate that barium is a significant activator of phagocytic cells, which results in deactivation of phagocytic response when challenged; these data serve to explain the enhanced adverse effect of barium in cased of fecal peritonitis. (orig.)

  15. Use of recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor during and after remission induction chemotherapy in patients aged 61 years and older with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) : Final report of AML-11, a phase III randomized study of the Leukemia Cooperative Group of European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC-LCG) and the Dutch Belgian Hemato-Oncology Cooperative Group (HOVON)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, B; Suciu, S; Archimbaud, E; Ossenkoppele, G; Verhoef, GEG; Vellenga, E; Wijermans, P; Berneman, Z; Dekker, AW; Stryckmans, P; Jehn, U; Muus, P; Sonneveld, P; Dardenne, M; Zittoun, R

    1997-01-01

    We conducted a prospective randomized multicenter clinical trial comparing the effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an adjunct to intensive chemotherapy in patients of 61 years and older with untreated newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients were

  16. Leukocyte telomere dynamics in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenstrup, Troels; Hjelmborg, Jacob V B; Mortensen, Laust H

    2013-01-01

    Limited data suggest that leukocytes of the elderly display ultra-short telomeres. It was reported that in some elderly persons leukocyte telomere length (LTL) shows age-dependent elongation. Using cross-sectional and longitudinal models, we characterized LTL dynamics in participants...

  17. Uptake of radiolabeled leukocytes in prosthetic graft infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serota, A.I.; Williams, R.A.; Rose, J.G.; Wilson, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    The utility of radionuclide labeled leukocytes in the demonstration of infection within vascular prostheses was examined. The infrarenal aorta was replaced with a 3 cm Dacron graft in 12 dogs. On the third postoperative day, six of the animals received an intravenous injection of 10(8) Staphylococcus aureus. Labeled leukocyte scans were performed at postoperative days one and three, and then weekly for 8 weeks with indium-111 and technetium-99 labeled autologous leukocytes. When scans showed focal uptake of isotope in the area of prosthetic material, the grafts were aseptically excised and cultured on mannitol-salt agar. Both control and infected animals had retroperitoneal isotope activity in the immediate postoperative period that disappeared by the end of the first week. By the eighth postoperative week, all of the animals that received the bacteremic challenge had both radionuclide concentration in the region of the vascular prosthesis and S. aureus cultured subsequently from the perigraft tissues. None of the control animals had either radionuclide or bacteriologic evidence of infection at the eighth postoperative week. The radiolabeled leukocyte scan is a highly sensitive and specific technique, clinically applicable for the diagnosis of vascular prosthetic infections

  18. 2010 update of EORTC guidelines for the use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to reduce the incidence of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in adult patients with lymphoproliferative disorders and solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aapro, M S; Bohlius, J; Cameron, D A; Dal Lago, Lissandra; Donnelly, J Peter; Kearney, N; Lyman, G H; Pettengell, R; Tjan-Heijnen, V C; Walewski, J; Weber, Damien C; Zielinski, C

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is a major risk factor for infection-related morbidity and mortality and also a significant dose-limiting toxicity in cancer treatment. Patients developing severe (grade 3/4) or febrile neutropenia (FN) during chemotherapy frequently receive dose reductions and/or delays to their chemotherapy. This may impact the success of treatment, particularly when treatment intent is either curative or to prolong survival. In Europe, prophylactic treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSFs), such as filgrastim (including approved biosimilars), lenograstim or pegfilgrastim is available to reduce the risk of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. However, the use of G-CSF prophylactic treatment varies widely in clinical practice, both in the timing of therapy and in the patients to whom it is offered. The need for generally applicable, European-focused guidelines led to the formation of a European Guidelines Working Party by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the publication in 2006 of guidelines for the use of G-CSF in adult cancer patients at risk of chemotherapy-induced FN. A new systematic literature review has been undertaken to ensure that recommendations are current and provide guidance on clinical practice in Europe. We recommend that patient-related adverse risk factors, such as elderly age (≥65 years) and neutrophil count be evaluated in the overall assessment of FN risk before administering each cycle of chemotherapy. It is important that after a previous episode of FN, patients receive prophylactic administration of G-CSF in subsequent cycles. We provide an expanded list of common chemotherapy regimens considered to have a high (≥20%) or intermediate (10-20%) risk of FN. Prophylactic G-CSF continues to be recommended in patients receiving a chemotherapy regimen with high risk of FN. When using a chemotherapy regimen associated with FN in 10-20% of patients, particular attention

  19. Inhibition of the mixed leukocyte reaction by alloantisera in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonker, M.; Leeuwen, A. van; Rood, J.J. van

    1977-01-01

    The incidence of MLC(mixed leukocyte culture)-inhibiting antibodies was determined in 42 pregnancy sera. MLC's were carried out between the cells from the serum donor and her husband in the presence of nonimmune AB serum and the test serum. Fifty per cent of the sera reduced the MLC response to less than 40% of the control values. Only four sera had lymphocytotoxic activity. The inhibition was strong against the specific immunizor, less strong against random unrelated cells and weak against cells which were SD(serologically defined)-identical with the serum donor. Absorptions with lymphocytes and platelets were carried out. Lymphocytes removed activity in three of the four sera tested. Platelets removed activity from one serum. It was concluded that both anti-LD(lymphocyte defined) and anti-SD antibodies were able to inhibit the MLR (mixed leukocyte reaction) at the stimulator cell level. (author)

  20. In-vitro Antioxidant, Cytotoxic, Cholinesterase Inhibitory Activities and Anti-Genotoxic Effects of Hypericum retusum Aucher Flowers, Fruits and Seeds Methanol Extracts in Human Mononuclear Leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Cumali; Aktepe, Necmettin; Yükselten, Yunus; Sunguroglu, Asuman; Boğa, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the antioxidant, anticancer, anticholinesterase, anti-genotoxic activities and phenolic contents of flower, fruit and seed methanol extracts of Hypericum retusum AUCHER. The amounts of protocatechuic acid, catechin, caffeic acid and syringic acid in methanol extracts were determined by HPLC. Total phenolic content of H. retusum seed extract was found more than fruit and flower extracts. The DPPH free radical scavenging activity of flower and seed methanol extracts showed close activity versus BHT as control. Among three extracts of H. retusum only flower methanol extract was exhibited considerable cytotoxic activities against to HeLa and NRK-52E cell lines. Moreover, seed methanol extract showed both acetyl and butyrl-cholinesterase inhibitory activity. The highest anti-genotoxic effects were seen 25 and 50 μg/mL concentrations. In this study, the extracts showed a strong antioxidant and anti-genotoxic effect. The seed extract was more efficient- than extracts of fruit and flowers. Our results suggest that the antioxidant and anti-genotoxic effects of extracts depend on their phenolic contents. Further studies should evaluate the in-vitro and in-vivo the benefits of H. retusum seed methanol extracts.

  1. Dietary (1-->3), (1-->4)-beta-D-glucans from oat activate nuclear factor-kappaB in intestinal leukocytes and enterocytes from mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volman, Julia J.; Mensink, Ronald P.; Ramakers, Julian D.; de Winther, Menno P.; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Rune; Buurman, Wim A.; Plat, Jogchum

    2010-01-01

    Dietary components, like beta-glucans, can modulate the intestinal immune response. We previously showed that fecal water enriched with oat beta-glucan stimulated the cytokine-induced immune response of enterocytes. It is, however, unclear whether beta-glucans activate nuclear factor-kappaB

  2. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocytes express estrogen receptor isoforms ERα and ERβ2 and are functionally modulated by estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, Luke R; Stafford, James L; Patiño, Reynaldo; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman W; Blazer, Vicki S

    2014-09-01

    Estrogens are recognized as modulators of immune responses in mammals and teleosts. While it is known that the effects of estrogens are mediated via leukocyte-specific estrogen receptors (ERs) in humans and mice, leucocyte-specific estrogen receptor expression and the effects of estrogens on this cell population is less explored and poorly understood in teleosts. Here in, we verify that channel catfish (Ictalurus punctaus) leukocytes express ERα and ERβ2. Transcripts of these isoforms were detected in tissue-associated leukocyte populations by PCR, but ERβ2 was rarely detected in PBLs. Expression of these receptors was temporally regulated in PBLs following polyclonal activation by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide or alloantigen based on evaluation by quantitative and end-point PCR. Examination of long-term leukocyte cell lines demonstrated that these receptors are differentially expressed depending on leukocyte lineage and phenotype. Expression of ERs was also temporally dynamic in some leukocyte lineages and may reflect stage of cell maturity. Estrogens affect the responsiveness of channel catfish peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to mitogens in vitro. Similarly, bactericidal activity and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced respiratory burst was modulated by 17β-estradiol. These actions were blocked by the pure ER antagonist ICI 182780 indicating that response is, in part, mediated via ERα. In summary, estrogen receptors are expressed in channel catfish leukocytes and participate in the regulation of the immune response. This is the first time leukocyte lineage expression has been reported in teleost cell lines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Chronic Ethanol Feeding Modulates Inflammatory Mediators, Activation of Nuclear Factor-κB, and Responsiveness to Endotoxin in Murine Kupffer Cells and Circulating Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Maraslioglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic ethanol abuse is known to increase susceptibility to infections after injury, in part, by modification of macrophage function. Several intracellular signalling mechanisms are involved in the initiation of inflammatory responses, including the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB pathway. In this study, we investigated the systemic and hepatic effect of chronic ethanol feeding on in vivo activation of NF-κB in NF-κBEGFP reporter gene mice. Specifically, the study focused on Kupffer cell proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and activation of NF-κB after chronic ethanol feeding followed by in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. We found that chronic ethanol upregulated NF-κB activation and increased hepatic and systemic proinflammatory cytokine levels. Similarly, LPS-stimulated IL-1β release from whole blood was significantly enhanced in ethanol-fed mice. However, LPS significantly increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels. These results demonstrate that chronic ethanol feeding can improve the responsiveness of macrophage LPS-stimulated IL-6 and TNF-α production and indicate that this effect may result from ethanol-induced alterations in intracellular signalling through NF-κB. Furthermore, LPS and TNF-α stimulated the gene expression of different inflammatory mediators, in part, in a NF-κB-dependent manner.

