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  1. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  2. Appearance and Disappearance of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) in Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL).

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    Payandeh, Mehrdad; Sadeghi, Edris; Khodarahmi, Reza; Sadeghi, Masoud

    2014-10-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) are the most common leukemias of the elderly (>43 year). However, the sequential occurrence of CML followed by CLL in the same patient is extremely rare. In our report, a 52-year-old female was diagnosed with CLL (type of bone marrow (BM) infiltration was nodular and interstitial) and was treated with chlorambucil. 64 months after the diagnosis of CLL, she developed CML. She was treated with imatinib (400mg/day). After a few months, signs of CML were disappeared and CLL became dominant. This is first reported case.

  3. Appearance and Disappearance of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) in Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

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    Payandeh, Mehrdad; Sadeghi, Edris; Khodarahmi, Reza; Sadeghi, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) are the most common leukemias of the elderly (>43 year). However, the sequential occurrence of CML followed by CLL in the same patient is extremely rare. In our report, a 52-year-old female was diagnosed with CLL (type of bone marrow (BM) infiltration was nodular and interstitial) and was treated with chlorambucil. 64 months after the diagnosis of CLL, she developed CML. She was treated with imatinib (400mg/day). After a fe...

  4. Turkish Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Study: Retrospective Sectional Analysis of CML Patients

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    Fahri Şahin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: here have been tremendous changes in treatment and follow-up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML in the last decade. Especially, regular publication and updating of NCCN and ELN guidelines have provided enermous rationale and base for close monitorization of patients with CML. But, it is stil needed to have registry results retrospectively to evaluate daily CML practices. METHODS: In this article, we have evaluated 1133 patients’ results with CML in terms of demographical features, disease status, response, resistance and use of second-generation TKIs. RESULTS: The response rate has been found relatively high in comparison with previously published articles, and we detected that there was a lack of appropriate and adequate molecular response assessment. CONCLUSION: We concluded that we need to improve registry systems and increase the availability of molecular response assessment to provide high-quality patient care.

  5. Evaluation of multielements in human serum of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) using SRTXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao, Catarine Canellas Gondim

    2005-04-01

    In this work, trace elements were analyzed in serum of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence using synchrotron radiation (SRTXRF). Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) affects the myeloid cells in the blood and affects 1 to 2 people per 100,000 and accounts for 7-20% cases of leukemia. Sixty patients with CML and sixty healthy volunteers (control group) were studied. Blood was collected into vacutainers without additives. Directly after collection, each blood sample was centrifuged at 3000 rev/min for 10 min in order to separate blood cells and suspended particles from blood serum. Sera were transferred into polyethylene tubes and stored in a freezer at 253 K. A 500 m u L serum quantity was spiked with Ga (50 m u L ) as internal standard. 10 m u L aliquots were pipetted on Perspex sample carrier. After deposition, the samples were left to dry under an infrared lamp. The measurements were performed at the X-Ray Fluorescence Beamline at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), using a polychromatic beam. Standard solutions with gallium as internal standard were prepared for calibration system. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb. Starting from the ANOVA test was observed that the elements P, S, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu and Rb presented real significant differences (α = 0.05) between groups (healthy subjects and CML patients) and Sex (males and females). (author)

  6. International development of an EORTC questionnaire for assessing health-related quality of life in chronic myeloid leukemia patients : The EORTC QLQ-CML24

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efficace, Fabio; Baccarani, Michele; Breccia, Massimo; Saussele, Susanne; Abel, Gregory; Caocci, Giovanni; Guilhot, Francois; Cocks, Kim; Naeem, Adel; Sprangers, Mirjam; Oerlemans, Simone; Chie, Weichu; Castagnetti, Fausto; Bombaci, Felice; Sharf, Giora; Cardoni, Annarita; Noens, Lucien; Pallua, Stephan; Salvucci, Marzia; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Rosti, Gianantonio; Mandelli, Franco

    Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is a key aspect for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. The aim of this study was to develop a disease-specific HRQOL questionnaire for patients with CML to supplement the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)-QLQ

  7. International development of an EORTC questionnaire for assessing health-related quality of life in chronic myeloid leukemia patients: the EORTC QLQ-CML24

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efficace, Fabio; Baccarani, Michele; Breccia, Massimo; Saussele, Susanne; Abel, Gregory; Caocci, Giovanni; Guilhot, Francois; Cocks, Kim; Naeem, Adel; Sprangers, Mirjam; Oerlemans, Simone; Chie, Weichu; Castagnetti, Fausto; Bombaci, Felice; Sharf, Giora; Cardoni, Annarita; Noens, Lucien; Pallua, Stephan; Salvucci, Marzia; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Rosti, Gianantonio; Mandelli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is a key aspect for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. The aim of this study was to develop a disease-specific HRQOL questionnaire for patients with CML to supplement the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)-QLQ

  8. The Efficacy of Reduced-dose Dasatinib as a Subsequent Therapy in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in the Chronic Phase: The LD-CML Study of the Kanto CML Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Hashino, Satoshi; Kimura, Shinya; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Takano, Hina; Hino, Masayuki; Uchiyama, Michihiro; Morita, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Junichi; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate the efficacy and safety profiles of low-dose dasatinib therapy (50 mg once daily). Methods Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase (CML-CP) who were being treated with low-dose imatinib (≤200 mg/day), but were resistant to this agent were enrolled in the current study (referred to as the LD-CML study). Results There subjects included 9 patients (4 men and 5 women); all were treated with dasatinib at a dose of 50 mg once daily. Among 8 patients who had not experienced major molecular response (MMR; BCR-ABL1 transcript ≤0.1% according to International Scale [IS]) at study enrollment, 5 attained MMR by 12 months. In particular, 3 of 9 patients demonstrated a deep molecular response (DMR; IS ≤0.0069%) by 18 months. Five patients developed lymphocytosis accompanied by cytotoxic lymphocyte predominance. There was no mortality or disease progression, and all continue to receive dasatinib therapy at 18 months with only 2 patients requiring dose reduction. Toxicities were mild-to-moderate, and pleural effusion was observed in 1 patient (grade 1). Conclusion Low-dose dasatinib can attain MMR and DMR without severe toxicity in patients with CML-CP who are unable to achieve MMR with low-dose imatinib. Switching to low-dose dasatinib should therefore be considered for patients in this setting, especially if they are otherwise considering a cessation of treatment. PMID:29033428

  9. Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Philip A; Kantarjian, Hagop; Cortes, Jorge E

    2017-01-01

    Few neoplastic diseases have undergone a transformation in a relatively short period of time like chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has in the last few years. In 1960, CML was the first cancer where a unique chromosomal abnormality, “a minute chromosome”,1 was identified and a pathophysiologic correlation suggested. Landmark work followed, recognizing the underlying translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 that gave rise to this abnormality2 and shortly afterward, the specific genes involved3,4 and the pathophysiologic implications of this novel rearrangement.5–7 Fast-forward a few years, this knowledge has given us the most remarkable example of a specific therapy targeting the dysregulated kinase activity represented by this molecular change. The broad use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has resulted in an improvement in the overall survival to the point where the life expectancy of patients today is nearly equal to that of the general population.8 Still, there are challenges and unanswered questions that define the reasons why the progress still escapes many patients, and the details that separate patients from ultimate “cure”. In this manuscript we review our current understanding of CML in 2015, present recommendations for optimal management, and discuss the unanswered questions and what could be done to answer them in the near future. PMID:26434969

  10. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... studying the leukemia cells collected from the blood, bone marrow, and/or spinal fluid, doctors can determine the type of leukemia a child has. This is important because treatment varies among different types ... blood or bone marrow, doctors can tell whether the Philadelphia chromosome is ...

  11. Evaluation of multielements in human serum of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) using SRTXRF; Avaliacao multielementar em soro humano de individuos portadores de leucemia mieloide cronica (LMC) usando SRTXRF

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    Leitao, Catarine Canellas Gondim

    2005-04-15

    In this work, trace elements were analyzed in serum of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence using synchrotron radiation (SRTXRF). Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) affects the myeloid cells in the blood and affects 1 to 2 people per 100,000 and accounts for 7-20% cases of leukemia. Sixty patients with CML and sixty healthy volunteers (control group) were studied. Blood was collected into vacutainers without additives. Directly after collection, each blood sample was centrifuged at 3000 rev/min for 10 min in order to separate blood cells and suspended particles from blood serum. Sera were transferred into polyethylene tubes and stored in a freezer at 253 K. A 500 {sup m}u{sup L} serum quantity was spiked with Ga (50 {sup m}u{sup L} ) as internal standard. 10 {sup m}u{sup L} aliquots were pipetted on Perspex sample carrier. After deposition, the samples were left to dry under an infrared lamp. The measurements were performed at the X-Ray Fluorescence Beamline at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), using a polychromatic beam. Standard solutions with gallium as internal standard were prepared for calibration system. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb. Starting from the ANOVA test was observed that the elements P, S, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu and Rb presented real significant differences ({alpha} = 0.05) between groups (healthy subjects and CML patients) and Sex (males and females). (author)

  12. SPARC expression in CML is associated to imatinib treatment and to inhibition of leukemia cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giallongo, Cesarina; Palumbo, Giuseppe A; Di Raimondo, Francesco; La Cava, Piera; Tibullo, Daniele; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Parrinello, Nunziatina; Cupri, Alessandra; Stagno, Fabio; Consoli, Carla; Chiarenza, Annalisa

    2013-01-01

    SPARC is a matricellular glycoprotein with growth-inhibitory and antiangiogenic activity in some cell types. The study of this protein in hematopoietic malignancies led to conflicting reports about its role as a tumor suppressor or promoter, depending on its different functions in the tumor microenvironment. In this study we investigated the variations in SPARC production by peripheral blood cells from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients at diagnosis and after treatment and we identified the subpopulation of cells that are the prevalent source of SPARC. We evaluated SPARC expression using real-time PCR and western blotting. SPARC serum levels were detected by ELISA assay. Finally we analyzed the interaction between exogenous SPARC and imatinib (IM), in vitro, using ATP-lite and cell cycle analysis. Our study shows that the CML cells of patients at diagnosis have a low mRNA and protein expression of SPARC. Low serum levels of this protein are also recorded in CML patients at diagnosis. However, after IM treatment we observed an increase of SPARC mRNA, protein, and serum level in the peripheral blood of these patients that had already started at 3 months and was maintained for at least the 18 months of observation. This SPARC increase was predominantly due to monocyte production. In addition, exogenous SPARC protein reduced the growth of K562 cell line and synergized in vitro with IM by inhibiting cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. Our results suggest that low endogenous SPARC expression is a constant feature of BCR/ABL positive cells and that IM treatment induces SPARC overproduction by normal cells. This exogenous SPARC may inhibit CML cell proliferation and may synergize with IM activity against CML

  13. SPARC expression in CML is associated to imatinib treatment and to inhibition of leukemia cell proliferation

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    Giallongo Cesarina

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SPARC is a matricellular glycoprotein with growth-inhibitory and antiangiogenic activity in some cell types. The study of this protein in hematopoietic malignancies led to conflicting reports about its role as a tumor suppressor or promoter, depending on its different functions in the tumor microenvironment. In this study we investigated the variations in SPARC production by peripheral blood cells from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients at diagnosis and after treatment and we identified the subpopulation of cells that are the prevalent source of SPARC. Methods We evaluated SPARC expression using real-time PCR and western blotting. SPARC serum levels were detected by ELISA assay. Finally we analyzed the interaction between exogenous SPARC and imatinib (IM, in vitro, using ATP-lite and cell cycle analysis. Results Our study shows that the CML cells of patients at diagnosis have a low mRNA and protein expression of SPARC. Low serum levels of this protein are also recorded in CML patients at diagnosis. However, after IM treatment we observed an increase of SPARC mRNA, protein, and serum level in the peripheral blood of these patients that had already started at 3 months and was maintained for at least the 18 months of observation. This SPARC increase was predominantly due to monocyte production. In addition, exogenous SPARC protein reduced the growth of K562 cell line and synergized in vitro with IM by inhibiting cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. Conclusion Our results suggest that low endogenous SPARC expression is a constant feature of BCR/ABL positive cells and that IM treatment induces SPARC overproduction by normal cells. This exogenous SPARC may inhibit CML cell proliferation and may synergize with IM activity against CML.

  14. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-20

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  15. Acadesine kills chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells through PKC-dependent induction of autophagic cell death.

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    Guillaume Robert

    Full Text Available CML is an hematopoietic stem cell disease characterized by the t(9;22 (q34;q11 translocation encoding the oncoprotein p210BCR-ABL. The effect of acadesine (AICAR, 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside a compound with known antileukemic effect on B cell chronic lymphoblastic leukemia (B-CLL was investigated in different CML cell lines. Acadesine triggered loss of cell metabolism in K562, LAMA-84 and JURL-MK1 and was also effective in killing imatinib-resistant K562 cells and Ba/F3 cells carrying the T315I-BCR-ABL mutation. The anti-leukemic effect of acadesine did not involve apoptosis but required rather induction of autophagic cell death. AMPK knock-down by Sh-RNA failed to prevent the effect of acadesine, indicating an AMPK-independent mechanism. The effect of acadesine was abrogated by GF109203X and Ro-32-0432, both inhibitor of classical and new PKCs and accordingly, acadesine triggered relocation and activation of several PKC isoforms in K562 cells. In addition, this compound exhibited a potent anti-leukemic effect in clonogenic assays of CML cells in methyl cellulose and in a xenograft model of K562 cells in nude mice. In conclusion, our work identifies an original and unexpected mechanism by which acadesine triggers autophagic cell death through PKC activation. Therefore, in addition to its promising effects in B-CLL, acadesine might also be beneficial for Imatinib-resistant CML patients.

  16. Two cases of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) treated with Iminitab (Glivec) in different phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoli, R.; Ciarlo, S.; Acosta, I.; Perez, S.; Lagorio, S.; Pratti, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: IMINITAB, inhibitor of cytoplasmic transduction signs, and hindering neoplastic cells growth, is a new therapeutic agent for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). It is a tyrosine kinase bcrabl inhibitor, inhibiting also the c-kit receptor protein in gastrointestinal neoplasia and small cells lung cancer. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of this agent in CML patients in two different time-periods, namely the chronic phase and the acute one. We hereby present two patients: 1) a 48 years old patient with radioactive contamination history, and 2) a 19 years old patient. In both cases diagnosis was confirmed by BM and BM biopsy, neutrophile alkaline phosphatase, and Ph chromosome t(9;22) (q34;q11). There were non-compatible BM donors available. Both patients were treated with hydroxyurea, hydroxyurea plus interferon, and one of them adding ARAC. Since there was no favorable response an Iminitab course was started. Patient (2) with blastic crisis remitted for 12 month until subsequent relapse and death. Patient (1) treated during chronic phase is still in remission. Neither of them attained negative Ph chromosome. Up to now, current reports show a high percentage of relapse in patients treated during the acute phase, while the chronic ones present a smaller number of relapses. It is to be noted the importance of the follow up during the chronic phase, due to the short time drug utilization in our country (May 2001). Good tolerance and sustained remission in CML patients allows being optimistic regarding this therapeutic agent. (author)

  17. Human AQP5 plays a role in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML.

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    Young Kwang Chae

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs have previously been associated with increased expression in solid tumors. However, its expression in hematologic malignancies including CML has not been described yet. Here, we report the expression of AQP5 in CML cells by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. While normal bone marrow biopsy samples (n = 5 showed no expression of AQP5, 32% of CML patient samples (n = 41 demonstrated AQP5 expression. In addition, AQP5 expression level increased with the emergence of imatinib mesylate resistance in paired samples (p = 0.047. We have found that the overexpression of AQP5 in K562 cells resulted in increased cell proliferation. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA targeting AQP5 reduced the cell proliferation rate in both K562 and LAMA84 CML cells. Moreover, by immunoblotting and flow cytometry, we show that phosphorylation of BCR-ABL1 is increased in AQP5-overexpressing CML cells and decreased in AQP5 siRNA-treated CML cells. Interestingly, caspase9 activity increased in AQP5 siRNA-treated cells. Finally, FISH showed no evidence of AQP5 gene amplification in CML from bone marrow. In summary, we report for the first time that AQP5 is overexpressed in CML cells and plays a role in promoting cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. Furthermore, our findings may provide the basis for a novel CML therapy targeting AQP5.

  18. Variable behavior of iPSCs derived from CML patients for response to TKI and hematopoietic differentiation.

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    Aurélie Bedel

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia disease (CML found effective therapy by treating patients with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, which suppress the BCR-ABL1 oncogene activity. However, the majority of patients achieving remission with TKI still have molecular evidences of disease persistence. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the disease persistence and recurrence. One of the hypotheses is that the primitive leukemic stem cells (LSCs can survive in the presence of TKI. Understanding the mechanisms leading to TKI resistance of the LSCs in CML is a critical issue but is limited by availability of cells from patients. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from CD34⁺ blood cells isolated from CML patients (CML-iPSCs as a model for studying LSCs survival in the presence of TKI and the mechanisms supporting TKI resistance. Interestingly, CML-iPSCs resisted to TKI treatment and their survival did not depend on BCR-ABL1, as for primitive LSCs. Induction of hematopoietic differentiation of CML-iPSC clones was reduced compared to normal clones. Hematopoietic progenitors obtained from iPSCs partially recovered TKI sensitivity. Notably, different CML-iPSCs obtained from the same CML patients were heterogeneous, in terms of BCR-ABL1 level and proliferation. Thus, several clones of CML-iPSCs are a powerful model to decipher all the mechanisms leading to LSC survival following TKI therapy and are a promising tool for testing new therapeutic agents.

  19. Mechanisms of Disease Persistence in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    9.2 1.4 0.03 K-Ras* 6.7 1.3 0.04 RALA 5.4 1.1 0.13 Opioid receptor mu1 4.4 1.1 0.36 Jak2 4.3 1.2 0.14 TRF1 4.3 1.5 0.06 WT-1* n/a 1.3 0.008 c...2002 American Society of Hematology, Scientific Committee on Neoplasia 2000-2004 American Medical Informatics Association: Global Trial Bank...kinase in the blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia with the Philadelphia chromosome. N Engl J Med 344:1038-1042

  20. Occurrence of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia

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    Pritish K Bhattacharyya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common leukemia of adults in the western world and constitutes about 33% of all leukemia′s. The incidence of CLL increases with age and are more common in older population. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML on the contrary occurs in both young adults and elderly and is a chronic myeloproliferative disease that originates from abnormal pluripotent stem cells and results in involvement of multiple hematopoietic lineages, but predominantly myeloid and less commonly lymphoid. Association between CLL and myeloid malignancies (CML, acute myeloid leukemia and MDS, myelodysplastic syndrome is rare. In literature documenting CLL and CML in same patients, occur either simultaneously or CML is preceded by CLL.

