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Sample records for leukemia recurrent adult

  1. CD19/CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Children or Young Adults With Recurrent or Refractory CD19 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-20

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Imaging findings of recurrent acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and young adults, with emphasis on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Rosalyn P.; Kaste, Sue C.

    2004-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common of all childhood malignancies. Current remission rates approach 80%. Recurrent disease can present in a wide variety of ways. MR imaging plays a crucial role in the detection of disease relapse. Because other disorders can mimic recurrence of leukemia, it is important for the radiologist to judge recurrence from non-recurrence accurately in order to avoid unnecessary testing and emotional stress on the patient and family. (orig.)

  3. Imaging findings of recurrent acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and young adults, with emphasis on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Rosalyn P. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, 332 N. Lauderdale, Memphis, TN 38105-2794 (United States); Kaste, Sue C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, 332 N. Lauderdale, Memphis, TN 38105-2794 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee, College of Medicine, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common of all childhood malignancies. Current remission rates approach 80%. Recurrent disease can present in a wide variety of ways. MR imaging plays a crucial role in the detection of disease relapse. Because other disorders can mimic recurrence of leukemia, it is important for the radiologist to judge recurrence from non-recurrence accurately in order to avoid unnecessary testing and emotional stress on the patient and family. (orig.)

  4. Tailored central nervous system-directed treatment strategy for isolated CNS recurrence of adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Changcheng; Liu, Xin; Zhu, Weibo; Cai, Xiaoyan; Wu, Jingsheng; Sun, Zimin

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this report was to investigate the tailored treatment strategies for isolated central nervous system (CNS) recurrence in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Isolated CNS recurrence was documented in 34 patients: there were 18, 6, and 10 patients with meningeal involvement type (type A), cranial nerve palsy type (type B), and myeloid sarcoma type (type C), respectively. For patients with type A, intrathecal chemotherapy was the predominant strategy. For type B, systemic HD-Ara-C with four cycles was the main treatment. For type C, cranial irradiation or craniospinal irradiation was adopted and two cycles of HD-Ara-C were given after the irradiation. The 5-year cumulative incidence of CNS recurrence was 12.8%. There was a significantly higher WBC count (32.6∼60.8 × 10(9)/l) in patients at first diagnosis who developed CNS recurrence (all of the three types) compared with patients with no CNS recurrence (10.1 × 10(9)/l) (P = 0.005). We found that a significantly more patients with AML-M5 and 11q23 abnormalities developed CNS recurrence in type A (P adult AML, but further studies are needed to improve the long-term survival.

  5. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-28

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  7. HA-1 T TCR T Cell Immunotherapy for the Treating of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-30

    HLA-A*0201 HA-1 Positive Cells Present; Minimal Residual Disease; Recurrent Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Recurrent Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment options for adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, stem cell transplant, and other medications. Get detailed information about the treatment of new and recurrent AML in this expert-reviewed summary.

  9. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. 5-Fluoro-2'-Deoxycytidine and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein and Azacitidine or Decitabine for Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Previously Treated With a Hypomethylating Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in cryptorchid testis: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Góes, Luccas Santos Patto de; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos; Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Neves de; Sant'Anna, Alexandre Crippa; Dall'Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Srougi, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    A 23-year-old male with a history of bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. He presented a large mass in the right inguinal region 5 years ago. Upon physical examination, right-sided cryptorchidism was observed. The tumor markers alpha-fetoprotein and beta-HCG were within normalcy range and lactate dehydrogenase was raised. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right testicular mass in contiguity with the inguinal canal to the ipsilateral retroperitoneum, associated with right hydronephrosis. Due to the risk of germ-cell tumor in undescended testicle, the patient underwent radical right orchiectomy. The pathological examination showed recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in the testis. He was referred to oncology for adjuvant therapy. Our literature review found no similar cases described

  14. Recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in cryptorchid testis: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Góes, Luccas Santos Patto de [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lopes, Roberto Iglesias [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Neves de; Sant' Anna, Alexandre Crippa; Dall' Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Srougi, Miguel [Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A 23-year-old male with a history of bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. He presented a large mass in the right inguinal region 5 years ago. Upon physical examination, right-sided cryptorchidism was observed. The tumor markers alpha-fetoprotein and beta-HCG were within normalcy range and lactate dehydrogenase was raised. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right testicular mass in contiguity with the inguinal canal to the ipsilateral retroperitoneum, associated with right hydronephrosis. Due to the risk of germ-cell tumor in undescended testicle, the patient underwent radical right orchiectomy. The pathological examination showed recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in the testis. He was referred to oncology for adjuvant therapy. Our literature review found no similar cases described.

  15. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-12

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  18. Cyclosporine, Pravastatin Sodium, Etoposide, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; also called acute lymphocytic leukemia) is a blood cancer that often gets worse quickly if it is not treated. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, stem cell transplant, and targeted therapy. Get detailed information about ALL in this expert-reviewed summary.

  2. Case report 429: Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Jun; Yamamoto, Itsuo; Hino, Megumu; Torizuka, Kanji; Kyoto Univ.; Uchiyama, Takahashi; Uchino, Haruto

    1987-01-01

    The radiological and pathological skeletal manifestations in a case of adult T-cell leukemia are presented. The authors have emphasized the presence of multiple areas of localized subperiosteal resorption as a helpful finding in the differential diagnosis between adult T-cell leukemia and multiple myeloma and hyperparathyroidism. A possible mechanism for these radiological features and its similarity to those of other T-cell malignancies are discussed briefly. (orig./SHA)

  3. Characteristic patterns of relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT for adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: a comparative study of recurrent lesions after transplantation and chemotherapy by the Nagasaki Transplant Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itonaga, H; Sawayama, Y; Taguchi, J; Honda, S; Taniguchi, H; Makiyama, J; Matsuo, E; Sato, S; Ando, K; Imanishi, D; Imaizumi, Y; Yoshida, S; Hata, T; Moriuchi, Y; Fukushima, T; Miyazaki, Y

    2015-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (allo-SCT) is a promising therapy that may provide long-term durable remission for adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) patients; however, the incidence of relapse associated with ATL remains high. To determine the clinical features of these patients at relapse, we retrospectively analyzed tumor lesions in 30 or 49 patients who relapsed following allo-SCT or chemotherapy (CHT), respectively, at three institutions in Nagasaki prefecture between 1997 and 2011. A multivariate analysis revealed that the development of abnormal lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of patients at relapse was less frequent after allo-SCT than after CHT (PSCT (P=0.014). Lesions were more frequently observed in the central nervous systems of patients who relapsed with new lesions only (P=0.005). Thus, the clinical manifestation of relapsed ATL was slightly complex, especially in post-transplant patients. Our results emphasized the need to develop adoptive modalities for early and accurate diagnoses of relapsed ATL.

  4. Recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in cryptorchid testis: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Góes, Luccas Santos Patto de; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos; Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Neves de; Sant’Anna, Alexandre Crippa; Dall’Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Srougi, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    A 23-year-old male with a history of bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. He presented a large mass in the right inguinal region 5 years ago. Upon physical examination, right-sided cryptorchidism was observed. The tumor markers alpha-fetoprotein and beta-HCG were within normalcy range and lactate dehydrogenase was raised. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right testicular mass in contiguity with the inguinal canal to the ipsilateral retroperitoneum, associat...

  5. Genomic Profiling of Adult and Pediatric B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Fang Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic landscapes of 92 adult and 111 pediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL were investigated using next-generation sequencing and copy number alteration analysis. Recurrent gene mutations and fusions were tested in an additional 87 adult and 93 pediatric patients. Among the 29 newly identified in-frame gene fusions, those involving MEF2D and ZNF384 were clinically relevant and were demonstrated to perturb B-cell differentiation, with EP300-ZNF384 inducing leukemia in mice. Eight gene expression subgroups associated with characteristic genetic abnormalities were identified, including leukemia with MEF2D and ZNF384 fusions in two distinct clusters. In subgroup G4 which was characterized by ERG deletion, DUX4-IGH fusion was detected in most cases. This comprehensive dataset allowed us to compare the features of molecular pathogenesis between adult and pediatric B-ALL and to identify signatures possibly related to the inferior outcome of adults to that of children. We found that, besides the known discrepancies in frequencies of prognostic markers, adult patients had more cooperative mutations and greater enrichment for alterations of epigenetic modifiers and genes linked to B-cell development, suggesting difference in the target cells of transformation between adult and pediatric patients and may explain in part the disparity in their responses to treatment.

  6. Occupation, hobbies, and acute leukemia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Paul D; Shore, David L; Rauscher, Garth H; Sandler, Dale P

    2005-10-01

    Occupational and industrial exposures have been implicated in the etiology of leukemia, yet uncertainty remains regarding potential high risk occupations. We examined the associations between self-reported occupations and hobbies and acute leukemia risk using data from 811 cases and 637 controls participating in a case-control study in the U.S. and Canada. We found that several occupations may increase the risk of acute leukemia, particularly occupations related to petroleum products, rubber, nuclear energy, munitions, plastics, and electronics manufacturing. Differences were noted according to histological type. Other occupations and hobbies were not clearly associated with risk.

  7. Recurrent SETBP1 mutations in atypical chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Rocco; Valletta, Simona; Winkelmann, Nils; Redaelli, Sara; Spinelli, Roberta; Pirola, Alessandra; Antolini, Laura; Mologni, Luca; Donadoni, Carla; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Schnittger, Susanne; Kim, Dong-Wook; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Rossi, Fabio; Gaipa, Giuseppe; De Martini, Greta P; di Celle, Paola Francia; Jang, Hyun Gyung; Fantin, Valeria; Bignell, Graham R; Magistroni, Vera; Haferlach, Torsten; Pogliani, Enrico Maria; Campbell, Peter J; Chase, Andrew J; Tapper, William J; Cross, Nicholas C P; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) shares clinical and laboratory features with CML, but it lacks the BCR-ABL1 fusion. We performed exome sequencing of eight aCMLs and identified somatic alterations of SETBP1 (encoding a p.Gly870Ser alteration) in two cases. Targeted resequencing of 70 aCMLs, 574 diverse hematological malignancies and 344 cancer cell lines identified SETBP1 mutations in 24 cases, including 17 of 70 aCMLs (24.3%; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 16–35%). Most mutations (92%) were located between codons 858 and 871 and were identical to changes seen in individuals with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Individuals with mutations had higher white blood cell counts (P = 0.008) and worse prognosis (P = 0.01). The p.Gly870Ser alteration abrogated a site for ubiquitination, and cells exogenously expressing this mutant exhibited higher amounts of SETBP1 and SET protein, lower PP2A activity and higher proliferation rates relative to those expressing the wild-type protein. In summary, mutated SETBP1 represents a newly discovered oncogene present in aCML and closely related diseases. PMID:23222956

  8. MDX-010 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. 'Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma' with bone demineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohuchida, Toshiyuki; Nishitani, Hiromu; Matsuura, Keiichi

    1985-01-01

    Two patients with T-cell malignancy having radiographic manifestations of generalized and localized bone demineralization are reported. One, a 53-year-old-man, had marked osteoporosis and severe hypercalcemia, but no clinical evidence of leukemia throughout his illness. At autopsy there was no definite evidence of bone involvement. Histologic proof was obtained from abdominal skin which revealed ''adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL).'' The second case, a 33-year-old man, complained of arthralgia in his hands and feet; radiographs showed severe localized demineralization and pathologic fractures. Specimens of his peripheral blood, cervical lymph nodes, and bone marrow revealed ATLL cells. (orig.)

  10. Treatment of Young Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Ankit; Litzow, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are a distinctive category of patients, with substantial difference in disease biology and response to therapy; hence, they pose unique challenges and issues beyond those faced by children and older adults. Despite inferior survival compared to children, there is growing evidence to suggest that young adults have improved outcomes when treated with pediatric-based approaches. With better supportive care and toxicity management and multidisciplinary team and approach, we have made great improvement in outcomes of young adults with ALL. However, despite significant progress, patients with persistence of minimal residual disease have a poor prognosis. This review discusses current controversies in the management of young adults with ALL, outcomes following pediatric and adult protocols, and the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We also explore recent advances in disease monitoring and highlight our approach to incorporation of novel therapies in the management of young adults with ALL.

  11. Recurrent Childhood Animal Cruelty and Its Link to Recurrent Adult Interpersonal Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentham, Caleb E; Hensley, Christopher; Policastro, Christina

    2018-06-01

    In the early 1960s, researchers began to examine the potential link between childhood animal cruelty and future interpersonal violence. Findings since then have been inconsistent in establishing a relationship between the two. This may be due to researchers failing to measure the recurrency of childhood animal abuse and the recurrency of later violent acts committed in adulthood. The current study, using data from 257 inmates at a medium-security prison in a Southern state, is a replication of research conducted by Tallichet and Hensley, and Hensley, Tallichet, and Dutkiewicz, which examined this recurrency issue. The only statistically significant predictor of recurrent adult interpersonal violence in this study was recurrent childhood animal cruelty. Inmates who engaged in recurrent childhood animal cruelty were more likely to commit recurrent adult interpersonal violence. Respondents' race, education, and childhood residence were not significant predictors of the outcome variable.

  12. Human T cell leukemia virus reactivation with progression of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ratner

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus-associated adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL has a very poor prognosis, despite trials of a variety of different treatment regimens. Virus expression has been reported to be limited or absent when ATLL is diagnosed, and this has suggested that secondary genetic or epigenetic changes are important in disease pathogenesis.We prospectively investigated combination chemotherapy followed by antiretroviral therapy for this disorder. Nineteen patients were prospectively enrolled between 2002 and 2006 at five medical centers in a phase II clinical trial of infusional chemotherapy with etoposide, doxorubicin, and vincristine, daily prednisone, and bolus cyclophosphamide (EPOCH given for two to six cycles until maximal clinical response, and followed by antiviral therapy with daily zidovudine, lamivudine, and alpha interferon-2a for up to one year. Seven patients were on study for less than one month due to progressive disease or chemotherapy toxicity. Eleven patients achieved an objective response with median duration of response of thirteen months, and two complete remissions. During chemotherapy induction, viral RNA expression increased (median 190-fold, and virus replication occurred, coincident with development of disease progression.EPOCH chemotherapy followed by antiretroviral therapy is an active therapeutic regimen for adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, but viral reactivation during induction chemotherapy may contribute to treatment failure. Alternative therapies are sorely needed in this disease that simultaneously prevent virus expression, and are cytocidal for malignant cells.

  13. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-10

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than 70. Past treatment with chemotherapy or radiation therapy . Being exposed to high levels of radiation in the environment (such as nuclear radiation). Having certain genetic disorders , such as Down syndrome . Signs and symptoms of adult ALL include fever, ...

  15. Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma T-Cell Lymphoma Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Young Adult Lymphoma Overview Treatment Options Relapsed/Refractory Long-term ...

  16. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera, Josep-Maria; Oriol, Albert

    2009-10-01

    Today, long-term survival is achieved in more than 80% of children 1 to 10 years old with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, cure rates for adults and adolescents and young adults (AYA) with ALL remain relatively low, at only 40% to 50%. Age is a continuous prognostic variable in ALL, with no single age at which prognosis deteriorates markedly. Within childhood ALL populations, older children have shown inferior outcomes, whereas younger adults have shown superior outcomes among adult ALL patients. The type of treatment (pediatric-based versus adult-based) for AYA has recently been a matter of debate. In this article the biology and treatment of ALL in AYA is reviewed.

  17. Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Kusumi, Shizuyo

    1992-01-01

    Leukemia is the first malignant disease found among A-bomb survivors. Leukemia registration has greatly contributed to epidemiological and hematological studies on A-bomb radiation-related leukemia and other hematopoietic diseases, consisting of community population and the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) sample (approximately 120,000 persons containing A-bomb survivors). Using the fixed LSS cohort, the prevalence rate of leukemia reached the peak during the years 1950-1954, and thereafter, it has been gradually decreased. However, risk patterns for leukemia are still unsolved: has leukemia risk increased in recent years?; are serial changes in leukemia risk influenced by age at the time of exposure (ATE)?; is there variation between Hiroshima and Nagasaki?; and others. To solve these questions, leukemia data are now under analysis using the revised DS86. Relative risk for leukemia, especially chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), is found to be linearly increased with increasing bone marrow doses. Serial patterns of both excess risk and excess relative risk have revealed that leukemia risk is high at 5-10 years after A-bombing in younger A-bomb survivors ATE. The influence of age ATE on serial changes is noticeable in ALL. Another factor involved in the prevalence of leukemia is background (spontaneously developed leukemia), which is the recent interest because young A-bomb survivors ATE reach the cancer-prone age. (N.K.)

  18. Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  19. Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Todd M; Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Ness, Kirsten K

    2016-04-01

    Treatment-related obesity and the metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Both conditions often begin during therapy. Preventive measures, including dietary counseling and tailored exercise, should be initiated early in the course of survivorship, with referral to specialists to optimize success. However, among adults who develop obesity or the metabolic syndrome and who do not respond to lifestyle therapy, medical intervention may be indicated to manage underlying pathology, such as growth hormone deficiency, or to mitigate risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Because no specific clinical trials have been done in this population to treat metabolic syndrome or its components, clinicians who follow adult survivors of childhood ALL should use the existing American Heart Association/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Scientific Statement to guide their approach.

  20. Risk of thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma after adult leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Birgens, Henrik S

    2011-01-01

    Patients with childhood leukemia surviving into adulthood have elevated risk of developing thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL); these risks cannot automatically be extrapolated to patients surviving adult leukemia. We tested whether survivors of adult leukemia...... are at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and NHL. We included the entire adult Danish population (14 years of age or older), in a 28-year follow-up period from 1980 through 2007, composed of 6 542 639 persons; during this period, 18 834 developed adult leukemia, 4561 developed thyroid...... cancer, 13 362 developed brain cancer, and 15 967 developed NHL. In nested studies using Cox regression models on individual participant data, we found that, after adult leukemia, the multivariate adjusted hazard ratios were 4.9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8-8.5) for thyroid cancer, 1.9 (95% CI, 1...

  1. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Patrick W; Douer, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The cure rate of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children is 80%, compared to less than half in adults. A major proportion of this cure rate drop occurs in adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The age range defining this population varies between studies, biological characteristics are different from both younger children and older adults, and AYAs are treated either by pediatric or adult oncologists, who often apply different treatment approaches to the same ALL patient population. The outcome of AYAs aged 15-21 years treated by more contemporary pediatric protocols is similar to that of younger children but is inferior when using adult regimens. This motivated studying AYA patients, including those above the age of 21 years, with pediatric or 'pediatrics-inspired' regimens that intensified nonmyelosuppressive drugs such as vincristine, steroids and asparaginase, with very promising preliminary results. Discovering new mutations in AYA ALL will help stratify patients into risk subgroups and identify targets for novel agents. This, together with fine-tuning pediatric chemotherapy principles will hopefully finally decrease the cure rate gap between children and AYAs - and even older adults. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Relationship between triterpenoid anticancer drug resistance, autophagy, and caspase-1 in adult T-cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Nakanishi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the inflammasome inhibitor cucurbitacin D (CuD induces apoptosis in human leukemia cell lines. Here, we investigated the effects of CuD and a B-cell lymphoma extra-large (Bcl-xL inhibitor on autophagy in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL isolated from adult T-cell leukemia (ATL patients. CuD induced PBL cell death in patients but not in healthy donors. This effect was not significantly inhibited by treatment with rapamycin or 3-methyladenine (3-MA. The Bcl-xL inhibitor Z36 induced death in primary cells from ATL patients including that induced by CuD treatment, effects that were partly inhibited by 3-MA. Similarly, cell death induced by the steroid prednisolone was enhanced in the presence of Z36. A western blot analysis revealed that Z36 also promoted CuD-induced poly(ADP ribose polymerase cleavage. Interestingly, the effects of CuD and Z36 were attenuated in primary ATL patient cells obtained upon recurrence after umbilical cord blood transplantation, as compared to those obtained before chemotherapy. Furthermore, cells from this patient expressed a high level of caspase-1, and treatment with caspase-1 inhibitor-enhanced CuD-induced cell death. Taken together, these results suggest that rescue from resistance to steroid drugs can enhance chemotherapy, and that caspase-1 is a good marker for drug resistance in ATL patients.

  3. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations...... subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s)....

  4. TREATMENT OF ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep-Maria Ribera

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this review was to update and discuss the current concepts andthe results of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adolescents and young adults(AYA. After a brief consideration of the epidemiologic and clinicobiologic characteristics of ALLin the AYA population, the main retrospective comparative studies stating the superiority ofpediatric over adult-based protocols were reviewed. The most important prospective studies inyoung adults using pediatric inspired or pediatric unmodified protocols were also reviewedemphasizing their feasibility at least up to the age of 40 yr and their promising results, with eventfreesurvival rates of 60-65% or greater. Results of trials from pediatric groups have shown that theunfavourable prognosis of adolescents is no more adequate. The majority of the older adolescentswith ALL can be cured with risk-adjusted and minimal residual disease-guided intensivechemotherapy, without stem cell transplantation. However, some specific subgroups, which aremore frequent in adolescents than in children (e.g., early pre-T, iAMP21, and BCR-ABL-like,deserve particular attention. In summary, the advances in treatment of ALL in adolescents havebeen translated to young adults, and that explains the significant improvement in survival of thesepatients in recent years.

  5. Biologic determinants of tumor recurrence in stage II colon cancer: validation study of the 12-gene recurrence score in cancer and leukemia group B (CALGB) 9581.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venook, Alan P; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Lopatin, Margarita; Ye, Xing; Lee, Mark; Friedman, Paula N; Frankel, Wendy; Clark-Langone, Kim; Millward, Carl; Shak, Steven; Goldberg, Richard M; Mahmoud, Najjia N; Warren, Robert S; Schilsky, Richard L; Bertagnolli, Monica M

    2013-05-10

    A greater understanding of the biology of tumor recurrence should improve adjuvant treatment decision making. We conducted a validation study of the 12-gene recurrence score (RS), a quantitative assay integrating stromal response and cell cycle gene expression, in tumor specimens from patients enrolled onto Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9581. CALGB 9581 randomly assigned 1,713 patients with stage II colon cancer to treatment with edrecolomab or observation and found no survival difference. The analysis reported here included all patients with available tissue and recurrence (n = 162) and a random (approximately 1:3) selection of nonrecurring patients. RS was assessed in 690 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples with quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction by using prespecified genes and a previously validated algorithm. Association of RS and recurrence was analyzed by weighted Cox proportional hazards regression. Continuous RS was significantly associated with risk of recurrence (P = .013) as was mismatch repair (MMR) gene deficiency (P = .044). In multivariate analyses, RS was the strongest predictor of recurrence (P = .004), independent of T stage, MMR, number of nodes examined, grade, and lymphovascular invasion. In T3 MMR-intact (MMR-I) patients, prespecified low and high RS groups had average 5-year recurrence risks of 13% (95% CI, 10% to 16%) and 21% (95% CI, 16% to 26%), respectively. The 12-gene RS predicts recurrence in stage II colon cancer in CALGB 9581. This is consistent with the importance of stromal response and cell cycle gene expression in colon tumor recurrence. RS appears to be most discerning for patients with T3 MMR-I tumors, although markers such as grade and lymphovascular invasion did not add value in this subset of patients.

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated in Pediatric and Adult Departments in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wennström, Lovisa; Edslev, Pernille Wendtland; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia suggest better results when using pediatric protocols for adult patients, while corresponding data for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are limited. PROCEDURE: We investigated disease characteristics and outcome...... countries. RESULTS: The incidence of AML was 4.9/million/year for the age group 10-14 years, 6.5 for 15-18 years, and 6.9 for 19-30 years. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was more frequent in adults and in females of all ages. Pediatric patients with APL had similar overall survival as pediatric patients...

  7. Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL; also called acute lymphocytic leukemia) is an aggressive cancer that can progress quickly without treatment. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, stem cell transplant, and targeted therapy. Get detailed information about the molecular genetics, prognosis, and treatment of ALL in this clinician summary.

  8. Management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Lori S; Reizine, Natalie; Stock, Wendy

    2018-02-01

    Substantial interest in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in young adults (YAs) and investigations focused on this patient population have resulted in therapeutic advancements that are changing the management paradigm and improving outcomes. The pediatric ALL approach is feasible and effective when administered by medical oncologists. Advanced diagnostics and minimal residual disease measurements aid in prognostication and have resulted in shifting recommendations regarding allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant in first remission. Blinatumomab, inotuzumab, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapies are transforming the treatment of relapsed/refractory ALL. This comprehensive review of the current management of ALL in YAs summarizes recent scientific developments and clinical trial findings related to ALL biology, frontline management approaches, novel therapies, and supportive care specific to this patient population. Finally, a practical guide to modern YA management for practicing clinicians is provided.

  9. Prognostic signature and clonality pattern of recurrently mutated genes in inactive chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtado, A M; Chen-Liang, T-H; Przychodzen, B; Hamedi, C; Muñoz-Ballester, J; Dienes, B; García-Malo, M D; Antón, A I; Arriba, F de; Teruel-Montoya, R; Ortuño, F J; Vicente, V; Maciejewski, J P; Jerez, A

    2015-01-01

    An increasing numbers of patients are being diagnosed with asymptomatic early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), with no treatment indication at baseline. We applied a high-throughput deep-targeted analysis, especially designed for covering widely TP53 and ATM genes, in 180 patients with inactive disease at diagnosis, to test the independent prognostic value of CLL somatic recurrent mutations. We found that 40/180 patients harbored at least one acquired variant with ATM (n=17, 9.4%), NOTCH1 (n=14, 7.7%), TP53 (n=14, 7.7%) and SF3B1 (n=10, 5.5%) as most prevalent mutated genes. Harboring one ‘sub-Sanger' TP53 mutation granted an independent 3.5-fold increase of probability of needing treatment. Those patients with a double-hit ATM lesion (mutation+11q deletion) had the shorter median time to first treatment (17 months). We found that a genomic variable: TP53 mutations, most of them under the sensitivity of conventional techniques; a cell phenotypic factor: CD38-positive expression; and a classical marker as β2-microglobulin, remained as the unique independent predictors of outcome. The high-throughput determination of TP53 status, particularly in this set of patients frequently lacking high-risk chromosomal aberrations, emerges as a key step, not only for prediction modeling, but also for exploring mutation-specific therapeutic approaches and minimal residual disease monitoring

  10. Role of L-asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: focus on adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rytting ME

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael E RyttingDepartment of Pediatrics and Leukemia, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Asparaginase preparations deplete asparagine in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL blasts. Asparaginase in its various forms is an important component of treatment regimens for pediatric ALL. Recently, interest and use of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL has increased, particularly in young adults. There is much less information on asparaginase use and toxicity in adult compared with pediatric populations. This review surveys prior published studies of the three most commonly used asparagine preparations as used in adult patients, and discusses important toxicities encountered in adult patients who receive asparaginase preparations.Keywords: asparaginase, leukemia, adults, children

  11. Risk of thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma after adult leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Birgens, Henrik S

    2011-01-01

    .2-3.1) for brain cancer, and 3.3 (95% CI, 2.5-4.4) for NHL. Corresponding hazard ratios after childhood leukemia were 10.4 (95% CI, 0.4-223) for thyroid cancer, 7.2 (95% CI, 2.0-26) for brain cancer, and 6.5 (95% CI, 0.4-110) for NHL. Patients with adult leukemia have excess risk of thyroid cancer, brain cancer......Patients with childhood leukemia surviving into adulthood have elevated risk of developing thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL); these risks cannot automatically be extrapolated to patients surviving adult leukemia. We tested whether survivors of adult leukemia...... are at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and NHL. We included the entire adult Danish population (14 years of age or older), in a 28-year follow-up period from 1980 through 2007, composed of 6 542 639 persons; during this period, 18 834 developed adult leukemia, 4561 developed thyroid...

  12. Long-term results of total body irradiation in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marnitz, Simone; Zich, Alexander; Budach, Volker; Jahn, Ulrich; Neumann, Oliver; Martus, Peter; Arnold, Renate

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this chart review of adult patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with total body irradiation (TBI) was to evaluate early and late toxicity and long-term outcome. A total of 110 adult patients (34 ± 12 years) with ALL underwent TBI (6 fractions of 2 Gy for a total of 12 Gy) as a part of the treatment regimen before transplantation. Treatment-related toxicity, mortality, and hematologic outcome are reported. Mean follow-up was 70 months. The 2- and 5-year leukemia-free survival rates were 78 and 72 %, respectively. In all, 29 % (32/110) patients suffered from medullary recurrence after a median time of 7 months. Gender was the only statistically significant prognostic factor in terms of overall survival in favor of female patients. Treatment-related mortality and overall survival after 2 and 5 years were 16 and 22 %, and 60 and 52.7 %, respectively. The most frequent late reaction wascGVHD of the skin (n = 33, 30 %). In addition, 15.5 % (17/110 patients) suffered pulmonary symptoms, and 6 patients developed lung fibrosis. Eyes were frequently affected by the radiation (31/110 = 28 %); 12 of 110 patients (11 %) presented with symptoms from osteoporosis, 5 of 110 patients (4.5 %) developed hypothyreosis and 2 patients diabetes mellitus. Of the male patients, 11 % reported erectile dysfunction or loss of libido, while 2 of 36 women reported menopausal syndrome at the mean time of 28 months after treatment with requirement for substitution. No women became pregnant after treatment. No acute or late cardiac toxicities were documented in our patients. No secondary malignancies were documented. Although hematologic outcome was in the upper range of that reported in the literature, treatment-related mortality (TRM) and medullary recurrences remain a challenge. Sophisticated radiation techniques allow for decreasing toxicity to certain organs and/or dose escalation to the bone marrow in highly selected patients in order to improve therapeutic

  13. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. An activating mutation of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) in adult T cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Mathew A; Olson, Sydney; Sundaramoorthi, Hemalatha; Cates, Kitra; Cheng, Xiaogang; Harding, John; Martens, Andrew; Challen, Grant A; Tyagi, Manoj; Ratner, Lee; Rauch, Daniel

    2018-03-14

    The human T cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax drives cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis early in the pathogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Subsequently, likely as a result of specific immuno-editing, Tax expression is downregulated and functionally replaced by somatic driver mutations of the host genome. Both amplification and point mutations of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) have been previously detected in ATL, and the K59R mutation is the most common single-nucleotide variation in IRF4 and is found exclusively in ATL. Here high throughput whole-exome sequencing revealed recurrent activating genetic alterations in the T cell receptor, CD28, and NF-kB pathways. Moreover, we found that IRF4, which is transcriptionally activated downstream of these pathways, is frequently mutated in ATL. IRF4 RNA, protein, and IRF4 transcriptional targets are uniformly elevated in HTLV transformed cells and ATL cell lines, and IRF4 was bound to genomic regulatory DNA of many of these transcriptional targets in HTLV-1 transformed cell lines. We further noted that the K59R IRF4 mutant is expressed at higher levels in the nucleus than is wild-type IRF4, and is transcriptionally more active. Expression of both wild-type and the K59R mutant of IRF4 from a constitutive promoter in retrovirally transduced murine bone marrow cells increased the abundance of T lymphocytes but not myeloid cells or B lymphocytes in mice. IRF4 may represent a therapeutic target in ATL since ATL cells select for a mutant of IRF4 with higher nuclear expression and transcriptional activity, and over-expression of IRF4 induces the expansion of T lymphocytes in vivo. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guldane Cengiz Seval

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this review were to discuss standard and investigational treatment strategies for adolescent and young adult with acute myeloid leukemia, excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML in adolescent and young adult patients (AYAs may need a different type of therapy than those currently used in children and older patients. As soon as AML is diagnosed, AYA patient should be offered to participate in well-designed clinical trials. The standard treatment approach for AYAs with AML is remission induction chemotherapy with an anthracycline/cytarabine combination, followed by either consolidation chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation, depending on the ability of the patient to tolerate intensive treatment and cytogenetic features. Presently, continuing progress of novel drugs targeting specific pathways in acute leukemia may bring AML treatment into a new era.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid beta-2-microglobulin in adult patients with acute leukemia or lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Kjeldsen, L; Dalhoff, K

    1992-01-01

    Beta-2-microglobulin (B2m) was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from 18 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloblastic leukemia or lymphoma in order to detect early central nervous system (CNS) involvement or relapse. Six had CNS-involvement documented by neurologic...... determination of CSF-B2m alone may be a useful and sensitive marker of CNS-dissemination in acute leukemia and malignant lymphoma. Using the criteria of CSF-B2m greater than 160 nmol/l as a positive diagnostic test the sensitivity of the test was 100%, the specificity was 76%. The same values for the CSF...

  17. Vaccination of adult and newborn mice of a resistant strain (C57BL/6J) against challenge with leukemias induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Adult or newborn C57BL/6J mice were immunized with isogenic Moloney strain MuLV-induced leukemia cells irradiated with 10,000 rads or treated with low concentrations of formalin. Groups of immunized and control mice were challenged with a range of doses of viable leukemia cells, and tumor deaths were recorded for 90 days after challenge. Then, the doses of challenge cells which produced 50% tumor deaths were calculated for immunized and control mice. The logarithm of their ratio quantified the degree of protection provided by immunization. For adult C57BL/6J mice, a single immunization with MuLV-induced leukemia cells was not effective; either cells plus Bacillus Calmette-Guerin or Corynebacterium parvum, or else two immunizations with irradiated leukemia cells were needed to produce statistically significant increases in the values of the doses of challenge cells which produced 50% tumor deaths. Cross-protection was obtained by immunization with other isogenic MuLV-induced leukemias, but not by immunization with isogenic carcinogen-induced tumors or with an isogenic spontaneous leukemia. For newborn mice, a single injection of irradiated leukemia cells provided 1.3 to 1.5 logs of protection, and admixture of B. Calmette-Guerin or C. parvum increased this protection to 2.4 to 2.7 logs. Since irradiated and frozen-thawed MuLV-induced leukemia cells contained viable MuLV, leukemia cells treated with 0.5 or 1.0% formalin were tested as an alternative. A single injection of formalin-treated isogenic leukemia cells admixed with C. parvum provided between 1.7 and 2.8 logs of protection. These results demonstrate that a single vaccination of newborn animals against a highly antigenic virally induced leukemia produces strong protection against a subsequent challenge with viable leukemia cells

  18. Translocation (10;17)(p15;q21) is a recurrent anomaly in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempescul, Adrian; Guillerm, Gaëlle; Douet-Guilbert, Nathalie; Morel, Frédéric; Le Bris, Marie-Josée; De Braekeleer, Marc

    2007-01-01

    We report here two cases of patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia, type M1 (FAB classification), associated with a t(10;17)(p15;q21). Fluorescence in situ hybridization with the LSI PML/RARA dual-color probe showed the breakpoint to be distal to the RARA locus. Four other patients with this translocation have been reported, three of them having acute undifferentiated or poorly differentiated leukemia.

  19. Recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax in young adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Dongsub; Lee, Sungsoo; Haam, Seok Jin; Paik, Hyo Chae; Lee, Doo Yun

    2015-08-01

    Although better nutritional support has improved the growth rates in children, the occurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax has also been increasing in children. The current study attempts to investigate the occurrence and recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax and the efficacy of surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax in young adults and children. A total of 840 patients were treated for pneumothorax at our hospital from January 2006 to December 2010. Exclusion criteria for this study were age >25 or secondary, traumatic or iatrogenic pneumothorax, and a total of 517 patients were included. Patients were classified into three groups according to age at the first episode of primary spontaneous pneumothorax: Group A: ≤16 years; Group B: 17-18 years and Group C: ≥19 years. The study group was composed of 470 male and 47 female patients. There were 234 right-sided, 279 left-sided and 4 bilateral primary spontaneous pneumothoraces. Wedge resection by video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed in 285 patients, while 232 were managed by observation or closed thoracostomy. In the wedge resection group, 51 patients experienced recurrence. The recurrence rates after wedge resection were 27.9% in Group A, 16.5% in Group B and 13.2% in Group C (P = 0.038). The recurrence rates after observation or closed thoracostomy were 45.7% in Group A, 51.9% in Group B and 47.7% in Group C (P = 0.764). In the present study, postoperative recurrence rates were higher than those in the literature. Intense and long-term follow-up was probably one reason for the relatively high recurrence rate. The recurrence rate after wedge resection in patients aged ≤16 years was higher than that in older patients. There was no difference between the recurrence rates after observation or closed thoracostomy, regardless of age. These results suggest that wedge resection might be delayed in children. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  20. Recurrent group A streptococcal vulvovaginitis in adult women: family epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Jack D; Funaro, Deana; Kaplan, Edward L

    2007-03-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) vulvovaginitis has been reported in prepubertal girls. In adult women, a vaginal carrier state has been described, but vulvovaginitis is rarely reported. We describe 2 cases of recurrent GAS vulvovaginitis in women whose husbands were gastrointestinal carriers of GAS. Characterization of the isolated strains demonstrated that identical emm types of GAS were shared by partners. Treatment of both partners resulted in resolution of vaginitis. On the basis of negative vaginal culture results obtained after treatment of each individual episode of vaginitis, we believe that the female patients were reinfected as a result of exposure to their husbands, with shedding likely to have occurred in bed. These cases reiterate the necessity for adequate screening of the patient's family and contacts in cases of recurrent GAS infection by culturing all potential areas of GAS carriage.

  1. A recurrent germline PAX5 mutation confers susceptibility to pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, S.; Schrader, K.A.; Waanders, E.; Timms, A.E.; Vijai, J.; Miething, C.; Wechsler, J.; Yang, J.; Hayes, J.; Klein, R.J.; Zhang, J.; Wei, L.; Wu, G.; Rusch, M.; Nagahawatte, P.; Ma, J; Chen, S.C.; Song, G.; Cheng, J.; Meyers, P.; Bhojwani, D.; Jhanwar, S.; Maslak, P.; Fleisher, M.; Littman, J.; Offit, L.; Rau-Murthy, R.; Fleischut, M.H.; Corines, M.; Murali, R.; Gao, X.; Manschreck, C.; Kitzing, T.; Murty, V.V.; Raimondi, S.C.; Kuiper, R.P.; Simons, A.; Schiffman, J.D.; Onel, K.; Plon, S.E.; Wheeler, D.A.; Ritter, D.; Ziegler, D.S.; Tucker, K.; Sutton, R.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Li, J.; Huntsman, D.G.; Hansford, S.; Senz, J.; Walsh, T.; Lee (Helen Dowling Instituut), M. van der; Hahn, C.N.; Roberts, K.G.; King, M.C.; Lo, S.M.; Levine, R.L.; Viale, A.; Socci, N.D.; Nathanson, K.L.; Scott, H.S.; Daly, M.; Lipkin, S.M.; Lowe, S.W.; Downing, J.R.; Altshuler, D.; Sandlund, J.T.; Horwitz, M.S.; Mullighan, C.G.; Offit, K.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic alterations of the lymphoid transcription factor gene PAX5 (also known as BSAP) are a hallmark of B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), but inherited mutations of PAX5 have not previously been described. Here we report a new heterozygous germline variant, c.547G>A

  2. Sixteen adult patients with acute leukemia treated by chemotherapy, total body irradiation and allogeneic marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodera, Yoshihisa; Morishima, Yasuo; Morishita, Yoshihisa [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1984-12-01

    Since 1976, 16 adult patients with acute leukemia have been treated by chemotherapy, total body irradiation (TBI) and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in the medical school hospital and the satellite hospitals of Nagoya University. The first group of 10 patients were given marrow grafts at the time of leukemic relapse and the second group of six patients were given the grafts in the period of remission of their disease. For the first group (ALL/ANLL 2:8, age (median) 33, M/F 8:2), HLA-identical donor cells (25 x 10/sup 7//kg(median)) were infused after the patients were conditioned with NSC D 245382 (ACNU) or daunorubicin, cyclophosphamide (CY) and a single shot of 1000 rad of TBI. For the second group (ALL/ANLL 4:2, age (median) 20, M/F 5:1), HLA-identical donor cells (22 x 10/sup 7//kg(median)) were infused after the patients were conditioned with CY and fractionated (250 rad x 4) TBI. All the patients were isolated in a laminar air flow room (LAF) after gut and skin decontamination. Engraftment of donor cells was confirmed in 15 out of the 16 patients. Febrile periods in LAF and the days required for platelet transfusion were prolonged in the first group. All the patients in the first group died within 12-214 days after BMT because of interstitial pneumonitis (7 patients) or bacterial infection (3 patients). On the other hand, five out of six patients in the second group are alive 84-540 days after BMT. For the surviving patients, the complications of chronic graft versus host disease, viral infections, tuberculosis, hepatitis, hemorrhagic cystitis and recurrence of leukemia are now the problems. It can be stated that the patient's clinical condition at the time of BMT is one of the most essential factors for the success of BMT although the effects of other variables, such as a change in the conditioning regimens or the supportive care, must also be carefully analyzed.

  3. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-22

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Nilotinib induced avascular necrosis of femoral head in an adult chronic myeloid leukemia patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekkudan, Shinto Francis; Nityanand, Soniya

    2018-06-01

    We report a rare case of avascular necrosis of femoral head (AVNFH) in an adult chronic myeloid leukemia - chronic phase (CML-CP) patient during due course of therapy with second line Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI), Nilotinib. A high index of clinical suspicion should be kept in any symptomatic CML patient on TKI's.

  5. Genetically Modified T-cell Infusion Following Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Recurrent or High-Risk Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-26

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. [Cellular immunophenotypes in 97 adults with acute leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedras, J; López-Karpovitch, X; Cárdenas, M R

    1997-01-01

    To analyze hematopoietic cell surface antigen reactivity in acute leukemia (AL) by flow cytometry and identify acute mixed-lineage leukemias (AMLL) employing the most widely accepted criteria. Ninety seven patients with de novo AL were studied. Cell surface antigens were investigated with monoclonal antibodies directed to: B lymphoid (CD10, CD19, CD20, CD21, CD22); T lymphoid (CD2, CD3, CD5, CD7); and myeloid (CD13, CD14, CD15, CD33, CD41) cell lineages. Maturation cell-associated antigens (CD34, HLA-DR and TdT) were also studied. Twelve patients unclassified by cytomorphology could be classified by immunophenotype. Using cytomorphologic, cytochemical and immunophenotypic data, 54 cases corresponded to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 43 were acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). In All there were 63% B lineage, 15% T, 7% T/B, 6% undifferentiated and 9% mixed-lineage (coexpression of two or more myeloid-associated antigens). In AML, myeloid immunophenotype was observed in 86% undifferentiated in 2%, and mixed-lineage in 12% (coexpression of two or more lymphoid-associated antigens). In addition, 26% of ALL cases and 12% of AML cases expressed a single myeloid and lymphoid antigen respectively. The most common aberrant antigens in ALL and AML were CD13 and CD7 respectively. The highest frequency of CD34 antigen expression (90%) was detected in patients with AMLL. Flow cytometric immunophenotypic analysis allowed to: a) establish diagnosis in cytomorphologically unclassified cases; b) identify AMLL with a frequency similar to that reported in other series; and c) confirm the heterogeneity of AL.

  7. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma treatment in Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Dantas Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is a peripheral disease associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1. Treatment is carried out according to clinical type with watchful waiting being recommended for less aggressive types. Aggressive adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is generally treated with chemotherapy and/or antivirals. The objective of this study was to correlate the survival of patients diagnosed in Bahia, Brazil, with the therapeutic approaches employed and to evaluate what issues existed in their treatment processes. Methods: Eighty-three adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma patients (26 smoldering, 23 chronic, 16 acute, 13 lymphoma and five primary cutaneous tumoral with available data were included in this study. Results: Complete response was achieved in seven smoldering patients with symptomatic treatment, in two with chronic disease using antivirals/chemotherapy, in one with acute disease using antivirals and in one lymphoma using the LSG15 regimen [vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisolone (VCAP; doxorubicin, ranimustine, and prednisolone (AMP; and vindesine, etoposide, carboplatin, and prednisolone (VECP]. Smoldering patients who received symptomatic treatment presented longer survival. Favorable chronic patients treated with antivirals presented longer survival compared to the unfavorable subtype. However, for the acute form, first-line chemotherapy was better, albeit without significance, than antivirals. Only one of the patients with lymphoma and primary cutaneous tumors responded. Conclusions: Watchful waiting associated with phototherapy represents the best option for smoldering adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma with survival in Bahia being superior to that described in Japan. There was a trend of better results with zidovudine/interferon-alpha in favorable chronic disease. Excellent results were achieved in the lymphoma type treated with the LSG15 protocol. Patients are diagnosed late

  8. Novel real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for simultaneous detection of recurrent fusion genes in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolz, Sandra; Barragán, Eva; Fuster, Óscar; Llop, Marta; Cervera, José; Such, Esperanza; De Juan, Inmaculada; Palanca, Sarai; Murria, Rosa; Bolufer, Pascual; Luna, Irene; Gómez, Inés; López, María; Ibáñez, Mariam; Sanz, Miguel A

    2013-09-01

    The recent World Health Organization classification recognizes different subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) according to the presence of several recurrent genetic abnormalities. Detection of these abnormalities and other molecular changes is of increasing interest because it contributes to a refined diagnosis and prognostic assessment in AML and enables monitoring of minimal residual disease. These genetic abnormalities can be detected using single RT-PCR, although the screening is still labor intensive and costly. We have developed a novel real-time RT-PCR assay to simultaneously detect 15 AML-associated rearrangements that is a simple and easily applicable method for use in clinical diagnostic laboratories. This method showed 100% specificity and sensitivity (95% confidence interval, 91% to 100% and 92% to 100%, respectively). The procedure was validated in a series of 105 patients with AML. The method confirmed all translocations detected using standard cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization and some additional undetected rearrangements. Two patients demonstrated two molecular rearrangements simultaneously, with BCR-ABL1 implicated in both, in addition to RUNX1-MECOM in one patient and PML-RARA in another. In conclusion, this novel real-time RT-PCR assay for simultaneous detection of multiple AML-associated fusion genes is a versatile and sensitive method for reliable screening of recurrent rearrangements in AML. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated in Pediatric and Adult Departments in the Nordic Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennström, Lovisa; Edslev, Pernille Wendtland; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Fløisand, Yngvar; Forestier, Erik; Gustafsson, Göran; Heldrup, Jesper; Hovi, Liisa; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Jonsson, Olafur Gisli; Lausen, Birgitte; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bernward; Holmberg, Erik; Juliusson, Gunnar; Stockelberg, Dick; Hasle, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Studies on adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia suggest better results when using pediatric protocols for adult patients, while corresponding data for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are limited. We investigated disease characteristics and outcome for de novo AML patients 10-30 years old treated in pediatric or adult departments. We included 166 patients 10-18 years of age with AML treated according to the pediatric NOPHO-protocols (1993-2009) compared with 253 patients aged 15-30 years treated in hematology departments (1996-2009) in the Nordic countries. The incidence of AML was 4.9/million/year for the age group 10-14 years, 6.5 for 15-18 years, and 6.9 for 19-30 years. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was more frequent in adults and in females of all ages. Pediatric patients with APL had similar overall survival as pediatric patients without APL. Overall survival at 5 years was 60% (52-68%) for pediatric patients compared to 65% (58-70%) for adult patients. Cytogenetics and presenting white blood cell count were the only independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Age was not an independent prognostic factor. No difference was found in outcome for AML patients age 10-30 years treated according to pediatric as compared to adult protocols. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Erythema multiforme in a patient with recurrent non-hodgkins lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Kumara Shankari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythema multiforme major (EMM is a hypersensitivity reaction usually secondary to medications, viruses or other infections. Its presentation is fairly typical with a symmetrical distribution of vesicles, bullae or targeted lesions on the upper body, arms, legs, palms, feet and oral mucosa. The authors present a delineated case of EMM in association with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma (NHL with a very unusual clinical presentation evolving overtime into a unique, almost dermatomal distribution. Typical therapies were not initially helpful and intravenous immunoglobulin antibody had to be administered.

  11. Reinduction therapy for adult acute leukemia with adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone: a Southwest Oncology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, L; Shaw, M T; Raab, S O

    1979-08-01

    In an attempt to improve remissions and survivals in previously treated patients with adult acute leukemia, we gave Adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone for induction therapy, followed by 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate for maintenance therapy to patients attaining complete remission (CR). The study group consisted of 18 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), ten with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and one with acute undifferentiated leukemia. Only one patient had previously received Adriamycin. Overall, there were ten CRs and two partial remissions. The five CRs and one partial remission in patients with AML occurred among those with one prior induction attempt; none of the eight AML patients with more than one prior induction attempt responded. The actuarial median duration of CR was 15 weeks and was similar for AML and acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Responders had a longer median survival (30 weeks) than nonresponders (9 weeks). Thus, although a reasonable number of responses in previously treated patients were obtained with this program, improvements in maintenance therapy are clearly needed.

  12. Exposure to ambient air pollution in Canada and the risk of adult leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, Nicholas; Goldberg, Mark S.; Hystad, Perry; Villeneuve, Paul J.; Johnson, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies investigating adult leukemia and air pollution. To address this gap, we analyzed data from a Canadian population-based case–control study conducted in 1994–1997. Cases were 1064 adults with incident leukemia and controls were 5039 healthy adults. We used data from satellites and fixed-site monitoring stations to estimate residential concentrations of NO 2 and fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) for the period prior to diagnosis, starting in 1975 and ending in 1994. We modeled the average annual exposure of each subject. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, province, smoking, education, body mass index, income, and self-reported exposures to ionizing radiation and benzene. We found an ‘n-shaped’ response function between exposure to NO 2 and all forms of leukemia: from the tenth percentile to the median (4.51 to 14.66 ppb), the OR was 1.20; 95% CI: 0.97–1.48 and from the 75th percentile to the 90th (22.75 to 29.7 ppb), the OR was 0.79; 95% CI 0.68–0.93. For PM 2.5 we found a response function consistent with a linear model, with an OR per 10 μg/m 3 of 0.97 (95% CI 0.75–1.26). For chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found response functions that were consistent with a simple linear model, with an OR per 5 ppb of NO 2 of 0.93 (95% CI 0.86–1.00) and an OR per 10 μg/m 3 of PM 2.5 of 0.62 (95% CI 0.42–0.93). In summary, for chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found no evidence of an association with air pollution and with all forms of leukemia we found weak evidence of an association only at low concentrations of NO 2 . It is possible that these inconsistent results may have arisen because of unaccounted urban/rural differences or possibly from a selection effect, especially among controls. - Highlights: • Analyzed associations between incidence of adult leukemia and PM • We used 20-year residential histories to estimate average annual

  13. Exposure to ambient air pollution in Canada and the risk of adult leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, Nicholas [Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Goldberg, Mark S., E-mail: mark.goldberg@mcgill.ca [Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Centre, 687 Pine Ave. W., R4.29, Montreal, Quebec H3A 1A1 (Canada); Hystad, Perry [College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Villeneuve, Paul J. [Department of Health Sciences, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Johnson, Kenneth C. [Science Integration Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of studies investigating adult leukemia and air pollution. To address this gap, we analyzed data from a Canadian population-based case–control study conducted in 1994–1997. Cases were 1064 adults with incident leukemia and controls were 5039 healthy adults. We used data from satellites and fixed-site monitoring stations to estimate residential concentrations of NO{sub 2} and fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) for the period prior to diagnosis, starting in 1975 and ending in 1994. We modeled the average annual exposure of each subject. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, province, smoking, education, body mass index, income, and self-reported exposures to ionizing radiation and benzene. We found an ‘n-shaped’ response function between exposure to NO{sub 2} and all forms of leukemia: from the tenth percentile to the median (4.51 to 14.66 ppb), the OR was 1.20; 95% CI: 0.97–1.48 and from the 75th percentile to the 90th (22.75 to 29.7 ppb), the OR was 0.79; 95% CI 0.68–0.93. For PM{sub 2.5} we found a response function consistent with a linear model, with an OR per 10 μg/m{sup 3} of 0.97 (95% CI 0.75–1.26). For chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found response functions that were consistent with a simple linear model, with an OR per 5 ppb of NO{sub 2} of 0.93 (95% CI 0.86–1.00) and an OR per 10 μg/m{sup 3} of PM{sub 2.5} of 0.62 (95% CI 0.42–0.93). In summary, for chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found no evidence of an association with air pollution and with all forms of leukemia we found weak evidence of an association only at low concentrations of NO{sub 2}. It is possible that these inconsistent results may have arisen because of unaccounted urban/rural differences or possibly from a selection effect, especially among controls. - Highlights: • Analyzed associations between incidence of adult leukemia and PM • We used 20-year residential

  14. Cigarette smoking and the risk of adult leukemia: results from the Three Mile Island cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Talbott, Evelyn O; Zborowski, Jeanne V; Rager, Judith R

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is an unconfirmed risk factor for the development of leukemia. The authors examined the potential link using data from the Three Mile Island cohort for the period 1979-1995. Eligible for analysis were 24,539 individuals aged 14 years or older who were followed up over 16 years from the Three Mile Island cohort. The authors identified all incident leukemia cases through the Pennsylvania Department of Health Cancer Registry. They used the Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the relationships and observed 42 incident leukemia cases, including 15 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases, in the cohort. After controlling for other confounding factors, the authors found current smoking to be associated with an increased risk of adult AML (relative risk = 3.47; 95% confidence interval = 1.002-11.99). The authors also observed a marginally significant linear trend of risk of AML associated with the number of years smoked (p = .06). The results from this study suggested that cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk of adult AML. Further investigation is required to confirm these findings.

  15. Risk group assignment differs for children and adults 1-45 yr with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated by the NOPHO ALL-2008 protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Nina; Birgens, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is poorer in adults than in children. Studies have indicated that young adults benefit from pediatric treatment, although no upper age limit has been defined.......The prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is poorer in adults than in children. Studies have indicated that young adults benefit from pediatric treatment, although no upper age limit has been defined....

  16. Chromosome aberrations in T lymphocytes carrying adult T-cell leukemia-associated antigens (ATLA) from healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, S; Hinuma, Y; Gotoh, Y I; Uchino, H

    1983-01-01

    Chromosomes were studied in cultured T lymphocytes carrying adult T-cell leukemia-associated antigens (ATLA) that were obtained from five Japanese anti-ATLA seropositive healthy adults. Chromosomally abnormal cells were observed in three of the five healthy adults, and these cells were clonal in two subjects. All cells examined in one subject had rearrangements of chromosome nos. 7 and 14. Clonal cells from the second had a minute chromosome of unknown origin. A few cells in the third had nonclonal rearrangements of chromosomes. Thus, ATLA-positive T lymphocytes in some anti-ATLA seropositive healthy people have chromosome aberrations.

  17. Adult T-cell leukemia-associated antigen (ATLA): detection of a glycoprotein in cell- and virus-free supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Schneider, J; Hinuma, Y; Hunsmann, G

    1982-01-01

    A glycoprotein of an apparent molecular mass of 46,000, gp 46, was enriched by affinity chromatography from the virus- and cell-free culture medium of adult T-cell leukemia virus (ATLV) infected cells. gp 46 was specifically precipitated with sera from patients with adult T-cell leukemia associated antigen (ATLA). Thus, gp 46 is a novel component of the ATLA antigen complex.

  18. Recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage in treatment with dasatinib in a patient showing SMAD4 mutation with acute lymphoblastic leukemia Philadelphia positive and juvenile polyposis hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Sartor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a patient affected by juvenile polyposis and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia linked to a SMAD4 mutation who developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia positive for the Philadelphia chromosome translocation and with a complex karyotype. During the treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib the patient presented recurrent severe gastrointestinal hemorrhages linked to the genetic background and aggravated by thrombocytopenia.

  19. Frontline treatment of acute myeloid leukemia in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamyan, Gevorg; Kadia, Tapan; Ravandi, Farhad; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge; Jabbour, Elias; Daver, Naval; Ohanian, Maro; Kantarjian, Hagop; Konopleva, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have highlighted significant progress in understanding the underlying genetic and epigenetic signatures of acute myeloid leukemia(AML). Most importantly, novel chemotherapy and targeted strategies have led to improved outcomes in selected genetic subsets. AML is a remarkably heterogeneous disease, and individualized therapies for disease-specific characteristics (considering patients’ age, cytogenetics, and mutations) could yield better outcomes. Compared with the historical 5-to 10-year survival rate of 10%, the survival of patients who undergo modern treatment approaches reaches up to 40–50%, and for specific subsets, the improvements are even more dramatic; for example, in acute promyelocytic leukemia, the use of all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide improved survival from 30–40% up to 80–90%. Similar progress has been documented in core-binding-factor-AML, with an increase in survival from 30% to 80% upon the use of high-dose cytarabine/fludarabine/granulocyte colony-stimulating factor combination regimens. AML treatment was also recently influenced by the discovery of the superiority of regimens with higher dose Ara-C and nucleoside analogues compared with the “7+3” regimen, with about a 20% improvement in overall survival. Despite these significant differences, most centers continue to use the “7+3” regimen, and greater awareness will improve the outcome. The discovery of targetable molecular abnormalities and recent studies of targeted therapies (gemtuzumab ozagomycin, FLT3 inhibitors, isocitrate dehydrogenase inhibitors, and epigenetic therapies), future use of checkpoint inhibitors and other immune therapies such as chimeric antigen receptor T-cells, and maintenance strategies based on the minimal residual disease evaluation represent novel, exciting clinical leads aimed to improve AML outcomes in the near future. PMID:28109402

  20. Studies of Wilms’ Tumor (WT1 Gene Expression in Adult Acute Leukemias in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Kang Lim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers provide certain values for diagnosis, monitor treatment effi cacy, or for the development of novel therapeutic approach for particular diseases. Thus, the identifi cation of specifi c of biomarkers for specifi c medical problems, including malignant diseases may be valuable in medical practice. In the study, we have used the Wilms’ tumor gene (WT1 as a biomarker to evaluate its expression in local adult patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia, including both acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias (AML and ALL.Aim: To investigate WT1 gene expression in adult patients with acute leukemia at diagnosis.Methods: Eighteen patients with acute leukemia diagnosed at Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, between September, 2004 and July, 2005 were included in this study. There were fifteen AML and three ALL cases aged from 18 to 71 years old. Total RNA and DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Expression of WT1 was detected by nested reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (Nested RT-PCR. K562, and 3T3 cells were used as positive- and negative-controls. The results were revalidated using real-time PCR. HLA-A genotyping was performed using sequence specific oligonucleotide polymorphism (SSOP analysis.Results: WT1 gene was exclusively expressed in all eighteen, including three ALL and fi fteen AML, patients. In contrast with WT1 gene, the HLA-A genotyping was remarkably heterogeneous in these patients.Conclusions: WT1 gene expression was observed in local patients with acute leukemia at diagnosis. It may be used as a potential molecular marker for diagnosis, clinical progression of the diseases or monitoring the response to treatment, as well as a target for the development of novel therapeutic approaches.

  1. The Clinical Implications of Methylated p15 and p73 Genes in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABD EL-HAMID, Th.M.; SHERISHER, M.A.; MOSSALLAM, Gh.I.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of promoter associated CpG islands is an epigenetic modification of DNA which is associated with gene silencing. It plays an important role in the leukemia pathogenesis. This phenomenon is frequently observed in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and results in the functional inactivation of its associated genes. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency and the prognostic impact of p15 and p73 genes methylation in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Patients and Methods: Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to analyze methylation of the p15 and p73 genes in 51 newly diagnosed adult ALL patients. Results: The methylation frequencies of p15 and p73 genes at diagnosis were 41.2% and 27.5% respectively, while concomitant methylation was detected in 14% of the patients. Concomitant methylation of p15 and p73 genes was associated with significant lower rate of CR compared to patients without methylation (57% versus 90%), p=0.008. Overall survival (OS) was not affected by p15 methylation, but was poorer with p73 methylation and the difference was near significant (p=0.059). For patients without meyhylation, the survival benefit was significant when compared to patients with p15, p73 or both genes methylation (p=0.047). The leukemia free survival was not affected by the methylation status of single gene p15 or p73, but tended to be worse in patients with methylated p15, p73 or both genes when compared to patients without methylation (p= 0.08). Conclusion: Aberrant p73 promoter methylation is a potential prognostic factor in adult ALL patients. P15 methylation is frequent in Egyptian adult ALL patients, its concomitant methylation with p73 is of poor prognostic significance. Identification of these molecular targets improve risk assessment and selection of appropriate therapy.