  4. Inflammation Scan Using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO Labelled Leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Woo Jin; Chung, Soo Kyo; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Bahk, Yong Whee; Kim, Hoon Kyo [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-07-15

    Inflammation scan using radiolabelled leukocytes has high sensitivity and specificity. Several methods for labelling leukocytes have been evaluated using P-32 diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP -32), H-3 thymidine, Cr-51 chromate, Ga-67 citrate and {sup 99m}Tc-sulfur colloid. In-111-oxine has proved so far to be the most reliable agent for labelling leukocytes. In-111-oxine is, however, expensive, not easily available when needed, and its radiation dose to leukocytes is relatively high. Moreover, resolution of the resultant image is relatively poor. {sup 99m}Tc is still the agent of choice because of, as compared with the indium, its favorable physical characteristics, lower cost and availability. Now the technique for labelling the leukocytes with technetium is successfully obtained using the lipophilic HMPAO with higher efficiency for granulocytes than for other cells. With this technique it is possible to label leukocytes in plans to improve the viability of the leukocytes. Inflammation scan using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO has been evaluated in several laboratories, and difference in methods for separation and labelling accounts for difference in efficiency, viability and biodistribution of the labelled leukocytes. We performed inflammation scan using leukocytes labelled with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO in three dogs 24 hours after inoculation of live E. Coli and S. Aureus in their right abdominal wall. We separated mixed leukocytes by simple sedimentation using 6% hetastarch (HES) and labelled the leukocytes with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO in 20% cell free plasma diluted with phosphate buffer solution. Uptake was high in the liver and spleen but is was minimal in the lungs on whole body scan. Kidneys and intestine showed minimal activity although it was high in the urinary bladder. Uptake of labelled leukocytes in the inflammation site was definite on 2 hour-postinjection scan and abscess was clearly delineated on 24 hour-delayed scan with high target-to-nontarget ratio. 4). Inflammation

  5. Leukocyte integrins and their ligand interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Young-Min; Lefort, Craig T.; Kim, Minsoo

    2010-01-01

    Although critical for cell adhesion and migration during normal immune-mediated reactions, leukocyte integrins are also involved in the pathogenesis of diverse clinical conditions including autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammation. Leukocyte integrins therefore have been targets for anti-adhesive therapies to treat the inflammatory disorders. Recently, the therapeutic potential of integrin antagonists has been demonstrated in psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. However, current therapeutics broadly affect integrin functions and, thus, yield unfavorable side effects. This review discusses the major leukocyte integrins and the anti-adhesion strategies for treating immune diseases. PMID:19184539

  6. A high-throughput microfluidic approach for 1000-fold leukocyte reduction of platelet-rich plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hui; Strachan, Briony C.; Gifford, Sean C.; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.

    2016-10-01

    Leukocyte reduction of donated blood products substantially reduces the risk of a number of transfusion-related complications. Current ‘leukoreduction’ filters operate by trapping leukocytes within specialized filtration material, while allowing desired blood components to pass through. However, the continuous release of inflammatory cytokines from the retained leukocytes, as well as the potential for platelet activation and clogging, are significant drawbacks of conventional ‘dead end’ filtration. To address these limitations, here we demonstrate our newly-developed ‘controlled incremental filtration’ (CIF) approach to perform high-throughput microfluidic removal of leukocytes from platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in a continuous flow regime. Leukocytes are separated from platelets within the PRP by progressively syphoning clarified PRP away from the concentrated leukocyte flowstream. Filtrate PRP collected from an optimally-designed CIF device typically showed a ~1000-fold (i.e. 99.9%) reduction in leukocyte concentration, while recovering >80% of the original platelets, at volumetric throughputs of ~1 mL/min. These results suggest that the CIF approach will enable users in many fields to now apply the advantages of microfluidic devices to particle separation, even for applications requiring macroscale flowrates.

  7. MECHANISMS OF CELL RESISTANCE TO CYTOMEGALOVIRUS ARE CONNECTED WITH CELL PROLIFERATION STATE AND TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVITY OF LEUKOCYTE AND IMMUNE INTERFERON GENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Sokolova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection in diploid human fibroblasts (HF and levels of cell resistance to this virus were shown to be in direct correlation with high α-interferon (IFNα gene activity and induction of IFNγ gene transcription. Regulation of IFNα mRNA transcription was revealed to be positively associated with cellular DNA synthesis. At the same time, activities of IFNβ and IFNγ genes were at the constantly low level and were not induced in DNA-synthetic phase (S-phase of the cells. Levels of IFNα mRNA synthesis are quite different for G0- vs S-phase-synchronized HF110044 cell cultures: appropriate values for dividing cells (S-phase proved to be 100-fold higher than in resting state (G0. The mode of CMV infection in resting HF-cell could be considered either as acute, or a productive one. On the contrary, proliferating cells exhibited lagging viral syntheses and delayed cell death. Arrest of CMV replication may be, to some extent, comparable with latent infectious state, being associated with high production of IFNα. Both basal and induced levels of IFNα mRNA in CMV-resistant adult human skin fibroblast cells (HSF-1608 were 10-fold higher than in human embryo lung cell line (HELF-977, which is highly sensitive to CMV. Moreover, a short-time induction of IFNγ genes was observed in resistant cells, whereas no such effect was noticed in highly sensitive cells. CMV reproduction in sensitive cell lines (HELF-977 and HELF-110044 partially inhibits IFNα mRNA transcription at the later stages of infection (24 to 48 hours. Thus, cellular resistance and control of CMV infection in diploid fibroblasts are associated predominantly with high transcription of IFNα gene, and with temporal induction of IFNγ gene. We did not reveal any participation of IFNβ genes in protection of human diploid fibroblasts from CMV.

  8. In vitro evaluation of canine leukocytes radiolabeled in whole blood with 99mTc stannous colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abushhiwa, Mohamed H.; Salehi, Nouria S.; Whitton, Robert C.; Charles, Jennifer A.; Finnin, Peter J.; Lording, Peter M.; Caple, Ivan W.; Parry, Bruce W.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Technetium-99m stannous colloid ( 99m TcSnC)-labeled leukocytes are used to investigate a variety of inflammatory diseases in human medicine. The present study investigates the in vitro behavior of canine leukocytes labeled in whole blood with 99m TcSnC. Methods: Blood samples from 10 healthy dogs were labeled with 99m TcSnC using a standard procedure. The distribution of radioactivity among blood components (plasma, leukocyte layers and erythrocytes) was measured following separation of the radiolabeled samples across Histopaque density gradients. Phagocytic function of labeled and unlabeled leukocytes was estimated using zymosan particles. Labeling retention by leukocytes was determined at 1, 3, 4 and 7 h postlabeling. Results: The mean±standard error percentage of radioactivity associated with plasma, erythrocyte and leukocyte fractions was 2.0±0.21%, 55.5±0.60% and 42.5±0.54%, respectively (the last comprising 70.2±0.83% in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and 29.8±0.83% in mononuclear leukocytes). Labeled canine leukocytes had a phagocytic activity of 91.3±0.28% (control, 91.7±0.26%). The radiolabeled canine leukocytes retained 94.1±0.30% of radioactivity at 7 h postlabeling. Conclusions: Radiolabeling of canine leukocytes in whole blood with 99m TcSnC has minor adverse effect on their phagocytic function. The radiolabeled canine leukocytes retained a large percentage of radioactivity for at least 7 h postlabeling

  9. In vitro phagocytosis of several Candida berkhout species by murine leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenla de Petrino, S E; Bibas Bonet de Jorrat, M E; Sirena, A

    1985-03-01

    In vitro phagocytosis of thirteen Candida berkhout species by rat leukocytes was studied to assess a possible correlation between pathogenicity and phagocytosis Yeast-leukocyte suspensions were mixed up for 3 h and phagocytic index, germ-tube formation and leukocyte candidacidal activity were evaluated. Highest values for phagocytosis were reached in all cases at the end of the first hour. Leukocyte candidacidal activity was absent. Only C. albicans produced germ-tubes. The various phagocytosis indices were determined depending on the Candida species assayed. Under these conditions, the more pathogenic species presented the lower indices of phagocytosis. It is determined that the in vitro phagocytic index may bear a close relationship with the pathogenicity of the Candida berkhout.