  1. Reduced intensity conditioning is superior to nonmyeloablative conditioning for older chronic myelogenous leukemia patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant during the tyrosine kinase inhibitor era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warlick, Erica; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Pedersen, Tanya L

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and reduced intensity conditioning (RIC)/nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning hematopoietic cell transplants (HCTs) have changed the therapeutic strategy for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. We analyzed post-HCT outcomes of 306 CML patients reported to...

  2. Disrupting BCR-ABL in Combination with Secondary Leukemia-Specific Pathways in CML Cells Leads to Enhanced Apoptosis and Decreased Proliferation

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    Woessner, David W.; Lim, Carol S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder caused by expression of the fusion gene BCR-ABL following a chromosomal translocation in the hematopoietic stem cell.1 Therapeutic management of CML uses tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which blocks ABL-signaling and effectively kill peripheral cells with BCR-ABL. However, TKIs are not curative, and chronic use of is required in order to treat CML. The primary failure for TKIs is through development of a resistant population d...

  3. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors therapy related neutropenia and thrombocythopenia correction in CML patients

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    V. A. Shuvaev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available At present, introduction of target therapy to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML treatment made CML not life-limiting disorder. The main condition of treatment efficacy is its continuity. The most common causes of dose reduction and CML therapy interruption is hematologic toxicities such as neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. The adverse events correction in these circumstances is vital. Recommendations for neutropenia and thrombocytopenia correction are proposed in this article. The basement and results of the use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF and thrombopoietine receptor agonist for hematologic toxicities correction with clinical case are presented.

  4. Assessment of imatinib as first-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia: 10-year survival results of the randomized CML study IV and impact of non-CML determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehlmann, R; Lauseker, M; Saußele, S; Pfirrmann, M; Krause, S; Kolb, H J; Neubauer, A; Hossfeld, D K; Nerl, C; Gratwohl, A; Baerlocher, G M; Heim, D; Brümmendorf, T H; Fabarius, A; Haferlach, C; Schlegelberger, B; Müller, M C; Jeromin, S; Proetel, U; Kohlbrenner, K; Voskanyan, A; Rinaldetti, S; Seifarth, W; Spieß, B; Balleisen, L; Goebeler, M C; Hänel, M; Ho, A; Dengler, J; Falge, C; Kanz, L; Kremers, S; Burchert, A; Kneba, M; Stegelmann, F; Köhne, C A; Lindemann, H W; Waller, C F; Pfreundschuh, M; Spiekermann, K; Berdel, W E; Müller, L; Edinger, M; Mayer, J; Beelen, D W; Bentz, M; Link, H; Hertenstein, B; Fuchs, R; Wernli, M; Schlegel, F; Schlag, R; de Wit, M; Trümper, L; Hebart, H; Hahn, M; Thomalla, J; Scheid, C; Schafhausen, P; Verbeek, W; Eckart, M J; Gassmann, W; Pezzutto, A; Schenk, M; Brossart, P; Geer, T; Bildat, S; Schäfer, E; Hochhaus, A; Hasford, J

    2017-11-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)-study IV was designed to explore whether treatment with imatinib (IM) at 400 mg/day (n=400) could be optimized by doubling the dose (n=420), adding interferon (IFN) (n=430) or cytarabine (n=158) or using IM after IFN-failure (n=128). From July 2002 to March 2012, 1551 newly diagnosed patients in chronic phase were randomized into a 5-arm study. The study was powered to detect a survival difference of 5% at 5 years. After a median observation time of 9.5 years, 10-year overall survival was 82%, 10-year progression-free survival was 80% and 10-year relative survival was 92%. Survival between IM400 mg and any experimental arm was not different. In a multivariate analysis, risk group, major-route chromosomal aberrations, comorbidities, smoking and treatment center (academic vs other) influenced survival significantly, but not any form of treatment optimization. Patients reaching the molecular response milestones at 3, 6 and 12 months had a significant survival advantage. For responders, monotherapy with IM400 mg provides a close to normal life expectancy independent of the time to response. Survival is more determined by patients' and disease factors than by initial treatment selection. Although improvements are also needed for refractory disease, more life-time can currently be gained by carefully addressing non-CML determinants of survival.

  5. Nilotinib induced avascular necrosis of femoral head in an adult chronic myeloid leukemia patient.

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    Thekkudan, Shinto Francis; Nityanand, Soniya

    2018-06-01

    We report a rare case of avascular necrosis of femoral head (AVNFH) in an adult chronic myeloid leukemia - chronic phase (CML-CP) patient during due course of therapy with second line Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI), Nilotinib. A high index of clinical suspicion should be kept in any symptomatic CML patient on TKI's.

  6. Understanding Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for as long as they take it. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is another treatment option that is only done if CML is not responding as expected to drug therapy. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) . Some CLL patients do not need treatment ...

  7. DRUG THERAPY IN THE PROGRESSED CML PATIENT WITH MULTI-TKI FAILURE

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    Ibrahim C. Haznedaroglu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to outline pharmacotherapy of the ‘third-line management of CML’ (progressive disease course after sequential TKI drugs. Current management of CML with multi-TKI failure is reviewed. TKI (bosutinib, ponatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib and non-TKI (omacetaxine mepussecinate, IFN or PEG-IFN drugs are available. The literature search was made in PubMed with particular focus on the clinical trials, recommendations, guidelines and expert opinions, as well as international recommendations. Progressing CML disease with multi-TKI failure should be treated with alloSCT based on the availability of the donor and EBMT transplant risk scores. The TKI and non-TKI drugs shall be used to get best promising (hematological, cytogenetic, molecular response. During the CP-CML phase of multi-TKI failure, 2nd generation TKIs (nilotinib or dasatinib are used if they remained. Bosutinib and ponatinib (3rd generation TKIs can be administered in triple-TKI failed (imatinib and nilotinib and dasatinib patients. The presence of T315I mutation at any phase requires ponatinib or omacetaxine mepussecinate therapy before allografting. During the AP/BC-CML phase of multi-TKI failure, the most powerful TKI available (ponatinib or dasatinib if remained together with chemotherapy should be given before alloSCT. Monitoring of CML disease and drug off-target risks (particularly vascular thrombotic events are vital.

  8. Ph1 chromosomes and bcr gene rearrangements in chronic myelocytic leukemia patients developed from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Takechi, Miho; Shigeta, Chiharu; Sakatani, Keiko; Oguma, Nobuo; Kamada, Nanao; Takimoto, Yasuo; Kuramoto, Atsushi

    1989-01-01

    This study compared findings of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) in A-bomb survivors (n=8) developing CML within 10 years after the bombing and in non-exposed CML patients (n=14). Both Ph 1 chromosomes and bcr rearrangement were observed in all patients in both exposed and non-exposed groups. There was no significant difference in distribution sites of bcr rearrangement between the groups. These results suggest that bcr-abl chimera mRNA and chimera protein associated with Ph 1 chromosomes have an important role in the development of CML among A-bomb survivors, as well as among non-exposed patients. (N.K.)

  9. Acompanhamento farmacoterapêutico dos pacientes com leucemia mieloide crônica em uso de mesilato de imatinibe na Universidade Federal do Ceará The pharmacotherapeutic follow- up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML on imatinib mesylate therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterfen S. Aquino

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Leucemia mieloide crônica (LMC é uma desordem genética de etiologia desconhecida, caracterizada por crescimento aumentado e não regulado de células precursoras mieloides na medula óssea. LMC está associada com uma característica translocação cromossômica chamada de cromossoma Philadelphia. Esse é um estudo observacional descritivo de pacientes com LMC do Hospital Universitário Walter Cantídio, Universidade Federal de Ceará, Brasil. O objetivo foi estudar a eficácia e a frequência de efeitos colaterais da terapia com mesilato de imatinibe. Vinte e seis pacientes foram incluídos: 09 em fase crônica (34,61%, 06 em fase acelerada (23,08% e 11 em crise blástica (42,31 %. Os casos em fase crônica tiveram intolerância prévia para interferon alfa (IFN- α. Resposta hematológica completa foi observada em sete pacientes, cinco em fase crônica, um em acelerada e um em crise blástica. Durante o primeiro ano de tratamento, quatro pacientes em fase crônica mostraram resposta citogenética completa. Um destes pacientes perdeu a resposta posteriormente. Nenhum paciente em fase acelerada ou crise blástica mostrou resposta citogenética completa. Entre os 18 pacientes que estavam vivos no fim do estudo, apenas quatro (22,22% não tiveram nenhuma queixa. Os mais comuns efeitos adversos foram: edema (50%, adinamia (33,33%, dor óssea e/ou articular (33,33%, cefaléia (27,78%, cãimbra (16,67%, diarreia (16,67%, insônia (16,67%, prurido (16,67%, equimoses (11,11%, náuseas (11,11%, dor epigástrica (5,55%, eritema (5,55%, lacrimejamento (5,55%, ressecamento da pele e lábios (5,55%, rush (5,55%, sudorese (5,55%. Uma minoria de pacientes desenvolveu resistência ao imatinibe. Para superar a resistência e aumentar a resposta positiva aos inibidores de tirosino- quinase novos fármacos e testes estão sendo utilizados e pesquisados.Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a genetic disorder of unknown etiology characterized by increased and

  10. Radotinib and its clinical potential in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskazan, Ahmet Emre; Keskin, Dilek

    2017-09-01

    Although imatinib has dramatically improved major outcomes in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), there are newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) approved worldwide for the treatment of resistant cases, and two second-generation TKIs (dasatinib, nilotinib) are approved in some nations for treating patients in the upfront setting. Radotinib (IY5511HCL, Supect® ) is a novel and selective second-generation BCR-ABL1 TKI, which is currently approved in Korea for the treatment of patients with CML both in the upfront and salvage settings. This review mainly focuses on the clinical potential of radotinib in patients with CML in chronic phase in terms of efficacy and safety.

  11. Laboratory tools for diagnosis and monitoring response in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohami, Tali; Nagler, Arnon; Amariglio, Ninette

    2012-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal hematological disease that represents 15-20% of all adult leukemia cases. The study and treatment of CML has contributed pivotal advances to translational medicine and cancer therapy. The discovery that a single chromosomal abnormality, the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, is responsible for the etiology of this disease was a milestone for treating and understanding CML. Subsequently, CML became the first disease for which allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is the treatment of choice. Currently, CML is one of the few diseases where treatment targeted against the chromosomal abnormality is the sole frontline therapy for newly diagnosed patients. The use of directed therapy for CML challenged disease monitoring during treatment and led to the development of definitions that document response and predict relapse sooner than the former routine methods. These methods relied on classical cytogenetics through molecular cytogenetics (FISH) and, finally, on molecular monitoring assays. This review discusses the laboratory tools used for diagnosing CML, for monitoring during treatment, and for assessing remission or relapse. The advantages and disadvantages of each test, the common definition of response levels, and the efforts to standardize molecular monitoring for CML patient management are discussed.

  12. Renal Bleeding Due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in a Patient With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Zettner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative disorder that normally presents in middle-aged adults. Renal infiltration and extramedullary hematopoiesis in renal tissue has been rarely reported. This case report presents a patient with CML and renal insufficiency who developed gross hematuria. Efforts at controlling the hematuria led to a cascade of events propelled by the underlying disorder that ultimately led to a radical nephrectomy, multiorgan failure, and prolonged hospitalization. We suggest that management of gross hematuria in clinically stable patients with CML, suspected of having extramedullary hematopoiesis, should prioritize treatment of the myeloproliferative disorder over efforts to control bleeding.

  13. Renal Bleeding Due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in a Patient With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettner, Stephanie; Mistry, Sandeep G

    2014-11-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder that normally presents in middle-aged adults. Renal infiltration and extramedullary hematopoiesis in renal tissue has been rarely reported. This case report presents a patient with CML and renal insufficiency who developed gross hematuria. Efforts at controlling the hematuria led to a cascade of events propelled by the underlying disorder that ultimately led to a radical nephrectomy, multiorgan failure, and prolonged hospitalization. We suggest that management of gross hematuria in clinically stable patients with CML, suspected of having extramedullary hematopoiesis, should prioritize treatment of the myeloproliferative disorder over efforts to control bleeding.

  14. Renal Bleeding Due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in a Patient With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Zettner; Sandeep G. Mistry

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder that normally presents in middle-aged adults. Renal infiltration and extramedullary hematopoiesis in renal tissue has been rarely reported. This case report presents a patient with CML and renal insufficiency who developed gross hematuria. Efforts at controlling the hematuria led to a cascade of events propelled by the underlying disorder that ultimately led to a radical nephrectomy, multiorgan failure, and prolonged hospital...

  15. Disrupting BCR-ABL in combination with secondary leukemia-specific pathways in CML cells leads to enhanced apoptosis and decreased proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessner, David W; Lim, Carol S

    2013-01-07

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder caused by expression of the fusion gene BCR-ABL following a chromosomal translocation in the hematopoietic stem cell. Therapeutic management of CML uses tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which block ABL-signaling and effectively kill peripheral cells with BCR-ABL. However, TKIs are not curative, and chronic use is required in order to treat CML. The primary failure for TKIs is through the development of a resistant population due to mutations in the TKI binding regions. This led us to develop the mutant coiled-coil, CC(mut2), an alternative method for BCR-ABL signaling inhibition by targeting the N-terminal oligomerization domain of BCR, necessary for ABL activation. In this article, we explore additional pathways that are important for leukemic stem cell survival in K562 cells. Using a candidate-based approach, we test the combination of CC(mut2) and inhibitors of unique secondary pathways in leukemic cells. Transformative potential was reduced following silencing of the leukemic stem cell factor Alox5 by RNA interference. Furthermore, blockade of the oncogenic protein MUC-1 by the novel peptide GO-201 yielded reductions in proliferation and increased cell death. Finally, we found that inhibiting macroautophagy using chloroquine in addition to blocking BCR-ABL signaling with the CC(mut2) was most effective in limiting cell survival and proliferation. This study has elucidated possible combination therapies for CML using novel blockade of BCR-ABL and secondary leukemia-specific pathways.

  16. Frequency of BCR-ABL Transcript Types in Syrian CML Patients

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    Sulaf Farhat-Maghribi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In Syria, CML patients are started on tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs and monitored until complete molecular response is achieved. BCR-ABL mRNA transcript type is not routinely identified, contrary to the recommendations. In this study we aimed to identify the frequency of different BCR-ABL transcripts in Syrian CML patients and highlight their significance on monitoring and treatment protocols. Methods. CML patients positive for BCR-ABL transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR were enrolled. BCR-ABL transcript types were investigated using a home-made PCR method that was adapted from published protocols and optimized. The transcript types were then confirmed using a commercially available research kit. Results. Twenty-four transcripts were found in 21 patients. The most common was b2a2, followed by b3a2, b3a3, and e1a3 present solely in 12 (57.1%, 3 (14.3%, 2 (9.5%, and 1 (4.8%, respectively. Three samples (14.3% contained dual transcripts. While b3a2 transcript was apparently associated with warning molecular response to imatinib treatment, b2a2, b3a3, and e1a3 transcripts collectively proved otherwise (P=0.047. Conclusion. It might be advisable to identify the BCR-ABL transcript type in CML patients at diagnosis, using an empirically verified method, in order to link the detected transcript with the clinical findings, possible resistance to treatment, and appropriate monitoring methods.

  17. Combination of pegylated IFN-α2b with imatinib increases molecular response rates in patients with low- or intermediate-risk chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Bengt; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Markevärn, Berit

    2011-01-01

    Biologic and clinical observations suggest that combining imatinib with IFN-α may improve treatment outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We randomized newly diagnosed chronic-phase CML patients with a low or intermediate Sokal risk score and in imatinib-induced complete hematologic remissio...

  18. Prognostic value of regulatory T cells in newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahran, Asmaa M; Badrawy, Hosny; Ibrahim, Abeer

    2014-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal disease, characterized by a reciprocal t(9, 22) that results in a chimeric BCR/ABL fusion gene. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) constitute the main cell population that enables cancer cells to evade immune surveillance. The purpose of our study was to investigate the level of Tregs in newly diagnosed CML patients and to correlate it with the patients' clinical, laboratory and molecular data. We also aimed to assess the effect of treatment using tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) on Treg levels. Tregs were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry in 63 newly diagnosed CML patients and 40 healthy controls. TKI was used in 45 patients with chronic phase CML, and the response to therapy was correlated with baseline Treg levels. The percentages of Tregs were significantly increased in CML patients compared to the controls. Treg numbers were significantly lower in patients with chronic phase CML versus the accelerated and blast phases, and were significantly lower in patients with complete molecular remission (CMR) compared to those patients without CMR. Tregs may play a role in the maintenance of CML. Moreover, the decrease of their levels in patients with CMR suggests that Tregs might have a clinical value in evaluating the effects of therapy.

  19. Targeted Therapies in Hematology and Their Impact on Patient Care: Chronic and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Elias Jabbour Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the genetic and molecular characterizations of leukemias have enhanced our capabilities to develop targeted therapies. The most dramatic examples of targeted therapy in cancer to date are the use of targeted BCR-ABL protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) which has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Inhibition of the signaling activity of this kinase has proved to be a highly successful treatment target, transforming the prognosis of patients with CML. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous disease with outcomes that vary widely according to subtype of the disease. Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors are promising strategies to help improve the cure rates in AML. In this review, we will highlight the results of recent clinical trials in which outcomes of CML and AML have been influenced significantly. Also, novel approaches to sequencing and combining available therapies will be covered. PMID:24246694

  20. Early Complete Molecular Response to First-Line Nilotinib in Two Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Carrying the p230 Transcript

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Greco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML with the rare fusion gene e19a2, encoding a p230 protein, has been described in patients with typical or rather aggressive clinical course. Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs induce a substantial cytogenetic and molecular response in all phases of CML, a minority of p230 positive patients have been treated with TKIs. We report two cases of CML patients carrying the p230 transcript, who achieved fast and deep complete molecular response (CMR after frontline treatment with nilotinib. Our results suggest the use of nilotinib as frontline agent for the treatment of this CML variant.