  2. [Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma associated with unusual positivity of anti-ATLA (adult T-cell leukemia-cell-associated antigen) antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, T; Okamura, H; Okamura, T; Gondo, H; Kudo, J; Shibuya, T; Harada, M; Niho, Y

    1990-03-01

    A 56-year-old female was admitted because of generalized lymphadenopathy. Based upon histological findings of biopsied lymph node, malignant lymphoma, diffuse large cell type was diagnosed. The surface marker analysis showed that malignant cells were positive for CD4 and CD2 but negative for CD8. Although anti-ATLA (adult T-cell leukemia associated antigen) antibody was negative with the use of a gelatin particle agglutination method (P.A.), other methods such as an indirect immunofluorescence assay (I.F.), an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (E.I.A.) and a Western blotting assay revealed the positivity for anti-ATLA antibody. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL/L) was confirmed by the presence of monoclonal integration of HTLV-I proviral DNA in biopsied specimen. This case, showing a pattern of P.A. (-) and I.F. (+), is extremely unusual, because I.F. and P.A. show highly close correlation. Thus, it is important to employ different methods for screening of anti-ATLA antibodies in the diagnosis of ATL/L.

  3. Adult cytomegalic inclusion disease in leukemia and malignant lymphoma. Report of two cases with concomitant pneumocystis infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, R M; Ichimaru, Michito; Izeki, Tetsuya

    1961-01-01

    Two cases of cytomegalic inclusion disease complicating chronic granulocytic leukemia and subacute lymphocytic leukemia in adult Japanese males in Nagasaki, Japan are reported. Both cases had concomitant pulmonary infection by pneumocystis carinii and both were exposed to the atomic bomb in 1945. It is believed these are the first reported autopsy cases of adult cytomegalic inclusion disease in which typical cytomegalic inclusion bodies were seen in the parenchymal cells of the salivary glands. Previously reported cases of adult cytomegalic inclusion disease complicating leukemia and malignant lymphoma are briefly summarized. Present knowledge of the relationship between cytomegalic and pneumocystis infections and association with lymphoma and leukemia is reviewed. The possible roles of chemotherapeutic agents and of radiation in the development of the cytomegalic and pneumocystis infections are also briefly discussed. 43 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Exercise for Recently Treated Adults With Acute Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leak Bryant, Ashley; Walton, AnnMarie L; Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Phillips, Brett; Bailey, Charlotte; Mayer, Deborah K; Battaglini, Claudio

    2017-07-01

    To explore perceived exercise benefits and barriers in adults with acute leukemia who recently completed an inpatient exercise intervention during induction therapy.
. Descriptive, exploratory design using semistructured interviews.
. Inpatient hematology/oncology unit at North Carolina Cancer Hospital in Chapel Hill.
. 6 adults with acute leukemia aged 35-67 years.
. Content analyses of semistructured interviews that were conducted with each participant prior to hospital discharge.
. Most participants were not meeting the recommended physical activity levels of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week before their diagnosis. Patients were highly pleased with the exercise intervention and the overall program. Common barriers to exercise were anxiety and aches and pains.
. Overall, participants experienced physical and psychological benefits with the exercise intervention with no adverse events from exercising regularly during induction chemotherapy. Referrals for cancer rehabilitation management will lead to prolonged recovery benefits.
. Findings inform the nurses' role in encouraging and supporting adults with acute leukemia to exercise and be physically active during their hospitalization. Nurses should also be responsible for assisting patients with physical function activities to increase mobility and enhance overall health-related quality of life.

  5. HTLV 1 associated adult T cell lymphoma/leukemia a clinicopathologic, immunophenotypic tale of three cases from non-endemic region of south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiq Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult T cell lymphoma/leukemia is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm caused by human T-cell lymphotrophic virus-1, affects mostly adults with systemic involvement and poor prognosis. Diagnosis of adult T-Cell leukemia/Lymphoma is challenging. The clinico-pathologic and immuno-phenotypic features of the three cases will be presented.

  6. Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in family caregivers of adult patients with acute leukemia from a dyadic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Mutian; Li, Jie; Chen, Chunyan; Cao, Fenglin

    2015-12-01

    Acute leukemia is a fatal disease in adults that not only affects the patients who suffer from it but also their family caregivers. No studies have investigated post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS) in family caregivers of adult patients with acute leukemia using a matched sample. The current study examined PTSS in adult patients with acute leukemia and their family caregivers and investigated the factors associated with caregivers' PTSS. A total of 163 patient-caregiver dyads completed questionnaires assessing their PTSS, psychological resilience, and perceived social support. Hierarchical linear regression was used to explore the related factors of caregivers' PTSS. More caregivers than patients met caseness criteria for PTSS (36.8% vs. 18.4%, p caregivers, being more closely related to the patients (e.g., spouses and parents), having patients with higher PTSS and having lower psychological resilience were independently associated with more severe PTSS. Caregivers of acute leukemia patients had significantly more severe PTSS than did their patients. This study is the first to investigate PTSS among family caregivers of adult patients with acute leukemia and its related factors in a matched sample. More attention should be paid to the caregivers of patients with acute leukemia to minimize their PTSS and thus improve mental health of caregivers and reduce potential negative consequences for the patients themselves. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Examining Fall Recurrence Risk of Homebound Hispanic Older Adults Receiving Home Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Guillermina R; Champion, Jane Dimmitt

    2017-03-01

    Unintentional falls and injuries is a major problem among older adults and the fourth cause of death in the United States. A previous fall event doubles the risk of recurrence and lessens the person's quality of life. Hispanic older adults have higher rates of disability and lower independent functioning due to poor medical health and risk for fall recurrence. Most fall studies focus on fall risk with few studies on fall recurrence in older adults receiving home health care services unrelated to fall incident. A descriptive pilot study of 30 homebound Hispanic older adults receiving home care services who reported a fall within 3 months was conducted by a multidisciplinary team to evaluate risk of fall recurrence. A heightened risk for fall recurrence was identified with high number of chronic illnesses, high intake of medications, vision problems, and prevalence of urinary incontinence. Findings highlight significant number of intrinsic factors for fall risk recurrence and injuries in a Hispanic older adults population that is homebound and receiving home care services. A multidisciplinary evaluation and culturally appropriate interventions to lessen the risk of fall recurrence are recommended.

  8. Anti-ATLA (antibody to adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma virus-associated antigen)-negative adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, M; Minato, K; Tobinai, K; Nagai, M; Setoya, T; Watanabe, S; Hoshino, H; Miwa, M; Nagoshi, H; Ichiki, N; Fukushima, N; Sugiura, K; Funaki, N

    1983-01-01

    Five cases of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) having typical clinicohematologic and morphologic features but negative for anti-ATLA [antibody to ATL virus (ATLV)-associated antigen (ATLA)] are presented. Some differences in immunologic, epidemiologic, and serologic data between anti-ATLA-positive and -negative ATLs are also described. Expression of ATLA in early primary cultured leukemic cells was found to be negative in three patients tested (Cases 1, 2 and 4), however, a long-term cultured cell line, ATL-6A, derived from peripheral blood leukemia cells from Case 1, was found to express ATLA. Mother of Case 1 and a daughter of Case 2 were anti-ATLA negative. These results indicate that ATLV was involved in certain anti-ATLA-negative ATL patients, at least in Case 1, and that the patient had no detectable immune response against ATLV and ATLA. However, in other cases in which no ATLA reactivity of serum and no ATLA expression in cultured leukemic cells were observed, another possibility such as activation of an unknown cellular oncogene specific for ATL without ATLV involvement may be considered. In order to prove these possibilities definitely, it is necessary to elucidate whether or not proviral DNA of ATLV is integrated into chromosomal DNA of ATL cells and to find a cellular oncogene specific for ATL in the future.

  9. Incidence of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma in nonendemic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Chihara, Dai

    2015-02-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a mature T-cell neoplasm with extremely poor prognosis caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The distribution of HTLV-1 and the incidence of ATLL in endemic areas have been well described, however, little is known about the incidences and the trends of the disease in nonendemic areas. Recently, studies have shown that the HTLV-1 carriers are increasing in nonendemic areas. Also, the incidence of ATLL seems to be significantly increasing in nonendemic areas suggesting that HTLV-1 carriers have emigrated from endemic areas. These epidemiologic studies indicate the necessity of edification of the disease caused by HTLV-1 and establishing appropriate preventive methods against infection in nonendemic areas.

  10. Treatment of refractory/relapsed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia with bortezomib- based chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Junmei Zhao,* Chao Wang,* Yongping Song, Yuzhang Liu, Baijun FangHenan Key Lab of Experimental Haematology, Henan Institute of Haematology, Henan Tumor Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China  *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nine pretreated patients aged >19 years with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL were treated with a combination of bortezomib plus chemotherapy before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT. Eight (88.9% patients, including two Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL patients, achieved a complete remission. Furthermore, the evaluable patients have benefited from allo-HSCT after response to this reinduction treatment. We conclude that bortezomib-based chemotherapy was highly effective for adults with refractory/relapsed ALL before allo-HSCT. Therefore, this regimen deserves a larger series within prospective trials to confirm these results. Keywords: acute lymphoblastic leukemia, refractory, relapsed, bortezomib

  11. Immunological aspects of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), a possible neoplasm of regulatory T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Yasuaki; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2008-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a distinct disease caused by the first discovered human oncogenic retrovirus, human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1). The peculiarity of this disease is not only in its causative agent HTLV-1 but also in the character of leukemia cells. ATLL cells express the mature helper/inducer T-cell antigens, CD2, CD3, CD4 and CD5 but usually lacking CD8. Despite CD4 expression, it has long been known that ATLL cells exhibit strong immunosuppressive activity ...

  12. Metabolic Characteristics and Risks Associated with Stone Recurrence in Korean Young Adult Stone Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ho Won; Seo, Sung Pil; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Yong-June; Yun, Seok-Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae; Lee, Sang-Cheol

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the metabolic characteristics and risks of stone recurrence in young adult stone patients in Korea. The medical records of 1532 patients presenting with renal or ureteric stones at our stone clinic between 1994 and 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were grouped according to age (young adult, 18-29 years; intermediate onset, 30-59 years; old age, ≥60 years) at first presentation, and measurements of clinicometabolic characteristics and risks of stone recurrence were compared. Overall, excretion of urinary stone-forming substances was highest in the intermediate onset group, followed by the young adult and old age groups. Importantly, excretion of urinary citrate was lowest in the young adult group. Kaplan-Meier analyses identified a significant difference between the three age groups in terms of stone recurrence (log rank test, p adult stone patients. Younger age (18-29 years) at first stone presentation was a significant risk factor for stone recurrence, and urinary citrate excretion was an independent risk factor affecting recurrence in this group. Metabolic evaluation and potassium citrate therapy should be considered for young adult stone patients to prevent recurrence.

  13. The epidemiological studies of leukemia around nuclear installations for children and young adults: synthesis of the critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    An epidemiological study published at the end of 2007 described an increased risk of leukemia among children less than five years leaving at less than 5 kilometers from German nuclear power plants. The objective of this report was to make a synthesis and a critical analysis of the results relative to the risk of leukemia among the children and young adults of less than twenty five years leaving near these nuclear installations. (N.C.)

  14. Challenges faced in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine SR

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Selena R Levine,1 Jennifer L McNeer,2 Michael S Isakoff1 1Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Hartford, CT, 2Section of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: The survival rate for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL has dramatically improved over the last 50 years. However, for those in the adolescent and young adult (AYA age-group of 15–30 years with ALL, there has not been the same degree of improvement. Historically, pediatric and adult providers have utilized different treatment approaches based on clinical trials. However, studies that have compared the outcome of AYA patients with ALL treated on pediatric or adult clinical trials have generally shown substantially better outcomes for this patient population treated with the pediatric trials. Additionally, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been considered as part of intensified therapy for AYA patients with ALL. Herein, we review the outcomes with chemotherapy alone and with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and explore the challenges faced in determining the ideal therapy for the AYA population of patients. Keywords: adolescent young adult oncology, leukemia, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

  15. Long-term results of total body irradiation in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, Simone; Zich, Alexander; Budach, Volker; Jahn, Ulrich; Neumann, Oliver [Charite University Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Martus, Peter [University Tuebingen, Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and Applied Biostatistics, Tuebingen (Germany); Arnold, Renate [Charite University Medicine, Campus CVK, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this chart review of adult patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with total body irradiation (TBI) was to evaluate early and late toxicity and long-term outcome. A total of 110 adult patients (34 ± 12 years) with ALL underwent TBI (6 fractions of 2 Gy for a total of 12 Gy) as a part of the treatment regimen before transplantation. Treatment-related toxicity, mortality, and hematologic outcome are reported. Mean follow-up was 70 months. The 2- and 5-year leukemia-free survival rates were 78 and 72 %, respectively. In all, 29 % (32/110) patients suffered from medullary recurrence after a median time of 7 months. Gender was the only statistically significant prognostic factor in terms of overall survival in favor of female patients. Treatment-related mortality and overall survival after 2 and 5 years were 16 and 22 %, and 60 and 52.7 %, respectively. The most frequent late reaction wascGVHD of the skin (n = 33, 30 %). In addition, 15.5 % (17/110 patients) suffered pulmonary symptoms, and 6 patients developed lung fibrosis. Eyes were frequently affected by the radiation (31/110 = 28 %); 12 of 110 patients (11 %) presented with symptoms from osteoporosis, 5 of 110 patients (4.5 %) developed hypothyreosis and 2 patients diabetes mellitus. Of the male patients, 11 % reported erectile dysfunction or loss of libido, while 2 of 36 women reported menopausal syndrome at the mean time of 28 months after treatment with requirement for substitution. No women became pregnant after treatment. No acute or late cardiac toxicities were documented in our patients. No secondary malignancies were documented. Although hematologic outcome was in the upper range of that reported in the literature, treatment-related mortality (TRM) and medullary recurrences remain a challenge. Sophisticated radiation techniques allow for decreasing toxicity to certain organs and/or dose escalation to the bone marrow in highly selected patients in order to improve therapeutic

  16. Remission rate of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all) in adolescents and young adults (aya)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallacha, A.; Haider, G.; Kumar, D.

    2018-01-01

    To determine the remission rate in adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Study Design:Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study:Department of Oncology, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC), Karachi from January, 2016 to March, 2017. Methodology:Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients aged 15-39 years, newly diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia from January, 2016 to March, 2017. Diagnosis was confirmed by bone marrow trephine biopsy and immuno-phenotyping. All the patients were treated with daunorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase in the induction phase. The response evaluation was done on day 35 of the induction phase and the remission rate was assessed by the bone marrow examination. Results:Of the total 50 AYA patients diagnosed with ALL, 41 patients could complete induction phase and 9 patients died during the first week of induction, therefore excluded from the study. Forty (97.8%) patients were <35years of age, 28 (68.3%) were male, of female 10 (24.4%) were housewives, 33 (80.5%) patients belonged to Sindh, 28 (68.3%) presented with fever and body ache, 17 (41.5%) patients had precursor B cell type ALL, with 7 (17.1%) patients had hemoglobin of <7 g/dL,11 (26.8%) patients had white cell count of >30x10/sup 9//L, platelet count of <20x103/mu L in 6 (14.6%) patients and complete morphological remission was reported in 29 (70.7%) patients. Conclusion:The remission induction rate was 70.7% in the adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at the study centre. (author)

  17. Optimal therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Eric S; Hunger, Stephen P

    2011-05-31

    Although the survival rate for adolescents and young adults (AYA) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has steadily improved over the past several decades, it still lags behind that of younger children. This Review explores the reasons for this discrepancy and potential solutions, focusing on patients aged 15-22 years. Recent studies that compared the outcome of AYA patients with ALL treated on pediatric or adult clinical trials have shown substantially better outcomes for this patient population obtained with the pediatric trials. Excellent early results have been obtained for patients with ALL aged up to 40-60 years who were treated in adult study groups with pediatric-based regimens. Targeting biological and socio-political features unique to AYA ALL has reduced the 'AYA gap' and has provided the foundation for basic science and translational and clinical AYA initiatives that are charged with the task of discovering further methods to improve the outcome of AYA with ALL.

  18. Somatic mutations in the transcriptional corepressor gene BCORL1 in adult acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Collins, Roxane; Jiao, Yuchen; Ouillette, Peter; Bixby, Dale; Erba, Harry; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Malek, Sami N

    2011-11-24

    To further our understanding of the genetic basis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), we determined the coding exon sequences of ∼ 18 000 protein-encoding genes in 8 patients with secondary AML. Here we report the discovery of novel somatic mutations in the transcriptional corepressor gene BCORL1 that is located on the X-chromosome. Analysis of BCORL1 in an unselected cohort of 173 AML patients identified a total of 10 mutated cases (6%) with BCORL1 mutations, whereas analysis of 19 AML cell lines uncovered 4 (21%) BCORL1 mutated cell lines. The majority (87%) of the mutations in BCORL1 were predicted to inactivate the gene product as a result of nonsense mutations, splice site mutation, or out-of-frame insertions or deletions. These results indicate that BCORL1 by genetic criteria is a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene, joining the growing list of genes recurrently mutated in AML.

  19. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma presenting multiple lymphomatous polyposis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Hokama; Nobuyuki Takasu; Jiro Fujita; Takeaki Tomoyose; Yu-ichi Yamamoto; Takako Watanabe; Tetsuo Hirata; Fukunori Kinjo; Seiya Kato; Koichi Ohshima; Hiroshi Uezato

    2008-01-01

    Multiple lymphomatous polyposis (HLP) is an unusual form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract. It has been reported that most MLP are observed in cases with mantle cell lymphoma of B-cell type. We herein present a case of a 66-year-old man with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). Colonoscopy revealed MLP throughout the colon and histopathological findings of ATLL cell infiltration. The patient died despite combination of chemotherapy. The literature of manifestations of colonic involvement of ATLL is reviewed and the importance of endoscopic evaluation to differentiate ATLL intestinal lesions from opportunistic infectious enterocolitis is discussed.

  20. MR imaging of the femoral marrow in adult acute leukemia. Correlation of MRI patterns with FAB subtype and prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Takagi, Shojiro; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Ichikawa, Tamaki; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Nagai, Jun

    1996-01-01

    MR imaging of the femoral marrow was performed in 36 patients with untreated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 7 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The MRI appearance was classified into five patterns: fatty marrow; faint signal; nodular pattern; heterogeneous infiltration; and diffuse infiltration. The MRI patterns of the femoral marrow were compared among the FAB subtypes of acute leukemia, and the MRI patterns were correlated with prognosis. All five MRI patterns were observed in the femoral marrow in adult acute leukemia, and diffuse infiltration was most commonly seen (41.9%). A completely fatty marrow was also depicted in two cases (4.7%) and faint signal in four cases (9.3%) in spite of untreated acute leukemia. The M2 subtype of AML tended to be demonstrated as a minimally abnormal MRI finding, which was significantly different from the other types of AML. The patients who showed fatty marrow or faint signal were thought to have a good prognosis, while diffuse or heterogeneous infiltration was regarded as a poor prognostic sign. However, there were some exceptions to these rules, and no significant differences were revealed in prognosis between minimally abnormal and advanced MRI patterns. We concluded that MRI of the femoral marrow could be useful in the assessment of tumor volume of adult acute leukemia, and that there were limitations to predicting prognosis on the basis of the MRI manifestations. (author)

  1. Congenital hypoparathyroidism presenting as recurrent seizures in an adult

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Sourya; Shukla, Samarth; Singh, Dinesh; Deshpande, Rohit; Mahajan, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    Hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism may manifest as serious neurologic symptoms such as seizures, movement disorders, or raised intracranial pressure. Several patients were observed to have these dangerous neurologic complications even without subtle signs of hypocalcemia like tetany, chvostek's sign or carpopedal spasms. We present a case of recurrent hypocalcemic seizures due to congenital hypoparathyroidism.

  2. Incidence of Severe Osteonecrosis Requiring Total Joint Arthroplasty in Children and Young Adults Treated for Leukemia or Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niinimäki, Riitta; Hansen, Lene Mølgaard; Niinimäki, Tuukka

    2013-01-01

    diagnosis codes given before the age of 40 were also retrieved. Results: The estimated cumulative incidence of TJA was 4.5% at 20 years for patients treated for chronic myeloid leukemia, followed by 2.1% for patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia. It was considerably lower in patients with acute...... the age of 10 (HR=24; 95% CI: 3.1-176 and HR=26; 95% CI: 3.6-192 respectively). Conclusion: The incidence of ON requiring TJA was highest among patients with myeloid leukemias and lowest in patients treated for ALL. Allo-SCT and age ≥10 years at diagnosis were the most important risk factors......Purpose: The population-based incidence of severe osteonecrosis (ON) necessitating total joint arthroplasty (TJA) in patients with hematological cancer is unknown. This study assessed the incidence of ON requiring primary TJA in children and young adults treated for leukemia or lymphoma. Methods...

  3. Outcome and risk factors of recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy in young adults with primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takashi; Takahashi, Yusuke; Uehara, Hirofumi; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Masafumi

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the risk factors of recurrence of pneumothorax following thoracoscopic bullectomy in young adults. Between January, 2005 and September, 2015, 167 patients aged ≤40 years underwent initial thoracoscopic bullectomy for primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) at our hospital. Recurrence-free probability was calculated from the date of surgery to recurrence or last follow-up, using the Kaplan-Meier method. Sixteen (9.6%) of the 167 patients suffered a recurrence (collective total, 16 recurrences). The recurrence-free intervals were 3-107 months (median 25.8 months), and the 5-year recurrence-free probability was 85.9%. Multivariate Cox analysis demonstrated that age ≤23 years (p = 0.029) and a history of ipsilateral pneumothorax before surgery (p = 0.029) were significantly associated with higher risk of recurrence. The 5-year recurrence-free probability was 72.3% for patients aged ≤23 years and a history of ipsilateral pneumothorax before surgery and 94.1% for those with neither of these factors (p = 0.001). Recurrence developed within 3 years after surgery in 14 of the 16 patients. Patients ≤23 years of age with a history of ipsilateral pneumothorax before surgery are at significantly high risk of its recurrence, frequently within 3 years; thus, the risk of postoperative recurrence of a pneumothorax must be kept in mind.

  4. Transethmoidal intranasal meningoencephalocele in an adult with recurrent meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Takafumi; Sugeno, Naoto; Shiga, Yusei; Takeda, Atsushi; Karibe, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji; Itoyama, Yasuto

    2005-08-01

    Intranasal meningoencephalocele is a rarely encountered congenital malformation. We report a case of transethmoidal intranasal meningoencephalocele in a 52-year old man with recurrent purulent meningitis. After treatment of the acute meningitis, frontal craniotomy followed by the removal of the stalk of the meningoencephalocele and repair of the bony defect was successfully performed. He has had no further meningitis or CSF rhinorrhea post-operatively. Detailed neuroradiological examination and appropriate surgical treatment are important to prevent fatal neurological complications of intranasal meningoencephalocele.

  5. Management of infection during chemotherapy for acute leukemia in Japan: a nationwide questionnaire-based survey by the Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Shun-Ichi; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hideaki; Hiramoto, Nobuhiro; Hosono, Naoko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Shigeno, Kazuyuki; Hatsumi, Naoko; Minamiguchi, Hitoshi; Miyatake, Junichi; Handa, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Nobu; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Yoshida, Minoru; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2017-11-01

    We performed a nationwide questionnaire-based survey to evaluate the current clinical practices of infectious complications during chemotherapy for acute leukemia in Japan. We e-mailed a questionnaire to member institutions of the Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group in September, 2013. The questionnaire consisted of 50 multiple-choice questions covering therapeutic environment, antimicrobial prophylaxis, screening test during neutropenia, empirical therapy for febrile neutropenia, and the use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. The results were compared to those of previous surveys conducted in 2001 and 2007, and also to the recommendations described in the guidelines. Usable responses were received from 141 out of 222 (63.5%) institutions. Chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia was performed in protective environment in 90% of the institutions, which increased compared to previous survey (76%). Fluoroquinolones and fluconazole were the most commonly used antimicrobial agents for antibacterial and antifungal prophylaxis, followed by sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and itraconazole, respectively. In empirical therapy for febrile neutropenia, monotherapy with β-lactum antibiotics was the first-line therapy in most of the institutions. While empirical antifungal therapy was adopted for persistent fever in more than half of the institutions, preemptive/presumptive therapy was also used in approximately 40% of the institutions. Most of the clinicians were reluctant to use granulocyte-colony stimulating factor routinely in chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. This study clarified the current clinical practices of infectious complications during chemotherapy for acute leukemia and would provide important information for the development of a suitable guideline in Japan.

  6. RBP2 Promotes Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia by Upregulating BCL2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Wang

    Full Text Available Despite recent increases in the cure rate of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, adult ALL remains a high-risk disease that exhibits a high relapse rate. In this study, we found that the histone demethylase retinoblastoma binding protein-2 (RBP2 was overexpressed in both on-going and relapse cases of adult ALL, which revealed that RBP2 overexpression was not only involved in the pathogenesis of ALL but that its overexpression might also be related to relapse of the disease. RBP2 knockdown induced apoptosis and attenuated leukemic cell viability. Our results demonstrated that BCL2 is a novel target of RBP2 and supported the notion of RBP2 being a regulator of BCL2 expression via directly binding to its promoter. As the role of RBP2 in regulating apoptosis was confirmed, RBP2 overexpression and activation of BCL2 might play important roles in ALL development and progression.

  7. Prognostic impact of IKZF1 deletion in adults with common B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiu-Mei; Liu, Kai-Yan; Gale, Robert Peter; Jiang, Bin; Liu, Yan-Rong; Jiang, Qian; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Chen, Shan-Shan; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Lan-Ping; Ruan, Guo-Rui

    2016-04-11

    Interrogate the impact of IKZF1 deletion on therapy-outcomes of adults with common B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. One hundred sixty-five consecutive adults with common B-cell ALL were tested for IKZF1 deletion and for BCR/ABL. Deletions in IKZF1 were detected using multiplex RQ-PCR, multiplex fluorescent PCR, sequence analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). BCR/ABL was detected using RQ-PCR. All subjects received chemotherapy and some also received an allotransplant and tyrosine kinase-inhibitors. Multivariate analyses were done to identify associations between IKZF1 deletion and other variables on non-relapse mortality (NRM), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), leukemia-free survival (LFS) and survival. Amongst subjects achieving complete remission those with IKZF1 deletion had similar 5-year non-relapse mortality (NRM) (11% [2-20%] vs. 16% [4-28%]; P = 0.736), a higher 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) (55% [35-76%] vs. 25% [12-38%]; P = 0.004), and worse 5-year leukemia-free survival (LFS) (33% [16-52%] vs. 59% [42-73%]; P = 0.012) and survival (48% [33-62%] vs. 75% [57-86%]; P = 0.002). In multivariate analyses IKZF1 deletion was associated with an increased relapse (relative risk [RR] =2.7, [1.4-5.2]; P = 0.002), a higher risk of treatment-failure (inverse of LFS; RR = 2.1, [1.2-3.6]; P = 0.007) and a higher risk of death (RR = 2.8, [1.5-5.5]; P = 0.002). The adverse impact of IKZF1 deletion on outcomes was stronger in subjects without vs. with BCR-ABL1 and in subjects receiving chemotherapy-only vs. an allotransplant. IKZF1 deletion was independently-associated with a higher relapse risk and worse LFS and survival in adults with common B-cell ALL after adjusting for other prognostic variables and differences in therapies. These data suggest IKZF1 deletion may be a useful prognostic variable in adults with common B-cell ALL, especially in persons without BCR-ABL1 and those receiving chemotherapy

  8. Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults of Northern China: Characteristics and Risk Factors for Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Yang, Li; Yang, Rui; Xu, Wei; Chen, Fu-Ping; Li, Nan; Zhang, Jin-Biao

    2017-01-01

    Young adults accounted for 10-14% of ischemic stroke patients. The risk factors may differ in this population from elder patients. In addition, the factors associated with stroke recurrence in this population have not been well investigated. The study aimed to investigate the characteristics and risk factors associated with recurrence of ischemic stroke in young adults. Clinical data of 1,395 patients of age 18-45 years who were treated between 2008 and 2014 in 3 centers located in northern China was reviewed. The first onset of stroke was taken as the initial events and recurrent stroke as the end point events. The end point events, age, gender, duration after first onset of stroke, history of disease, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score at admission, Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classifications of the cause of stroke and adherence to medication were recorded. These factors were analyzed and compared between recurrence and non-recurrence group. Information about recurrent stroke was collected through clinical (readmission to hospital with ischemic stroke) or telephone follow-up survey. Logistic regression was used to analyze the risk factors of recurrence. The most common causes of stroke were large vessel atherosclerosis and small vessel occlusion, followed by cardioembolism. NIHSS score at admission (OR 1.088; 95% CI 1.028-1.152; p = 0.004) were associated with recurrence. Vascular disease, especially premature atherosclerosis, is the major risk factor for ischemic stroke in the young adult population of northern China. Timely screening of the cause of stroke with severe NIHSS score needs further attention. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Radiogenic leukemia revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloney, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced leukemia is considered to be similar to the de novo disease. However, following an analysis of clinical and hematological findings in leukemia occurring in irradiated cervical cancer patients, adult Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, and spondylitics treated with x-ray, striking differences were noted. Acute leukemias in cervical cancer patients and Japanese survivors were similar in type to acute de novo leukemias in adults. Cell types among spondylitics were very dissimilar; rare forms, eg, acute erythromyelocytic leukemia (AEL) and acute megakaryocytic leukemia, were increased. Pancytopenia occurred in 25 of 35 cases and erythromyelodysplastic disorders were noted in seven of 35 acute cases. The leukemias and myelodysplastic disorders closely resembled those occurring in patients treated with alkylating agents. This similarity suggests a common pathogenesis involving marrow stem cell injury and extra-medullary mediators of hematopoiesis. Investigation of early acute leukemias and myelodysplastic disorders with newer techniques may provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of leukemia in humans

  10. Clinical and prognostic implications of Roundabout 4 (robo4 in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Kai Chen

    Full Text Available Robo4 is involved in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell homeostasis and essential for tumor angiogenesis. Expression of Robo4 was recently found in solid tumors and leukemia stem cells. However, the clinical implications of Robo4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML remain unclear.We investigated the clinical and prognostic relevance of mRNA expression of Robo4 in bone marrow (BM mononuclear cells from 218 adult patients with de novo AML. We also performed immunohistochemical staining to assess the Robo4 protein expression in the BM biopsy specimens from 30 selected AML patients in the cohort.Higher Robo4 expression was closely associated with lower white blood cell counts, expression of HLA-DR, CD13, CD34 and CD56 on leukemia cells, t(8;21 and ASXL1 mutation, but negatively correlated with t(15;17 and CEBPA mutation. Compared to patients with lower Robo4 expression, those with higher expression had significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS. This result was confirmed in an independent validation cohort. Furthermore, multivariate analyses showed that higher Robo4 expression was an independent poor prognostic factor for DFS and OS in total cohort and patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics, irrespective of age, WBC count, karyotype, and mutation status of NPM1/FLT3-ITD, and CEBPA.BM Robo4 expression can serve as a new biomarker to predict clinical outcomes in AML patients and Robo4 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in patients with higher Robo4 expression.

  11. [Clinical and cytological differences in adult acute lymphatic and acute undifferentiated leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbrederis, K; Schmalzl, F

    1976-01-01

    The usefulness for clinical purposes of the distinction of acute undifferentiated (AUL) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is suggested by the following observations: 1. Maturation from AUL to ALL has not been observed. Transformation of ALL to AUL has been reported i.e. less of cytoplasmic polysaccharides; however this seems rather to be the effect of cytotoxic therapy and not a real change of the cytological type. 2. Significant differences among ALL and AUL can be noted as far as the therapeutic response is concerned: All of the 9 patients with ALL but only 2 out of 9 patients with AUL went into remission. The mean survival of the cases with ALL amounts to 34, that of AUL only to 4 months. Out of the patients with ALL 4 patients are still alive in persistant first remission after 77, 57, 36 and 28 months. 3. ALL occurs most frequently in young adults (mean age of 21 patients: 31.7 years): AUL is more frequent in elderly patients (Mean age of 18 patients: 57.6 years). 4. In our material ALL did never occur consequent to a typical preluekemic stage, which was followed either by myeloblastic, monocytic, erythroleukemic or undifferentiated leukemias.

  12. Changes in cytogenetics and molecular genetics in acute myeloid leukemia from childhood to adult age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzig, Ursula; Zimmermann, Martin; Reinhardt, Dirk; Rasche, Mareike; von Neuhoff, Christine; Alpermann, Tamara; Dworzak, Michael; Perglerová, Karolína; Zemanova, Zuzana; Tchinda, Joelle; Bradtke, Jutta; Thiede, Christian; Haferlach, Claudia

    2016-12-15

    To obtain better insight into the biology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in various age groups, this study focused on the genetic changes occurring during a lifetime. This study analyzed the relation between age and genetics from birth to 100 years in 5564 patients with de novo AML diagnosed from 1998 to 2012 (1192 patients from nationwide pediatric studies [AML Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster studies 98 and 2004] and 4372 adults registered with the Munich Leukemia Laboratory). The frequencies of cytogenetic subgroups were age-dependent. Favorable subtypes (t(8;21), inv(16)/t(16;16), and t(15;17)) decreased in general from the pediatric age group (2 to groups ( 70 years; P age-specific incidence with age. Interestingly, the frequency of 11q23 abnormalities decreased from infants to older patients. The proportion of clinically relevant molecular aberrations of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α, nucleophosmin (NPM1), and NPM1/fms-related tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication increased with age. Altogether, with the exclusion of infants, a significant decrease in the proportion of favorable cytogenetic subtypes and an increase in unfavorable cytogenetics were observed with increasing age. These findings indicate different mechanisms for the pathogenesis of AML; these different mechanisms also suggest directions for etiological research and contribute to the more unfavorable prognosis with increasing age. Cancer 2016;122:3821-3830. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  13. Role for protein geranylgeranylation in adult T-cell leukemia cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Mizuho; Uota, Shin; Saitoh, Yasunori; Takahashi, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Haruyo; Amet, Tohti; Arai, Ayako; Miura, Osamu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease that develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals. Despite the accumulating knowledge of the molecular biology of HTLV-I-infected cells, effective therapeutic strategies remain to be established. Recent reports showed that the hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor statins have anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on certain tumor cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. Here, we report that statins hinder the survival of ATL cells and induce apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation is responsible for these effects, since simultaneous treatment with isoprenoid precursors, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate or farnesyl pyrophosphate, but not a cholesterol precursor squalene, restored the viability of ATL cells. Simvastatin inhibited geranylgeranylation of small GTPases Rab5B and Rac1 in ATL cells, and a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor GGTI-298 reduced ATL cell viability more efficiently than a farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277. These results not only unveil an important role for protein geranylgeranylation in ATL cell survival, but also implicate therapeutic potentials of statins in the treatment of ATL

  14. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults – from genomics to the clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenderian SS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Saad Sirop Kenderian, Mark R Litzow Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adolescents and young adults (AYA represents a unique and challenging disease entity. Despite the recent improvement of survival in this population over the last decade, it is still lagging behind the excellent cure rates obtained in pediatric ALL. This special population of AYA receives care from pediatric as well as adult hematologists and can be treated on pediatric or adult protocols. There is a substantial difference in disease biology, response to chemotherapy, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation between pediatric and AYA patients. This review discusses current controversies in the management of AYA, outcomes following treatment with pediatric and adult protocols, and the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. It focuses on the unique clinical, biological, and socioeconomic characteristics of this population that might partly explain the inferior outcomes. This review also explores recent advances in genomic profiling and emerging treatments in ALL. Keywords: novel agents, monoclonal antibodies, stem cell transplantation, bone marrow transplantation, Philadelphia positive ALL, genomic profile

  15. Mechanism of infectivity of a murine leukemia virus in adult mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.L.; Barrington, M.H.; Lerner, R.A.; Dixon, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    Infection of adult BALB/c mice with murine leukemia virus (MuLV) induces typical thymic lymphomas. Expression of virus was measured by using a radioimmunoassay for murine P-30, a virion core protein. Nineteen days after injection of MuLV-S into adult mice, there were 0.3μg P-30/ml of serum. X-irradiation permitted the early expression of high levels of viremia, when given before or after MuLV-S administration, and it also hastened the development of lymphomas. Seventeen to 21 days after injection of MuLV-S into x-irradiated (600 rads) adult mice, there were 2.7 μg of P-30/ml of serum. The virus produced by infected adult mice was infectious and oncogenic when given to newborn mice. Several lines of evidence are presented that suggest the mechanism by which x-irradiation permits early expession of virion proteins and lymphomas is not immunosuppression

  16. Treatment of Adults with Idiopathic Recurrent Pericarditis: Novel Use of Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwier, Nicholas C; Hale, Genevieve M; Davies, Marie L

    2017-03-01

    Idiopathic recurrent pericarditis (IRP) can be challenging to treat. Even after guideline-directed first-line treatment consisting of aspirin (ASA) or a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) in combination with colchicine therapy, recurrences still occur in greater than 20% of patients. Many patients then require treatment with long-term corticosteroids, which is not a favorable option due to their short- and long-term adverse effects. Because it is theorized that the pathophysiology of IRP may possess autoimmune sequelae, the use of immunotherapy for the treatment of IRP has emerged. In this review, we describe the literature associated with immunotherapy used to treat IRP in an adult population as well as provide an overview of the safety and monitoring parameters for each agent. The most common immunotherapies used after patients have had multiple recurrences of IRP are anakinra, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and azathioprine. In most cases, these immunotherapies are adjunctive therapy, with the goal of tapering and discontinuing immunosuppressive corticosteroids. After reviewing the data, anakinra resulted in more patients discontinuing corticosteroids and prevented further recurrences of pericarditis. IVIG resulted in symptom resolution and no further recurrences in most of the patients. Azathioprine was associated with more than half of patients becoming recurrence free; however, many patients required a restart of corticosteroids due to recurrence. Clinicians should be aware of the adverse effects of immunotherapy, ranging from mild gastrointestinal events to risk of infection and serious blood dyscrasias that may require diligent monitoring. The use of immunotherapy for the treatment of adults with IRP should be restricted to patients who have multiple recurrences. Ideally, immunotherapy would be adjunctive to first-line combination therapy with ASA/NSAID plus colchicine, with the goal of tapering and discontinuing immunosuppressive

  17. Diagnostic decision-making after a first and recurrent seizure in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The role of EEG after a first seizure has been debated. Epileptiform EEG activity is a good predictor of seizure recurrence, but is reported in only 8-50% of first-seizure adult patients. Even if the EEG is abnormal, the opinions about treatment after a first seizure differ. The role of EEG

  18. Employment in French young adult survivors of childhood leukemia: an LEA study (for Leucemies de l'Enfant et de l'Adolescent-childhood and adolescent leukemia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbis, Julie; Reggio, Céline; Michel, Gérard; Chastagner, Pascal; Bertrand, Yves; Kanold, Justyna; Sirvent, Nicolas; Plantaz, Dominique; Baruchel, André; Tabone, Marie-Dominique; Garnier, Floriane; Lehucher-Michel, Marie-Pascale; Auquier, Pascal

    2016-12-01

    Our principal aim was to assess the occupational outcomes of French survivors of childhood leukemia, compared to national population. The secondary objective was to identify determinants linked with employment stability after childhood leukemia. All survivors aged 15 and over enrolled in the French LEA Cohort (Childhood and Adolescent Leukemia) were included. Occupational data were self-reported. The occupational distributions expected in the cohort for each age range were established based on the distribution in France as reference, and comparisons between observed and expected distributions were performed. Logistic regression model was used to explore determinants of stability of survivors' employment. The questionnaire was completed by 845 eligible survivors (response rate 87.8 %), with a mean age of 22.3 ± 5.4 years and a mean follow-up duration of 14.3 ± 6.3 years. Among the 361 survivors currently in the labor market, 36 (10.0 %) were seeking a job, which is significantly lower than expected (19.3 %) compared to French population. Conversely, among those currently employed, the number of survivors in unstable employment (43.9 %) was significantly higher than expected (33.5 %). Younger age and higher number of late effects were risk factors for unstable employment. While the employment rate of the young French adult population of childhood leukemia survivors seems rather positive, access to a steady job appears to be compromised for some survivors. A strategy to better identify particular subgroups of survivors at greatest risk for difficulties in their professional achievement will help ensure the development of specific intervention strategies and support procedures.

  19. Hierarchy in gene expression is predictive of risk, progression, and outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shubham; Deem, Michael W.

    2015-02-01

    Cancer progresses with a change in the structure of the gene network in normal cells. We define a measure of organizational hierarchy in gene networks of affected cells in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. With a retrospective cohort analysis based on the gene expression profiles of 116 AML patients, we find that the likelihood of future cancer relapse and the level of clinical risk are directly correlated with the level of organization in the cancer related gene network. We also explore the variation of the level of organization in the gene network with cancer progression. We find that this variation is non-monotonic, which implies the fitness landscape in the evolution of AML cancer cells is non-trivial. We further find that the hierarchy in gene expression at the time of diagnosis may be a useful biomarker in AML prognosis.

  20. Hierarchy in gene expression is predictive of risk, progression, and outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, Shubham; Deem, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Cancer progresses with a change in the structure of the gene network in normal cells. We define a measure of organizational hierarchy in gene networks of affected cells in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. With a retrospective cohort analysis based on the gene expression profiles of 116 AML patients, we find that the likelihood of future cancer relapse and the level of clinical risk are directly correlated with the level of organization in the cancer related gene network. We also explore the variation of the level of organization in the gene network with cancer progression. We find that this variation is non-monotonic, which implies the fitness landscape in the evolution of AML cancer cells is non-trivial. We further find that the hierarchy in gene expression at the time of diagnosis may be a useful biomarker in AML prognosis. (paper)

  1. Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma. Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Zúñiga, M J M; Cortez-Franco, F; Qujiano-Gomero, E

    2018-06-01

    Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL) is an aggressive neoplasm of T lymphocytes associated with Human T-lymphotropic virus type1 (HTLV-1) infection. HTLV-1 is a public health problem because it is endemic in native groups in Latin America, and its infection leads to several chronic diseases as ATLL. We aimed to review current literature of ATLL in order to consider it as a differential diagnosis in front of patients with compatible symptoms. Prognosis is still poor in aggressive and indolent variants, with survival rates from months to few years. Treatment based on chemotherapy, antiretroviral, and allogenic stem cell transplantation are currently improving survival rates, but with limited results. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Establishment of cell lines from adult T-cell leukemia cells dependent on negatively charged polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagami, Yoshitoyo; Uchiyama, Susumu; Kato, Harumi; Okada, Yasutaka; Seto, Masao; Kinoshita, Tomohiro

    2017-07-05

    Growing adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) cells in vitro is difficult. Here, we examined the effects of static electricity in the culture medium on the proliferation of ATLL cells. Six out of 10 ATLL cells did not proliferate in vitro and thus had to be cultured in a medium containing negatively charged polymers. In the presence of poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) or chondroitin sulfate (CDR), cell lines (HKOX3-PGA, HKOX3-CDR) were established from the same single ATLL case using interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and feeder cells expressing OX40L (OX40L + HK). Dextran sulfate inhibited growth in both HKOX3 cell lines. Both PGA and OX40L + HK were indispensable for HKOX3-PGA growth, but HKOX3-CDR could proliferate in the presence of CDR or OX40L + HK alone. Thus, the specific action of each negatively charged polymer promoted the growth of specific ATLL cells in vitro.

  3. The epidemiological studies of leukemia around nuclear facilities for children and young adults: critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This objective of this report is to make a review of studies relative to the risk of leukemia among children and young adults less than twenty five years old near the nuclear facilities. the nuclear facilities considered in this report are nuclear power plants (electric power generation), the nuclear research centers, the fuel or weapons fabrication plants, reprocessing plants. This report does not describe the risk analysis near the sites of nuclear weapons test, the consequences of accidents on nuclear facilities such Chernobylsk or the the population near the military and industrial site of Mayak (Ural). The same is for the mining sites and the facilities of uranium extraction that are out of this report. (N.C.)

  4. Comparison of outcomes after unrelated cord blood and unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation in adults with acute leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruggeri, A; Labopin, M; Sanz, G

    2015-01-01

    outcomes after UCBT and Haplo in adults with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Median follow-up was 24 months. Analysis was performed separately for patients with AML, n=918 (Haplo=360, UCBT=558) and ALL, n=528 (Haplo=158 and UCBT=370). UCBT was associated......Outcomes after unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation (Haplo) and after unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) are encouraging and have become alternative options to treat patients with high-risk acute leukemia without human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched donor. We compared...... with delayed engraftment and higher graft failure in both AML and ALL recipients. In multivariate analysis, UCBT was associated with lower incidence of chronic graft-vs-host disease both in the AML group (hazard ratio (HR)=0.63, P=0.008) and in the ALL group (HR=0.58, P=0.01). Not statistically significant...

  5. Cytogenetic findings in adult secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML): frequency of favorable and adverse chromosomal aberrations do not differ from adult de novo AML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preiss, Birgitte S; Bergman, Olav J; Friis, Lone S

    2010-01-01

    During a 15-year period, 161 adult patients were diagnosed with secondary acute myeloid leukemia (s-AML) in the region of Southern Denmark. In 73 patients, the AML diagnosis was preceded by myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS-AML), in 31 patients by an antecedent hematologic disease, and in 57 patients...

  6. Doxorubicin and ifosfamide combination chemotherapy in previously treated acute leukemia in adults: a Southwest Oncology Group pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, D H; Bickers, J N; Vial, R H; Hussein, K; Bottomley, R; Hewlett, J S; Wilson, H E; Stuckey, W J

    1980-01-01

    The Southwest Oncology Group did a limited institutional pilot study of the combination of doxorubicin and ifosfamide in the treatment of previously treated adult patients with acute leukemia. Thirty-four patients received one or two courses of the combination. All patients had received prior chemotherapy and 32 had received prior anthracycline chemotherapy. Three patients died before their responses could be fully evaluated. Fourteen patients achieved complete remission (41%) and one patient achieved partial remission. The complete remission rate was 27% for patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (myelomonoblastic leukemia, monoblastic leukemia, and erythroleukemia) and 89% for patients with acute lymphocytic and undifferentiated leukemia (ALL). Toxic effects included severe hematologic reactions in 33 of 34 patients, hematuria in six patients, altered sensorium in one patient, and congestive heart failure in one patient. The safety of the combination was established and toxic side effects of this therapy were tolerable. The 89% complete remission rate for previously treated patients with ALL suggests that the combination of doxorubicin and ifosfamide may be particularly effective in ALL.

  7. Regulatory T cells-derived IL-35 promotes the growth of adult acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qianshan; Pan, Ying; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Li, Qing; Wang, Jia; Tao, Lili; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-11-15

    Tumor immune escape mechanism mediated by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IL-35, as a novel inhibitory cytokine, is produced by Tregs specially and regulates functions of Tregs in murine. However, IL-35 expression of Tregs in human is still disputed, and its role in AML is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that IL-35 was expressed highly in peripheral blood plasma of adult patients with AML and significantly correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy. Tregs-derived from adult AML patients produced IL-35 in a stimulation-dependent manner. IL-35 promoted AML blasts immune escape by expanding Tregs and inhibiting CD4+CD25-effector T cells (Teffs). Furthermore, IL-35 directly promoted the proliferation of AML blasts and reduced the apoptosis of AML blasts. Together, our study demonstrates that IL-35-derived from Tregs promotes the growth of adult AML blasts, suggesting that IL-35 has an important role in the pathogenesis of AML. © 2015 UICC.

  8. Updating the treatment of recurrent tonsillitis in adults. Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina GASCÓN-RUBIO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: Acute pharyngitis in adults (APA is one of the most frequent reasons for consultation in primary care. The main objective of this review is to update the therapeutic options for the prevention and treatment of APA and to determine which interventions have the greatest impact in reducing morbidity and improving the quality of life of patients, which directly affects the consumption of health resources. Material and Methods: First clinical criteria of the FAA, indications of tonsillectomy and patterns of antibiotic therapy according to clinical guidelines of national and international scientific societies were defined. Subsequently, the literature related to the treatment of the FAA including other therapeutic options not covered in previous clinical guidelines (P. Leucotomos extract, vaccination by the mucosal route, AM3 and beta-glucans, homeopathy and herbal medicine was revised. ClinicalKey bases and PubMed data were used. Results: The comparison of the studies was difficult due to the disparity of criteria for inclusion and diagnostics, sample sizes, time tracking and poor uniformity in the clinical scales measuring variations. Conclusions: Therefore we cannot conclude whether a therapeutic option is more effective than another in the treatment and prevention of adult APA.

  9. Dissociative fugue: Recurrent episodes in a young adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintan Madhusudan Raval

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissociative fugue is a rare disorder which has been described as sudden, unexpected, travel away from home or one′s customary place of daily activities, with the inability to recall some or all of one′s past. There is no systematic data existing on it and very few cases reported in the literature. Here we report a case of fugue in a young adult male who travelled 8 times away from his home during last 1΍ year. He has a loss of memory for episodes with patchy recall of few events. Longest duration of fugue episode was of 1-month. The case describes mode of presentation to hospital and treatment given to restore his identity and reunite him in society and family.

  10. An early thymic precursor phenotype predicts outcome exclusively in HOXA-overexpressing adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Group for Research in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Jonathan; Marchand, Tony; Touzart, Aurore; Cieslak, Agata; Trinquand, Amélie; Sutton, Laurent; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Hamel, Jean-François; Asnafi, Vahid

    2016-06-01

    Gene expression studies have consistently identified a HOXA-overexpressing cluster of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, but it is unclear whether these constitute a homogeneous clinical entity, and the biological consequences of HOXA overexpression have not been systematically examined. We characterized the biology and outcome of 55 HOXA-positive cases among 209 patients with adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia uniformly treated during the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003 and -2005 studies. HOXA-positive patients had markedly higher rates of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype (40.8% versus 14.5%, P=0.0004), chemoresistance (59.3% versus 40.8%, P=0.026) and positivity for minimal residual disease (48.5% versus 23.5%, P=0.01) than the HOXA-negative group. These differences were due to particularly high frequencies of chemoresistant early thymic precursor-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia in HOXA-positive cases harboring fusion oncoproteins that transactivate HOXA Strikingly, the presence of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype was associated with marked outcome differences within the HOXA-positive group (5-year overall survival 31.2% in HOXA-positive early thymic precursor versus 66.7% in HOXA-positive non-early thymic precursor, P=0.03), but not in HOXA-negative cases (5-year overall survival 74.2% in HOXA-negative early thymic precursor versus 57.2% in HOXA-negative non-early thymic precursor, P=0.44). Multivariate analysis further revealed that HOXA positivity independently affected event-free survival (P=0.053) and relapse risk (P=0.039) of chemoresistant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These results show that the underlying mechanism of HOXA deregulation dictates the clinico-biological phenotype, and that the negative prognosis of early thymic precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia is exclusive to HOXA-positive patients, suggesting that early treatment intensification is currently

  11. Anti-adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma effects of indole-3-carbinol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okudaira Taeko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is a malignancy derived from T cells infected with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1, and it is known to be resistant to standard anticancer therapies. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C, a naturally occurring component of Brassica vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprout, is a promising chemopreventive agent as it is reported to possess antimutagenic, antitumorigenic and antiestrogenic properties in experimental studies. The aim of this study was to determine the potential anti-ATLL effects of I3C both in vitro and in vivo. Results In the in vitro study, I3C inhibited cell viability of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines and ATLL cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, I3C did not exert any inhibitory effect on uninfected T-cell lines and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. I3C prevented the G1/S transition by reducing the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D2, Cdk4 and Cdk6, and induced apoptosis by reducing the expression of XIAP, survivin and Bcl-2, and by upregulating the expression of Bak. The induced apoptosis was associated with activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9, and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage. I3C also suppressed IκBα phosphorylation and JunD expression, resulting in inactivation of NF-κB and AP-1. Inoculation of HTLV-1-infected T cells in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency resulted in tumor growth. The latter was inhibited by treatment with I3C (50 mg/kg/day orally, but not the vehicle control. Conclusion Our preclinical data suggest that I3C could be potentially a useful chemotherapeutic agent for patients with ATLL.

  12. [Copy number alterations in adult patients with mature B acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with specific immunochemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera, Jordi; Zamora, Lurdes; García, Olga; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Genescà, Eulàlia; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2016-12-02

    Unlike Burkitt lymphoma, molecular abnormalities other than C-MYC rearrangements have scarcely been studied in patients with mature B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency and prognostic significance of copy number alterations (CNA) in genes involved in lymphoid differentiation, cell cycle and tumor suppression in adult patients with B-ALL. We have analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification the genetic material from bone marrow at diagnosis from 25 adult B-ALL patients treated with rituximab and specific chemotherapy. The most frequent CNA were alterations in the 14q32.33 region (11 cases, 44%) followed by alterations in the cell cycle regulator genes CDKN2A/B and RB1 (16%). No correlation between the presence of specific CNA and the clinical-biologic features or the response to therapy was found. The high frequency of CNA in the 14q32.33 region, CDKN2A/B and RB1 found in our study could contribute to the aggressiveness and invasiveness of mature B-ALL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of the nutritional status of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia during induction chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluche, Elise; Girault, Stephane; Jesus, Pierre; Monzat, Sophie; Turlure, Pascal; Leobon, Sophie; Abraham, Julie; Daly, Nathalie; Dauriac, Olivia; Bordessoule, Dominique

    2017-09-01

    To the best of our knowledge, few studies have evaluated the nutritional status in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) during induction treatment. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe nutritional status of newly diagnosed adult patients with AML at admission and during induction chemotherapy. We included consecutive newly diagnosed adult patients with AML who were admitted to the Department of Hematology (Limoges University Hospital) from April 2010 to January 2014. Nutritional assessment included body mass index (BMI) and weight loss to diagnose undernutrition. Weekly laboratory tests were collected and total energy expenditure was calculated to adapt food intake. Of 95 patients, 14 (15%) presented with undernutrition at admission: low BMI values (P 5% for 9.5% patients. After chemotherapy induction, 17 patients (18%) were undernutrition (P = 0.05). Patients without undernutrition had a significantly lower median weight, BMI, and serum albumin level at discharge compared with their admission values (P nutritional status undergoing induction chemotherapy have shorter hospital stays and longer survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Trends in adult leukemia incidence and survival in Denmark, 1943-2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Nielsen, Ove Juul; Johansen, Christoffer

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of leukemia is largely unknown. Ecological data indicating trends in incidence and survival can provide information about changes in risk factors, can reflect underlying changes in diagnostic classification, and can measure therapeutic advances. From the records of the Danish Cancer...... Registry with registration starting from 1943, we calculated age-specific, period-specific, and age-standardized (world standard) incidence rates of chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL), acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for persons above the age...... of 18. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and median survival times were calculated. Between 1943 and 2003, there were 26,036 cases of leukemia reported. The age-specific incidence rates of CLL, CML, and AML were higher for older men and women, while the incidence rates of ALL by age were more homogeneous...

  15. Structure-activity relationship of 9-methylstreptimidone, a compound that induces apoptosis selectively in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeiri, Masatoshi; Ota, Eisuke; Nishiyama, Shigeru; Kiyota, Hiromasa; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that 9-methylstreptimidone, a piperidine compound isolated from a culture filtrate of Streptomyces, induces apoptosis selectively in adult T-cell leukemia cells. It was screened for a compound that inhibits LPS-induced NF-kappaB and NO production in mouse macrophages. However, 9-methystreptimidone is poorly obtained from the producing microorganism and difficult to synthesize. Therefore, in the present research, we studied the structure-activity relationship to look for new selective inhibitors. We found that the structure of the unsaturated hydrophobic portion of 9-methylstreptimidone was essential for the inhibition of LPS-induced NO production. Among the 9-methylstreptimidone-related compounds tested, (+/-)-4,alpha-diepi-streptovitacin A inhibited NO production in macrophage-like cells as potently as 9-methylstreptimidone and without cellular toxicity. Moreover, this compound selectively induced apoptosis in adult T-cell leukemia MT-1 cells.

  16. Recurrence and graft loss after renal transplantation in adults with IgA vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Mayuko; Yamamoto, Izumi; Komatsuzaki, Yo; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Katsumata, Haruki; Katsuma, Ai; Mafune, Aki; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Horita, Shigeru; Okumi, Masayoshi; Ishida, Hideki; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2017-08-01

    IgA vasculitis, a rare condition resulting in end-stage renal disease, is a small-vessel vasculitis that affects the kidney in 49-83 % of adults. The reported recurrence rate of IgA vasculitis in renal transplant recipients is 11.5-60 %, leading to graft loss in 0-50 % of these patients. However, limited data are available on recurrence and graft loss after renal transplantation. We evaluated renal transplant recipients seen from 1987 to 2015 at the Jikei University School of Medicine and the Department of Urology, Tokyo Women's Medical University. Using a 1:2 match, 21 patients with IgA vasculitis and 42 controls were selected. The mean post-transplant follow-up was 121 ± 69 months for IgA vasculitis and 147 ± 66 months for the controls. The 15-year patient survival was 100 % in IgA vasculitis and 97.6 % in the controls (p = 0.22). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year graft survival rates were 95.2, 90.5, and 81 % in IgA vasculitis and 100, 90.5, and 88.1 % in the controls, respectively (p = 0.63). The recurrence rate was 28.6 % (6 of 21 cases) and half of them (3 of 6 cases) showed histological activity (ISKDC III). We treated them with methylprednisolone pulse therapy and/or tonsillectomy. None of the recurrence cases lost the allograft. The long-term patient and graft survival of IgA vasculitis in renal transplantation were comparable with the previous reports. The recurrence rate was 28.6 %, but none of the recurrent cases showed allograft loss in this study. We speculate that methylprednisolone pulse therapy and/or tonsillectomy prevent the progression of recurrent IgA vasculitis.

  17. Comparing chronic interpersonal and noninterpersonal stress domains as predictors of depression recurrence in emerging adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Erin S; Craighead, W Edward

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how persistent interpersonal difficulties distinctly affect the course of major depressive disorder (MDD) during emerging adulthood is critical, given that early experiences impact future coping resources and functioning. Research on stress and MDD has mostly concentrated on stressful life events, while chronic stress largely has not been explored. The present study examined interpersonal (intimate relationship, close friendships, social life, family relationships) and noninterpersonal (academic, work, financial, personal health, and family members' health) domains of chronic stress as time-varying predictors of depressive recurrence in emerging adults. Baseline assessments identified previously depressed emerging adults (N = 119), who subsequently completed 6-month, 12-month and 18-month follow-up interviews to determine chronic stress experiences and onset of new major depressive episodes. Survival analyses indicated that time-varying total chronic stress and chronic interpersonal stress predicted higher risk for depression recurrence; however, chronic noninterpersonal stress was not associated with recurrence. Intimate relationship stress, close friendship stress, family relationship stress, personal health, and family members' health independently predicted MDD recurrence, over and above well-established depression risk factors of dysfunctional cognitions and personality disorder symptoms. Evidence that interpersonal stress could have substantial impact on course of depression is consistent with theories of emerging adulthood, a time when young people are individuating from the family and experiencing significant social transition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recurrent epistaxis caused by an intranasal supernumerary tooth in a young adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dhafeeri, Hamed O; Kavarodi, Abdulmajid; Al Shaikh, Khalil; Bukhari, Ahmed; Al Hussain, Omair; El Baramawy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Male, 27. Recurrent epistaxis. Nasal bleeding. -. -. Pediatrics and Neonatology. Congenital defects/diseases. Recurrent epistaxis is a common disorder among children and young adults. We report an unusual cause, intranasal supernumerary tooth causing friction with Little's area of the nasal septum. A 22-year-old male presented with recurrent, mild, unilateral left-sided epistaxis once to twice per month for 3 years. This usually occurred after minor nasal trauma or rubbing his nose. The patient also suffered from recurrent tonsillitis. There was neither history of blood transfusion or nasal packing, nor a history suggestive of bleeding diathesis. Anterior rhinoscopy revealed ivory white nasal mass antero-inferiorly in the left nasal cavity touching Little's area. There was no bleeding. Nasal endoscopy showed a white cylindrical bony mass 1 cm long arising from the floor of the nose, with no attachment to the nasal septum or the lateral wall of the nose. Examination of the right nasal cavity was unremarkable. Nasal teeth result from the ectopic eruption of supernumerary teeth and may cause a variety of symptoms including recurrent epistaxis. Their clinical and radiologic presentation is so characteristic that their diagnosis is not difficult. CT scan is helpful in planning management. Early extraction prevents further complications and prevents further attacks of epistaxis.