  10. Leukocyte and serum S100A8/S100A9 expression reflects disease activity in ANCA-associated vasculitis and glomerulonephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Ruth J; Hamour, Sally; Chavele, Konstantia-Maria; Todd, Sarah K; Rasmussen, Niels; Flint, Shaun; Lyons, Paul A; Smith, Kenneth G C; Pusey, Charles D; Cook, H Terence; Salama, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis (AAV) commonly results in glomerulonephritis, in which neutrophils and monocytes have important roles. The heterodimer calprotectin (S100A8/S100A9, mrp8/14) is a Toll-like receptor-4 ligand found in neutrophils and monocytes and is elevated in inflammatory conditions. By immunohistochemistry of renal biopsies, patients with focal or crescentic glomerular lesions were found to have the highest expression of calprotectin and those with sclerotic the least. Serum levels of calprotectin as measured by ELISA were elevated in patients with active AAV and the levels decreased but did not normalize during remission, suggesting subclinical inflammation. Calprotectin levels in patients with limited systemic disease increased following treatment withdrawal and were significantly elevated in patients who relapsed compared with those who did not. As assessed by flow cytometry, patients with AAV had higher monocyte and neutrophil cell surface calprotectin expression than healthy controls, but this was not associated with augmented mRNA expression in CD14+ monocytes or CD16+ neutrophils. Thus, serum calprotectin is a potential disease biomarker in patients with AAV, and may have a role in disease pathogenesis. PMID:23423260

  11. Ganglioside-specific IgG and IgA recruit leukocyte effector functions in Guillain-Barre syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorge, N.M. van; Yuki, N.; Koga, M.; Susuki, K.; Jansen, M.D.; Kooten, C. van; Wokke, J.H.; Winkel, J.G.J. van de; Pol, W.L. van der; Berg, L.H. van den

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of ganglioside-specific autoantibodies to recruit leukocyte effector functions was studied. Serum samples from 87 patients with Guillain–Barré (GBS) or Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), containing GM1-, GQ1b-, or GD1b-specific IgG or IgA, were tested for leukocyte activating capacity.

  12. Meisoindigo, but not its core chemical structure indirubin, inhibits zebrafish interstitial leukocyte chemotactic migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Baixin; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Deng, Xu; Gu, Lijuan; Wang, Qiongyu; Zeng, Zhi; Gao, Xiang; Gao, Qingping; Wang, Yueying

    2017-12-01

    Inflammatory disease is a big threat to human health. Leukocyte chemotactic migration is required for efficient inflammatory response. Inhibition of leukocyte chemotactic migration to the inflammatory site has been shown to provide therapeutic targets for treating inflammatory diseases. Our study was designed to discover effective and safe compounds that can inhibit leukocyte chemotactic migration, thus providing possible novel therapeutic strategy for treating inflammatory diseases. In this study, we used transgenic zebrafish model (Tg:zlyz-EGFP line) to visualize the process of leukocyte chemotactic migration. Then, we used this model to screen the hit compound and evaluate its biological activity on leukocyte chemotactic migration. Furthermore, western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of the hit compound on the AKT or ERK-mediated pathway, which plays an important role in leukocyte chemotactic migration. In this study, using zebrafish-based chemical screening, we identified that the hit compound meisoindigo (25 μM, 50 μM, 75 μM) can significantly inhibit zebrafish leukocyte chemotactic migration in a dose-dependent manner (p = 0.01, p = 0.0006, p migration (p = 0.43). Furthermore, our results unexpectedly showed that indirubin, the core structure of meisoindigo, had no significant effect on zebrafish leukocyte chemotactic migration (p = 0.6001). Additionally, our results revealed that meisoindigo exerts no effect on the Akt or Erk-mediated signalling pathway. Our results suggest that meisoindigo, but not indirubin, is effective for inhibiting leukocyte chemotactic migration, thus providing a potential therapeutic agent for treating inflammatory diseases.

  13. Maternal circulating leukocytes display early chemotactic responsiveness during late gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez-Lopez Nardhy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parturition has been widely described as an immunological response; however, it is unknown how this is triggered. We hypothesized that an early event in parturition is an increased responsiveness of peripheral leukocytes to chemotactic stimuli expressed by reproductive tissues, and this precedes expression of tissue chemotactic activity, uterine activation and the systemic progesterone/estradiol shift. Methods Tissues and blood were collected from pregnant Long-Evans rats on gestational days (GD 17, 20 and 22 (term gestation. We employed a validated Boyden chamber assay, flow cytometry, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results We found that GD20 maternal peripheral leukocytes migrated more than those from GD17 when these were tested with GD22 uterus and cervix extracts. Leukocytes on GD20 also displayed a significant increase in chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (Ccl2 gene expression and this correlated with an increase in peripheral granulocyte proportions and a decrease in B cell and monocyte proportions. Tissue chemotactic activity and specific chemokines (CCL2, chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1/CXCL1, and CXCL10 were mostly unchanged from GD17 to GD20 and increased only on GD22. CXCL10 peaked on GD20 in cervical tissues. As expected, prostaglandin F2α receptor and oxytocin receptor gene expression increased dramatically between GD20 and 22. Progesterone concentrations fell and estradiol-17β concentrations increased in peripheral serum, cervical and uterine tissue extracts between GD20 and 22. Conclusion Maternal circulating leukocytes display early chemotactic responsiveness, which leads to their infiltration into the uterus where they may participate in the process of parturition.

  14. Total hip and knee replacement surgery results in changes in leukocyte and endothelial markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maclean Kirsty M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is estimated that over 8 million people in the United Kingdom suffer from osteoarthritis. These patients may require orthopaedic surgical intervention to help alleviate their clinical condition. Investigations presented here was to test the hypothesis that total hip replacement (THR and total knee replacement (TKR orthopaedic surgery result in changes to leukocyte and endothelial markers thus increasing inflammatory reactions postoperatively. Methods During this 'pilot study', ten test subjects were all scheduled for THR or TKR elective surgery due to osteoarthritis. Leukocyte concentrations were measured using an automated full blood count analyser. Leukocyte CD11b (Mac-1 and CD62L cell surface expression, intracellular production of H2O2 and elastase were measured as markers of leukocyte function. Von Willebrand factor (vWF and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1 were measured as markers of endothelial activation. Results The results obtained during this study demonstrate that THR and TKR orthopaedic surgery result in similar changes of leukocyte and endothelial markers, suggestive of increased inflammatory reactions postoperatively. Specifically, THR and TKR surgery resulted in a leukocytosis, this being demonstrated by an increase in the total leukocyte concentration following surgery. Evidence of leukocyte activation was demonstrated by a decrease in CD62L expression and an increase in CD11b expression by neutrophils and monocytes respectively. An increase in the intracellular H2O2 production by neutrophils and monocytes and in the leukocyte elastase concentrations was also evident of leukocyte activation following orthopaedic surgery. With respect to endothelial activation, increases in vWF and sICAM-1 concentrations were demonstrated following surgery. Conclusion In general it appeared that most of the leukocyte and endothelial markers measured during these studies peaked between days 1

  15. Impact of sex, MHC, and age of recipients on the therapeutic effect of transferred leukocytes from cancer-resistant SR/CR mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jonathan M

    2009-09-01

    leukocytes will likely prevent donor leukocyte engraftment which would help minimize the risk of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. Therefore, using leukocytes from healthy donors with high anti-cancer activity may be a feasible therapeutic concept for treating malignant diseases.

  16. Reduced platelet-mediated and enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis in experimentally induced diabetes in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winocour, P.D.; Colwell, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of fibrinolytic activity in diabetes mellitus have produced conflicting results. This may be a result of methodologic insensitivity or of variable contributions of the different blood components to whole blood fibrinolysis. To explore these two possibilities, the authors used a sensitive solid-phase radiometric assay to examine the fibrinolytic activity of whole blood, platelet-rich plasma, leukocytes, and platelet- and leukocyte-poor plasma prepared from control rats and rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes at various times after induction of diabetes. Fibrinolytic activity of whole blood from diabetic rats after 7 days was significantly reduced, and remained reduced after longer durations of diabetes up to 28 days. Platelet-rich plasma from diabetic rats had decreased fibrinolytic activity, which followed the same time course of changes as in whole blood. The platelet contribution to whole blood fibrinolysis was further reduced in vivo after 14 days of diabetes by a reduced whole blood platelet count. In contrast, fibrinolytic activity of leukocytes from diabetic rats became enhanced after 7 days of diabetes. After 49 days of diabetes, the whole blood leukocyte count was reduced, and in vivo would offset the enhanced activity. Plasma fibrinolytic activity was small compared with that of whole blood and was unaltered in diabetic rats. The authors conclude that altered platelet function contributes to decreased fibrinolytic activity of whole blood in diabetic rats, and that this may be partially offset by enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis

  17. Uptake of apoptotic leukocytes by synovial lining macrophages inhibits immune complex-mediated arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lent, P L; Licht, R; Dijkman, H; Holthuysen, A E; Berden, J H; van den Berg, W B

    2001-11-01

    Previously we have shown that synovial lining macrophages (SLMs) determine the onset of experimental immune complex-mediated arthritis (ICA). During joint inflammation, many leukocytes undergo apoptosis, and removal of leukocytes by SLMs may regulate resolution of inflammation. In this study we investigated binding and uptake of apoptotic leukocytes by SLMs and its impact on the onset of murine experimental arthritis. We used an in vitro model to evaluate phagocytosis of apoptotic cells on chemotaxis. Phagocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes resulted in a significant decrease (58%) of chemotactic activity for polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). If apoptotic cells were injected directly into a normal murine knee joint, SLMs resulted in a prominent uptake of cells. After ICA induction, electron micrographs showed that apoptotic leukocytes were evidently present in SLMs on days 1 and 2. Injection of apoptotic leukocytes into the knee joint 1 h before induction of ICA significantly inhibited PMN infiltration into the knee joint at 24 h (61% decrease). This study indicates that uptake of apoptotic leukocytes by SLM reduces chemotactic activity and inhibits the onset of experimental arthritis. These findings indicate an important mechanism in the resolution of joint inflammation.