  1. Combined Population Dynamics and Entropy Modelling Supports Patient Stratification in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehme, Marc; Koschmieder, Steffen; Montazeri, Maryam; Copland, Mhairi; Oehler, Vivian G.; Radich, Jerald P.; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Schuppert, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Modelling the parameters of multistep carcinogenesis is key for a better understanding of cancer progression, biomarker identification and the design of individualized therapies. Using chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) as a paradigm for hierarchical disease evolution we show that combined population dynamic modelling and CML patient biopsy genomic analysis enables patient stratification at unprecedented resolution. Linking CD34+ similarity as a disease progression marker to patient-derived gene expression entropy separated established CML progression stages and uncovered additional heterogeneity within disease stages. Importantly, our patient data informed model enables quantitative approximation of individual patients’ disease history within chronic phase (CP) and significantly separates “early” from “late” CP. Our findings provide a novel rationale for personalized and genome-informed disease progression risk assessment that is independent and complementary to conventional measures of CML disease burden and prognosis.

  2. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... talk about donating their baby's cord blood College football player stays true to his commitment Be the ... appointment, the transplant doctor will: Review your medical history Talk with you about your treatment options Discuss ...

  3. Minimal cross-intolerance with nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic or accelerated phase who are intolerant to imatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhaus, Andreas; le Coutre, Philipp D.; Rosti, Gianantonio; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Jabbour, Elias; Gillis, Kathryn; Woodman, Richard C.; Blakesley, Rick E.; Giles, Francis J.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Baccarani, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Nilotinib has significant efficacy in patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) and in patients with CML-CP or CML in accelerated phase (CML-AP) after imatinib failure. We investigated the occurrence of cross-intolerance to nilotinib in imatinib-intolerant patients with CML. Only 1/75 (1%) patients with nonhematologic imatinib intolerance experienced a similar grade 3/4 adverse event (AE), and 3/75 (4%) experienced a similar persistent grade 2 nonhematologic AE on nilotinib. Only 7/40 (18%) patients with hematologic imatinib intolerance discontinued nilotinib, all because of grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia. Ninety percent of imatinib-intolerant patients with CML-CP who did not have complete hematologic response (CHR) at baseline (n = 52) achieved CHR on nilotinib. Nilotinib induced a major cytogenetic response in 66% and 41% of patients with imatinib-intolerant CML-CP and CML-AP (complete cytogenetic response in 51% and 30%), respectively. Minimal cross-intolerance was confirmed in patients with imatinib-intolerant CML. The favorable tolerability of nilotinib in patients with imatinib intolerance leads to alleviation of AE-related symptoms and significant and durable responses. In addition to its established clinical benefit in patients with newly diagnosed CML and those resistant to imatinib, nilotinib is effective and well-tolerated for long-term use in patients with imatinib intolerance. This study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00471497 PMID:21467546

  4. “Preleukemic or smoldering” chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML:BCR-ABL1 positive: A brief case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Bennett

    2015-01-01

    The most common feature of CML is an elevated WBC count, usually above 25×103/µL, and frequently above 100×103/µL. We report a case of confirmed Ph+CML with a normal CBC detected because of the presence of rare myelocytes and 2% basophils [Fig. 1]. Previous leukocyte counts for the preceding eight years were normal with the exception of one done four months prior to his presentation that showed an abnormal differential with 1% basophils, 2% metamyelocytes and 2% myelocytes.

  5. [Chromosome abnormalities associated with Phl and acturial survivorship curve in chronic myeloid leukemia. Probabilistic interpretation of blastic transformation of CML].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutris, G

    1981-12-01

    Sixty-six patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia, all with Philadelphia chromosome, have been studied for chromosomic abnormalities associated (CAA) to Ph', as well as for actuarial curve of survivorship. Patients dying from another disease were excluded from this study. Frequency of cells with CAA was measured and appeared strongly higher after blastic transformation than during myelocytic state; probability to be a blastic transformation is closely correlated with this frequency. On the other hand, actuarial curve of survivorship is very well represented by an exponential curve. This suggests a constant rate of death during disease evolution, for these patients without intercurrent disease. As a mean survivance after blastic transformation is very shorter than myelocytic duration, a constant rate of blastic transformation could be advanced: it explains possible occurrence of transformation as soon as preclinic state of a chronic myelogenous leukemia. Even if CAA frequency increases after blastic transformation, CAA can occur a long time before it and do not explain it: submicroscopic origin should be searched for the constant rate of blastic transformation would express the risk of a genic transformation at a constant rate during myelocytic state.

  6. Analysis of low Z elements in serum of patients with leukemias by SRTXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Jesus, Edgar F.O. de; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: catarine@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: edgar@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ/COPPE), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nuclear Engineering Program. Nuclear Instrumentation Lab.; Carvalho, Silvia M.F., E-mail: silvia@hemorio.rj.gov.b [State Institute of Hematology Arthur de Siqueira Cavalcanti (HEMORIO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Leukemia is a disease that occurs all over the world. Leukemia is a type of cancer. All cancers begin in cells, which make up blood and other tissues. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as the body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes this orderly process goes wrong. New cells form when the body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. Leukemia is a kind of cancer that begins in blood cells. There are four common types of leukemia: Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL). In this work, low Z elements were determined in serum of patients with four groups of leukemia (CML, AML, CLL and ALL) and control group (CG) or healthy subjects using Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence induced by Synchrotron Radiation (SRTXRF). We studied thirty patients - male gender and feminine gender - with ages ranging from 18 to 60 years, suffering from CML, AML, CLL, ALL and thirty healthy volunteers aged 18 to 60 years. All the serum samples were collected from people who live in the urban area of Rio de Janeiro City/Brazil. All of them were submitted to medical history. This study was performed with the approval of the ethics committee. It was possible to determine the elemental concentrations of the following six elements: Na, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. By using t-test it could be seen significant differences (alpha = 0.05) between groups of healthy subjects and four groups of leukemia. The t- test showed real differences among the elemental concentrations. Thus, our findings indicate that the elements can be directly related to the biochemical processes in leukemias. The significant differences found between the groups may be indicators of these diseases. This could help biomedical field with regard to early diagnosis and improved medical treatment. (author)

  7. Analysis of low Z elements in serum of patients with leukemias by SRTXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Jesus, Edgar F.O. de; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia is a disease that occurs all over the world. Leukemia is a type of cancer. All cancers begin in cells, which make up blood and other tissues. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as the body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes this orderly process goes wrong. New cells form when the body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. Leukemia is a kind of cancer that begins in blood cells. There are four common types of leukemia: Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL). In this work, low Z elements were determined in serum of patients with four groups of leukemia (CML, AML, CLL and ALL) and control group (CG) or healthy subjects using Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence induced by Synchrotron Radiation (SRTXRF). We studied thirty patients - male gender and feminine gender - with ages ranging from 18 to 60 years, suffering from CML, AML, CLL, ALL and thirty healthy volunteers aged 18 to 60 years. All the serum samples were collected from people who live in the urban area of Rio de Janeiro City/Brazil. All of them were submitted to medical history. This study was performed with the approval of the ethics committee. It was possible to determine the elemental concentrations of the following six elements: Na, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. By using t-test it could be seen significant differences (α = 0.05) between groups of healthy subjects and four groups of leukemia. The t- test showed real differences among the elemental concentrations. Thus, our findings indicate that the elements can be directly related to the biochemical processes in leukemias. The significant differences found between the groups may be indicators of these diseases. This could help biomedical field with regard to early diagnosis and improved medical treatment. (author)

  8. Quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia patients in Brazil: ability to work as a key factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerschlak, Nelson; de Souza, Carmino; Cornacchioni, Ana Lúcia; Pasquini, Ricardo; Tabak, Daniel; Spector, Nelson; Steagall, Merula

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of patients receiving treatment by the public health system in Brazil for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a disease requiring daily and strict compliance to oral medication and regular blood and bone marrow controls, which are invasive exams. Between 2008 and 2010, patients with CML were surveyed by telephone. Quality of life was evaluated by the functional assessment of chronic illness therapy (FACIT) tool. The mean QOL among CML patients was 92.53 (out of 124 total points) in the trial outcome index, 78.50 (out of 108) in the general total score, and 130.43 (out of 176) in the leukemia total score. Patients who had the prescriptions recently changed anyway had better QOL general score (p = 0.012) and leukemia-specific score (p = 0.043) than those who remained with the same treatment. Imatinib was not associated with this change in QOL (p > 0.797). The more the patient felt able to work, the higher the scores in all three FACIT scales (p work, while chemotherapy (p = 0.017) and the use of hydroxyurea (p = 0.001) were inversely associated with work capability. A recent change in medication can improve quality of life. The ability to work is an important component of quality of life of patients with CML. Ability to work should be specifically considered in CML treatment.

  9. Dasatinib in Pediatric Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic Phase: Results From a Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Lia; Kearns, Pamela R; de Martino, Maria Lucia; Lee; De Souza, Carmino Antonio; Bertrand, Yves; Hijiya, Nobuko; Stork, Linda C; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Cardos, Rocio Cardenas; Saikia, Tapan; Fagioli, Franca; Seo, Jong Jin; Landman-Parker, Judith; Lancaster, Donna; Place, Andrew E; Rabin, Karen R; Sacchi, Mariana; Swanink, Rene; Zwaan, C Michel

    2018-05-01

    Purpose Safe, effective treatments are needed for pediatric patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Dasatinib is approved for treatment of adults and children with CML-CP. A phase I study determined suitable dosing for children with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemias. Methods CA180-226/NCT00777036 is a phase II, open-label, nonrandomized prospective trial of patients 30% for imatinib-resistant/intolerant patients and complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) > 55% for newly diagnosed patients were of clinical interest. Results Of 113 patients with CML-CP, 14 (48%) who were imatinib-resistant/intolerant and 61 (73%) who were newly diagnosed remained on treatment at time of analysis. Major cytogenetic response > 30% was reached by 3 months in the imatinib-resistant/intolerant group and CCyR > 55% was reached by 6 months in the newly diagnosed CML-CP group. CCyR and major molecular response by 12 months, respectively, were 76% and 41% in the imatinib-resistant/intolerant group and 92% and 52% in newly diagnosed CML-CP group. Progression-free survival by 48 months was 78% and 93% in the imatinib-resistant/intolerant and newly diagnosed CML-CP groups, respectively. No dasatinib-related pleural or pericardial effusion, pulmonary edema, or pulmonary arterial hypertension were reported. Bone growth and development events were reported in 4% of patients. Conclusion In the largest prospective trial to date in children with CML-CP, we demonstrate that dasatinib is a safe, effective treatment of pediatric CML-CP. Target responses to first- or second-line dasatinib were met early, and deep molecular responses were observed. Safety of dasatinib in pediatric patients was similar to that observed in adults; however, no cases of pleural or pericardial effusion or pulmonary arterial hypertension were reported.

  10. Tyrosine kinase inhibition: A therapeutic target for the management of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias J; Cortes, Jorge E; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematologic neoplasm with a progressive, ultimately terminal, disease course. In most cases, CML arises owing to the aberrant formation of a chimeric gene for a constitutively active tyrosine kinase. Inhibition of the signaling activity of this kinase has proved to be a highly successful treatment target transforming the prognosis of patients with CML. New tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) continue to improve the management of CML, offering alternative options for those resistant to or intolerant of standard TKIs. Here we review the pathobiology of CML and explore emerging strategies to optimize the management of chronic-phase CML, particularly first-line treatment. PMID:24236822

  11. Nilotinib: optimal therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and resistance or intolerance to imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Ronan; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Padmanabhan, Swaminathan; Carew, Jennifer; Giles, Francis

    2009-09-21

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is the consequence of a single balanced translocation that produces the BCR-ABL fusion oncogene which is detectable in over 90% of patients at presentation. The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib mesylate (IM) has improved survival in all phases of CML and is the standard of care for newly diagnosed patients in chronic phase. Despite the very significant therapeutic benefits of IM, a small minority of patients with early stage disease do not benefit optimally while IM therapy in patients with advanced disease is of modest benefit in many. Diverse mechanisms may be responsible for IM failures, with point mutations within the Bcr-Abl kinase domain being amongst the most common resistance mechanisms described in patients with advanced CML. The development of novel agents designed to overcome IM resistance, while still primarily targeted on BCR-ABL, led to the creation of the high affinity aminopyrimidine inhibitor, nilotinib. Nilotinib is much more potent as a BCR-ABL inhibitor than IM and inhibits both wild type and IM-resistant BCR-ABL with significant clinical activity across the entire spectrum of BCR-ABL mutants with the exception of T315I. The selection of a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor to rescue patients with imatinib failure will be based on several factors including age, co-morbid medical problems and ABL kinase mutational profile. It should be noted that while the use of targeted BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors in CML represents a paradigm shift in CML management these agents are not likely to have activity against the quiescent CML stem cell pool. The purpose of this review is to summarize the pre-clinical and clinical data on nilotinib in patients with CML who have failed prior therapy with IM or dasatinib.

  12. Overexpression of chitinase like protein YKL-40 in leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K. Hurmale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available YKL-40 is a member of mammalian chitanase (CHI3L1, expressed and secreted by several types of solid tumor cells, inflammatory cells and stem cells. The precise physiological role of YKL-40 in cancer is still not clear and it is suggested that it play a role in cancer cell proliferation, differentiation, metastatic potential, cell attachment and migration, reorganization and tissue remodeling.The aim of the study was to check the appearance of YKL-40 in leukemic cells and over-expression of YKL-40 in the plasma of leukemia patients in comparison to healthy controls, and find whether YKL-40 could serve as a peripheral biomarker for leukemia. The study was conducted between July 2012 and March 2013 and included 67 volunteers, 55 having leukemia at the stage of diagnosis ofthe disease and 12 normal healthy volunteers. YKL-40 levels were determined in all plasma samples using the YKL-40 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kit and expression of YKL-40 was observed by using immunocytochemical (ICC analysis. YKL-40 plasma levels differed significantly between patients with leukemia and the normal healthy volunteers (P=<0.001 and YKL-40 was positively expressed in all four types of leukemia (AML, ALL, CLL and CML specimens.

  13. Downregulation of miR-451 in Tunisian chronic myeloid leukemia patients: potential implication in imatinib resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Ismael; Douzi, Kais; Gharbi, Hanen; Benhassine, Islem; Teber, Mouheb; Amouri, Hassiba; Ben Hadj Othman, Hind; Farrah, Ahlem; Ben Lakhel, Raihane; Abbes, Salem; Menif, Samia

    2017-05-01

    Resistance to imatinib has been recognized as a major challenge for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Aberrant expression of miR-451 has been reported to participate in anticancer drug resistance. However, the role of miR-451 in imatinib resistance has not been investigated. The present study was undertaken to determine the expression of miR-451 in order to find a possible association between the expression of this miRNA and imatinib resistance in Tunisian CML patients. First, real-time RT-PCR was performed to identify the expression of miR-451 in peripheral leukocytes of 59 CML patients treated with imatinib. Then, bioinformatics analysis was carried out to understand the regulatory roles of miR-451 in imatinib-resistant process. Downregulated miR-451 was observed in imatinib-resistant CML cases. In silico analysis identified MYC as a potential target of miR-451. We further revealed the existence of an MYC-binding site in MiR-451 promoter region. On the other hand, increased level of MYC was detected in imatinib-resistant CML cases which may explain the causative role of MYC in CML cases and the downregulation of miR-451. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-451 and MYC form together a regulatory loop which may act as a potential therapeutic target, and disruption of suggested regulatory loop could help to improve CML therapy.

  14. Expression of interferon regulatory factor 4 in chronic myeloid leukemia: correlation with response to interferon alfa therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M; Hochhaus, A; König-Merediz, S A; Brendel, C; Proba, J; Hoppe, G J; Wittig, B; Ehninger, G; Hehlmann, R; Neubauer, A

    2000-10-01

    Mice experiments have established an important role for interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members in hematopoiesis. We wanted to study the expression of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) in various hematologic disorders, especially chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and its association with response to interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) treatment in CML. Blood samples from various hematopoietic cell lines, different leukemia patients (70 CML, 29 acute myeloid leukemia [AML], 10 chronic myelomonocytic leukemia [CMMoL], 10 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and 10 chronic lymphoid leukemia patients), and 33 healthy volunteers were monitored for IRF4 expression by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Then, with a focus on CML, the IRF4 level was determined in sorted cell subpopulations from CML patients and healthy volunteers and in in vitro-stimulated CML cells. Furthermore, IRF4 expression was compared in the CML samples taken before IFN-alpha therapy and in 47 additional CML samples taken during IFN-alpha therapy. IRF4 expression was then correlated with cytogenetic response to IFN-alpha. IRF4 expression was significantly impaired in CML, AML, and CMMoL samples. The downregulation of IRF4 in CML samples was predominantly found in T cells. In CML patients during IFN-alpha therapy, a significant increase in IRF4 levels was detected, and this was also observed in sorted T cells from CML patients. The increase seen during IFN-alpha therapy was not due to different blood counts. In regard to the cytogenetic response with IFN-alpha, a good response was associated with high IRF4 expression. IRF4 expression is downregulated in T cells of CML patients, and its increase is associated with a good response to IFN-alpha therapy. These data suggest IRF4 expression as a useful marker to monitor, if not predict, response to IFN-alpha in CML.