  19. Racial disparities in the survival of American children, adolescents, and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, and Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Justine M; Keegan, Theresa H M; Tao, Li; Abrahão, Renata; Bleyer, Archie; Viny, Aaron D

    2016-09-01

    Race-based survival in children and adolescents with hematologic malignancies has been a national challenge for decades. Large-scale investigations of age- and race-based survival trends over time in these patients have not previously been reported. The objective of this study was to investigate whether race- and age-related differences in pediatric and adolescent and young adult (AYA) leukemia and lymphoma survival persist and to what extent these differences have changed over time. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, this study investigated the outcomes of black and white (1975-2012; n = 27,369) and white and Hispanic (1992-2012; n = 20,574) children (0-14 years old) and AYAs (15-39 years old) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Estimates of 5- and 10-year relative survival were compared over time. Trends showed a convergence of survival for white and black children with ALL but a divergence in survival for AYA patients. Hispanic children and AYAs both suffered inferior outcomes. Trends for AML revealed persistent survival differences between black and white children and suggested worsening disparities for AYAs. Survival trends in HL revealed sustained survival differences between black and white AYA patients, whereas no differences were found in Hispanic and white patient outcomes for AML or HL. Although survival for children and AYAs with ALL, AML, and HL has improved over the past 4 decades, differences persist between black, white, and Hispanic children and AYAs; survival disparities between black and white children with ALL have been nearly eliminated. Strategies aimed at identifying causality and reducing disparities are warranted. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2723-2730. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  20. IRF-4 and c-Rel expression in antiviral-resistant adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Juan Carlos; Ruiz, Phillip; Ratner, Lee; Reis, Isildinha M.; Brites, Carlos; Pedroso, Celia; Byrne, Gerald E.; Toomey, Ngoc L.; Andela, Valentine; Harhaj, Edward W.; Lossos, Izidore S.; Harrington, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a generally fatal malignancy. Most ATLL patients fare poorly with conventional chemotherapy; however, antiviral therapy with zidovudine (AZT) and interferon alpha (IFN-α) has produced long-term clinical remissions. We studied primary ATLL tumors and identified molecular features linked to sensitivity and resistance to antiviral therapy. Enhanced expression of the proto-oncogene c-Rel was noted in 9 of 27 tumors. Resistant tumors exhibited c-Rel (6 of 1...

  1. Comparable Efficacy of Idelalisib Plus Rituximab and Ibrutinib in Relapsed/refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A Retrospective Case Matched Study of the Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puła, Bartosz; Budziszewska, Bożena Katarzyna; Rybka, Justyna; Gil, Lidia; Subocz, Edyta; Długosz-Danecka, Monika; Zawirska, Daria; Waszczuk-Gajda, Anna; Iskierka-Jażdżewska, Elżbieta; Kopacz, Agnieszka; Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Czyż, Jarosław; Lech-Marańda, Ewa; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Jamroziak, Krzysztof

    2018-05-01

    There is limited amount of data available on the comparative efficacy of ibrutinib and idelalisib, the B-cell receptor inhibitors (BCRi) newly approved for relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (r/r CLL/SLL) treatment. The aim of our study was to analyze and compare the outcomes of real-world r/r CLL/SLL patients treated with these two BCRi in outside clinical trials. A comparative case matched 1:2 analysis was performed on idelalisib combined with rituximab and ibrutinib efficacy in 102 patients with r/r CLL/SLL from two observational studies of the Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG). Both therapies produced similar overall response rates (idelalisib plus rituximab 76.4% and ibrutinib 72.1%). Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in both groups were not reached. Furthermore, no significant difference was observed between both BCRi regimens in regard to PFS (HR=0.75, 95% CI=0.30-1.86, p=0.55) and OS (HR=0.65, 95%CI=0.26-1.68, p=0.39). In summary, the results of this retrospective analysis suggest that idelalisib combined with rituximab and ibrutinib therapies have comparable activity in r/r CLL/SLL in daily clinical practice. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. Safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of asparaginase in the treatment of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koprivnikar J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jamie Koprivnikar, James McCloskey, Stefan Faderl Division of Leukemia, John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ, USA Abstract: Adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL are known to have inferior outcomes compared to the pediatric population. Although the reasons for this are likely manyfold, the agents utilized and the increased intensity of pediatric treatments compared to adult treatments are likely significant contributing factors. Asparaginase, an enzyme that converts asparagine to aspartic acid, forms the backbone of almost all pediatric regimens and works by depleting extracellular asparagine, which ALL cells are unable to synthesize. Asparaginase toxicities, which include hypersensitivity reactions, pancreatitis, liver dysfunction, and thrombosis, have hindered its widespread use in the adult population. Here, we review the toxicity and efficacy of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL. With the proper precautions, it is a safe and effective agent in the treatment of younger adults with ALL with response rates in the frontline setting ranging from 78% to 96%, compared to most trials showing a 4-year overall survival of 50% or better. The age cutoff for consideration of treatment with pediatric-inspired regimens is not clear, but recent studies show promise particularly in the adolescent and young adult population. New formulations of asparaginase are actively in development, including erythrocyte-encapsulated asparaginase, which is designed to minimize the toxicity and improve the delivery of the drug. Keywords: PEG-asparaginase, ALL, chemotherapy, pegaspargase, AYA, pediatric 

  3. Ultrastructural cytochemical prospective study of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: detection of peroxidase activity in patients failing to respond to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiffers, J; Darmendrail, V; Larrue, J; Villenave, I; Bernard, P; Boisseau, M; Broustet, A

    1981-08-15

    Ultrastructural cytochemical studies revealed peroxidase activity in five of 25 adult patients with apparent null lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in whom the peroxidase reaction studied with light microscopy was negative. None of these 5 patients responded to a chemotherapy regimen used for adult ALL. The importance of ultrastructural cytochemistry which allows the recognition of myeloblastic differentiation in undifferentiated blast cells is also demonstrated. The correct classification of such cases may be important for prognosis because they appear to be resistant to the chemotherapy used in treating ALL.

  4. Proliferation kinetics and cyclic AMP as prognostic factors in adult acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paietta, E; Mittermayer, K; Schwarzmeier, J

    1980-07-01

    In 41 adult patients with acute leukemia (myeloblastic, lymphoblastic, and undifferentiated), proliferation kinetics (as determined by double-label autoradiography) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) concentration were studied for their significance in the prediction of responsiveness to cytostatic therapy. Patients with good clinical response had significantly shorter turnover times and higher labeling indices in the bone marrow than did those who failed to respond to treatment. Cases for which cell kinetics did not correlate with clinical response were explained by variance in the distribution of leukemic blasts between the proliferative cell cycle and the resting pool. Good clinical response was also found to be associated with low levels of cAMP in leukemic cells prior to therapy, whereas high cAMP contents predicted failure. Low cAMP concentrations, however, did not necessarily correlate with short turnover times and vice versa. This might be due to fluctuations of the cAMP concentrations during the cell cycle.

  5. Formulation of Genetic Counseling Format for Adult Bangladeshi Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Z; Nishat, L; Yesmin, Z A; Banu, L A

    2018-01-01

    With the advancement of medical genetics, particular emphasis is given on the genetic counseling worldwide. In Bangladesh, genetic counseling services are not yet developed. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a malignant disease of the myeloid cells of bone marrow. Like other malignant diseases, it may result from a mutation in the DNA. A genetic counseling format will educate the AML patients and provide appropriate medical and emotional support. The aim of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to develop a genetic counseling format for adult Bangladeshi patients with AML. Taking this into account, a draft format was prepared by reviewing relevant documents available online which was later analyzed by an expert panel through a group discussion and thus a proposed format was developed. To make the format effective in the perspective of Bangladeshi population, the proposed format was applied in counseling, and thus a final format was developed in the English language. This format will educate the counselors, clinicians, and patients about the utility and importance of the genetic counseling and genetic tests. Also, the patients feel comfort regarding the whole counseling process and going for postcounseling treatments and advice. Though it is written in English, it may be translated into mother tongue for better communication during counseling.

  6. Chronic adult T-cell Leukemia in a young male after blood transfusion as a newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Colucci

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell Lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL and HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HTM/TSP. Areas of extremely high HTLV-1 prevalence are surrounded by areas of middle or very low prevalence. ATLL is an aggressive lymphoproliferative malignancy of peripheral T cells, with an incidence of less than 5% in HTLV-1-infected individuals. ATLL developed in the majority of cases in individuals who were infected with HTLV-1 by their mothers due to prolonged breastfeeding. In non-endemic areas, ATLL is usually limited to immigrants, their sexual partners and descendants from endemic regions. Very few cases of ATLL have been diagnosed in recipient patients few years after an organ transplantation or blood transfusion worldwide. Achieving an accurate and fast diagnosis of ATLL can be challenging due to the lack of professional experience, delayed consultation and difficulty in its sub-classification. We present a case of a delayed onset of a chronic ATLL in an 18-years-old male who was transfused with blood components as a premature newborn in Buenos Aires, a non-endemic city of South America.

  7. Formulation of Genetic Counseling Format for Adult Bangladeshi Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Rahman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of medical genetics, particular emphasis is given on the genetic counseling worldwide. In Bangladesh, genetic counseling services are not yet developed. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a malignant disease of the myeloid cells of bone marrow. Like other malignant diseases, it may result from a mutation in the DNA. A genetic counseling format will educate the AML patients and provide appropriate medical and emotional support. The aim of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to develop a genetic counseling format for adult Bangladeshi patients with AML. Taking this into account, a draft format was prepared by reviewing relevant documents available online which was later analyzed by an expert panel through a group discussion and thus a proposed format was developed. To make the format effective in the perspective of Bangladeshi population, the proposed format was applied in counseling, and thus a final format was developed in the English language. This format will educate the counselors, clinicians, and patients about the utility and importance of the genetic counseling and genetic tests. Also, the patients feel comfort regarding the whole counseling process and going for postcounseling treatments and advice. Though it is written in English, it may be translated into mother tongue for better communication during counseling.

  8. Chemical exposure and leukemia clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper draws attention to the heterogeneous distribution of leukemia in childhood and in adults. The topic of cluster reports and generalized clustering is addressed. These issues are applied to what is known of the risk factor for both adult and childhood leukemia. Finally, the significance of parental occupational exposure and childhood leukemia is covered. (author). 23 refs

  9. A prospective registration study to determine feasibility of hematopoietic SCT in adults with acute leukemia: planning, expectations and reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labopin, M; Gorin, N-C; Polge, E; Socié, G; Gurman, G; Gluckman, E; Jindra, P; Poiré, X; Schäfer-Eckart, K; Ruutu, T; Milone, G; Arcese, W; Mohty, M; Rocha, V

    2014-03-01

    For adults with acute leukemia, it is important to know whether the therapeutic schemes initially planned were actually implemented. The European Group for Blood and Marrow transplantation Acute Leukemia Working Party prospectively followed 695 consecutive patients who were registered at the time of HLA typing. Of 304 patients with an available matched sibling donor (MSD), SCT was planned in 264, chemotherapy in 33 and autografting in 7. For the rest, an unrelated donor (UD) search was initiated in 198. Among these, 117 were transplanted, 114 received chemotherapy and 77 underwent autografting. Probabilities of receiving a planned treatment were 60 and 65% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Patients scheduled to receive MSD SCT had an 82% probability, whereas those scheduled to undergo UD SCT had a 57% probability, of receiving their transplant at 1 year. The only factor associated with a lower probability of MSD SCT in first remission was delayed HLA typing (HR=0.82; P=0.03). One year after enrollment, 40% of patients did not follow their initial treatment plan. Because OS was 50% only at 3 years and only 57% of the patients without a MSD underwent SCT, this suggests room for improvement in outcomes for adults with acute leukemia.

  10. CD19/CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory CD19 Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma or B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Associated With Chronic Inflammation; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Epstein-Barr Virus Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Elderly; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; T-Cell/Histiocyte-Rich Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside ... develops quickly. Both adults and children can get acute myeloid leukemia ( AML ). This article is about AML in children.

  12. Recurrent severe invasive pneumococcal disease in an adult with previously unknown hyposplenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Vibe C; Schejbel, Lone; Hoffmann, Steen

    2015-01-01

    was found. Despite immunization against S. pneumoniae and measurement of what was interpreted as protective levels of serotype-specific IgG antibodies after vaccination, the patient suffered from a third episode of IPD. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with predisposing medical conditions or a history of severe......BACKGROUND: The risk of life-threatening and invasive infections with encapsulated bacteria is increased in patients with hyposplenia or asplenia. We report a case of recurrent invasive pneumococcal meningitis in a woman with previous unknown hyposplenia. She was vaccinated after the first episode...... of meningitis and developed sufficient levels of pneumococcal antibodies. The pneumococcal strains isolated were serotype 7 F and 17 F. To our knowledge, there has been no previously reported case of recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in a pneumococcal vaccinated adult with hyposplenia and apparently...

  13. Daunorubicin Hydrochloride, Cytarabine and Oblimersen Sodium in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Patterns of care and outcomes in adolescent and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Lori; Alvarez, Elysia; Lichtensztajn, Daphne; Abrahão, Renata; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Keegan, Theresa

    2018-04-24

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs, 15-39 years) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represent a heterogeneous population who receive care in pediatric or adult cancer settings. Using the California Cancer Registry, we describe AYA ALL patterns of care and outcomes over the past decade. Sociodemographics, treatment location, and front-line therapies administered to AYAs diagnosed with ALL between 2004 and 2014 were obtained. Cox regression models evaluated associations between ALL setting and regimen and overall survival (OS) and leukemia-specific survival (LSS) for the entire cohort, younger AYA (<25 years), and AYAs treated in the adult cancer setting only. Of 1473 cases, 67.7% were treated in an adult setting; of these, 24.8% received a pediatric ALL regimen and 40.7% were treated at a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated center. In multivariable analyses, front-line treatment in a pediatric (vs adult) setting (OS HR = 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.76; LSS HR = 0.51, 95% CI, 0.35-0.74) and at an NCI/Children's Oncology Group (COG) center (OS HR = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.66-0.96; LSS HR = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.65-0.97) were associated with significantly superior survival. Results were similar when analyses were limited to younger AYAs. Outcomes for AYAs treated in an adult setting did not differ following front-line pediatric or adult ALL regimens. Our population-level findings demonstrate that two-thirds of AYAs with newly diagnosed ALL are treated in an adult cancer setting, with the majority receiving care in community settings. Given the potential survival benefits, front-line treatment of AYA ALL at pediatric and/or NCI/COG-designated cancer centers should be considered. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  15. Reduced Intensity Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With De Novo or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-24

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Recurrence of a t(8;21-Positive Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Form of a Granulocytic Sarcoma Involving Cranial Bones: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambra Di Veroli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulocytic sarcoma (GS is a rare extramedullary solid tumor defined as an accumulation of myeloblasts or immature myeloid cells. It can cooccur with or precede the acute myeloid leukemia (AML as well as following treated AML. The incidence of GS in AML patients is 3–8% but it significantly rises in M2 FAB subtype AML. This variety of AML harbors t(8;21 in up to 20–25% of cases (especially in children and black ones of African origin and, at a molecular level, it is characterized by the generation of a fusion gene known as RUNX1-RUNX1T1. Approximately 10% of M2 AML patients will develop GS, as a consequence, the t(8;21 and the relative transcript represent the most common cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities in GS. FLT3-ITD mutation was rarely described in AML patients presenting with GS. FLT3 ITD is generally strongly associated with poor prognosis in AML, and is rarely reported in patients with t(8;21. GS presentation is extremely variable depending on organs involved; in general, cranial bones and sinus are very rarely affected sites. We report a rare case of GS occurring as a recurrence of a previously treated t(8;21, FLT3-ITD positive AML, involving mastoid bones and paravertebral tissues.

  17. Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute myeloid (myelogenous) leukemia (AML) treatment options include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, stem cell transplant, and other medications. Cytogenetic analysis helps predict treatment outcomes. Get detailed information about AML in this summary for clinicians.

  18. Phosphoproteomic profiling analysis in pediatric acute leukemias and in solid tumors of the adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basso, G.; Nitti, D.

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed 120 pediatric patients affected with B-cell AL (B-Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia) by Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA). Leukemia cells from bone marrow aspirates were stored in liquid nitrogen in the Bio Bank of the Laboratory of Pediatric Onco hematology in Padova. Clinical data, such as immuno phenotype, outcome, response to therapy and chromosomal translocations, were collected for all the patients

  19. Dominance of highly divergent feline leukemia virus A progeny variants in a cat with recurrent viremia and fatal lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer-Pham Kim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a cat that had ostensibly recovered from feline leukemia virus (FeLV infection, we observed the reappearance of the virus and the development of fatal lymphoma 8.5 years after the initial experimental exposure to FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. The goals of the present study were to investigate this FeLV reoccurrence and molecularly characterize the progeny viruses. Results The FeLV reoccurrence was detected by the presence of FeLV antigen and RNA in the blood and saliva. The cat was feline immunodeficiency virus positive and showed CD4+ T-cell depletion, severe leukopenia, anemia and a multicentric monoclonal B-cell lymphoma. FeLV-A, but not -B or -C, was detectable. Sequencing of the envelope gene revealed three FeLV variants that were highly divergent from the virus that was originally inoculated (89-91% identity to FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. In the long terminal repeat 31 point mutations, some previously described in cats with lymphomas, were detected. The FeLV variant tissue provirus and viral RNA loads were significantly higher than the FeLV-A/Glasgow-1 loads. Moreover, the variant loads were significantly higher in lymphoma positive compared to lymphoma negative tissues. An increase in the variant provirus blood load was observed at the time of FeLV reoccurrence. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that ostensibly recovered FeLV provirus-positive cats may act as a source of infection following FeLV reactivation. The virus variants that had largely replaced the inoculation strain had unusually heavily mutated envelopes. The mutations may have led to increased viral fitness and/or changed the mutagenic characteristics of the virus.

  20. Childhood maltreatment and differential treatment response and recurrence in adult major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Kate L; Bagby, R Michael; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2012-06-01

    A substantial number of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) do not respond to treatment, and recurrence rates remain high. The purpose of this study was to examine a history of severe childhood abuse as a moderator of response following a 16-week acute treatment trial, and of recurrence over a 12-month follow-up. Participants included 203 adult outpatients with MDD (129 women; age 18-60). The design was a 16-week single-center randomized, open label trial of interpersonal psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, or antidepressant medication, with a 12-month naturalistic follow-up, conducted at a university psychiatry center in Canada. The main outcome measure was Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores at treatment end point. Childhood maltreatment was assessed at the completion of treatment using an interview-based contextual measure of childhood physical, sexual, and emotional abuse. Multiple imputation was adopted to estimate missing values. Patients with severe maltreatment were significantly less likely to respond to interpersonal psychotherapy than to cognitive-behavioral therapy or medication (OR = 3.61), whereas no differences among treatments were found in those with no history of maltreatment (ORs therapy than from interpersonal psychotherapy. However, these patients remain vulnerable to recurrence regardless of treatment modality.

  1. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia Leucemia linfoblástica do adulto

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    Robin Foà

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the most recent advances in the diagnostic and prognostic work-up of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, and on their implications in the clinical management of the disease. Over the years, information obtained through extensive immunophenotyping, karyotyping, molecular genetics, multidrug resistance and, more recently, genomic profiling is progressively contributing to a better understanding of the biology of this complex disease, to the identification of subgroups of patients with different clinical outcomes, to a more precise monitoring of minimal residual disease, to the use of different therapeutic protocols based on prognostic indicators and, finally, to the design of innovative and specific treatment strategies. The next few years will tell us if this biologically-guided approach, which is progressively individualizing the management of adult ALL patients, will ultimately impact on the prognosis of a disease that has stagnated over many decade.Esta revisão focaliza os mais recentes avanços no diagnóstico e prognóstico da leucemia linfoblástica aguda do adulto e suas implicações no manuseio clínico desta doença. Com o passar dos anos, informações obtidas através de extensa pesquisa em imunofenotipagem, citogenética, genética molecular, resistência a múltiplas drogas e, mais recentemente, perfil genômico têm contribuído progressivamente para o melhor entendimento da biologia desta doença complexa, na identificação de sub grupos de pacientes com evolução clínica distintas, no mais preciso monitoramento da doença residual mínima, no uso de diferentes protocolos baseados em indicadores prognósticos e, mais recentemente, também no desenho de tratamentos inovativos e específicos. Os próximos anos nos dirão se abordagens baseadas guiadas biologicamente, que será uma individualização progressiva do manuseio dos pacientes adultos com LLA podem causar um impacto favorável em uma doen

  2. Influence of insurance and marital status on outcomes of adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fintel, Andrew E; Jamy, Omer; Martin, Mike G

    2015-06-01

    Although outcomes for adolescents and young adults (AYA) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are worse when treated according to adult rather than pediatric protocols, one criticism is that this may be due to the emancipation of young adults. Using case listing session of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 18 (1973-2010), we examined outcomes for AYA with ALL defined similar to Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 10,403 criteria (age 18-30) predicated on marital and insurance status as surrogates for emancipation (limiting analysis to 2007-2010). Analyses were conducted with SEER*Stat 8.1.2, Microsoft Excel 2007, and GraphPad Prism 6. Comparisons were made by the Fisher exact test and log rank test (Mantel-Cox); all P values were 2-sided. Although age (24 and younger vs. 25 and older) was predictive of median overall survival (OS) (not reached vs. 33; P = .0029) (3-year OS 66% vs. 49%), social factors were not. Three-year OS for insured versus uninsured patients was 61% versus 50%, and median OS was not reached versus 30 months (P = .2334). Three-year OS for single versus married patients was 62% versus 55%, with median OS not reached for both groups (P = .1084). Insurance status and marriage did not influence outcomes for AYA with ALL, suggesting that intrinsic differences in disease and disease-specific therapies are more important than social issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Slow-Stroke Back Massage on Symptom Cluster in Adult Patients With Acute Leukemia: Supportive Care in Cancer Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinia, Mojtaba; Baraz, Shahram; Shariati, Abdolali; Malehi, Amal Saki

    Patients with acute leukemia usually experience pain, fatigue, and sleep disorders, which affect their quality of life. Massage therapy, as a nondrug approach, can be useful in controlling such problems. However, very few studies have been conducted on the effects of massage therapy on the complications of leukemia. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of slow-stroke back massage (SSBM) on the symptom cluster in acute leukemia adult patients undergoing chemotherapy. In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients with acute leukemia were allocated randomly to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group received SSBM 3 times a week (every other day for 10 minutes) for 4 weeks. The pain, fatigue, and sleep disorder intensities were measured using the numeric rating scale. The sleep quality was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Statistical tests of χ, t test, and the repeated-measure analysis of variance were used for data analysis. Results showed that the SSBM intervention significantly reduced the progressive sleep disorder, pain, fatigue, and improved sleep quality over time. Slow-stroke back massage, as a simple, noninvasive, and cost-effective approach, along with routine nursing care, can be used to improve the symptom cluster of pain, fatigue, and sleep disorders in leukemia patients. Oncology nurses can increase their knowledge regarding this symptom cluster and work to diminish the cluster components by using SSBM in adult leukemia patients.

  4. The association of tobacco and other factors with recurrent aphthous stomatitis in an US adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Hidalgo, F; Shulman, J D; Beach, M M

    2004-11-01

    To determine point and annual prevalence of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). Reported prevalence of RAS in textbooks and much of the literature varies according to study location, patient selection and whether point prevalence (presence of lesions at examination) or period prevalence (history of lesions during a specified period) is reported. Many studies are based on non-probability samples and this may contribute to significant variation in reported prevalence and factors presumed to be associated with RAS. We analyzed data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994, a large United States probability sample, for RAS and covariates suggested in the literature using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Oral mucosal examinations were performed on 17 235 adults 17 years and older. Of these, 146 (0.89%) had at least one clinically apparent aphthous lesion. For annual (reported) prevalence, Whites (20.87%) and Mexican-Americans (12.88%) had several fold higher prevalence of RAS than Blacks (4.96%). Adults younger than 40 years of age had almost twice the prevalence (22.54%) of those older than 40 years (13.42%). Annual prevalence was significantly higher in whites and Mexican-Americans (compared with blacks), individuals 17-39 years of age, cigarette non-smokers, and those with recurrent herpes labialis history; while it was lower in males. Point prevalence was significantly higher in whites, Mexican-American, individuals 17-39 years of age, cigarette non-smokers, and males.

  5. Mogamulizumab for the treatment of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimitsu M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Makoto Yoshimitsu, Naomichi Arima Division of Hematology and Immunology, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan Abstract: Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma caused by latent infection of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1. The outcome for ATLL is very poor, with a 3-year overall survival of approximately 24% with conventional chemotherapy; thus, there is an unmet need for developing new treatment options. Defucosylated humanized anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4 antibody (KW-0761, mogamulizumab has been clinically available for the treatment of relapsed or refractory ATLL in Japan since 2012, and a Phase II study of mogamulizumab for patients with relapsed CCR4+ ATLL demonstrated a 50% objective response, a 30.8% complete response, and an acceptable safety profile. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used to treat patients with ATLL, and mogamulizumab in combination with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used successfully in a limited number of patients to treat refractory or relapsed ATLL. The efficacy of combining mogamulizumab with standard chemotherapy (mLSG15 for patients with ATLL has also been examined, and the results have shown higher rates of complete response with the combined therapy (52% compared with for chemotherapy alone (33%. Mogamulizumab also has potential application in the treatment of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical paraparesis, Epstein–Barr virus-associated T-cell and natural killer-cell lymphoproliferative diseases, and peripheral and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Possible adverse events of mogamulizumab have been reported, such as cutaneous adverse reactions (including Stevens–Johnson syndrome, diffuse panbronchiolitis, reactivation of hepatitis B, and opportunistic infections. The treatment outcome of patients

  6. FoxP3+ regulatory T cells are distinct from leukemia cells in HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulza, Frederic; Nosaka, Kisato; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Pagliuca, Tony; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2009-11-15

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). It has been postulated that ATLL cells might act as regulatory T cells (T(regs)) which, in common with ATLL cells, express both CD25 and FoxP3, and so contribute to the severe immune suppression typical of ATLL. We report here that the frequency of CD25(+) cells varied independently of the frequency of FoxP3(+) cells in both a cross-sectional study and in a longitudinal study of 2 patients with chronic ATLL. Furthermore, the capacity of ATLL cells to suppress proliferation of heterologous CD4(+)CD25(-) cells correlated with the frequency of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) cells but was independent of CD25 expression. Finally, the frequency of CD4(+)FoxP3(+) cells was inversely correlated with the lytic activity of HTLV-1-specific CTLs in patients with ATLL. We conclude that ATLL is not a tumor of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, and that a population of FoxP3(+) cells distinct from ATLL cells has regulatory functions and may impair the cell-mediated immune response to HTLV-1 in patients with ATLL.

  7. The Meaning of Disease and Spiritual Responses to Stressors in Adults With Acute Leukemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsi, Zahra

    2015-12-01

    Some studies have shown that patients with cancer may experience significant spiritual distress as well as spiritual growth, that there is a positive association between spirituality and coping, and that positive religious coping predicts enhanced health outcomes. This study was designed to help explain how the meaning of disease and spiritual responses to threatening stressors influence the final experiential outcomes of adults with leukemia undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Iran. This grounded theory study conducted in-depth interviews between 2009 and 2011 on 10 adults in Iran with leukemia undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Recorded audio interviews were transcribed verbatim in Persian and coded and analyzed using Corbin and Strauss (2008)'s approach. Main categories that emerged from data included "experiencing the meaning of cancer"; "changing perceptions of death, life and health"; and "moving toward perfection and sublimity." "Finding meaning" was the main concept that defined the final outcome of the experience of participants. Understanding the meaning to patients of disease and treatments may help healthcare providers better appreciate the patients' perspective and improve the physician-patient relationship. Nurses are well positioned to play a decisive role in helping patients cope effectively with their treatment process and in helping ensure positive outcomes for treatments through their helping patients find the unique meaning of their experience.

  8. Xenotransplantation elicits salient tumorigenicity of adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells via aberrant AKT activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Takanashi, Tomoka; Nasu, Kentaro; Tamai, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Mai; Satoh, Ikuro; Ine, Shoji; Sasaki, Osamu; Satoh, Kennichi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Sugamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    The transplantation of human cancer cells into immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(null) (NOG) mice often causes highly malignant cell populations like cancer stem cells to emerge. Here, by serial transplantation in NOG mice, we established two highly tumorigenic adult T-cell leukemia-derived cell lines, ST1-N6 and TL-Om1-N8. When transplanted s.c., these cells formed tumors significantly earlier and from fewer initial cells than their parental lines ST1 and TL-Om1. We found that protein kinase B (AKT) signaling was upregulated in ST1-N6 and TL-Om1-N8 cells, and that this upregulation was due to the decreased expression of a negative regulator, INPP5D. Furthermore, the introduction of a constitutively active AKT mutant expression vector into ST1 cells augmented the tumorigenicity of the cells, whereas treatment with the AKT inhibitor MK-2206 attenuated the progression of tumors induced by ST1-N6 cells. Collectively, our results reveal that the AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in the malignancy of adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that may increase the risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia include: Previous cancer treatment. Children and adults who've had certain types of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for other kinds of cancer may have an increased ... leukemia. Exposure to radiation. People exposed to very high ...

  10. Wilms’ Tumor 1 Gene Mutations Independently Predict Poor Outcome in Adults With Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschka, Peter; Marcucci, Guido; Ruppert, Amy S.; Whitman, Susan P.; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Maharry, Kati; Langer, Christian; Baldus, Claudia D.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Powell, Bayard L.; Baer, Maria R.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Larson, Richard A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the prognostic impact of Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1) gene mutations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). Patients and Methods We studied 196 adults younger than 60 years with newly diagnosed primary CN-AML, who were treated similarly on Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) protocols 9621 and 19808, for WT1 mutations in exons 7 and 9. The patients also were assessed for the presence of FLT3 internal tandem duplications (FLT3-ITD), FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain mutations (FLT3-TKD), MLL partial tandem duplications (MLL-PTD), NPM1 and CEBPA mutations, and for the expression levels of ERG and BAALC. Results Twenty-one patients (10.7%) harbored WT1 mutations. Complete remission rates were not significantly different between patients with WT1 mutations and those with unmutated WT1 (P = .36; 76% v 84%). Patients with WT1 mutations had worse disease-free survival (DFS; P < .001; 3-year rates, 13% v 50%) and overall survival (OS; P < .001; 3-year rates, 10% v 56%) than patients with unmutated WT1. In multivariable analyses, WT1 mutations independently predicted worse DFS (P = .009; hazard ratio [HR] = 2.7) when controlling for CEBPA mutational status, ERG expression level, and FLT3-ITD/NPM1 molecular-risk group (ie, FLT3-ITDnegative/NPM1mutated as low risk v FLT3-ITDpositive and/or NPM1wild-type as high risk). WT1 mutations also independently predicted worse OS (P < .001; HR = 3.2) when controlling for CEBPA mutational status, FLT3-ITD/NPM1 molecular-risk group, and white blood cell count. Conclusion We report the first evidence that WT1 mutations independently predict extremely poor outcome in intensively treated, younger patients with CN-AML. Future trials should include testing for WT1 mutations as part of molecularly based risk assessment and risk-adapted treatment stratification of patients with CN-AML. PMID:18559874

  11. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma associated with HTLV-1 infection in a Brazilian adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALLE Antonio Carlos Francesconi do

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 15-year-old patient infected with HTLV-1 who developed a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, confirmed by histopathological and immunohistochemical examination, as well as clinically and hematologically confirmed leukemia. The patient died 3 months after initial presentation of the disease. The rarity of the disease in this age group justifies the present report.

  12. The role of ABC-transporters in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, Sabine Louise Anne

    2005-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a disease characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation and maturation arest of lymphoid progenitor cells in the bone marrow, resulting in an excesso f malignant cells. The disease has a peak incidence between the age of 2-5 years, and a low and steady rise from the

  13. Impact of cytogenetic abnormalities in adults with Ph-negative B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina; Baranger, Laurence; Hunault, Mathilde; Cuccuini, Wendy; Lefebvre, Christine; Bidet, Audrey; Tigaud, Isabelle; Eclache, Virginie; Delabesse, Eric; Bilhou-Nabéra, Chrystèle; Terré, Christine; Chapiro, Elise; Gachard, Nathalie; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joelle; Ameye, Geneviève; Porter, Sarah; Grardel, Nathalie; Béné, Marie C; Chalandon, Yves; Graux, Carlos; Huguet, Françoise; Lhéritier, Véronique; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2017-10-19

    Multiple cytogenetic subgroups have been described in adult Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative B-cell precursor (BCP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), often comprising small numbers of patients. In this study, we aimed to reassess the prognostic value of cytogenetic abnormalities in a large series of 617 adult patients with Ph-negative BCP-ALL (median age, 38 years), treated in the intensified Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003/2005 trials. Combined data from karyotype, DNA index, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction screening for relevant abnormalities were centrally reviewed and were informative in 542 cases (88%), allowing classification in 10 exclusive primary cytogenetic subgroups and in secondary subgroups, including complex and monosomal karyotypes. Prognostic analyses focused on cumulative incidence of failure (including primary refractoriness and relapse), event-free survival, and overall survival. Only 2 subgroups, namely t(4;11)/ KMT2A-AFF1 and 14q32/ IGH translocations, displayed a significantly worse outcome in this context, still observed after adjustment for age and after censoring patients who received allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in first remission at SCT time. A worse outcome was also observed in patients with low hypodiploidy/near triploidy, but this was likely related to their higher age and worse tolerance to therapy. The other cytogenetic abnormalities, including complex and monosomal karyotypes, had no prognostic value in these intensive protocols designed for adult patients up to the age of 60 years. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. Pathogenetic, Clinical, and Prognostic Features of Adult t(4;11(q21;q23/MLL-AF4 Positive B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Marchesi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Translocation t(4;11(q21;q23 leading to formation of MLL-AF4 fusion gene is found in about 10% of newly diagnosed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adult patients. Patients expressing this chromosomal aberration present typical biological, immunophenotypic, and clinical features. This form of leukemia is universally recognized as high-risk leukemia and treatment intensification with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in first complete remission (CR could be a valid option to improve prognosis, but data obtained from the literature are controversial. In this review, we briefly describe pathogenetic, clinical, and prognostic characteristics of adult t(4;11(q21;q23/MLL-AF4 positive ALL and provide a review of the clinical outcome reported by the most important cooperative groups worldwide.

  15. A new recurrent inversion, inv(7)(p15q34), leads to transcriptional activation of HOXA10 and HOXA11 in a subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speleman, F; Cauwelier, B; Dastugue, N; Cools, J; Verhasselt, B; Poppe, B; Van Roy, N; Vandesompele, J; Graux, C; Uyttebroeck, A; Boogaerts, M; De Moerloose, B; Benoit, Y; Selleslag, D; Billiet, J; Robert, A; Huguet, F; Vandenberghe, P; De Paepe, A; Marynen, P; Hagemeijer, A

    2005-03-01

    Chromosomal translocations with breakpoints in T-cell receptor (TCR) genes are recurrent in T-cell malignancies. These translocations involve the TCRalphadelta gene (14q11), the TCRbeta gene (7q34) and to a lesser extent the TCRgamma gene at chromosomal band 7p14 and juxtapose T-cell oncogenes next to TCR regulatory sequences leading to deregulated expression of those oncogenes. Here, we describe a new recurrent chromosomal inversion of chromosome 7, inv(7)(p15q34), in a subset of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by CD2 negative and CD4 positive, CD8 negative blasts. This rearrangement juxtaposes the distal part of the HOXA gene cluster on 7p15 to the TCRbeta locus on 7q34. Real time quantitative PCR analysis for all HOXA genes revealed high levels of HOXA10 and HOXA11 expression in all inv(7) positive cases. This is the first report of a recurrent chromosome rearrangement targeting the HOXA gene cluster in T-cell malignancies resulting in deregulated HOXA gene expression (particularly HOXA10 and HOXA11) and is in keeping with a previous report suggesting HOXA deregulation in MLL-rearranged T- and B cell lymphoblastic leukemia as the key factor in leukaemic transformation. Finally, our observation also supports the previous suggested role of HOXA10 and HOXA11 in normal thymocyte development.

  16. [Long-term destiny of adolescents and young adults with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with a pediatric protocol type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Hernández, Manuel Antonio; Alvarado-Ibarra, Martha; Álvarez-Veral, José Luis; Ortiz-Zepeda, Maricela; Guajardo-Leal, Martha Lilia; Cota-Range, Xochitl

    The prognosis, in the long term, of adolescents and young adults with acute de novo lymphoblastic leukemia, treated with a pediatric type protocol. To analyze the efficacy and tolerability of a chemotherapy regimen of pediatric type on patients 15-35 years old with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Ph(-). A retrospective study of patients received from 2001 to 2013, without initial infiltration of the central nervous system. They received the regimen called LALÍN. Terminal goals: frequency of initial remission, probability of survival free of leukemia and event-free survival for five years. We included 101 patients; there were 29 relapses and 19 deaths. There was initial remission in 97% of the cases; survival free of leukemia of 0.58 and event-free survival 0.44. No difference in patients aged 16-21 years vs. 22-35 (p > 0.55). Negative prognostic factors: abnormal karyotypes, except hyperdiploids (p = 0.001); > 5% of blasts, on 14 day induction (p = 0. 0001); delay in the punctuality of the courses of the chemotherapy regimen (p = 0.0001). A pediatric type regimen is applicable to patients aged from 16 to 35 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, without greater toxicity and a best survival free of leukemia. The count of > 5% of blasts and the delay in the execution of the stages of the chemotherapy regimen are the stronger negative prognostic factors.

  17. Management of adult recurrent respiratory papillomatosis with oral acyclovir following micro laryngeal surgery: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Jagdish; Sreenivas, V; Hemanth, V; Nandakumar, R

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the role of oral acyclovir in monthly regimes after microdebrider assisted excision in 3 patients with adult recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (ARRP). Three patients with ARRP who presented to a tertiary referral hospital in stridor were initially treated with a tracheostomy in order to secure airway. On further evaluation by videolaryngoscopy extensive bilateral laryngeal papillomatosis was noted with history of similar conditions in the past for which they were repeatedly operated. They were admitted and underwent Microlaryngeal surgery and laryngeal microdebrider assisted surgery under general anesthesia. Post operatively a course of oral acyclovir at 800 mg/5 times/day for 5 days was administered. On repeat assessment with videolaryngoscopy at monthly intervals a complete remission of the disease was noted with no residual disease at the end of 1 year in 2 cases. One case had a recurrence. Renal parameters were monitored periodically. It may be concluded that the action of anti viral drugs at regular intervals in addition to a short course of oral steroids lead to rapid recovery and prevented latent virus activation within the laryngo tracheal system hence maintaining long term improvement. This can avoid multiple laryngeal surgeries, repeated respiratory emergencies and risk for malignant transformation in the future thereby reducing morbidity and effect on quality of life.

  18. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis with an atypical presentation in an adult man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Cheng William [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hsiao, Edward C. [University of California San Francisco, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, and the Institute for Human Genetics, Department of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Horvai, Andrew E. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Pathology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Link, Thomas M. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We present the case of a 33-year-old man with no significant medical history who developed right scapular pain, left-sided sacroiliac joint pain, and lower back pain, and was eventually diagnosed with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO). Imaging demonstrated multiple scattered T2-hyperintense lesions on MRI at the spine and the left SI joint, some of which progressed and one regressed in size on follow-up. Histopathology demonstrated only non-specific chronic inflammation compatible with CRMO. No evidence of infectious organisms or neoplastic processes was found. The pain was relapsing and remitting in nature. Laboratory investigations were notable for no evidence of hematologic malignancy or infection, but only a mild increase in alkaline phosphatase. This case highlights that CRMO, despite being thought of as a childhood-onset disease, can present in adults as well, and also provides illustrative examples of imaging and histological findings. (orig.)

  19. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis with an atypical presentation in an adult man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Cheng William; Hsiao, Edward C.; Horvai, Andrew E.; Link, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 33-year-old man with no significant medical history who developed right scapular pain, left-sided sacroiliac joint pain, and lower back pain, and was eventually diagnosed with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO). Imaging demonstrated multiple scattered T2-hyperintense lesions on MRI at the spine and the left SI joint, some of which progressed and one regressed in size on follow-up. Histopathology demonstrated only non-specific chronic inflammation compatible with CRMO. No evidence of infectious organisms or neoplastic processes was found. The pain was relapsing and remitting in nature. Laboratory investigations were notable for no evidence of hematologic malignancy or infection, but only a mild increase in alkaline phosphatase. This case highlights that CRMO, despite being thought of as a childhood-onset disease, can present in adults as well, and also provides illustrative examples of imaging and histological findings. (orig.)

  20. Effects of Growth Hormone Therapy on Bone Mass, Metabolic Balance, and Well-Being in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heijkant, Silvia; Hoorweg-Nijman, Gera; Huisman, Jaap; Drent, Madeleine; van der Pal, Heleen; Kaspers, Gert-Jan; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette

    2011-01-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD), mostly after cranial radiotherapy (CRT), may lead to several negative effects. Young adult survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) could benefit from GH therapy in different ways. Twenty ALL survivors (17.1 +/- 4.3 y after diagnosis) with low bone mineral

  1. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better. Most children with ALL can be cured. Children often have a better outcome than adults. ... Both leukemia itself and the treatment can lead to many problems such as bleeding, weight loss, and infections.

  2. Severe malnutrition evaluated by patient-generated subjective global assessment results in poor outcome among adult patients with acute leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Wang, Chang; Liu, Xiaoliang; Liu, Qiuju; Lin, Hai; Liu, Chunshui; Jin, Fengyan; Yang, Yan; Bai, Ou; Tan, Yehui; Gao, Sujun; Li, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate nutritional status in adult patients with acute leukemia (AL) using patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) and to investigate the influence of nutritional status on prognosis. We observationally investigated 68 adult patients with newly diagnosed AL who received PG-SGA at the First Hospital of Jilin University between May 2013 and July 2015. Clinical features, chemotherapy regimens, biochemical indexes, body composition, complete remission (CR) rate, minimal residual disease (MRD), survival time, and side-effects of chemotherapy were compared between patients with and without severe malnutrition. Mean PG-SGA scores of the total patients were 6.1 ± 4.0, and 19 of 68 (27.9%) patients had severe malnutrition (PG-SGA score ≥9). Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) had higher scores than those with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL; P = .011) and high-risk patients had higher scores regardless of whether they had AML or ALL (AML, P = .012; ALL, P = .043). Univariate analysis showed that severe malnutrition was correlated with age (P = .041), transferrin (P = .042), Karnofsky Performance Status score (P = .006), and C-reactive protein (CRP) (P = .018). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that severe malnutrition was associated with CRP (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.020, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.002–1.039, P = .026). No difference was found in CR rate (P = .831) between patients with and without malnutrition, but those who were severely malnourished had higher MRD (P = .048 in AML patients, P = .036 in ALL patients) and more gastrointestinal side-effects (P = .014). Severe malnutrition was also associated with inferior overall survival (HR = 0.243, 95% CI: 0.063–0.945, P = .041) but not with event-free survival (HR = 0.808, 95% CI: 0.338–1.934, P = .663). Severe malnutrition defined by PG-SGA in adult patients with de novo AL may result in poor outcome

  3. High incidence of antibodies to HTLV-I tax in blood relatives of adult T cell leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayama, A; Chen, Y M; Tachibana, N; Shioiri, S; Lee, T H; Tsuda, K; Essex, M

    1991-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is caused by the human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I). Although the mechanisms of the leukemogenic process are unknown, the tax gene may have a role in this process. Because clustering occurs with HTLV-I and ATL, members of ATL families were examined for antibodies to the tax protein and compared with matched HTLV-I-positive blood donors. To investigate the antibody response to this protein, a plasmid, pBHX-4, was constructed to express a recombinant tax protein (r-tax). For ATL patients and their HTLV-I antibody-positive blood relatives, the rate of seroreactivity with the r-tax protein was 67.3% (35/52), compared with 51.6% (97/188) for HTLV-I antibody-positive control blood donors (P less than .05). The difference between direct offspring of ATL patients and matched HTLV-I blood donors was even greater (84.2% [16/91] vs. 44.2% [42/95]; P less than .005). Thus, tax antibody positivity in direct offspring of ATL patients may reflect differences in time or route of HTLV-I infection. Alternatively, it might reflect genetic differences in host susceptibility or virus strain.

  4. NF-κB signaling mechanisms in HTLV-1-induced adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harhaj, Edward William; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2018-05-03

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex deltaretrovirus linked to adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), a fatal CD4+ malignancy in 3-5% of infected individuals. The HTLV-1 Tax regulatory protein plays indispensable roles in regulating viral gene expression and activating cellular signaling pathways that drive the proliferation and clonal expansion of T cells bearing HTLV-1 proviral integrations. Tax is a potent activator of NF-κB, a key signaling pathway that is essential for the survival and proliferation of HTLV-1 infected T cells. However, constitutive NF-κB activation by Tax also triggers a senescence response, suggesting the possibility that only T cells capable of overcoming NF-κB-induced senescence can selectively undergo clonal expansion after HTLV-1 infection. Tax expression is often silenced in the majority of ATLL due to genetic alterations in the tax gene or DNA hypermethylation of the 5'-LTR. Despite the loss of Tax, NF-κB activation remains persistently activated in ATLL due to somatic mutations in genes in the T/B-cell receptor (T/BCR) and NF-κB signaling pathways. In this review, we focus on the key events driving Tax-dependent and independent mechanisms of NF-κB activation during the multi-step process leading to ATLL. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Hematopoietic stem cells can be separated from leukemic cells in a subgroup of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenwen; Foerner, Elena; Buss, Eike; Jauch, Anna; Eckstein, Volker; Wuchter, Patrick; Ho, Anthony D; Lutz, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    In B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) separation of normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has so far been limited to a subgroup of patients. As aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-activity is enriched in various stem cells we investigated its value for HSC isolation in adult B-ALL. Based on ALDH-activity patients could be stratified in ALDH-numerous (≥1.9% ALDH +  cells) and ALDH-rare (cells) cases. In ALDH-rare B-ALL clonal-marker negative HSC could be separated by the CD34 + CD38 - ALDH +  phenotype, whereas this separation was not possible in ALDH-numerous B-ALL. Functional analysis confirmed the HSC-potential of isolated cells, which were uniformly CD19-negative. However, addition of ALDH-activity further improved HSC-purity. In summary, we provide a method to separate functionally normal HSC from leukemic cells in a subgroup of B-ALL patients that can be identified prospectively. This protocol thereby facilitates comparative analyses of matched HSC and leukemic cells in order to improve our understanding of leukemia evolution.

  6. T Cell Receptor Vβ Staining Identifies the Malignant Clone in Adult T cell Leukemia and Reveals Killing of Leukemia Cells by Autologous CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen G Rowan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses can contribute to long-term remission of many malignancies. The etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL, human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1, contains highly immunogenic CTL epitopes, but ATL patients typically have low frequencies of cytokine-producing HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cells in the circulation. It remains unclear whether patients with ATL possess CTLs that can kill the malignant HTLV-1 infected clone. Here we used flow cytometric staining of TCRVβ and cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1 to identify monoclonal populations of HTLV-1-infected T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with ATL. Thus, we quantified the rate of CD8+-mediated killing of the putative malignant clone in ex vivo blood samples. We observed that CD8+ cells from ATL patients were unable to lyse autologous ATL clones when tested directly ex vivo. However, short in vitro culture restored the ability of CD8+ cells to kill ex vivo ATL clones in some donors. The capacity of CD8+ cells to lyse HTLV-1 infected cells which expressed the viral sense strand gene products was significantly enhanced after in vitro culture, and donors with an ATL clone that expressed the HTLV-1 Tax gene were most likely to make a detectable lytic CD8+ response to the ATL cells. We conclude that some patients with ATL possess functional tumour-specific CTLs which could be exploited to contribute to control of the disease.

  7. Trends in risk of recurrence after the first ischemic stroke in adults younger than 55 years of age in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, Kok Wai; Björck, Lena; Ståhl, Christina H; Nielsen, Susanne; Sandström, Tatiana Z; Jern, Christina; Torén, Kjell; Rosengren, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on stroke recurrence in younger adults often contain small sample size which makes it difficult to study trends in stroke recurrence over a long period of time. The aim of the present study was to investigate temporal trends in the risk of recurrence in younger patients with a first ischemic stroke. All men and women aged 18-54 years who had survived at least 28 days after a first ischemic stroke from 1987 to 2006 were identified in the Swedish Inpatient Register. The patients were stratified into four 5-year periods according to their admission period and were followed up for a total of four years after the index event with regard to recurrent ischemic stroke. A Cox regression model was used to analyze the risk of recurrent ischemic stroke. Of the 17,149 ischemic stroke patients who were identified, 2432 (14.2%) had a recurrent ischemic stroke event within four years. From the first to the last periods (1987-1991 versus 2002-2006), the four-year risk of recurrent ischemic stroke decreased by 55% (hazard ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.53) in men and 59% (hazard ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.50) in women. The cumulative four-year risk was 11.8% (95% CI 10.55-13.25) in men and 9.8% (95% CI 8.40-11.46) in women during the last five-year period (2002-2006). The risk of recurrence among younger ischemic stroke patients has decreased over the past 20 years. Despite these improvements, younger patients are still at a high risk for recurrent ischemic stroke. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  8. Risk factors for aggressive recurrent respiratory papillomatosis in adults and juveniles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turid Omland

    Full Text Available In this cohort study we examined whether gender, age at onset, observation time or human papillomavirus (HPV genotype are risk factors for an aggressive clinical course in Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (RRP. Clinical data from patient records comprised gender, age at onset, date of first endolaryngeal procedure with biopsy, date of last follow-up, total number of endolaryngeal procedures, and complications during the observation period. Disease was defined as juvenile (JoRRP or adult onset (AoRRP according to whether the disease was acquired before or after the age of 18. Aggressive disease was defined as distal spread, tracheostomy, four surgical operations annually or >10 surgeries in total. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. HPV genotyping was performed by quantitative PCR assay identifying 15 HPV genotypes. The study included 224 patients. The majority were males (141/174 in AoRRPs and 31/50 in JoRRPs; p = 0.005. The median follow-up from initial diagnosis was 12.0 years (IQR 3.7-32.9 for JoRRPs and 4.0 years (IQR 0.8-11.7 for AoRRPs. The disease was more aggressive in juveniles than adults (p10 years (OR = 13.41, 95% CI [5.46, 32.99[, p10 years were risk factors for an aggressive disease course in AoRRPs.

  9. Irinotecan and temozolomide in recurrent Ewing sarcoma: an analysis in 51 adult and pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerini, E; Jones, R L; Setola, E; Picci, P; Marchesi, E; Luksch, R; Grignani, G; Cesari, M; Longhi, A; Abate, M E; Paioli, A; Szucs, Z; D'ambrosio, L; Scotlandi, K; Fagioli, F; Asaftei, S; Ferrari, S

    2018-03-13

    Data on temozolomide (TEM) and irinotecan (IRI) activity in recurrent Ewing sarcoma (EWS), especially in adult patients, are limited. Patients receiving TEM 100 mg/m 2 /day oral, and IRI 40 mg/m 2 /day intravenous, days 1-5, every 21 days, were included in this multi-institutional retrospective study. Disease control rate (DCR) [overall response rate (ORR) [complete response (CR) + partial response (PR)] + stable disease (SD)], 6-months progression-free survival (6-mos PFS) and 1-year overall survival (OS) were assessed. The median age of the 51 patients was 21 years (range 3-65 years): 34 patients (66%) were adults (≥18 years of age), 24 (48%) had ECOG 1 and 35 (69%) were presented with multiple site recurrence. TEMIRI was used at first relapse/progression in 13 (25%) patients, while the remainder received TEMIRI for second or greater relapse/progression. Fourteen (27%) patients had received prior myeloablative therapy with busulfan and melphalan. We observed five (10%) CR, 12 (24%) PR and 19 (37%) SD, with a DCR of 71%. 6-mos PFS was 49% (95% CI 35-63) and it was significantly influenced by ECOG (6-mos PFS 64% [95% CI 45-83] for ECOG 0, 34% [95% CI 14-54] for ECOG ≥1; p = .006) and LDH (6-mos PFS 62% [95% CI 44-79] for normal LDH, 22% [95% CI 3-42] for high LDH; p = .02), with no difference according to line of treatment, age and metastatic pattern. One-year OS was 55% (95% CI 39-70), with RECIST response (p = .001) and ECOG (p = .0002) independently associated with outcome. Grade 3 and 4 toxicity included neutropenia in 12% of patients, thrombocytopenia in 4%, diarrhea in 4%. This series confirms the activity of TEMIRI in both adults and pediatric patients. This schedule offers a 71% DCR, independently of the line of chemotherapy. Predictive factors of response are ECOG and LDH.

  10. CAR T Cell Immunotherapy Promising in Refractory Leukemia | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is a common childhood malignancy that also affects young adults. Although current treatments have significant toxicities, children with chemotherapy susceptible subtypes have high survival rates. However, less than 10 percent of children and young adults with newly-diagnosed or recurrent B-ALL that is insensitive to therapy survive, and this rate has not budged in the last 20 years.

  11. Heterogeneous breakpoints in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the dic(9;20)(p11-13;q11) show recurrent involvement of genes at 20q11.21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qian; Wright, Sarah L; Moorman, Anthony V; Parker, Helen; Griffiths, Mike; Ross, Fiona M; Davies, Teresa; Harrison, Christine J; Strefford, Jon C

    2009-08-01

    The dic(9;20)(p11-13;q11) is a recurrent chromosomal abnormality in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Although it results in loss of material from 9p and 20q, the molecular targets on both chromosomes have not been fully elucidated. From an initial cohort of 58 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with this translocation, breakpoint mapping with fluorescence in situ hybridization on 26 of them revealed breakpoint heterogeneity of both chromosomes. PAX5 has been proposed to be the target gene on 9p, while for 20q, FISH analysis implicated the involvement of the ASXL1 gene, either by a breakpoint within (n=4) or centromeric (deletion, n=12) of the gene. Molecular copy-number counting, long-distance inverse PCR and direct sequence analysis identified six dic(9;20) breakpoint sequences. In addition to the three previously reported: PAX5-ASXL1, PAX5-C20ORF112 and PAX5-KIF3B; we identified three new ones in this study: sequences 3' of PAX5 disrupting ASXL1, and ZCCHC7 disrupted by sequences 3' of FRG1B and LOC1499503. This study provides insight into the breakpoint complexity underlying dicentric chromosomal formation in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and highlights putative target gene loci.

  12. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced and Recurrent Soft-Tissue Sarcomas in Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Phuoc T.; Hara, Wendy; Su Zheng; Lin, H. Jill; Bendapudi, Pavan K.; Norton, Jeffrey; Teng, Nelson; King, Christopher R.; Kapp, Daniel S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcomes of and identify prognostic factors for patients treated with surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for locally advanced and recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma in adults from a single institution. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 50 consecutive patients treated with IORT to 62 sites of disease. Primary sites included retroperitoneum-pelvis (78%), extremity (8%), and other (14%). Seventy percent of patients had recurrent disease failing prior surgery (70%) and/or radiation (32%). Mean disease-free interval (DFI) before IORT was 1.9 years (range, 2 weeks-5.4 years). The IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays using individually sized beveled cone applicators. Clinical characteristics were as follows: mean tumor size, 10 cm (range, 1-25 cm); high-grade histologic subtype (72%); and mean dose, 1,159 cGy (range, 600-1,600 cGy). Postoperative radiation or chemotherapy was administered to 37% of IORT Sites and 32% of patients, respectively. Outcomes measured were infield control (IFC), locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and treatment-related complications. Mean and median follow-up of alive patients were 59 and 35 months, respectively. Results: Kaplan-Meier 5-year IFC, LRC, DMFS, and DSS probabilities for the entire group were 55%, 26%, 51%, and 25%, respectively. Prognostic factors found to be significant (p < 0.05) on multivariate analysis were prior DFI and tumor size for LRC, extremity location and leiomyosarcoma histologic subtype for DMFS, and prior DFI for DSS. Our cohort had five Grade 3/4 complications associated with treatment or a 5-year Kaplan-Meier Grade 3/4 complication-free survival rate of 85%. Conclusions: IORT after tumor reductive surgery is well tolerated and seems to confer IFC in carefully selected patients

  13. Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) account for about 20% of childhood myeloid leukemias. Other myeloid malignancies include transient abnormal myelopoiesis and myelodysplastic syndrome. Get detailed information about the classification, clinical presentation, diagnostic and molecular evaluation, prognosis, and treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent disease in this summary for clinicians.

  14. Trends in mortality of adult patients diagnosed with myeloid leukemia from 1994 to 2011 in southeastern Brazil

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    Fernando Callera

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate trends in mortality among adults with myeloid leukemia in the Vale do Paraíba, State of São Paulo. Methods: Data from the Brazilian National Health Service database DATASUS provided the number of deaths caused by myeloid leukemia and the number of inhabitants per year in the Regional Health Division XVII from 1994 to 2011. Registries were categorized according to gender into four age ranges (over 20 years, 20-49, 50-69 and over 70 years for an estimation of the annual percent change for age-adjusted mortality rates. The percent changes were calculated using the Joinpoint regression analysis model. Results: Overall, a significant decline per year was demonstrated for the entire sample (over 20 years across the 18-year period studied (annual percent change: −5.59%; 95% CI: −8.5 to −2.5% for males; p-value < 0.05 and −7.02%; 95% CI −11.2 to −2.8% for females; p-value < 0.05 with no significant difference between genders. In an analysis using two Joinpoints, significant drops were observed from 1994 to 2001 (annual percent change: −21.22%; 95% confidence interval: −27.9 to −13.9%; p-value < 0.05 and from 1994 to 2003 (annual percent change: −12.86%; 95% confidence interval −22.2 to −2.5%; p-value < 0.05 for men and women, respectively. The declining trends were greatest for patients aged over 70 years with the age-adjusted mortality rates in younger groups declining non-significantly except for males aged 50-69 years old. Conclusion: Our data suggest a significant decline per year in age-adjusted mortality rates of adult patients diagnosed with myeloid leukemia from 1994 to 2011 in the Vale do Paraíba, State of São Paulo.

  15. Outcome after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients included in four consecutive risk-adapted trials by the PETHEMA Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriol, Albert; Vives, Susana; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Rivas, Concepción; Bethencourt, Concepción; Moscardó, Federico; Bueno, Javier; Grande, Carlos; del Potro, Eloy; Guardia, Ramon; Brunet, Salut; Bergua, Juan; Bernal, Teresa; Moreno, Maria-José; Calvo, Carlota; Bastida, Pilar; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-04-01

    About one half of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are not cured of the disease and ultimately die. The objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing the outcome of adult patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We analyzed the characteristics, the outcome and the prognostic factors for survival after first relapse in a series of 263 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (excluding those with mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) prospectively enrolled in four consecutive risk-adapted PETHEMA trials. The median overall survival after relapse was 4.5 months (95% CI, 4-5 months) with a 5-year overall survival of 10% (95% CI, 8%-12%); 45% of patients receiving intensive second-line treatment achieved a second complete remission and 22% (95% CI, 14%-30%) of them remained disease free at 5 years. Factors predicting a good outcome after rescue therapy were age less than 30 years (2-year overall survival of 21% versus 10% for those over 30 years old; P<0.022) and a first remission lasting more than 2 years (2-year overall survival of 36% versus 17% among those with a shorter first remission; P<0.001). Patients under 30 years old whose first complete remission lasted longer than 2 years had a 5-year overall survival of 38% (95% CI, 23%-53%) and a 5-year disease-free survival of 53% (95% CI, 34%-72%). The prognosis of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse is poor. Those aged less than 30 years with a first complete remission lasting longer than 2 years have reasonable possibilities of becoming long-term survivors while patients over this age or those who relapse early cannot be successfully rescued using the therapies currently available.

  16. Somatic mutations in the transcriptional corepressor gene BCORL1 in adult acute myelogenous leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Meng; Collins, Roxane; Jiao, Yuchen; Ouillette, Peter; Bixby, Dale; Erba, Harry; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Malek, Sami N.

    2011-01-01

    To further our understanding of the genetic basis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), we determined the coding exon sequences of ∼ 18 000 protein-encoding genes in 8 patients with secondary AML. Here we report the discovery of novel somatic mutations in the transcriptional corepressor gene BCORL1 that is located on the X-chromosome. Analysis of BCORL1 in an unselected cohort of 173 AML patients identified a total of 10 mutated cases (6%) with BCORL1 mutations, whereas analysis of 19 AML cell...

  17. ALLOGENEIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR ADULT PATIENTS WITH ACUTE LEUKEMIA – 14 YEARS EXPERIENCE

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    Jože Pretnar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of various prognostic factors on long-term survival and event free survival after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with acute leukemia.Methods and patients. Between years 1989 and 2002 44 patients with acute leukemia (30 with AML and 14 with ALL were transplanted. Survival curves using the Kaplan-Meier method were calculated for patients transplanted with two different sources of stem cells – bone marrow and peripheral blood and separately for patients with female donor.Results. Estimated 10 years survival for AML is 43% and 64% for ALL patients which is not statistically different. There are no significant differences in outcome regarding source of stem cells and in donors’ gender.Conclusions. To conclude, our results show that neither source of stem cells nor donor’s gender has impact on the long-term survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. As published previously patients transplanted beyond the first remission have significantly worse outcome.