  18. Increased oxidative DNA damage in mononuclear leukocytes in vitiligo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannelli, Lisa [Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: lisag@pharm.unifi.it; Bellandi, Serena [Department of Dermatological Sciences, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence (Italy); Pitozzi, Vanessa [Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence (Italy); Fabbri, Paolo [Department of Dermatological Sciences, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence (Italy); Dolara, Piero [Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence (Italy); Moretti, Silvia [Department of Dermatological Sciences, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence (Italy)

    2004-11-22

    Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary disorder of the skin of unknown aetiology. The autocytotoxic hypothesis suggests that melanocyte impairment could be related to increased oxidative stress. Evidences have been reported that in vitiligo oxidative stress might also be present systemically. We used the comet assay (single cell alkaline gel electrophoresis) to evaluate DNA strand breaks and DNA base oxidation, measured as formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites, in peripheral blood cells from patients with active vitiligo and healthy controls. The basal level of oxidative DNA damage in mononuclear leukocytes was increased in vitiligo compared to normal subjects, whereas DNA strand breaks (SBs) were not changed. This alteration was not accompanied by a different capability to respond to in vitro oxidative challenge. No differences in the basal levels of DNA damage in polymorphonuclear leukocytes were found between patients and healthy subjects. Thus, this study supports the hypothesis that in vitiligo a systemic oxidative stress exists, and demonstrates for the first time the presence of oxidative alterations at the nuclear level. The increase in oxidative DNA damage shown in the mononuclear component of peripheral blood leukocytes from vitiligo patients was not particularly severe. However, these findings support an adjuvant role of antioxidant treatment in vitiligo.

  19. Increased oxidative DNA damage in mononuclear leukocytes in vitiligo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannelli, Lisa; Bellandi, Serena; Pitozzi, Vanessa; Fabbri, Paolo; Dolara, Piero; Moretti, Silvia

    2004-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary disorder of the skin of unknown aetiology. The autocytotoxic hypothesis suggests that melanocyte impairment could be related to increased oxidative stress. Evidences have been reported that in vitiligo oxidative stress might also be present systemically. We used the comet assay (single cell alkaline gel electrophoresis) to evaluate DNA strand breaks and DNA base oxidation, measured as formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites, in peripheral blood cells from patients with active vitiligo and healthy controls. The basal level of oxidative DNA damage in mononuclear leukocytes was increased in vitiligo compared to normal subjects, whereas DNA strand breaks (SBs) were not changed. This alteration was not accompanied by a different capability to respond to in vitro oxidative challenge. No differences in the basal levels of DNA damage in polymorphonuclear leukocytes were found between patients and healthy subjects. Thus, this study supports the hypothesis that in vitiligo a systemic oxidative stress exists, and demonstrates for the first time the presence of oxidative alterations at the nuclear level. The increase in oxidative DNA damage shown in the mononuclear component of peripheral blood leukocytes from vitiligo patients was not particularly severe. However, these findings support an adjuvant role of antioxidant treatment in vitiligo

  20. SIZE FRACTIONS OF AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER INDUCE GRANULOCYTE MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS BY MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE PATHWAYS. (R827351C004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. Visualization of a prosthetic vascular graft due to platelet contamination during 111Indium-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, E.; Ramberg, K.

    1988-01-01

    A prosthetic axillo-femoral bypass graft was visualized during 111 In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in a patient referred for possible abdominal abscess. The presence of significant cardiac blood-pool activity raised the possibility that this uptake was due to deposition of contaminating labeled platelets rather than labeled leukocytes. An analysis of a small sample of the patient's blood confirmed that the circulating activity was due to labeled platelets. Increased activity along prosthetic vascular grafts in patients undergoing 111 In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy may be due to adherent platelet, and not indicative of infection

  2. Significance of leukocyte scanning in infected endoprostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W.; Pasurka, B.; Boerner, W.

    1989-03-01

    31 patients with suspected septic loosening of an endoprosthesis (hip endoprosthesis n=30; knee endoprosthesis n=1) were examined with leukocyte scans (10 MBq /sup 111/In-oxine: n=22; 300 MBq /sup 99m/Tc-HMPAO: n=9). The results were compared with results of the bacterial growth (n=22), the histology (n=12) and of the bone scans (/sup 99m/Tc-MDP: n=20) which were performed within 4 days. The sensitivity of the bone scan was 100%, the specificity 30% and the diagnostic accuracy regarding a septic loosening of the arthroplasty was 55%. For the leukocyte scans a comparable sensitivity of 100%, but a higher specificity (86%) and accuracy (91%) could be calculated. A false positive leukocyte scan could be observed in a periprosthetic granuloma, an ossifying periarthritis and in a patient with negative bacterial growth with the histological proof of an inflammation.

  3. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leuko...

  4. Modeling leukocyte-leukocyte non-contact interactions in a lymph node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Nicola; Caccia, Michele; Sironi, Laura; Collini, Maddalena; D'Alfonso, Laura; Granucci, Francesca; Zanoni, Ivan; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The interaction among leukocytes is at the basis of the innate and adaptive immune-response and it is largely ascribed to direct cell-cell contacts. However, the exchange of a number of chemical stimuli (chemokines) allows also non-contact interaction during the immunological response. We want here to evaluate the extent of the effect of the non-contact interactions on the observed leukocyte-leukocyte kinematics and their interaction duration. To this aim we adopt a simplified mean field description inspired by the Keller-Segel chemotaxis model, of which we report an analytical solution suited for slowly varying sources of chemokines. Since our focus is on the non-contact interactions, leukocyte-leukocyte contact interactions are simulated only by means of a space dependent friction coefficient of the cells. The analytical solution of the Keller-Segel model is then taken as the basis of numerical simulations of interactions between leukocytes and their duration. The mean field interaction force that we derive has a time-space separable form and depends on the chemotaxis sensitivity parameter as well as on the chemokines diffusion coefficient and their degradation rate. All these parameters affect the distribution of the interaction durations. We draw a successful qualitative comparison between simulated data and sets of experimental data for DC-NK cells interaction duration and other kinematic parameters. Remarkably, the predicted percentage of the leukocyte-leukocyte interactions falls in the experimental range and depends (~25% increase) upon the chemotactic parameter indicating a non-negligible direct effect of the non-contact interaction on the leukocyte interactions.

  5. Modeling leukocyte-leukocyte non-contact interactions in a lymph node.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gritti

    Full Text Available The interaction among leukocytes is at the basis of the innate and adaptive immune-response and it is largely ascribed to direct cell-cell contacts. However, the exchange of a number of chemical stimuli (chemokines allows also non-contact interaction during the immunological response. We want here to evaluate the extent of the effect of the non-contact interactions on the observed leukocyte-leukocyte kinematics and their interaction duration. To this aim we adopt a simplified mean field description inspired by the Keller-Segel chemotaxis model, of which we report an analytical solution suited for slowly varying sources of chemokines. Since our focus is on the non-contact interactions, leukocyte-leukocyte contact interactions are simulated only by means of a space dependent friction coefficient of the cells. The analytical solution of the Keller-Segel model is then taken as the basis of numerical simulations of interactions between leukocytes and their duration. The mean field interaction force that we derive has a time-space separable form and depends on the chemotaxis sensitivity parameter as well as on the chemokines diffusion coefficient and their degradation rate. All these parameters affect the distribution of the interaction durations. We draw a successful qualitative comparison between simulated data and sets of experimental data for DC-NK cells interaction duration and other kinematic parameters. Remarkably, the predicted percentage of the leukocyte-leukocyte interactions falls in the experimental range and depends (~25% increase upon the chemotactic parameter indicating a non-negligible direct effect of the non-contact interaction on the leukocyte interactions.

  6. Palmitoylated transmembrane adaptor proteins in leukocyte signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpánek, Ondřej; Dráber, Peter; Hořejší, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2014), s. 895-902 ISSN 0898-6568 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Leukocyte * Adaptor * Palmitoylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.315, year: 2014

  7. Altered expression of adhesion molecules on peripheral blood leukocytes in feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olyslaegers, Dominique A J; Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; Vermeulen, Ben L; Dewerchin, Hannah L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-10-25

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, coronavirus-induced systemic disease in domestic and wild felids. The pathology associated with FIP (multifocal granulomatous vasculitis) is considered to be elicited by exaggerated activation and subsequent extravasation of leukocytes. As changes in the expression of adhesion molecules on circulating leukocytes precede their margination and emigration, we reasoned that the expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules may be altered in FIP. In present study, the expression of principal adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte transmigration (CD15s, CD11a, CD11b, CD18, CD49d, and CD54) on peripheral blood leukocytes from cats with naturally occurring FIP (n=15) and controls (n=12) was quantified by flow cytometry using a formaldehyde-based rapid leukocyte preparation technique. T- and B-lymphocytes from FIP patients exhibit higher expression of both subunits (CD11a and CD18) composing the β2 integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1. In addition, the expression of the α4 subunit (CD49d) of the β1 integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 was elevated on B-lymphocytes from FIP patients. The expression of CD11b and CD18, that combine to form the β2 integrin macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1), was elevated on monocytes, whereas the density of CD49d was reduced on this population in FIP. Granulocytes of FIP cats displayed an increased expression of the α chain of Mac-1 (CD11b). These observations suggest that leukocytes from FIP patients show signs of systemic activation causing them to extravasate into surrounding tissues and ultimately contribute to pyogranuloma formation seen in FIP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Production of antibodies which recognize opiate receptors on murine leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, D.J.J.; Bost, K.L.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    An antibody has been developed which recognizes opiate receptors on cells of the immune system. This antibody blocks specific binding of the radiolabeled opiate receptor ligand, /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine, to receptors on murine splenocytes. Additionally, the anti-receptor antibody competes with ..beta..-endorphin, meta-enkephalin, and naloxone for the same binding site on the leukocytes. Moreover, the anti-receptor antibody possesses agonist activity similar to ..beta..-endorphin in suppressing cAMP production by lymphocytes. These results suggest the development of an antibody which recognizes classical opiate receptors on cells of the immune system.