  15. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Treatment for Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radich, Jerald P; Mauro, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder that accounts for approximately 10% of new cases of leukemia. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has led to a reduction in mortalities. Thus, the estimated prevalence of CML is increasing. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network and the European Leukemia Net guidelines incorporate frequent molecular monitoring of the fusion BCR-ABL transcript to ensure that patients reach and keep treatment milestones. Most patients with CML are diagnosed in the chronic phase, and approximately 10% to 30% of these patients will at some time in their course meet definition criteria of resistance to imatinib. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Effects of recombinant human alpha-2b and gamma interferons on bone marrow megakaryocyte progenitors (CFU-Meg) from patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Y; Dan, K; Kuriya, S; Nomura, T

    1989-10-01

    The effects of recombinant human interferon (IFN) alpha-2b and gamma on the bone marrow megakaryocyte progenitors (CFU-Meg) were compared between eight patients in the chronic phase of Ph1-positive chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and five hematologically normal patients. CFU-Meg was assayed in plasma clot culture added with phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocyte-conditioned medium as a source of colony stimulating activity. The average count of CFU-Meg colonies formed from the bone marrow of CML patients was 5.5 times that of normal controls. Spontaneous CFU-Meg colonies were grown in seven of eight CML patients, but in none of five controls. Colony formation by CFU-Meg in CML as well as normal bone marrow was suppressed by the two preparations of IFN in a dose dependent fashion. Their suppressive influence on colonies from CFU-Meg was comparable between CML and normal bone marrow at lower concentrations, but was less marked for CML than normal bone marrow at higher concentrations. The formation of CFU-Meg colonies from CML bone marrow was more severely suppressed by IFN-gamma than IFN-alpha-2b. Depletion of either T lymphocytes or adherent cells from the CML bone marrow cells diminished the suppressive effects of IFN-gamma, but had no influence on the effects of IFN-alpha-2b.

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC Regulate Activation of Granulocyte-Like Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (G-MDSC in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

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    Cesarina Giallongo

    Full Text Available It is well known that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have a role in promotion of tumor growth, survival and drug-resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Recent reports indicated that a subpopulation of myeloid cells, defined as granulocyte-like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC is increased in these patients. So far, the role of MSC in MDSC expansion and activation into the BM microenvironment remains unexplored. To address this question, here we use a specific experimental model in vitro, co-culturing MSC with peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC from normal individuals, in order to generate MSC-educated G-MDSC. Although MSC of healthy donors (HD and CML patients were able to generate the same amount of MDSC, only CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC exhibited suppressive ability on autologous T lymphocytes. In addition, compared with HD-MSC, CML-MSC over-expressed some immunomodulatory factors including TGFβ, IL6 and IL10, that could be involved in MDSC activation. CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC expressed higher levels of ARG1, TNFα, IL1β, COX2 and IL6 than G-MDSC isolated from co-culture with HD-MSC. Our data provide evidence that CML-MSC may play a critical role in tumor microenvironment by orchestrating G-MDSC activation and regulating T lymphocytes-mediated leukemia surveillance, thus contributing to CML immune escape.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) Regulate Activation of Granulocyte-Like Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (G-MDSC) in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallongo, Cesarina; Romano, Alessandra; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; La Cava, Piera; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Stagno, Fabio; Vigneri, Paolo; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Palumbo, Giuseppe Alberto; Tibullo, Daniele; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have a role in promotion of tumor growth, survival and drug-resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Recent reports indicated that a subpopulation of myeloid cells, defined as granulocyte-like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC) is increased in these patients. So far, the role of MSC in MDSC expansion and activation into the BM microenvironment remains unexplored. To address this question, here we use a specific experimental model in vitro, co-culturing MSC with peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC) from normal individuals, in order to generate MSC-educated G-MDSC. Although MSC of healthy donors (HD) and CML patients were able to generate the same amount of MDSC, only CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC exhibited suppressive ability on autologous T lymphocytes. In addition, compared with HD-MSC, CML-MSC over-expressed some immunomodulatory factors including TGFβ, IL6 and IL10, that could be involved in MDSC activation. CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC expressed higher levels of ARG1, TNFα, IL1β, COX2 and IL6 than G-MDSC isolated from co-culture with HD-MSC. Our data provide evidence that CML-MSC may play a critical role in tumor microenvironment by orchestrating G-MDSC activation and regulating T lymphocytes-mediated leukemia surveillance, thus contributing to CML immune escape.

  19. Tophaceous gout in an amputation stump in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Christine B.; Mohana-Borges, Aurea; Pathria, Mini

    2003-01-01

    Gout is a common rheumatologic disorder that can have an unusual clinical presentation. This case report describes the development of a gouty tophus at a site of remote traumatic forearm amputation in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). It further addresses the imaging characteristics of tophaceous gout as well as the differential diagnostic considerations as regards both the imaging findings and the clinical presentation. (orig.)

  20. B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia with 11q22.3 Rearrangement in Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treated with Imatinib

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    Krzysztof Lewandowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of two diseases chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL is a rare phenomenon. Both neoplastic disorders have several common epidemiological denominators (they occur more often in men over 50 years of age but different origin and long term prognosis. In this paper we described the clinical and pathological findings in patient with CML in major molecular response who developed B-CLL with 11q22.3 rearrangement and Coombs positive hemolytic anemia during the imatinib treatment. Due to the presence of the symptoms of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and optimal CML response to the imatinib treatment, the decision about combined therapy with prednisone and imatinib was made. During the follow-up, the normalization of complete blood count and resolution of peripheral lymphadenopathy were noted. The hematologic response of B-CLL was diagnosed. The repeated FISH analysis of cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes showed 2% of cells carrying 11q22.3 rearrangement. At the same time, molecular monitoring confirmed the deep molecular response of CML. The effectiveness of such combination in the described case raises the question about the best therapeutic option in such situation, especially in patients with good imatinib tolerance and optimal response.

  1. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia In a Pregnant Woman: A Case Report

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    Aytekin Tokmak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a rare disease in pregnancy. Our aim is to present a 37 weeks of pregnant woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia. A 27 Years in multigravi (gravida 5, parity: 4, at 37 weeks gestation was admitted with the diagnosis of painful pregnancy and CML. Physical examination findings were normal, complete blood count and peripheral blood smear results were consistent with CML. The patient was diagnosed CML in the 30th week of pregnancy and were treated with hydroxyurea and interferon. Treatment depends on the mother and the fetus did not develop any side effects. Our patient with CML is interesting due to lack of perinatal effects and take the diagnosis at an early age. CML diagnosed during pregnancy requires a multidisciplinary approach and hydroxyurea and interferon treatment on the mother and fetus are at low risk of inducing adverse effects. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(4.000: 811-813

  2. Treating the chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patient: which TKI, when to switch and when to stop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ami B; Wilds, Brandon W; Deininger, Michael W

    2017-07-01

    With the discovery of imatinib mesylate nearly 20 years ago, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were found to be effective in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). TKI therapy has since revolutionized the treatment of CML and has served as a paradigm of success for targeted drug therapy in cancer. Several new TKIs for CML have been approved over the last two decades that exhibit improved potency over imatinib and have different off-target profiles, providing options for individualized therapy selection. Areas covered: Current management of chronic phase CML, including guidance on the sequential use of imatinib and newer-generation TKIs and evolving treatment strategies such as TKI discontinuation. Relevant literature was identified by searching biomedical databases (i.e. PubMed) for primary research material. Expert commentary: Although survival outcomes have drastically improved for CML patients, treatment for CML has grown more complex with the introduction of next-generation TKIs and the advent of treatment-free remissions (TFR). Goals of therapy have shifted accordingly, with increased focus on improving quality of life, managing patient expectations and optimizing patient adherence.

  3. Efficiency of use endobronchial laser doppler-flowmetry in patients with chronic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanina, E. A.; Voitsekhovskiy, V. V.; Landyshev, Y. S.; Tkacheva, S. I.

    2016-11-01

    In this work indicatorsendobronchial microcirculation were investigated in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), multiple myeloma (MM), polycythemia vera (PV), idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF). A diagnostic bronchoscopy was performed using fibreoptic «Olympus» (Japan).Endobronchial laser Doppler flowmetry was carried out on the laser analyzer capillary blood LAK-02 (Russia). Laser Doppler flowmetry indicators such as parameter of microcirculation, the oscillation amplitude in the endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic, cardiac and respiratory ranges were calculated by continuous the Wavelet transforms. Reduced cardiac and respiratory amplitudes in CML and CLL are primarily due to the development leukostasis. If PV is the case, this is due to sludge syndrome. And when MM occurs, it is caused by protein stasis in the vessels of the bronchial tubes. Increased endothelial oscillation amplitudes in the range in CML, PV, IMF and their reduction in MM indicate the presence of endothelial dysfunction in these patients. Increasing the amplitude of oscillations in the range of neurogenic indicates the development of arteriolar vasodilation as a compensatory response to the violation of blood flow. Increasing the amplitude of oscillations of myogenic tone indicating decrease precapillaries as a compensatory reaction to improve blood flow. It is concluded that endobronchial laser Doppler flowmetry is an important method allowing diagnosing the pathology of the microvasculature of the bronchi in chronic leukemia.

  4. Leukemia in patients following radiotherapy for malignant neoplasms in the pelvic region

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    Murohashi, Ikuo

    1985-01-01

    A prospective study of 1572 women treated with radiotherapy for cervical (1478 women) and ovarian cancer (95 women) was done. Patients had been followed clinically and especially by blood tests between 1961 and 1981, comprising 8990 women-years (WY). Following radiotherapy, 5 patients developed non-lymphocytic leukemia (2 acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), 1 acute monocytic leukemia (AMoL), and 2 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)). Based on rates for the general population, 0.45 case would be expected, and, therefore, the relative risk was 11.2. The average mean marrow dose for all our subjects was calculated to be 11.77 rad, the risk of radiation-induced leukemia was 0.43 excess case per year per one million women exposed to 1 rad of radiation to the bone marrow. Four patients with cervical cancer who developed leukemia were in a high-dose-rate group treated with both a linear accelerator (Linac) and remote afterloading system (RALS), and 1 patient with ovarian cancer who developed leukemia was treated with a Linac alone. This is the first report of a statistically significant increased risk of leukemia for patients treated with large doses of radiation for malignant neoplasms in the pelvic region. (author).

  5. Leukemia in patients following radiotherapy for malignant neoplasms in the pelvic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murohashi, Ikuo

    1985-01-01

    A prospective study of 1572 women treated with radiotherapy for cervical (1478 women) and ovarian cancer (95 women) was done. Patients had been followed clinically and especially by blood tests between 1961 and 1981, comprising 8990 women-years (WY). Following radiotherapy, 5 patients developed non-lymphocytic leukemia [2 acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), 1 acute monocytic leukemia (AMoL), and 2 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)]. Based on rates for the general population, 0.45 case would be expected, and, therefore, the relative risk was 11.2. The average mean marrow dose for all our subjects was calculated to be 11.77 rad, the risk of radiation-induced leukemia was 0.43 excess case per year per one million women exposed to 1 rad of radiation to the bone marrow. Four patients with cervical cancer who developed leukemia were in a high-dose-rate group treated with both a linear accelerator (Linac) and remote afterloading system (RALS), and 1 patient with ovarian cancer who developed leukemia was treated with a Linac alone. This is the first report of a statistically significant increased risk of leukemia for patients treated with large doses of radiation for malignant neoplasms in the pelvic region. (author)

  6. Outcome of allogeneic SCT in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyekunle, Anthony; Zander, Axel R; Binder, Mascha; Ayuk, Francis; Zabelina, Tatjana; Christopeit, Maximilian; Stübig, Thomas; Alchalby, Haefaa; Schafhausen, Philippe; Lellek, Heinrich; Wolschke, Christine; Müller, Ingo; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2013-04-01

    The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) led to a dramatic change in the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) with a rapid decline in the number of patients receiving SCT in first chronic phase (CP1). We evaluated 68 consecutive patients in all phases of CML (male/female = 39:29, 27 in CP1), who received SCT from related/unrelated donors (related/unrelated = 23:45) under myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning (MAC/RIC = 45:23). Forty-eight patients (71 %) received TKIs pre-SCT, 20 patients post-SCT (29 %). Overall survival (OS) of CP1 patients achieved a plateau of 85 % at 10 months. Relapse-free survival (RFS) of CP1 patients was 85 % at 1 and 2 years, and 81 % at 5 years. Multivariate analysis showed adverse OS and RFS for patients transplanted >CP1 (hazard ratio (HR) = 6.61 and 4.62) and those who had grade III-IV aGvHD (HR = 2.45 and 1.82). Patients with advanced CML had estimated OS of 65 and 47 %; and RFS of 41 and 32 % at 1 and 2 years respectively. Therefore, for patients with advanced CML phases, allogeneic SCT provides an acceptable chance of cure. Transplant research should focus on improving conditioning regimens and post-SCT management for this subgroup of CML patients.

  7. Determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and Bcr-Abl transcript in the follow-up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v32i2.6408 Determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and Bcr-Abl transcript in the follow-up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v32i2.6408

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Cezar Fujita

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a malignant myeloproliferative disorder that originates from a pluripotent stem cell characterized by abnormal release of the expanded, malignant stem cell clone from the bone marrow into the bloodstream. The vast majority of patients with CML present Bcr-Abl transcripts. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH is considered a biochemical marker common for tumor growth, anaerobic glycolysis and has been considered a poor prognostic factor for acute myeloid leukemia. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the concentration of LDH in plasma and the detection of the Bcr-Abl transcripts in patients with CML and healthy donors. We analyzed 22 patients demonstrably diagnosed with CML and 56 healthy donors. LDH concentration in plasma was higher in patients with CML. All patients with CML in this study were under treatment, but even so four patients had the Bcr-Abl (b3a2 transcript in peripheral blood. Two out of the four patients with b3a2 showed higher LDH (486 U L-1 and 589 U L-1. Thus, although the study was conducted with small numbers of samples, it is possible to suggest therapy alteration for two patients who presented transcript b3a2 in the peripheral blood samples and whose LDH concentration was high, in order to improve the disease.Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a malignant myeloproliferative disorder that originates from a pluripotent stem cell characterized by abnormal release of the expanded, malignant stem cell clone from the bone marrow into the bloodstream. The vast majority of patients with CML present Bcr-Abl transcripts. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH is considered a biochemical marker common for tumor growth, anaerobic glycolysis and has been considered a poor prognostic factor for acute myeloid leukemia. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the concentration of LDH in plasma and the detection of the Bcr-Abl transcripts in patients with CML and healthy donors. We analyzed 22 patients demonstrably diagnosed

  8. Hoxa9 and Hoxa10 induce CML myeloid blast crisis development through activation of Myb expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Vijay; Vishwakarma, Bandana A; Chu, Su; Oakley, Kevin; Han, Yufen; Bhatia, Ravi; Du, Yang

    2017-11-17

    Mechanisms underlying the progression of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) from chronic phase to myeloid blast crisis are poorly understood. Our previous studies have suggested that overexpression of SETBP1 can drive this progression by conferring unlimited self-renewal capability to granulocyte macrophage progenitors (GMPs). Here we show that overexpression of Hoxa9 or Hoxa10 , both transcriptional targets of Setbp1 , is also sufficient to induce self-renewal of primary myeloid progenitors, causing their immortalization in culture. More importantly, both are able to cooperate with BCR/ABL to consistently induce transformation of mouse GMPs and development of aggressive leukemias resembling CML myeloid blast crisis, suggesting that either gene can drive CML progression by promoting the self-renewal of GMPs. We further identify Myb as a common critical target for Hoxa9 and Hoxa10 in inducing self-renewal of myeloid progenitors as Myb knockdown significantly reduced colony-forming potential of myeloid progenitors immortalized by the expression of either gene. Interestingly, Myb is also capable of immortalizing primary myeloid progenitors in culture and cooperating with BCR/ABL to induce leukemic transformation of mouse GMPs. Significantly increased levels of MYB transcript also were detected in all human CML blast crisis samples examined over chronic phase samples, further suggesting the possibility that MYB overexpression may play a prevalent role in driving human CML myeloid blast crisis development. In summary, our results identify overexpression of HOXA9 , HOXA10 , and MYB as critical drivers of CML progression, and suggest MYB as a key therapeutic target for inhibiting the self-renewal of leukemia-initiating cells in CML myeloid blast crisis patients.

  9. Nilotinib: optimal therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and resistance or intolerance to imatinib

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    Ronan Swords

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ronan Swords, Devalingam Mahalingam, Swaminathan Padmanabhan, Jennifer Carew, Francis GilesInstitute for Drug Development, Cancer Therapy and Research Centre, University of Texas Health Science Centre at San Antonio, USAAbstract: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is the consequence of a single balanced translocation that produces the BCR-ABL fusion oncogene which is detectable in over 90% of patients at presentation. The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib mesylate (IM has improved survival in all phases of CML and is the standard of care for newly diagnosed patients in chronic phase. Despite the very significant therapeutic benefits of IM, a small minority of patients with early stage disease do not benefit optimally while IM therapy in patients with advanced disease is of modest benefit in many. Diverse mechanisms may be responsible for IM failures, with point mutations within the Bcr-Abl kinase domain being amongst the most common resistance mechanisms described in patients with advanced CML. The development of novel agents designed to overcome IM resistance, while still primarily targeted on BCR-ABL, led to the creation of the high affinity aminopyrimidine inhibitor, nilotinib. Nilotinib is much more potent as a BCR-ABL inhibitor than IM and inhibits both wild type and IM-resistant BCR-ABL with significant clinical activity across the entire spectrum of BCR-ABL mutants with the exception of T315I. The selection of a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor to rescue patients with imatinib failure will be based on several factors including age, co-morbid medical problems and ABL kinase mutational profile. It should be noted that while the use of targeted BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors in CML represents a paradigm shift in CML management these agents are not likely to have activity against the quiescent CML stem cell pool. The purpose of this review is to summarize the pre-clinical and clinical data on nilotinib in patients with CML who have failed prior

  10. Sequential Use of Second-Generation Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Treatment and Intensive Chemotherapy Induced Long-Term Complete Molecular Response in Imatinib-Resistant CML Patient Presenting as a Myeloid Blast Crisis

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    Masaaki Tsuji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML-MBC is rarely seen at presentation and has a poor prognosis. There is no standard therapy for CML-MBC. It is often difficult to distinguish CML-MBC from acute myeloid leukemia expressing the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+ AML. We present a case in which CML-MBC was seen at the initial presentation in a 75-year-old male. He was treated with conventional AML-directed chemotherapy followed by imatinib mesylate monotherapy, which failed to induce response. However, he achieved long-term complete molecular response after combination therapy involving dasatinib, a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and conventional chemotherapy.