  18. Dasatinib Induced Avascular Necrosis of Femoral Head in Adult Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

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    Mohamed A. Yassin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph chromosome resulting from the reciprocal translocation t(9;22(q34;q11. The molecular consequence of this translocation is the generation of the BCR-ABL fusion gene, which encodes a constitutively active protein tyrosine kinase. The oncogenic protein tyrosine kinase, which is located in the cytoplasm, is responsible for the leukemia phenotype through the constitutive activation of multiple signaling pathways involved in the cell cycle and in adhesion and apoptosis. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH is not a specific disease. It occurs as a complication or secondary to various causes. These conditions probably lead to impaired blood supply to the femoral head. The diagnosis of AVNFH is based on clinical findings and is supported by specific radiological manifestations. We reported a case of a 34-year-old Sudanese female with CML who developed AVNFH after receiving dasatinib as a second-line therapy. Though the mechanism by which dasatinib can cause avascular necrosis (AVN is not clear, it can be postulated because of microcirculatory obstruction of the femoral head. To the best of our knowledge and after extensive literature search, this is the first reported case of AVNFH induced by dasatinib in a patient with CML.

  19. Moderating effects of perceived growth on the association between fear of cancer recurrence and health-related quality of life among adolescent and young adult cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dalnim; Park, Crystal L

    2017-01-01

    We examined whether (1) fear of cancer recurrence was related to lower health-related quality of life and (2) perceived growth moderated the link between fear of recurrence and health-related quality of life. About 292 adolescent and young adult cancer survivors (diagnosed with cancer at ages 15-34) completed a cross-sectional survey. Fear of recurrence was related to poorer physical and mental health-related quality of life. The negative association between fear of recurrence and mental health-related quality of life was moderated by perceived growth. Fostering perceived growth may mitigate the adverse associations of fear of recurrence and health-related quality of life.

  20. Markedly improved outcomes and acceptable toxicity in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia following treatment with a pediatric protocol: a phase II study by the Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, F; Sakura, T; Yujiri, T; Kondo, E; Fujimaki, K; Sasaki, O; Miyatake, J; Handa, H; Ueda, Y; Aoyama, Y; Takada, S; Tanaka, Y; Usui, N; Miyawaki, S; Suenobu, S; Horibe, K; Kiyoi, H; Ohnishi, K; Miyazaki, Y; Ohtake, S; Kobayashi, Y; Matsuo, K; Naoe, T

    2014-01-01

    The superiority of the pediatric protocol for adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has already been demonstrated, however, its efficacy in young adults remains unclear. The ALL202-U protocol was conducted to examine the efficacy and feasibility of a pediatric protocol in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with BCR–ABL-negative ALL. Patients aged 15–24 years (n=139) were treated with the same protocol used for pediatric B-ALL. The primary objective of this study was to assess the disease-free survival (DFS) rate and its secondary aims were to assess toxicity, the complete remission (CR) rate and the overall survival (OS) rate. The CR rate was 94%. The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 67% (95% confidence interval (CI) 58–75%) and 73% (95% CI 64–80%), respectively. Severe adverse events were observed at a frequency that was similar to or lower than that in children treated with the same protocol. Only insufficient maintenance therapy significantly worsened the DFS (hazard ratio 5.60, P<0.001). These results indicate that this protocol may be a feasible and highly effective treatment for AYA with BCR–ABL-negative ALL

  1. Antiangiogenic Therapy in the Treatment of Recurrent Medulloblastoma in the Adult: Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Giuseppe Privitera

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a rare tumor in central nervous system, with an even rarer occurrence in adulthood. The management of a recurrent disease is a medical challenge; chemotherapy has been used as the treatment of choice, while reirradiation has been employed in selected cases. We report the case of a 51-year-old man with recurrent medulloblastoma. He was treated with local reirradiation, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic drug, with the latter giving the longer progression-free interval. The aim of this report is to show that recurrent medulloblastoma in adults can be approached with a multimodality treatment and that antiangiogenic therapy should have a role in the management of this disease.

  2. Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults with Moyamoya Disease: Prognostic Factors for Stroke Recurrence and Functional Outcome after Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng; Deng, Xiaofeng; Gao, Faliang; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Rong; Zhao, Jizong

    2017-07-01

    Stroke in young adults is uncommon and rarely described. Moyamoya disease is one of the leading causes of stroke in young adults. We aimed to study the prognostic factors for stroke recurrences and functional outcomes in young stroke patients with moyamoya disease after revascularization. We reviewed 696 consecutive patients with moyamoya disease admitted to our hospital from 2009-2015 and identified patients aged 18-45 years with first-ever stroke. Follow-up was conducted via face-to-face or structured telephone interviews. Outcome measures were recurrent stroke events and unfavorable functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale >2). We included 121 young patients with moyamoya disease suffering from stroke (initial presentation age, 35.4 ± 7.5 years). All patients underwent revascularization after the acute phase of initial stroke events as the secondary prevention for recurrences. During follow-up (median, 40 months), 9 patients (7.4%) experienced recurrent strokes and 8 of them (6.6%) suffered unfavorable functional outcomes. In the multivariate analysis, diabetes was an independent predictor for stroke recurrences (hazard ratio 6.76; 95% confidence interval 1.30-35.11; P = 0.02) and was significantly associated with unfavorable functional outcomes (odds ratio 7.87; 95% confidence interval 1.42-38.74; P = 0.01). We identified diabetes as an independent risk factor for recurrent strokes and unfavorable functional outcomes after revascularization in young stroke patients with moyamoya disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adult T-cell leukemia: molecular basis for clonal expansion and transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toshiki

    2017-03-02

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) that develops through a multistep carcinogenesis process involving 5 or more genetic events. We provide a comprehensive overview of recently uncovered information on the molecular basis of leukemogenesis in ATL. Broadly, the landscape of genetic abnormalities in ATL that include alterations highly enriched in genes for T-cell receptor-NF-κB signaling such as PLCG1 , PRKCB , and CARD11 and gain-of function mutations in CCR4 and CCR7 Conversely, the epigenetic landscape of ATL can be summarized as polycomb repressive complex 2 hyperactivation with genome-wide H3K27 me3 accumulation as the basis of the unique transcriptome of ATL cells. Expression of H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste 2 was shown to be induced by HTLV-1 Tax and NF-κB. Furthermore, provirus integration site analysis with high-throughput sequencing enabled the analysis of clonal composition and cell number of each clone in vivo, whereas multicolor flow cytometric analysis with CD7 and cell adhesion molecule 1 enabled the identification of HTLV-1-infected CD4 + T cells in vivo. Sorted immortalized but untransformed cells displayed epigenetic changes closely overlapping those observed in terminally transformed ATL cells, suggesting that epigenetic abnormalities are likely earlier events in leukemogenesis. These new findings broaden the scope of conceptualization of the molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis, dissecting them into immortalization and clonal progression. These recent findings also open a new direction of drug development for ATL prevention and treatment because epigenetic marks can be reprogrammed. Mechanisms underlying initial immortalization and progressive accumulation of these abnormalities remain to be elucidated. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. ATF3, an HTLV-1 bZip factor binding protein, promotes proliferation of adult T-cell leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohshima Koichi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL is an aggressive malignancy of CD4+ T-cells caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ gene, which is encoded by the minus strand of the viral genome, is expressed as an antisense transcript in all ATL cases. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 as an HBZ-interacting protein. ATF3 has been reported to be expressed in ATL cells, but its biological significance is not known. Results Immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that ATF3 interacts with HBZ. Expression of ATF3 was upregulated in ATL cell lines and fresh ATL cases. Reporter assay revealed that ATF3 could interfere with the HTLV-1 Tax's transactivation of the 5' proviral long terminal repeat (LTR, doing so by affecting the ATF/CRE site, as well as HBZ. Suppressing ATF3 expression inhibited proliferation and strongly reduced the viability of ATL cells. As mechanisms of growth-promoting activity of ATF3, comparative expression profiling of ATF3 knockdown cells identified candidate genes that are critical for the cell cycle and cell death, including cell division cycle 2 (CDC2 and cyclin E2. ATF3 also enhanced p53 transcriptional activity, but this activity was suppressed by HBZ. Conclusions Thus, ATF3 expression has positive and negative effects on the proliferation and survival of ATL cells. HBZ impedes its negative effects, leaving ATF3 to promote proliferation of ATL cells via mechanisms including upregulation of CDC2 and cyclin E2. Both HBZ and ATF3 suppress Tax expression, which enables infected cells to escape the host immune system.

  5. The Prognostic Impact of K-RAS Mutations in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Treated with High Dose Cytarabine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, E.I.; Gawish, H.H.; Al-Azizi, N.M.A.; El-Hefni, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Activating point mutation of the RAS gene has been generally accepted as an oncogenic event in a variety of malignancies. It represents one of the most common genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However there is still controversy about its clinical relevance on the treatment outcome of this leukemia. Objective: This study aimed to clarify the biologic and prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in relation to the dose of cytarabine (ara-C) used in post induction consolidation chemotherapy in adult AML patients. Patients and Methods: The study comprised 71de novo AML patients with a male: Female ratio of 1.4: 1; their ages ranged from 21-59 years with a median of 37 years. They were subjected to full clinical evaluation, routine laboratory investigations, cytogenetic studies by G banding and K-RAS mutation detection using realtime PCR. The patients were randomized into 2 groups (gps) according to the ara-C dose used in consolidation treatment, HDAC gp receiving 400 mg ara-C and LDAC gp receiving 100 mg ara-C. They were followed over a period of 5 years. Results: Mutations in the K-RAS gene (mutRAS) were detected in 23 patients (32%) with the remaining 48 patients (68%) having wild type RAS (wtRAS). Blast cell percentage was significantly lower in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (p=<0.001). The M4 subtype of AML and cases with Inv 16 showed significantly higher frequencies in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients, (p=0.015, 0.003, respectively). The patients were followed up for a median of 43 months (range 11-57 months). There was no significant difference in overall survival (OS) between mutRAS and wtRAS patients (p=0.326). Within the mutRAS patients treated with HDAC, cumulative OS was significantly higher than those treated with LDAC (p=0.001). This was not the case in the wtRAS group (p=0.285). There was no significant difference in disease The Prognostic Impact of K-RAS Mutations in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Treated with High Dose

  6. Interleukin-7 receptor-α gene mutations are not detected in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozovski, Uri; Li, Ping; Harris, David; Ohanian, Maro; Kantarjian, Hagop; Estrov, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations in cancer cell genes are classified according to their functional significance. Those that provide the malignant cells with significant advantage are collectively referred to as driver mutations and those that do not, are the passenger mutations. Accordingly, analytical criteria to distinguish driver mutations from passenger mutations have been recently suggested. Recent studies revealed mutations in interleukin-7 receptor-α (IL7R) gene in 10% of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients and in only a few cases of pediatric B-ALL. IL7R mutations are also frequently found in patients with lung cancer, but whereas in pediatric T-ALL IL7R mutations are “drivers” (consisting of gain-of-function mutations within a narrow 50-base pair interval at exon 6 that confer cytokine-independent cell growth and promote tumor transformation), in lung cancer, mutations are substitution mutations randomly distributed across the gene and are probably only “passenger” events. Because the treatment response of adult T-ALL is significantly poorer than that of childhood T-ALL and because exon 6 IL7R mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of childhood T-ALL, we sought to determine how the pattern of IL7R mutations varies between adult and childhood T-ALL. To that end, we sequenced the 50-base pair interval in exon 6 of the IL7R of DNA obtained from bone marrow samples of 35 randomly selected adult patients with T-ALL. Our analysis revealed that none of these 35 samples carried an IL7R mutation in exon 6. Whether differences in the genetic makeup of adult and childhood T-ALL explain the differential response to therapy remains to be determined

  7. Influence of detection of pretreatment cytogenetic abnormalities on first complete remission and survival in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Georgieva Velizarova

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adults focuses on the initial assessment of the prognostic relevant cytogenetic features as well as a response-guided therapy based on molecular data. We examined the importance of molecular-cytogenetic abnormalities for complete remission (CR rates and the overall survival (OS in adult ALLs.Materials and Methods: Conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed on bone marrow cells from 33 newly-diagnosed ALL adults. Two karyotype categories [standard- risk group- normal karyotype, hyperdiplody and other structural aberrations, and high-risk group-t(11q23/MLL, t(9;22/bcr-abl, t(1;19, t(8;14, C-MYC and complex karyotype] and the biologically and clinically relevant ALL ploidy subgroups were prospectively defined.Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were found in 52% of the cases with a high rate of poor-risk translocations - t(9;22, t(8q24, t(11q23, t(1;19. The total CR rate was 67% and the median time for achievement 2.33 months. Male sex, an age below 35 years and the absence of high risk translocations might have contributed to the high CR rates. Female patients, hyperdiplody, low white blood cells (WBC, and random cytogenetic aberrations had the longest OS. OS, 3- and 5-years survival periods were significantly shorter for poor-risk than standard risk group (p=.015, p=.001 and p=.005, respectively.Conclusion: This study emphasizes the lack of influence of cytogenetic aberrations on the CR and the time to achieve CR. However, our observations show that these aberrations are an independent prognostic factor in adult ALL - they allow predicting therapy resistance and the OS time after intensetreatment.

  8. A pilot study of daunorubicin-augmented hyper-CVAD induction chemotherapy for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Park, Ji Hyun; Yoon, So Young; Cho, Yo-Han; Lee, Mark Hong

    2018-02-01

    Induction of complete remission (CR) is imperative for long-term survival in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients regardless of transplantation eligibility. Hyper-CVAD chemotherapy is a widely-used frontline remission induction regimen for these patients. We conducted a pilot trial of frontline remission induction using daunorubicin-augmented hyper-CVAD regimen (hyper-CVDD) in adult ALL patients (n = 15). The CR rate after this modified regimen was 100% (n = 15). Twelve patients were able to proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, two patients died before transplantation due to infection, and the remaining one who was ineligible for transplant due to her age received an additional five courses of consolidation chemotherapy. Overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) of the study patients was 61.0 and 47.5% at 3 years. OS and relapse-free survival of transplanted patients was 66.8 and 55.0% at 3 years. This pilot trial demonstrates the favorable efficacy of the hyper-CVDD chemotherapy as a frontline remission induction regimen. Further clinical trials using this regimen are warranted.

  9. [Recurrent vascular access trombosis associated with the prothrombin mutation G20210A in a adult patient in haemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, L F; Coll, E; Monteagudo, I; Collado, S; López-Pedret, J; Cases, A

    2005-01-01

    Vascular access-related complications are a frequent cause of morbidity in haemodialysis patients and generate high costs. We present the case of an adult patient with end-stage renal disease and recurrent vascular access thrombosis associated with the prothrombin mutation G20210A and renal graft intolerance. The clinical expression of this heterozygous gene mutation may have been favoured by inflammatory state, frequent in dialysis patients. In this patient, the inflammatory response associated with the renal graft intolerance would have favored the development of recurrent vascular access thrombosis in a adult heterozygous for prothrombin mutation G20210A. In the case of early dysfunction of haemodialysis vascular access and after ruling out technical problems, it is convenient to carry out a screening for thrombophilia.

  10. Efficacy of Group CBT Vs Group Information and Support in Relapse and Recurrence of Depression in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tony Cassidy

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse the rates and length of time to relapse and/or recurrence of depression in individuals who attended either Group CBT or Group Information and Support in an adult secondary mental health setting in Ireland. The present study centred on the analysis of previously collected data from groups running between 2005 and 2010 and on the retrospective file review. It formed part of a larger scale research study conducted by the Principal Clinical Psychologist evaluating the ...

  11. The prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in adult acute myeloid leukemia patients treated with high-dose cytarabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad EI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebtesam I Ahmad, Heba H Gawish, Nashwa MA Al Azizi, Ashraf M ElhefniClinical Pathology Department, Hematology and Oncology Unit of Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Sharkia, EgyptBackground: Activating point mutation of the RAS gene has been generally accepted as an oncogenic event in a variety of malignancies. It represents one of the most common genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, little is known about its clinical relevance in the treatment outcome for this leukemia.Objective: This study aimed to clarify the biologic and prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in relation to the dose of cytarabine (ara-C used in postinduction consolidation chemotherapy in adult AML patients.Patients and methods: The study comprised of 71 de novo AML patients with male/female ratio 1.4:1; their ages ranged from 21–59 years with a median of 37 years. They were subjected to full clinical evaluation, routine laboratory investigations, cytogenetic studies by G-banding (Giemsa staining, and K-RAS mutation detection using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The patients were randomized into two groups according to the ara-C dose used in consolidation treatment, the high the dose ara-C (HDAC group receiving 400 mg ara-C and-low-dose ara-C (LDAC group receiving 100 mg ara-C; they were followed over a period of five years.Results: Mutations in the K-RAS gene (mutRAS were detected in 23 patients (32% with the remaining 48 patients (68% having wild-type RAS (wtRAS. The percent of blast cells was significantly lower in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P ≤ 0.001 while M4 subtype of AML and Inv(16 frequencies were significantly higher in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P = 0.015 and (P = 0.003, respectively. The patients were followed up for a median of 43 months (range 11–57 months. There was no significant difference in overall survival (OS between mutRAS and wtRAS (P = 0.326. Within the mut

  12. Comparison of Cultivars and Seasonal Variation in Blueberry (Vaccinium Species) Leaf Extract on Adult T-Cell Leukemia Cell Line Growth Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Kai, Hisahiro; Fuse, Takuichi; Kunitake, Hisato; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Matsuno, Koji

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of blueberry leaves on the proliferation of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cell lines have previously been reported. A comparison of blueberry leaf extracts from different cultivars and seasonal variation were investigated regarding their effects on ATL cell line proliferation. The inhibitory effects of 80% ethanol leaf extracts from different blueberry cultivars collected from April to December in 2006 or 2008 were evaluated using two ATL cell lines. The bioactivities of ...

  13. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-07

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  14. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a comprehensive review and 2017 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwilliger, T; Abdul-Hay, M

    2017-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the second most common acute leukemia in adults, with an incidence of over 6500 cases per year in the United States alone. The hallmark of ALL is chromosomal abnormalities and genetic alterations involved in differentiation and proliferation of lymphoid precursor cells. In adults, 75% of cases develop from precursors of the B-cell lineage, with the remainder of cases consisting of malignant T-cell precursors. Traditionally, risk stratification has been based on clinical factors such age, white blood cell count and response to chemotherapy; however, the identification of recurrent genetic alterations has helped refine individual prognosis and guide management. Despite advances in management, the backbone of therapy remains multi-agent chemotherapy with vincristine, corticosteroids and an anthracycline with allogeneic stem cell transplantation for eligible candidates. Elderly patients are often unable to tolerate such regimens and carry a particularly poor prognosis. Here, we review the major recent advances in the treatment of ALL. PMID:28665419

  15. Development and internal validation of a prognostic model to predict recurrence free survival in patients with adult granulosa cell tumors of the ovary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, Hannah S.; Schuit, Ewoud; Horlings, Hugo M.; van der Velden, Jacobus; van Driel, Willemien J.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Kenter, Gemma G.; Buist, Marrije R.

    2014-01-01

    Models to predict the probability of recurrence free survival exist for various types of malignancies, but a model for recurrence free survival in individuals with an adult granulosa cell tumor (GCT) of the ovary is lacking. We aimed to develop and internally validate such a prognostic model. We

  16. Effector Regulatory T Cells Reflect the Equilibrium between Antitumor Immunity and Autoimmunity in Adult T-cell Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureshino, Hiroshi; Shindo, Takero; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Watanabe, Eri; Satoh, Natsuko; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Kitamura, Hiroaki; Doi, Kazuko; Nagase, Kotaro; Kimura, Hiromi; Samukawa, Makoto; Kusunoki, Susumu; Miyahara, Masaharu; Shin-I, Tadasu; Suzuki, Ryuji; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Kimura, Shinya

    2016-08-01

    The regulatory T cells (Treg) with the most potent immunosuppressive activity are the effector Tregs (eTreg) with a CD45RA(-)Foxp3(++)CCR4(+) phenotype. Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells often share the Treg phenotype and also express CCR4. Although mogamulizumab, a monoclonal antibody to CCR4, shows marked antitumor effects against ATL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, concerns have been raised that it may induce severe autoimmune immunopathology by depleting eTregs. Here, we present case reports for two patients with ATL who responded to mogamulizumab but developed a severe skin rash and autoimmune brainstem encephalitis. Deep sequencing of the T-cell receptor revealed that ATL cells and naturally occurring Tregs within the cell population with a Treg phenotype can be clearly distinguished according to CADM1 expression. The onset of skin rash and brainstem encephalitis was coincident with eTreg depletion from the peripheral blood, whereas ATL relapses were coincident with eTreg recovery. These results imply that eTreg numbers in the peripheral blood sensitively reflect the equilibrium between antitumor immunity and autoimmunity, and that mogamulizumab might suppress ATL until the eTreg population recovers. Close monitoring of eTreg numbers is crucial if we are to provide immunomodulatory treatments that target malignancy without severe adverse events. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 644-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Advancements in the management of medically less-fit and older adults with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Laura C; Klepin, Heidi D; Walter, Roland B

    2018-06-01

    Treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in older adults remains daunting. The unique biology often renders conventional chemotherapies less effective. Accurately predicting the toxicities of treatment is another unresolved challenge. Treatment planning thus requires a good knowledge of the current trial data and familiarity with clinical tools, including formal fitness and geriatric assessments. Both obstacles - disease biology and patient fitness - might be easier overcome with specific, AML cell-targeted agents rather than traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy. This may be the future of AML therapy, but it is not our current state. Areas covered: Herein, the authors appraise the data supporting a standard induction approach, including an outline of how to predict treatment-related mortality and a review of the most up-to-date methods of geriatric assessment. They also discuss treatment expectations with less-intense therapies and highlight novel agents in development. Finally, they provide a basic approach to choosing treatment intensity. Expert opinion: In an older and/or medically less-fit patient, treatment choice should begin with a thorough disease assessment, a formal evaluation of patient fitness and frailty. There should also be a clear communication with the patient and patient's family about the risks and anticipated benefits of either an intense or nonintense treatment approach.

  18. Histone H4 acetylation by immunohistochemistry and prognosis in newly diagnosed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advani, Anjali S; Sungren, Shawnda; Hsi, Eric D; Gibson, Sarah E; Douglas, Elizabeth; Jin, Tao; Zhao, Xiaoxian; Kalaycio, Matt; Copelan, Ed; Sobecks, Ronald; Sekeres, Mikkael

    2010-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are a novel anti-tumor therapy. To determine whether HDAC inhibitors may be useful in the treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), we examined the acetylation of histone H4 by immunohistochemistry in newly diagnosed ALL patients and evaluated the impact of acetylation on complete remission (CR) rate, relapse-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Patients ≥18 years of age and an available diagnostic bone marrow biopsy were evaluated. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to identify univariate and multivariate correlates of CR, RFS, and OS. The variables histone H4 acetylation (positive or negative), white blood count, cytogenetic (CG) risk group (CALGB criteria), and age were used in multivariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, histone acetylation was associated with a trend towards an improved OS (for all CG risk groups) (HR = 0.51, p = 0.09). In patients without poor risk CG, there was an impressive association between the presence of histone acetylation and an improved CR rate (OR 3.43, p = 0.035), RFS (HR 0.07, p = 0.005), and OS (HR 0.24, p = 0.007). This association remained statistically significant in multivariate analysis. These data provide a rationale for the design of novel regimens incorporating HDAC inhibitors in ALL

  19. Some clinical and laboratory variables in adult patients with chronic myeloid leukemia treated with recombinant alpha interferon + cytosine arabinoside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa Martinez, Edgardo; Diaz Duran, Carmen Virginia; Avila Cabrera, Onel

    2011-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is the most frequent myeloproliferative syndrome in adults. In a longitudinal retrospective study performed between January 1985 - December 2009, 46 patients in chronic phase diagnosed at the Institute of Hematology and Immunology were evaluated. They received cytoreductor agent as first treatment followed by interferon α2 + cytosar. Forty one percent showed high risk Sokal prognosis score. The most frequent clinical manifestations at diagnosis were asthenia (37 %), splenomegaly (31 %) and weigh lost (28.3 %). The partial and complete hematological response was of 26,8 % and 65.9 % after 6 months and the complete cytogenetic and molecular response was of 9.1 % and 16.3 %. The most frequent adverse reactions were: fever (34.9 %), thrombocytopenia (26.3 %) and general syndrome (23.8 %). Resistance or intolerance to INFα2 was found in 47.8 % of the patients and 90.0 % died due to progression of the disease. The 5 year overall survival was of 63.8 % and the 3 years free event survival was of 68.9 %. According to Sokal prognosis score the overall survival showed significant difference between groups (p= 0.005) but there was no significant difference for free event survival (p= 0.165). The INFα2 treatment in our patients showed better results than those obtained in different developed countries and is an effective therapeutic option in Cuba

  20. Effect of Intensive Chemotherapy on Physical, Cognitive, and Emotional Health of Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepin, Heidi D; Tooze, Janet A; Pardee, Timothy S; Ellis, Leslie R; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Mihalko, Shannon L; Danhauer, Suzanne C; Rao, Arati V; Wildes, Tanya M; Williamson, Jeff D; Powell, Bayard L; Kritchevsky, Stephen B

    2016-10-01

    To measure short-term changes in physical and cognitive function and emotional well-being of older adults receiving intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Prospective observational study. Single academic institution. Individuals aged 60 and older with newly diagnosed AML who received induction chemotherapy (N = 49, mean age 70 ± 6.2, 56% male). Geriatric assessment (GA) was performed during inpatient examination for AML and within 8 weeks after hospital discharge after induction chemotherapy. Measures were the Pepper Assessment Tool for Disability (activity of daily living, instrumental activity of daily living (IADL), mobility questions), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), grip strength, Modified Mini-Mental State examination, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and the Distress Thermometer. Changes in GA measures were assessed using paired t-tests. Analysis of variance models were used to evaluate relationships between GA variables and change in function over time. After chemotherapy, IADL dependence worsened (mean 1.4 baseline vs 2.1 follow-up, P physical function. These data support the importance of interventions to maintain physical function during and after chemotherapy. Depressive symptoms before and during chemotherapy may be linked to potentially modifiable physical function declines. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Quantitative PCR for HTLV-1 provirus in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma using paraffin tumor sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Junki; Masaki, Ayako; Fujii, Keiichiro; Takino, Hisashi; Murase, Takayuki; Yonekura, Kentaro; Utsunomiya, Atae; Ishida, Takashi; Iida, Shinsuke; Inagaki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Detection of HTLV-1 provirus using paraffin tumor sections may assist the diagnosis of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). For the detection, non-quantitative PCR assay has been reported, but its usefulness and limitations remain unclear. To our knowledge, quantitative PCR assay using paraffin tumor sections has not been reported. Using paraffin sections from ATLLs and non-ATLL T-cell lymphomas, we first performed non-quantitative PCR for HTLV-1 provirus. Next, we determined tumor ratios and carried out quantitative PCR to obtain provirus copy numbers. The results were analyzed with a simple regression model and a novel criterion, cut-off using 95 % rejection limits. Our quantitative PCR assay showed an excellent association between tumor ratios and the copy numbers (r = 0.89, P paraffin tumor sections may be useful for the screening of ATLL cases, especially in HTLV-1 non-endemic areas where easy access to serological testing for HTLV-1 infection is limited. © 2016 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. IRF-4 and c-Rel expression in antiviral-resistant adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Juan Carlos; Ruiz, Phillip; Ratner, Lee; Reis, Isildinha M.; Brites, Carlos; Pedroso, Celia; Byrne, Gerald E.; Toomey, Ngoc L.; Andela, Valentine; Harhaj, Edward W.; Lossos, Izidore S.

    2007-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a generally fatal malignancy. Most ATLL patients fare poorly with conventional chemotherapy; however, antiviral therapy with zidovudine (AZT) and interferon alpha (IFN-α) has produced long-term clinical remissions. We studied primary ATLL tumors and identified molecular features linked to sensitivity and resistance to antiviral therapy. Enhanced expression of the proto-oncogene c-Rel was noted in 9 of 27 tumors. Resistant tumors exhibited c-Rel (6 of 10; 60%) more often than did sensitive variants (1 of 9; 11%). This finding was independent of the disease form. Elevated expression of the putative c-Rel target, interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF-4), was observed in 10 (91%) of 11 nonresponders and in all tested patients with c-Rel+ tumors and occurred in the absence of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax. In contrast, tumors in complete responders did not express c-Rel or IRF-4. Gene rearrangement studies demonstrated the persistence of circulating T-cell clones in long-term survivors maintained on antiviral therapy. The expression of nuclear c-Rel and IRF-4 occurs in the absence of Tax in primary ATLL and is associated with antiviral resistance. These molecular features may help guide treatment. AZT and IFN-α is a suppressive rather than a curative regimen, and patients in clinical remission should remain on maintenance therapy indefinitely. PMID:17138822

  3. A case study of the neuropsychological outcomes following microsurgery, conventional radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy for an adult's recurrent craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, David; Allan, Alfred; Becerra, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    To examine the neuropsychological outcomes for an adult patient, 2 years after receiving microsurgery and conventional radiotherapy for a recurrent craniopharyngioma; and the impact of a further intervention, stereotactic radiotherapy, on this level of neuropsychological functioning. JD, a 30 year old male whose recurrent craniopharyngioma had 2 years earlier been treated with two operations and conventional radiotherapy. JD was assessed (using standardized clinical tests) before and after a course of stereotactic radiotherapy. Prior to stereotactic radiotherapy (and 2 years after microsurgery and conventional radiotherapy) JD's IQ was intact, but considerable impairments were present in executive functioning, memory, theory of mind and processing speed. Fifteen months after stereotactic radiotherapy, all neuropsychological domains remained largely static or improved, supporting the utility of this treatment option in the neuropsychological domain. However, deficits in executive functioning, memory and processing speed remained. These findings suggest that, even after multiple treatments, substantial cognitive impairments can be present in an adult patient with a recurrent craniopharyngioma. This profile of deficits underlines the inadequacy of relying purely on IQ as a marker for cognitive health in this population and emphasizes the need to include neuropsychological impairments as a focus of rehabilitation with these patients.

  4. The molecular landscape of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia reveals recurrent structural alterations and age-specific mutational interactions | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present the molecular landscape of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and characterize nearly 1,000 participants in Children’s Oncology Group (COG) AML trials. The COG–National Cancer Institute (NCI) TARGET AML initiative assessed cases by whole-genome, targeted DNA, mRNA and microRNA sequencing and CpG methylation profiling. Validated DNA variants corresponded to diverse, infrequent mutations, with fewer than 40 genes mutated in >2% of cases.

  5. Effectiveness of modified hyper-CVAD chemotherapy regimen in the treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a retrospective experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaeikhoo, Hasan; Rajaeinejad, Mohsen; Keyhani, Manoutchehr; Zokaasadi, Mohammad; Dehghani Firoozabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2018-03-01

    Several chemotherapy regimens have been developed for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but relapse still presents the most common obstacles to attaining long-term survival. The hyper-CVAD (hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and prednisolone)/HD MTX and Ara-C (high-dose methotrexate and cytarabine) chemotherapy regimen was first started in the MD Anderson Cancer Center as an intensive regimen for adult patients with ALL. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified hyper-CVAD protocol. We used hyper-CVAD as consolidation/maintenance after remission induction with daunorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (and cyclophosphamide for T-cell ALL only) rather than standard hyper-CVAD in order to reduce treatment complications. This study was conducted as a retrospective review of medical records of ALL patients at 501 army hospital, Tehran, Iran, from 2005 to 2015. Three hundred and one patients underwent modified hyper-CVAD chemotherapy regimen. Complete remission and overall survival (OS) rates were measured as primary endpoints. Two hundred and forty-six (81.7%) reached complete remission (CR) during the first 6 months of treatment, and 55 patients (18.3%) did not reach CR. The 5-year OS rate was 51.8% (95% CI (confidence interval): 45.1-57.8%). Modified hyper-CVAD regimen is an efficient intensive chemotherapy regimen for consolidation/maintenance of adults with newly diagnosed ALL and has an acceptable 5-year overall that is comparable to standard hyper-CVAD regimen. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Prevalence and characteristics of metabolic syndrome in adults from the French childhood leukemia survivors’ cohort: a comparison with controls from the French population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudin, Claire; Berbis, Julie; Bertrand, Yves; Vercasson, Camille; Thomas, Frédérique; Chastagner, Pascal; Ducassou, Stéphane; Kanold, Justyna; Tabone, Marie-Dominique; Paillard, Catherine; Poirée, Marilyne; Plantaz, Dominique; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Gandemer, Virginie; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Sirvent, Nicolas; Saultier, Paul; Béliard, Sophie; Leverger, Guy; Baruchel, André; Auquier, Pascal; Pannier, Bruno; Michel, Gérard

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among adults from the French LEA childhood acute leukemia survivors’ cohort was prospectively evaluated considering the type of anti-leukemic treatment received, and compared with that of controls. The metabolic profile of these patients was compared with that of controls. A total of 3203 patients from a French volunteer cohort were age- and sex-matched 3:1 to 1025 leukemia survivors (in both cohorts, mean age: 24.4 years; females: 51%). Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Metabolic syndrome was found in 10.3% of patients (mean follow-up duration: 16.3±0.2 years) and 4.5% of controls, (OR=2.49; Pmetabolic syndrome displayed a unique profile compared with controls: smaller waist circumference (91 vs. 99.6 cm; P=0.01), and increased triglyceride levels (3.99 vs. 1.5 mmol/L; Pmetabolic syndrome had a larger waist circumference (109 vs. 99.6 cm; P=0.007) than controls. Regardless of the anti-leukemic treatment, metabolic syndrome risk was higher among childhood leukemia survivors. Its presentation differed depending on the treatment type, thus suggesting a divergent pathophysiology. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01756599. PMID:29351982

  7. Frequency of p190 and p210 BCR-ABL rearrangements and survival in Brazilian adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana de França Azevedo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigated the occurrence of the p190 and p210 break point clusterregion-Abelson (BCR-ABL rearrangements in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and possible associations with clinical and laboratory characteristics and survival. Methods: Forty-one over 18-year-old patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia of both genders followed-up between January 2008 and May 2012 were included in this study. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical charts of the patients. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using specific primers was employed to identify molecular rearrangements. Results: At diagnosis, the median age was 33 years, and there was a predominance of males (61%. The most common immunophenotype was B lineage (76%. BCR-ABL rearrangements was detected in 14 (34% patients with the following distribution: p190 (28%, p210 (50% and double positive (22%. Overall survival of patients with a mean/median of 331/246 days of follow up was 39%, respectively, negative BCR-ABL (44% and positive BCR-ABL (28%. Conclusion: These results confirm the high frequency of BCR-ABL rearrangements and the low survival rate of adult Brazilian patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  8. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Stages Treatment Options About Clinical Trials Latest Research ...

  9. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  10. Cellular immune therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kater, Arnon P.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Kipps, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Although chemotherapy can induce complete responses in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), it is not considered curative. Treated patients generally develop recurrent disease requiring additional therapy, which can cause worsening immune dysfunction, myelosuppression, and selection for

  11. Toxicity profile and treatment delays in NOPHO ALL2008-comparing adults and children with Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Nina; Birgens, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cure rates improve when adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated according to pediatric protocols. Assumed risks of toxicities and associated delays in treatment have played a role in setting upper age limits. The aim of this study was to examine...... the toxicity profile and treatment delays in NOPHO ALL2008 comparing children and adults. METHODS: We collected information on 19 treatment-related toxicities, systematically captured at 3-month intervals throughout therapy, and time intervals between 12 consecutive treatment phases for 1076 patients aged 1......-45 yrs treated according to the Nordic/Baltic ALL2008 protocol. RESULTS: No adults died during induction. The duration of induction therapy and postinduction treatment phases did not differ between children and adults, except for patients 18-45 yrs being significantly delayed during two of nine high...

  12. T-cell-depleted haploidentical stem cell transplantation results improve with time in adults with acute leukemia: A study from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestili, Simona; Labopin, Myriam; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Velardi, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Maertens, Johan; Kanz, Lothar; Aversa, Franco; Lewalle, Philippe; Bunjes, Donald; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2018-05-15

    T-cell-depleted, haploidentical transplantations (haplos) are commonly offered to patients who have high-risk, acute leukemia in the absence of a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) full-matched donor. To determine the effect of transplantation period, the authors divided 308 adults with de novo, acute leukemia who underwent T-cell-depleted haplo from 2005 to 2015 into 2 groups, according the year in which they underwent transplantation (2005-2011 [n = 191] and 2012-2015 [n = 117]). The median age was 41 years in patients who underwent transplantation before 2012 and 46 years in those who underwent transplantation after 2012 (P = .04). Most patients had acute myeloid leukemia (75% vs 69%; P = .26) and were in first complete remission (CR1) (55% vs 64%; P = .12) at the time of transplantation. The cumulative incidence of grade 2, 3, and 4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and chronic GvHD were not different between the 2 groups (acute GvHD: 20% vs 22% cumulative incidence in patients who underwent haplo before and after 2012, respectively [P = .67]; chronic GvHD: 19% vs 11% cumulative incidence, respectively; P = .12]. The 2-year relapse incidence was 20%, the nonrelapse mortality (NRM) rate was 48%, and no difference was observed over time (21% vs 19% [P = .72] and 54% vs 38% [P = .11] for patients who underwent haplo before and after 2012, respectively). The main cause of NRM was infection. Haplo after 2012 (hazard ratio [HR], 0.57; P = .01), younger age (HR, 0.82; P = .02), and receipt of a reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen (HR, 0.53; P = .01) were independently associated with lower NRM. The 2-year overall survival rate was 36% and improved after 2012 (29% vs 47% before 2012; P = .02); and it was higher for patients who underwent transplantation in CR1 (41% vs 29%; P = .01). In multivariate analysis, haplo after 2012 (HR, 0.54; P = .003) and receipt of a RIC regimen (HR, 0.54; P = .005) were independently associated with better overall survival

  13. Duodenal duplication cyst (DDC) communicating with the pancreatobiliary duct--a rare cause of recurrent acute pancreatitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Jan Jin; Spalding, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Duodenal duplication cysts (DDC) are rare congenital anomalies that usually present in infancy and childhood. Acute presentation in adults is even rarer. We report a case of a 34-year-old man who presented with recurrent acute pancreatitis and was found to have a cystic lesion in the second part of his duodenum. Further investigations revealed communication between the cystic lesion and the distal common bile duct. We describe the details of the operative approach taken to resect the DDC. We describe the differential diagnoses and the criteria for diagnosing DDC. Management options for DDC are discussed along with our recommendations.

  14. Management of idiopathic recurrent pericarditis in adults and in children: a role for IL-1 receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucato, Antonio; Emmi, Giacomo; Cantarini, Luca; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Gattorno, Marco; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Marcolongo, Renzo; Imazio, Massimo; Martini, Alberto; Prisco, Domenico

    2018-06-01

    Recurrent pericarditis is one of the most frequent pericardial diseases, affecting up to 30% of the patients who have experienced acute pericarditis. While the diagnosis of acute pericarditis is sometime straight forward, its etiology and therapeutic management are still a challenge for physicians. In developed countries, the idiopathic form is the most frequent, and the search for an infectious etiology is almost invariably negative. Nevertheless, since standard treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine is not always able to neutralize pericardial inflammation in recurrent pericarditis, anakinra, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, has been proposed as a possible therapeutic alternative for refractory forms. IL-1 is a cytokine that exerts a pivotal role in innate immunity and in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, and in autoinflammatory disorders, as familial Mediterranean fever and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. The successful management of patients with acute idiopathic recurrent pericarditis (IRP) needs a teamwork approach, where cardiologists, rheumatologists, clinical immunologists and internists are involved. In this review, we will discuss the clinical and therapeutical challenges of IRP both in adults and children from a clinical practice standpoint. We will also briefly illustrate the main pathogenic mechanisms of IRP to provide internists and cardiologists with the rationale for approaching the use of anakinra in selected clinical cases.

  15. Examining the Relationship between Childhood Animal Cruelty Motives and Recurrent Adult Violent Crimes toward Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Joshua C.; Hensley, Christopher; Tallichet, Suzanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Few researchers have studied the predictive ability of childhood animal cruelty motives as they are associated with later recurrent violence toward humans. Based on a sample of 180 inmates at one medium- and one maximum-security prison in a Southern state, the present study examines the relationship among several retrospectively identified motives…

  16. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 is a novel specific molecular target in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Tomoko; Ishida, Takashi; Ito, Asahi; Masaki, Ayako; Kinoshita, Shiori; Suzuki, Susumu; Takino, Hisashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Ri, Masaki; Kusumoto, Shigeru; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Imada, Kazunori; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Inagaki, Hiroshi; Scholz, Arne; Lienau, Philip; Kuroda, Taruho; Ueda, Ryuzo; Iida, Shinsuke

    2017-08-31

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9), a subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex, regulates gene transcription elongation by phosphorylating the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). The deregulation of CDK9/P-TEFb has important implications for many cancer types. BAY 1143572 is a novel and highly selective CDK9/P-TEFb inhibitor currently being investigated in phase 1 studies. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of BAY 1143572 in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). As a result of CDK9 inhibition and subsequent inhibition of phosphorylation at serine 2 of the RNAPII CTD, BAY 1143572 decreased c-Myc and Mcl-1 levels in ATL-derived or human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1)-transformed lines and primary ATL cells tested, leading to their growth inhibition and apoptosis. Median inhibitory concentrations for BAY 1143572 in ATL-derived or HTLV-1-transformed lines (n = 8), primary ATL cells (n = 11), and CD4 + cells from healthy volunteers (n = 5) were 0.535, 0.30, and 0.36 μM, respectively. Next, NOG mice were used as recipients of tumor cells from an ATL patient. BAY 1143572-treated ATL-bearing mice (once daily 12.5 mg/kg oral application) demonstrated significantly decreased ATL cell infiltration of the liver and bone marrow, as well as decreased human soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels in serum (reflecting the ATL tumor burden), compared with untreated mice (n = 8 for both). BAY 1143572-treated ATL-bearing mice demonstrated significantly prolonged survival compared with untreated ATL-bearing mice (n = 7 for both). Collectively, this study indicates that BAY 1143572 showed strong potential as a novel treatment of ATL. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. Philadelphia chromosome-positive adult acute leukemia with monosomy of chromosome number seven: a subgroup with poor response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, A M; Keating, M J; Trujillo, J; Cork, A; Youness, E; Ahearn, M J; McCredie, K B; Freireich, E J

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-four adult patients were seen at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston, Texas between 1969 and 1980 with acute leukemia (AL) and a deleted G-group chromosome that was shown by Giemsa banding to be a Philadelphia (Ph1) chromosome t(9;22) in 21 patients. Fourteen had the Ph1 chromosome as the sole abnormality, 12 had the Ph1 chromosome and loss of one chromosome of the C-group (identified by Giemsa banding analysis as number 7 in eight patients), while eight had the Ph1 chromosome and other changes. These three groups were similar in sex, age distribution and hematologic parameters. The median age of 40 was lower than usually seen in AL. The distribution of the morphologic subtypes was similar to that seen at this institution, with 50% being acute myeloblastic, 12% acute myelomonocytic, 20% lymphoblastic and 18% acute undifferentiated. The complete remission rate with chemotherapy was low: 25% in the Ph1 +/- 7, 50% in the Ph1 +/other group and 43% in the Ph1 +/other group. Median survival time was 8 months for the Ph1 +/- 7 group, 5.5 months for the Ph1 +/other group and 9.0 months for the Ph1 +/alone group. These patients with Ph1 + AL had higher white blood cell counts, increased extramedullary disease and poorer responses to therapy than usual for patients with AL. The deletion of chromosome 7 and the acquisition of the Ph1 chromosome identifies a group of patients with characteristics similar to all the patients with Ph1 + AL but a poor response to therapy and short remission duration.

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia after aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, Ayami; Strahm, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Furlan, Ingrid; Schwarz, Stephan; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Walther, Joachim-Ulrich; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Nöllke, Peter; Führer, Monika; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2014-03-01

    Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (sMDS/sAML) are the most serious secondary events occurring after immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. Here we evaluate the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 17 children and young adults with sMDS/sAML after childhood aplastic anemia. The median interval between the diagnosis of aplastic anemia and the development of sMDS/sAML was 2.9 years (range, 1.2 to 13.0 years). At a median age of 13.1 years (range, 4.4 to 26.7 years), patients underwent HSCT with bone marrow (n = 6) or peripheral blood stem cell (n = 11) grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors (n = 2), mismatched family donors (n = 2), or unrelated donors (n = 13). Monosomy 7 was detected in 13 patients. The preparative regimen consisted of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan in 11 patients and other agents in 6 patients. All patients achieved neutrophil engraftment. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 47%, and that of chronic GVHD was 70%. Relapse occurred in 1 patient. The major cause of death was transplant-related complication (n = 9). Overall survival and event-free survival at 5 years after HSCT were both 41%. In summary, this study indicates that HSCT is a curative therapy for some patients with sMDS/sAML after aplastic anemia. Future efforts should focus on reducing transplantation-related mortality. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Atypical chronic myeloid leukaemia: A case of an orphan disease-A multicenter report by the Polish Adult Leukemia Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd-Sokołowska, Joanna; Mądry, Krzysztof; Waszczuk-Gajda, Anna; Biecek, Przemysław; Szwedyk, Paweł; Budziszewska, Katarzyna; Raźny, Magdalena; Dutka, Magdalena; Obara, Agata; Wasilewska, Ewa; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Piekarska, Agnieszka; Bober, Grażyna; Krzemień, Helena; Stella-Hołowiecka, Beata; Kapelko-Słowik, Katarzyna; Sawicki, Waldemar; Paszkowska-Kowalewska, Małgorzata; Machowicz, Rafał; Dwilewicz-Trojaczek, Jadwiga

    2018-03-07

    Atypical chronic myeloid leukaemia (aCML) belongs to myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. Because of its rarity and changing diagnostic criteria throughout subsequent classifications, data on aCML are very scarce. Therefore, we at the Polish Adult Leukemia Group performed a nationwide survey on aCML. Eleven biggest Polish centres participated in the study. Altogether, 45 patients were reported, among whom only 18 patients (40%) fulfilled diagnostic criteria. Among misdiagnosed patients, myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative syndrome unclassifiable and chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia were the most frequent diagnoses. Thirteen patients were male, median age 64.6 years (range 40.4-80.9). The median parameters at diagnosis were as follows: white blood cell count 97 × 10 9 /L (23.8-342) with immature progenitors amounting at 27.5% (12-72), haemoglobin 8.6 g/dL (3.9-14.9), and platelet count 66 × 10 9 /L (34-833). Cytoreductive treatment was used in all patients, and 2 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The median overall survival was 14.1 months (95% CI, 7.2), with median acute myeloid leukaemia-free survival of 13.3 months (95% CI, 3.6-22.6). Cumulative incidence of acute myeloid leukaemia transformation after 1 year in aCML group was 12.5% (95% CI, 0%-29.6%). To conclude, aCML harbours a poor prognosis. Treatment options are limited, with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation being the only curative method at present, although only a minority of patients are transplant eligible. Educational measures are needed to improve the quality of diagnoses. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma—A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giam, Chou-Zen; Semmes, Oliver John

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1) is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10–20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%–5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ), encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling—the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8) and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13)—to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided. PMID:27322308

  1. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma—A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou-Zen Giam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10–20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%–5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ, encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling—the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8 and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13—to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided.

  2. Crucial role of carbonic anhydrase IX in tumorigenicity of xenotransplanted adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasu, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Takanashi, Tomoka; Tamai, Keiichi; Sato, Ikuro; Ine, Shoji; Sasaki, Osamu; Satoh, Kennichi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fukushima, Takuya; Harigae, Hideo; Sugamura, Kazuo

    2017-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9) is a membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase that regulates cellular pH, is upregulated in various solid tumors, and is considered to be a therapeutic target. Here, we describe the essential role of CA9 in the tumorigenicity of cells derived from human adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). We previously established the highly tumorigenic ST1-N6 subline from the ATL-derived ST1 cell line by serial xenotransplantation in NOG mice. In the present study, we first show that CA9 expression is strongly enhanced in ST1-N6 cells. We then sorted ST1 cells by high or low CA9 expression and established ST1-CA9 high and ST1-CA9 low sublines. ST1-CA9 high cells, like ST1-N6 cells, were more strongly tumorigenic than ST1-CA9 low or parental ST1 cells when injected into NOG mice. Knockdown of CA9 with shRNAs suppressed the ability of ST1-CA9 high cells to initiate tumors, and the tumorigenicity of ST1 cells was significantly enhanced by introducing wild-type CA9 or a CA9 mutant with deletion of an intracytoplasmic domain. However, a CA9 with point mutations in the catalytic site did not increase the tumorigenicity of ST1 cells. Furthermore, we detected a small population of CA9 + CD25 + cells in lymph nodes of ATL patients. These findings suggest that CA9, and particularly its carbonic anhydrase activity, promotes the tumorigenicity of ATL-derived cells and may be involved in malignant development of lymphoma-type ATL. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. Bolus and continuous infusion mitoxantrone in newly diagnosed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of two consecutive phase II clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Y; Akpek, G; Kansu, E; Kars, A; Tekuzman, G; Baltali, E; Güler, N; Barista, I; Güllü, I; Ozisik, Y; Firat, D

    1998-01-01

    Two consecutive phase II clinical studies were designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bolus and continuous infusion (CI) mitoxantrone (MTZ) in 39 patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). MTZ was used as part of the classical ALL induction regimen. Twenty patients were treated with bolus MTZ (10 mg/m2 for 3 days) combined with vincristine and prednisone. The same regimen was given to a second set of 19 patients, except that MTZ was administered as a 24-hr CI. Both groups received bimonthly intensifications with vincristine and prednisone for 3 years, along with oral maintenance therapy. Patients in the CI-MTZ study arm received additional MTZ on the first day of intensification cycles. Seventeen patients (85%) in the bolus arm and 15 patients (79%) in the CI arm achieved complete remission (CR). Median disease-free survivals (DFS) in the bolus and CI groups were 11 and 15 months after median follow-ups of 16 (3.5-96) and 13 (2.3-32) months, respectively. At 2.5 years, DFS rates were 29.4% and 34.4% in the bolus and CI groups (p > 0.05). There were no significant differences between two groups in rates of early death, degree of organ toxicity, or duration of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Significant cardiac toxicity was not observed in either group. Bolus or CI administration of MTZ was equally effective and was well tolerated. Neither the mode of administration nor increasing the dose intensity of MTZ by incorporating intensification cycles reduced relapse rates. Development of new antileukemia agents and novel treatment approaches are still needed to improve the high relapse rates in adult ALL once a complete response is achieved.

  4. Cost and Outcome of Treatment of Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia at the National Cancer Institute-Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zawahry, H.M.; Zeeneldin, A.A.; Samra, M.A.; El-Gammal, M.M.; Mattar, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Despite important advances in the therapy of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the majority of patients die of their disease, unless bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is done. Infection and hemorrhage are still the major causes of mortality in AML patients. Progress in therapy and supportive care has led to gradual improvement in the overall results, but further improvements are still needed. Patients and Methods: The aim of this study is to identify the outcome and costs of adult AML patients treated with conventional chemotherapy (CCT) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University during the time period from April 1999 to January 2002. Clinical, laboratory characteristics were all recorded. Data regarding different types of therapies given for these patients including response, outcome and costs were also collected. Results: The median age of 82 identified AML patients was 34 years. The complete remission (CR) rate after induction with CCT was 52% (42/82 patients) with a median CR duration of 9 months. Twenty-eight percent of patients who achieved CR subsequently relapsed. By January 2003, fifty-eight patients were dead (70.7%). Infections were the major mortality cause, followed by disease progression then bleeding (65%, 28% and 7% respectively). The median treatment cost per patient was 33158 Egyptian Pounds (LE). It was higher for patients who achieved CR compared to those who relapsed and/or died. Drugs contributed by 78 % to the total treatment cost, while hospitalization, investigations and blood-component therapy contributed by 6%, 7% and 8% respectively. Conclusions: Outcome of patients with AML treated at NCI- Cairo University can be enhanced by improvement of supportive therapy; mainly infection control and expanding BMT programs to accommodate all eligible patients

  5. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia young adult patient treated with a pediatric-like chemotherapeutic schedule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Papayannidis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report here the case of a young adult affected by pre B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, who developed, during a pediatric-like chemotherapy consolidation schedule with high dosage of Methotrexate, a severe neurological toxicity. Clinical presentation and neuroimaging data were diagnostic for posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES. A complete resolution was quickly obtained with medical blood pressure control and anticonvulsants administration. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of PRES described in the adult ALL setting. Currently, the clinical management of this aggressive disease is moving towards a pediatric-like approach also in adult patients, due to the better outcome reached with intensive chemotherapeutic regimens in children population. However, therapy-related toxicities have to be taken into account, since their onset may adversely affect patients’ clinical outcome.

  6. Monocytic leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, M T

    1980-05-01

    The monocytic leukemias may be subdivided into acute monocytic leukemia, acute myelomonocytic leukemia, and subacute and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. The clinical features of acute monocytic and acute myelomonocytic leukemias are similar and are manifestations of bone marrow failure. Gingival hypertrophy and skin infiltration are more frequent in acute monocytic leukemia. Cytomorphologically the blast cells in acute monocytic leukemia may be undifferentiated or differentiated, whereas in the acute myelomonocytic variety there are mixed populations of monocytic and myeloblastic cells. Cytochemical characteristics include strongly positive reactions for nonspecific esterase, inhibited by fluoride. The functional characteristics of acute monocytic and acute myelomonocytic cells resemble those of monocytes and include glass adherence and phagocytoses, the presence of Fc receptors for IgG and C'3, and the production of colony stimulating activity. Subacute and chronic myelomonocytic leukemias are insidious and slowly progressive diseases characterized by anemia and peripheral blood monocytosis. Atypical monocytes called paramyeloid cells are characteristic. The drugs used in the treatment of acute monocytic and acute myelomonocytic leukemias include cytosine arabinoside, the anthracyclines, and VP 16-213. Drug therapy in subacute and chronic myelomonocytic leukemias is not usually indicated, although VP 16-213 has been claimed to be effective.

  7. Posttraumatic stress disorder increases risk for suicide attempt in adults with recurrent major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Daniel; Wilcox, Holly C; MacKinnon, Dean F; Mondimore, Francis M; Schweizer, Barbara; Jancic, Dunya; Coryell, William H; Weissman, Myrna M; Levinson, Douglas F; Potash, James B

    2013-10-01

    Genetics of Recurrent Early-Onset Depression study (GenRED II) data were used to examine the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and attempted suicide in a population of 1,433 individuals with recurrent early-onset major depressive disorder (MDD). We tested the hypothesis that PTSD resulting from assaultive trauma increases risk for attempted suicide among individuals with recurrent MDD. Data on lifetime trauma exposures and clinical symptoms were collected using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies version 3.0 and best estimate diagnoses of MDD, PTSD, and other DSM-IV Axis I disorders were reported with best estimated age of onset. The lifetime prevalence of suicide attempt in this sample was 28%. Lifetime PTSD was diagnosed in 205 (14.3%) participants. We used discrete time-survival analyses to take into account timing in the PTSD-suicide attempt relationship while adjusting for demographic variables (gender, race, age, and education level) and comorbid diagnoses prior to trauma exposure. PTSD was an independent predictor of subsequent suicide attempt (HR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.6, 3.8; P < .0001). Neither assaultive nor nonassaultive trauma without PTSD significantly predicted subsequent suicide attempt after Bonferroni correction. The association between PTSD and subsequent suicide attempt was driven by traumatic events involving assaultive violence (HR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.3, 2.2; P< .0001). Among those with recurrent MDD, PTSD appears to be a vulnerability marker of maladaptive responses to traumatic events and an independent risk factor for attempted suicide. Additional studies examining differences between those with and without PTSD on biological measures might shed light on this potential vulnerability. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Phase II study of imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea in adults with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, David A; Egorin, Merrill J; Quinn, Jennifer A; Rich, Jeremy N; Rich, Jeremy N; Gururangan, Sridharan; Gururangan, Idharan; Vredenburgh, James J; Desjardins, Annick; Sathornsumetee, Sith; Provenzale, James M; Herndon, James E; Dowell, Jeannette M; Badruddoja, Michael A; McLendon, Roger E; Lagattuta, Theodore F; Kicielinski, Kimberly P; Dresemann, Gregor; Sampson, John H; Friedman, Allan H; Salvado, August J; Friedman, Henry S

    2005-12-20

    We performed a phase II study to evaluate the combination of imatinib mesylate, an adenosine triphosphate mimetic, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, plus hydroxyurea, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Patients with GBM at any recurrence received imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea (500 mg twice a day) orally on a continuous, daily schedule. The imatinib mesylate dose was 500 mg twice a day for patients on enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and 400 mg once a day for those not on EIAEDs. Assessments were performed every 28 days. The primary end point was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). Thirty-three patients enrolled with progressive disease after prior radiotherapy and at least temozolomide-based chemotherapy. With a median follow-up of 58 weeks, 27% of patients were progression-free at 6 months, and the median PFS was 14.4 weeks. Three patients (9%) achieved radiographic response, and 14 (42%) achieved stable disease. Cox regression analysis identified concurrent EIAED use and no more than one prior progression as independent positive prognostic factors of PFS. The most common toxicities included grade 3 neutropenia (16%), thrombocytopenia (6%), and edema (6%). There were no grade 4 or 5 events. Concurrent EIAED use lowered imatinib mesylate exposure. Imatinib mesylate clearance was decreased at day 28 compared with day 1 in all patients, suggesting an effect of hydroxyurea. Imatinib mesylate plus hydroxyurea is well tolerated and associated with durable antitumor activity in some patients with recurrent GBM.

  9. Chest HRCT findings in acute transformation of adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Fumito; Sato, Haruka; Omeri, Ahmad Khalid; Ono, Asami; Tokuyama, Kouhei; Ando, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Akira; Mori, Hiromu; Ogata, Masao; Kohno, Kazuhiro; Takano, Kuniko

    2015-01-01

    To assess chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with acute transformation of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients at our institution with ATLL between October 2000 and March 2014. The cases included acute type (n = 20), lymphoma type (n = 21), smouldering type (n = 24) and chronic type (n = 7). Sixteen (7 men, 9 women; aged 36-85 years, mean 63.3 years) of 31 patients (24 with smouldering and seven with chronic type; 51.6 %) developed acute transformation of ATLL, and had undergone chest HRCT examinations. Parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes, pericardial effusion, pleural effusion and skin lesions were evaluated on HRCT. Chest HRCT of 15 of the 16 patients showed abnormal findings, including ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n = 8), consolidation (n = 5), interlobular septal thickening (n = 5) and nodules (n = 5). Pleural effusion was found in five patients, lymph node enlargement in 10 patients and multiple skin thickening in two patients. Almost all patients with acute transformation of ATLL had abnormal findings on chest HRCT, which consisted mainly of lymph node enlargement, GGO, interlobular septal thickening, nodules and bilateral pleural effusions. (orig.)

  10. The addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin to chemotherapy in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia has remained largely unchanged for the last 30 years since the advent of combination chemotherapy with cytarabine arabinoside and daunorubicin with remission rates around 70% but with long term survival still only around 40% in young adults. Doses of chemotherapy have been pushed to the limit of toxicity. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin allows additional chemotherapy to be delivered to the leukaemic cells without significantly adding to toxicity since the active agent is coupled to a monoclonal anti-CD33 antibody. It was approved by the FDA in 2000 for the treatment of elderly patients with relapsed CD33 positive AML at a dose of 9mg/m(2) on two days two weeks apart. Almost at once, questions were raised about its safety, with a particular liver signal, and it was voluntarily withdrawn from practice in 2010. Many groups have been examining the role of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with chemotherapy, usually at lower doses than originally recommended, with varying degrees of success and toxicity and gemtuzumab ozogamicin is now entering a period of rehabilitation. Currently it is only commercially available in Japan although it is currently also available in the UK Bloodwise AML18 study.