  9. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis enhances leukocyte rolling and adhesion in human microvasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain Mokarram

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO is a multifunctional signaling molecule that regulates important cellular events in inflammation including leukocyte recruitment. Previous studies have shown that pharmacological inhibition of NO synthesis induces leukocyte recruitment in various in vitro and animal models. However, it is not known whether NO modulation has similar effects on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions within the human microvasculature. The present study explored the effect of systemic L-NAME treatment on leukocyte recruitment in the SCID-hu mouse model. Methods Human skin xenografts were transplanted in SCID mice to study human leukocyte dynamics in human vasculature. Early events of human leukocyte recruitment in human vasculature were studied using intravital microscopy. NO synthesis was pharmacologically inhibited using NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to elucidate E-selectin expression in human xenograft skin. Human neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions were also studied in an in vitro flow chamber assay system. P- and E-selectin expression on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs was measured using ELISA. Platelet-activating factor (PAF synthesis was detected using a TLC-based assay. Results L-NAME treatment significantly enhanced the rolling and adhesion of human leukocytes to the human vasculature. Functional blocking of P- and E-selectins significantly inhibited rolling but not adhesion induced by inhibition of NO synthesis. Systemic L-NAME treatment enhanced E-selectin expression in human xenograft skin. L-NAME treatment significantly enhanced P- and E-selectin expression on HUVECs. L-NAME treatment did not significantly modify neutrophil rolling or adhesion to HUVECs indicating that L-NAME−induced subtle P- and E-selectin expression was insufficient to elicit dynamic neutrophil-HUVEC interactions in vitro. Moreover, synthesis of endothelial

  10. Inhibition of leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase by guava tea leaves prevents development of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Otsuki, Akemi; Mori, Yoshiko; Kawakami, Yuki; Ito, Hideyuki

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the crucial steps for atherosclerosis development, and an essential role of leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase expressed in macrophages in this process has been demonstrated. The biochemical mechanism of the oxidation of circulating LDL by leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase in macrophages has been proposed. The major ingredients in guava tea leaves which inhibited the catalytic activity of leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase were quercetin and ethyl gallate. Administration of extracts from guava tea leaves to apoE-deficient mice significantly attenuated atherogenic lesions in the aorta and aortic sinus. We recently showed that Qing Shan Lu Shui inhibited the catalytic activity of leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase. The major components inhibiting the enzyme contained in Qing Shan Lu Shui were identified to be novel monoterpene glycosides. The anti-atherogenic effect of the tea leaves might be attributed to the inhibition of leukocyte-type 12-lipoxygenase by these components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO labeled leukocyte imaging in ulcerative colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Yasuhiro; Aburano, Tamio; Takashio, Tetsuya; Shuke, Noriyuki; Ayabe, Tokiyoshi; Nomura, Masashi; Kohgo, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Yukio; Satoh, Junichi [Asahikawa Medical Coll., Hokkaido (Japan)

    1996-07-01

    Inflammatory imaging using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labeled mixed leukocytes was assessed for use in treating 11 cases diagnosed as ulcerative colitis: 10 cases with total colitis and 1 with left-sided colitis. They consisted of 8 patients with relapse-remitting type and 3 with chronic continuous type. Radionuclide abdominal images were obtained at 1 hr, 4 hr and 24 hr after intravenous injection of 200 MBq prepared {sup 99m}Tc leukocytes. Obvious colonic activity noted at 4 hr served as the basis for positive comparative criterion in the present study. The diagnostic efficacy of radionuclide imaging was compared with endoscopic findings (based on Matts` classification) and the clinical manifestations as reference. The sensitivity and specificity of this imaging were 83.3% and 85.7%, respectively, these values being consistent with endoscopic findings and clinical manifestations at sites of disease activity. All of positive images changed to negative after treatment by leukocyte apheresis or glucocorticoid. Based on these results, {sup 99m}Tc leukocyte imaging can be used to accurately evaluate severity and treatment response in ulcerative colitis. Leukocytes may be closely related to the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. (author)

  12. Flow cytofluorometric assay of human whole blood leukocyte DNA degradation in response to Yersinia pestis and Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Grebenyukova, Tatyana P.; Bobyleva, Elena V.; Golovko, Elena M.; Malyukova, Tatyana A.; Lyapin, Mikhail N.; Kostyukova, Tatyana A.; Yezhov, Igor N.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.

    2001-05-01

    Human leukocytes containing less than 2C DNA per cell (damaged or dead cells) were detected and quantified by flow cytometry and DNA-specific staining with ethidium bromide and mithramycin in whole blood infected with Staphylococcus aureus or Yersinia pestis. Addition of live S. aureus to the blood (100 microbe cells per one leukocyte) resulted in rapid degradation of leukocyte DNA within 3 to 6 hours of incubation at 37 degree(s)C. However, only about 50 percent cells were damaged and the leukocytes with the intact genetic apparatus could be found in the blood for a period up to 24 hours. The leukocyte injury was preceded by an increase of DNA per cell content (as compared to the normal one) that was likely to be connected with the active phagocytosis of S. aureus by granulocytes (2C DNA of diploid phagocytes plus the all bacterial DNA absorbed). In response to the same dose of actively growing (at 37 degree(s)C) virulent Y. pestis cells, no increase in DNA content per cell could be observed in the human blood leukocytes. The process of the leukocyte DNA degradation started after a 6-hour incubation, and between 18 to 24 hours of incubation about 90 percent leukocytes (phagocytes and lymphocytes) lost their specific DNA fluorescence. These results demonstrated a high potential of flow cytometry in comparative analysis in vitro of the leukocyte DNA degradation process in human blood in response to bacteria with various pathogenic properties. They agree with the modern idea of an apoptotic mechanism of immunosuppression in plague.

  13. Further comparisons of endogenous pyrogens and leukocytic endogenous mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampschmidt, R F; Upchurch, H F; Worthington, M L

    1983-07-01

    It was recently shown (Murphy et al., Infect. Immun. 34:177-183), that rabbit macrophages produce two biochemically and immunologically distinct endogenous pyrogens. One of these has or copurifies with substances having a molecular weight of 13,000 and a pI of 7.3. This protein was produced by blood monocytes or inflammatory cells elicited in 16-h rabbit peritoneal exudates. These acute peritoneal exudates were produced by the intraperitoneal injection of large volumes of saline containing shellfish glycogen. When the leukocytes in these exudates were washed and incubated at 37 degrees C in saline, they released an endogenous pyrogen. The injection of this pyrogen into rabbits, rats, or mice caused the biological manifestations which have been attributed to leukocytic endogenous mediator. These effects were increases in blood neutrophils, the lowering of plasma iron and zinc levels, and the increased synthesis of the acute-phase proteins. The other rabbit endogenous pyrogen seems to be a family of proteins with isoelectric points between 4.5 and 5.0. These proteins are produced by macrophages in the lung, liver, or in chronic peritoneal exudates. In these experiments, the lower-isoelectric-point endogenous pyrogens were produced by macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of rabbits that had been injected 4 days earlier with 50 ml of light mineral oil. These rabbit pyrogens were found to have leukocytic endogenous mediator activity in mice but to be completely inactive in rats. When injected into rabbits, these proteins produced fever, lowered plasma iron, increased blood neutrophils, but failed to elevate plasma fibrinogen.

  14. In-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in postoperative joint infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yoji; Uetani, Masataka; Aziz, A.; Hayashi, Kuniaki

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the role of In-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy in the patients with suspected postoperative joint infection, 41 scintigraphic examinations were performed in 24 patients. Scintigrams were interpreted by the degree of accumulation of labeled leukocytes, and were classified into 3 groups: positive, intermediate, and negative. In the cases of positive leukocyte scans, definite diagnosis of infection was made in all cases except one. In the cases of negative scans, there was no evidence of infection. In 13 cases, leukocyte scintigrams were interpreted in conjunction with bone scintigrams. Definite diagnosis of infection was made in all of the cases with positive combined leukocyte/bone scan, and there was no evidence of infection in cases with negative combined leukocyte/bone scan. This study demonstrates that In-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy is a useful method in diagnosis of postoperative joint infection, and accuracy of the examination improves when combined with bone scintigraphy. (author)

  15. Effect of leukocyte hydrolases on bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.; Michel, J.; Ferne, M.; Bergner-Rabinowitz, S.; Ginsburg, I.

    1979-01-01

    Leukocyte extracts, trypsin, and lysozyme are all capable of releasing the bulk of the LPS from S. typhi, S. typhimurium, and E. coli. Bacteria which have been killed by heat, ultraviolet irradiation, or by a variety of metabolic inhibitors and antibiotics which affect protein, DNA, RNA, and cell wall synthesis no longer yield soluble LPS following treatment with the releasing agents. On the other hand, bacteria which are resistant to certain of the antibiotics yield nearly the full amount of soluble LPS following treatment, suggesting that certain heatabile endogenous metabolic pathways collaborate with the releasing agents in the release of LPS from the bacteria. It is suggested that some of the beneficial effects of antibiotics on infections with gram-negative bacteria may be the prevention of massive release of endotoxin by leukocyte enzymes in inflammatory sites

  16. Aberrant leukocyte telomere length in Birdshot Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazirpanah, Nadia; Verhagen, Fleurieke H; Rothova, Anna; Missotten, Tom O A R; van Velthoven, Mirjam; Den Hollander, Anneke I; Hoyng, Carel B; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Broen, Jasper C A; Kuiper, Jonas J W

    2017-01-01

    Birdshot Uveitis (BU) is an archetypical chronic inflammatory eye disease, with poor visual prognosis, that provides an excellent model for studying chronic inflammation. BU typically affects patients in the fifth decade of life. This suggests that it may represent an age-related chronic inflammatory disease, which has been linked to increased erosion of telomere length of leukocytes. To study this in detail, we exploited a sensitive standardized quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to determine the peripheral blood leukocyte telomere length (LTL) in 91 genotyped Dutch BU patients and 150 unaffected Dutch controls. Although LTL erosion rates were very similar between BU patients and healthy controls, we observed that BU patients displayed longer LTL, with a median of log (LTL) = 4.87 (= 74131 base pair) compared to 4.31 (= 20417 base pair) in unaffected controls (PRTEL1. These findings suggest that BU is accompanied by significantly longer LTL.