  11. p53 Gene (NY-CO-13 Levels in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: The Role of Imatinib and Nilotinib

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    Hayder M. Al-kuraishy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The p53 gene is also known as tumor suppressor p53. The main functions of the p53 gene are an anticancer effect and cellular genomic stability via various pathways including activation of DNA repair, induction of apoptosis, and arresting of cell growth at the G1/S phase. Normally, the p53 gene is inactivated by mouse double minute 2 proteins (mdm2, but it is activated in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are effective chemotherapeutic agents in the management of CML. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the differential effect of imatinib and nilotinib on p53 gene serum levels in patients with CML. A total number of 60 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia with ages ranging from 47 to 59 years were recruited from the Iraqi Hematology Center. They started with tyrosine kinase inhibitors as first-line chemotherapy. They were divided into two groups—Group A, 29 patients treated with imatinib and Group B, 31 patients treated with nilotinib—and compared with 28 healthy subjects for evaluation p53 serum levels regarding the selective effect of either imatinib or nilotinib. There were significantly (p < 0.01 high p53 gene serum levels in patients with CML (2.135 ± 1.44 ng/mL compared to the control (0.142 ± 0.11 ng/mL. Patients with CML that were treated with either imatinib or nilotinib showed insignificant differences in most of the hematological profile (p > 0.05 whereas, p53 serum levels were high (3.22 ± 1.99 ng/mL in nilotinib-treated patients and relatively low (1.18 ± 0.19 ng/mL in imatinib-treated patients (p = 0.0001. Conclusions: Nilotinib is more effective than imatinib in raising p53 serum levels in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

  12. Chronic myeloid leukemia patients sensitive and resistant to imatinib treatment show different metabolic responses.

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    Jiye A

    Full Text Available The BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib is highly effective for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. However, some patients gradually develop resistance to imatinib, resulting in therapeutic failure. Metabonomic and genomic profiling of patients' responses to drug interventions can provide novel information about the in vivo metabolism of low-molecular-weight compounds and extend our insight into the mechanism of drug resistance. Based on a multi-platform of high-throughput metabonomics, SNP array analysis, karyotype and mutation, the metabolic phenotypes and genomic polymorphisms of CML patients and their diverse responses to imatinib were characterized. The untreated CML patients (UCML showed different metabolic patterns from those of healthy controls, and the discriminatory metabolites suggested the perturbed metabolism of the urea cycle, tricarboxylic acid cycle, lipid metabolism, and amino acid turnover in UCML. After imatinib treatment, patients sensitive to imatinib (SCML and patients resistant to imatinib (RCML had similar metabolic phenotypes to those of healthy controls and UCML, respectively. SCML showed a significant metabolic response to imatinib, with marked restoration of the perturbed metabolism. Most of the metabolites characterizing CML were adjusted to normal levels, including the intermediates of the urea cycle and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA. In contrast, neither cytogenetic nor metabonomic analysis indicated any positive response to imatinib in RCML. We report for the first time the associated genetic and metabonomic responses of CML patients to imatinib and show that the perturbed in vivo metabolism of UCML is independent of imatinib treatment in resistant patients. Thus, metabonomics can potentially characterize patients' sensitivity or resistance to drug intervention.

  13. The -137G/C Polymorphism in Interleukin-18 Gene Promoter Contributes to Chronic Lymphocytic and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Risk in Turkish Patients

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    Serap Yalçın

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Interleukin-18 (IL-18 is a cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 superfamily and is secreted by various immune and nonimmune cells. Evidence has shown that IL-18 has both anticancer and procancer effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between IL-18 gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL and chronic myelogenous leukemias (CML in Turkish patients. Materials and Methods: The frequencies of polymorphisms (rs61667799(G/T, rs5744227(C/G, rs5744228(A/G, and rs187238(G/C were studied in 20 CLL patients, 30 CML patients, and 30 healthy individuals. The genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing analysis. Results: Significant associations were detected between the IL-18 rs187238(G/C polymorphism and chronic leukemia. A higher prevalence of the C allele was found in CML cases with respect to controls. The GC heterozygous and CC homozygous genotypes were associated with risk of CML when compared with controls. However, prevalence of the C allele was not significantly high in CLL cases with respect to controls. There was only a significant difference between the homozygous CC genotype of CLL patients and the control group; thus, it can be concluded that the CC genotype may be associated with the risk of CLL. Based on our data, there were no significant associations between the IL-18 rs61667799(G/T, rs5744227(C/G, or rs5744228(A/G polymorphisms and CLL or CML. Conclusions: IL-18 gene promoter rs187238(G/C polymorphism is associated with chronic leukemia in the Turkish population. However, due to the limited number of studied patients, these are preliminary results that show the association between -137G/C polymorphism and patients (CLL and CML. Further large-scale studies combined with haplotype and expression analysis are required to validate the current findings.

  14. [Cardiovascular management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia from a multidisciplinary perspective, and proposing action protocol by consensus meeting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gutiérrez, Valentín; Jiménez-Velasco, Antonio; Gómez-Casares, M Teresa; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; López-Sendón, Jose Luis; Steegmann Olmedillas, Juan Luis

    2016-06-17

    The second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, dasatinib and nilotinib) used in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment have shown a benefit compared to imatinib in responses achieved and disease progression. However, both have been related to some cardiovascular toxicity, being more frequent in patients with cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs). Nowadays, due to the lack of recommendations for CML patients, CVRF management is carried out heterogeneously. The aim of this work is to develop recommendations on the prevention and monitoring of cardiovascular events (CVD) in patients with CML treated with TKIs. Experts from the Spanish Group of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia together with experts in cardiovascular risk have elaborated, after a consensus meeting, recommendations for the prevention and follow-up of CVE in patients with CML treated with TKI. Recommendations regarding the necessary information to be collected on clinical history, treatment decisions, as well as treatment and monitoring of CVRFs are shown in this document. TKI treatment requires comprehensive patient management from a multidisciplinary approach, in which both the prevention and management of CVRFs are essential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Translocation of BCR to chromosome 9: A new cytogenetic variant detected by FISH in two Ph-negative, BCR-positive patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hagemeijer (Anne); A. Buijs (Arjan); E.M.E. Smit (Elisabeth); L.A.J. Janssen (Bart); G.J.M. Creemers (Geert-Jan); D. van der Plas (D.); G.C. Grosveld (Gerard)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractLeukemic cells from two patients with Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) were investigated: I) Cytogenetics showed a normal 46.XY karyotype in both cases, 2) molecular studies revealed rearrangement of the M-BCR region and formation of BCR-ABL fusion mRNA with b2a2

  16. [The molecular-cytogenetic characterization and tyrosine kinase inhibitors efficacy in newly diagnosed chronic phase CML patients with variant Philadelphia chromosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J J; Zhang, Y L; Zhang, S J; Zhou, J; Yu, F K; Zu, Y L; Zhao, H F; Li, Z; Song, Y P

    2018-03-14

    Objective: To investigate the molecular-cytogenetic characterization and impact on tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) therapy in chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML-CP) patients with variant Ph chromosome (vPh). Methods: The clinical data of 32 patients with vPh chromosomes were collected and compared with 703 patients with typical Ph chromosome in newly diagnosed CML-CP who were on first-line imatinib (IM) and with BCR-ABL transcript of P210. Results: There was no significant difference in demographic and hematological characteristics between vPh and classic Ph patients. 3(9.4%) of the 32 vPh cases were simple variant translocations. Among the remaining 29 cases with complex variant translocations, 28 cases (87.5%) involved 3 chromosomes, and only 1 (3.1%) involved 4 chromosomes. Except for 8, 15, 18, X, and Y chromosomes, the other chromosomes were involved. The frequency of chromosome 12q(15.5%) and 1p (12.1%) were higher involved. The most common FISH signal pattern was 2G2R1Y (74.1%), followed by 1G1R2F (14.8%), 2G1R1Y (3.7%), 1G2R1Y (3.7%), 1G1R1Y (3.7%). The comparison of complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) ( P =0.269), major molecular response (MMR) ( P =0.391) were carried out between simple and complex mechanisms, without difference. Compared with the classic Ph, the patients with vPh had higher IM primary resistance rate ( χ 2 =3.978, P =0.046), especially primary hematological resistance ( χ 2 =7.870, P =0.005), but the difference of CCyR ( χ 2 =0.192, P =0.661), MMR ( χ 2 =0.822, P =0.365), EFS ( χ 2 =0.509, P =0.476), OS ( χ 2 =3.485, P =0.062) were not statistically significant, and multivariate analysis showed that the presence of vPh did not affect OS ( RR =0.692, 95% CI 0.393-1.765, P =0.658)、EFS ( RR =0.893, 95% CI 0.347-2.132, P =0.126) and PFS ( RR =1.176, 95% CI 0.643-2.682, P =0.703). Conclusion: CML-CP patients with vPh and classic Ph had similar demographic and hematological characteristics. Except for 22q11, 9q34, the

  17. The genetic polymorphism and expression profiles of NLRP3 inflammasome in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Amin; Yu, Jie; Yan, Shuxin; Zhao, Xia; Chen, Chen; Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Xueyun; Hua, Mingqiang; Wang, Ruiqing; Zhang, Chen; Zhong, Chaoqin; He, Na; Ji, Chunyan; Ma, Daoxin

    2018-01-01

    NLRP3 inflammasome has been recently reported as an important risk factor in the development of cancer. But the relationship between polymorphisms of NLRP3 inflammasome related genes and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is rarely reported. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association of five genetic polymorphisms (NLRP3, IL-1β, IL-18, CARD8 and NF-κB) in 267 CML patients and 344 healthy controls. We found that the AT genotype of CARD8 (rs2043211) was significantly higher compared to TT genotype in high and intermediate risk CML patients. IL-1β (rs16944) polymorphism in early molecular response at 6 months was marginally different, with more GG and less AA genotype in BCR-ABL IS >1% group. IL-18 (rs1946518) polymorphism was significantly different with more GG genotype in BCR-ABL IS >1% group at 6 months. We also demonstrated that WBC count of newly diagnosed patients carrying AG genotype was significantly higher than that of GG or AA genotype of IL-1β (rs16944). The onset age of patients carrying ins/ins genotype of NF-κB (rs28362491) was significantly older than that of ins/del and del/del genotype. Moreover, IL-1β or NLRP3 mRNA expression was decreased and IL-18 mRNA expression was increased significantly in CML patients compared with controls. In conclusion, the genetic polymorphisms of NLRP3 inflammasome may be served as potential predictors for CML. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dasatinib Induced Avascular Necrosis of Femoral Head in Adult Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Yassin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph chromosome resulting from the reciprocal translocation t(9;22(q34;q11. The molecular consequence of this translocation is the generation of the BCR-ABL fusion gene, which encodes a constitutively active protein tyrosine kinase. The oncogenic protein tyrosine kinase, which is located in the cytoplasm, is responsible for the leukemia phenotype through the constitutive activation of multiple signaling pathways involved in the cell cycle and in adhesion and apoptosis. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH is not a specific disease. It occurs as a complication or secondary to various causes. These conditions probably lead to impaired blood supply to the femoral head. The diagnosis of AVNFH is based on clinical findings and is supported by specific radiological manifestations. We reported a case of a 34-year-old Sudanese female with CML who developed AVNFH after receiving dasatinib as a second-line therapy. Though the mechanism by which dasatinib can cause avascular necrosis (AVN is not clear, it can be postulated because of microcirculatory obstruction of the femoral head. To the best of our knowledge and after extensive literature search, this is the first reported case of AVNFH induced by dasatinib in a patient with CML.

  19. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia Overview Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is an uncommon type of cancer of the blood cells. The term "chronic" in chronic myelogenous leukemia indicates that this cancer ...

  20. Nilotinib-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vihang Patel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nilotinib, a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is used for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML; it has been widely used especially for imatinib-resistant CML. Despite being a novel drug in this therapeutic class, it has the potential to be harmful. We present the case of an elderly woman who developed life-threatening acute pancreatitis as an adverse event after having started the drug. There is only one reported case in the literature of nilotinib-induced acute pancreatitis. The purpose of this case report is to educate physicians who prescribe this medication to be aware of potential life-threatening adverse events. As more and more therapies are available, physicians should be aware of potential effects of cancer treatment that could be life-threatening to patients.

  1. Variants forms of Philadelphia translocation in two patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valent, A.; Zamecnikova, A.; Krizan, P.; Karlic, H.; Nowotny, H.

    1996-01-01

    During a 4-year period (December 1990-December 1994), among other diagnoses hundred cases of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) were analyzed in our departments. We focused our attention on two cases with a variant form of Philadelphia translocation. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic studies were performed to resolve the status of BCR and ABL in the bone marrow or peripheral blood cells of the two CML patients with complex translocations involving chromosomes, 3, 9, 22 and 9, 12, 22 respectively. In the first case the presence of Ph chromosome was detected cytogenetically, BCR-ABL translocation was detected by Southern hybridization. In the second phase, only the PCR method showed BCR-ABL rearrangement. The second case, with a random variant form of Ph translocation, could be detected using different methods of clinical molecular genetics. (author)

  2. Pleural effusion as the initial manifestation of chronic myeloid leukemia: Report of a case with clinical and cytologic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paras Nuwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusion in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is very rare and poorly understood. We report here a 26-year-old male patient having CML and presenting with pleural effusion as the first clinical sign. The possible mechanism of pleural effusion in CML, the cytological interpretive problem and the clinical significance of finding immature leucocytes in pleural fluid are also briefly discussed.

  3. Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are increased and exert immunosuppressive activity together with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesarina Giallongo

    Full Text Available Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell population, including myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, able to inhibit T cells activity. We identified a significantly expanded MDSCs population in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients at diagnosis that decreased to normal levels after imatinib therapy. In addition, expression of arginase 1 (Arg1 that depletes microenvironment of arginine, an essential aminoacid for T cell function, resulted in an increase in patients at diagnosis. Purified CML CD11b+CD33+CD14-HLADR- cells markedly suppressed normal donor T cell proliferation in vitro. Comparing CML Gr-MDSCs to autologous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs we observed a higher Arg1 expression and activity in PMNs, together with an inhibitory effect on T cells in vitro. Our data indicate that CML cells create an immuno-tolerant environment associated to MDSCs expansion with immunosuppressive capacity mediated by Arg1. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time also an immunosuppressive activity of CML PMNs, suggesting a strong potential immune escape mechanism created by CML cells, which control the anti-tumor reactive T cells. MDSCs should be monitored in imatinib discontinuation trials to understand their importance in relapsing patients.

  4. Do endothelial cells belong to the primitive stem leukemic clone in CML? Role of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Teresa L; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; López-Ruano, Guillermo; Muntión, Sandra; Preciado, Silvia; Hernández-Ruano, Montserrat; Rosado, Belén; de las Heras, Natalia; Chillón, M Carmen; Hernández-Hernández, Ángel; González, Marcos; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Del Cañizo, Consuelo

    2015-08-01

    The expression of BCR-ABL in hematopoietic stem cells is a well-defined primary event in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Some reports have described the presence of BCR-ABL on endothelial cells from CML patients, suggesting the origin of the disease in a primitive hemangioblastic cell. On the other hand, extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by CML leukemic cells are involved in the angiogenesis modulation process. In the current work we hypothesized that EVs released from BCR-ABL(+) cells may carry inside the oncogene that can be transferred to endothelial cells leading to the expression of both BCR-ABL transcript and the oncoprotein. EVs from K562 cells and plasma of newly diagnosed CML patients were isolated by ultracentrifugation. RT-PCR analysis detected the presence of BCR-ABL RNA in the EVs isolated from both K562 cells and plasma of CML patients. The incorporation of these EVs into endothelial cells was demonstrated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that after 24h of incubation most EVs were incorporated. BCR-ABL transcripts were detected in all experiments on endothelial cells incubated with EVs from both sources. The presence of BCR-ABL on endothelial cells incubated with Philadelphia(+) EVs was also confirmed by Western blot assays. In summary, endothelial cells acquire BCR-ABL RNA and the oncoprotein after incubation with EVs released from Ph(+) positive cells (either from K562 cells or from plasma of newly diagnosed CML patients). This results challenge the hypothesis that endothelial cells may be part of the Philadelphia(+) clone in CML. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heterogeneity of BCR-ABL rearrangement in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Najia; Saboor, Mohammad; Ghani, Rubina; Moinuddin, Moinuddin

    2014-07-01

    Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson (BCR-ABL) rearrangement or Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is derived from a reciprocal chromosomal translocation between ABL gene on chromosome 9 and BCR gene on chromosome 22. This chimeric protein has various sizes and therefore different clinical behaviour. The purpose of this study was to determine the heterogeneity of BCR-ABL rearrangement in patients with Ph(+)CML in Pakistan. The study was conducted at Civil Hospital and Baqai Institute of Hematology (BIH) Karachi. Blood samples from 25 patients with CML were collected. Multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to identify various BCR-ABL transcripts. All 25 samples showed BCR-ABL rearrangements. Out of these, 24 (96%) patients expressed p210 BCR-ABL rearrangements i.e. 60% (n=15) had b3a2 and 32% (n=8) had b2a2 rearrangements. Co-expression of b3a2 /b2a2 rearrangement and p190 (e1a3) rearrangement was also identified in two patients. It is apparent that majority of the patients had p210 BCR-ABL rearrangements. Frequency of co-expression and rare fusion transcripts was very low.

  6. Chromosome abnormalities in the acute phase of CML

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J D

    1978-01-01

    Additional chromosome changes are superimposed on the Ph/sup 1/ positive cell line in approximately 80% of patients in the acute phase of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). These changes may precede the onset of blast crisis by several months. They are nonrandom and frequently involve an extra No. 8, an isochromosome for the long arm of No. 17, an extra No. 19, and a second Ph/sup 1/ chromosome. Since such changes may occur in combination, modal numbers frequently range between 47 and 57 chromosomes. Although present evidence suggests that abnormal clones originate, or at least proliferate, in the spleen, similar changes have been observed in patients who underwent splenectomy during the chronic phase of their disease. The question of particular clinical-chromosomal correlations has been discussed in only one study. It appeared that patients whose karyotype did not change might have a longer median survival than those whose karyotype showed additional abnormalities. Tests for levels of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TDT) and response to anti-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) serum suggest that some, but not all patients react as do patients with ALL. Those who are similar to ALL have high levels of TDT and are anti-ALL serum-positive; the others have low levels of TDT and are anti-ALL serum-negative. In the future, correlations of these more sophisticated tests with the blast morphology, clinical course, and karyotype pattern should provide significant new insights into the acute phase of CML.