  11. Chest HRCT findings in acute transformation of adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Fumito; Sato, Haruka; Omeri, Ahmad Khalid; Ono, Asami; Tokuyama, Kouhei; Ando, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Akira; Mori, Hiromu [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yufu, Oita (Japan); Ogata, Masao; Kohno, Kazuhiro; Takano, Kuniko [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Yufu, Oita (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    To assess chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with acute transformation of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients at our institution with ATLL between October 2000 and March 2014. The cases included acute type (n = 20), lymphoma type (n = 21), smouldering type (n = 24) and chronic type (n = 7). Sixteen (7 men, 9 women; aged 36-85 years, mean 63.3 years) of 31 patients (24 with smouldering and seven with chronic type; 51.6 %) developed acute transformation of ATLL, and had undergone chest HRCT examinations. Parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes, pericardial effusion, pleural effusion and skin lesions were evaluated on HRCT. Chest HRCT of 15 of the 16 patients showed abnormal findings, including ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n = 8), consolidation (n = 5), interlobular septal thickening (n = 5) and nodules (n = 5). Pleural effusion was found in five patients, lymph node enlargement in 10 patients and multiple skin thickening in two patients. Almost all patients with acute transformation of ATLL had abnormal findings on chest HRCT, which consisted mainly of lymph node enlargement, GGO, interlobular septal thickening, nodules and bilateral pleural effusions. (orig.)

  12. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; Renneville, A; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Emerenciano, M; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Barbieri Blunck, C; Almeida Lopes, B; Zuna, J; Trka, J; Ballerini, P; Lapillonne, H; De Braekeleer, M; Cazzaniga, G; Corral Abascal, L; van der Velden, V H J; Delabesse, E; Park, T S; Oh, S H; Silva, M L M; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Moore, A S; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Zerkalenkova, E; Olshanskaya, Y; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Teigler-Schlegel, A; Zur Stadt, U; Lentes, J; Göhring, G; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Madsen, H O; Gruhn, B; Duarte, X; Gameiro, P; Lippert, E; Bidet, A; Cayuela, J M; Clappier, E; Alonso, C N; Zwaan, C M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Möricke, A; Alten, J; Schrappe, M; Stanulla, M; Strehl, S; Attarbaschi, A; Dworzak, M; Haas, O A; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Caye, A; Suarez, L; Cavé, H; Marschalek, R

    2018-02-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL/KMT2A gene are associated with infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. Here we present the data obtained from 2345 acute leukemia patients. Genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and 11 novel TPGs were identified. Thus, a total of 135 different MLL rearrangements have been identified so far, of which 94 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. In all, 35 out of these 94 TPGs occur recurrently, but only 9 specific gene fusions account for more than 90% of all illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene. We observed an age-dependent breakpoint shift with breakpoints localizing within MLL intron 11 associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and younger patients, while breakpoints in MLL intron 9 predominate in AML or older patients. The molecular characterization of MLL breakpoints suggests different etiologies in the different age groups and allows the correlation of functional domains of the MLL gene with clinical outcome. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the MLL recombinome in acute leukemia and demonstrates that the establishment of patient-specific chromosomal fusion sites allows the design of specific PCR primers for minimal residual disease analyses for all patients.

  13. Leukemia -- Eosinophilic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Leukemia - Eosinophilic Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Stages Treatment Options About Clinical Trials Latest Research ...

  14. Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Adolescents and Young Adults (15-24 Years Old) After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Leukemia in First Complete Remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, Marguerite; Andreoli, Annalisa; Dhédin, Nathalie; Lengliné, Etienne; Masson, Emeline; Robin, Marie; Granier, Clémence; Larghero, Jérôme; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Socié, Gérard; Boissel, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer are a unique group of patients in terms of disease incidence and biology, outcome, and psychosocial needs. This study aims to correlate the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and age in a population of children and young adults with acute leukemia undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in first complete remission (CR). We analyzed the outcome of 153 consecutive children (<15 years), AYAs (15-24 years), and adults (25-35 years) with lymphoblastic or myeloid acute leukemia in first CR who underwent HSCT with matched donors after myeloablative conditioning. GvHD prophylaxis was methotrexate and cyclosporine A (CsA) in all patients. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute GvHD (aGvHD) was significantly higher in AYA patients than in children (subdistribution hazard ratio (SHR), 2.04, p = 0.005) or adults (SHR 1.59, p = 0.048). Both gut and skin aGvHD occurred more frequently in AYA patients. Increasing CsA blood levels with age could not fully account for this difference. No difference in terms of grade III-IV aGvHD was observed. Chronic GvHD was more frequent in AYAs (SHR 2.81, p = 0.007) and adults (SHR 2.31, p = 0.033) than in children. No difference in terms of nonrelated mortality and overall survival was observed among the age subgroups. Since GvHD occurrence is strongly correlated to quality of life, specific attention should be paid to AYAs undergoing HSCT. Further studies should investigate the reasons for the excess of GvHD observed in this population.

  15. Common genetic markers and prediction of recurrent events after ischemic stroke in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzini, A; Grassi, M; Del Zotto, E; Lodigiani, C; Ferrazzi, P; Spalloni, A; Patella, R; Giossi, A; Volonghi, I; Iacoviello, L; Magoni, M; Rota, L L; Rasura, M; Padovani, A

    2009-09-01

    Scarce information is available on the usefulness of new prediction markers for identifying young ischemic stroke patients at highest risk of recurrence. The predictive effect of traditional risk factors as well as of the 20210A variant of prothrombin gene, the 1691A variant of factor V gene, and the TT677 genotype of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene on the risk of recurrence was investigated in a hospital-based cohort study of 511 ischemic stroke patients younger than 45 years followed up for a mean of 43.4 months. Outcome measures were fatal/nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or TIA. Risk prediction was assessed with the use of the concordance c (c index), and the Net Reclassification Improvement (NRI). The risk of recurrence increased with increasing number of traditional factors (hazard ratio [HR] 2.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.57-3.35 for subjects with 1 factor: HR 5.25, 95% CI 2.45-11.2 for subjects with 2), as well as with that of predisposing genotypes (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.33-2.89 for subjects carrying 1 at-risk genotype; HR 3.83, 95% CI 1.76-8.34 for those carrying 2). The c statistics increased significantly when the genotypes were included into a model with traditional risk factors (0.696 vs 0.635, test z = 2.41). The NRI was also significant (NRI = 0.172, test z = 2.17). Addition of common genetic variants to traditional risk factors may be an effective method for discriminating young stroke patients at different risk of future ischemic events.

  16. Wide rectal duplication cyst in an adult resected by anterior approach: efficacy and recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, Michela; Saccomani, Giorgia; Lacelli, Francesca; Saccomani, Giovanni E

    2017-06-01

    Alimentary tract duplications are uncommon congenital abnormalities usually diagnosed and treated in childhood. Rectal involvement is extremely rare. We report the case of a 22-year-old female who presented with chronic abdominal and perianal pain; feeling of rectal fullness. Workup revealed a rectal duplication cyst. The patient underwent a complete transabdominal excision of the cyst: an hybrid laparoscopic and laparotomic technique was adopted. The hybrid isolated anterior abdominal approach is safe and feasible even for the treatment of wide rectal duplication cysts. Real recurrence in rectal duplication cysts is uncommon when the first operation was performed with radical intent.

  17. An Adult Case of Recurrent Guillain-Barré Syndrome with Anti-galactocerebroside Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hisashi; Kimura, Tadashi; Yuki, Natsuko; Yoshioka, Akira

    2017-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman with a history of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) developed somnolence and tetraparesis after pneumonia. Based on clinical and laboratory findings, she was diagnosed with complications of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). Anti-galactocerebroside (Gal-C) IgG antibodies were detected in her serum. Cases of recurrent GBS in patients who are positive for this antibody are extremely rare. The anti-Gal-C IgG antibodies likely played an important role in the pathogenesis of the AIDP and ADEM. PMID:29093388

  18. Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 define subgroups of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Starza, Roberta; Barba, Gianluca; Demeyer, Sofie; Pierini, Valentina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gianfelici, Valentina; Schwab, Claire; Matteucci, Caterina; Vicente, Carmen; Cools, Jan; Messina, Monica; Crescenzi, Barbara; Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin; Basso, Giuseppe; Harrison, Christine J; Mecucci, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 were detected in 23/200 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Genomic studies identified two types of deletions: interstitial and terminal. Interstitial 5q deletions, found in five cases, were present in both adults and children with a female predominance (chi-square, P=0.012). Interestingly, these cases resembled immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing significant down-regulation of five out of the ten top differentially expressed genes in this leukemia group, including TCF7 which maps within the 5q31 common deleted region. Mutations of genes known to be associated with immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, i.e. WT1, ETV6, JAK1, JAK3, and RUNX1, were present, while CDKN2A/B deletions/mutations were never detected. All patients had relapsed/resistant disease and blasts showed an early differentiation arrest with expression of myeloid markers. Terminal 5q deletions, found in 18 of patients, were more prevalent in adults (chi-square, P=0.010) and defined a subgroup of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by 130 up- and 197 down-regulated genes. Down-regulated genes included TRIM41, ZFP62, MAPK9, MGAT1, and CNOT6, all mapping within the 1.4 Mb common deleted region at 5q35.3. Of interest, besides CNOT6 down-regulation, these cases also showed low BTG1 expression and a high incidence of CNOT3 mutations, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with terminal 5q deletions. In conclusion, interstitial and terminal 5q deletions are recurrent genomic losses identifying distinct subtypes of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  19. Effect of Intensive Chemotherapy on Physical, Cognitive, and Emotional Health of Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Tooze, Janet A.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Mihalko, Shannon L.; Danhauer, Suzanne C.; Rao, Arati V.; Wildes, Tanya M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Powell, Bayard L.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To measure short-term changes in physical and cognitive function and emotional well-being of older adults receiving intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). DESIGN Prospective observational study. SETTING Single academic institution. PARTICIPANTS Individuals aged 60 and older with newly diagnosed AML who received induction chemotherapy (N = 49, mean age 70 ± 6.2, 56% male). MEASUREMENTS Geriatric assessment (GA) was performed during inpatient examination for AML and within 8 weeks after hospital discharge after induction chemotherapy. Measures were the Pepper Assessment Tool for Disability (activity of daily living, instrumental activity of daily living (IADL), mobility questions), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), grip strength, Modified Mini-Mental State examination, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and the Distress Thermometer. Changes in GA measures were assessed using paired t-tests. Analysis of variance models were used to evaluate relationships between GA variables and change in function over time. RESULTS After chemotherapy, IADL dependence worsened (mean 1.4 baseline vs 2.1 follow-up, P < .001), as did mean SPPB scores (7.5 vs 5.9, P = .02 for total). Grip strength also declined (38.9 ± 7.7 vs 34.2 ± 10.3 kg, P < .001 for men; 24.5 ± 4.8 vs 21.8 ± 4.7 kg, P = .007 for women). No significant changes in cognitive function (mean 84.7 vs 85.1, P = .72) or depressive symptoms (14.0 vs. 11.3, P = .11) were detected, but symptoms of distress declined (5.0 vs 3.2, P < .001). Participants with depressive symptoms at baseline and follow-up had greater declines in SPPB scores those without at both time points. CONCLUSIONS Short-term survivors of intensive chemotherapy for AML had clinically meaningful declines in physical function. These data support the importance of interventions to maintain physical function during and after chemotherapy. Depressive symptoms before and during chemotherapy may be linked to

  20. A network biology approach evaluating the anticancer effects of bortezomib identifies SPARC as a therapeutic target in adult T-cell leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Junko H Ohyashiki1, Ryoko Hamamura2, Chiaki Kobayashi2, Yu Zhang2, Kazuma Ohyashiki21Intractable Immune System Disease Research Center, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan; 2First Department of Internal Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: There is a need to identify the regulatory gene interaction of anticancer drugs on target cancer cells. Whole genome expression profiling offers promise in this regard, but can be complicated by the challenge of identifying the genes affected by hundreds to thousands of genes that induce changes in expression. A proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, could be a potential therapeutic agent in treating adult T-cell leukemia (ATL patients, however, the underlying mechanism by which bortezomib induces cell death in ATL cells via gene regulatory network has not been fully elucidated. Here we show that a Bayesian statistical framework by VoyaGene® identified a secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC gene, a tumor-invasiveness related gene, as a possible modulator of bortezomib-induced cell death in ATL cells. Functional analysis using RNAi experiments revealed that inhibition of the expression SPARC by siRNA enhanced the apoptotic effect of bortezomib on ATL cells in accordance with an increase of cleaved caspase 3. Targeting SPARC may help to treat ATL patients in combination with bortezomib. This work shows that a network biology approach can be used advantageously to identify the genetic interaction related to anticancer effects.Keywords: network biology, adult T cell leukemia, bortezomib, SPARC

  1. Effects of intensive induction and consolidation chemotherapy with idarubicin and high dose cytarabine on minimal residual disease levels in newly diagnosed adult precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth F. Bradstock

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An intensive induction regimen, consisting of idarubicin and high dose cytarabine, was assessed in 19 adult patients, median age 44 years, with newly diagnosed precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Patients achieving a complete response (CR were given an attenuated consolidation course. The primary endpoints were induction death rate and incidence of serious non-hematological toxicity. Grades 3–4 diarrhoea occurred in 47% of patients during induction. Two patients (11% died during induction therapy, and 2 were withdrawn due to resistant disease or prolonged marrow hypoplasia. Fifteen patients achieved CR (79%, but levels of minimal residual disease (MRD after induction were comparable with those previously observed using a modified pediatric protocol. Overall survival at 5 years was 36.8% while leukemia-free survival was 44.1%. An intensive AML protocol used in adults with ALL resulted in substantial toxicity and provided similar levels of cytoreduction to conventional ALL protocols, without improving long-term outcomes.

  2. Combination of cytogenetic classification and MRD status correlates with outcome of autologous versus allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adults with primary acute myeloid leukemia in first remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianfeng; Zhang, Guixin; Liang, Chen; Li, Gang; Chen, Xin; Ma, Qiaoling; Zhai, Weihua; Yang, Donglin; He, Yi; Jiang, Erlie; Feng, Sizhou; Han, Mingzhe

    2017-04-01

    Both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (auto- and allo-SCT) are treatment choice for adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after complete remission (CR). However, the decision-making remains controversial in some situations. To figure out the treatment choice, we retrospectively investigated 172 consecutive patients with primary AML who received auto- (n=46) or allo-SCT (n=126) from a single transplant center. Auto- and allo-SCT group demonstrated comparable overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.616, P=0.559, respectively). Cytogenetic classification and minimal residual disease (MRD) after one course of consolidation were identified as independent risk factors for DFS (hazard ratio (HR), 1.800; 95% CI, 1.172-2.763; P=0.007; HR, 2.042; 95%CI, 1.003-4.154; P=0.049; respectively). We subsequently found that auto- and allo-SCT offered comparable DFS to patients with favorable or intermediate risk and were tested MRD neg after one course of consolidation (P=0.270) otherwise auto-SCT were inferior due to increased risk of leukemia relapse. Our study indicated that the combination of cytogenetic classification and MRD monitoring correlated with outcome of auto- versus allo-SCT and might help the choice between the two types of SCT for adults with primary AML, which is of significance for patients with expected intermediate prognosis in the current scenario. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The scars of childhood adversity: minor stress sensitivity and depressive symptoms in remitted recurrently depressed adult patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Kok

    Full Text Available Childhood adversity may lead to depressive relapse through its long-lasting influence on stress sensitivity. In line with the stress sensitization hypothesis, minor (daily stress is associated with depressive relapse. Therefore, we examine the impact of childhood adversity on daily stress and its predictive value on prospectively assessed depressive symptoms in recurrently depressed patients.Daily stress was assessed in recurrently depressed adult patients, enrolled into two randomized trials while remitted. The reported intensity and frequency of dependent and independent daily stress was assessed at baseline. Independent stress is externally generated, for example an accident happening to a friend, while dependent stress is internally generated, for example getting into a fight with a neighbor. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed with childhood adversity, independent and dependent daily stress as predictor variables of prospectively measured depressive symptoms after three months of follow-up (n = 138.We found that childhood adversity was not significantly associated with a higher frequency and intensity of daily stress. The intensity of both independent and dependent daily stress was predictive of depressive symptom levels at follow-up (unadjusted models respectively: B = 0.47, t = 2.05, p = 0.041, 95% CI = 0.02-0.92; B = 0.29, t = 2.20, p = 0.028, 95% CI = 0.03-0.55. No associations were found between childhood adversity and depressive symptoms at follow-up.No evidence was found supporting stress sensitization due to the experience of childhood adversity in this recurrently depressed but remitted patient group. Nevertheless, our research indicates that daily stress might be a target for preventive treatment.Trial A: Nederlands Trial Register NTR1907 Trial B: Nederlands Trial Register NTR2503.

  4. ATM function and its relationship with ATM gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia with the recurrent deletion (11q22.3-23.2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y; Chen, H-C; Su, X; Thompson, P A; Liu, X; Do, K-A; Wierda, W; Keating, M J; Plunkett, W

    2016-09-02

    Approximately 10-20% of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients exhibit del(11q22-23) before treatment, this cohort increases to over 40% upon progression following chemoimmunotherapy. The coding sequence of the DNA damage response gene, ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), is contained in this deletion. The residual ATM allele is frequently mutated, suggesting a relationship between gene function and clinical response. To investigate this possibility, we sought to develop and validate an assay for the function of ATM protein in these patients. SMC1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes 1) and KAP1 (KRAB-associated protein 1) were found to be unique substrates of ATM kinase by immunoblot detection following ionizing radiation. Using a pool of eight fluorescence in situ hybridization-negative CLL samples as a standard, the phosphorylation of SMC1 and KAP1 from 46 del (11q22-23) samples was analyzed using normal mixture model-based clustering. This identified 13 samples (28%) that were deficient in ATM function. Targeted sequencing of the ATM gene of these samples, with reference to genomic DNA, revealed 12 somatic mutations and 15 germline mutations in these samples. No strong correlation was observed between ATM mutation and function. Therefore, mutation status may not be taken as an indicator of ATM function. Rather, a direct assay of the kinase activity should be used in the development of therapies.

  5. Long-term maintenance combination chemotherapy with OPEC/MPEC (vincristine or methotrexate, prednisolone, etoposide and cyclophosphamide) or with daily oral etoposide and prednisolone can improve survival and quality of life in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, K; Matsumoto, T; Ohtsubo, H; Fujiwara, H; Imamura, N; Hidaka, S; Kukita, T; Tei, C; Matsumoto, M; Arima, N

    1999-12-01

    Acute leukemia and lymphoma varieties of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) usually carry a poor prognosis. While etoposide is generally useful for treating ATL, especially as a daily oral maintenance regimen, etoposide has not proven effective in severe types of ATL efficient in some patients. Of 87 ATL patients whom we have treated, 51 had acute leukemia, 22 lymphoma and 14 progressive chronic leukemia. Seventy-nine patients were treated with a long term maintenance combination protocol, OPEC/MPEC (weekly doses of vincristine, 0.7 mg/m2 or methotrexate, 14 mg/m2; prednisolone, 20 mg/m2; etoposide, 70 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide, 200 mg/m2). The other 8 patients, 3 with acute leukemia, 2 with lymphoma and 3 with progressive chronic leukemia, were treated with daily oral administration of 25 mg of etoposide and 10 mg of prednisolone (DOEP). The dose administered was modified in individual cases to maintain the granulocyte count and reduce the number of ATL cells. Considering both protocols, a complete response and a partial response were achieved in 31.0% and 58.6% patients, respectively. Median survival times (MST) of all patients and, acute leukemia, lymphoma and progressive chronic leukemia types were 7.5, 6.7, 9.6 and 12.4 months, respectively. Respective MST of patients treated with OPEC/MPEC or DOEP protocols were 7.1 and 18.0 months. Relatively normal WBC counts, lower lactate dehydrogenase concentration and normal calcium concentration, limited numbers of anatomic sites involved, good performance status and good response to chemotherapy were significantly associated with long survival time. Drug toxicity was not apparent, and about half of patients were treated in an outpatient setting.

  6. WRN-targeted therapy using inhibitors NSC 19630 and NSC 617145 induce apoptosis in HTLV-1-transformed adult T-cell leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Moles

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL, a lymphoproliferative malignancy with a dismal prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Recent evidence shows that HTLV-1-transformed cells present defects in both DNA replication and DNA repair, suggesting that these cells might be particularly sensitive to treatment with a small helicase inhibitor. Because the “Werner syndrome ATP-dependent helicase” encoded by the WRN gene plays important roles in both cellular proliferation and DNA repair, we hypothesized that inhibition of WRN activity could be used as a new strategy to target ATLL cells. Methods Our analysis demonstrates an apoptotic effect induced by the WRN helicase inhibitor in HTLV-1-transformed cells in vitro and ATL-derived cell lines. Inhibition of cellular proliferation and induction of apoptosis were demonstrated with cell cycle analysis, XTT proliferation assay, clonogenic assay, annexin V staining, and measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Results Targeted inhibition of the WRN helicase induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HTLV-1-transformed leukemia cells. Treatment with NSC 19630 (WRN inhibitor induces S-phase cell cycle arrest, disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2. These events were associated with activation of caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in ATL cells. We identified some ATL cells, ATL-55T and LMY1, less sensitive to NSC 19630 but sensitive to another WRN inhibitor, NSC 617145. Conclusions WRN is essential for survival of ATL cells. Our studies suggest that targeting the WRN helicase with small inhibitors is a novel promising strategy to target HTLV-1-transformed ATL cells.

  7. Local recurrence and distant metastasis of supratentorial primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor in an adult patient successfully treated with intensive induction chemotherapy and maintenance temozolomide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terheggen, F.; Troost, D.; Majoie, C. B.; Leenstra, S.; Richel, D. J.

    2007-01-01

    Supratentorial primitive neuro-ectodermal tumors (PNET) in adults are very rare. Extraneural metastasis are unusual and the optimal palliative chemotherapy regimen is not established. We present a 26-year-old patient with local recurrence and distant metastasis of supratentorial PNET successfully

  8. Severe malnutrition evaluated by patient-generated subjective global assessment results in poor outcome among adult patients with acute leukemia: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Wang, Chang; Liu, Xiaoliang; Liu, Qiuju; Lin, Hai; Liu, Chunshui; Jin, Fengyan; Yang, Yan; Bai, Ou; Tan, Yehui; Gao, Sujun; Li, Wei

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate nutritional status in adult patients with acute leukemia (AL) using patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) and to investigate the influence of nutritional status on prognosis.We observationally investigated 68 adult patients with newly diagnosed AL who received PG-SGA at the First Hospital of Jilin University between May 2013 and July 2015. Clinical features, chemotherapy regimens, biochemical indexes, body composition, complete remission (CR) rate, minimal residual disease (MRD), survival time, and side-effects of chemotherapy were compared between patients with and without severe malnutrition.Mean PG-SGA scores of the total patients were 6.1 ± 4.0, and 19 of 68 (27.9%) patients had severe malnutrition (PG-SGA score ≥9). Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) had higher scores than those with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL; P = .011) and high-risk patients had higher scores regardless of whether they had AML or ALL (AML, P = .012; ALL, P = .043). Univariate analysis showed that severe malnutrition was correlated with age (P = .041), transferrin (P = .042), Karnofsky Performance Status score (P = .006), and C-reactive protein (CRP) (P = .018). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that severe malnutrition was associated with CRP (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.020, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.002-1.039, P = .026). No difference was found in CR rate (P = .831) between patients with and without malnutrition, but those who were severely malnourished had higher MRD (P = .048 in AML patients, P = .036 in ALL patients) and more gastrointestinal side-effects (P = .014). Severe malnutrition was also associated with inferior overall survival (HR = 0.243, 95% CI: 0.063-0.945, P = .041) but not with event-free survival (HR = 0.808, 95% CI: 0.338-1.934, P = .663).Severe malnutrition defined by PG-SGA in adult patients with de novo AL may result in poor outcome. Copyright

  9. Hypomethylation of the Treg-Specific Demethylated Region in FOXP3 Is a Hallmark of the Regulatory T-cell Subtype in Adult T-cell Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Yayoi; Shimazu, Yutaka; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Nagai, Yuya; Sugino, Noriko; Fujii, Sumie; Kawahara, Masahiro; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-02-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1. Because of its immunosuppressive property and resistance to treatment, patients with ATL have poor prognoses. ATL cells possess the regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype, such as CD4 and CD25, and usually express forkhead box P3 (FOXP3). However, the mechanisms of FOXP3 expression and its association with Treg-like characteristics in ATL remain unclear. Selective demethylation of the Treg-specific demethylated region (TSDR) in the FOXP3 gene leads to stable FOXP3 expression and defines natural Tregs. Here, we focus on the functional and clinical relationship between the epigenetic pattern of the TSDR and ATL. Analysis of DNA methylation in specimens from 26 patients with ATL showed that 15 patients (58%) hypomethylated the TSDR. The FOXP3(+) cells were mainly observed in the TSDR-hypomethylated cases. The TSDR-hypomethylated ATL cells exerted more suppressive function than the TSDR-methylated ATL cells. Thus, the epigenetic analysis of the FOXP3 gene identified a distinct subtype with Treg properties in heterogeneous ATL. Furthermore, we observed that the hypomethylation of TSDR was associated with poor outcomes in ATL. These results suggest that the DNA methylation status of the TSDR is an important hallmark to define this heterogeneous disease and to predict ATL patient prognosis. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Healing Touch as a Supportive Intervention for Adult Acute Leukemia Patients: A Pilot Investigation of Effects on Distress and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhauer, Suzanne C.; Tooze, Janet A.; Holder, Paige; Miller, Christina; Jesse, Michelle T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Goals were to determine the feasibility of conducting a study of Healing Touch (HT) for acute leukemia patients and to obtain preliminary data on its effectiveness. Methods Forty hospitalized leukemia patients completed a brief survey of HT knowledge/experience. A prospective cohort (N=12) was invited to participate in an HT intervention (9 30-minute sessions over 3 weeks); they completed measures of distress, symptoms, and sleep (at weeks 1 and 5), and completed single item ratings of fatigue, nausea, distress, and pain immediately pre-post selected HT sessions. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to analyze change in pre-post session ratings and distress, symptom, and sleep measures. Results Among survey respondents, 8% had used HT in the past, and 71% were interested in using HT. In the prospective cohort, there were significant pre-post session improvements in fatigue and nausea (but not in distress and pain). There were no significant changes between weeks 1 and 5 in distress, symptoms, or sleep. Ratings and qualitative feedback on HT were positive, focused mainly on feeling relaxed following HT sessions. Conclusions It is feasible to recruit patients hospitalized for acute leukemia to a study of HT. Preliminary data on short-term improvements in symptoms indicate these are promising outcomes for future study. PMID:19087765

  11. Prolonged Survival of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Intrathecal Treatments for Isolated Central Nervous System Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elan Gorshein

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is commonly cured when diagnosed in the pediatric population. It portends a poorer prognosis if present in adult patients. Although adults frequently achieve complete remission, relapse rates are substantial, particularly among the elderly and high-risk populations. In the absence of prophylactic intrathecal chemotherapy, more than half of patients may develop CNS involvement or relapse, which is associated with significant risk for systemic illness. This report describes a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia with repeated isolated CNS relapses. This case should remind clinicians that isolated CNS disease in the absence of systemic recurrence could successfully respond to intrathecal therapy and offer patients a favorable quality of life.

  12. Development of a modified prognostic index for patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma aged 70 years or younger: possible risk-adapted management strategies including allogeneic transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Utsunomiya, Atae; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Owatari, Satsuki; Miyagi, Takashi; Taguchi, Jun; Choi, Ilseung; Otsuka, Eiichi; Nakachi, Sawako; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Kurosawa, Saiko; Tobinai, Kensei; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2017-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma is a distinct type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I. Although allogeneic stem cell transplantation after chemotherapy is a recommended treatment option for patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, there is no consensus about indications for allogeneic stem cell transplantation because there is no established risk stratification system for transplant eligible patients. We conducted a nationwide survey of patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma in order to construct a new, large database that includes 1,792 patients aged 70 years or younger with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2013 and received intensive first-line chemotherapy. We randomly divided patients into two groups (training and validation sets). Acute type, poor performance status, high soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels (> 5,000 U/mL), high adjusted calcium levels (≥ 12 mg/dL), and high C-reactive protein levels (≥ 2.5 mg/dL) were independent adverse prognostic factors used in the training set. We used these five variables to divide patients into three risk groups. In the validation set, median overall survival for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups was 626 days, 322 days, and 197 days, respectively. In the intermediate- and high-risk groups, transplanted recipients had significantly better overall survival than non-transplanted patients. We developed a promising new risk stratification system to identify patients aged 70 years or younger with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma who may benefit from upfront allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies are warranted to confirm the benefit of this treatment strategy. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  13. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemia , and other conditions . Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Key Points Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease ... chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease in which too many myelocytes ...

  14. Atypical Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemia , and other conditions . Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Key Points Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease ... chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease in which too many myelocytes ...

  15. Understanding Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for as long as they take it. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is another treatment option that is only done if CML is not responding as expected to drug therapy. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) . Some CLL patients do not need treatment ...

  16. Childhood Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acute types. Symptoms include Infections Fever Loss of appetite Tiredness Easy bruising or bleeding Swollen lymph nodes Night sweats Shortness of breath Pain in the bones or joints Risk factors for childhood leukemia include having a brother ...

  17. Carfilzomib and Hyper-CVAD in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Comparison of Cultivars and Seasonal Variation in Blueberry (Vaccinium Species) Leaf Extract on Adult T-Cell Leukemia Cell Line Growth Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Hisahiro; Fuse, Takuichi; Kunitake, Hisato; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Matsuno, Koji

    2014-06-30

    The inhibitory effects of blueberry leaves on the proliferation of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cell lines have previously been reported. A comparison of blueberry leaf extracts from different cultivars and seasonal variation were investigated regarding their effects on ATL cell line proliferation. The inhibitory effects of 80% ethanol leaf extracts from different blueberry cultivars collected from April to December in 2006 or 2008 were evaluated using two ATL cell lines. The bioactivities of leaf extracts of rabbit-eye blueberry ( Vaccinium virgatum Aiton; RB species), southern highbush blueberry ( V. spp.; SB species), northern highbush blueberry ( V. corymbosum L.; NB species), and wild blueberry ( V. bracteatum Thunb.; WB species) were compared. Of these, leaves of the RB species collected in December showed a significantly stronger inhibitory effect in both cell lines than the SB, NB, or WB species. These results suggest elevated biosynthesis of ATL-preventative bioactive compounds in the leaves of the RB species before the defoliation season.

  19. Adult T-cell leukemia-associated antigen (ATLA) and anti-ATLA antibodies in patients with Hodgkin's disease in the Nagasaki District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, K; Amagasaki, T; Yamada, Y; Ikeda, S; Momita, S; Toriya, K; Kamihira, S; Ichimaru, M

    1983-01-01

    Seven patients with Hodgkin's disease in the Nagasaki district were examined for adult T-cell leukemia-associated antigen (ATLA), a human retrovirus-associated antigen, and anti-ATLA antibodies. Anti-ATLA antibody reactivity with the ATLA-positive cultured cells from an ATL patient was demonstrated in four (57.1%) of seven patients. This suggests that infection by a human retrovirus may be closely associated with Hodgkin's disease in the Nagasaki district. However, ATLA could not be induced in the cultured mononuclear cells taken from biopsied lymph nodes of the three patients examined. Hence, it is necessary to collect more direct evidence in the search for a viral etiology of Hodgkin's disease.

  20. Autoimmune Demyelinating Polyneuropathy as a Manifestation of Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Adult Cord Blood Transplantation in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrick Hogan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated demyelinating disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a rare entity with unclear etiology. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP has been reported after related and adult unrelated allogeneic stem cell transplantation but no such case has been reported after unrelated cord blood transplantation. We hereby present the first case of AIDP after double umbilical cord blood transplantation (DUCBT. A 55-year-old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL received a cord blood transplant for relapsed refractory disease with high risk cytogenetics. On day 221, patient presented with skin rash, tingling in both lower extremites, and ascending paralysis that progressed rapidly over the course of 2 days. The workup resulted in a diagnosis of AIDP and administration of intravenous immunoglobulins plus steroids was initiated. Motor and sensory powers were fully recovered and his chronic GVHD was managed for several months with single agent sirolimus.

  1. Outcome of patients with HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma after SCT: a retrospective study by the EBMT LWP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarbachi, A; Cwynarski, K; Boumendil, A; Finel, H; Fields, P; Raj, K; Nagler, A; Mohty, M; Sureda, A; Dreger, P; Hermine, O

    2014-10-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) carries a dismal prognosis. Experience with allo-SCT for ATL appears encouraging but is limited to Japanese series. This retrospective analysis of the EBMT registry revealed 21 HTLV-I seropositive ATL including 7 acute and 12 lymphoma subtypes. Four patients received auto-SCT and rapidly died from ATL. Out of 17 allo-SCT (4 myeloablative, 13 reduced intensity), 6 are still alive (4 were in CR1 at SCT). Eleven patients died within 2 years, eight from relapse/progression and three from transplant toxicity. Six of seven informative patients who lived >12 months had chronic GVHD. Overall these results indicate that allo-SCT but not auto-SCT may salvage a subset of ATL patients, supporting the existence of graft vs ATL effect also in non-Japanese patients.

  2. Minimal Residual Disease at First Achievement of Complete Remission Predicts Outcome in Adult Patients with Philadelphia Chromosome-Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Zhang

    Full Text Available We evaluated the prognostic effect of minimal residual disease at first achievement of complete remission (MRD at CR1 in adult patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. A total of 97 patients received treatment in our center between 2007 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed in this study. Patients were divided into two arms according to the post-remission therapy (chemotherapy alone or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT they received. MRD was detected by four-color flow cytometry. We chose 0.02% and 0.2% as the cut-off points of MRD at CR1 for risk stratification using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The 3-year overall survival (OS and leukemia free survival (LFS rates for the whole cohort were 46.2% and 40.5%. MRD at CR1 had a significantly negative correlation with survival in both arms. Three-year OS rates in the chemotherapy arm were 70.0%, 25.2%, 0% (P = 0.003 for low, intermediate, and high levels of MRD at CR1, respectively. Three-year OS rates in the transplant arm were 81.8%, 64.3%, 27.3% (P = 0.005 for low, intermediate, and high levels of MRD at CR1, respectively. Multivariate analysis confirmed that higher level of MRD at CR1 was a significant adverse factor for OS and LFS. Compared with chemotherapy alone, allo-HSCT significantly improved LFS rates in patients with intermediate (P = 0.005 and high (P = 0.022 levels of MRD at CR1, but not patients with low level of MRD at CR1 (P = 0.851. These results suggested that MRD at CR1 could strongly predict the outcome of adult ALL. Patients with intermediate and high levels of MRD at CR1 would benefit from allo-HSCT.

  3. Association of Macroeconomic Factors With Nonrelapse Mortality After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Adults With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: An Analysis From the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Sebastian; Labopin, Myriam; Ibatici, Adalberto; Browne, Paul; Czerw, Tomasz; Socie, Gerard; Unal, Ali; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Goker, Hakan; Potter, Mike; Furness, Caroline L; McQuaker, Grant; Beelen, Dietrich; Milpied, Noel; Campos, Antonio; Craddock, Charles; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-03-01

    From a global perspective, the rates of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) are closely related to the economic status of a country. However, a potential association with outcome has not yet been documented. The goal of this study was to evaluate effects of health care expenditure (HCE), Human Development Index (HDI), team density, and center experience on nonrelapse mortality (NRM) after HLA-matched sibling alloHCT for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A total of 983 patients treated with myeloablative alloHCT between 2004 and 2008 in 24 European countries were included. In a univariate analysis, the probability of day 100 NRM was increased for countries with lower current HCE (8% vs. 3%; p = .06), countries with lower HDI (8% vs. 3%; p = .02), and centers with less experience (8% vs. 5%; p = .04). In addition, the overall NRM was increased for countries with lower current HCE (21% vs. 17%; p = .09) and HDI (21% vs. 16%; p = .03) and for centers with lower activity (21% vs. 16%; p = .07). In a multivariate analysis, the strongest predictive model for day 100 NRM included current HCE greater than the median (hazard ratio [HR], 0.39; p = .002). The overall NRM was mostly predicted by HDI greater than the median (HR, 0.65; p = .01). Both lower current HCE and HDI were associated with decreased probability of overall survival. Both macroeconomic factors and the socioeconomic status of a country strongly influence NRM after alloHCT for adults with ALL. Our findings should be considered when clinical studies in the field of alloHCT are interpreted. ©AlphaMed Press.

  4. A clinical trial of supervised exercise for adult inpatients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing induction chemotherapy☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibhai, Shabbir M.H.; O’Neill, Sara; Fisher-Schlombs, Karla; Breunis, Henriette; Brandwein, Joseph M.; Timilshina, Narhari; Tomlinson, George A.; Klepin, Heidi D.; Culos-Reed, S. Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) receiving induction chemotherapy (IC) were enrolled in a supervised exercise intervention to determine safety, feasibility, and efficacy. Physical fitness measures, quality of life (QOL) and fatigue were assessed using standardized measures at baseline, post-induction, and post first consolidation. Retention was excellent, the intervention was safe, and efficacy estimates suggested benefits in physical fitness and QOL outcomes. Exercise is a safe, promising intervention for improving fitness and QOL in this patient population. These results provide a foundation for a randomized trial to better understand the impact of exercise during IC on clinically important outcomes. PMID:22726923

  5. A clinical trial of supervised exercise for adult inpatients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing induction chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibhai, Shabbir M H; O'Neill, Sara; Fisher-Schlombs, Karla; Breunis, Henriette; Brandwein, Joseph M; Timilshina, Narhari; Tomlinson, George A; Klepin, Heidi D; Culos-Reed, S Nicole

    2012-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) receiving induction chemotherapy (IC) were enrolled in a supervised exercise intervention to determine safety, feasibility, and efficacy. Physical fitness measures, quality of life (QOL) and fatigue were assessed using standardized measures at baseline, post-induction, and post first consolidation. Retention was excellent, the intervention was safe, and efficacy estimates suggested benefits in physical fitness and QOL outcomes. Exercise is a safe, promising intervention for improving fitness and QOL in this patient population. These results provide a foundation for a randomized trial to better understand the impact of exercise during IC on clinically important outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The genomic landscape of pediatric and young adult T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic alterations that activate NOTCH1 signaling and T cell transcription factors, coupled with inactivation of the INK4/ARF tumor suppressors, are hallmarks of T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), but detailed genome-wide sequencing of large T-ALL cohorts has not been carried out. Using integrated genomic analysis of 264 T-ALL cases, we identified 106 putative driver genes, half of which had not previously been described in childhood T-ALL (for example, CCND3, CTCF, MYB, SMARCA4, ZFP36L2 and MYCN).

  7. Rationale for a pediatric-inspired approach in the adolescent and young adult population with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, with a focus on asparaginase treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Rizzari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades great improvements have been made in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, with 5-year overall survival rates currently approaching almost 90%. In comparison, results reported in adolescents and young adults (AYAs are relatively poor. In adults, results have improved, but are still lagging behind those obtained in children. Possible reasons for this different pattern of results include an increased incidence of unfavorable and a decreased incidence of favorable cytogenetic abnormalities in AYAs compared with children. Furthermore, in AYAs less intensive treatments (especially lower cumulative doses of drugs such as asparaginase, corticosteroids and methotrexate and longer gaps between courses of chemotherapy are planned compared to those in children. However, although favorable results obtained in AYAs receiving pediatric protocols have been consistently reported in several international collaborative trials, physicians must also be aware of the specific toxicity pattern associated with increased success in AYAs, since an excess of toxicity may compromise overall treatment schedule intensity. Cooperative efforts between pediatric and adult hematologists in designing specific protocols for AYAs are warranted.

  8. Recurrent die-offs of adult coho salmon returning to spawn in Puget Sound lowland urban streams.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel L Scholz

    Full Text Available Several Seattle-area streams in Puget Sound were the focus of habitat restoration projects in the 1990s. Post-project effectiveness monitoring surveys revealed anomalous behaviors among adult coho salmon returning to spawn in restored reaches. These included erratic surface swimming, gaping, fin splaying, and loss of orientation and equilibrium. Affected fish died within hours, and female carcasses generally showed high rates (>90% of egg retention. Beginning in the fall of 2002, systematic spawner surveys were conducted to 1 assess the severity of the adult die-offs, 2 compare spawner mortality in urban vs. non-urban streams, and 3 identify water quality and spawner condition factors that might be associated with the recurrent fish kills. The forensic investigation focused on conventional water quality parameters (e.g., dissolved oxygen, temperature, ammonia, fish condition, pathogen exposure and disease status, and exposures to metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and current use pesticides. Daily surveys of a representative urban stream (Longfellow Creek from 2002-2009 revealed premature spawner mortality rates that ranged from 60-100% of each fall run. The comparable rate in a non-urban stream was <1% (Fortson Creek, surveyed in 2002. Conventional water quality, pesticide exposure, disease, and spawner condition showed no relationship to the syndrome. Coho salmon did show evidence of exposure to metals and petroleum hydrocarbons, both of which commonly originate from motor vehicles in urban landscapes. The weight of evidence suggests that freshwater-transitional coho are particularly vulnerable to an as-yet unidentified toxic contaminant (or contaminant mixture in urban runoff. Stormwater may therefore place important constraints on efforts to conserve and recover coho populations in urban and urbanizing watersheds throughout the western United States.

  9. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; CD45-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  10. An adult patient who developed malignant fibrous histiocytoma 9 years after radiation therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yasuhiro; Ohno, Norioki; Horikawa, Yoko; Nishimura, Shin-ichiro; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Shimose, Shoji

    2002-01-01

    A 24-year-old Japanese man with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which occurred during childhood, developed malignant fibrous histiocytoma of his left knee. His past history revealed that he had undergone leukemic blast cell invasion of the left knee and subsequent radiation therapy 9 years ago. The total radiation doses for the upper part of the left tibia and the lower part of the left femur were 60 Gy and 40 Gy, respectively. Neither distant metastasis nor a relapse of leukemia occurred. A curative resection of the left femur with a noninvasive margin was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy including high-dose methotrexate was given successfully before and after surgery; this was followed by relapse-free survival for 3 years. The nature of postirradiation malignant fibrous histiocytoma is highly aggressive. When a patient complains of persistent symptoms in a previously irradiated field, the possibility of this tumor must be taken into account. The importance of early diagnosis cannot be over-emphasized. (author)

  11. An adult patient who developed malignant fibrous histiocytoma 9 years after radiation therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Yasuhiro [National Hiroshima Hospital, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Ohno, Norioki; Horikawa, Yoko; Nishimura, Shin-ichiro; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Shimose, Shoji [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-12-01

    A 24-year-old Japanese man with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which occurred during childhood, developed malignant fibrous histiocytoma of his left knee. His past history revealed that he had undergone leukemic blast cell invasion of the left knee and subsequent radiation therapy 9 years ago. The total radiation doses for the upper part of the left tibia and the lower part of the left femur were 60 Gy and 40 Gy, respectively. Neither distant metastasis nor a relapse of leukemia occurred. A curative resection of the left femur with a noninvasive margin was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy including high-dose methotrexate was given successfully before and after surgery; this was followed by relapse-free survival for 3 years. The nature of postirradiation malignant fibrous histiocytoma is highly aggressive. When a patient complains of persistent symptoms in a previously irradiated field, the possibility of this tumor must be taken into account. The importance of early diagnosis cannot be over-emphasized. (author)

  12. The evolving role of chemotherapy and hematopoietic cell transplants in Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzow, M R; Fielding, A K; Luger, S M; Paietta, E; Ofran, Y; Rowe, J M; Goldstone, A H; Tallman, M S; Lazarus, H M

    2017-12-01

    The introduction of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) into the treatment of patients with Ph or BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia has revolutionized the treatment of this poor prognosis acute leukemia. The combination of TKI with chemotherapy has improved response rates and allowed more patients to proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (alloHCT). Older patients have excellent responses to TKI and corticosteroids or in combination with minimal chemotherapy. This raises the question as to whether patients require full-intensity chemotherapy with TKI to achieve molecular remissions. The pediatricians have proposed that cure is achievable without alloHCT in children. These results have suggested that many patients may not require traditional chemotherapy in addition to TKI to achieve remission, and that patients who achieve a negative minimal residual disease state may not require alloHCT. The data in support of these questions is presented here and a suggested future clinical trial design based on these data is proposed.

  13. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) treatment options can include observation, steroids, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and/or stem cell transplant. Get detailed information about newly diagnosed and recurrent CLL and available treatment modalities in this summary for clinicians.

  14. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairy cell leukemia treatment options include watchful waiting when there are no symptoms, chemotherapy, biologic therapy, surgery, and targeted therapy. Learn more about the diagnosis and treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent hairy cell leukemia in this expert-reviewed summary.

  15. The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas Kræsten

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The main aim of the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) was to obtain information about the epidemiology of the hematologic cancers acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). STUDY POPULATION: The registry...... was established in January 2000 by the Danish Acute Leukemia Group and has been expanded over the years. It includes adult AML patients diagnosed in Denmark since 2000, ALL patients diagnosed since 2005, and MDS patients diagnosed since 2010. The coverage of leukemia patients exceeds 99%, and the coverage of MDS...... years. To ensure this high coverage, completeness, and quality of data, linkage to the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Registry of Patients, and several programmed data entry checks are used. CONCLUSION: The completeness and positive predictive values of the leukemia data have...

  16. Leukemia and lymphoma in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Leukemia has been observed to increase with increasing radiation dose in the A-bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first radiation-related cases occurred 3 to 5 years following exposure. The peak incidence years were about 7 to 8 years following exposure and the leukemogenic effect has decreased since that time, but it may last for 40 years or longer in the most heavily exposed persons. A bimodal susceptibility pattern was observed, with peaks following exposure during childhood and after age 50. Latent periods for the development of acute leukemia were shortest in the younger exposed persons. Both acute and chronic forms of leukemia occurred in exposed persons at younger ages in life than normally is expected. The most common types of radiation-induced leukemia were acute and chronic granulocytic in adults and children, and acute lymphocytic in children. The highest radiation-related leukemia risk was for chronic granulocytic leukemia following childhood exposure

  17. Clinical and Surgical Findings and Outcome Following Rumenotomy in Adult Dairy Cattle Affected with Recurrent Rumen Tympany Associated with Non-Metallic Foreign Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Bani Ismail; A. Al-Majali; K. Al-Qudah

    2007-01-01

    Medical records of 31 adult dairy cows suffering from recurrent rumen tympany for at least 1 month duration that underwent exploratory laparotomy and rumenotomy were reviewed and information was obtained on signalment, history, physical examination findings, laboratory findings and surgical findings. Cases were categorized according to surgical findings into 3 groups. Group 1 (n = 10) included cattle with reticuloruminal, metallic foreign bodies and perireticular adhesions/inflammation, group...

  18. Anti-ATLA (antibody to adult T-cell leukemia virus-associated antigen), highly positive in OKT4-positive mature T-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobinai, K; Nagai, M; Setoya, T; Shibata, T; Minato, K; Shimoyama, M

    1983-01-01

    Serum or plasma specimens from 252 patients with lymphoid malignancies were screened for reactivity with adult T-cell leukemia virus-associated antigen (ATLA), and the relationship between the immunologic phenotype of the tumor cells and ATLA reactivity was determined. Anti-ATLA antibodies were found in 24 (29.3%) of 82 patients with T-cell malignancy. In contrast, the antibodies were found in none of the 106 patients with B-cell malignancy and only rarely in patients with other lymphoid malignancies without blood transfusions. Among the patients with T-cell malignancy, anti-ATLA antibodies were found in 23 (45.1%) of the 51 patients with OKT4-positive mature T-cell (inducer/helper T-cell) malignancy, but in none of the patients with T-cell malignancy of pre-T, thymic T-cell or OKT8-positive mature T-cell (suppressor/cytotoxic T-cell) phenotype. Furthermore, among the OKT4-positive mature T-cell malignancies, the antibodies were found in 16 (84.2%) of 19 patients with ATL and in 5 (27.8%) of 18 patients with mature (peripheral) T-cell lymphoma, in none of four with typical T-chronic lymphocytic leukemia, in one of nine with mycosis fungoides and in the one patient with small-cell variant of Sézary's syndrome. These results suggest that anti-ATLA positive T-cell malignancies with OKT4-positive mature T-cell phenotype must be the same disease, because it is highly possible that they have the same etiology and the same cellular origin. In the atypical cases, it seems necessary to demonstrate monoclonal integration of proviral DNA of ATLV or HTLV into the tumor cells in order to establish the final diagnosis of ATL.

  19. Profile of imatinib in pediatric leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke MJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael J BurkeDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology/Bone Marrow Transplantation, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Using targeted therapy for treatment of cancer has become the paradigm to which clinical trials aspire. Imatinib, the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, was the first of its kind to specifically target and inhibit the underlying Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+ oncogene found to be driving chronic myeloid leukemia in adults, and has since become standard of care for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in children. Imatinib, with its ability to target Ph+ leukemia, has been successfully incorporated into the treatment of not only pediatric chronic myeloid leukemia but also Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. With the incorporation of imatinib into combination chemotherapy for pediatric Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia, current survival rates are far higher than at any other time for this once dreadful disease. With more children today receiving treatment with imatinib for either chronic myeloid leukemia or Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia, knowledge is accumulating surrounding the short-term and long-term toxicities observed in children, adolescents, and young adults treated with this TKI. In summary, the TKI imatinib has made a historic impact in the treatment of pediatric Ph+ leukemias, transforming what were once very high-risk diseases with considerable morbidity and mortality into ones that are now very treatable but with a new awareness surrounding the long-term toxicities that may come with this price for cure.Keywords: imatinib, leukemia, lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, pediatric

  20. Toxicity profile and treatment delays in NOPHO ALL2008-comparing adults and children with Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Nina; Birgens, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Griškevičius, Laimonas; Hallböök, Helene; Heyman, Mats; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Jónsson, Ólafur Gísli; Palk, Katrin; Pruunsild, Kaie; Quist-Paulsen, Petter; Vaitkeviciene, Goda; Vettenranta, Kim; Asberg, Ann; Helt, Louise Rold; Frandsen, Thomas; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2016-02-01

    Cure rates improve when adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated according to pediatric protocols. Assumed risks of toxicities and associated delays in treatment have played a role in setting upper age limits. The aim of this study was to examine the toxicity profile and treatment delays in NOPHO ALL2008 comparing children and adults. We collected information on 19 treatment-related toxicities, systematically captured at 3-month intervals throughout therapy, and time intervals between 12 consecutive treatment phases for 1076 patients aged 1-45 yrs treated according to the Nordic/Baltic ALL2008 protocol. No adults died during induction. The duration of induction therapy and postinduction treatment phases did not differ between children and adults, except for patients 18-45 yrs being significantly delayed during two of nine high-risk blocks (median number of days for patients 1-9, 10-17, and 18-45 yrs; the glucocorticosteroid/antimetabolite-based block B1: 24, 26, and 29 d, respectively, P = 0.001, and Block 5 (in most cases also a B block): 29, 29, and 37 d, respectively, P = 0.02). A higher incidence of thrombosis with increasing age was found; highest odds ratio 5.4 (95% CI: (2.6;11.0)) for patients 15-17 yrs compared with children 1-9 yrs (P children, although thrombosis and avascular osteonecrosis was most common among adolescents. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A new Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System for refractory/relapsed adult acute myelogeneous leukaemia patients: a GOELAMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, P; Labopin, M; Turlure, P; Prebet, T; Pigneux, A; Hunault, M; Filanovsky, K; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Luquet, I; Lode, L; Richebourg, S; Blanchet, O; Gachard, N; Vey, N; Ifrah, N; Milpied, N; Harousseau, J-L; Bene, M-C; Mohty, M; Delaunay, J

    2011-06-01

    A simplified prognostic score is presented based on the multivariate analysis of 138 refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients (median age 55 years, range: 19-70) receiving a combination of intensive chemotherapy+Gemtuzumab as salvage regimen. Overall, 2-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 29±4% and 36±4%, respectively. Disease status (relapse Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System was then validated on an independent cohort of 111 refractory/relapsed AML patients. This new simplified prognostic score, using three clinical and biological parameters routinely applied, allow to discriminate around two third of the patients who should benefit from a salvage intensive regimen in the setting of refractory/relapsed AML patients. The other one third of the patients should receive investigational therapy.

  2. Pulmonary complications of induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia in adults. Findings of chest X-rays and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.; Huettmann, C.; Jacobi, V.; Boehme, A.

    1998-01-01

    To exclude pulmonary complications, 359 chest radiographs and 50 computed tomographs of the lung were performed in 95 patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia. The radiological findings were registered, described and correlated with clinical findings in the present study on 2395 days of observation. Results: In summary, 52 patients showed alterations of the lung. Pulmonary hyperhydration was seen in 21 cases, bacterial pneumonia was found in 18 cases, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis was documented in 14 cases, and 5 cases of severe haemorrhage were seen. An unexplained pulmonary edema in 13 patients with interstitial and alveolar infiltrates is considered to be a complication of treatment with cytosine-arabinoside. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that chest X-ray and computed tomography have a high impact in detection and treatment of pulmonary complications following intensive chemotherapy. We may expect the development of diffuse opacity following administration of cytosine-arabinoside in medium-sized doses. (orig.) [de

  3. Medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors for adult acute lymphocytic leukemia: the InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibola, Christine F; Slager, Susan L; Berndt, Sonja I; Lightfoot, Tracy; Sampson, Joshua N; Morton, Lindsay M; Weisenburger, Dennis D

    2014-08-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (ALL) in adults is a rare malignancy with a poor clinical outcome, and few reported etiologic risk factors. We performed an exploratory pooled study of 152 ALL cases and 23096 controls from 16 case-control studies to investigate the role of medical history, lifestyle, family history, and occupational risk factors and risk of ALL. Age- race/ethnicity-, sex-, and study-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression. An increased risk of ALL was found in those with a family history of a hematological malignancy (OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.22 to 5.54) and in leather (OR = 3.91, 95% CI = 1.35 to 11.35) and sewing/embroidery workers (OR = 2.92, 95% CI = 1.00 to 8.49). Consumers of alcohol had an increased risk of B-cell ALL (OR = 2.87, 95% CI = 1.18 to 6.95). The small number of statistically significant risk factors identified out of the 112 variables examined could be chance findings and will require further replication to assess their role in the etiology of adult ALL. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Prevalence of antibody to adult T-cell leukemia virus-associated antigens (ATLA) in Japanese monkeys and other non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, M; Komuro, A; Nozawa, K; Shotake, T; Ishikawa, K; Yamamoto, K; Ishida, T; Honjo, S; Hinuma, Y

    1984-02-15

    The prevalence of adult T-cell-leukemia virus (ATLV) infection was examined in Japanese monkeys living naturally in various parts of Japan and in other species of non-human primates imported into and kept in Japan. Sera of 2,650 Japanese monkeys from 41 troops throughout Japan were tested. High incidences of anti-ATLV-associated antigen (ATLA)-positive monkeys were found in most troops, not only in the endemic area of human ATL(Southwestern Japan), but also in non-endemic areas. The incidence of sero-positive individuals increased gradually with age, reaching a maximum when the animals became adult, indicating age dependency, like that found by epidemiological studies on humans. Anti-ATLA antibodies were also detected in 90 of 815 sera of imported non-human primates of 33 species other than Japanese monkeys. All the anti-ATLA sero-positive monkeys were Catarrhines (Old World monkeys), mainly macaques of Asian origin. Some sero-positive monkeys were also found among animals of African origin, but no antibody was detected in Prosimians and Platyrrhines (New World monkeys). The clear-cut difference between the geographical distribution of sero-positive simians and that of humans indicates the improbability of direct transmission of ATLV from simians to humans.

  5. Spectrum of somatic mutations detected by targeted next-generation sequencing and their prognostic significance in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Feng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Target-specific next-generation sequencing technology was used to analyze 112 genes in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. This sequencing mainly focused on the specific mutational hotspots. Among the 121 patients, 93 patients were B-ALL (76.9%, and 28 patients (23.1% were T-ALL. Of the 121 patients, 110 (90.9% harbored at least one mutation. The five most frequently mutated genes in T-ALL are NOTCH1, JAK3, FBXW7, FAT1, and NRAS. In B-ALL, FAT1, SF1, CRLF2, TET2, and PTPN1 have higher incidence of mutations. Gene mutations are different between Ph+ALL and Ph−ALL patients. B-ALL patients with PTPN11 mutation and T-ALL patients with NOTCH1 and/or FBXW7 mutations showed better survival. But B-ALL with JAK1/JAK2 mutations showed worse survival. The results suggest that gene mutations exist in adult ALL patients universally, they are related with prognosis.

  6. Multi-institutional phase 2 clinical and pharmacogenomic trial of tipifarnib plus etoposide for elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Judith E; Vener, Tatiana I; Raponi, Mitch; Ritchie, Ellen K; Smith, B Douglas; Gore, Steven D; Morris, Lawrence E; Feldman, Eric J; Greer, Jacqueline M; Malek, Sami; Carraway, Hetty E; Ironside, Valerie; Galkin, Steven; Levis, Mark J; McDevitt, Michael A; Roboz, Gail R; Gocke, Christopher D; Derecho, Carlo; Palma, John; Wang, Yixin; Kaufmann, Scott H; Wright, John J; Garret-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2012-01-05

    Tipifarnib (T) exhibits modest activity in elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on preclinical synergy, a phase 1 trial of T plus etoposide (E) yielded 25% complete remission (CR). We selected 2 comparable dose levels for a randomized phase 2 trial in 84 adults (age range, 70-90 years; median, 76 years) who were not candidates for conventional chemotherapy. Arm A (T 600 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 100 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) and arm B (T 400 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 200 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) yielded similar CR, but arm B had greater toxicity. Total CR was 25%, day 30 death rate 7%. A 2-gene signature of high RASGRP1 and low aprataxin (APTX) expression previously predicted for T response. Assays using blasts from a subset of 40 patients treated with T plus E on this study showed that AMLs with a RASGRP1/APTX ratio of more than 5.2 had a 78% CR rate and negative predictive value 87%. This ratio did not correlate with outcome in 41 patients treated with conventional chemotherapies. The next T-based clinical trials will test the ability of the 2-gene signature to enrich for T responders prospectively. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00602771.

  7. Long-term antibiotics for prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection in older adults: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Haroon; Davies, Freya; Francis, Nick; Farewell, Daniel; Butler, Christoper; Paranjothy, Shantini

    2017-05-29

    To address clinical uncertainties about the effectiveness and safety of long-term antibiotic therapy for preventing recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older adults. Systematic review andmeta-analysis of randomised trials. We searched Medline, Embase, The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature( CINAHL), and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials from inception to August 2016. Eligible studies compared long-term antibiotic therapy with non-antibiotic therapy or placebo in men or women aged over 65, or in postmenopausal women, with recurrent UTIs. We did not identify any studies that included older men. Three randomised controlled trials compared long-term antibiotics with vaginal oestrogens (n=150), oral lactobacilli (n=238) and D-mannose powder (n=94) in postmenopausal women. Long-term antibiotics reduced the risk of UTI recurrence by 24% (three trials, n=482; pooled risk ratio (RR) 0.76; 95% CI 0.61 to 0.95, number needed to treat=8.5). There was no statistically significant increase in risk of adverse events (mild adverse events: pooled RR 1.52; 95% CI 0.76 to 3.03; serious adverse events: pooled RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.31 to 2.66). One trial showed 90% of urinary and faecal Escherichia coli isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole after 1 month of prophylaxis. Findings from three small trials with relatively short follow-up periods suggest long-term antibiotic therapy reduces the risk of recurrence in postmenopausal women with recurrent UTI. We did not identify any evidence to inform several clinically important scenarios including, benefits and harms in older men or frail care home residents, optimal duration of prophylaxis, recurrence rates once prophylaxis stops and effects on urinary antibiotic resistance. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Hyper-CVAD Compared With BFM-like Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. A Retrospective Single-Center Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Cheikh, Jean; El Dika, Imane; Massoud, Radwan; Charafeddine, Maya; Mahfouz, Rami; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Several induction regimens have been developed for treatment of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, only a few prospective randomized trials have directly compared these regimens. In this report, we retrospectively evaluated the outcome of 62 adult ALL patients treated with either hyper-CVAD (hyper fractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone; n = 38) or a BFM (Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster)-like regimen (n = 24) between November 2000 and January 2016 at the American university of Beirut Medical Center in Lebanon. The feasibility of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for those patients was also evaluated. The median follow-up time was 29 (range, 1-129) months. Fifteen (39%) and 10 (42%) patients underwent allo-SCT in the hyper-CVAD and BFM-like group, respectively. At the time of the last follow-up, 28 patients (74%) were in complete remission in the hyper-CVAD group versus 18 patients (75%) in the BFM-like group. Of those, 20 patients (53%) versus 11 patients (46%) were minimal residual disease-negative at the last follow-up, respectively. The 3-year overall survival rate (71.9% vs. 76.9%; P = .808) and 3-year disease-free survival (54.7% vs. 76.4%; P = .435) were similar in hyper-CVAD group compared with the BFM-like group, respectively. Both chemotherapies were relatively well tolerated. Overall, despite the older age and a greater number of patients with high-risk category (including Philadelphia chromosome-positive) in the hyper-CVAD group, this did not translate into a difference in survival outcome between the 2 groups. The hyper-CVAD regimen appears to be feasible for adult patients with ALL in terms of tolerability and efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Unrelated cord blood transplantation in adults with myelodysplasia or secondary acute myeloblastic leukemia: a survey on behalf of Eurocord and CLWP of EBMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, M; Sanz, G F; Ionescu, I; Rio, B; Sirvent, A; Renaud, M; Carreras, E; Milpied, N; Mohty, M; Beguin, Y; Bordigoni, P; de Witte, T; Picardi, A; Purtill, D; Gluckman, E; Kroger, N; Rocha, V

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate, through the Eurocord and European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) registries, outcomes and risk factors for outcomes in adult patients who underwent single or double unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or secondary acute myeloblastic leukemia (sAML). A total of 180 adults with MDS (n=39) or sAML (n=69) were analyzed. Risk factors for outcomes were analyzed using the Fine and Gray method and the Cox model. Median age was 43 (18-72) years. In all, 77 patients (71%) received a single UCBT. Myeloablative conditioning regimen (MAC) was given to 57 (53%) patients. Median numbers of nucleated and CD34(+) cells at freezing were 3.6 × 10(7) and 1.1 × 10(5) kg. At 60 days, cumulative incidence of neutrophil recovery was 78±4% and was independently associated with the number of CD34(+) cells per kg (>1.1 × 10(5); P=0.005) and advanced disease status (blasts vs 34%; P=0.009). A 2-year disease-free-survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 30 and 34%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients with high-risk disease (blasts >5% and International Prognostic scoring system (IPSS) intermediate-2 or high in MDS) had significant poorer DFS (hazard ratio (HR): 1.76; P=0.047). In spite of high NRM, these data indicate that UCBT is an acceptable alternative option to treat adults with high-risk MDS or sAML, without a suitable human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched donor.