  17. Leukocyte telomere length and hippocampus volume: a meta-analysis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Nilsonne

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte telomere length has been shown to correlate to hippocampus volume, but effect estimates differ in magnitude and are not uniformly positive. This study aimed primarily to investigate the relationship between leukocyte telomere length and hippocampus gray matter volume by meta-analysis and secondarily to investigate possible effect moderators. Five studies were included with a total of 2107 participants, of which 1960 were contributed by one single influential study. A random-effects meta-analysis estimated the effect to r = 0.12 [95% CI -0.13, 0.37] in the presence of heterogeneity and a subjectively estimated moderate to high risk of bias. There was no evidence that apolipoprotein E (APOE genotype was an effect moderator, nor that the ratio of leukocyte telomerase activity to telomere length was a better predictor than leukocyte telomere length for hippocampus volume. This meta-analysis, while not proving a positive relationship, also is not able to disprove the earlier finding of a positive correlation in the one large study included in analyses. We propose that a relationship between leukocyte telomere length and hippocamus volume may be mediated by transmigrating monocytes which differentiate into microglia in the brain parenchyma.

  18. Glycocalyx Degradation Induces a Proinflammatory Phenotype and Increased Leukocyte Adhesion in Cultured Endothelial Cells under Flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karli K McDonald

    Full Text Available Leukocyte adhesion to the endothelium is an early step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Effective adhesion requires the binding of leukocytes to their cognate receptors on the surface of endothelial cells. The glycocalyx covers the surface of endothelial cells and is important in the mechanotransduction of shear stress. This study aimed to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of the glycocalyx in leukocyte adhesion under flow. We performed experiments using 3-D cell culture models, exposing human abdominal aortic endothelial cells to steady laminar shear stress (10 dynes/cm2 for 24 hours. We found that with the enzymatic degradation of the glycocalyx, endothelial cells developed a proinflammatory phenotype when exposed to uniform steady shear stress leading to an increase in leukocyte adhesion. Our results show an up-regulation of ICAM-1 with degradation compared to non-degraded controls (3-fold increase, p<0.05 and we attribute this effect to a de-regulation in NF-κB activity in response to flow. These results suggest that the glycocalyx is not solely a physical barrier to adhesion but rather plays an important role in governing the phenotype of endothelial cells, a key determinant in leukocyte adhesion. We provide evidence for how the destabilization of this structure may be an early and defining feature in the initiation of atherosclerosis.

  19. In-111-labeled leukocytes in the diagnosis of rejection and cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forstrom, L.A.; Loken, M.K.; Cook, A.; Chandler, R.; McCullough, J.

    1981-01-01

    Indium-111-labeled (In-111) leukocytes have been shown to be useful in the localization of inflammatory processes, including renal transplant rejection. Using previously reported labeling methods, 63 studies with this agent have been performed in 53 renal transplant patients. Indications for study included suspected rejection or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Studies were performed in 33 men and 20 women, with ages ranging from 6 to 68 years. Autologous cells were normally used for labeling, although leukocytes obtained from ABO-compatible donors were used in three subjects. Rectilinear scanner and/or scintillation camera images were obtained at 24 hours after intravenous administration of 0.1 to 0.6 mCi of In-111-leukocytes. There was abnormal uptake of In-111-leukocytes in the transplanted kidney in 11 of 15 cases of rejection. In three additional cases of increased transplant uptake, CMV infection was present in two. Abnormal lung uptake was present in 13 of 14 patients with CMV infection. In four additional cases, increased lung uptake was associated with other pulmonary inflammatory disease. Increased lung activity was not seen in patients with uncomplicated transplant rejection. These results suggest that In-111-leukocyte imaging may be useful in the differential diagnosis of rejection versus CMV infection in renal transplant patients

  20. In-111-labeled leukocytes in the diagnosis of rejection and cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forstrom, L.A.; Loken, M.K.; Cook, A.; Chandler, R.; McCullough, J.

    1981-01-01

    Indium-111-labelled (In-111) leukocytes have been shown to be useful in the localization of inflammatory processes, including renal transplant rejection. Using previously reported labelling methods, 63 studies with this agent have been performed in 53 renal transplant patients. Indications for study included suspected rejection or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Studies were performed in 33 men and 20 women, with ages ranging from 6 to 68 years. Autologous cells were normally used for labeling, although leukocytes obtained from ABO-compatible donors were used in three subjects. Rectilinear scanner and/or scintillation camera images were obtained at 24 hours after intravenous administration of 0.1 to 0.6 mCi of In-111 leukocytes. There was abnormal uptake of In-111-leukocytes in the transplanted kidney in 11 of 15 cases of rejection. In three additional cases of increased transplant uptake, CMV infection was present in two. Abnormal lung uptake was present in 13 of 14 patients with CMV infection. In four additional cases, increased lung uptake was associated with other pulmonary inflammatory disease. Increased lung activity was not seen in patients with uncomplicated transplant rejection. These results suggest that In-111-leukocyte imaging may be useful in the differential diagnosis of rejection versus CMV infection in renal transplant patients

  1. Cognitive Change during the Life Course and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Late Middle-Aged Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, L.; Bendix, Laila; Harbo, Maria

    2016-01-01

    style. Design, Setting, and Participants: Two groups of men with negative (n = 97) and positive (n = 93) change in cognitive performance were selected from a birth cohort of 1985 Danish men born in 1953. Cognitive performance of each individual was assessed at age similar to 20 and 56 years. Leukocyte...... telomere length at age similar to 58 was measured using qPCR. Linear regression models were used to investigate the association between cognitive function and leukocyte telomere length. Results: Men with negative change in cognitive performance during adult life had significantly shorter mean leukocyte...... telomere length than men with positive change in cognitive performance (unadjusted difference beta = -0.09, 95% CI -0.16 to -0.02, p = 0.02). This association remained significant after adjusting for smoking, alcohol consumption, leisure time activity, body mass index (BMI) and cholesterol (adjusted...

  2. Leukocyte scintiscanning for the diagnosis of inflammations. Leukozytenszintigraphie zur Diagnostik entzuendlicher Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W

    1988-01-01

    The value of leukocyte scintiscanning for clinical diagnostics is examined with regard to various areas of indications, and as a method of first examination, or as an alternative to, or additional method to be combined with, the other usual techniques. Leukocyte scintiscanning is indicated as a good first examination method in case of chronic enteritis in a highly active stage, stenosis of the colon, or when abscess is suspected, or infected renal cysts, or infection of angioplasty, osteomyelitis, or in case of fiever of unknown origin and impossible focal diagnosis. It also is applicable for follow-up diagnostics in chronic enteritis, suspected abdominal abscess, prosthetic valvular endocarditis, and infection of hip joint prothesis. The method also may yield additional information in case of renal graft rejection, coronary inflammations, for differential diagnosis of brain tumor or abcess, edematous or antodigestive pancreatitis, and in chronic polyarthritis. For leukocyte labelling, indium-111 and Tc-99m are primarily used. (ECB).

  3. Mechanisms of the priming effect of low doses of lipopoly-saccharides on leukocyte-dependent platelet aggregation in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Bosco, Ornella; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Fascio Pecetto, Paolo; Lupia, Enrico; Goffi, Alberto; Omedè, Paola; Emanuelli, Giorgio; Camussi, Giovanni

    2003-11-01

    Several studies focused on the ability of bacterial lipopolysac-charides (LPS) in triggering platelet and/or leukocyte activation. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in the aggregation of platelets and in their interaction with leukocytes in whole blood after stimulation with low doses of LPS. LPS did not directly induce platelet aggregation in whole blood, but they primed the aggregation of platelets induced by epinephrine, adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid. As shown by cytofluorimetry, platelets neither bind FITC-LPS, nor express the LPS-receptors CD14 and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). On the contrary, LPS primed monocytes and to a lesser extent polymorphonuclear neutrophils to adhere to platelets. Both platelet-leukocyte interaction and platelet aggregation in whole blood were inhibited by blockade of CD14 and TLR4. Moreover, the interaction between platelets and leukocytes was inhibited by P-selectin, and by blockade of PAF and reactive oxygen species, suggesting a role of P-selectin and of leukocyte-derived mediators. In conclusion, these results elucidate the mechanisms leading to platelet activation and interaction with leukocytes triggered by LPS. They suggest that the activation of platelets by LPS is mainly dependent on leukocytes and especially monocytes as a result of CD14 and TLR4 engagement. Moreover, we found that leukocyte-platelet interaction was triggered by the synthesis of PAF and the generation of oxygen radicals that induced upregulation of surface expression of P-selectin.

  4. HDAC inhibitors: modulating leukocyte differentiation, survival, proliferation and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Matthew J; Shakespear, Melanie R; Kamal, Nabilah A; Fairlie, David P

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors in cancer models were first linked to their ability to cause growth arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells. It is now clear that these agents also have pleiotropic effects on angiogenesis and the immune system, and some of these properties are likely to contribute to their anti-cancer activities. It is also emerging that inhibitors of specific HDACs affect the differentiation, survival and/or proliferation of distinct immune cell populations. This is true for innate immune cells such as macrophages, as well as cells of the acquired immune system, for example, T-regulatory cells. These effects may contribute to therapeutic profiles in some autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disease models. Here, we review our current understanding of how classical HDACs (HDACs 1-11) and their inhibitors impact on differentiation, survival and proliferation of distinct leukocyte populations, as well as the likely relevance of these effects to autoimmune and inflammatory disease processes. The ability of HDAC inhibitors to modulate leukocyte survival may have implications for the rationale of developing selective inhibitors as anti-inflammatory drugs.