  7. Treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia with interleukin-2: a phase II study in 21 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vey, N; Blaise, D; Lafage, M; Olive, D; Viens, P; Baume, D; Camerlo, J; Stoppa, A M; Gabus, R; Brandely, M; Hercend, T; Maraninchi, D

    1999-03-01

    We designed a phase II study to assess the activity of recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Study population included 11 patients in the chronic phase of CML (6 in hematologic remission and 5 with active disease), 6 patients in the accelerated phase, and 4 in blastic phase of CML. Patients received three 5-day cycles administrated every other week. rIL-2 was given as intravenous bolus infusions of 8 x 10(6) IU/m2 three times a day during cycle 1 and twice a day during cycles 2 and 3. Response to rIL-2 was assessed on day 45. No hematologic response was achieved in the patients with evaluable disease. One patient in hematologic remission with rIL-2 achieved a major response (from 72% to 9% Ph+ metaphases), and two patients had some degree of reduction of Ph+ metaphases. Responses were short-lived (< 6 months), but two of these three patients achieved a new cytogenetic response with interferon given post-rIL-2. A significant immune activation was achieved with rIL-2 including a marked increase in CD3+/CD25+ cells, CD56+ cells, and in natural killer/lymphokine activated killer cell cytotoxic activity. These results confirm preclinical studies, which showed that IL-2 has antileukemic activity in CML. However, the responses observed were short lived and restricted to a subgroup of patients with low disease burden. This invites further studies testing its impact in situations of minimal disease or in combination with other cytokines.

  8. Prostaglandin E1 and Its Analog Misoprostol Inhibit Human CML Stem Cell Self-Renewal via EP4 Receptor Activation and Repression of AP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengyin; He, Bing; Ma, Xiaoke; Yu, Shuyang; Bhave, Rupali R; Lentz, Steven R; Tan, Kai; Guzman, Monica L; Zhao, Chen; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2017-09-07

    Effective treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) largely depends on the eradication of CML leukemic stem cells (LSCs). We recently showed that CML LSCs depend on Tcf1 and Lef1 factors for self-renewal. Using a connectivity map, we identified prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) as a small molecule that partly elicited the gene expression changes in LSCs caused by Tcf1/Lef1 deficiency. Although it has little impact on normal hematopoiesis, we found that PGE1 treatment impaired the persistence and activity of LSCs in a pre-clinical murine CML model and a xenograft model of transplanted CML patient CD34 + stem/progenitor cells. Mechanistically, PGE1 acted on the EP4 receptor and repressed Fosb and Fos AP-1 factors in a β-catenin-independent manner. Misoprostol, an FDA-approved EP4 agonist, conferred similar protection against CML. These findings suggest that activation of this PGE1-EP4 pathway specifically targets CML LSCs and that the combination of PGE1/misoprostol with conventional tyrosine-kinase inhibitors could provide effective therapy for CML. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Premature chromosome condensation studies in human leukemia. I. Pretreatment characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hittelman, W N; Broussard, L C; McCredie, K

    1979-11-01

    The phenomenon of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) was used to compare the bone marrow proliferation characteristics of 163 patients with various forms of leukemia prior to the initiation of new therapy. The proliferative potential index (PPI, or fraction of G1 cells in late G1 phase) and the fraction of cells in S phase was determined and compared to the type of disease and the bone marrow blast infiltrate for each patient. Previously untreated patients with acute leukemia exhibited an average PPI value three times that of normal bone marrow (37.5% for acute myeloblastic leukemia [AML], acute monomyeloblastic leukemia [AMML], or acute promyelocytic leukemia [APML] and 42% for acute lymphocytic leukemia [ALL] or acute undifferentiated leukemia [AUL]). Untreated chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients showed intermediate PPI values (25.2%), whereas CML patients with controlled disease exhibited nearly normal PPI values (14.6%). On the other hand, blastic-phase CML patients exhibited PPI values closer to that observed in patients with acute leukemia (35.4%). Seven patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) exhibited even higher PPI values. No correlations were observed between PPI values, fraction of cells in S phase, and marrow blast infiltrate. For untreated acute disease patients, PPI values were prognostic for response only at low and high PPI values. These results suggest that the PCC-determined proliferative potential is a biologic reflection of the degree of malignancy within the bone marrow.

  10. Investigation of selected trace elements in Sudanese patients with leukemia using NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elradi, M. M. M.

    2010-10-01

    In the present study, the concentrations of Co, Cr, Fe, Hg, Rb, Se, Zn in the serum of 103 adult patients with newly diagnosed of leukemia (before treatment) were studied. Samples were collected from Radiation of Isotopes Center-Khartoum (RICK) and Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Biology-Aljazeera State. Samples were freeze-dried and analyzed using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Serum levels of these elements were compared with the contents found in healthy group samples. The patients were divided into 4 groups: 1- Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL), 2- Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), 3- Chronic Lymphoid Leukemia (CLL), 4- Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML). The control group was formed of 40 healthy subjects, data analysis was performed using the T-tests. partial correlation was used to study a relationship between two variables. It was found that, In group I (ALL ): higher concentration of Cr, Fe, Hg, Rb, Zn, were found in the serum of patients with significant difference as compared to healthy group (p 0.05), the level of selenium was statistically lower than in the control group (p 0.05). Similar result was obtained in Co. The level of selenium was statistically lower than in the control group (p< 0.05). (Author)

  11. Randomized study on hydroxyurea alone versus hydroxyurea combined with low-dose interferon-alpha 2b for chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluin-Nelemans, JC; Delannoy, A; Louwagie, A; Le Cessie, S; Hermans, J; van der Burgh, JF; Hagemeijer, AM; Van den Berghe, H

    1998-01-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) is considered the standard therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients not suitable for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. From 1987 through 1992, 195 patients in the Benelux with recent untreated CML were randomized between low-dose IFN-alpha 2b (3 MIU, 5

  12. Dasatinib or imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia : 2-year follow-up from a randomized phase 3 trial (DASISION)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Shah, Neil P.; Cortes, Jorge E.; Baccarani, Michele; Agarwal, Mohan B.; Soledad Undurraga, Maria; Wang, Jianxiang; Kassack Ipina, Juan Julio; Kim, Dong-Wook; Ogura, Michinori; Pavlovsky, Carolina; Junghanss, Christian; Milone, Jorge H.; Nicolini, Franck E.; Robak, Tadeusz; Van Droogenbroeck, Jan; Vellenga, Edo; Bradley-Garelik, M. Brigid; Zhu, Chao; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Dasatinib is a highly potent BCR-ABL inhibitor with established efficacy and safety in imatinib-resistant/-intolerant patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In the phase 3 DASISION trial, patients with newly diagnosed chronic-phase (CP) CML were randomized to receive dasatinib 100 mg (n =

  13. A propensity score matching analysis of dasatinib and nilotinib as a frontline therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Koichi; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Yang, Yulong; Sasaki, Koji; Jain, Preetesh; DellaSala, Sara; Ravandi, Farhad; Kadia, Tapan; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Daver, Naval; Borthakur, Gautam; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Jabbour, Elias; Cortes, Jorge E

    2016-11-15

    Both dasatinib and nilotinib are approved frontline therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) based on randomized trials compared with imatinib. However, no head-to-head comparison of dasatinib and nilotinib has been conducted in patients with newly diagnosed CML-CP. The authors conducted a propensity score (PS) matched comparison of patients with CML-CP who received frontline therapy with either dasatinib (N = 102) or nilotinib (N = 104) under the respective phase 2 trials conducted in parallel. PS matching resulted in 87 patients from each trial being matched for pretreatment characteristics. The 3-month BCR-ABL1/ABL1 ratio treatment cohorts. The 3-year probability of event-free survival was 89% among the patients who received dasatinib and 87% among those who received nilotinib (P = .99), and the corresponding 3-year overall survival probabilities were 99% and 93%, respectively (P = .95). No statistical difference was observed between the dasatinib and nilotinib groups in any of the other survival endpoints. The treatment discontinuation rate also was similar between the 2 cohorts (dasatinib group, 18%; nilotinib group, 19%; P = .82). In a PS-matched cohort of patients with newly diagnosed CML-CP, dasatinib and nilotinib offer similar response and survival outcomes. Both drugs can be considered reasonable standard-of-care options as first-line therapy for patients with CML-CP. Cancer 2016;122:3336-3343. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  14. Characterization of the CDR3 structure of the Vβ21 T cell clone in patients with P210(BCR-ABL)-positive chronic myeloid leukemia and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Xianfeng; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Li, Bo; Chen, Yu; Yan, Xiaojuan; Li, Yangqiu

    2011-10-01

    The clonally expanded T cells identified in most cancer patients that respond to tumor-associated antigen such as P210(BCR-ABL) protein have definite, specific antitumor cytotoxicity. T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ CDR3 repertoire diversity was analyzed in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and BCR-ABL(+) B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) by GeneScan. A high frequency of oligoclonal expansion of the TCR Vβ21 subfamily was observed in the peripheral blood of CML and B-ALL patients. These clonally expanded Vβ21 T cells were correlated with the pathophysiologic process of CML. A conserved amino acid motif (SLxxV) was observed within the CDR3 region in only 3 patients with CML. Preferential usage of the Jβ segments was also observed in a minority of patients. The 3-dimensional structures of the CDR3 region containing the same motif or using the same Jβ segment displayed low similarity; on the contrary, the conformation of the CDR3 region containing no conserved motif in some T cell clones was highly similar. In conclusion, our findings indicate a high frequency of TCR Vβ21 subfamily expansion in p210(BCR-ABL)-positive CML and B-ALL patients. The characterization of the CDR3 structure was complex. Regrettably, at this time it was not possible to confirm that the Vβ21 T cell clones were derived from the stimulation of p210(BCR-ABL) protein. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Frequency of JAK2 V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia positive Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Najia; Saboor, Mohammed; Ghani, Rubina; Moinuddin, Moinuddin

    2014-01-01

    Co-existence of myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) and Janus associated kinase 2 mutation (JAK2 V617F) is a well-established fact. Only few case reports are available showing presence of JAK2 V617F mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of JAK2 V617F mutation in Philadelphia Chromosome positive (Ph (+)) CML patients in Pakistan. The study was conducted from August 2009 to July 2010 at Civil Hospital and Baqai Institute of Hematology (BIH) Karachi. Blood samples from 25 patients with CML were collected. Multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed for Breakpoint Cluster Region - Abelson (BCR-ABL) rearrangement. Conventional PCR was performed for JAK2 V617F mutation on BCR-ABL positive samples. All 25 samples showed BCR-ABL rearrangement. Out of these 11 samples (44%) had JAK2 V617F mutation; the remaining 14 (56%) cases showed JAK2 617V wild type. It is concluded that the co-existence of Ph (+)CML and JAK2 V617F mutation is possible.

  16. Planned Pregnancy in a Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patient in Molecular Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovsky, Carolina; Giere, Isabel; Van Thillo, Germán

    2012-01-01

    Excellent response rates and a good quality of life have been observed since the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment. Consequently, some challenges began to appear in CML women in child-bearing age wishing to become pregnant. Currently, many women around the world are in stable major/complete molecular response MMR/CMR (MMR: <0.1% BCR-ABL/ABL and CMR: undetectable BCR-ABL mRNA by RQ-PCR transcript levels on the international scale). The condition of stable MMR/CMR is linked to a long-term virtual absence of progression to the accelerated and blastic phase and to the possibility of stopping the TKI treatment with the maintenance of a condition of CMR in a proportion of cases. Imatinib teratogenic and prescribing information prohibits the use of it during pregnancy. We describe the case of a 36-year-old female patient with CML in chronic phase who stopped imatinib after 2 years in major molecular response (MMR) to plan a pregnancy. Molecular monitoring by RQ-PCR was performed quarterly. She achieved a safe pregnancy and delivery maintaining an optimal molecular response throughout the pregnancy. Isolated literature reports have been described, but no formal advice has been described at present time. PMID:22928126

  17. Chronic myelogenous leukemia: molecular monitoring in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Ryabchikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib has led to significant progress in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML treatment. To date, genetic monitoring is a mandatory attribute of therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The purpose of this study was to access the imatinib therapy efficacy in CML patients using complete molecular genetic monitoring by standard cytogenetics, realtime polymerase chain reaction and mutational analysis. Correlation between cytogenetic and molecular response was shown. Heterogeneity of molecular response in each patient group was revealed by expression of BCR-ABL. Kinase domain mutations were detected in 32 % of CML patients resistant to imatinib.

  18. Chronic myeloid leukemia patients in Tunisia: epidemiology and outcome in the imatinib era (a multicentric experience).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Lakhal, Raihane; Ghedira, Hela; Bellaaj, Hatem; Ben Youssef, Yosra; Menif, Samia; Manai, Zeineb; Bedoui, Manel; Lakhal, Amel; M'Sadek, Fehmi; Elloumi, Moez; Khélif, Abderrahmane; Ben Romdhane, Neila; Laatiri, Mohamed Adnène; Ben Othmen, Tarek; Meddeb, Balkis

    2018-04-01

    Data are limited in developing countries regarding the clinicopathologic features and response to therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the era of imatinib (IM). The objective of this study is to report on the clinicoepidemiologic features of CML in Tunisia, to evaluate the long-term outcome of patients in chronic (CP) or accelerated phase (AP) treated with IM 400 mg daily as frontline therapy, and to determine imatinib's efficacy and safety. From October 2002 to December 2014, 410 CML patients were treated with IM in six Tunisian departments of hematology. Response (hematologic, cytogenetic, and molecular responses) and outcome-overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and progression-free survival (PFS)-were evaluated. The following prognostic factors were analyzed for their impact on the European leukemia net (ELN) response, OS, EFS, and PFS at 5 years: age, sex, leukocyte count, Sokal score, European Treatment and Outcome Study (EUTOS) score, CML phase, time to starting IM, and impact of adverse events. The median age was 45 years (3-85 years). Two hundred ten (51.2%) patients were male. Splenomegaly was present in 322 of the 410 (79%). Additional cytogenetic abnormalities were encountered in 25 (6.3%) patients. At diagnosis, 379 (92.4%) patients were in CP, 31 (7.6%) were in AP. The Sokal risk was low in 87 (22.5%), intermediate in 138 (35.7%), and high in 164 patients (41.9%). The EUTOS risk was low in 217 (74%), and high in 77 (26%) patients. The rates of cumulative complete cytogenetic response (CCyR), major molecular response (MMR), and molecular response 4/5 log (MR4.5) in CP/AP-CML patients were 72, 68.4, and 46.4%, respectively. The median time to reach CCyR, MMR, and MR4.5 was 6 months (3-51), 18 months (3-72), and 24 months (3-100), respectively. According to the ELN criteria, optimal, suboptimal response, and failure were noted in 206 (51.8%), 61 (15.3%), and 125 (31.4%) patients, respectively. Five-year event-free survival (EFS

  19. Long-term safety and efficacy of dasatinib in the treatment of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant or intolerant to imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoumariyeh K

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Khalid Shoumariyeh, Nikolas von BubnoffDepartment of Hematology, Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany Abstract: Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML has undergone dramatic changes in the last decade. Dissecting the molecular pathways that lead to the development of this disease resulted in the development of targeted therapy against the molecular driver of CML, namely the aberrantly activated tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL1. By introducing the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib to the treatment repertoire, the natural course of the disease has been dramatically altered and overall survival of patients with CML prolonged substantially. Nevertheless, a significant number of patients are primarily resistant, acquire resistance during the course of their disease, or do not tolerate the intake of imatinib due to adverse effects. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors were developed in an attempt to overcome these problems. Dasatinib is a potent oral kinase inhibitor that was originally developed as an Src-kinase inhibitor but exhibited promising potency against BCR-ABL1 as well. Phase I and II trials demonstrated efficacy in patients failing imatinib, and thus dasatanib was approved in 2006 for the treatment of imatinib-resistant or -intolerant patients with chronic-phase CML harboring the BCR-ABL1 fusion protein. It has since shown promising efficacy and good overall tolerability in subsequent clinical trials, including the Phase III first-line DASISION trial that led to the extension of its approval for first-line treatment of chronic-phase CML. The following review summarizes the available data on the long-term efficacy and safety of dasatinib as a second-line therapy in chronic-phase CML. Keywords: BCR-ABL1, TKI, CML-CP, second-line treatment

  20. PTCH1 is a reliable marker for predicting imatinib response in chronic myeloid leukemia patients in chronic phase.

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    Juan M Alonso-Dominguez

    Full Text Available Patched homolog 1 gene (PTCH1 expression and the ratio of PTCH1 to Smoothened (SMO expression have been proposed as prognostic markers of the response of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients to imatinib. We compared these measurements in a realistic cohort of 101 patients with CML in chronic phase (CP using a simplified qPCR method, and confirmed the prognostic power of each in a competing risk analysis. Gene expression levels were measured in peripheral blood samples at diagnosis. The PTCH1/SMO ratio did not improve PTCH1 prognostic power (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.71 vs. 0.72. In order to reduce the number of genes to be analyzed, PTCH1 was the selected measurement. High and low PTCH1 expression groups had significantly different cumulative incidences of imatinib failure (IF, which was defined as discontinuation of imatinib due to lack of efficacy (5% vs. 25% at 4 years, P = 0.013, probabilities of achieving a major molecular response (81% vs. 53% at first year, P = 0.02, and proportions of early molecular failure (14% vs. 43%, P = 0.015. Every progression to an advanced phase (n = 3 and CML-related death (n = 2 occurred in the low PTCH1 group (P<0.001 for both comparisons. PTCH1 was an independent prognostic factor for the prediction of IF. We also validated previously published thresholds for PTCH1 expression. Therefore, we confirmed that PTCH1 expression can predict the imatinib response in CML patients in CP by applying a more rigorous statistical analysis. Thus, PTCH1 expression is a promising molecular marker for predicting the imatinib response in CML patients in CP.