  10. [Clinical curative effect and changes of serum immunology of Traditional Chinese Medicine combined with surgical treatment on the adult onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Jun; Xiao, Yang

    2018-01-20

    Objective: To observe the outcomes of Traditional Chinese Medicine combined with CO_2 laser surgery on the clinical course and serum immunological indexes of Adult onset Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis. Method: 69 cases of adult recurrent respiratory papilloma patients who enrolled in Beijing Tongren Hospital from September 2014 to March 2016 were divided randomly into two groups.The Chinese medicine surgery group were treated with traditional Chinese medicine combined with CO_2 laser surgery and the surgery group were treated with CO_2 laser surgery alone.All patients were followed up for more than one year.Relapse time and Derkay score were examed and analyzed between two groups before and after treatment.The detection of aperipheral blood immunoglobulin,T cell subsets,percentage of B cell and NK cell and IgG subtype examed every six month. Result: There was no significant difference between two group in Derkay score,lesion recurrence time and the index of immunology before the treatment( P >0.05).However,the recurrence time after treatment [(14.11±1.57)months]prolonged than before treatment[(10.85±2.33)months]in the experimental group.The examination of IgG [(1 539.84±388.20)mg/dl],percentage of total T lymphocytes[(85.14±22.24)%],Th cells[(47.34±19.07)%],B lymphocytes[(12.55±5.26)%]in treatment of traditional Chinese medicine was higher than that before treatment of serum IgG [(1 225.14±260.27)mg/dl],T cells [(69.68±11.12)%],Th [(41.97±10.92)%],B lymphocytes[(10.30±5.45)%].The difference was statistically significant( P traditional Chinese medicine combined with laser surgery for the treatment of adult recurrent respiratory papillomatosis,can effectively prolong the recurrence time of patients,improve their immune cell antiviral ability and be worthy of clinical popularization and application.

  11. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia Overview Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is an uncommon type of cancer of the blood cells. The term "chronic" in chronic myelogenous leukemia indicates that this cancer ...

  12. Stakeholders' views of recurrent sore throat, tonsillitis and their management: a qualitative interview study for the NAtional Trial of Tonsillectomy IN Adults (NATTINA Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, L A; Rousseau, N S; Wilson, J A; Wilkes, S; Haighton, C A

    2017-04-01

    To determine the impact of recurrent sore throats and tonsillitis in adults and stakeholder views of treatment pathways. Qualitative semistructured interview design reporting novel data from a feasibility study for a UK national trial of tonsillectomy in adults. Nine study sites linked to ear, nose and throat departments in National Health Service hospitals located across the United Kingdom. Fifteen patients, 11 general practitioners and 22 ear, nose and throat staff consented to in-depth interviews, which were analysed using a framework analysis approach. Views of stakeholder groups. Recurrent sore throats were reported to severely impact patients' family, work and social life. Ear, nose and throat staff stated that patients faced increasing barriers to secondary care service access. General practitioners were under pressure to reduce 'limited clinical value' surgical procedures. The findings from this study suggest that there is a disconnect between the attitudes of the stakeholders and the reality of recurrent sore throat, tonsillectomy procedures and service provision. More evidence for the role of tonsillectomy is needed from randomised controlled trials to determine whether it should continue to be ranked as a procedure of limited clinical effectiveness. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Selective Depletion of CD45RA+ T Cells From Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Grafts in Preventing GVHD in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-23

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-1; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. C7a, a Biphosphinic Cyclopalladated Compound, Efficiently Controls the Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Adult T Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Figueiredo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is a highly aggressive disease that occurs in individuals infected with the human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1. Patients with aggressive ATLL have a poor prognosis because the leukemic cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. We have investigated the therapeutic efficacy of a biphosphinic cyclopalladated complex {Pd2 [S(−C2, N-dmpa]2 (μ-dppeCl2}, termed C7a, in a patient-derived xenograft model of ATLL, and investigated the mechanism of C7a action in HTLV-1-positive and negative transformed T cell lines in vitro. In vivo survival studies in immunocompromised mice inoculated with human RV-ATL cells and intraperitoneally treated with C7a led to significantly increased survival of the treated mice. We investigated the mechanism of C7a activity in vitro and found that it induced mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, caspase activation, nuclear condensation and DNA degradation. These results suggest that C7a triggers apoptotic cell death in both HTLV-1 infected and uninfected human transformed T-cell lines. Significantly, C7a was not cytotoxic to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy donors and HTLV-1-infected individuals. C7a inhibited more than 60% of the ex vivo spontaneous proliferation of PBMC from HTLV-1-infected individuals. These results support a potential therapeutic role for C7a in both ATLL and HTLV-1-negative T-cell lymphomas.

  15. Adult T-cell leukemia on the east coast of Kii Peninsula--presentation of an anti-ATLA-negative case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karitani, Y; Kobayashi, T; Koh, T; Iwata, Y; Tanaka, I; Minami, N; Shirakawa, S

    1983-01-01

    Nineteen patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) have been found in the last seven years along the east coast of Kii Peninsula in Japan. The leukemic cells were of the immunologically inducer/helper T-cell phenotype. The prognosis was very poor (median survival time, 85 days), and most of the patients had fatal complications of pulmonary infections. Antibody against ATL-associated antigen (anti-ATLA) was detected in sera from 9 of 10 patients who were born along the coast. However, it was not detected in one patient who was born in a district surrounded by mountains. Although he had neither superficial lymphadenopathy nor skin lesions, he showed rapid clinical deterioration. His leukemic cells appeared to be extremely bizarre with marked nuclear deformation compared with those of the other patients. In surface marker studies the leukemic cells reacted positively with OKT3, OKT4 and OKIa-1 monoclonal antibodies. The characteristics of the anti-ATLA-negative case are discussed in comparison with the other ATL cases.

  16. Detection of adult T-cell leukemia virus (ATLV) bearing lymphocytes in concentrated red blood cells derived from ATL associated antibody (ATLA-Ab) positive donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Y; Ohya, K; Ueda, R; Fukuda, T

    1986-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia associated antibody (ATLA-Ab) positive persons were screened by indirect immunofluorescence (IF) testing. Their lymphocytes were collected from concentrated red blood cells (CRC), and cultured in vitro with and without phytohemagglutinin (PHA) for 10 days. The expression of ATL virus (ATLV) positive lymphocytes during the in vitro culture was then analyzed by IF assay using mouse monoclonal antibody ATL-19 reactive to p19 core protein of ATLV. 97% of ATLA-Ab positive CRC (36 cases) demonstrated ATLV positive lymphocytes after being cultured for more than 10 days with PHA, whereas, none of ATLA-Ab negative CRC (22 cases) demonstrated ATLV positive lymphocytes. All of the 10 ATLA-Ab positive CRC that were stored for 2, 4, and 7 days contained lymphocytes which expressed ATLV after in vitro culture, while 7 of 10 CRC stored for 14 days and only 1 of 10 CRCs stored for 20 days, expressed ATLV positive lymphocytes. This data indicates that almost all of the ATLA-Ab positive blood contained ATLV positive lymphocytes, and that the in vitro appearance of these ATLV positive lymphocytes was reduced by storing the CRC for more than 14 days.

  17. Impact of miR-155 and miR-126 as novel biomarkers on the assessment of disease progression and prognosis in adult T-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kaori; Sasaki, Daisuke; Tsuruda, Kazuto; Inokuchi, Naoko; Nagai, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2012-12-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) provide new insight in the development of cancer, but little is known about their clinical relevance as biomarkers in the assessment of diagnosis, classification, progression and prognosis of various cancers. To explore a potential novel biomarker, we examined the cellular and plasma miRNA profiles in adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) characterized by diverse clinical features. Using CD4-positive cells isolated from 2 non-infected healthy individuals, 3 chronic ATL patients and 3 acute ATL patients, cellular miRNAs were profiled by microarray. The microarray screened 5 miRNAs namely miR-155, let-7g, miR-126, miR-130a and let-7b because of the large difference in their expression in diseased vs. that of healthy controls. The expression levels of before 5 miRNAs re-quantified by reverse transcription quantifiable polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) were not always accordant in cells and plasma. The high and low plasma levels of miR-155 and miR-126 changed with ATL stage. The present study revealed that there is a quantitative discrepancy between cellular and plasma miRNAs. The elevation of plasma miR-155 and the reduction in miR-126 correlated with poor prognosis, indicating their usefulness as a novel biomarker for the assessment of disease stage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of Cyclophosphamide Combined with Total Body Irradiation, Oral Busulfan, or Intravenous Busulfan for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Kenjiro; Kako, Shinichi; Shigematsu, Akio; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Doki, Noriko; Fukuda, Takahiro; Kanamori, Heiwa; Onizuka, Makoto; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Kurokawa, Mineo; Inoue, Yoshiko; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Morishima, Yasuo; Mizuta, Shuichi; Tanaka, Junji

    2016-12-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis to compare outcomes in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) with conditioning regimens containing cyclophosphamide (CY) in combination with total body irradiation (TBI), oral busulfan (p.o. BU), or intravenous busulfan (i.v. BU). We used data for January 2000 to December 2012 from the Transplant Registry Unified Management Program of the Japan Society of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation. We identified 2130 patients treated with TBI/CY (n = 2028), p.o. BU/CY (n = 60), or i.v. BU/CY (n = 42). Two-year overall survival (OS) and 2-year relapse-free survival rates were 69.0% and 62.1%, respectively, in the TBI/CY group, 55.9% and 54.2% in the p.o. BU/CY group, and 71.0% and 46.8% in the i.v. BU/CY group. In multivariate analysis, compared with TBI/CY, p.o. BU/CY, but not i.v. BU/CY, was associated with lower OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.46; P = .047) and a higher incidence of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HR, 3.36; P = .030). No between-group differences were seen in the incidence of nonrelapse mortality, relapse, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), or chronic GVHD. We suggest that i.v. BU/CY might be a possible alternative allo-HCT conditioning regimen for adults with ALL who are not suitable for TBI. Copyright © 2016 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Linking Costs and Survival in the Treatment of Older Adults With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Analysis of SEER-Medicare Data From 1995 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Jung; Winn, Aaron N; Parsons, Susan K; Neumann, Peter J; Weiss, Elisa S; Cohen, Joshua T

    2016-04-01

    The high prices of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) therapy are well recognized, but less discussion has focused on the value of health care spending on the disease. This study examined whether the added costs have been "worth" the benefits among older adults with CML. We analyzed trends in health care costs and survival over time of 2164 CML patients over age 65 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare-linked database. We estimated life expectancy over a 15-year duration after diagnosis using a Weibull survival model and projected the corresponding costs using a 2-part model, adjusting for patient characteristics. We estimated population-level survival, total health care costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (expressed as cost per life year gained) over the period of 1995-2007. We found that therapeutic improvements in the treatment of CML have been associated with survival gains among older adults. Mean life expectancy was 2.2 years in 1995 and increased to 4.2 years in 2007. During the same timeframe, CML care costs have increased, from $127,000 in 1995 to $278,000 in 2007 (2010 dollars), mostly due to increasing tyrosine kinase inhibitor costs. The aggregated incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $74,000/life year gained. Our findings showed that, despite high costs, CML care may provide reasonable value for money among older patients between 1995-2007. Our study sheds light on the value of health care spending on CML by considering both the costs and the benefits. Future research should investigate strategies to improve treatment adherence to maximize the value of CML care.

  20. Phase II study of Gleevec® plus hydroxyurea (HU) in adults with progressive or recurrent meningioma

    OpenAIRE

    Reardon, David A.; Norden, Andrew D.; Desjardins, Annick; Vredenburgh, James J.; Herndon, James E.; Coan, April; Sampson, John H.; Gururangan, Sridharan; Peters, Katherine B.; McLendon, Roger E.; Norfleet, Julie A.; Lipp, Eric S.; Drappatz, Jan; Wen, Patrick Y.; Friedman, Henry S.

    2011-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive/recurrent meningioma. A total of 21 patients with progressive/recurrent meningioma were enrolled in this dual center, single-arm, phase II trial. All patients received 500 mg of hydroxyurea twice a day. Imatinib was administered at 400 mg/day for patients not on CYP3A enzyme inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and at 500 mg twice a day for patients on EIAEDs. The primary endpoint wa...

  1. Inotuzumab ozogamicin in adults with relapsed or refractory CD22-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a phase 1/2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stock, Wendy; Stein, Anthony S; Shustov, Andrei; Liedtke, Michaela; Schiffer, Charles A; Vandendries, Erik; Liau, Katherine; Ananthakrishnan, Revathi; Boni, Joseph; Laird, A Douglas; Fostvedt, Luke; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Advani, Anjali S

    2017-06-27

    This study evaluated the safety, antitumor activity, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of inotuzumab ozogamicin (InO) for CD22-positive relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In phase 1, patients received InO 1.2 (n = 3), 1.6 (n = 12), or 1.8 (n = 9) mg/m 2 per cycle on days 1, 8, and 15 over a 28-day cycle (≤6 cycles). The recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) was confirmed (expansion cohort; n = 13); safety and activity of InO were assessed in patients receiving the RP2D in phase 2 (n = 35) and in all treated patients (n = 72). The RP2D was 1.8 mg/m 2 per cycle (0.8 mg/m 2 on day 1; 0.5 mg/m 2 on days 8 and 15), with reduction to 1.6 mg/m 2 per cycle after complete remission (CR) or CR with incomplete marrow recovery (CRi). Treatment-related toxicities were primarily cytopenias. Four patients experienced treatment-related venoocclusive disease/sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (VOD/SOS; 1 fatal). Two VOD/SOS events occurred during treatment without intervening transplant; of 24 patients proceeding to poststudy transplant, 2 experienced VOD/SOS after transplant. Forty-nine (68%) patients had CR/CRi, with 41 (84%) achieving minimal residual disease (MRD) negativity. Median progression-free survival was 3.9 (95% confidence interval, 2.9-5.4) months; median overall survival was 7.4 (5.7-9.2) months for all treated patients, with median 23.7 (range, 6.8-29.8) months of follow-up for all treated patients alive at data cutoff. Achievement of MRD negativity was associated with higher InO exposure. InO was well tolerated and demonstrated high single-agent activity and MRD-negativity rates. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01363297.

  2. Recurrent varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rotker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicocele recurrence is one of the most common complications associated with varicocele repair. A systematic review was performed to evaluate varicocele recurrence rates, anatomic causes of recurrence, and methods of management of recurrent varicoceles. The PubMed database was evaluated using keywords "recurrent" and "varicocele" as well as MESH criteria "recurrent" and "varicocele." Articles were not included that were not in English, represented single case reports, focused solely on subclinical varicocele, or focused solely on a pediatric population (age <18. Rates of recurrence vary with the technique of varicocele repair from 0% to 35%. Anatomy of recurrence can be defined by venography. Management of varicocele recurrence can be surgical or via embolization.

  3. Leukemia revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E P

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

  4. Leukemia revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately

  5. Pembrolizumab Alone or With Idelalisib or Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Other Low-Grade B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Refractory Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Richter Syndrome; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  6. Fungal natural products targeting chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Tanja Thorskov; Kildgaard, Sara; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in adults from the western world. No curative treatments of CLL are presently known so the treatment strategy today is primarily to prolong patient survival,1 why we have initiated new activities towards discovery of novel compounds......,3 This includes analysis of the spectroscopic data generated from LC-DAD-MS to reveal whether the active principles are either structurally known compounds or are likely to be novel compounds. This paper will illustrate our integrated discovery approaches and recent findings of anti-leukemia compounds....

  7. The leukemias: Epidemiologic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linet, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Particularly geared to physicians and cancer researchers, this study of the epidemiology and etiology of leukemia analyzes the four major leukemia subtypes in terms of genetic and familial determinant factors and examines the incidence, distribution and frequency of reported leukemia clusters. Linet discusses the connection between other types of malignancies, their treatments, and the subsequent development of leukemia and evaluates the impact on leukemia onset of such environmental factors as radiation therapy, drugs, and occupational hazards

  8. Clinicopathologic features of adult T-cell leukemias/lymphomas at a North American tertiary care medical center: infrequent involvement of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, Andy C; Kreisel, Friederike H; Frater, John L; Nguyen, TuDung T

    2014-02-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). Published series of ATLLs seen at a United States medical institution are rare. We present the features of 4 ATLLs diagnosed at our North American tertiary care medical center from 1990 to 2012. Despite the absence of a history of origin from an endemic region, all our ATLLs demonstrated evidence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by ATLL was uncommon in our series, and represented only 1.6% (1/64) of all CNS B-cell or T-cell lymphomas diagnosed over a 20+ year period at our institution. Review of the medical literature reveals that the majority of CNS-involved ATLLs present with the lymphoma or acute subtype, and complete remission is difficult to achieve in these cases. CNS involvement frequently occurs with a systemic disease, which carries an aggressive clinical course with poor prognosis. In addition, CNS involvement by ATLL can be the initial presentation or seen with relapsed disease, can be the only site or be associated with other tissue sites of involvement, and may manifest with variable clinical signs/symptoms. Our retrospective study reveals that ATLLs are rare mature T-cell lymphomas in a native North American population, but the clinical and histopathologic features of ATLLs from this nonendemic region are similar to those seen from other endemic regions. Early recognition of these rare ATLLs involving uncommon sites, such as the CNS, will help optimize treatment for these infrequent mature T-cell lymphomas.

  9. Intent-to-treat leukemia remission by CD19 CAR T cells of defined formulation and dose in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Rebecca A; Finney, Olivia; Annesley, Colleen; Brakke, Hannah; Summers, Corinne; Leger, Kasey; Bleakley, Marie; Brown, Christopher; Mgebroff, Stephanie; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S; Hoglund, Virginia; Lindgren, Catherine; Oron, Assaf P; Li, Daniel; Riddell, Stanley R; Park, Julie R; Jensen, Michael C

    2017-06-22

    Transitioning CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells from early-phase trials in relapsed patients to a viable therapeutic approach with predictable efficacy and low toxicity for broad application among patients with high unmet need is currently complicated by product heterogeneity resulting from transduction of undefined T-cell mixtures, variability of transgene expression, and terminal differentiation of cells at the end of culture. A phase 1 trial of 45 children and young adults with relapsed or refractory B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia was conducted using a CD19 CAR product of defined CD4/CD8 composition, uniform CAR expression, and limited effector differentiation. Products meeting all defined specifications occurred in 93% of enrolled patients. The maximum tolerated dose was 10 6 CAR T cells per kg, and there were no deaths or instances of cerebral edema attributable to product toxicity. The overall intent-to-treat minimal residual disease-negative (MRD - ) remission rate for this phase 1 study was 89%. The MRD - remission rate was 93% in patients who received a CAR T-cell product and 100% in the subset of patients who received fludarabine and cyclophosphamide lymphodepletion. Twenty-three percent of patients developed reversible severe cytokine release syndrome and/or reversible severe neurotoxicity. These data demonstrate that manufacturing a defined-composition CD19 CAR T cell identifies an optimal cell dose with highly potent antitumor activity and a tolerable adverse effect profile in a cohort of patients with an otherwise poor prognosis. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT02028455. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. All-trans retinoic acid as adjunct to intensive treatment in younger adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia: results of the randomized AMLSG 07-04 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenk, Richard F; Lübbert, Michael; Benner, Axel; Lamparter, Alexander; Krauter, Jürgen; Herr, Wolfgang; Martin, Hans; Salih, Helmut R; Kündgen, Andrea; Horst, Heinz-A; Brossart, Peter; Götze, Katharina; Nachbaur, David; Wattad, Mohammed; Köhne, Claus-Henning; Fiedler, Walter; Bentz, Martin; Wulf, Gerald; Held, Gerhard; Hertenstein, Bernd; Salwender, Hans; Gaidzik, Verena I; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Weber, Daniela; Döhner, Konstanze; Ganser, Arnold; Döhner, Hartmut

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the impact of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in combination with chemotherapy and to assess the NPM1 status as biomarker for ATRA therapy in younger adult patients (18-60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients were randomized for intensive chemotherapy with or without open-label ATRA (45 mg/m 2 , days 6-8; 15 mg/m 2 , days 9-21). Two cycles of induction therapy were followed by risk-adapted consolidation with high-dose cytarabine or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Due to the open label character of the study, analysis was performed on an intention-to-treat (ITT) and a per-protocol (PP) basis. One thousand one hundred patients were randomized (556, STANDARD; 544, ATRA) with 38 patients treated vice versa. Median follow-up for survival was 5.2 years. ITT analyses revealed no difference between ATRA and STANDARD for the total cohort and for the subset of NPM1-mutated AML with respect to event-free (EFS; p = 0.93, p = 0.17) and overall survival (OS; p = 0.24 and p = 0.32, respectively). Pre-specified PP analyses revealed better EFS in NPM1-mutated AML (p = 0.05) and better OS in the total cohort (p = 0.03). Explorative subgroup analyses on an ITT basis revealed better OS (p = 0.05) in ATRA for genetic low-risk patients according to ELN recommendations. The clinical trial is registered at clinicaltrialsregister.eu (EudraCT Number: 2004-004321-95).

  11. Sestamibi technetium-99m brain single-photon emission computed tomography to identify recurrent glioma in adults: 201 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Jeune, Florence Prigent; Dubois, François; Blond, Serge; Steinling, Marc

    2006-04-01

    In the follow-up of treated gliomas, CT and MRI can often not differentiate radionecrosis from recurrent tumor. The aim of this study was to assess the interest of functional imaging with (99m)Tc-MIBI SPECT in a large series of 201 examinations. MIBI SPECT were performed in 81 patients treated for brain gliomas. A MIBI uptake index was computed as the ratio of counts in the lesion to counts in the controlateral region. SPECT was compared to stereotactic biopsy in 14 cases, or in the others cases to imaging evolution or clinical course at 6 months after the last tomoscintigraphy Two hundred and one tomoscintigraphies were performed. One hundred and two scans were true positive, 82 scans were true negative. Six scans were false positive (corresponding to 3 patients): 2 patients with an inflammatory reaction after radiosurgery, 1 with no explanation up to now. Eleven scans were false negative (5 patients): 1 patient with a deep peri-ventricular lesion, 2 patients with no contrast enhancement on MRI, 2 patients with a temporal tumor. The sensitivity for tumor recurrence was 90%, specificity 91.5% and accuracy 90.5%. We studied separately low and high grade glioma: sensitivity for tumor recurrence was respectively 91% and 89%, specificity 100% and 83% and accuracy 95% and 87%. MIBI SPECT allowed the diagnose of anaplasic degenerence of low grade sometimes earlier than clinical (5 cases) or MRI signs (7 cases). Our results confirm the usefullness of MIBI SPECT in the follow-up of treated gliomas for the differential diagnosis between radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence.

  12. The role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in pediatric lymph-node acute lymphoblastic leukemia involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cistaro, Angelina; Saglio, Francesco; Asaftei, Sebastian; Fania, Piercarlo; Berger, Massimo; Fagioli, Franca

    2011-01-01

    In pediatric oncology, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is emerging as an essential diagnostic tool in characterizing suspicious neoplastic lesions and staging malignant diseases. Most studies regarding the possible role of FDG-PET/CT in the management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients are limited to adults. Here we report a pediatric patient with recurrent ALL, in which FDG-PET/CT was used both to define more precisely the cause of lymphadenopathy and to assess the effect of the second-line therapy.

  13. Recurrence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Bolivian children and adults after a population-based "screen and treat" strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapalasingam, Sumathi; Rajasingham, Anu; Macy, Jonathan T; Friedman, Cindy R; Hoekstra, Robert M; Ayers, Tracy; Gold, Benjamin; Quick, Robert E

    2014-10-01

    Strategies to prevent gastric cancer by decreasing Helicobacter pylori infections in high-prevalence, low-income countries could include a population-based "screen and treat" eradication program. We tested residents of two rural villages for H. pylori infection using urea breath test (UBT), treated infected persons using directly observed therapy (DOT), retested for cure, and retested after 1 year later for H. pylori infection. We tested 1,065 (92%) of 1153 residents from two villages in rural Bolivia. Baseline H. pylori prevalence was 80% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 78-84). Age-specific cure rates were similar (≥92%) after DOT. Among those cured, 12% (95% CI: 8-15) had recurrent infection. Age-specific annual H. pylori recurrence rates for combined villages were 20% (95% CI: 10-29) in persons pylori recurrence rates following a population-based screen and treat program; this H. pylori eradication strategy may not be feasible in high-prevalence, low-income settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Phase II study of Gleevec® plus hydroxyurea in adults with progressive or recurrent low-grade glioma1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, David A.; Desjardins, Annick; Vredenburgh, James J.; Herndon, James E.; Coan, April; Gururangan, Sridharan; Peters, Katherine B.; McLendon, Roger; Sathornsumetee, Sith; Rich, Jeremy N.; Lipp, Eric S.; Janney, Dorothea; Friedman, Henry S.

    2013-01-01

    Background We evaluated the efficacy of imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive/recurrent low-grade glioma. Methods A total of 64 patients with recurrent/progressive low-grade glioma were enrolled in this single-center study that stratified patients into astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma cohorts. All patients received 500 mg of hydroxyurea twice a day. Imatinib was administered at 400 mg per day for patients not on EIAEDs and at 500 mg twice a day if on EIAEDs. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival at 12 months (PFS-12) and secondary endpoints were safety, median progression-free survival and radiographic response rate. Results Thirty-two patients were enrolled into each cohort. Eleven patients (17%) had prior radiotherapy and 24 (38%) had received prior chemotherapy. The median PFS and PFS-12 were 11 months and 39%, respectively. Outcome did not differ between the histologic cohorts. No patient achieved a radiographic response. The most common grade 3 or greater adverse events were neutropenia (11%), thrombocytopenia (3%) and diarrhea (3%). Conclusions Imatinib plus hydroxyurea was well tolerated among recurrent/progressive LGG patients but this regimen demonstrated negligible anti-tumor activity. PMID:22371319

  15. High prevalence of morphological subtype FAB M1 in adults with de novo acute myeloid leukemia in São José dos Campos, São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Callera

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Geographical variations have been described in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. In Brazil, few studies have been published on this. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the high prevalence of French-American-British (FAB M1 subtype in adults with de novo AML in São José dos Campos, State of São Paulo, Brazil. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective analysis, at Hospital Pio XII in São José dos Campos, a public non-teaching institution. METHODS: Records from 39 consecutive adult patients with de novo AML referred to Hospital Pio XII between January 2002 and September 2004 were reviewed. Peripheral blood and blood marrow smears were reviewed blindly by five hematologists and classified according to FAB criteria. The rates of remission, relapse, mortality according treatment phase, survival and leukemia-free survival were calculated. RESULTS: The prevalence of each category as determined via a consensus among five observers was M0: 0%; M1: 43.6%; M2: 30.7%; M3: 12.8%; M4: 5.1%; M5: 2.6%: M6: 2.6%; and M7: 2.6%. The remission and the relapse rates were 82% and 41% respectively. The mortality rate was 69% (induction of remission: 7/39, 17.9%; post induction: 10/32, 31.2%; and relapse: 10/16, 62.5%. The survival rate was 30% and leukemia-free survival was 33%. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrated a high prevalence of FAB M1 subtype in adults with de novo AML in São José dos Campos. Our data suggest the occurrence of different regional prevalences of FAB AML categories in Brazil.

  16. Kelainan Hemostasis pada Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelly Dia Rofinda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Leukemia adalah penyakit keganasan pada jaringan hematopoietik yang ditandai denganpenggantian elemen sumsum tulang normal oleh sel darah abnormal atau sel leukemik. Salah satu manifestasi klinisdari leukemia adalah perdarahan yang disebabkan oleh berbagai kelainan hemostasis.Kelainan hemostasis yang dapat terjadi pada leukemia berupa trombositopenia, disfungsi trombosit,koagulasi intravaskuler diseminata, defek protein koagulasi, fibrinolisis primer dan trombosis. Patogenesis danpatofosiologi kelainan hemostasis pada leukemia tersebut terjadi dengan berbagai mekanisme.Kata kunci: leukemia, kelainan hemostasisAbstractBackground: AbstractLeukemia is a malignancy of hematopoietic tissue which is characterized bysubstituted of bone marrow element with abnormal blood cell or leukemic cell. One of clinical manifestation ofleukemia is bleeding that is caused by several hemostasis disorders.Hemostasis disorders in leukemia such asthrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, disseminated intravascular coagulation, coagulation protein defect, primaryfibrinolysis and thrombosis. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of thus hemostasis disorders in leukemia occur withdifferent mechanism.Keywords: leukemia, hemostasis disorder

  17. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had central nervous system involvement: a study from the Adult ALL Working Group of the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Akio; Kako, Shinichi; Mitsuhashi, Kenjiro; Iwato, Koji; Uchida, Naoyuki; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Fukuda, Takahiro; Sawa, Masashi; Senoo, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Miyamura, Koichi; Takada, Satoru; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Morishima, Yasuo; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Mizuta, Shuichi; Tanaka, Junji

    2017-06-01

    The prognosis for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with central nervous system (CNS) involvement (CNS+) who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains unclear. We retrospectively compared the outcomes of allo-SCT for patients with CNS involvement and for patients without CNS involvement (CNS-) using a database in Japan. The eligibility criteria for this study were as follows: diagnosis of ALL, aged more than 16 years, allo-SCT between 2005 and 2012, and first SCT. Data for 2582 patients including 136 CNS+ patients and 2446 CNS- patients were used for analyses. As compared with CNS- patients, CNS+ patients were younger, had worse disease status at SCT and had poorer performance status (PS) at SCT (P < 0.01). Incidence of relapse was higher in CNS+ patients (P = 0.02), and incidence of CNS relapse was also higher (P < 0.01). The probability of 3-year overall survival (OS) was better in CNS- patients (P < 0.01) by univariate analysis. However, in patients who received SCT in CR, there was no difference in the probability of OS between CNS+ and CNS- patients (P = 0.38) and CNS involvement did not have an unfavorable effect on OS by multivariate analysis. CNS+ patients who achieved CR showed OS comparable to that of CNS- patients.

  18. The Role of Type I Insulin Like Growth Factor Receptor (IGF-IR) in Adult and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAMEL, M.M.; HAMMAM, A.A.; ELHOSEINY, Sh.M.; MOKHLES, A.; MOHSEN, E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Type 1 insulin like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) is over expressed in many tumors including hematological cancers. It is a critical signaling molecule for tumor cell proliferation and survival. Data suggest that IGF-IR antibodies can effectively and specifically inhibit cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Blockage of IGF-IR expression could be a promising therapeutic approach for the management of cancer patients. Aim of Work: To characterize the expression pattern of IGF-IR gene in malignant lymphoblasts of children and adults suffering from ALL in relation to clinical features at diagnosis. Patients and Methods: The expression of IGF-IR was analyzed in 60 patients with ALL, 30 childhood ALL (16 newly diagnosed and 14 in complete remission) and 30 adulthood ALL (15 newly diagnosed and 15 in complete remission) together with 20 normal age and sex matched healthy controls using a Real-Time Quantitative Reverse- Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RTQ-PCR) to assess the possible relation, association or correlation between IGF-IR expression and ALL clinical and laboratory features at diagnosis. Results: IGF-IR was expressed in all 60 patients with ALL; the expression levels of IGF-IR were significantly higher in newly diagnosed patients than in patients in complete remission (CR) and controls (p<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in the expression of IGF-IR between patients with different clinical and laboratory features. Conclusion: IGF-1R seems to play a crucial role in patients with ALL since it is expressed in all ALL cases (adulthood and childhood). Therefore, new therapeutic agents targeting IGF-1R may provide a better chance for those patients

  19. Parallel targeted next generation sequencing of childhood and adult acute myeloid leukemia patients reveals uniform genomic profile of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Irena; Kostic, Jelena; Stanic, Bojana; Pejanovic, Nadja; Lucic, Bojana; Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Janic, Dragana; Dokmanovic, Lidija; Jankovic, Srdja; Vukovic, Nada Suvajdzic; Tomin, Dragica; Perisic, Ognjen; Rakocevic, Goran; Popovic, Milos; Pavlovic, Sonja; Tosic, Natasa

    2016-10-01

    The age-specific differences in the genetic mechanisms of myeloid leukemogenesis have been observed and studied previously. However, NGS technology has provided a possibility to obtain a large amount of mutation data. We analyzed DNA samples from 20 childhood (cAML) and 20 adult AML (aAML) patients, using NGS targeted sequencing. The average coverage of high-quality sequences was 2981 × per amplicon. A total of 412 (207 cAML, 205 aAML) variants in the coding regions were detected; out of which, only 122 (62 cAML and 60 aAML) were potentially protein-changing. Our results confirmed that AML contains small number of genetic alterations (median 3 mutations/patient in both groups). The prevalence of the most frequent single gene AML associated mutations differed in cAML and aAML patient cohorts: IDH1 (0 % cAML, 5 % aAML), IDH2 (0 % cAML, 10 % aAML), NPM1 (10 % cAML, 35 % aAML). Additionally, potentially protein-changing variants were found in tyrosine kinase genes or genes encoding tyrosine kinase associated proteins (JAK3, ABL1, GNAQ, and EGFR) in cAML, while among aAML, the prevalence is directed towards variants in the methylation and histone modifying genes (IDH1, IDH2, and SMARCB1). Besides uniform genomic profile of AML, specific genetic characteristic was exclusively detected in cAML and aAML.

  20. Predictors of long-term recurrent vascular events after ischemic stroke at young age: the Italian Project on Stroke in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Grassi, Mario; Lodigiani, Corrado; Patella, Rosalba; Gandolfo, Carlo; Zini, Andrea; Delodovici, Maria Luisa; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Del Sette, Massimo; Toriello, Antonella; Musolino, Rossella; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Bovi, Paolo; Adami, Alessandro; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Sessa, Maria; Cavallini, Anna; Marcheselli, Simona; Bonifati, Domenico Marco; Checcarelli, Nicoletta; Tancredi, Lucia; Chiti, Alberto; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Spalloni, Alessandra; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Giacalone, Giacomo; Ferrazzi, Paola; Poli, Loris; Morotti, Andrea; Rasura, Maurizia; Simone, Anna Maria; Gamba, Massimo; Cerrato, Paolo; Micieli, Giuseppe; Melis, Maurizio; Massucco, Davide; De Giuli, Valeria; Iacoviello, Licia; Padovani, Alessandro

    2014-04-22

    Data on long-term risk and predictors of recurrent thrombotic events after ischemic stroke at a young age are limited. We followed 1867 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who were 18 to 45 years of age (mean age, 36.8±7.1 years; women, 49.0%), as part of the Italian Project on Stroke in Young Adults (IPSYS). Median follow-up was 40 months (25th to 75th percentile, 53). The primary end point was a composite of ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, or other arterial events. One hundred sixty-three patients had recurrent thrombotic events (average rate, 2.26 per 100 person-years at risk). At 10 years, cumulative risk was 14.7% (95% confidence interval, 12.2%-17.9%) for primary end point, 14.0% (95% confidence interval, 11.4%-17.1%) for brain ischemia, and 0.7% (95% confidence interval, 0.4%-1.3%) for myocardial infarction or other arterial events. Familial history of stroke, migraine with aura, circulating antiphospholipid antibodies, discontinuation of antiplatelet and antihypertensive medications, and any increase of 1 traditional vascular risk factor were independent predictors of the composite end point in multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis. A point-scoring system for each variable was generated by their β-coefficients, and a predictive score (IPSYS score) was calculated as the sum of the weighted scores. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the 0- to 5-year score was 0.66 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.71; mean, 10-fold internally cross-validated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.65). Among patients with ischemic stroke aged 18 to 45 years, the long-term risk of recurrent thrombotic events is associated with modifiable, age-specific risk factors. The IPSYS score may serve as a simple tool for risk estimation.

  1. Phase II study of Gleevec® plus hydroxyurea (HU) in adults with progressive or recurrent meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, David A; Norden, Andrew D; Desjardins, Annick; Vredenburgh, James J; Herndon, James E; Coan, April; Sampson, John H; Gururangan, Sridharan; Peters, Katherine B; McLendon, Roger E; Norfleet, Julie A; Lipp, Eric S; Drappatz, Jan; Wen, Patrick Y; Friedman, Henry S

    2012-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of imatinib plus hydroxyurea in patients with progressive/recurrent meningioma. A total of 21 patients with progressive/recurrent meningioma were enrolled in this dual center, single-arm, phase II trial. All patients received 500 mg of hydroxyurea twice a day. Imatinib was administered at 400 mg/day for patients not on CYP3A enzyme inducing anti-epileptic drugs (EIAEDs) and at 500 mg twice a day for patients on EIAEDs. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6) and secondary endpoints were safety, radiographic response rate, and overall survival (OS). Best radiographic response was stable disease and was observed in 14 patients (67%). PFS-6 for all patients, those with grade I tumors (n = 8) and those with grade II or III tumors (n = 13) was 61.9, 87.5 and 46.2%, respectively. Patients with grade II or III tumors had poorer PFS and OS than those with grade I tumors, (P = 0.025 and P = 0.018) respectively. The only grade 3 or greater adverse event occurring in ≥ 10% of patients was anemia (10%). Imatinib plus hydroxyurea is well tolerated among patients with meningioma but has modest anti-tumor activity for this indication.

  2. Reanalysis of atomic bomb survivors' leukemia based on the recent classification for leukemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao.

    1990-01-01

    Four hundred and ninety-three A-bomb survivors developing leukemia, who had been exposed within 9,000 m from the hypocenter, were entered on the study for reanalysis of their disease based on the new classification. Chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) showed the highest concordance rate (95%) between the previous and new classifications. For 10 survivors previously diagnosed as having chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a new classification diagnosed CLL as well in 3 and adult T-cell leukemia in the other 7. None of the A-bomb survivors exposed to one Gy or more had subtype M3 of acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), although the exposed group had almost the same distribution pattern of AML subtypes as the naturally induced leukemic group. The incidence of CML was significantly lower than that of AML in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. As A-bomb survivors were older at the time of A-bombing, the relative risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was decreased; that of CML and other types of leukemia was increased. An increased relative risk of ALL and CML tended to be associated with larger doses. A significantly shortened interval between A-bomb exposure and the development of leukemia was also associated with larger doses. (N.K.)

  3. Heterogeneity in acute undifferentiated leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMaistre, A; Childs, C C; Hirsch-Ginsberg, C; Reuben, J; Cork, A; Trujillo, J M; Andersson, B; McCredie, K B; Freireich, E; Stass, S A

    1988-01-01

    From January 1985 to May 1987, we studied 256 adults with newly diagnosed acute leukemia. Acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL) was diagnosed in 12 of the 256 (4.6%) cases when lineage could not be delineated by light microscopy and light cytochemistry. To further characterize the blasts, immunophenotyping, ultrastructural myeloperoxidase (UMPO), and ultrastructural platelet peroxidase parameters were examined in 10, 11, and 6 of the 12 cases, respectively. Five cases demonstrated UMPO and were reclassified as acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). Of the six UMPO-negative cases, three had a myeloid and one had a mixed immunophenotype. One UMPO-negative patient with a myeloid immunophenotype was probed for the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (JH) and the beta chain of the T-cell receptor gene (Tcr beta) with no evidence of rearrangement. Six cases were treated with standard acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) chemotherapy and failed to achieve complete remission (CR). Various AML chemotherapeutic regimens produced CR in only 3 of the 12 cases. One case was treated with gamma interferon and the other 2 with high-dose Ara-C. Our findings indicate a myeloid lineage can be detected by UMPO (5/12) in some cases of AUL. A germline configuration with JH and Tcr beta in one case as well as a myeloid immunophenotype in 3 UMPO-negative cases raises the possibility that myeloid lineage commitment may occur in the absence of myeloid peroxidase (MPO) cytochemical positivity.

  4. Clinical Presentations of Acute Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahab, F.; Raziq, F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To document the clinical presentation and epidemiology of various types of acute leukemia with their respective referral source at a tertiary level centre in Peshawar. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology, Hayatabad Medical Complex (HMC), Peshawar, from January 2011 to May 2012. Methodology: A total of 618 bone marrow biopsy reports were reviewed. All biopsy reports labeled as acute leukemia were reviewed for age, gender, address, referring unit, diagnosis on bone marrow examination, presenting complaints, duration of illness and findings of clinical examination. Results: Ninety-two patients were diagnosed as suffering from acute leukemias (15%). ALL was most prevalent (46%), followed by AML (38%) and undifferentiated acute leukemia (16%). Males were affected more compared to females (60% vs. 40%). ALL and AML were predominant in pediatric (64%) and adults (77%) patients respectively. Patients from Afghanistan accounted for 33% of all cases followed by Peshawar (14%). Fever (77%), pallor (33%) and bleeding disorders (23%) were the main presenting complaints. Enlargement of liver, spleen and lymph nodes together was associated with ALL compared with AML (p = 0.004). Conclusion: ALL-L1 and AML-M4 were the most common sub-types. Fever, pallor and bleeding disorders were the main presenting complaints. Enlargement of liver, spleen and lymph nodes was more frequently associated with ALL compared to AML. (author)

  5. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Meyer; T. Burmeister; D. Gröger (D.); G. Tsaur; L. Fechina; A. Renneville; R. Sutton; N. Venn; M. Emerenciano (M.); Pombo-De-Oliveira, M.S. (M. S.); Barbieri Blunck, C. (C.); Almeida Lopes, B. (B.); J. Zuna; J. Trka (Jan); Ballerini, P. (P.); Lapillonne, H. (H.); E. de Braekeleer; G. Cazzaniga (Gianni); Corral Abascal, L. (L.); V.H.J. van der Velden (Vincent); E. Delabesse; Park, T.S. (T. S.); S.H. Oh (S.); M.L.M. Silva (M. L M); T. Lund-Aho (T.); V. Juvonen (V.); A.S. Moore (A.); O. Heidenreich; Vormoor, J. (J.); Zerkalenkova, E. (E.); Olshanskaya, Y. (Y.); Bueno, C. (C.); P. Menéndez (Pablo); A. Teigler-Schlegel; U. zur Stadt; Lentes, J. (J.); G. Göhring (Gudrun); Kustanovich, A. (A.); O. Aleinikova (O.); Schäfer, B.W. (B. W.); S. Kubetzko (S.); H.O. Madsen; Gruhn, B. (B.); Duarte, X. (X.); P. Gameiro; E. Lippert (Eric); Bidet, A. (A.); J.-M. Cayuela (Jean-Michel); E. Clappier; C.N. Alonso (Cristina); C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); S. Izraeli (Shai); L. Trakhtenbrot; P. Archer (P.); J. Hancock; A. Möricke; Alten, J. (J.); M. Schrappe (Martin); M. Stanulla (Martin); S. Strehl; A. Attarbaschi (Andishe); M.N. Dworzak (Michael); Haas, O.A. (O. A.); R. Panzer-Grümayer (Renate); L. Sedek (Lukasz); Szczepa, T. (T.); A. Caye (Aurélie); Suarez, L. (L.); H. Cavé (Helene); R. Marschalek (Rolf)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractChromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL/KMT2A gene are associated with infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. Here we present the data obtained from 2345 acute leukemia patients. Genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner

  6. Examining the Origins of Myeloid Leukemia | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute myeloid leukemia or AML, a cancer of the white blood cells, is the most common type of rapidly-growing leukemia in adults. The over-production of white blood cells in the bone marrow inhibits the development of other necessary blood components including red blood cells, which carry oxygen throughout the body, and platelets, which are required for clot formation. The

  7. Infectious olecranon and patellar bursitis: short-course adjuvant antibiotic therapy is not a risk factor for recurrence in adult hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Cédric; Huttner, Angela; Assal, Mathieu; Bernard, Louis; Lew, Daniel; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Uçkay, Ilker

    2010-05-01

    No evidence-based recommendations exist for the management of infectious bursitis. We examined epidemiology and risk factors for recurrence of septic bursitis. Specifically, we compared outcome in patients receiving bursectomy plus short-course adjuvant antibiotic therapy (7 days). Retrospective study of adult patients with infectious olecranon and patellar bursitis requiring hospitalization at Geneva University Hospital from January 1996 to March 2009. We identified 343 episodes of infectious bursitis (237 olecranon and 106 patellar). Staphylococcus aureus predominated among the 256 cases with an identifiable pathogen (85%). Three hundred and twelve cases (91%) were treated surgically; 142 (41%) with one-stage bursectomy and closure and 146 with two-stage bursectomy. All received antibiotics for a median duration of 13 days with a median intravenous component of 3 days. Cure was achieved in 293 (85%) episodes. Total duration of antibiotic therapy [odds ratio (OR) 0.9; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.8-1.1] showed no association with cure. In multivariate analysis, only immunosuppression was linked to recurrence (OR 5.6; 95% CI 1.9-18.4). Compared with 14 days of antibiotic treatment (OR 0.9; 95% CI 0.1-10.7) was equivalent, as was the intravenous component (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.3). In severe infectious bursitis requiring hospitalization, adjuvant antibiotic therapy might be limited to 7 days in non-immunosuppressed patients.

  8. Cytogenetic basis of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, J H; Pittman, S M; Singh, S; Wass, E J; Vincent, P C; Gunz, F W

    1975-10-01

    The chromosomes of 12 adult patients with acute leukemia were analyzed by conventional means and by Giemsa and centromeric banding techniques. Acute myeloblastic leukemia was diagnosed in 7, acute myelomonocytic leukemia in 2, and acute undifferentiated leukemia in 3. Bone marrow was aspirated from patients when in relapse or remission, and both euploid and aneuploid cells were examined. All patients showed trisomy no. 9 and many showed additional numerical or structural changes in some or all their cells. These changes included monosomy no. 21 and/or monosomy no. 8. The proportion of trisomy no. 9 cells was 30-50% in patients in full remission and up to 100% in patients in relapse; thus trisomy no. 9 might be an important marker of leukemic cells. A mechanism was proposed to explain the induction and selection of the trisomy no. 9 karotype.

  9. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  10. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  11. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  12. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  13. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is used for painful and enlarged lymph nodes. Blood transfusions or platelet transfusions may be required if blood ... unexplained fatigue, bruising, excessive sweating, or weight loss. Alternative ... Leukemia - chronic lymphocytic (CLL); Blood cancer - chronic lymphocytic leukemia; Bone marrow cancer - chronic ...

  14. Occurrence of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritish K Bhattacharyya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common leukemia of adults in the western world and constitutes about 33% of all leukemia′s. The incidence of CLL increases with age and are more common in older population. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML on the contrary occurs in both young adults and elderly and is a chronic myeloproliferative disease that originates from abnormal pluripotent stem cells and results in involvement of multiple hematopoietic lineages, but predominantly myeloid and less commonly lymphoid. Association between CLL and myeloid malignancies (CML, acute myeloid leukemia and MDS, myelodysplastic syndrome is rare. In literature documenting CLL and CML in same patients, occur either simultaneously or CML is preceded by CLL.

  15. Development of Ultra-Super Sensitive Immunohistochemistry and Its Application to the Etiological Study of Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasui, Kazuhisa; Wang, Jia; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Izumo, Shuji; Eizuru, Yoshito; Matsuyama, Takami

    2012-01-01

    Antigen retrieval (AR) and ultra-super sensitive immunohistochemistry (ultra-IHC) have been established for application to archival human pathology specimens. The original ultra-IHC was the ImmunoMax method or the catalyzed signal amplification system (ImmunoMax/CSA method), comprising the streptavidin-biotin complex (sABC) method and catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD) reaction with visualization of its deposition. By introducing procedures to diminish non-specific staining in the original ultra-IHC method, we developed the modified ImmunoMax/CSA method with AR heating sections in an AR solution (heating-AR). The heating-AR and modified ImmunoMax/CSA method visualized expression of the predominantly simple present form of HTLV-1 proviral DNA pX region p40Tax protein (Tax) in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) cells in archival pathology specimens in approximately 75% of cases. The simple present form of Tax detected exhibited a close relation with ATLL cell proliferation. We also established a new simplified CSA (nsCSA) system by replacing the sABC method with the secondary antibody- and horse radish peroxidase-labeled polymer reagent method, introducing the pretreatments blocking non-specific binding of secondary antibody reagent, and diminishing the diffusion of deposition in the CARD reaction. Combined with AR treating sections with proteinase K solution (enzymatic-AR), the nsCSA system visualized granular immunostaining of the complex present form of Tax in a small number of ATLL cells in most cases, presenting the possibility of etiological pathological diagnosis of ATLL and suggesting that the complex present form of Tax-positive ATLL cells were young cells derived from ATLL stem cells. The heating-AR and ultra-IHC detected physiological expression of the p53 protein and its probable phosphorylation by Tax in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of peripheral blood tissue specimens from HTLV-1 carriers, as well as physiological and pathological expression

  16. Evidence-based guidelines for the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in adults with Philadelphia chromosome–positive or BCR-ABL–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Canadian consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couban, S.; Savoie, L.; Mourad, Y. Abou; Leber, B.; Minden, M.; Turner, R.; Palada, V.; Shehata, N.; Christofides, A.; Lachance, S.

    2014-01-01

    Adult Philadelphia chromosome–positive (Ph+) or BCR-ABL–positive (BCR-ABL+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all) is an acute leukemia previously associated with a high relapse rate, short disease-free survival, and poor overall survival. In adults, allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant in first remission remains the only proven curative strategy for transplant-eligible patients. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (tkis) in the treatment of patients with Ph+ or BCR-ABL+ all has significantly improved the depth and duration of complete remission, allowing more patients to proceed to transplantation. Although tkis are now considered a standard of care in this setting, few randomized trials have examined the optimal use of tkis in patients with Ph+ all. Questions of major importance remain, including the best way to administer these medications, the choice of tki to administer, and the schedule and the duration to use. We present the results of a systematic review of the literature with consensus recommendations based on the available evidence. PMID:24764712

  17. Extramedullary leukemia in children presenting with proptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naik Milind

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We highlight the orbital manifestations of acute myeloid leukemia and the role of peripheral blood smear in the diagnosis of these cases. A total of 12 patients who presented with proptosis and were subsequently diagnosed to have acute myeloid leukemia based on incision biopsy or peripheral blood smear were included in the study. Results A retrospective review of all cases of acute myeloid leukemia presenting to the Orbital clinic was performed. The age at presentation, gender, presenting features, duration of symptoms and fundus features were noted. In addition the temporal relationship of the orbital disease to the diagnosis of leukemia, laterality, location of the orbital mass, imaging features and the diagnostic tools used to diagnose leukemia were noted. The median age at presentation was 6 years. The male: female ratio was 0.7:1. None of these patients had been diagnosed earlier as having acute myeloid leukemia. The presenting features included proptosis in all patients, orbital mass in 5 (41.7%, visual symptoms in 2 (16.7% and subconjunctival hemorrhage in one patient (8.3%. A diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia was established by incision biopsy in 4 patients, subsequently confirmed by peripheral blood smear testing and bone marrow biopsy in 2 patients which revealed the presence of systemic involvement. Imprint smears of the biopsy identified blasts in 2 of 4 cases. In 8 patients presenting with ocular manifestations, diagnosis was established by peripheral blood smear examination alone which revealed a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia. Conclusion A peripheral blood smear should be performed in all cases of sudden onset proptosis or an orbital mass in children and young adults along with an orbital biopsy. It can always be complemented with a bone marrow biopsy especially in cases of aleukemic leukemia or when the blood smear is inconclusive.

  18. Clinical and microbiologic characteristics of adult patients with recurrent bacteraemia caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C-H; Su, L-H; Chen, F-J; Tang, Y-F; Chien, C-C; Liu, J-W

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of patients with recurrent bacteraemia caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae (EK) are rarely described. Flomoxef belongs to the cephamycins group and demonstrates in vitro activity against ESBL-producing organisms. Whether flomoxef may be used for the treatment of such infections remains controversial. This retrospective case-control study enrolled adult patients who had bacteraemia caused by ESBL-EK during 2005-2011. Case patients were those who had more than one episode of ESBL-EK bacteraemia. Controls were those who were matched for age and interval time of blood sampling and had only one episode of ESBL-EK bacteraemia with subsequent bacteraemia episodes caused by other non-ESBL-EK bacteria. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and microbiologic profiles of the initial and subsequent ESBL-EK isolates were analysed. During the study period, 424 patients were found to have at least one positive blood culture after the first ESBL-EK bacteraemia episode, and 67 (15.8%) had a second episode of ESBL-EK bacteraemia. Bacteraemia resulting from vascular catheter-related infection (odds ratio, 3.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-8.05), and definitive therapy with flomoxef (odds ratio, 2.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-8.15) were both independent risk factors for the recurrence. Among the 56 patients with available ESBL-EK isolates for analysis, 38 (67.8%) were infected by genetically similar strains. In three of these 38 recurrent ESBL-EK bacteraemia cases caused by an identical strain, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of carbapenem for the subsequent K. pneumoniae isolates were fourfold or higher than the initial isolates. Recurrent bacteraemia was not uncommon in our patients with ESBL-EK bacteraemia, and most of the episodes were caused by identical strains. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  19. Lower rates of symptom recurrence and surgical revision after primary compared with secondary endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to aqueductal stenosis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Eric W; Goodwin, C Rory; Jusué-Torres, Ignacio; Elder, Benjamin D; Hoffberger, Jamie; Lu, Jennifer; Blitz, Ari M; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is the treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus; however, the success of ETV in patients who have previously undergone shunt placement remains unclear. The present study analyzed 103 adult patients with aqueductal stenosis who underwent ETV for obstructive hydrocephalus and evaluated the effect of previous shunt placement on post-ETV outcomes. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of 151 consecutive patients who were treated between 2007 and 2013 with ETV for hydrocephalus. One hundred three (68.2%) patients with aqueductal stenosis causing obstructive hydrocephalus were included in the analysis. Postoperative ETV patency and aqueductal and cisternal flow were assessed by high-resolution, gradient-echo MRI. Post-ETV Mini-Mental State Examination, Timed Up and Go, and Tinetti scores were compared with preoperative values. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed comparing the post-ETV outcomes in patients who underwent a primary (no previous shunt) ETV (n = 64) versus secondary (previous shunt) ETV (n = 39). RESULTS The majority of patients showed significant improvement in symptoms after ETV; however, no significant differences were seen in any of the quantitative tests performed during follow-up. Symptom recurrence occurred in 29 (28.2%) patients after ETV, after a median of 3.0 (interquartile range 0.8-8.0) months post-ETV failure. Twenty-seven (26.2%) patients required surgical revision after their initial ETV. Patients who received a secondary ETV had higher rates of symptom recurrence (p = 0.003) and surgical revision (p = 0.003), particularly in regard to additional shunt placement/revision post-ETV (p = 0.005). These differences remained significant after multivariate analysis for both symptom recurrence (p = 0.030) and surgical revision (p = 0.043). CONCLUSIONS Patients with obstructive hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis exhibit symptomatic improvement after ETV, with a

  20. Effectiveness of different treatment modalities for the management of adult-onset granulosa cell tumours of the ovary (primary and recurrent).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurumurthy, Mahalakshmi; Bryant, Andrew; Shanbhag, Smruta

    2014-04-21

    Granulosa cell tumour is a rare gynaecological tumour of the ovary with recurrences many years after initial diagnosis and treatment. Evidence-based management of granulosa cell tumour of the ovary is limited, and treatment has not been standardised. Surgery, including fertility-sparing procedures for young women, has traditionally been the standard treatment. Adjuvant treatments following surgery have been based on non-randomised trials. A combination of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin (BEP) has traditionally been used for treatment of advanced and/or recurrent disease that cannot be optimally managed surgically. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different treatment modalities offered in current practice for the management of primary, residual and recurrent adult-onset granulosa cell tumours (GCTs) of the ovary. We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to December 2013. We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings and reference lists of included studies. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and observational studies that examined women with adult-onset granulosa cell tumours of the ovary (primary and recurrent). For non-randomised studies, we included studies that used multivariate analysis to adjust for baseline characteristics. Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Studies were heterogeneous with respect to treatment comparisons, so data were not synthesised in meta-analyses, and methods for assessing heterogeneity were not needed. Risk of bias in included studies was assessed by using the six core items used to assess RCTs and by evaluating four additional criteria specifically addressing risk of bias in non-randomised studies. Five retrospective cohort studies (535 women with a diagnosis of GCT) that used appropriate statistical methods

  1. Family poverty over the early life course and recurrent adolescent and young adult anxiety and depression: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najman, Jake M; Hayatbakhsh, Mohammad R; Clavarino, Alexandra; Bor, William; O'Callaghan, Michael J; Williams, Gail M

    2010-09-01

    We determined whether exposure to family poverty over a child's early life course predicts adolescent and young adult anxiety and depression. We used a birth cohort study of a sample of women in Brisbane, Australia, who were recruited in early pregnancy and whose children were followed up on at ages 14 and 21 years. Some 2609 mothers and adolescents provided usable data at the 14- and 21-year follow-ups. After adjustment for poverty at other phases, poverty at the 14-year follow-up was the strongest predictor of adolescent and young adult anxiety and depression. The more frequently the child was exposed to poverty, the greater was the risk of that individual being anxious and depressed at both the 14- and 21-year follow-ups. Family poverty predicts higher rates of adolescent and young adult anxiety and depression. Increased frequency of child exposure to poverty is a consistent predictor of adolescent and young adult anxiety and depression. Repeated experiences of poverty over a child's early life course are associated with increased levels of poor mental health.

  2. Recurrent Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jon; Galen, Benjamin T

    2017-07-01

    Recurrent meningitis is a rare clinical scenario that can be self-limiting or life threatening depending on the underlying etiology. This review describes the causes, risk factors, treatment, and prognosis for recurrent meningitis. As a general overview of a broad topic, the aim of this review is to provide clinicians with a comprehensive differential diagnosis to aide in the evaluation and management of a patient with recurrent meningitis. New developments related to understanding the pathophysiology of recurrent meningitis are as scarce as studies evaluating the treatment and prevention of this rare disorder. A trial evaluating oral valacyclovir suppression after HSV-2 meningitis did not demonstrate a benefit in preventing recurrences. The data on prophylactic antibiotics after basilar skull fractures do not support their use. Intrathecal trastuzumab has shown promise in treating leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from HER-2 positive breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies used to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases are new potential causes of drug-induced aseptic meningitis. Despite their potential for causing recurrent meningitis, the clinical entities reviewed herein are not frequently discussed together given that they are a heterogeneous collection of unrelated, rare diseases. Epidemiologic data on recurrent meningitis are lacking. The syndrome of recurrent benign lymphocytic meningitis described by Mollaret in 1944 was later found to be closely related to HSV-2 reactivation, but HSV-2 is by no means the only etiology of recurrent aseptic meningitis. While the mainstay of treatment for recurrent meningitis is supportive care, it is paramount to ensure that reversible and treatable causes have been addressed for further prevention.