  5. Leukocyte Telomere Length and Cognitive Function in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Frith

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the specific association between leukocyte telomere length and cognitive function among a national sample of the broader U.S. older adult population. Data from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES were used to identify 1,722 adults, between 60-85 years, with complete data on selected study variables. DNA was extracted from whole blood via the LTL assay, which is administered using quantitative polymerase chain reaction to measure telomere length relative to standard reference DNA (T/S ratio. Average telomere length was recorded, with two to three assays performed to control for individual variability. The DSST (Digit Symbol Substitution Test was used to assess participant executive cognitive functioning tasks of pairing and free recall. Individuals were excluded if they had been diagnosed with coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, heart attack or stroke at the baseline assessment. Leukocyte telomere length was associated with higher cognitive performance, independent of gender, race-ethnicity, physical activity status, body mass index and other covariates. In this sample, there was a strong association between LTL and cognition; for every 1 T/S ratio increase in LTL, there was a corresponding 9.9 unit increase in the DSST (β = 9.9; 95% CI: 5.6-14.2; P [JCBPR 2018; 7(1.000: 14-18

  6. Histopathology of murine toxoplasmosis under treatment with dialyzable leukocyte extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Eugenia Fuentes-Castro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs contain molecules smaller than 10 kDa with biological activity in receptor organisms. Primarily, they participate in the regulation of the Th1 immune response, which is essential for the control of several intracellular infections, such as toxoplasmosis. This disease is associated with congenital infection, encephalitis or systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals. The clinical course of this infection fundamentally depends on a well-regulated immune response and timely treatment with the appropriate drugs. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of treatment with a leukocyte extract, derived from crocodile lymphoid tissue, on the histopathology and brain parasite load in NIH mice that had been infected with cysts of Toxoplasma gondii (ME-49 strain. METHODS The treatment was applied during the acute and chronic stages of the infection. Histopathological changes were evaluated in the ileum, liver and spleen at one, four and eight weeks after infection and in the brain at week 8. The parasite load was evaluated by counting the cysts of T. gondii found in the brain. FINDINGS Compared to the control mouse group, the mice infected with T. gondii and under treatment with DLE showed less tissue damage, mainly at the intestinal, splenic and hepatic levels. In addition, a greater percentage of survival was observed, and there was a considerable reduction in the parasite load in the brain. CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that DLE derived from crocodile is a potential adjunctive therapy in the conventional treatment of toxoplasmosis.

  7. Enhancement in ex vivo phagocytic capacity of peritoneal leukocytes in mice by oral delivery of various lactic-acid-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeonhee; Lee, Taik-Soo

    2005-01-01

    Lactic-acid-producing bacteria (LABs) are known to have immunomodulating activity. In the current study, various LABs were tested for their immunity-enhancing activity, especially the phagocytic activity of leukocytes. Viable but not heat-killed cells of Weissella kimchii strain PL9001, Lactobacillus fermentum strain PL9005, and L. plantarum strain PL9011 significantly increased the ex vivo phagocytic capacity of mouse peritoneal leukocytes to ingest fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Escherichia coli in a strain-dependent manner. Results of this and previous studies suggest these LABs as candidates for new probiotics. This is the first report of the enhancement of peritoneal leukocyte activity of these species.

  8. 99mTc-HMPAO Labelled WBC Scan in Experimental Abscess by Labelling Autologous Leukocytes with In-House-Synthesized HMPAO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Shin, Hyung Sik; Ahn, Curie; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Choi, Kang Won; Koh, Chang Soon; Jung, Jae Min; Chung, Eun Ju

    1991-01-01

    With HMPAO we have synthesized in our laboratory, we labelled 99m Tc to canine leukocytes. Experimental abscess made by subcutaneous injection with Staphylococcus aureus was imaged with these 99m Tc labelled leukocytes. Labelling efficiency of HMPAO with 99m Tc was 66.2% ± 14.6% (N=9). Labelling efficiency of leukocytes with 99m Tc-HMPAO was 54% ± 7.79 (N=7). Cell bound radio activity in 99m Tc-HMPAO labelled leukocytes was around 80%. when these cells were incubated in plasma in vitro at 37 .deg. C for 5 hours. In vivo cell bound activity was over 80% at 24 hours after injection. One day and four days after inoculation, uptake at the inflammatory focus was found with 99m Tc labelled leukocytes. Uptake showed up in 4 hour image, and the uptake at the lesion was most prominent in 24 hour image. These findings show that in-house-synthesized HMPAO could be used for labelling leukocytes with 99m Tc, and that 99m Tc-HMPAO-labelled leukocytes were so stable and viable that inflammatory focus could be visualized with these 99m Tc-labelled leukocytes.

  9. Leukocyte- and endothelial-derived microparticles: a circulating source for fibrinolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Romaric; Plawinski, Laurent; Robert, Stéphane; Doeuvre, Loïc; Sabatier, Florence; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara; Mezzapesa, Anna; Anfosso, Francine; Leroyer, Aurelie S.; Poullin, Pascale; Jourde, Noémie; Njock, Makon-Sébastien; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Anglés-Cano, Eduardo; Dignat-George, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Background We recently assigned a new fibrinolytic function to cell-derived microparticles in vitro. In this study we explored the relevance of this novel property of microparticles to the in vivo situation. Design and Methods Circulating microparticles were isolated from the plasma of patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or cardiovascular disease and from healthy subjects. Microparticles were also obtained from purified human blood cell subpopulations. The plasminogen activators on microparticles were identified by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays; their capacity to generate plasmin was quantified with a chromogenic assay and their fibrinolytic activity was determined by zymography. Results Circulating microparticles isolated from patients generate a range of plasmin activity at their surface. This property was related to a variable content of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and/or tissue plasminogen activator. Using distinct microparticle subpopulations, we demonstrated that plasmin is generated on endothelial and leukocyte microparticles, but not on microparticles of platelet or erythrocyte origin. Leukocyte-derived microparticles bear urokinase-type plasminogen activator and its receptor whereas endothelial microparticles carry tissue plasminogen activator and tissue plasminogen activator/inhibitor complexes. Conclusions Endothelial and leukocyte microparticles, bearing respectively tissue plasminogen activator or urokinase-type plasminogen activator, support a part of the fibrinolytic activity in the circulation which is modulated in pathological settings. Awareness of this blood-borne fibrinolytic activity conveyed by microparticles provides a more comprehensive view of the role of microparticles in the hemostatic equilibrium. PMID:22733025

  10. Monoclonal antibodies and coupling reagents to cell membrane proteins for leukocyte labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAfee, J.G.; Gagne, G.; Subramanian, G.; Schneider, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Current gamma-emitting agents for tagging leukocytes, In-111 oxine or tropolone, label all cell types indiscriminantly, and nuclear localization in lymphocytes results in radiation damage. Coupling reagents and murine monoclonal antibodies (Mab) specific for cell surface antigens of human leukocytes were tried as cell labeling agents to avoid nuclear localization. 10/sup 8/ mixed human leukocytes in Hepes buffer were added to tubes coated with 5 mg of dry cyclic dianhydride of DTPA for 15 minutes at room temperature. After washing, 0.1 ml of In-111 Cl in ACD (pH 6.8) was added. After 30 minutes, a cell labeling yield of 23% was obtained. Washing the cells in an elutriation centrifuge showed that this label was irreversible. Mab for cell surface antigens of human granulocytes were labeled with 300 μCi of I-125 using the Iodobead technic and unbound activity was removed by gel column chromatography. 1-10 μg were added to 10/sup 8/ mixed leukocytes in 0.5 ml plasma or saline for 1 hr. With Mab anti-leu M4 (clone G7 E11), an IgM, the cell labeling yield was 21%, irreversible, and specific for granulocytes. With anti-human leukocyte Mab NEI-042 (clone 9.4), and IgG2a, and anti-granulocyte Mab MAS-065 (clone FMCl1) an IgG1, the cell labeling was relatively unstable. Labeling of leukocyte subpopulations with Mab is feasible, and the binding of multivalent IgM is stronger than that of other immunoglobulins. DTPA cyclic anhydride is firmly bound to cell membranes, but the labeling is non-specific

  11. Aberrant leukocyte telomere length in Birdshot Uveitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Vazirpanah

    Full Text Available Birdshot Uveitis (BU is an archetypical chronic inflammatory eye disease, with poor visual prognosis, that provides an excellent model for studying chronic inflammation. BU typically affects patients in the fifth decade of life. This suggests that it may represent an age-related chronic inflammatory disease, which has been linked to increased erosion of telomere length of leukocytes.To study this in detail, we exploited a sensitive standardized quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to determine the peripheral blood leukocyte telomere length (LTL in 91 genotyped Dutch BU patients and 150 unaffected Dutch controls.Although LTL erosion rates were very similar between BU patients and healthy controls, we observed that BU patients displayed longer LTL, with a median of log (LTL = 4.87 (= 74131 base pair compared to 4.31 (= 20417 base pair in unaffected controls (P<0.0001. The cause underpinning the difference in LTL could not be explained by clinical parameters, immune cell-subtype distribution, nor genetic predisposition based upon the computed weighted genetic risk score of genotyped validated variants in TERC, TERT, NAF1, OBFC1 and RTEL1.These findings suggest that BU is accompanied by significantly longer LTL.