  1. Recovering from chronic myeloid leukemia: the patients' perspective seen through the lens of narrative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, G; Cecchini, I; Breccia, M; Capochiani, E; Della Seta, R; Galimberti, S; Melosi, A; Simonetti, F; Pizzuti, M; Capalbo, S F; Falzetti, F; Mazza, P; Di Renzo, N; Mastrullo, L; Rapezzi, D; Orlandi, E; Intermesoli, T; Iurlo, A; Pungolino, E; Pacilli, M

    2017-10-01

    The main objective of this study is to gain a deeper understanding of how patients suffering from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cope with their illness. The study aims to reconstruct the subjective meaning-making process related to CML in order to gain insights into the impact the disease has on patients' emotions and everyday lives, as well as to explore the psychological impact of their being presented with the chance to suspend their therapy and recover from the disease. Data were gathered from a qualitative study conducted in Italy on 158 Italian CML patients. Basing the study on the narrative inquiry approach, the patients were required to describe their patient journey in a qualitative narrative diary. These contained prompts to elicit the free expression of their needs, expectations, and priorities. A lexicographic analysis was carried out with T-LAB software and in particular a thematic analysis of elementary contexts (TAECs) and a word association analysis (WAA). The TAEC detected four thematic clusters related to two factors (temporal frame and contextual setting) that explained the variance among the narratives. The WAA evidenced a wide variety of emotions, both positive and negative, as patients reacted to the possibility of interrupting their therapy. A better understanding of patients' experiences can offer insights into promoting the development of more sustainable healthcare services and into therapeutic innovation aimed at improving patients' quality of life and at engaging them more in their treatment. The findings of this study can also help make medical professionals more aware of the patient's burden and help them identify potential interactions and emotional levers to improve clinical relationships.

  2. A new monoclonal antibody detects downregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type γ in chronic myeloid leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Vezzalini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor gamma (PTPRG is a ubiquitously expressed member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase family known to act as a tumor suppressor gene in many different neoplasms with mechanisms of inactivation including mutations and methylation of CpG islands in the promoter region. Although a critical role in human hematopoiesis and an oncosuppressor role in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML have been reported, only one polyclonal antibody (named chPTPRG has been described as capable of recognizing the native antigen of this phosphatase by flow cytometry. Protein biomarkers of CML have not yet found applications in the clinic, and in this study, we have analyzed a group of newly diagnosed CML patients before and after treatment. The aim of this work was to characterize and exploit a newly developed murine monoclonal antibody specific for the PTPRG extracellular domain (named TPγ B9-2 to better define PTPRG protein downregulation in CML patients. Methods TPγ B9-2 specifically recognizes PTPRG (both human and murine by flow cytometry, western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemistry. Results Co-localization experiments performed with both anti-PTPRG antibodies identified the presence of isoforms and confirmed protein downregulation at diagnosis in the Philadelphia-positive myeloid lineage (including CD34+/CD38bright/dim cells. After effective tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI treatment, its expression recovered in tandem with the return of Philadelphia-negative hematopoiesis. Of note, PTPRG mRNA levels remain unchanged in tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI non-responder patients, confirming that downregulation selectively occurs in primary CML cells. Conclusions The availability of this unique antibody permits its evaluation for clinical application including the support for diagnosis and follow-up of these disorders. Evaluation of PTPRG as a potential therapeutic target is also facilitated by the

  3. The Culture Repopulation Ability (CRA) Assay and Incubation in Low Oxygen to Test Antileukemic Drugs on Imatinib-Resistant CML Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheloni, Giulia; Tanturli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a stem cell-driven disorder caused by the BCR/Abl oncoprotein, a constitutively active tyrosine kinase (TK). Chronic-phase CML patients are treated with impressive efficacy with TK inhibitors (TKi) such as imatinib mesylate (IM). However, rather than definitively curing CML, TKi induces a state of minimal residual disease, due to the persistence of leukemia stem cells (LSC) which are insensitive to this class of drugs. LSC persistence may be due to different reasons, including the suppression of BCR/Abl oncoprotein. It has been shown that this suppression follows incubation in low oxygen under appropriate culture conditions and incubation times.Here we describe the culture repopulation ability (CRA) assay, a non-clonogenic assay capable - together with incubation in low oxygen - to reveal in vitro stem cells endowed with marrow repopulation ability (MRA) in vivo. The CRA assay can be used, before moving to animal tests, as a simple and reliable method for the prescreening of drugs potentially active on CML and other leukemias with respect to their activity on the more immature leukemia cell subsets.

  4. Intermittent targeted therapies and stochastic evolution in patients affected by chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, N.; Persano Adorno, D.; Valenti, D.; Spagnolo, B.

    2016-05-01

    Front line therapy for the treatment of patients affected by chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is based on the administration of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, namely imatinib or, more recently, axitinib. Although imatinib is highly effective and represents an example of a successful molecular targeted therapy, the appearance of resistance is observed in a proportion of patients, especially those in advanced stages. In this work, we investigate the appearance of resistance in patients affected by CML, by modeling the evolutionary dynamics of cancerous cell populations in a simulated patient treated by an intermittent targeted therapy. We simulate, with the Monte Carlo method, the stochastic evolution of initially healthy cells to leukemic clones, due to genetic mutations and changes in their reproductive behavior. We first present the model and its validation with experimental data by considering a continuous therapy. Then, we investigate how fluctuations in the number of leukemic cells affect patient response to the therapy when the drug is administered with an intermittent time scheduling. Here we show that an intermittent therapy (IT) represents a valid choice in patients with high risk of toxicity, despite an associated delay to the complete restoration of healthy cells. Moreover, a suitably tuned IT can reduce the probability of developing resistance.

  5. [Development of Ph negative acute myeloid leukemia in a patient with minor-BCR/ABL positive chronic myeloid leukemia achieving a partial cytogenetic response during tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Soichiro; Miura, Ikuo; Tanaka, Hideo

    2015-06-01

    A 78-year-old male, who had CKD and chronic heart failure, was referred to our hospital for evaluation of leukocytosis. His bone marrow contained 12% blast cells and chromosome analysis showed the Ph chromosome as well as other changes. The patient was diagnosed with the accelerated-phase CML because FISH and RT-PCR disclosed BCR/ABL fusion signals and minor BCR/ABL, respectively. Imatinib was administered, but the CML was resistant to this treatment. We gave him nilotinib employing a reduced and intermittent administration protocol because of the progression of anemia and heart failure. The patient achieved PCyR in 8 months, but, 12 months later, his WBC count increased and 83% of the cells were blasts. Because the probable diagnosis was the blast crisis of CML, we switched from nilotinib to dasatinib. However, leukocytosis worsened and he died of pneumonia. It was later revealed that he had a normal karyotype and both FISH and RT-PCR analysis of BCR/ABL were negative. His final diagnosis was Ph negative AML developing from Ph positive CML in PCyR. Since there were no dysplastic changes indicative of MDS, it was assumed that the AML was not secondary leukemia caused by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor but, rather, de novo AML.

  6. Polimorfismo do gene tp53 no códon 72 em pacientes com suspeita de LMC Codon 72 polymorphism of the TP53 gene in patients suspected to have CML

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    Camila S. Hamú

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A leucemia mielóide crônica (LMC é uma doença proliferativa do sistema hematopoiético, caracterizada pela expansão clonal de uma célula-tronco primitiva e pluripotente denominada stem cell. Este tipo de leucemia está associado, em 90% dos casos, à translocação t(9;22(q34;q11. Essa alteração cromossômica estrutural codifica para uma proteína quimérica BCR-ABL, que confere às células leucêmicas uma alta resistência à morte, independente do agente indutor desse processo. A proteína p53 é uma reguladora transcricional induzida por danos no DNA, fato que resulta na parada do ciclo celular com conseqüente ativação de mecanismos de reparo ou mesmo na indução à apoptose. As mutações no gene TP53 são as alterações genéticas mais comuns em tumores malignos humanos. O presente estudo teve como objetivo genotipar e determinar a freqüência alélica do polimorfismo do TP53 no códon 72 (arginina - Arg e prolina - Pro, em pacientes com suspeita de LMC, pela Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase. Desta forma, os resultados indicaram que 73,4% (23/30 dos pacientes apresentaram homozigose para arginina (Arg/Arg e 26,6% (7/30 heterozigose (Arg/Pro. Não foi encontrado nenhum paciente homozigoto para prolina (Pro/Pro. Os resultados obtidos sugerem que o polimorfismo do gene TP53 no códon 72 não é um fator de risco importante para a iniciação, promoção e progressão da LMC.Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a proliferative disorder of the hematopoietic system characterized by clonal expansion of a primitive and pluripotent stem cell. In this type of leukemia, up to 90% of all cases is associated to a specific chromosomal translocation, t(9;22(q34;q11. The genomic alteration results in a chimeric protein, BCR-ABL, that confers a high resistance leukemia cells to death, independent of the induction mechanism of this process. Protein p53 is a transcriptional factor expressed after DNA damage which ceases cell cycle progression and

  7. Diagnosis of large granular lymphocytic leukemia in a patient previously treated for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sinem Civriz Bozdag; Sinem Namdaroglu; Omur Kayikci; Gülsah Kaygusuz; Itir Demiriz; Murat Cinarsoy; Emre Tekgunduz; Fevzi Altuntas

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by the clonal expansion of cytotoxic T or natural killer cells. We report on a patient diagnosed with T-cell LGL leukemia two years after the achievement of hematologic remission for acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  8. Azacytidine in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced durable responses in patients with advanced phase chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiu, Mathilde; Oberkampf, Florence; Ghez, David; Cony-Makhoul, Pascale; Beckeriche, Florence; Cano, Isabelle; Taksin, Anne L; Benbrahim, Omar; Ghez, Stéphanie; Farhat, Hassan; Rigaudeau, Sophie; de Gunzburg, Noémie; Lara, Diane; Terre, Christine; Raggueneau, Victoria; Garcia, Isabel; Spentchian, Marc; De Botton, Stéphane; Rousselot, Philippe

    2017-11-28

    Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) era has brought great improvement in outcome in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), prognosis of accelerated phase or myeloid blast crisis patients or of de novo Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia remains poor. We conducted a retrospective study on patients with advanced phase disease treated with a TKI and azacytidine. Sixteen patients were eligible. Median age was 64.9 years, the median number of previous therapies was 2.5 lines, and median follow-up was 23.1 months. Hematologic response (HR) rate was 81.3%. Median overall survival (OS), event free survival and relapse-free survival (RFS) were 31.5, 23.3, and 32.2 months, respectively. All except one patient were treated as out-patients after the first cycle. Five patients were bridged to allogenic hematopoietic stem cells transplant. The combination of a TKI and azacytidine is a safe and efficient regiment for patients with CML patients in advanced phases.

  9. Re-emergence of interferon-α in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpaz, M; Hehlmann, R; Quintás-Cardama, A; Mercer, J; Cortes, J

    2013-01-01

    Treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has evolved from chemotherapy (busulfan, hydroxyurea) to interferon-α (IFNα), and finally to tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib. Although imatinib has profoundly improved outcomes for patients with CML, it has limitations. Most significantly, imatinib cannot eradicate CML primitive progenitors, which likely accounts for the high relapse rate when imatinib is discontinued. IFNα, unlike imatinib, preferentially targets CML stem cells. Early studies with IFNα in CML demonstrated its ability to induce cytogenetic remission. Moreover, a small percentage of patients treated with IFNα were able to sustain durable remissions after discontinuing therapy and were probably cured. The mechanisms by which IFNα exerts its antitumor activity in CML are not well understood; however, activation of leukemia-specific immunity may have a role. Some clinical studies have demonstrated that the combination of imatinib and IFNα is superior to either therapy alone, perhaps because of their different mechanisms of action. Nonetheless, the side effects of IFNα often impede its administration, especially in combination therapy. Here, we review the role of IFNα in CML treatment and the recent developments that have renewed interest in this once standard therapy for patients with CML. PMID:23238589

  10. Study of ultrasonic imagine of spleen in patients with leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hui; Zhou Chunyan; Jiang Ju; Luo Liying; Huang Yanhong

    2011-01-01

    To investigate spleen ultrasonic imagine in patients with leukemia and to provide basis information for preventing and treat disease,the spleens imaging of 158 patients with leukemia were detected by B mode ultrasonicgraphy and the data of clinical medical examination were analyzed.The results showed that the spleens' ultrasonic imagine of patients with leukemia were not related to the degree of anemia.The ultrasonic imagines of spleen in patients with chronic leukemia were different to the other kinds of leukemia.The ultrasonic imagine of spleens in leukemia patients are related to types and development of leukemia.The B-ultrasound screening should be used to help clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients with leukemia. (authors)

  11. Nilotinib versus imatinib for newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saglio, Giuseppe; Kim, Dong-Wook; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2010-01-01

    Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase.......Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase....

  12. Review of diagnosis and classification of leukemias that occurred in A-bomb survivors (preliminary report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, T; Tomonaga, M; Ichimaru, M; Kamata, N; Kuramoto, A

    1984-11-01

    According to the current knowledge of diagnosis and classification, a review of 157 patients who had developed leukemia before June 30, 1967 was made. The incidence of acute leukemia decreased slightly among A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima; however, the incidence of acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) increased. The number of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was unchanged. The frequency of CML implied that A-bombing damaged stem cells. Among A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki, although the number of acute non-lymphatic leukemia decreased, the number of ALL was unchanged. Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) was diagnosed in 7 A-bomb survivors, confirming that Nagasaki is an endemic area for ATL. These preliminary results seem to be of importance in elucidating the mechanism of leukemia developing among A-bomb survivors. (Namekawa, K.).

  13. Review of diagnosis and classification of leukemias that occurred in A-bomb survivors (preliminary report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao; Ichimaru, Michito; Kamata, Nanao; Kuramoto, Atsushi.

    1984-01-01

    According to the current knowledge of diagnosis and classification, a review of 157 patients who had developed leukemia before June 30, 1967 was made. The total number of acute leukemia slightly decreased among A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima; however, the number of acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) increased. The number of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was unchanged. The frequency of CML implied that A-bombing damaged stem cells in a high incidence. Among A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki, although the number of acute non-lymphatic leukemia decreased, the number of ALL was unchanged. Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) was diagnosed in 7 A-bomb survivors, confirming that Nagasaki is an endemic area for ATL. These preliminary results seem to be of importance in elucidating the mechanism of leukemia developiong among A-bomb survivors. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Emerging Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hamad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder. Current targeted therapies designed to inhibit the tyrosine kinase activity of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein have made a significant breakthrough in the treatment of CML patients. However, CML remains a chronic disease that a patient must manage for life. Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI therapy has completely transformed the prognosis of CML, it has made the therapeutic management more complex. The interruption of TKI treatment results in early disease progression because it does not eliminate quiescent CML stem cells which remain a potential reservoir for disease relapse. This highlights the need to develop new therapeutic strategies for CML to achieve a permanent cure, and to allow TKI interruption. This review summarizes recent research done on alternative targeted therapies with a particular focus on some important signaling pathways (such as Alox5, Hedgehog, Wnt/b-catenin, autophagy, and PML that have the potential to target CML stem cells and potentially provide cure for CML.

  15. Marijuana Smoking in Patients With Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaja, Sara; Yacoub, Abraham; Cheema, Asima; Rihana, Nancy; Russo, Robin; Velez, Ana Paula; Nanjappa, Sowmya; Sandin, Ramon L; Bohra, Chandrashekar; Gajanan, Ganesh; Greene, John N

    2016-07-01

    Worldwide, marijuana (cannabis) is a widely used drug. The incidence of marijuana smoking is increasing and is second only to tobacco as the most widely smoked substance in the general population. It is also the second most commonly used recreational drug after alcohol. Some adverse effects of marijuana smoking have been documented; however, the number of studies on the pulmonary effects of marijuana in individuals with leukemia is limited. In our case series, we report on 2 men with acute myeloid leukemia with miliary nodular lung patterns on computed tomography of the chest due to heavy marijuana use. We also report on 2 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia who had a history of smoking marijuana and then developed lung opacities consistent with mold infection.

  16. Rhabdomyolysis Associated with Fenofibrate Monotherapy in a Patient with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

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    Kazuya Kato

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis associated with fenofibrate monotherapy is extremely rare. Here, we report a rare case of rhabdomyolysis of the psoas muscle in an 82-year-old man with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML. He was prescribed fenofibrate because of a hypertriglyceridemia. The patient reported generalized muscle pain and right abdominal pain while receiving fenofibrate monotherapy. An abdominal computed tomography scan and an abdominal ultrasound showed a large and low attenuation and high echogenicity, respectively, in the right middle abdominal area. Laboratory values included a serum creatine concentration of 4.1 mg/dl and a creatinine phosphokinase concentration of 5,882 IU/l. During laparotomy, a large hematoma and necrotic mass was identified in the right psoas muscle. Histological examination revealed that the resected specimens were of the psoas muscle with irregular fiber sizes, degenerating fibers surrounding the inflammatory reaction, and fiber necrosis that is typical for polymyositis. Based on these findings and the clinical history, a diagnosis of fenofibrate-induced rhabdomyolysis was made. To the best of our knowledge, no patient has ever been diagnosed with fulminant psoas rhabdomyolysis due to a fenofibrate monotherapy. This report details the rare case of rhabdomyolysis in a patient with CML associated with fenofibrate monotherapy and offers a review of the literature.