  3. Chronic neutrophilic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeweg, Arthur; Burch, Micah; Krause, John R

    2018-01-01

    Chronic neutrophilic leukemia is a rare myeloproliferative disorder characterized by a sustained peripheral blood neutrophilia, absence of the BCR/ABL oncoprotein, bone marrow hypercellularity with less than 5% myeloblasts and normal neutrophil maturation, and no dysplasia. This leukemia has been associated with mutations in the colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (CSF3R) that may activate this receptor, leading to the proliferation of neutrophils that are the hallmark of chronic neutrophilic leukemia. We present a case of chronic neutrophilic leukemia and discuss the criteria for diagnosis and the significance of mutations found in this leukemia.

  4. Pathogenesis and treatment of leukemia: an Asian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2012-03-01

    Leukemias occur worldwide, but there are important geographic differences in incidences. Three leukemias with special Asian perspectives, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), T-cell large granular lymphocyte (T-LGL) leukemia and NK-cell leukemia. In APL, China has made contributions in discovering the efficacy of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide. Some APL patients are potentially curable after treatment with ATRA or arsenic trioxide as a single agent. Combined treatment of APL with ATRA and arsenic trioxide induces remission with deeper molecular response. An oral formulation of arsenic trioxide is available, making outpatient treatment feasible. Future regimens for APL should examine how ATRA and arsenic trioxide can be optimally combined with other synergistic drugs. Asian patients with T-LGL leukemia present more frequently with pure red cell aplasia, but less frequently with neutropenia, recurrent infection, splenomegaly and rheumatoid arthritis as compared with Western patients. These differences have potential effects on treatment and disease pathogenesis. NK-cell leukemia is rapidly fatal and occurs almost exclusively in Asian and South American patients. Conventional anthracycline-based chemotherapy designed for B-cell lymphomas do not work in NK-cell leukemias. Novel therapeutic approaches targeting cellular signaling pathways or preferentially upregulated genes are needed to improve outcome.

  5. Human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax genotype analysis in Okinawa, the southernmost and remotest islands of Japan: Different distributions compared with mainland Japan and the potential value for the prognosis of aggressive adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakihama, Shugo; Saito, Mineki; Kuba-Miyara, Megumi; Tomoyose, Takeaki; Taira, Naoya; Miyagi, Takashi; Hayashi, Masaki; Kinjo, Shigeko; Nakachi, Sawako; Tedokon, Iori; Nishi, Yukiko; Tamaki, Keita; Morichika, Kazuho; Uchihara, Jun-Nosuke; Morishima, Satoko; Karube, Ken-Nosuke; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Fukushima, Takuya

    2017-10-01

    Okinawa, comprising remote islands off the mainland of Japan, is an endemic area of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1), the causative virus of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (HAM). We investigated the tax genotype of HTLV-1 among 29 HTLV-1 carriers, 74 ATL patients, and 33 HAM patients in Okinawa. The genotype distribution-60 (44%) taxA cases and 76 (56%) taxB cases-differed from that of a previous report from Kagoshima Prefecture in mainland Japan (taxA, 10%; taxB, 90%). A comparison of the clinical outcomes of 45 patients (taxA, 14; taxB, 31) with aggressive ATL revealed that the overall response and 1-year overall survival rates for taxA (50% and 35%, respectively) were lower than those for taxB (71% and 49%, respectively). In a multivariate analysis of two prognostic indices for aggressive ATL, Japan Clinical Oncology Group-Prognostic Index and Prognostic Index for acute and lymphoma ATL, with respect to age, performance status, corrected calcium, soluble interleukin-2 receptor, and tax genotype, the estimated hazard ratio of taxA compared with taxB was 2.68 (95% confidence interval, 0.87-8.25; P=0.086). Our results suggest that the tax genotype has clinical value as a prognostic factor for aggressive ATL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does radical cure of asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum place adults in endemic areas at increased risk of recurrent symptomatic malaria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Binka, Fred; Koram, Kwadwo; Anto, Francis; Adjuik, Martin; Nkrumah, Francis; Smith, Tom

    2002-07-01

    A cohort of 197 adults in Kassena-Nankana District (northern Ghana) was radically cured of malaria parasites to study subsequent incidence of malaria infection. During the following 20 weeks of the malaria transmission season, 49% experienced clinical attacks associated with Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia. In a group of 202 adults identically followed-up 1 year later without being treated, only 38% experienced such episodes (log-rank test for equality of survivor functions, P=0.035). Clinical attacks in radically cured individuals presented with lower parasite densities but more symptoms. Randomized studies are needed to test the hypothesis that radical cure of P. falciparum enhances the risk and severity of subsequent clinical malaria attacks.

  7. A comparative analysis of molecular genetic and conventional cytogenetic detection of diagnostically important translocations in more than 400 cases of acute leukemia, highlighting the frequency of false-negative conventional cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Rebecca L; Naghashpour, Mojdeh; Watt, Christopher D; Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Bagg, Adam

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we correlated the results of concurrent molecular and cytogenetic detection of entity-defining translocations in adults with acute leukemia to determine the frequency of cryptic translocations missed by conventional cytogenetics (CC) and of recurrent, prognostically relevant translocations not detectable by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (MRP). During a 5.5-year period, 442 diagnostic acute leukemia specimens were submitted for MRP-based detection of 7 common recurrent translocations: t(8;21), t(15;17), inv(16), t(9;22), t(12;21), t(4;11), and t(1;19), with a detection rate of 15.2% (67/442). CC was performed in 330 (74.7%) of 442 cases. In 7 of these 330 cases, CC missed the translocation detected by MRP. In 50 additional cases, CC revealed 1 of the MRP-detectable translocations (all were also MRP positive), yielding a false-negative rate of 12% (7/57) for the CC assay. The remaining 140 of 190 cases with clonal cytogenetic changes harbored abnormalities that were not targeted by the MRP assay, including 8 that define specific acute myeloid leukemia entities. This study revealed the frequent occurrence of false-negative, entity-defining CC analysis and highlighted the complementary nature of MRP and CC approaches in detecting genetic abnormalities in acute leukemia.

  8. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, Julian; Burmeister, T

    2013-01-01

    patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79......Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia...... patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All...

  9. An auto-SCT-based total therapy resulted in encouraging outcomes in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: report from a single center of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J; Zou, D-H; Li, Z-J; Fu, M-W; Xu, Y; Zhao, Y-Z; Qi, J-Y; Feng, S-Z; Liu, B-C; Lin, D; Mi, Y-C; Han, M-Z; Wang, J-X; Qiu, L-G

    2012-08-01

    Application of auto-SCT in the post-remission therapy for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with ALL is controversial. We analyzed the outcomes of 79 AYAs (15-24 years) with ALL who received our designed total therapy protocol with auto-SCT in first CR from 1990 to 2009. The estimated OS and EFS at 5 years for the cohort were 62.8±5.9 and 61.5±5.7%. The cumulative non-relapse mortality and relapse rate at 5 years for the cohort were 7.2±3.1 and 33.6±5.8%. Time to CR >4 weeks was the only independent unfavorable factor associated with OS, EFS and relapse in multivariate analysis. Patients in standard risk (SR) group and high risk (HR) group had better OS (78.3±7.4, 63.8±10.2 vs 38.1±11.6%) and EFS (78.0±7.4, 63.4±9.4 vs 32.4±11.3%), and lower relapse rate (15.9±6.5, 31.5±9.5 vs 65.7±11.8%) compared with patients in very high risk (VHR) group. Our data confirmed that auto-SCT-based total therapy might be an optional treatment strategy for AYAs with ALL in SR. Patients in HR also could get benefit from such schedule. But for those in VHR, allogenetic SCT is still the prior recommendation for the frequent recurrence after auto-SCT.

  10. Recurrences of Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpaciu, D; Goanta, C M; Cirpaciu, M D

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy in known as the most common cause of facial paralysis, determined by the acute onset of lower motor neuron weakness of the facial nerve with no detectable cause. With a lifetime risk of 1 in 60 and an annual incidence of 11-40/100,000 population, the condition resolves completely in around 71% of the untreated cases. Clinical trials performed for Bell's palsy have reported some recurrences, ipsilateral or contralateral to the side affected in the primary episode of facial palsy. Only few data are found in the literature. Melkersson-Rosenthal is a rare neuromucocutaneous syndrome characterized by recurrent facial paralysis, fissured tongue (lingua plicata), orofacial edema. We attempted to analyze some clinical and epidemiologic aspects of recurrent idiopathic palsy, and to develop relevant correlations between the existing data in literature and those obtained in this study. This is a retrospective study carried out on a 10-years period for adults and a five-year period for children. A number of 185 patients aged between 4 and 70 years old were analyzed. 136 of them were adults and 49 were children. 22 of 185 patients with Bell's palsy (12%) had a recurrent partial or complete facial paralysis with one to six episodes of palsy. From this group of 22 cases, 5 patients were diagnosed with Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome. The patients' age was between 4 and 70 years old, with a medium age of 27,6 years. In the group studied, fifteen patients, meaning 68%, were women and seven were men. The majority of patients in our group with more than two facial palsy episodes had at least one episode on the contralateral side. Our study found a significant incidence of recurrences of idiopathic facial palsy. Recurrent idiopathic facial palsy and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome is diagnosed more often in young females. Recurrence is more likely to occur in the first two years from the onset, which leads to the conclusion that we should have a follow up of patients

  11. Near-haploid and low-hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safavi, Setareh; Paulsson, Kajsa

    2017-01-01

    Hypodiploidy leukemia (ALL) in both children and adults. It has long been clear by cytogenetic analyses, and recently confirmed by mutational profiling, that these cases may be further subdivided into 2 subtypes: near-haploid ALL...

  12. Hypertension Control in Adults With Diabetes Mellitus and Recurrent Cardiovascular Events: Global Results From the Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes With Sitagliptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navar, Ann Marie; Gallup, Dianne S; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Green, Jennifer B; McGuire, Darren K; Armstrong, Paul W; Buse, John B; Engel, Samuel S; Lachin, John M; Standl, Eberhard; Van de Werf, Frans; Holman, Rury R; Peterson, Eric D

    2017-11-01

    Systolic blood pressure (SBP) treatment targets for adults with diabetes mellitus remain unclear. SBP levels among 12 275 adults with diabetes mellitus, prior cardiovascular disease, and treated hypertension were evaluated in the TECOS (Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes With Sitagliptin) randomized trial of sitagliptin versus placebo. The association between baseline SBP and recurrent cardiovascular disease was evaluated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling with restricted cubic splines, adjusting for clinical characteristics. Kaplan-Meier curves by baseline SBP were created to assess time to cardiovascular disease and 2 potential hypotension-related adverse events: worsening kidney function and fractures. The association between time-updated SBP and outcomes was examined using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. Overall, 42.2% of adults with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension had an SBP ≥140 mm Hg. The association between SBP and cardiovascular disease risk was U shaped, with a nadir ≈130 mm Hg. When the analysis was restricted to those with baseline SBP of 110 to 150 mm Hg, the adjusted association between SBP and cardiovascular disease risk was flat (hazard ratio per 10-mm Hg increase, 0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-1.02). There was no association between SBP and risk of fracture. Above 150 mm Hg, higher SBP was associated with increasing risk of worsening kidney function (hazard ratio per 10-mm Hg increase, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.18). Many patients with diabetes mellitus have uncontrolled hypertension. The U-shaped association between SBP and cardiovascular disease events was largely driven by those with very high or low SBP, with no difference in cardiovascular disease risk between 110 and 150 mm Hg. Lower SBP was not associated with higher risks of fractures or worsening kidney function. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Mitoxantrone, etoposide and cytarabine following epigenetic priming with decitabine in adults with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia or other high-grade myeloid neoplasms: a phase 1/2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, A B; Othus, M; Huebner, E M; Buckley, S A; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, E L; Orlowski, K F; Scott, B L; Becker, P S; Hendrie, P C; Chen, T L; Percival, M-E M; Estey, E H; Stirewalt, D L; Walter, R B

    2017-12-01

    DNA methyltransferase inhibitors sensitize leukemia cells to chemotherapeutics. We therefore conducted a phase 1/2 study of mitoxantrone, etoposide and cytarabine following 'priming' with 5-10 days of decitabine (dec/MEC) in 52 adults (median age 55 (range: 19-72) years) with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or other high-grade myeloid neoplasms. During dose escalation in cohorts of 6-12 patients, all dose levels were well tolerated. As response rates appeared similar with 7 and 10 days of decitabine, a 7-day course was defined as the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D). Among 46 patients treated at/above the RP2D, 10 (22%) achieved a complete remission (CR), 8 without measurable residual disease; five additional patients achieved CR with incomplete platelet recovery, for an overall response rate of 33%. Seven patients (15%) died within 28 days of treatment initiation. Infection/neutropenic fever, nausea and mucositis were the most common adverse events. While the CR rate compared favorably to a matched historic control population (observed/expected CR ratio=1.77), CR rate and survival were similar to two contemporary salvage regimens used at our institution (G-CLAC (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF); clofarabine; cytarabine) and G-CLAM (G-CSF; cladribine; cytarabine; mitoxantrone)). Thus, while meeting the prespecified efficacy goal, we found no evidence that dec/MEC is substantially better than other cytarabine-based regimens currently used for relapsed/refractory AML.

  14. Characterization and analysis of the outcome of adults with acute myeloid leukemia treated in a Brazilian University hospital over three decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Souto Filho

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the outcome of 227 patients with acute myeloid leukemia during three decades (period 1 - 1980’s, N = 89; period 2 - 1990’s, N = 73; period 3 - 2000’s, N = 65 at a single institution. Major differences between the three groups included a higher median age, rates of multilineage dysplasia and co-morbidities, and a lower rate of clinical manifestations of advanced leukemia in recent years. The proportion of patients who received induction remission chemotherapy was 66, 75, and 85% for periods 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P = 0.04. The median survival was 40, 77, and 112 days, and the 5-year overall survival was 7, 13, and 22%, respectively (P = 0.01. The median disease-free survival was 266, 278, and 386 days (P = 0.049. Survival expectation for patients with acute myeloid leukemia has substantially improved during this 30-year period, due to a combination of lower tumor burden and a more efficient use of chemotherapy and supportive care.

  15. What You Need to Know about Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Leukemia This booklet is about leukemia. Leukemia is cancer of the blood and bone marrow ( ... This book covers: Basics about blood cells and leukemia Types of doctors who treat leukemia Treatments for ...

  16. Toxoplasma gondii myelitis in a patient with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma Mielite por Toxoplasma gondii em um paciente com leucemia-linfoma de células T do adulto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELVES MACIEL

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL caused by HTLV-I may be associated with severe immunosupression and several opportunistic infections. Toxoplasmic encephalitis is a common central nervous system opportunistic infection in severely immunosupressed patients, however spinal cord involvement by this parasite is rare. In this paper, we report a case of toxoplasmic myelitis in a patient with ATL.Leucemia de células T do adulto (ATL, causada pelo HTLV-I, pode estar associada com imunossupressão severa e muitas infecções oportunistas. Encefalite por toxoplasmose é uma infecção oportunista do sistema nervoso central em pacientes imunossuprimidos, no entanto o envolvimento da medula espinal por este parasita é raro. Neste artigo, apresentamos um caso de mielite em um paciente com ATL.

  17. Laryngopharyngeal reflux and herpes simplex virus type 2 are possible risk factors for adult-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (prospective case-control study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formánek, M; Jančatová, D; Komínek, P; Matoušek, P; Zeleník, K

    2017-06-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) causes recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). Although HPV prevalence is high, the incidence of papillomatosis is low. Thus, factors other than HPV infection probably contribute to RRP. This study investigated whether patients with papillomatosis are more often infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 and chlamydia trachomatis (ChT) and whether laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) occurs in this group of patients more often. Prospective case-control study. Department of Otorhinolaryngology of University Hospital. The study included 20 patients with adult-onset RRP and 20 adult patients with vocal cord cyst and no pathology of laryngeal mucosa (control group). Immunohistochemical analysis of pepsin, HPV, herpes simplex virus type 2 and ChT was performed in biopsy specimens of laryngeal papillomas and of healthy laryngeal mucosa (control group) obtained from medial part of removed vocal cord cyst during microlaryngoscopy procedures. Pathologic LPR (pepsin in tissue) was diagnosed in 8/20 (40.0%) patients with papillomatosis and in 0/20 control patients (P = .003). Herpes simplex virus type 2 was present in 9/20 (45.0%) patients with papillomatosis and in 0/20 control patients (P = .001). Five specimens were positive for both pepsin and herpes simplex virus type 2. No samples were positive for ChT. There were no significant differences between groups for age, body mass index, diabetes mellitus and gastrooesophageal reflux disease. Tobacco exposure was not more frequent in RRP group either (P = .01). Results show that LPR and herpes simplex virus type 2 are significantly more often present in patients with RRP. LPR and herpes simplex virus type 2 might activate latent HPV infection and thereby be possible risk factors for RRP. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Hairy cell leukemia: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Timothy; Mobarek, Dalia; Wegge, Julia; Tabbara, Imad A

    2008-10-01

    Hairy cell Leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder that was characterized in the late 1950s. HCL is defined, according to the WHO classification, as a mature (peripheral) B-cell neoplasm (1). HCL accounts for between 2-3% of all leukemia cases, with about 600 new cases diagnosed in the U.S. each year (1). HCL occurs more commonly in males, with an overall male to female ratio of approximately 4:1. The median age of onset is 52 years. This disease is seen more commonly in Caucasians and appears to be especially frequent in Ashkenazi Jewish males, with rare occurrence in persons of Asian and African descents (1). Hairy cells are distinct, clonal B cells arrested at a late stage of maturation. They are small B lymphoid cells that possess oval nuclei and abundant cytoplasm with characteristic micro-filamentous ("hairy") projections. They strongly express CD103, CD22, and CD11c (2). These cells typically infiltrate the bone marrow, the spleen, and to a lesser extent the liver, lymph nodes, and skin. Many patients present with splenomegaly and pancytopenia. Other clinical manifestations include recurrent opportunistic infections and vasculitis. Historically, HCL was considered uniformly fatal (2). However, recent treatment advances, using purine analogues such as Cladribine and Pentostatin, led to a significant improvement in prognosis with achievement of high response rates and durable remissions (2).

  19. Recurrent vulvovaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anna M; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Vulvovaginitis (VV) is one of the most commonly encountered problems by a gynecologist. Many women frequently self-treat with over-the-counter medications, and may present to their health-care provider after a treatment failure. Vulvovaginal candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and trichomoniasis may occur as discreet or recurrent episodes, and have been associated with significant treatment cost and morbidity. We present an update on diagnostic capabilities and treatment modalities that address recurrent and refractory episodes of VV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Integral Care Guide for Early Detection and Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder in Adults. Integral Attention of Adults with a Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder: Part II: General Aspects of Treatment, Management of the Acute Phase, Continuation and Maintenance of Patients with a Depression Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia Bohórquez; Valencia, Jenny García; Guarín, Maritza Rodríguez; Borrero, Álvaro Enrique Arenas; Díaz, Sergio Mario Castro; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Riveros, Patricia Maldonado; Jaramillo, Luis Eduardo; Brito, Enrique; Acosta, Carlos Alberto Palacio; Pedraza, Ricardo Sánchez; González-Pacheco, Juan; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    This article presents recommendations based on evidence gathered to answer a series of clinical questions concerning the depressive episode and the recurrent depressive disorder, with emphasis on general treatment aspects, treatment in the acute phase and management of the continuation/maintenance, all intended to grant health care parameters based on the best and more updated available evidence for achieving minimum quality standards with adult patients thus diagnosed. A practical clinical guide was elaborated according to standards of the Methodological Guide of the Ministry of Social Protection. Recommendation from NICE90 and CANMAT guides were adopted and updated so as to answer the questions posed while de novo questions were developed. Recommendations 5-22 corresponding to management of depression are presented. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. [Integral Care Guide for Early Detection and Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder in Adults. Integral Attention of Adults with a Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder: Part III: Treatment of Resistant Depression and Psychotic Depression, Occupational Therapy and Day Hospital Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia Bohórquez; Valencia, Jenny García; Guarín, Maritza Rodríguez; Ángel, Juliana Rodríguez; Jaramillo, Luis Eduardo; Acosta, Carlos Alberto Palacio; Pedraza, Ricardo Sánchez; Díaz, Sergio Mario Castro; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María

    2012-12-01

    This article presents recommendations based on the evidence gathered to answer a series of clinical questions concerning the depressive episode and the recurrent depressive disorder. Emphasis was given to general treatment issues of resistant depression and psychotic depression, occupational therapy and day hospital treatment so as to grant diagnosed adult patients the health care parameters based on the best and more updated evidence available and achieve minimum quality standards. A practical clinical guide was elaborated according to standards of the Methodological Guide of the Ministry of Social Protection. Recommendation from NICE90 and CANMAT guides were adopted and updated so as to answer the questions posed while de novo questions were developed. Recommendations 23-25 corresponding to the management of depression are presented. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Murine and human leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchenal, J H

    1975-01-01

    Essentially all the drugs which are active against human leukemias and lymphomas are active against one type or another of the rodent leukemias and lymphomas. Leukemia L1210 has been generally the most successful screening tool for clinically active compounds. Leukemia P388, however, seems to be better in detecting active antibiotics and natural products and P1534 is particularly sensitive to the Vinca alkaloids, while L5178Y, EARAD, and 6C3HED are useful in detecting the activities of various asparaginase containing fractions. Cell cultures of these leukemias can demonstrate mechanism of drug action and quantitate resistance. Spontaneous AKR leukemia is a model of the advanced human disease. In these leukemias vincristine and prednisone produce a 4 log cell kill. Cytoxan and arabinosyl cytosine (Ara-C) are also effective. On the other hand drugs such as mercaptopurine (6MP) and methotrexate which are highly active in the maintenance phase of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and in L1210 have little or no activity against the AKR spontaneous system. Mouse leukemias can also detect schedule dependence, synergistic combinations, cross resistance, oral activity, and the ability of drugs to pass the blood brain barrier. A case in point is the Ara-C analog 2,2'-anhydro-arabinofuranosyl-5-fluorocytosine (AAFC) which is not schedule dependent, is active orally, is potentiated by thioguanine, and is effective against intracerebrally inoculated mouse leukemia. AAFC and its analogs might thus be a considerable improvement over Ara-C which is at the present time the most important component of the combination treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

  3. Total-Body Irradiation and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-11

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Renal Medullary Carcinoma; Type 1 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Type 2 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, M; Tomonaga, M; Amenomori, T; Matsuo, T [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1991-12-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5{approx}0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author).

  5. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Amenomori, T.; Matsuo, T.

    1991-01-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5∼0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author)

  6. The relationship between CNS prophylactic treatment and smoking behavior in adult survivors of childhood leukemia: a National Cancer Institute and Children's Cancer Group (NCI/CCG) study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, M.L.; Weiss, R.E.; Guo, M.D.; Byrne, J.; Mills, J.L.; Robison, L.L.; Zeltzer, L.K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the relationship of both cranial radiation dose (CRD) and intra-thecal methotrexate (IT-MTX) dose with smoking behavior in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Material and Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted by NCI/CCG with 593 young adult survivors (median age, 21.6 years), treated prior to age 20 years on CCG ALL protocols from 1970 to 1986, and 409 sibling controls (median age, 24.5 years). Subjects were telephone surveyed regarding risk-taking behaviors, including cigarette smoking. A previous report has compared the smoking behavior of survivors to controls; this report will focus on the association between CNS treatment variables and smoking behavior for survivors only. Contingency table analysis was used to determine the prevalence of having ever smoked regularly (i.e. ≥ 100 cigarettes total and daily use for ≥ 6 months) for each treatment group: combinations of CRD (0-18 Gy vs. 24 Gy) and IT-MTX (0 to ≤ 83 mg vs. >83 mg). Logistic regression analysis was used to examine CRD, IT-MTX dose, age at diagnosis and age at follow-up as predictors for smoking. Too few subjects received intravenous methotrexate to evaluate this as an explanatory variable. The analysis was done separately for survivors from treatment periods 1 and 2 (1970-77 and 1978-86, respectively) to control for the time period cohort effect (which we have previously demonstrated to be significant). These treatment period definitions also correlated with a shift in protocol treatment trends from 24 Gy to 0-18 Gy and lower dose IT-MTX to higher dose IT-MTX. Results: Among the survivors from treatment period 1 who received 24 Gy CRD, those treated with higher dose IT-MTX (>83 mg) were significantly more likely to have ever been regular smokers than those treated with no or lower dose IT-MTX (31% vs. 16%, p=0.016). Among survivors from treatment period 1 who received 0-18 Gy CRD, the smoking prevalence was also greater in

  7. Experimental studies of leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoro, Kenjiro

    1977-01-01

    Mouse leukemia, especially the relationship between that and endogenous type-C RNA virus (murine leukemia virus, MLV), was generally discussed centering around the recent findings and reports. Correlation of carcinogenesis due to x-rays and carcinogens with the occurrence of MLV, the relationship of total body fractionated x-ray irradiation and successive acellular transmission by the neonatal inoculation with MLV, and the relationship between N-nitrosobutylurea or N-nitrosoethylurea and MLV were discussed. The relationship between the occurrence of MLV and thymus or spleen was also discussed. Biotic differences in mice and rats, the relationship between MLV the organotropism of MLV and provocation of leukemia, the directivity of MLV to thymus and the etiologic correlation of rat leukemia or mouse leukemia with MLV were mentioned. (Ichikawa, K.)

  8. Enduring effects of Preventive Cognitive Therapy in adults remitted from recurrent depression : A 10 year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockting, C. L. H.; Smid, N. H.; Koeter, M. W. J.; Spinhoven, P.; Beck, A. T.; Schene, Aart H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prevention of recurrence is a challenge in the management of major depressive disorder (MDD). The long-term effects of Preventive Cognitive Therapy (PCT) in preventing recurrence in MDD are not known. Methods: A RCT comparing the addition of PCT to Treatment As Usual (TAU), versus TAU

  9. FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD influence the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA but not LRP mRNA assessed with RQ-PCR method in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasilowska-Adamska, Barbara; Solarska, Iwona; Paluszewska, Monika; Malinowska, Iwona; Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw W; Warzocha, Krzysztof

    2014-04-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) and mixed-lineage leukemia gene-partial tandem duplication (MLL-PTD) are aberrations associated with leukemia which indicate unsatisfactory prognosis. Downstream regulatory targets of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD are not well defined. We have analyzed the expression of MDR-1, multidrug resistant protein-1 (MRP-1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and lung resistance protein (LRP) messenger RNA (mRNA) in relation to the mutational status of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD in 185 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) adult patients. The real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction method was performed to assess the expression of the MDR-1, MRP-1, BCRP, and LRP mRNA, and the results were presented as coefficients calculated using an intermediate method according to Pfaffl's rule. Significantly higher expressions of MDR-1 mRNA were found in patients who did not harbor FLT3-ITD (0.20 vs. 0.05; p = 0.0001) and MRP-1 mRNA in patients with this mutation (0.96 vs. 0.70; p = 0.002) and of BCRP mRNA in patients with MLL-PTD (0.61 vs. 0.38; p = 0.03). In univariate analysis, the high expression of MDR-1 mRNA (≥0.1317) negatively influenced the outcome of induction therapy (p = 0.05), whereas the high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) was associated with a high relapse rate (RR) (p = 0.013). We found that the high expression of MDR-1 (≥0.1317), MRP-1 (≥0.8409), and BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) significantly influenced disease-free survival (DFS; p = 0.059, 0.032, and 0.009, respectively) and overall survival (0.048, 0.014, and 0.059, respectively). Moreover, a high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) proved to be an independent prognostic factor for RR (p = 0.01) and DFS (p = 0.002) in multivariate analysis. The significant correlation between the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA and FLT3-ITD or MLL-PTD in AML patients requires further investigation.

  10. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic

  11. The clinical characteristics, therapy and outcome of 85 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL-AFF1 prospectively treated in the UKALLXII/ECOG2993 trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, David I.; Moorman, Anthony V.; Chilton, Lucy; Paietta, Elisabeth; Enshaie, Amir; DeWald, Gordon; Harrison, Christine J.; Fielding, Adele K.; Foroni, Letizia; Goldstone, Anthony H.; Litzow, Mark R.; Luger, Selina M.; McMillan, Andrew K.; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M.; Tallman, Martin S.; Wiernik, Peter; Lazarus, Hillard M.

    2013-01-01

    The biology and outcome of adult t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL-AFF1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia are poorly understood. We describe the outcome and delineate prognostic factors and optimal post-remission therapy in 85 consecutive patients (median age 38 years) treated uniformly in the prospective trial UKALLXII/ECOG2993. The immunophenotype of this leukemia was pro-B (CD10NEG). Immaturity was further suggested by high expression of the stem-cell antigens, CD133 and CD135, although CD34 expression was significantly lower than in t(4;11)-negative patients. Complete remission was achieved in 77 (93%) patients but only 35% survived 5 years (95% CI: 25–45%); the relapse rate was 45% (95% CI: 33–58%). Thirty-one patients underwent allogeneic transplantation in first remission (15 sibling donors and 16 unrelated donors): with 5-year survival rates of 56% and 67% respectively, only 2/31 patients relapsed. This compares with a 24% survival rate and 59% relapse rate in 46 patients who received post-remission chemotherapy. A major determinant of outcome was age with 71% of patients aged <25 years surviving. Younger patients had lower relapse rates (19%) but most received allografts in first complete remission. In conclusion, multivariate analysis did not demonstrate an advantage of allografting over chemotherapy but only five younger patients received chemotherapy. Prospective trials are required to determine whether poor outcomes in older patients can be improved by reduced-intensity conditioning allografts. NCT00002514 www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:23349309

  12. Reclassification of leukemia among A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki using French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao; Bennett, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The concordance rate for diagnoses of atomic bomb-related cases of leukemia in Nagasaki was determined using the French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) hematologists and one of the members (JMB) of the FAB cooperative group reviewed independently the peripheral blood and/or bone marrow smears from 193 people with leukemia or a related disorder. There was 85 % agreement in the identification of types and subtypes of acute leukemia. There was almost complete agreement for the diagnoses of non-FAB disorders (chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and others) resulting in overall concordance of 88.2 %. The present study suggest that the previously established leukemia types for about a quarter of the cases of acute leukemia and related disorders except CML should be changed. Considerable numbers of cases of ATL and MDS were involved in this series. The frequency of the former disease was not high in the high-dose irradiated group, but that of the latter was considerably high. All subtypes of AML except M3 and M6 were present in the high-dose group. The striking difference in CML incidence between Nagasaki and Hiroshima may continue to be a problem in relation to biological response to radiation exposure. (author)

  13. Reclassification of leukemia among A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki using French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao; Bennett, J.M. and others

    1988-06-01

    The concordance rate for diagnoses of atomic bomb-related cases of leukemia in Nagasaki was determined using the French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) hematologists and one of the members (JMB) of the FAB cooperative group reviewed independently the peripheral blood and/or bone marrow smears from 193 people with leukemia or a related disorder. There was 85 % agreement in the identification of types and subtypes of acute leukemia. There was almost complete agreement for the diagnoses of non-FAB disorders (chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and others) resulting in overall concordance of 88.2 %. The present study suggest that the previously established leukemia types for about a quarter of the cases of acute leukemia and related disorders except CML should be changed. Considerable numbers of cases of ATL and MDS were involved in this series. The frequency of the former disease was not high in the high-dose irradiated group, but that of the latter was considerably high. All subtypes of AML except M3 and M6 were present in the high-dose group. The striking difference in CML incidence between Nagasaki and Hiroshima may continue to be a problem in relation to biological response to radiation exposure.

  14. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D

    2018-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL/KMT2A gene are associated with infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. Here we present the data obtained from 2345 acute leukemia patients. Genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs)...... of patient-specific chromosomal fusion sites allows the design of specific PCR primers for minimal residual disease analyses for all patients.Leukemia advance online publication, 8 August 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.213....

  15. Review of diagnosis and classification of leukemias that occurred in A-bomb survivors (preliminary report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, T; Tomonaga, M; Ichimaru, M; Kamata, N; Kuramoto, A

    1984-11-01

    According to the current knowledge of diagnosis and classification, a review of 157 patients who had developed leukemia before June 30, 1967 was made. The incidence of acute leukemia decreased slightly among A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima; however, the incidence of acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) increased. The number of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was unchanged. The frequency of CML implied that A-bombing damaged stem cells. Among A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki, although the number of acute non-lymphatic leukemia decreased, the number of ALL was unchanged. Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) was diagnosed in 7 A-bomb survivors, confirming that Nagasaki is an endemic area for ATL. These preliminary results seem to be of importance in elucidating the mechanism of leukemia developing among A-bomb survivors. (Namekawa, K.).

  16. Review of diagnosis and classification of leukemias that occurred in A-bomb survivors (preliminary report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao; Ichimaru, Michito; Kamata, Nanao; Kuramoto, Atsushi.

    1984-01-01

    According to the current knowledge of diagnosis and classification, a review of 157 patients who had developed leukemia before June 30, 1967 was made. The total number of acute leukemia slightly decreased among A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima; however, the number of acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) increased. The number of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was unchanged. The frequency of CML implied that A-bombing damaged stem cells in a high incidence. Among A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki, although the number of acute non-lymphatic leukemia decreased, the number of ALL was unchanged. Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) was diagnosed in 7 A-bomb survivors, confirming that Nagasaki is an endemic area for ATL. These preliminary results seem to be of importance in elucidating the mechanism of leukemia developiong among A-bomb survivors. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Antibodies to adult T-cell leukemia-virus-associated antigen (ATLA) in sera from patients with ATL and controls in Japan: a nation-wide sero-epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinuma, Y; Komoda, H; Chosa, T; Kondo, T; Kohakura, M; Takenaka, T; Kikuchi, M; Ichimaru, M; Yunoki, K; Sato, I; Matsuo, R; Takiuchi, Y; Uchino, H; Hanaoka, M

    1982-06-15

    A nation-wide sero-epidemiologic survey of adult T-cell leukemia virus (ATLV), detected es anti-ATLA (ATLV-associated antigen), was made in Japan. Sera from adult donors in 15 different locations were screened for anti-ATLA. High incidences (6 to 37%) of antibody-positive donors were found in seven regions, one in northern Japan, and the others in southwestern regions. These areas are ATLV-endemic areas corresponding to ATL-endemic areas. Examination of sera from healthy donors aged 6 to 80 years in ATL-endemic areas showed an age-dependent increase of seropositive donors with a maximum of about 30% at 40 years of age. Anti-ATLA was found in all but two of 142 patients with ATL. Anti-ATLA-positive patients with ATL were mainly found in ATLV-endemic areas, and only a few in ATL-nonendemic areas. Six patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in ATLV-nonendemic areas gave a negative reaction for anti-ATLA. The geometric mean titer of anti-ATLA of patients with ATL was higher than that of healthy donors.

  18. The clinical characteristics and prognostic significance of AID, miR-181b, and miR-155 expression in adult patients with de novo B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangquan; Cao, Yang; Dong, Weimin; Lin, Yan; Wang, Qi; Wu, Wei; Hua, Xiaoying; Ling, Yun; Xie, Xiaobao; Hu, Shaoyan; Cen, Jiannong; Gu, Weiying

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate clinical characteristics and prognostic significance of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) gene, miR-181b and miR-155 expression in de novo adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) patients. Results showed that AID and miR-155 expression were higher in B-ALL patients than healthy controls, while miR-181b expression was lower in B-ALL patients. In addition, Ph + B-ALLs had higher AID expression than Ph - B-ALLs, and its high expression was associated with BCR-ABL. Moreover, B-ALL patients with AID high or miR-181b low expression had a shorter overall survival (OS). AID high with miR-181b low , AID high with miR-155 low , miR-181b low , miR-155 low , AID high with miR-181b low and miR-155 low expression were associated with shorter OS. Combination of the three molecules are more accurate predictors for unfavorable OS compared with univariate group. Therefore, AID, miR-181b and miR-155 provide clinical prognosis of adult de novo B-ALL patients and may refine their molecular risk classification.

  19. Low 25(OH) Vitamin D3 Levels Are Associated with Adverse Outcome in Newly-Diagnosed Intensively-Treated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hun Ju; Muindi, Josephia R.; Tan, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Liu, Song; Wilding, Gregory E.; Ford, Laurie A.; Sait, Sheila N.J.; Block, Annemarie W.; Adjei, Araba A.; Barcos, Maurice; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Thompson, James E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L.; Wetzler, Meir

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies suggest that low 25(OH) vitamin D3 levels may be prognostic in some malignancies, but no studies have evaluated their impact on treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Methods VD levels were evaluated in 97 consecutive newly diagnosed, intensively-treated AML patients. MicroRNA-expression profiles and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 25(OH) vitamin D3 pathway genes were evaluated and correlated with 25(OH) vitamin D3 levels and treatment outcome. Results Thirty-four (35%) patients had normal 25(OH) vitamin D3 levels (32–100 ng/ml), 34 (35%) insufficient (20–31.9 ng/ml) and 29 (30%) deficient levels (<20 ng/ml). Insufficient/deficient 25(OH) vitamin D3 levels were associated with worse relapse-free survival (RFS) compared to normal vitamin D3 levels. In multivariate analyses, deficient 25(OH) vitamin D3, smoking, European LeukemiaNet Genetic Groups and white blood cell count retained their statistical significance for RFS. A number of microRNAs and SNPs were found to be associated with 25(OH) vitamin D3 level, although none remained significant after multiple test corrections; one 25(OH) vitamin D3 receptor SNP, rs10783219, was associated with lower complete remission rate (p=0.0442), shorter RFS (p=0.0058) and overall survival (p=0.0011). Conclusions It remains to be determined what role microRNA and SNP profiles play in contributing to low 25(OH) vitamin D3 level and/or outcome and whether supplementation will improve AML outcome. PMID:24166051

  20. The incidence of leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors: 1950 – 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wan-Ling; Preston, Dale L.; Soda, Midori; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Kodama, Kazunori; Kimura, Akiro; Kamada, Nanao; Dohy, Hiroo; Tomonaga, Masao; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Cullings, Harry M.; Suyama, Akihiko; Ozasa, Kotaro; Shore, Roy E.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2013-01-01

    A marked increase in leukemia risks was the first and most striking late effect of radiation exposure seen among the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. This paper presents analyses of radiation effects on leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma incidence in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors updated 14 years since the last comprehensive report on these malignancies. These analyses make use of tumor- and leukemia-registry-based incidence data on 113,011 cohort members with 3.6 million person-years of follow-up from late 1950 through the end of 2001. In addition to a detailed analysis of the excess risk for all leukemias other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia or adult T-cell leukemia (neither of which appear to be radiation-related), we present results for the major hematopoietic malignancy types: acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, adult T-cell leukemia, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Poisson regression methods were used to characterize the shape of the radiation dose response relationship and, to the extent the data allowed, to investigate variation in the excess risks with sex, attained age, exposure age, and time since exposure. In contrast to the previous report that focused on describing excess absolute rates, we considered both excess absolute rate (EAR) and excess relative risk (ERR) models and found that ERR models can often provide equivalent and sometimes more parsimonious descriptions of the excess risk than EAR models. The leukemia results indicated that there was a non-linear dose response for leukemias other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia or adult T-cell leukemia, which varied markedly with time and age at exposure, with much of the evidence for this non-linearity arising from the acute myeloid leukemia risks. Although the leukemia excess risks generally declined with attained age or time since exposure, there was evidence

  1. Progress in the leukemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galton, D.A.G.; Spiers, A.S.D.

    1971-01-01

    Recent work on the epidemiology of leukemia is reviewed in relation to factors of possible etiologic importance. There is still much geographic variation in the accuracy of diagnosis, the reliability of death certification, and the provision of national registries for classifying leukemia according to cytologic type. This variation and the low incidence of all types of leukemia make difficult the recognition of potentially significant distributions or trends that might suggest the operation of environmental leukemogens and their interaction with genetically determined susceptibility. Exposure to ionizing radiation remains the only predisposing factor beyond doubt for acute and chronic granulocytic leukemia, but its exact role remains obscure. There is no evidence that radiation plays a part in the etiology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In the population of survivors of the Hiroshima atomic bomb explosion of 1945, the incidence of leukemia (mainly CGL), though declining in the second 10-year period, was still higher than that of Japan as a whole. The suggestion that the exposure of women to radiation could increase the likelihood of leukemia in their still unconceived children was examined by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in a prospective study of 17,700 children, and no increase in the incidence of leukemia was found in the children of parents who had been heavily exposed to radiation before conception. In the 1960's a decline in the United States mortality rates for leukemia among the white population was recorded. This decline was most marked in children below age 5, and it was suggested that the decline could have resulted from a drop in the use of diagnostic radiology in pregnant women following the reports in 1956 of the Medical Research Council and the National Academy of Sciences on the biologic hazards of radiation. A similar decline in mortality was reported from Norway. (464 references) (U.S.)

  2. Obinutuzumab is Effective in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Rheumatoid Arthritis After Rituximab Failure: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lachowiez, Curtis; Deodhar, Atul; Kozin, Eliana; Spurgeon, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 68 Final Diagnosis: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia Symptoms: Arthritis Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: ? Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia affecting older adults. As such, many of these patients suffer from co-existing disease states, and the provider must take these comorbidities into account when determining a treatment regimen. The widespread use of monoclonal an...

  3. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: experience in adult patients treated with hyperCVAD and 0195 Protocol, at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán. Cohort 2003-2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga-Ortiz, Luis; Buitrón-Santiago, Natalie; Rosas-López, Adriana; Rosas-Arzate, Guadalupe; Armengolt-Jiménez, Alicia; Aguayo, Alvaro; López-Karpovitch, Xavier; Crespo-Solís, Erick

    2008-01-01

    Despite therapeutic advances, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults remains a disease with poor long term outcome and survival rates. Developing countries lack of information about this disease. On the other hand, infections are frequent complications related to mortality and some research studies do not show accurate rates of septic shock or other related factors. To describe characteristics of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, response to treatment, complications and to evaluate further survival related factors and to compare our experience with other reports of literature. Between September 2003 to November 2007, the entire cohort of patients with diagnosis of ALL was included. The treatment regimens used were MDACC HyperCVAD (HCVAD) and 0195 (institutional regimen). Of 40 patients included with the diagnosis of ALL, 92% was B phenotype and 8%, T phenotype, with a median age of 27 years. The median follow up was 28.5 months. Initially, 14% showed central nervous system infiltration; of 51% with available cytogenetics, 16.7% was Philadelphia chromosome positive. There were 36 patients who received treatment: 13 received HCVAD and 23 the 0195 protocol; 78% achieved global complete remission, 85% for the patients with HCVAD and 74% with 0195. The induction death rate was 2.8%. The median disease-free survival was 11.6 months (IC 95%, 2.5-20.8 months) and overall survival was 15 months (IC 95%, 10.6-19.4 months). In 95% of patients, no prophylactic antibiotic therapy was used and treatment related death was 8.4% (2.8% during induction and 5.6% during the rest of treatment). Factors associated with worse survival rate were hyperleukocytosis, T phenotype and lack of early complete remission. During induction, grade 3 to 4 non hematopoietic toxicity was 17%. Incidence of neutropenic febrile episodes was 61% and septic shock was 11%. With HCVAD, we observed worse complete remission, disease-free survival and overall survival rates compared with the

  4. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  5. Comparing outcomes of matched related donor and matched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplants in adults with B-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Eric; Martens, Michael; Wang, Hai-Lin; Brazauskas, Ruta; Weisdorf, Daniel; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Khoury, H Jean; de Lima, Marcos; Saber, Wael

    2017-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) using human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched related donors (RDs) and allogeneic HCT using HLA-matched unrelated donors (URDs) produce similar outcomes for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia, whereas the donor source has been reported to be a predictor of outcomes in myelodysplastic syndrome. Post-HCT outcomes for 1458 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients from 2000 to 2011 were analyzed, and RD and URD transplants were compared. The median age was 37 years (range, 18-69 years). In the multivariate analysis, HLA 8/8 allele-matched URD recipients had similar transplant-related mortality (TRM) and all-cause mortality in comparison with RD recipients (hazard ratios [HRs], 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.91-1.48] and 1.01 [95% CI, 0.85-1.19], respectively); 7/8 URD recipients had a greater risk of TRM and all-cause mortality in comparison with RD recipients (HRs, 1.92 [95% CI, 1.47-2.52] and 1.29 [95% CI, 1.05-1.58], respectively). The risk of TRM and all-cause mortality was also greater for 7/8 URD recipients versus 8/8 URD recipients. Compared with RD recipients, both 8/8 and 7/8 URD recipients had a lower risk of relapse (HRs, 0.77 [95% CI, 0.62-0.97] and 0.75 [95% CI, 0.56-1.00], respectively). Both 8/8 and 7/8 URD recipients had a greater risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD; HRs, 2.18 [95% CI, 1.76-2.70] and 2.65 [95% CI, 2.06-3.42], respectively) and chronic GVHD (HRs, 1.28 [95% CI, 1.06-1.55] and 1.46 [95% CI, 1.14-1.88], respectively) in comparison with RD recipients. In the absence of RD transplantation, 8/8 URD transplantation is a viable alternative with similar survival outcomes, whereas 7/8 URD transplantation is associated with poorer overall survival. Cancer 2017;123:3346-55. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. [Establishment of Primary Adult MDS Nested Case-Control Study Cohort and Study of Risk Factors Associated with MDS Evolution to Leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Chen, Bo-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Guo-Wei

    2015-12-01

    To establish a nested case-control study cohort in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients and investigate the clinical characteristics, WHO subtype and risk factors associated with MDS evolution to leukemia of this cohort. All patients, ≥18 years of age, provided by 24 Shanghai hospitals with initial clinical findings consistent with a hematopoietic abnormality between June 2003 and April 2007, were the candidates for inclusion in this study. The blood and bone marrow samples of every patient should be provided at baseline. Diagnosis was made by incorporating morphologic, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic and molecular features according to WHO classification criteria. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using conventional G-banding karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques. Cumulative risk of evolution was estimated by Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate Log-rank method and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. A total of 435 patients were diagnosed as MDS. The median age of MDS onset was 58(18-90) years, with 248 male patients and 187 female patients (male: female 1.33: 1). The percentage of cases with refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD) was the highest (65.5%), while that of refraetory anemia (RA) (2.3%), refractory anenia with ring sideroblast (RARS) (1.1%) and 5q-syndrome (0.5%) was lower. Trisomy 8 (+8) was the most common chromosome abnormalities (71 cases, 12.7%). The mean follow-up time was 20.3 (4.2-57.1) months. Cases were patients with evolution by the end of follow-up, while controls were patients without evolution by that time. Case group included 41 patients and control group included 342 patients. Univariate analysis showed that the age, sex, WHO subtype, WBC count, absolute neutrophil count (ANC), IPSS cytogenetic subgroup, IPSS group and bone marrow blast percentage were significant risk factors for leukemia-free survival (LFS). Multivariate analysis of COX model

  7. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia-associated chromosomal abnormalities and miRNA deregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiefer Y

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Yvonne Kiefer1, Christoph Schulte2, Markus Tiemann2, Joern Bullerdiek11Center for Human Genetics, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany; 2Hematopathology Hamburg, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is the most common leukemia in adults. By cytogenetic investigations major subgroups of the disease can be identified that reflect different routes of tumor development. Of these chromosomal deviations, trisomy 12 and deletions of parts of either the long arm of chromosome 13, the long arm of chromosome 11, or the short arm of chromosome 17 are most commonly detected. In some of these aberrations the molecular target has been identified as eg, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM in case of deletions of chromosomal region 11q22~23 and the genes encoding microRNAs miR-15a/16-1 as likely targets of deletions of chromosomal band 13q14.3. Of note, these aberrations do not characterize independent subgroups but often coexist within the metaphases of one tumor. Generally, complex aberrations are associated with a worse prognosis than simple karyotypic alterations. Due to smaller sizes of the missing segment the detection of recurrent deletions is not always possible by means of classical cytogenetics but requires more advanced techniques as in particular fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Nevertheless, at this time it is not recommended to replace classical cytogenetics by FISH because this would miss additional information given by complex or secondary karyotypic alterations. However, the results of cytogenetic analyses allow the stratification of prognostic and predictive groups of the disease. Of these, the group characterized by deletions involving TP53 is clinically most relevant. In the future refined methods as eg, array-based comparative genomic hybridization will supplement the existing techniques to characterize CLL. Keywords: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chromosomal abnormality, miRNA deregulation

  8. Occupation and leukemia in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talibov, Madar; Kautiainen, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar

    2012-01-01

    We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries.......We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries....

  9. Correlation of the microculture-kinetic drug-induced apoptosis assay with patient outcomes in initial treatment of adult acute myelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Stephen A; Raptis, Anastasios; Hallquist, Allan; Rutledge, James; Chernick, Michael; Perree, Mathieu; Talbott, Mahsa S; Presant, Cary A

    2013-03-01

    Overall survival (OS) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains poor. Determining prognostic factors will help in selecting patients for appropriate treatments. Our aim was to determine whether the level of drug-induced apoptosis (chemosensitivity) demonstrated by the microculture-kinetic drug-induced apoptosis (MiCK) assay significantly predicted outcomes after standard AML induction therapy. A total of 109 patients with untreated AML had blood and/or bone marrow aspirate samples analyzed for anthracycline-induced apoptosis using the MiCK assay. The amount of apoptosis observed over 48 h was determined and expressed as kinetic units of apoptosis (KU). Complete remission (CR) was significantly higher (72%) in patients with high idarubicin-induced apoptosis >3 KU compared to patients with apoptosis ≤ 3 KU (p = 0.01). Multivariate analysis showed the only significant variables to be idarubicin-induced apoptosis and karyotype. Median overall survival of patients with idarubicin-induced apoptosis >3 KU was 16.1 months compared to 4.5 months in patients with apoptosis ≤ 3 KU (p = 0.004). Multivariate analysis showed the only significant variable to be idarubicin-induced apoptosis. Chemotherapy-induced apoptosis measured by the MiCK assay demonstrated significant correlation with outcomes and appears predictive of complete remission and overall survival for patients receiving standard induction chemotherapy.

  10. Bortezomib interactions with chemotherapy agents in acute leukemia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Terzah M; Gannavarapu, Anurhadha; Blaney, Susan M; D'Argenio, David Z; Plon, Sharon E; Berg, Stacey L

    2006-07-01

    Although there is effective chemotherapy for many patients with leukemia, 20% of children and up to 65% of adults relapse. Novel therapies are needed to treat these patients. Leukemia cells are very sensitive to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (VELCADE(R), PS-341), which enhances the in vitro cytotoxic effects of dexamethasone and doxorubicin in multiple myeloma. To determine if bortezomib enhances the cytotoxicity of agents used in leukemia, we employed an in vitro tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay (MTT) to evaluate the cytotoxic effects of bortezomib alone and in combination with dexamethasone, vincristine, doxorubicin, cytarabine, asparaginase, geldanamycin, trichostatin A, and the bcl-2 inhibitor HA14.1. We demonstrated that primary leukemia lymphoblasts and leukemia cell lines are sensitive to bortezomib, with an average IC(50) of 12 nM. Qualitative and quantitative bortezomib-drug interactions were evaluated using the universal response surface approach (URSA). Bortezomib was synergistic with dexamethasone in dexamethasone-sensitive leukemia cells, and additive with vincristine, asparaginase, cytarabine, and doxorubicin. The anti-leukemic activity of bortezomib was also additive with geldanamycin and HA14.1, and additive or synergistic with trichostatin A. These results were compared to analysis using the median-dose effect method, which generated complex drug interactions due to differences in dose-response curve sigmoidicities. These data suggest bortezomib could potentiate the cytotoxic effects of combination chemotherapy in patients with leukemia.

  11. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Current Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Eun-Mi; Kittai, Adam; Tabbara, Imad A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common type of leukemia in adults, and while in early, asymptomatic stages treatment is not indicated, the threat to the quality of life and increased mortality of patients posed by more advanced-stage disease necessitate therapeutic intervention. Guidelines of when and how to treat are not well-established because CLL is a disease of the elderly and it is important to balance preservation of functional status and control of the disease. Advances in molecular and genetic profiling has led to the ability to identify sub-groups of patients with CLL whose disease may respond to selected therapy. This review discusses current standard therapies in the major sub-groups of CLL based on age and functional status, in both the front-line and relapsed/refractory settings. It also provides a concise review of novel agents that have shown considerable efficacy in CLL. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. [Integral Care Guide for Early Detection and Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder in Adults. Integral Attention of Adults with a Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder: Part I: Risk Factors, Screening, Suicide Risk Diagnosis and Assessment in Patients with a Depression Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia Bohórquez; Valencia, Jenny García; Guarín, Maritza Rodríguez; Narváez, Eliana Bravo; Jaramillo, Luis Eduardo; Acosta, Carlos Alberto Palacio; Pedraza, Ricardo Sánchez; Díaz, Sergio Mario Castro

    2012-12-01

    Depression is an important cause of morbidity and disability in the world; however, it is under-diagnosed at all care levels. The purpose here is to present recommendations based on the evidence gathered to answer a series of clinical questions concerning risk factors, screening, suicide risk diagnosis and evaluation in patients undergoing a depressive episode and recurrent depressive disorder. Emphasis has been made upon the approach used at the primary care level so as to grant adult diagnosed patients the health care guidelines based on the best and more updated evidence available thus achieving minimum quality standards. A practical clinical guide was elaborated according to standards of the Methodological Guide of the Ministry of Social Protection. Recommendation from guides NICE90 and CANMAT were adopted and updated so as to answer the questions posed while de novo questions were developed. Recommendations 1-22 corresponding to screening, suicide risk and depression diagnosis were presented. The corresponding degree of recommendation is included. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma in a patient with HTLV-I/II associated myelopathy Leucemia - linfoma de células T do adulto em um paciente com mielopatia associada a HTLV-I/II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia Freitas

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myelopathy associated with T-lymphotropic virus type I (HAM has been described as an endemic disease in several areas of the world, meanwhile there are few papers describing the association between HAM and adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. We report the case of a man that, after four years of progressive spastic paraparesis and neurogenic bladder, developed a clinical picture of a lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by dermal and systemic envolvement, mimicking mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome.Apesar da infecção pelo HTLV-I ser endêmica em várias regiões do mundo, poucos são os relatos da associação entre leucemia-linfoma de células T do adulto (ATLL e encefalomieloneuropatia pelo HTLV-I. No presente artigo é descrito um paciente que no curso do comprometimento neurológico pelo HTLV-I desenvolveu quadro de leucemia com infiltração de tecido dérmico semelhante ao encontrado na micose fungóide/síndrome de Sézary.

  14. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML

  15. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  16. 3D protein-structure-oriented discovery of clinical relation across chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mochament, Konstantinos; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Polychronidou, Eleftheria

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common adult leukemia with still unclear etiology. Indications of antigenic pressure have been hinted, using sequence and structure-based reasoning. The accuracy of such approaches, and in particular of the ones derived from 3D models obtained from t...

  17. Tracheoesophageal fistula resulting from invasive aspergillosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Si Won [Daejeon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) in adult patients is an uncommon complication in leukemia. We present here on a case of TEF in a 46-year-old woman with ALL. The patient was asymptomatic and TEF is resulted from aspergillus bronchitis during the chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

  18. Tracheoesophageal fistula resulting from invasive aspergillosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Si Won

    2006-01-01

    Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) in adult patients is an uncommon complication in leukemia. We present here on a case of TEF in a 46-year-old woman with ALL. The patient was asymptomatic and TEF is resulted from aspergillus bronchitis during the chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

  19. Inheritance of leukemia in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Nanao

    1991-01-01

    Since Gardner et al. reported an increased incidence of leukemia among children of workers of a nuclear reactor in Sellafield, UK, there have been a number of discussions on the possibility of increased incidence of leukemia among children born from parents exposed to radiation or chemical agents. In this present paper, apart from the leukemia incidence in children from atomic bomb survivors which was discussed by Dr. Yoshimoto, familial leukemia, i.e., a cluster of leukemia among family members within four genetic relations, was discussed with special reference to the age distribution, type of leukemia and consanguinity. Leukemia in twin and leukemias in individuals with congenital anomalies with or without chromosome abnormalities were also discussed. (author)

  20. Stages of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  1. Development and relative validation of a food frequency questionnaire for French-Canadian adolescent and young adult survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Sophia; Portolese, Olivia; Chertouk, Yasmine; Leahy, Jade; Bertout, Laurence; Laverdière, Caroline; Krajinovic, Maja; Sinnett, Daniel; Levy, Emile; Marcil, Valérie

    2018-04-21

    Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (cALL) experience cardiometabolic and bone complications after treatments. This study aimed at developing and validating an interview-administrated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) that will serve to estimate the impact of nutrition in the development of long-term sequalea of French-Canadian cALL survivors. The FFQ was developed to assess habitual diet, Mediterranean diet score, nutrients promoting bone health and antioxidants. It was validated using a 3-day food record (3-DFR) in 80 cALL survivors (50% male) aged between 11.4 and 40.1 years (median of 18.0 years). Reproducibility was evaluated by comparing FFQs from visit 1 and 2 in 29 cALL survivors. When compared to 3-DFR, the mean values for macro- and micronutrient intake were overestimated by our FFQ with the exception of lipid-related nutrients. Correlations between nutrient intakes derived from the FFQs and the 3-DFRs showed moderate to very good correlations (0.46-0.74). Intraclass correlation coefficients assessing FFQ reproducibility ranged from 0.62 to 0.92, indicating moderate to good reliability. Furthermore, classification into quartiles showed more than 75% of macro- and micronutrients derived from FFQs 1 and 2 classified into the same or adjacent quartile. Overall, our results support the reproducibility and accuracy of the developed FFQ to appropriately classify individuals according to their dietary intake. This validated tool will be valuable for future studies analyzing the impact of nutrition on cardiometabolic and bone complications in French-speaking populations.

  2. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with abnormal brain CT scan after cranial irradiation for central nervous system leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Junko; Abe, Takanori; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    1988-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with central neurologic symptoms immediately after the second irradiation (20 Gy to the brain and 10 Gy to the spinal cord) for central nervous system (CNS)-leukemia 3 years and 2 months after the first cranial irradiation with 20 Gy. White matter was depicted as diffusely high density area on CT; histology revealed necrosis of leukemic cells. In the present patient with repeated recurrent CNS-leukemia, leukemic cells seemed to have been damaged simultaneously after irradiation because of parenchymal widespread involvement of leukemic cells, resulting in brain edema, an increased intracranial pressure and parenchymal disturbance. This finding may have an important implication for the risk of cranial irradiation in the case of widespread involvement of leukemic cells. Re-evaluation of cranial irradiation in such cases is suggested. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. Long non-coding RNA taurine-upregulated gene 1 correlates with poor prognosis, induces cell proliferation, and represses cell apoptosis via targeting aurora kinase A in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinfeng; Zhang, Lina; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Ruirong; Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Chenglu; Liu, Hong; Huang, Hongming

    2018-04-13

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) taurine-upregulated gene 1 (TUG1) with clinicopathological feature and prognosis, and to explore its effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis as well as the relevant target genes in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). LncRNA TUG1 expression was detected in bone marrow samples from 186 AML patients and 62 controls. Blank mimic, lncRNA TUG1 mimic, blank inhibitor, and lncRNA TUG1 inhibitor lentivirus vectors were transfected in KG-1 cells. Rescue experiment was performed by transfection of lncRNA TUG1 inhibitor and aurora kinase A (AURKA) mimic lentivirus vectors. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, RNA, and protein expressions were determined by CKK-8, annexin V-FITC-propidium iodide, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and western blot assays. LncRNA TUG1 expression was higher in AML patients compared to controls and correlated with higher white blood cell counts, monosomal karyotype, FLT3-ITD mutation, poor-risk stratification, and poor prognosis, which independently predicted worse event-free survival and overall survival. In vitro, lncRNA TUG1 expression was higher in AML cell lines (KG-1, MOLM-14, HL-60, NB-4, and THP-1 cells) compared to controls. LncRNA TUG1 mimic promoted cell proliferation and decreased cell apoptosis rate, while lncRNA TUG1 inhibitor repressed cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis rate. Rescue experiment showed that AURKA attenuated the influence of lncRNA TUG1 on AML cell proliferation and apoptosis. In conclusion, lncRNA TUG1 associates with advanced disease and worse prognosis in adult AML patients, and it induces AML cell proliferation and represses cell apoptosis via targeting AURKA.