  12. Indium-111 leukocyte imaging in appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, D.A.; Weber, P.M.; Kang, I.Y.; dos Remedios, L.V.; Jasko, I.A.; Sawicki, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Indium- 111 -labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was applied to the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Thirty-two patients observed in the hospital for possible appendicitis were prospectively studied. Scanning was done 2 hr after radiopharmaceutical injection. Thirteen scans were positive for acute appendicitis, and all but one were confirmed at laparotomy. In addition, two cases of colitis and two cases of peritonitis were detected. Of 15 negative studies, 11 had a benign course. Four patients with negative studies had laparotomy; two were found to have appendicitis and two had a normal appendix. Of 14 proven cases of appendicitis, 12 scans were positive for appendicitis with one false-positive scan, providing a sensitivity of 86%. Specificity was 93%: all negative cases except one had negative scans. Overall accuracy was 91% (29 of 32), comparing favorably with the accepted false-positive laparotomy rate of 25%. Use of In- 111 -labeled leukocyte scintigraphy serves to reduce the false-positive laparotomy rate and to shorten the clinical observation time in patients with acute appendicitis

  13. [In-line leukocyte depletion ov thrombocytapheresis concentrates with the Fresenius-AS-104 cell separator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, T; Kretschmer, V

    1997-01-01

    This study reports on in-line filtration of 72 platelet concentrates (PC) collected by the Fresenius AS 104 cell separator, using the new C4F sets with integrated leukocyte filters (Biofil P plus). 72 volunteer donors, automatic counts of platelets, microscopical counting of residual leukocytes with the Nageotte chamber, GMP-140 by flow cytometrie, beta-thromboglobulin release, platelet aggregation (ADP, collagen). Filtration reduced leukocytes by 98.5%. Residual leukocyte contamination remained clearly below 5 x 10(6) (mean 0.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(6), maximum 2.8 x 10(6). Platelet loss by filtration was found to be between 27.4 and 0.7% (median 8.5%). Filtration caused a significant decrease of platelet aggregability (p < 0.005), but no significant increase of beta-thromboglobulin release and only a slight decrease of GMP-140 expression. From these data can be concluded that in-line filtration was highly efficient with acceptable platelet retention. No significant platelet activation could be observed in the PC. The decrease of platelet aggregability have been due to the reduction of activated platelets which are believed to show reduced in vivo survival.

  14. Rapid, high-efficiency labeling of leukocytes with In-111 after hemolytic removal of erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karesh, S.M.; Henkin, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    During the labeling of leukocytes with Indium-111, conventional methodology involves separation and washing to remove red cells. This technique results in the loss of a significant number of leukocytes. Citrated whole blood of ten normal volunteers was studied for an alternate labeling method following sedimentation for 30 to 45 minutes and low speed centrifugation of the leukocyte-rich plasma. The average labeling for these ten volunteers by Indium-111 was 90% versus 60% by the older technique. Viability as measured by the trypan blue exclusion test was greater than 95%, WBC losses were essentially zero, and no WBC clumping was observed. Eighteen patients referred for leukocyte imaging were studied by this method. In this patient population, there was 91% labeling with viability greater than 95% and no evidence of clumping. Less than 5% RBC's were noted in any lot. Indium-111 WBC activity 20 minutes post injection averaged 79% of whole blood activity. This modification results in decreased losses of white cells, reduces preparation time to less than 2 hours, and significantly improves the labeling efficiency of the final product. Liver/spleen ratios and image quality were unchanged from the original method

  15. Tumor regression induced by intratumor therapy with a disabled infectious single cycle (DISC) herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector, DISC/HSV/murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, correlates with antigen-specific adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Selman A; Lynam, June; McLean, Cornelia S; Entwisle, Claire; Loudon, Peter; Rojas, José M; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Li, Geng; Mian, Shahid; Rees, Robert C

    2002-04-01

    Direct intratumor injection of a disabled infectious single cycle HSV-2 virus encoding the murine GM-CSF gene (DISC/mGM-CSF) into established murine colon carcinoma CT26 tumors induced a significant delay in tumor growth and complete tumor regression in up to 70% of animals. Pre-existing immunity to HSV did not reduce the therapeutic efficacy of DISC/mGM-CSF, and, when administered in combination with syngeneic dendritic cells, further decreased tumor growth and increased the incidence of complete tumor regression. Direct intratumor injection of DISC/mGM-CSF also inhibited the growth of CT26 tumor cells implanted on the contralateral flank or seeded into the lungs following i.v. injection of tumor cells (experimental lung metastasis). Proliferation of splenocytes in response to Con A was impaired in progressor and tumor-bearer, but not regressor, mice. A potent tumor-specific CTL response was generated from splenocytes of all mice with regressing, but not progressing tumors following in vitro peptide stimulation; this response was specific for the gp70 AH-1 peptide SPSYVYHQF and correlated with IFN-gamma, but not IL-4 cytokine production. Depletion of CD8(+) T cells from regressor splenocytes before in vitro stimulation with the relevant peptide abolished their cytolytic activity, while depletion of CD4(+) T cells only partially inhibited CTL generation. Tumor regression induced by DISC/mGM-CSF virus immunotherapy provides a unique model for evaluating the immune mechanism(s) involved in tumor rejection, upon which tumor immunotherapy regimes may be based.

  16. Studies on N5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocystein methyltransferase in normal and leukemia leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peytremann, R; Thorndike, J; Beck, W S

    1975-11-01

    A cobalamin-dependent N5-methyltetra-hydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase (methyl-transferase) was demonstrated in unfractioned extracts of human normal and leukemia leukocytes. Activity was substantially reduced in the absence of an added cobalamin derivative. Presumably, this residual activity reflects the endogeneous level of holoenzyme. Enzyme activity was notably higher in lymphoid cells than in myeloid cells. Thus, mean specific activities (+/-SD) were: chronic lymphocytic leukemia lymphocytes, 2.15+/-1.16; normal lymphocytes, 0.91+/-0.59; normal mature granulocytes, 0.15+/-0.10; chronic myelocytic leukemia granulocytes, barely detectable activity. Properties of leukocytes enzymes resembled those of methyltransferases previously studied in bacteria and other animal cells. Granulocytes and chronic myelocytic leukemia cells contain a factor or factors that inhibits Escherichia coli enzyme. The data suggest that the prominence of this cobalamin-dependent enzyme in lymphocytes and other mononuclear cell types may be related to their potential for cell division.

  17. The Many Faces of Human Leukocyte Antigen-G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mette; Djurisic, Snezana; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy is an immunological paradox, where fetal antigens encoded by polymorphic genes inherited from the father do not provoke a maternal immune response. The fetus is not rejected as it would be theorized according to principles of tissue transplantation. A major contribution to fetal tolerance...... is the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G, a nonclassical HLA protein displaying limited polymorphism, restricted tissue distribution, and a unique alternative splice pattern. HLA-G is primarily expressed in placenta and plays multifaceted roles during pregnancy, both as a soluble and a membrane-bound molecule......, differences in HLA-G isoform expression, and possible differences in functional activity. Furthermore, we highlight important observations regarding HLA-G genetics and expression in preeclampsia that future research should address....

  18. Effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, C.F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were investigated, using male Long-Evans rats exposed to 1% lead acetate in the drinking water for varying periods of time to achieve blood lead levels ranging from 20-200 μg/dl. Studies of PMN bacterial and fungal killing activity, chemotaxis and phagocytosis demonstrated that: 1) bactericidal activity of PMN from rats exposed to lead was not altered; 2) chemotactic activity remained within normal limits; 3) the phagocytic ability of the PMN also remained unaltered. In addition to these normal findings, one major abnormality was demonstrated: a significant decrease in the ability of PMN from rats exposed to lead to kill Candida albicans. This defect was not related to age or to length of exposure. It could not be produced by addition of lead to the test system in vitro. Further investigation revealed significant decreases in PMN glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, catalase, and myeloperoxidase activities. These data support two possible mechanisms for the abnormal fungicidal activity of PMN from lead-exposed rats: decrease in ability to reduce oxygen to active metabolites, or reduction in myeloperoxidase activity due to diminshed synthesis of the heme moiety required for its function

  19. Advances in RNAi therapeutic delivery to leukocytes using lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramishetti, Srinivas; Landesman-Milo, Dalit; Peer, Dan

    2016-11-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) therapeutics has advanced into clinical trials for liver diseases and solid tumors, but remain a challenge for manipulating leukocytes fate due to lack of specificity and safety issues. Leukocytes ingest pathogens and defend the body through a complex network. They are also involved in the pathogeneses of inflammation, viral infection, autoimmunity and cancers. Modulating gene expression in leukocytes using siRNAs holds great promise to treat leukocyte-mediated diseases. Leukocytes are notoriously hard to transduce with siRNAs and are spread throughout the body often located deep in tissues, therefore developing an efficient systemic delivery strategy is still a challenge. Here, we discuss recent advances in siRNA delivery to leukocyte subsets such as macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells and lymphocytes. We focus mainly on lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) comprised of new generation of ionizable lipids and their ability to deliver siRNA to primary or malignant leukocytes in a targeted manner. Special emphasis is made on LNPs targeted to subsets of leukocytes and we detail a novel microfluidic mixing technology that could aid in changing the landscape of process development of LNPs from a lab tool to a potential novel therapeutic modality.

  20. Tenocytes, pro-inflammatory cytokines and leukocytes: a relationship?

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Sadi, Onays; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula; Kohl, Benjamin; Lohan, Anke; Lemke, Marion; Ertel, Wolfgang; John, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    Leukocyte derived pro-inflammatory mediators could be involved in tendon healing and scar formation. Hence, the effect of autologous leukocytes (PBMCs, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neutrophils) on primary rabbit Achilles tenocytes gene expression was tested in insert assisted co-cultures.

  1. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675 Leukocyte...

  2. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 DNase-seq Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. File list: DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 DNase-seq Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Histone Blood Polymorphonuclear ...leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Unclassified Blood P