  4. Potential contribution of a novel Tax epitope-specific CD4+ T cells to graft-versus-Tax effect in adult T cell leukemia patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Yotaro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Takamori, Ayako; Sasada, Amane; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Choi, Ilseung; Utsunomiya, Atae; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Yamano, Yoshihisa; Eto, Tetsuya; Koh, Ki-Ryang; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Suehiro, Youko; Kato, Koji; Takemoto, Shigeki; Okamura, Jun; Uike, Naokuni; Kannagi, Mari

    2013-04-15

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is an effective treatment for adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) caused by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). We previously reported that Tax-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) contributed to graft-versus-ATL effects in ATL patients after allo-HSCT. However, the role of HTLV-1-specific CD4(+) T cells in the effects remains unclear. In this study, we showed that Tax-specific CD4(+) as well as CD8(+) T cell responses were induced in some ATL patients following allo-HSCT. To further analyze HTLV-1-specific CD4(+) T cell responses, we identified a novel HLA-DRB1*0101-restricted epitope, Tax155-167, recognized by HTLV-1-specific CD4(+) Th1-like cells, a major population of HTLV-1-specific CD4(+) T cell line, which was established from an ATL patient at 180 d after allo-HSCT from an unrelated seronegative donor by in vitro stimulation with HTLV-1-infected cells from the same patient. Costimulation of PBMCs with both the identified epitope (Tax155-167) and known CTL epitope peptides markedly enhanced the expansion of Tax-specific CD8(+) T cells in PBMCs compared with stimulation with CTL epitope peptide alone in all three HLA-DRB1*0101(+) patients post-allo-HSCT tested. In addition, direct detection using newly generated HLA-DRB1*0101/Tax155-167 tetramers revealed that Tax155-167-specific CD4(+) T cells were present in all HTLV-1-infected individuals tested, regardless of HSCT. These results suggest that Tax155-167 may be the dominant epitope recognized by HTLV-1-specific CD4(+) T cells in HLA-DRB1*0101(+)-infected individuals and that Tax-specific CD4(+) T cells may augment the graft-versus-Tax effects via efficient induction of Tax-specific CD8(+) T cell responses.

  5. Molecular biomarkers for the study of childhood leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Martyn T.; McHale, Cliona M.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Zhang, Luoping; Wiencke, John K.; Zheng, Shichun; Gunn, Laura; Skibola, Christine F.; Ma, Xiaomei; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    Various specific chromosome rearrangements, including t(8;21), t(15;17), and inv(16), are found in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), t(12;21) and t(1;19) are common. We sequenced the translocation breakpoints of 56 patients with childhood ALL or AML harboring t(12;21), t(8;21), t(15;17), inv(16), and t(1;19), and demonstrated, with the notable exception of t(1;19), that these rearrangements are commonly detected in the neonatal blood spots (Guthrie cards) of the cases. These findings show that most childhood leukemias begin before birth and that maternal and perinatal exposures such as chemical and infectious agents are likely to be critical. Indeed, we have reported that exposure to indoor pesticides during pregnancy and the first year of life raises leukemia risk, but that later exposures do not. We have also examined aberrant gene methylation in different cytogenetic subgroups and have found striking differences between them, suggesting that epigenetic events are also important in the development of some forms of childhood leukemia. Further, at least two studies now show that the inactivating NAD(P)H:quinone acceptor oxidoreductase (NQO1) C609T polymorphism is positively associated with leukemias arising in the first 1-2 years of life and polymorphisms in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene have been associated with adult and childhood ALL. Thus, low folate intake and compounds that are detoxified by NQO1 may be important in elevating leukemia risk in children. Finally, we are exploring the use of proteomics to subclassify leukemia, because cytogenetic analysis is costly and time-consuming. Several proteins have been identified that may serve as useful biomarkers for rapidly identifying different forms of childhood leukemia

  6. Relapse or Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood Cancer Statistics Webinars Video Library Types of Children’s Cancer Leukemia Lymphoma Solid Tumors (Sarcomas) More… During Treatment Tests and Procedures Treatment Options Treatment Side Effects ...

  7. Unrelated cord blood transplantation in adults with myelodysplasia or secondary acute myeloblastic leukemia: a survey on behalf of Eurocord and CLWP of EBMT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robin, M.; Sanz, G.F.; Ionescu, I.; Rio, B.; Sirvent, A.; Renaud, M.; Carreras, E.; Milpied, N.; Mohty, M.; Beguin, Y.; Bordigoni, P.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Picardi, A.; Purtill, D.; Gluckman, E.; Kroger, N.; Rocha, V.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate, through the Eurocord and European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) registries, outcomes and risk factors for outcomes in adult patients who underwent single or double unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)

  8. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shrotriya, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence.

  9. [Identification of novel pathogenic gene mutations in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia by whole-exome resequencing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Norio

    2015-12-01

    A new class of gene mutations, identified in the pathogenesis of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML), includes DNMT3A, IDH1/2, TET2 and EZH2. However, these mutations are rare in pediatric AML cases, indicating that pathogeneses differ between adult and pediatric forms of AML. Meanwhile, the recent development of massively parallel sequencing technologies has provided a new opportunity to discover genetic changes across entire genomes or proteincoding sequences. In order to reveal a complete registry of gene mutations, we performed whole exome resequencing of paired tumor-normal specimens from 19 pediatric AML cases using Illumina HiSeq 2000. In total, 80 somatic mutations or 4.2 mutations per sample were identified. Many of the recurrent mutations identified in this study involved previously reported targets in AML, such as FLT3, CEBPA, KIT, CBL, NRAS, WT1 and EZH2. On the other hand, several genes were newly identified in the current study, including BCORL1 and major cohesin components such as SMC3 and RAD21. Whole exome resequencing revealed a complex array of gene mutations in pediatric AML genomes. Our results indicate that a subset of pediatric AML represents a discrete entity that could be discriminated from its adult counterpart, in terms of the spectrum of gene mutations.

  10. Characterization of leukemias with ETV6-ABL1 fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaliova, Marketa; Moorman, Anthony V.; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Stanulla, Martin; Harvey, Richard C.; Roberts, Kathryn G.; Heatley, Sue L.; Loh, Mignon L.; Konopleva, Marina; Chen, I-Ming; Zimmermannova, Olga; Schwab, Claire; Smith, Owen; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joelle; Chabannon, Christian; Kim, Myungshin; Frederik Falkenburg, J. H.; Norton, Alice; Marshall, Karen; Haas, Oskar A.; Starkova, Julia; Stuchly, Jan; Hunger, Stephen P.; White, Deborah; Mullighan, Charles G.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Stary, Jan; Trka, Jan; Zuna, Jan

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the incidence, clinical features and genetics of ETV6-ABL1 leukemias, representing targetable kinase-activating lesions, we analyzed 44 new and published cases of ETV6-ABL1-positive hematologic malignancies [22 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (13 children, 9 adults) and 22 myeloid malignancies (18 myeloproliferative neoplasms, 4 acute myeloid leukemias)]. The presence of the ETV6-ABL1 fusion was ascertained by cytogenetics, fluorescence in-situ hybridization, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and RNA sequencing. Genomic and gene expression profiling was performed by single nucleotide polymorphism and expression arrays. Systematic screening of more than 4,500 cases revealed that in acute lymphoblastic leukemia ETV6-ABL1 is rare in childhood (0.17% cases) and slightly more common in adults (0.38%). There is no systematic screening of myeloproliferative neoplasms; however, the number of ETV6-ABL1-positive cases and the relative incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and myeloproliferative neoplasms suggest that in adulthood ETV6-ABL1 is more common in BCR-ABL1-negative chronic myeloid leukemia-like myeloproliferations than in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The genomic profile of ETV6-ABL1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia resembled that of BCR-ABL1 and BCR-ABL1-like cases with 80% of patients having concurrent CDKN2A/B and IKZF1 deletions. In the gene expression profiling all the ETV6-ABL1-positive samples clustered in close vicinity to BCR-ABL1 cases. All but one of the cases of ETV6-ABL1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia were classified as BCR-ABL1-like by a standardized assay. Over 60% of patients died, irrespectively of the disease or age subgroup examined. In conclusion, ETV6-ABL1 fusion occurs in both lymphoid and myeloid leukemias; the genomic profile and clinical behavior resemble BCR-ABL1-positive malignancies, including the unfavorable prognosis, particularly of acute leukemias. The poor outcome suggests that treatment with

  11. Congenital Leukemia in Down's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, W.; Khan, F.; Muzaffar, M.; Khan, U. A.; Rehman, M. U.; Khan, M. A.; Bari, A.

    2006-01-01

    Congenital Leukemia is a condition and often associated with fatal outcome/sup 1/. Most of the neonatal cases reported have acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia, in contrast to the predominance of acute lymphoblastic leukemia found in later childhood. congenital leukemia is occasionally associated with number of congenital anomalies and with chromosomal disorders such as Down's syndrome. Subtle cytogenetic abnormalities may occur more commonly in the affected infants and their parents, when studied with newer cytogenetic techniques/sup 2/. Inherent unstable hematopoieses resulting from chromosomal aberration in children with Downs's syndrome can present with transient myeloproliferative disorder, mimicking leukemia which undergoes spontaneous recovery/sup 3/. Only few cases of congenital leukemia with Downs syndrome, presented as congenital leukemia. (author)

  12. Genomics in childhood acute myeloid leukemia comes of age | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    TARGET investigator’s study of nearly 1,000 pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases reveals marked differences between the genomic landscapes of pediatric and adult AML and offers directions for future work.

  13. Childhood CT scans linked to leukemia and brain cancer later in life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children and young adults scanned multiple times by computed tomography (CT), a commonly used diagnostic tool, have a small increased risk of leukemia and brain tumors in the decade following their first scan.

  14. Biological Prognostic Markers in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimíra Vroblová

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most frequent leukemic disease of adults in the Western world. It is remarkable by an extraordinary heterogeneity of clinical course with overall survival ranging from several months to more than 15 years. Classical staging sytems by Rai and Binet, while readily available and useful for initial assessment of prognosis, are not able to determine individual patient’s ongoing clinical course of CLL at the time of diagnosis, especially in early stages. Therefore, newer biological prognostic parameters are currently being clinically evaluated. Mutational status of variable region of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes (IgVH, cytogenetic aberrations, and both intracellular ZAP- 70 and surface CD38 expression are recognized as parameters with established prognostic value. Molecules regulating the process of angiogenesis are also considered as promising markers. The purpose of this review is to summarize in detail the specific role of these prognostic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  15. [Cytomorphology of acute mixed leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucić, Mirna; Batinić, Drago; Zadro, Renata; Mrsić, Sanja; Labar, Boris

    2008-10-01

    Biphenotypic acute leukemias (AL) with blasts expressing both myeloid and lymphoid antigens are grouped with undifferentiated AL and bilineal AL in the group of AL of ambiguous lineage. Not all AL with myeloid and lymphoid antigens (ALMy+Ly) are true biphenotypic AL. According to EGIL scoring system, true biphenotypic ALMy+Ly are those with a sum of antigens 2 or more points for both myeloid and lymphoid lineage or for B and T lineage. The aim of this study was to compare cytomorphology and immunophenotype of AL to better understand the relation of certain AL morphology, immunophenotype, cytogenetics and molecular biology of biphenotypic AL. The study included a group of 169 AL patients treated from 1985 till 1991, and a group of 102 AL patients treated from 1993 till 1996 at Zagreb University Hospital Center. Bone marrow and peripheral blood of the two groups of AL patients were analyzed according to Pappenheim (May-Grunwald-Giemsa), cytochemical and alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) immunocytochemical staining. Flow cytometry immunophenotyping of bone marrow was also done in both patient groups. In the group of 169 adult AL patients, 116 were cytomorphologically classified as acute myeloblastic leukemias (AML), 35 as acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALL) and 18 as acute undifferentiated leukemias (ANLM). In 6 (3.4%) of 169 AL patients, blasts expressed both myeloid and lymphoid antigens. In the group of 102 AL patients there were 19 (18.6%) ALMy+Ly. In 64 patients cytomorphologically classified into AML subgroup out of 102 AL patients, there were 15 (14.7%/102; 23.4%/64) AML with lymphoid antigens (AMLLy+). In 35 patients cytomorphologically diagnosed as ALL and 3 as ANLM out of 102 AL, there were 4 (3.9%/102; 10.5%/38) ALL with myeloid antigens (ALLMy+). The incidence of mixed AL in 102 AL was more consistent with other studies, pointing to the necessity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), CD7 and TdT determination as part of standard immunophenotyping

  16. Selective Depletion of CD45RA+ T Cells From Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Grafts From HLA-Matched Related and Unrelated Donors in Preventing GVHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-25

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-1; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article...

  18. Mouse models in leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voncken, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Human Philadelphia-positive leukemia results from a balanced chromosomal translocation, which fuses the BCR gene on chromosome 22 to the ABL proto-oncogene on chromosome 9. The understanding of Ph-positive leukemogenesis has advanced enormously over

  19. Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be the exclusive property of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society which in its sole discretion may use this material as it sees fit. I agree to the terms of the Standard Photography Release.* Submit * This field is required * Please fix the validation error messages in the Form Your story was ...

  20. [Acute myeloid leukemia in adults: experience at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán from 2003 to 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrón-Santiago, Natalie; Arteaga-Ortiz, Luis; Rosas-López, Adriana; Aguayo, Alvaro; López-Karpovitch, Xavier; Crespo-Solís, Erick

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) comprises a group of diseases with different biologic characteristics; despite knowledge improvements, these are not reflected in long term survival. To describe characteristics of adults with AML in a hospital of Mexico City, their treatment response, complications and to evaluate survival related factors. Cohort study. Between January 2003 and July 2008, patients with AML diagnosis were included (except promyelocitic). Treatment protocols used: 3 + 7, high doses of cytarabine and autologous bone marrow transplant as consolidation therapy. 53 patients were included. Median age: 44 years (15-79). At diagnosis: tumor lysis syndrome in 4/ 53 (7.5%), 3/51 (5.9%) with altered liver function test and hyperleukocytosis in 8/53 (15.1%). 46 patients had available cytogenetic and this was successful in 28/46 (60.8%), 12/28 (42.8%) had adverse cytogenetic; 16/28 (57.1%) intermediate risk and none was favorable. There were 2 losses during follow up, 7 patients did not receive chemotherapy with curative intent and 1 died at diagnosis. 43 patients received 3 + 7, 13.9% died during aplasia, complete remission was achieved in 27/43 (62.7%) and 10/43 (23.2%) were refractory to treatment. A second induction attempt was required in 39.5% (17/43). Median disease free survival (DFS) was 491 days (366-615), with a median follow up of 993 days (105-1744). The median overall survival (OS) was 531 days (312-749). Aplasia related mortality decreased (p = 0.09) between the actual cohort (13.9%) and the historical cohort (37%). Long term survival in AML patients remains poor despite improvements in diagnosis, classification, and treatment. In our institution, it is required to improve induction protocols and cytogenetic analysis in order to adequately choose the group of patients that could be benefit from stem cell transplant.

  1. [Initial subretinal localization of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML5) recurrence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, S; François, S; Urier, N; Genevieve, F; d'Hermies, F; Rachieru, P; Ifrah, N

    2001-10-13

    Reduced visual acuity in patients with acute leucemia can result from many causes including an ocular localization. A patient previously treated for acute myeloblastic leucemia-5 (AML5) developed bilateral vision impairment related to a subretinal localization of the leucemia. Meningeal and bone marrow relapse followed. The subretinal localization responded only to massive systemic steroid treatment. Although asymptomatic, ocular localizations are frequent in leucemia. Their prognostic impact depends on the ocular structure involved and on the chronology of onset--early or late in the leucemia course. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism of ocular involvement remains unexplained but hyperleucocytosis at presentation may be a risk factor and would justify at least systematic specialized examinations and discussion of prophylactic treatment.

  2. Leukemia mortality trends among children, adolescents, and young adults in Latin America Tendencias de la mortalidad por leucemia en niños, adolescentes y adultos jóvenes en América Latina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paula Curado

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare trends in leukemia mortality among children (0-14 years of age and adolescents and young adults (AYA, 15-24 years of age in 12 countries in Latin America during 1980-2004. METHODS: Data from the World Health Organization mortality database was analyzed using a joinpoint regression model to identify significant mortality rate changes over time and to estimate annual percent change. RESULTS: Leukemia is ranked first among cancer-related causes of death among children and AYA in Latin America. In children, the global percentage changes indicate increased rates for both sexes in Colombia, Ecuador, and Mexico, with substantially higher rates for Mexico. In AYA, significant increases were observed for both sexes in Mexico; Ecuador saw some increase for both sexes; and Colombia and Uruguay had increases in females only. Downward trends were observed in Argentina for both sexes, and in Costa Rica for males only. There were no major changes in the other countries analyzed. CONCLUSIONS: Leukemia mortality rates among AYA are declining, but show less significant decreases than rates among children. The study results point to a global need for further advances, specifically for AYA, similar to those made by childhood leukemia therapeutic protocols. Also, specialized oncological centers exist in most countries of Latin America, but they are often inaccessible. Special attention should be given to Mexico due to the significant increase in mortality rates.OBJETIVO: Describir y comparar las tendencias de la mortalidad por leucemia en los niños (entre los 0 y los 14 años de edad y en los adolescentes y adultos jóvenes (entre los 15 y los 24 años de edad en 12 países de América Latina entre 1980 y el 2004. MÉTODOS: Se analizaron los datos sobre mortalidad de la base de datos de la Organización Mundial de la Salud mediante un modelo de regresión joinpoint, con el fin de detectar los cambios significativos en la tasa de

  3. Localized nasal cavity, sinus, and massive bilateral orbital involvement by human T cell leukemia virus 1 adult T cell lymphoma, with epidermal hypertrophy due to mite infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Laveaux

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available HTLV1 adult T cell lymphoma occurs tends to be widely disseminated and aggressive, with only brief responses to chemotherapy. Aside from cervical adenopathy, involvement of head and neck structures is uncommon and orbital involvement rare. We report a case of nasal cavity HTLV lymphoma with massive bilateral orbital involvement and proptosis, resulting in complete left and partial right eye amaurosis. No other sites of disease were found. Response to chemotherapy was rapid and complete, with almost complete restoration of vision and oculo-motor function; the patient has remained in remission for one year. An associated problem was striking bilateral hypertrophic, hyperkeratotic eyelid and breast lesions due to mite infestation. 

  4. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (∼90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements. PMID:23628958

  5. L-asparaginase treatment in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Pieters (Rob); S.P. Hunger (Stephen); J. Boos (Joachim); C. Rizzari (Carmelo); L.B. Silverman (Lewis); A. Baruchel (André); N. Goekbuget (Nicola); M. Schrappe (Martin); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAsparaginases are a cornerstone of treatment protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are used for remission induction and intensification treatment in all pediatric regimens and in the majority of adult treatment protocols. Extensive clinical data have shown that intensive

  6. Single or Double Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-13

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory

  7. The Basel experience with total body irradiation for conditioning patients with acute leukemia for allogenic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speck, B.; Cornu, P.; Nissen, C.; Gratwohl, A.; Sartorius, J.

    1979-01-01

    We are reporting our experience with 13 patients suffering from end stage acute leukemia that were prepared for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by combined chemotherapy followed by high dose cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI). Only one patient became a long term survivor. Of the evaluable 12 patients, 6 died of interstitial pneumonia, 4 of GvH and 1 of recurrent leukemia. We conclude that adding combined chemotherapy to the standard conditioning program with Cy and TBI probably increases the risk of developing fatal interstitial pneumonia without eliminating the risk of recurrent leukemia. We suggest that allogenic marrow grafts should be performed earlier in the course of refractory acute leukemias, because in patients with end stage disease its chances of being curative are small

  8. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth / For Parents / Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) What's in this article? About Leukemia Causes ...

  9. How Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myeloid Leukemia? More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treatment After Treatment Back To Top Imagine a world ...

  10. The contributions of the European Medicines Agency and its pediatric committee to the fight against childhood leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose K

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Klaus Rose,1,* Philip D Walson,2,* 1klausrose Consulting, Pediatric Drug Development and More, Riehen, Switzerland; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University Medical School, Goettingen, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Although the diagnosis of childhood leukemia is no longer a death sentence, too many patients still die, more with acute myeloid leukemia than with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The European Union pediatric legislation was introduced to improve pharmaceutical treatment of children, but some question whether the European Medicines Agency (EMA approach is helping children with leukemia. Some have even suggested that the decisions of EMA pediatric committee (PDCO are counterproductive. This study was designed to investigate the impact of PDCO-issued pediatric investigation plans (PIPs for leukemia drugs.Methods: All PIPs listed under “oncology” were downloaded from the EMA website. Non-leukemia decisions including misclassifications, waivers (no PIP, and solid tumors were discarded. The leukemia decisions were analyzed, compared to pediatric leukemia trials in the database http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, and discussed in the light of current literature.Results: The PDCO leukemia decisions demand clinical trials in pediatric leukemia for all new adult drugs without prioritization. However, because leukemia in children is different and much rarer than in adults, these decisions have resulted in proposed studies that are scientifically and ethically questionable. They are also unnecessary, since once promising new compounds are approved for adults, more appropriate, prioritized pediatric leukemia trials are initiated worldwide without PDCO involvement.Conclusion: EMA/PDCO leukemia PIPs do little to advance the treatment of childhood leukemia. The unintended negative effects of the flawed EMA/PDCO's standardized requesting of non-prioritized testing of every new adult leukemia drug in

  11. OUTCOME OF FRONTLINE TREATMENT WITH “GENERIC” IMATINIB IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA IN ALGERIAN POPULATION: A MULTICENTER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Amine BEKADJA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In a developing country like Algeria, such expensive therapy is not available. Alternative approaches are needed to help these adult. In Algeria ‘imatib’ (CIPLA-India was introduced in 2006; but no study has been published yet in the North Africa region regarding response and outcome of this copy in CML patients. The goal of this multicenter study is to characterize newly adult CML in the western region of Algeria and to assess the effectiveness and safety of imatib (IM, copy as frontline therapy for patients with CML. Patients and Methods: The study was carried out in 7 hematology centers in the western Algeria. Patients, who were diagnosed to be suffering from CML between January 1st, 2007 and  December 31st, 2014 were selected for data analysis. All patients received a copy preparation, consisting of the alpha crystal form of imatinib, (IM, copy at a oral dose of 400 mg daily and monitored for tolerance and side effects while on therapy. Results: Between January 2007 and December 2014, 355 patients with CML were treated with imatib (Copy. The median follow- up of the study was 46 months (range: 13–107 months. Complete hematological response (CHR was seen in 83% of patients within 3 months. According to the Sokal score, 72% patients with low, 78% with intermediate and 69% with high risk disease achieved a CHR in 3 months (p=0.26 and according to the EUTOS score, 81% of patients with low and 70% with high risk disease achieved a CHR in 3 months (p=0.08. The major molecular response (MMR at six months (M6, M9, M12, M18 and M24 was 21%, 38%, 35%, 51% and 67% respectively and 34% of patients achieved a complete molecular response (CMR. The projected 5-year overall survival (OS rate was 83%. Side effects of imatib (copy in this study were similar to those reported previously for the entire imatinib mesylate treatment study and only 8% of patients were intolerant to imatib (copy and treated with a second generation of BCR

  12. Gene expression profiling of acute myeloid leukemia samples from adult patients with AML-M1 and -M2 through boutique microarrays, real-time PCR and droplet digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Luiza; Kaźmierczak, Maciej; Milewski, Marek C; Góralski, Michał; Łuczak, Magdalena; Wojtaszewska, Marzena; Uszczyńska-Ratajczak, Barbara; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Komarnicki, Mieczysław; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2018-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common and severe form of acute leukemia diagnosed in adults. Owing to its heterogeneity, AML is divided into classes associated with different treatment outcomes and specific gene expression profiles. Based on previous studies on AML, in this study, we designed and generated an AML-array containing 900 oligonucleotide probes complementary to human genes implicated in hematopoietic cell differentiation and maturation, proliferation, apoptosis and leukemic transformation. The AML-array was used to hybridize 118 samples from 33 patients with AML of the M1 and M2 subtypes of the French-American‑British (FAB) classification and 15 healthy volunteers (HV). Rigorous analysis of the microarray data revealed that 83 genes were differentially expressed between the patients with AML and the HV, including genes not yet discussed in the context of AML pathogenesis. The most overexpressed genes in AML were STMN1, KITLG, CDK6, MCM5, KRAS, CEBPA, MYC, ANGPT1, SRGN, RPLP0, ENO1 and SET, whereas the most underexpressed genes were IFITM1, LTB, FCN1, BIRC3, LYZ, ADD3, S100A9, FCER1G, PTRPE, CD74 and TMSB4X. The overexpression of the CPA3 gene was specific for AML with mutated NPM1 and FLT3. Although the microarray-based method was insufficient to differentiate between any other AML subgroups, quantitative PCR approaches enabled us to identify 3 genes (ANXA3, S100A9 and WT1) whose expression can be used to discriminate between the 2 studied AML FAB subtypes. The expression levels of the ANXA3 and S100A9 genes were increased, whereas those of WT1 were decreased in the AML-M2 compared to the AML-M1 group. We also examined the association between the STMN1, CAT and ABL1 genes, and the FLT3 and NPM1 mutation status. FLT3+/NPM1- AML was associated with the highest expression of STMN1, and ABL1 was upregulated in FLT3+ AML and CAT in FLT3- AML, irrespectively of the NPM1 mutation status. Moreover, our results indicated that CAT and WT1

  13. Array-based genomic screening at diagnosis and during follow-up in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Rebeqa; Mansouri, Larry; Isaksson, Anders

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution genomic microarrays enable simultaneous detection of copy-number aberrations such as the known recurrent aberrations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia [del(11q), del(13q), del(17p) and trisomy 12], and copy-number neutral loss of heterozygosity. Moreover, comparison of genomic...... profiles from sequential patients' samples allows detection of clonal evolution....

  14. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    For acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the 5-year survival rate has improved significantly since 1975. Get information about risk factors, signs, diagnosis, molecular features, survival, risk-based treatment assignment, and induction and postinduction therapy for children and adolescents with newly diagnosed and recurrent ALL.

  15. Array-based genomic screening at diagnosis and during follow-up in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Rebeqa; Mansouri, Larry; Isaksson, Anders

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution genomic microarrays enable simultaneous detection of copy-number aberrations such as the known recurrent aberrations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia [del(11q), del(13q), del(17p) and trisomy 12], and copy-number neutral loss of heterozygosity. Moreover, comparison of genomic...

  16. Distinct patterns of novel gene mutations in poor-prognostic stereotyped subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strefford, J C; Sutton, L-A; Baliakas, P

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed recurrent mutations of the NOTCH1, SF3B1 and BIRC3 genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), especially among aggressive, chemorefractory cases. Nevertheless, it is currently unknown whether their presence may differ in subsets of patients carrying stereotyped B...

  17. Leukemia and radium groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, B.L.; Letourneau, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    In the August 2, 1985, issue of JAMMA, Lyman et al claim to have shown an association between leukemia incidence in Florida and radium in groundwater supplies. Although cautious in their conclusions, the authors imply that this excess in leukemia was in fact caused by radiation. The authors believe they have not presented a convincing argument for causation. The radiation doses at these levels of exposure could account for only a tiny fraction of the leukemia excess

  18. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor arising 8 years after chemotherapy and radiotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yuya; Toma, Yasuo; Arai, Masayuki; Higashi, Ryo; Kashihara, Kengo; Kaizaki, Yasuharu

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) arising 8 years after chemotherapy and radiotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A 15-year-old boy with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the age of 7, underwent chemotherapy and 14 Gy of radiotherapy to the whole brain. He was admitted to our department due to the development of aphasia, right hemiparesis and generalized convulsive seizure. MRI showed an irregularly enhanced mass in the left frontal lobe. A gross total removal of the tumor was performed and histological examination showed it to be PNET. Postoperatively, the patient underwent 20 Gy of radiotherapy to the whole brain and 42 Gy of local radiotherapy. Follow-up MRI showed no evidence of recurrent tumor 4 months after the radiotherapy. This tumor was thought to be a secondary brain tumor arising in this survivor of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and it is a rare complication of successful leukemia treatment. (author)

  19. Pericarditis as presenting manifestation of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in a young child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J Y; Demello, D; O'Connor, D M; Chen, S C; Gale, G B

    1983-07-15

    A case of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia presenting as pericarditis is reported in a five-year-old boy. Initially, a clinical diagnosis of viral pericarditis was made, because the child did not demonstrate hematologic or clinical manifestations of leukemia. Acute undifferentiated or lymphocytic leukemia. Acute undifferentiated or lymphocytic leukemia was diagnosed one week after admission when his peripheral blood count became abnormal. The patient did not respond to vincristine and prednisone. When cytochemical evaluation indicated acute myelomonocytic leukemia, employment of cytosine arabinoside and 6-thioguanine was instituted and the child began to improve. Currently, he is still in good remission and has no evidence of recurrence of pericarditis, 1 1/2 years after his initial presentation. In reviewing the literature, we found 17 patients who had leukemic pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade. There are three reported cases of young children with pericardial effusion as the initial manifestation of acute lymphocytic leukemia, but no reported cases due to nonlymphocytic leukemia, as in this child.

  20. Extramedullary leukemia in children with acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støve, Heidi Kristine; Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic significance of extramedullary leukemia (EML) in childhood acute myeloid leukemia is not clarified. PROCEDURE: This population-based study included 315 children from the NOPHO-AML 2004 trial. RESULTS: At diagnosis, 73 (23%) patients had EML: 39 (12%) had myeloid sarcoma...... the OS. No patients relapsed at the primary site of the myeloid sarcoma despite management without radiotherapy....

  1. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrotriya, Shiva; Walsh, Declan; Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Thomas, Shirley; Lorton, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence. MeSH (Medical Subject Heading) terms were used to search multiple electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, SCOPUS, EBM-Cochrane). Two independent reviewers selected research papers. We also included a quality Assessment (QA) score. Reports with QA scores <50% were excluded. PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) methodology was utilized for this review (S1 PRISMA Checklist). 271 articles were identified for final review. There were 45% prospective studies and 52% retrospective. 264 had intermediate QA score (≥50% but <80%); Seven were adequate (80% -100%); A high CRP was predictive of prognosis in 90% (245/271) of studies-80% of the 245 studies by multivariate analysis, 20% by univariate analysis. Many (52%) of the articles were about gastrointestinal malignancies (GI) or kidney malignancies. A high CRP was prognostic in 90% (127 of 141) of the reports in those groups of tumors. CRP was also prognostic in most reports in other solid tumors primary sites. A high CRP was associated with higher mortality in 90% of reports in people with solid tumors primary sites. This was particularly notable in GI malignancies and kidney malignancies. In other solid tumors (lung, pancreas, hepatocellular cancer, and bladder) an elevated CRP also predicted prognosis. In addition there is also evidence to support the use of CRP to help decide treatment response and identify tumor recurrence. Better designed large scale studies should be conducted to examine these issues more comprehensively.

  2. Trends in incidence of leukemia in Poland after the Chernobyl disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowski, B.

    1996-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident the whole population of Poland was exposed to low-level radiation mainly emitted by I-131 and Cs-137. In 6-year period the incidence of leukemia increased in 2 groups of children: age 0-4 in males and 5-7 in females. In adults in some clinical types of leukemia significant trends of incidence were observed: in acute myleoid leukemia in age groups of 70-79 for males, in chronic myleoid leukemia in age groups of 40-49 and 60-69 for females, in chronic lymphatic leukemia in age group of 70-79 for males. Non of those trends was significant prior to the Chernobyl disaster

  3. Childhood Leukemia and Primary Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Todd P.; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Singer, Amanda W.; Miller, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common pediatric cancer, affecting 3,800 children per year in the United States. Its annual incidence has increased over the last decades, especially among Latinos. Although most children diagnosed with leukemia are now cured, many suffer long-term complications, and primary prevention efforts are urgently needed. The early onset of leukemia – usually before age five – and the presence at birth of “pre-leukemic” genetic signatures indicate that pre- and postnatal events are critical to the development of the disease. In contrast to most pediatric cancers, there is a growing body of literature – in the United States and internationally – that has implicated several environmental, infectious, and dietary risk factors in the etiology of childhood leukemia, mainly for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common subtype. For example, exposures to pesticides, tobacco smoke, solvents, and traffic emissions have consistently demonstrated positive associations with the risk of developing childhood leukemia. In contrast, intake of vitamins and folate supplementation during the pre-conception period or pregnancy, breastfeeding, and exposure to routine childhood infections have been shown to reduce the risk of childhood leukemia. Some children may be especially vulnerable to these risk factors, as demonstrated by a disproportionate burden of childhood leukemia in the Latino population of California. The evidence supporting the associations between childhood leukemia and its risk factors – including pooled analyses from around the world and systematic reviews – is strong; however, the dissemination of this knowledge to clinicians has been limited. To protect children’s health, it is prudent to initiate programs designed to alter exposure to well-established leukemia risk factors rather than to suspend judgement until no uncertainty remains. Primary prevention programs for childhood leukemia would also result in the significant co

  4. Detection of Tax-specific CTLs in lymph nodes of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma patients and its association with Foxp3 positivity of regulatory T-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Ayako; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Arakawa, Fumiko; Kiyasu, Junichi; Sato, Kensaku; Niino, Daisuke; Kimura, Yoshizo; Yoshida, Maki; Kawano, Riko; Muta, Hiroko; Sugita, Yasuo; Ohshima, Koichi

    2017-06-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type (HTLV)-1 Tax is a viral protein that has been reported to be important in the proliferation of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) cells and to be a target of HTLV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, it is not clear how Tax-specific CTLs behave in lymph nodes of ATLL patients. The present study analyzed the immunostaining of Tax-specific CTLs. Furthermore, ATLL tumor cells are known to be positive for forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)and to have a regulatory T (Treg)-cell-like function. The association between T-reg function and number and activity of Tax-specific CTLs was also investigated. A total of 15 ATLL lymphoma cases with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A24, for which Tax has a high affinity, were selected from the files of the Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Kurume University (Kurume, Japan) using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Immunostaining was performed for cluster of differentiation (CD) 20, CD3, CD4, CD8, T-cell intracellular antigen-1 and Foxp3 in paraffin sections, and for Tax, interferon γ and HLA-A24 in frozen sections. In addition, the staining of Tax-specific CTLs (HLA-A24-restricted) was analyzed by MHC Dextramer ® assay in frozen sections. In addition, the messenger RNA expression of Tax and HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor were also evaluated by reverse transcription-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining of Tax protein in lymphoma tissue revealed the presence of positive lymphoma cells ranging from 5 to 80%, and immunohistochemical staining of HLA-A24 revealed the presence of positive lymphoma cells ranging from 1 to 95%. The expression of Tax and HLA-A24 was downregulated by viral function. Foxp3, a marker for Treg cells, was expressed in 0-90% of cells. Several cases exhibited Tax-specific CTL (HLA-A24-restricted)-positive cells, and there was an inverse correlation between Tax-specific CTLs and Foxp3. However, neither Tax nor HLA-A24 expression was associated with CTL or

  5. Recurrent Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Linnea Boegeskov; Goertz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a disease with high mortality and a substantial risk of recurrence. However, the recurrence risk is poorly documented and the knowledge of potential predictors for recurrence among co-morbidities and medicine with antithrombotic effect is limited....... OBJECTIVES: 1) To estimate the short- and long-term cumulative risks of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). 2) To investigate associations between typical comorbid diseases, surgical treatment, use of medicine with antithrombotic effects, including antithrombotic treatment (ATT), selective serotonin...

  6. Treatment for Relapsed/Refractory AML Based on a High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-11

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  7. Sequence analysis of Leukemia DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacong, Nasria; Lusiyanti, Desy; Irawan, Muhammad. Isa

    2018-03-01

    Cancer is a very deadly disease, one of which is leukemia disease or better known as blood cancer. The cancer cell can be detected by taking DNA in laboratory test. This study focused on local alignment of leukemia and non leukemia data resulting from NCBI in the form of DNA sequences by using Smith-Waterman algorithm. SmithWaterman algorithm was invented by TF Smith and MS Waterman in 1981. These algorithms try to find as much as possible similarity of a pair of sequences, by giving a negative value to the unequal base pair (mismatch), and positive values on the same base pair (match). So that will obtain the maximum positive value as the end of the alignment, and the minimum value as the initial alignment. This study will use sequences of leukemia and 3 sequences of non leukemia.

  8. Recurrent meningitis in the adult: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge Meningitis recurrente en el adulto: un reto diagnóstico y terapéutico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Zuluaga Quintero

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Recurrent meningitis is an uncommon condition with the capability of causing important midand long-term sequelae. Its clinical presentation depends on the etiologic agent, although most patients exhibit at least one of the classical symptoms of acute meningitis (intense headache, fever and neck stiffness. Due to the clinical variability of the disease, a high level of suspicion and an adequate use of laboratory tests are required in order to establish a timely diagnosis. This article contains a literature review regarding epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of recurrent meningitis.

    La meningitis recurrente no es una entidad común pero tiene el potencial de generar secuelas importantes a mediano y largo plazo. Su cuadro clínico depende del agente causal aunque en la mayoría de los pacientes se conserva al menos uno de los síntomas clásicos de la meningitis aguda (cefalea intensa, fiebre y rigidez de nuca. Debido a su variabilidad clínica se requieren un alto nivel de sospecha y usar bien las pruebas de laboratorio para llegar oportunamente al diagnóstico. El presente artículo contiene una revisión de la literatura sobre la epidemiología, la etiología, el cuadro clínico, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento de esta enfermedad.

  9. [Acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, Ken

    2007-02-01

    The annual incident rate of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is now 10 per million in Japan, against 5 to 9 per million in the USA and Europe. Overall long-term survival has now been achieved for more than 50% of pediatric patients with AML in the USA and in Europe. The prognostic factors of pediatric AML were analyzed,and patients with AML were classified according to prognostic factors. The t(15;17), inv(16) and t(8;21) have emerged as predictors of good prognosis in children with AML. Monosomy 7, monosomy 5 and del (5 q) abnormalities showed a poor prognosis. In addition to chromosomal deletions, FLT 3/ITD identifies pediatric patients with a particularly poor prognosis. Clinical trials of AML feature intensive chemotherapy with or without subsequent stem cell transplantation. Risk group stratification is becoming increasingly important in planning AML therapy. APL can be distinguished from other subtypes of AML by virtue of its excellent response and overall outcome as a result of differentiation therapy with ATRA. Children with Down syndrome and AML have been shown to have a superior prognosis to AML therapy compared to other children with AML. The results of the Japan Cooperative Study Group protocol ANLL 91 was one of the best previously reported in the literature. With the consideration of quality of life (QOL), risk-adapted therapy was introduced in the AML 99 trial conducted by the Japanese Childhood AML Cooperative Study Group. A high survival rate of 79% at 3 years was achieved for childhood de novo AML in the AML 99 trial. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the treatment strategy according to risk stratification based on leukemia cell biology and response to the initial induction therapy in children with AML, the Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (JPLSG) has organized multi-center phase II trials in children with newly diagnosed AML.

  10. The predictive value of childhood recurrent abdominal pain for adult emotional disorders, and the influence of negative cognitive style. Findings from a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Stein

    Full Text Available Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP in childhood is common, with no explanatory pathology identified in the majority of cases. Previous studies have consistently demonstrated an association between childhood RAP and later emotional distress disorders. The aim of this study was to replicate this finding through the analysis of a large dataset, and explore how a negative style of thinking could potentially influence this relationship.The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC is a population cohort of children born in the Avon area of the UK, between 1991-1992. Data on childhood RAP was collected via maternal reports at 3, 4, 7 and 9 years. Mood, anxiety and cognitive style were measured at age 18. We controlled for various confounding factors, including maternal anxiety and the child's pre-existing psychopathology. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations, and moderation effects of cognitive style were analysed using likelihood ratios.Experiencing RAP at any one time-point is associated with an increased odds of depression and/or anxiety disorder at 18 (OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.83. We found a dose-response relationship and each additional marker of RAP was associated with a 26% (CI: 7% to 47% increase in risk of having a mood and/or anxiety disorder. Individuals who attribute adversity to global, stable or personal factors were at amplified risk.Childhood RAP predicts depression and anxiety disorders at 18 and should be targeted for early intervention. Individuals with a negative cognitive style may be particularly vulnerable, suggesting that cognitive interpretations of physical symptoms could play an important role in long-term health outcomes.

  11. Recurrent spontaneous attacks of dizziness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This article describes the common causes of recurrent vertigo and dizziness that can be diagnosed largely on the basis of history. Ninety percent of spontaneous recurrent vertigo and dizziness can be explained by six disorders: (1) Ménière disease is characterized by vertigo attacks, lasting 20 minutes to several hours, with concomitant hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. Aural symptoms become permanent during the course of the disease. (2) Attacks of vestibular migraine may last anywhere from minutes to days. Most patients have a previous history of migraine headaches, and many experience migraine symptoms during the attack. (3) Vertebrobasilar TIAs affect older adults with vascular risk factors. Most attacks last less than 1 hour and are accompanied by other symptoms from the posterior circulation territory. (4) Vestibular paroxysmia is caused by vascular compression of the eighth cranial nerve. It manifests itself with brief attacks of vertigo that recur many times per day, sometimes with concomitant cochlear symptoms. (5) Orthostatic hypotension causes brief episodes of dizziness lasting seconds to a few minutes after standing up and is relieved by sitting or lying down. In older adults, it may be accompanied by supine hypertension. (6) Panic attacks usually last minutes, occur in specific situations, and are accompanied by choking, palpitations, tremor, heat, and anxiety. Less common causes of spontaneous recurrent vertigo and dizziness include perilymph fistula, superior canal dehiscence, autoimmune inner ear disease, otosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmia, and medication side effects. Neurologists need to venture into otolaryngology, internal medicine, and psychiatry to master the differential diagnosis of recurrent dizziness.

  12. CAR-T cells targeting CLL-1 as an approach to treat acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jinghua; Chen, Siyu; Xiao, Wei; Li, Wende; Wang, Liang; Yang, Shuo; Wang, Weida; Xu, Liping; Liao, Shuangye; Liu, Wenjian; Wang, Yang; Liu, Nawei; Zhang, Jianeng; Xia, Xiaojun; Kang, Tiebang

    2018-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the most common types of adult acute leukemia. Standard chemotherapies can induce complete remission in selected patients; however, a majority of patients eventually relapse and succumb to the disease. Thus, the development of novel therapeutics for AML is urgently needed. Human C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL-1) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein, and its expression is restricted to myeloid cells and the majority of AML blasts. Moreov...

  13. Secondary Leukemia Associated with the Anti-Cancer Agent, Etoposide, a Topoisomerase II Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Sachiko Ezoe

    2012-01-01

    Etoposide is an anticancer agent, which is successfully and extensively used in treatments for various types of cancers in children and adults. However, due to the increases in survival and overall cure rate of cancer patients, interest has arisen on the potential risk of this agent for therapy-related secondary leukemia. Topoisomerase II inhibitors, including etoposide and teniposide, frequently cause rearrangements involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL<...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... marrow , or other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  15. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the past. Being exposed to radiation from an atomic bomb or to the chemical benzene . Having a history of a blood ... does not give formal guidelines or recommendations for making decisions about health care. ... Boards write the PDQ cancer information summaries and keep them up ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the past. Being exposed to radiation from an atomic bomb or to the chemical benzene . Having a history of a blood ... does not give formal guidelines or recommendations for making decisions about health care. ... Boards write the PDQ cancer information summaries and keep them up ...

  17. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... marrow , or other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  18. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... back in the blood or bone marrow . Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  19. Cancers other than leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, G W; Kato, H [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1975-09-01

    Cancers which are unlikely to appear among atomic bomb survirors in excess of natural incidence include skin cancer and bone cancer, as these appear to require for their initiation doses that are incompatible with life if administered on a whole body basis. Although chronic lymphocytic leukemia continues to provide an important exception, and for many sites of cancer there is not yet evidence that radiation has increased incidence above normal levels, the data on A-bomb survivors are otherwise consistent with the hypothesis that the carcinogenic effect of ionizing radiation is general, involving all tissues. Studies of cancer among A-bomb survivors are notably limited with respect to the influence of variables other than dose, age, sex, and time. It seems highly desirable that other risk factors be studied in conjunction with radiation dose and demographic variables in an effort to detect interactions that might provide clues as to the etiology of cancer and as to the mechanisms by which ionizing radiation produces cancer. Provisional estimates suggest that the absolute risk of cancer, in terms of excess cases per 10/sup 6/ person-year rads (T65 dose) are about 1.6 for leukemia, 1.2 for thyroid, 2.1 for breast and 2.0 for lung, when estimation is based on age-ATB groups that have demonstrated these effects.

  20. Coexistence of chronic myeloid leukemia and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with antecedent chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelgasim, Khadega A; Rehan, Hinna; Alsubaie, Maha; Al Atwi, Nasser; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Alshieban, Saeed; Almughairi, Areej

    2018-03-11

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia are the most common types of adult leukemia. However, it is rare for the same patient to suffer from both. Richter's transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is frequently observed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Purine analog therapy and the presence of trisomy 12, and CCND1 gene rearrangement have been linked to increased risk of Richter's transformation. The coexistence of chronic myeloid leukemia and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in the same patient is extremely rare, with only nine reported cases. Here, we describe the first reported case of concurrent chronic myeloid leukemia and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in a background of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A 60-year-old Saudi man known to have diabetes, hypertension, and chronic active hepatitis B was diagnosed as having Rai stage II chronic lymphocytic leukemia, with trisomy 12 and rearrangement of the CCND1 gene in December 2012. He required no therapy until January 2016 when he developed significant anemia, thrombocytopenia, and constitutional symptoms. He received six cycles of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab, after which he achieved complete remission. One month later, he presented with progressive leukocytosis (mostly neutrophilia) and splenomegaly. Fluorescence in situ hybridization from bone marrow aspirate was positive for translocation (9;22) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction detected BCR-ABL fusion gene consistent with chronic myeloid leukemia. He had no morphologic or immunophenotypic evidence of chronic lymphocytic leukemia at the time. Imatinib, a first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was started. Eight months later, a screening imaging revealed new liver lesions, which were confirmed to be diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia, progressive leukocytosis and splenomegaly caused by emerging chronic myeloid leukemia can be easily overlooked. It is unlikely that chronic myeloid

  1. Mast cell leukemia associated with undefined morphology and chronic basophilic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cehreli, Cavit; Alacacioglu, Inci; Piskin, Ozden; Ates, Halil; Cehreli, Ruksan; Calibasi, Gizem; Yuksel, Erdinc; Ozkal, Sermin; Ozsan, Guner H

    2014-01-01

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is rare type of neoplasia with an incidence of 1% in a large series of 342 adult patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM). Chronic basophilic leukemia (CBL) is an extremely rare type of leukemia with appearance of 7 cases in the literature. A 73 year-old female patient who presented with weaknes, had a prolonged duration of hematologic remission after treatment of her CBL by hydroxyurea (HU). Evolution of SM occurring as a second neoplasia concurrently with relapse of de novo CBL was demonstrated by mast cells (MCs) infiltration in the bone marrow (BM) biopsy and smear and increase in tryptase level. Transformation to MCL with simultaneous occurrance of accelerated phase of CBL were documented by the appearance of MCs in both BM and peripheral blood (PB) smears, antigen expressions detected by flow cytometry and spesific stains. Sequence analysis of c-kit gene revealed c-kit exon 11 K550N mutation. Undefined associations of MCL with different mast cell morphology, increase in IL-6 level and accelerated phase of de novo CBL was described. Elevations in CRP and IL-6 levels occurring with increases in basophil counts to high levels revealed that febrile episodes with abdominal pain seen in our patient were induced by increase in IL-6 levels released from neoplastic basophils. Neoplastic basophils with diffuse and coarse basophilic granules possibly mimic neutrophils with toxic granules and cause wrong characterization of neoplastic basophils as neutrophils by the automated blood cell counters and misleaded physicians.

  2. Ibrutinib in Treating Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Patients With HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; HIV Infection; Intraocular Lymphoma; Multicentric Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Recurrence in affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, L V; Olsen, E W; Andersen, P K

    1999-01-01

    The risk of recurrence in affective disorder is influenced by the number of prior episodes and by a person's tendency toward recurrence. Newly developed frailty models were used to estimate the effect of the number of episodes on the rate of recurrence, taking into account individual frailty toward...... recurrence. The study base was the Danish psychiatric case register of all hospital admissions for primary affective disorder in Denmark during 1971-1993. A total of 20,350 first-admission patients were discharged with a diagnosis of major affective disorder. For women with unipolar disorder and for all...... kinds of patients with bipolar disorder, the rate of recurrence was affected by the number of prior episodes even when the effect was adjusted for individual frailty toward recurrence. No effect of episodes but a large effect of the frailty parameter was found for unipolar men. The authors concluded...

  4. Stages of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the lymph system . Having relatives who are Russian Jews or Eastern European Jews. Signs and symptoms ... information about clinical trials is also available. To Learn More About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia For more information ...

  5. Down syndrome preleukemia and leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Kelly W; Taub, Jeffrey W; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Roberts, Irene; Vyas, Paresh

    2015-02-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute leukemias acute have unique biological, cytogenetic, and intrinsic factors that affect their treatment and outcome. Myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome (ML-DS) is associated with high event-free survival (EFS) rates and frequently preceded by a preleukemia condition, the transient abnormal hematopoiesis (TAM) present at birth. For acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), their EFS and overall survival are poorer than non-DS ALL, it is important to enroll them on therapeutic trials, including relapse trials; investigate new agents that could potentially improve their leukemia-free survival; and strive to maximize the supportive care these patients need. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Central nervous system in leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phair, J P; Anderson, R E; Namiki, Hideo

    1964-03-12

    The present report summarizes the pertinent clinical and pathologic findings in 165 cases of leukemia in atomic bomb exposed victims autopsied during the period 1949 to 1962 at ABCC in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Significant parenchymal hemorrhage occurred most often in acute myelogenous leukemia and was markedly increased in patients dying with high terminal white blood cell counts. Possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cerebral hemorrhage in leukemia are discussed. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and subdural hematoma were not related to leukocytosis but appeared to be influenced by marked thrombocytopenia. Leukemic infiltrates of a diffuse nature involving the meninges were paradoxically increased in patients receiving adequate chemotherapy. Meningeal tumors did not show this peculiar relationship to therapy and were not found in association with lymphatic leukemia. Infections involving the central nervous system were confined to patients receiving chemotherapy including steroids. 39 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  7. Pharmacogenetics in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheok, Meyling H.; Pottier, Nicolas; Kager, Leo

    2009-01-01

    Progress in the treatment of acute leukemia in children has been remarkable, from a disease being lethal four decades ago to current cure rates exceeding 80%. This exemplary progress is largely due to the optimization of existing treatment modalities rather than the discovery of new antileukemic agents. However, despite these high cure rates, the annual number of children whose leukemia relapses after their initial therapy remains greater than that of new cases of most types of childhood cancers. The aim of pharmacogenetics is to develop strategies to personalize treatment and tailor therapy to individual patients, with the goal of optimizing efficacy and safety through better understanding of human genome variability and its influence on drug response. In this review, we summarize recent pharmacogenomic studies related to the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These studies illustrate the promise of pharmacogenomics to further advance the treatment of human cancers, with childhood leukemia serving as a paradigm. PMID:19100367

  8. Recurrent hamburger thyrotoxicosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Malvinder S.; Sturge, Cecil

    2003-01-01

    RECURRENT EPISODES OF SPONTANEOUSLY RESOLVING HYPERTHYROIDISM may be caused by release of preformed hormone from the thyroid gland after it has been damaged by inflammation (recurrent silent thyroiditis) or by exogenous administration of thyroid hormone, which might be intentional or surreptitious (thyrotoxicosis factitia). Community-wide outbreaks of “hamburger thyrotoxicosis” resulting from inadvertent consumption of beef contaminated with bovine thyroid gland have been previously reported. Here we describe a single patient who experienced recurrent episodes of this phenomenon over an 11-year period and present an approach to systematically evaluating patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism. PMID:12952802

  9. PROGRESS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady gains in clinical research and a renaissance of genomics in leukemia have led to improved outcomes. The recognition of tremendous heterogeneity in AML has allowed individualized treatments of specific disease entities within the context of patient age, cytogenetics, and mutational analysis. The following is a comprehensive review of the current state of AML therapy and a roadmap of our approach to these distinct disease entities. PMID:25441110

  10. Plasma cell leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic......-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds...... regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding...

  11. Treatment of prolymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollister, D. Jr.; Coleman, M.

    1982-01-01

    Prolymphocytic leukemia is characterized by marked splenomegaly, distinctive cellular morphologic characteristics, and a poor clinical course. Five patients with typical PL were treated systematically with vincristine/prednisone, chlorambucil/prednisone, splenic irradiation, splenectomy, and other chemotherapy regimens. No patient responded to vincristine/prednisone. Two patients responded to chlorambucil/prednisone, and four patients had brief responses to splenic irradiation. Two patients underwent splenectomy, one of whom had a prolonged clinical remission. There were no complete remissions. No other chemotherapy combinations were of value. The median survival was 33 months. Recommendations are made to use chlorambucil/prednisone or splenic irradiation as initial treatment. Splenectomy should be considered in patients refractory to these modalities. The course of PL may be more protracted than originally reported

  12. Treatment of prolymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollister, S. Jr.; Coleman, M.

    1982-01-01

    Prolymphocytic leukemia is characterized by marked splenomegaly, distinctive cellular morphologic characteristics, and a poor clinical course. Five patients with typical PL were treated systematically with vincristine/prednisone, chlorambucil/prednisone, splenic irradiation, splenectomy, and other chemotherapy regimens. No patient responded to vincristine/prednisone. Two patients responded to chlorambucil/prednisone, and four patients had brief responses to splenic irradiation. Two patients underwent splenectomy, one of whom had a prolonged clinical remissions. No other chemotherapy combinations were of value. The median survival was 33 months. Recommendations are made to use chlorambucil/prednisone or splenic irradiation as initial treatment. Splenectomy should be considered in patients refractory to these modalities. The course of PL may be more protracted than originally reported

  13. Effect of pravastatin and fosinopril on recurrent urinary tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, K.B.; Visser, Sipke; Hak, E.

    OBJECTIVES: Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a problem affecting both women and men. Animal experiments and in vitro studies indicate that statins might prevent recurrent UTIs. We assessed the effects of pravastatin on UTI antibiotic prescribing among adults. METHODS: A post hoc

  14. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T; Hauptman, Paul J; Stolker, Joshua M

    2016-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  15. Residential mobility and childhood leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoon, A T; Oksuzyan, S; Crespi, C M; Arah, O A; Cockburn, M; Vergara, X; Kheifets, L

    2018-07-01

    Studies of environmental exposures and childhood leukemia studies do not usually account for residential mobility. Yet, in addition to being a potential risk factor, mobility can induce selection bias, confounding, or measurement error in such studies. Using data collected for California Powerline Study (CAPS), we attempt to disentangle the effect of mobility. We analyzed data from a population-based case-control study of childhood leukemia using cases who were born in California and diagnosed between 1988 and 2008 and birth certificate controls. We used stratified logistic regression, case-only analysis, and propensity-score adjustments to assess predictors of residential mobility between birth and diagnosis, and account for potential confounding due to residential mobility. Children who moved tended to be older, lived in housing other than single-family homes, had younger mothers and fewer siblings, and were of lower socioeconomic status. Odds ratios for leukemia among non-movers living mobility, including dwelling type, increased odds ratios for leukemia to 2.61 (95% CI: 1.76-3.86) for living mobility of childhood leukemia cases varied by several sociodemographic characteristics, but not by the distance to the nearest power line or calculated magnetic fields. Mobility appears to be an unlikely explanation for the associations observed between power lines exposure and childhood leukemia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute childhood leukemia: Nursing care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zietz, Hallie A

    1997-01-01

    Modern therapy for childhood acute leukemia has provided a dramatically improved prognosis over that of just 30 years ago. In the early 1960's survival rates for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were 4% and 3%, respectively. By the 1980's survival rates had risen to 72% for all and 25% to 40% for AML. Today, a diagnosis of all carries an 80% survival rate and as high as a 90% survival rate for some low-risk subtypes. Such high cure rates depend on intense and complex, multimodal therapeutic protocols. Therefore, nursing care of the child with acute leukemia must meet the demands of complicated medical therapies and balance those with the needs of a sick child and their concerned family. An understanding of disease process and principles of medical management guide appropriate and effective nursing interventions. Leukemia is a malignant disorder of the blood and blood- forming organs (bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen). Most believe that acute leukemia results from a malignant transformation of a single early haematopoietic stem cell that is capable of indefinite self-renewal. These immature cells of blasts do not respond to normal physiologic stimuli for differentiation and gradually become the predominant cell in the bone marrow

  17. Childhood pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with translocation t(1;19)(q21.1;p13.3) and two additional chromosomal aberrations involving chromosomes 1, 6, and 13: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafa, Abdulsamad; As'sad, Manar; Liehr, Thomas; Aljapawe, Abdulmunim; Al Achkar, Walid

    2017-04-07

    The translocation t(1;19)(q23;p13), which results in the TCF3-PBX1 chimeric gene, is one of the most frequent rearrangements observed in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It appears in both adult and pediatric patients with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia at an overall frequency of 3 to 5%. Most cases of pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia carrying the translocation t(1;19) have a typical immunophenotype with homogeneous expression of CD19, CD10, CD9, complete absence of CD34, and at least diminished CD20. Moreover, the translocation t(1;19) correlates with known clinical high risk factors, such as elevated white blood cell count, high serum lactate dehydrogenase levels, and central nervous system involvement; early reports indicated that patients with translocation t(1;19) had a poor outcome under standard treatment. We report the case of a 15-year-old Syrian boy with pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with abnormal karyotype with a der(19)t(1;19)(q21.1;p13.3) and two yet unreported chromosomal aberrations: an interstitial deletion 6q12 to 6q26 and a der(13)t(1;13)(q21.1;p13). According to the literature, cases who are translocation t(1;19)-positive have a significantly higher incidence of central nervous system relapse than patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia without the translocation. Of interest, central nervous system involvement was also seen in our patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of childhood pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with an unbalanced translocation t(1;19) with two additional chromosomal aberrations, del(6)(q12q26) and t(1;13)(q21.3;p13), which seem to be recurrent and could influence clinical outcome. Also the present case confirms the impact of the translocation t(1;19) on central nervous system relapse, which should be studied for underlying mechanisms in future.

  18. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, F.

    1998-01-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an unusual clinical entity. More than 200 cases are described in the literature and it is presented here with special reference to its radiological aspects. It is an acquired disease of the skeleton which occurs predominantly during childhood and adolescence. About ten per cent of cases begin in early or, rarely, in later adult life. This variant is described here for the first time and is discussed as 'adult CRMO'. The underlying pathology is a bland, predominantly lympho-plasma cellular osteomyelitis which is self-limiting and leads to bone sclerosis (Garre). It probably involves an abnormal immune process which follows an infection but remains clinically latent and remains aseptic and sterile. In a quarter of cases there is an association with pustulosis palmo-plantaris and its relationship with psoriatic arthropathy is discussed. The clinical, histopathological and imaging features (radiological and particularly MRT) and the bone changes are described. (orig./AJ) [de

  19. Secondary Leukemia Associated with the Anti-Cancer Agent, Etoposide, a Topoisomerase II Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Ezoe

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Etoposide is an anticancer agent, which is successfully and extensively used in treatments for various types of cancers in children and adults. However, due to the increases in survival and overall cure rate of cancer patients, interest has arisen on the potential risk of this agent for therapy-related secondary leukemia. Topoisomerase II inhibitors, including etoposide and teniposide, frequently cause rearrangements involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL gene on chromosome 11q23, which is associated with secondary leukemia. The prognosis is extremely poor for leukemias associated with rearrangements in the MLL gene, including etoposide-related secondary leukemias. It is of great importance to gain precise knowledge of the clinical aspects of these diseases and the mechanism underlying the leukemogenesis induced by this agent to ensure correct assessments of current and future therapy strategies. Here, I will review current knowledge regarding the clinical aspects of etoposide-related secondary leukemia, some probable mechanisms, and strategies for treating etoposide-induced leukemia.

  20. Unrelated allogeneic stem-cell transplantation in adult patients – 10-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jožef Pretnar

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Unrelated allogeneic stem-cell transplantation is suitable for acute myeloblastic leukemias with unfavorable risk factors. However, results in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are worse. Unrelated transplantation is not efficient as salvage treatment for patients with recurrent disease after autologous transplantation or chemotherapy- resistant relapse.