  17. Effectiveness of quantitative real time PCR in long-term follow-up of chronic myeloid leukemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savasoglu, K.; Berber, B.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the use of the Quantitative Real Time PCR (RQ-PCR) assay follow-up with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational. Place and Duration of Study: Izmir Ataturk Education and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey, from 2009 to 2013. Methodology: Cytogenetic, FISH, RQ-PCR test results from 177 CML patients materials selected between 2009 - 2013 years was set up for comparison analysis. Statistical analysis was performed to compare between FISH, karyotype and RQ-PCR results of the patients. Karyotyping and FISH specificity and sensitivity rates determined by ROC analysis compared with RQ-PCR results. Chi-square test was used to compare test failure rates. Results:Sensitivity and specificity values were determined for karyotyping 17.6 - 98% (p=0.118, p > 0.05) and for FISH 22.5 - 96% (p=0.064, p > 0.05) respectively. FISH sensitivity was slightly higher than karyotyping but there was calculated a strong correlation between them (p < 0.001). RQ-PCR test failure rate did not correlate with other two tests (p > 0.05); however, karyotyping and FISH test failure rate was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Besides, the situation needed for karyotype analysis, RQ-PCR assay can be used alone in the follow-up of CML disease. (author)

  18. Variant Philadelphia translocations with different breakpoints in six chronic myeloid leukemia patients

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    Dilhan Kuru

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The Philadelphia (Ph chromosome, consisting of the t(9;22(q34;q11 translocation, is observed in ~90% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Variant Ph translocations are observed in 5%-10% of CML patients. In variant translocations 3 and possibly more chromosomes are involved. Herein we report 6 CML patients with variant Ph translocations.Materials and Methods: Bone marrow samples were examined using conventional cytogenetic meth ods. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with whole-chromosome paints and BCR-ABL 1D probes were used to confirm and/or complement the findings, and identify rearrangements beyond the resolution of conventional cytogenetic methods. Results: Variant Ph translocations in the 6 patients were as follows: t(7;22(p22;q11, t(9;22;15(q34;q11;q22, t(15;22(p11;q11, t(1;9;22;3(q24;q34;q11;q21, t(12;22(p13;q11, and t(4;8;9;22(q11;q13;q34;q11.Conclusion: Among the patients, 3 had simple and 3 had complex variant Ph translocations. Two of the presented cases had variant Ph chromosomes not previously described, 1 of which had a new complex Ph translocation involving chromosomes 1, 3, 9, 22, and t(1;9;22;3(q24;q34;q11;q21 apart from a clone with a classical Ph, and the other case had variant Ph translocation with chromosomes 4, 8, 9, and 22, and t(4;8;9;22(q11;q13;q34;q11 full complex translocation. Number of studies reported that some patients with variant Ph translocation were poor responders to imatinib. All of our patients with variant Ph translocations had suboptimal responses to imatinib, denoting a poor prognosis also. Variant Ph translocations may be important as they are associated with prognosis and therapy for CML patients.

  19. Investigation of selected trace elements in Sudanese patients with leukemia using NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elradi, M M. M. [Atomic Energy Council, Sudan Academy of Sciences, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2010-10-15

    In the present study, the concentrations of Co, Cr, Fe, Hg, Rb, Se, Zn in the serum of 103 adult patients with newly diagnosed of leukemia (before treatment) were studied. Samples were collected from Radiation of Isotopes Center-Khartoum (RICK) and Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Biology-Aljazeera State. Samples were freeze-dried and analyzed using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Serum levels of these elements were compared with the contents found in healthy group samples. The patients were divided into 4 groups: 1- Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL), 2- Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), 3- Chronic Lymphoid Leukemia (CLL), 4- Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML). The control group was formed of 40 healthy subjects, data analysis was performed using the T-tests. partial correlation was used to study a relationship between two variables. It was found that, In group I (ALL): higher concentration of Cr, Fe, Hg, Rb, Zn, were found in the serum of patients with significant difference as compared to healthy group (p < 0.05). The concentration of Co was higher than the control group but statistically not significant. The level of selenium was considerably lower than in the control group (p < 0.05). In group II (AML): Significantly elevated values were found in Cr and Fe as compared to the control group. The concentrations of Co, Hg and Zn also were higher but statistically not significant (p> 0.05), the level of selenium was statistically lower than in the control group (p< 0.05). In group III (CLL): It was observed that contents of the Cr, Fe, Hg, Rb, Zn elements were elevated significantly (p<0.05) than healthy subjects. The concentration of Co was higher than the control group but statistically not significant, the level of selenium was considerably lower than in the control group (p < 0.05). In group 4 (CML): The concentrations of Fe, Hg, Rb, Zn were statistically higher than in the healthy subject (p < 0.05). Also the level of Cr was higher but statistically not

  20. The option value of innovative treatments in the context of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Yuri; Penrod, John R; Qiu, Xiaoli Lily; Romley, John; Thornton Snider, Julia; Philipson, Tomas

    2012-11-01

    To quantify in the context of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) the additional value patients receive when innovative treatments enable them to survive until the advent of even more effective future treatments (ie, the "option value"). Observational study using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry comprising all US patients with CML diagnosed between 2000 and 2008 (N = 9,760). We quantified the option value of recent breakthroughs in CML treatment by first conducting retrospective survival analyses on SEER data to assess the effectiveness of TKI treatments, and then forecasting survival from CML and other causes to measure expected future medical progress. We then developed an analytical framework to calculate option value of innovative CML therapies, and used an economic model to value these gains. We calculated the option value created both by future innovations in CML treatment and by medical progress in reducing background mortality. For a recently diagnosed CML patient, the option value of innovative therapies from future medical innovation amounts to 0.76 life-years. This option value is worth $63,000, equivalent to 9% of the average survival gains from existing treatments. Future innovations in CML treatment jointly account for 96% of this benefit. The option value of innovative treatments has significance in the context of CML and, more broadly, in disease areas with rapid innovation. Incorporating option value into traditional valuations of medical innovations is both a feasible and a necessary practice in health technology assessment.

  1. Laboratory recommendations for scoring deep molecular responses following treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cross, N. C. P.; White, H. E.; Colomer, D.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors has advanced to a stage where many patients achieve very low or undetectable levels of disease. Remarkably, some of these patients remain in sustained remission when treatment is withdrawn, suggesting that they may be at ...... of sensitivity. Here we present detailed laboratory recommendations, developed as part of the European Treatment and Outcome Study for CML (EUTOS), to enable testing laboratories to score MR in a reproducible manner for CML patients expressing the most common BCR-ABL1 variants....

  2. Phase II trial of vindesine in patients with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklaroff, R B; Arlin, Z; Young, C W

    1979-01-01

    Vindesine was administered to 18 patients with acute leukemia who had failed conventional chemotherapy. Each course of therapy consisted of an iv bolus infusion at a dose of 1-2 mg/m2 given daily x 5-10 days. Of 13 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, two had partial remissions which lasted 2 and 3 months and five had minor responses. One of three patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia and one of two patients with blastic crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia each had a minor response. The data suggest that vindesine has activity in the treatment of acute leukemia.

  3. RhoA: A therapeutic target for chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molli Poonam R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is a malignant pluripotent stem cells disorder of myeloid cells. In CML patients, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL the terminally differentiated cells of myeloid series exhibit defects in several actin dependent functions such as adhesion, motility, chemotaxis, agglutination, phagocytosis and microbicidal activities. A definite and global abnormality was observed in stimulation of actin polymerization in CML PMNL. Signalling molecules ras and rhoGTPases regulate spatial and temporal polymerization of actin and thus, a broad range of physiological processes. Therefore, status of these GTPases as well as actin was studied in resting and fMLP stimulated normal and CML PMNL. Methods To study expression of GTPases and actin, Western blotting and flow cytometry analysis were done, while spatial expression and colocalization of these proteins were studied by using laser confocal microscopy. To study effect of inhibitors on cell proliferation CCK-8 assay was done. Significance of differences in expression of proteins within the samples and between normal and CML was tested by using Wilcoxon signed rank test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Bivariate and partial correlation analyses were done to study relationship between all the parameters. Results In CML PMNL, actin expression and its architecture were altered and stimulation of actin polymerization was absent. Differences were also observed in expression, organization or stimulation of all the three GTPases in normal and CML PMNL. In normal PMNL, ras was the critical GTPase regulating expression of rhoGTPases and actin and actin polymerization. But in CML PMNL, rhoA took a central place. In accordance with these, treatment with rho/ROCK pathway inhibitors resulted in specific growth inhibition of CML cell lines. Conclusions RhoA has emerged as the key molecule responsible for functional defects in CML PMNL and therefore can be used as a

  4. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Contribute to the Stromal Myofibroblasts in Leukemic NOD/SCID Mouse In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Shirasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells converted into myofibroblasts to create a microenvironment for proliferation of CML cells in vitro. To analyze a biological contribution of CML-derived myofibroblasts in vivo, we observed the characters of leukemic nonobese diabetes/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mouse. Bone marrow nonadherent mononuclear cells as well as human CD45-positive cells obtained from CML patients were injected to the irradiated NOD/SCID mice. When the chimeric BCR-ABL transcript was demonstrated in blood, human CML cells were detected in NOD/SCID murine bone marrow. And CML-derived myofibroblasts composed with the bone marrow-stroma, which produced significant amounts of human vascular endothelial growth factor A. When the parental CML cells were cultured with myofibroblasts separated from CML cell-engrafted NOD/SCID murine bone marrow, CML cells proliferated significantly. These observations indicate that CML cells make an adequate microenvironment for their own proliferation in vivo.

  5. Interferon alpha for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Bengt; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with interferon-alpha (IFN-a) was introduced in the early 1980s. Several clinical trials showed a survival advantage for patients treated with IFN-a compared to conventional chemotherapy. Some patients achieved longstanding complete cytogenetic remissions...

  6. Potential mechanisms of disease progression and management of advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias J.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Cortés, Jorge E.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Despite vast improvements in treatment of Philadelphia chromosome–positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP), advanced stages of CML, accelerated phase or blast crisis, remain notoriously difficult to treat. Treatments that are highly effective against CML-CP produce disappointing results against advanced disease. Therefore, a primary goal of therapy should be to maintain patients in CP for as long as possible, by (1) striving for deep, early molecular response to treatment; (2) using tyrosine kinase inhibitors that lower risk of disease progression; and (3) more closely observing patients who demonstrate cytogenetic risk factors at diagnosis or during treatment. PMID:24050507

  7. Evaluation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells, T regulatory and Th17 cells in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hus, Iwona; Tabarkiewicz, Jacek; Lewandowska, Magdalena; Wasiak, Magdalena; Wdowiak, Paulina; Kusz, Maria; Legieć, Monika; Dmoszyńska, Anna; Roliński, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    Immunotherapy with dendritic cells (DC) may constitute a new and advantageous option for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who respond to therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), but do not reach complete cytogenetic or molecular remission. In this study, we evaluated the immunophenotype of DC generated from monocytes (Mo-DC) of patients with CML and the influence of TKI therapy on the results of CML-DC generation. We also measured the percentages of T regulatory cells (Tregs) as well as Th17 cells in 19 untreated patients suffering from CML, and in 28 CML patients treated with TKI. We found that DC can be reliably generated from the peripheral blood CD14+ cells of untreated CML patients. But we observed a persistent expression of CD14 monocyte marker on DC from CML patients, together with lower percentages of Mo-DC with expression of CD1a (p = 0.002), CD80 (p = 0.0005), CD83 (p = 0.0004), and CD209 (p = 0.02) compared to healthy donors. There was an adverse correlation between WBC count and the percentage of Mo-DC with co-expression of CD80 and CD86 (R = -0.63; p = 0.03). In patients treated with TKI, we observed higher efficacy of DC generation in seven-day cultures, compared to untreated patients. Expression of CD209 on DC was higher in patients treated with TKI (0.02). The duration of TKI therapy correlated adversely with MFI for CD1a (R = -0.49; p = 0.006) and positively with MFI for CD83 (R = 0.63; p = 0.01). Percentages of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+ cells (p = 0.0002) and Th17 cells (p = 0.02) were significantly higher in untreated CML patients compared to healthy controls. There was a significant correlation between the percentage of Treg cells and the percentage of peripheral blood basophiles (R = 0.821; p = 0.02). There were no changes in Tregs or Th17 cell percentages in CML patients after six months of TKI therapy. However, the expression of intracellular IL-17 in Th17 cells correlated negatively with the time of TKI therapy in the whole group

  8. Evaluation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells, T regulatory and Th17 cells in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Roliński

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy with dendritic cells (DC may constitute a new and advantageous option for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML who respond to therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, but do not reach complete cytogenetic or molecular remission. In this study, we evaluated the immunophenotype of DC generated from monocytes (Mo-DC of patients with CML and the influence of TKI therapy on the results of CML-DC generation. We also measured the percentages of T regulatory cells (Tregs as well as Th17 cells in 19 untreated patients suffering from CML, and in 28 CML patients treated with TKI. We found that DC can be reliably generated from the peripheral blood CD14+ cells of untreated CML patients. But we observed a persistent expression of CD14 monocyte marker on DC from CML patients, together with lower percentages of Mo-DC with expression of CD1a (p = 0.002, CD80 (p = 0.0005, CD83 (p = 0.0004, and CD209 (p = 0.02 compared to healthy donors. There was an adverse correlation between WBC count and the percentage of Mo-DC with co-expression of CD80 and CD86 (R = –0.63; p = 0.03. In patients treated with TKI, we observed higher efficacy of DC generation in seven-day cultures, compared to untreated patients. Expression of CD209 on DC was higher in patients treated with TKI (0.02. The duration of TKI therapy correlated adversely with MFI for CD1a (R = –0.49; p = 0.006 and positively with MFI for CD83 (R = 0.63; p = 0.01. Percentages of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+ cells (p = 0.0002 and Th17 cells (p = 0.02 were significantly higher in untreated CML patients compared to healthy controls. There was a significant correlation between the percentage of Treg cells and the percentage of peripheral blood basophiles (R = 0.821; p = 0.02. There were no changes in Tregs or Th17 cell percentages in CML patients after six months of TKI therapy. However, the expression of intracellular IL-17 in Th17 cells correlated negatively with the time of TKI therapy in the

  9. Statistical Analysis of Competing Risks: Overall Survival in a Group of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fürstová, Jana; Valenta, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2011), s. 2-10 ISSN 1801-5603 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : competing risks * chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) * overall survival * cause-specific hazard * cumulative incidence function Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.eu/images/2011-1/Furstova_en.pdf

  10. Targeting of the BLT2 in chronic myeloid leukemia inhibits leukemia stem/progenitor cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Meifang; Ai, Hongmei; Li, Tao [Department of Laboratory Medicine, JingZhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China); Rajoria, Pasupati; Shahu, Prakash [Department of Clinical Medicine, Medical School of Yangtze University, Jingzhou (China); Li, Xiansong, E-mail: lixiansongjz@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, JingZhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China)

    2016-04-15

    Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has significantly improved clinical outcome for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. However, patients develop resistance when the disease progresses to the blast phase (BP) and the mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that BCR-ABL activates BLT2 in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to promote leukemogenesis and this involves the p53 signaling pathway. Compared to normal bone marrow (NBM), the mRNA and protein levels of BLT2 are significantly increased in BP-CML CD34{sup +} stem/progenitor cells. This is correlated with increasing BCR-ABL expression. In contrast, knockdown of BCR-ABL or inhibition of its tyrosine kinase activity decreases Blt2 protein level. BLT2 inhibition induces apoptosis, inhibits proliferation, colony formation and self-renewal capacity of CD34{sup +} cells from TKI-resistant BP-CML patients. Importantly, the inhibitory effects of BCR-ABL TKI on CML stem/progenitor cells are further enhanced upon combination with BLT2 inhibition. We further show that BLT2 activation selectively suppresses p53 but not Wnt or BMP-mediated luciferase activity and transcription. Our results demonstrate that BLT2 is a novel pathway activated by BCR-ABL and critically involved in the resistance of BP-CML CD34{sup +} stem/progenitors to TKIs treatment. Our findings suggest that BLT2 and p53 can serve as therapeutic targets for CML treatment. - Highlights: • BCR-ABL regulates BLT2 expression to promote leukemogenesis. • BLT2 is essential to maintain CML cell function. • Activation of BLT2 suppresses p53 signaling pathway in CML cells. • Inhibition of BLT2 and BCR-ABL synergize in eliminating CML CD34{sup +} stem/progenitors.

  11. Analysis of Survival of Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treated with Imatinib in the Last 15 Years in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoud, Marcel; Sakr, Riwa; Kerbage, Fouad; Makdissi, Joseph; Hawi, Jenny; Rached, Layale; Nasr, Fady; Chahine, Georges

    2017-07-01

    In the 2000s, the introduction of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), imatinib, improved the survival outcomes of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In Lebanon, we rapidly adopted this treatment strategy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the survival rates of Lebanese CML patients. We examined the rates of major molecular response (MMR) and complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) and analyzed the overall survival, progression-free survival, and event-free survival of CML patients treated with front-line imatinib in 3 university hospitals in Lebanon. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 46 patients diagnosed with CML and treated with front-line imatinib 400 mg/day from 2000 and followed up to 2015. In all patients, initially, 2 diagnostic tests were performed: cytogenetic analysis and qualitative molecular testing of the BCR-ABL transcript. The male-to-female sex ratio was 3:1. The median age at diagnosis was 49 years, and the mean age was 44.52 years. At diagnosis, 46 patients were in the chronic phase. All patients started imatinib 400 mg/day. Of the 46 patients, 35 had a typical karyotype, 8 an atypical karyotype, and 3 hypoploidism. The MMR rate at 18 months was 58.69%. The cumulative CCyR rate at 18 months of therapy with imatinib at the standard dose was 67.39%. The event-free survival rate was 75.86% and 74.14% at 5 and 8 years, respectively. The progression-free survival rate was 77.59% and 75.86% at 5 and 8 years, respectively. The overall survival rate was 98.27% and 98.27% at 5 and 8 years, respectively. Of the 46 patients, 12 developed disease progression and were salvaged by second-generation TKIs. These 12 patients were still alive with a MMR. In our study population, the achievement of a MMR and CCyR and overall survival, progression-free survival, and event-free survival were similar to previous published data. Reaching high survival rates with a first-generation TKI in a country with limited

  12. Disease-related mortality exceeds treatment-related mortality in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia on second-line or later therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Edward; McGarry, Lisa; Gala, Smeet; Nieset, Christopher; Nanavaty, Merena; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Levy, Yair

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of newly-diagnosed patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) results in near-normal life expectancy. However, CP-CML patients resistant to initial TKIs face a poorer prognosis and significantly higher CML-related mortality. We conducted a systematic literature review to evaluate the specific causes of deaths (diseases progression versus drug-related) in CP-CML patients receiving second- or third-line therapy. We identified eight studies based on our criteria that reported causes of death. Overall, 5% of second-line and 10% of third-line patients died during the study follow-up period. For second-line, (7 studies, n=1926), mortality was attributed to disease progression for 41% of deaths, 2% to treatment-related causes, 3% were treatment-unrelated, and 50% were unspecified adverse events (AEs), not likely related to study drug. In third-line, (2 studies, n=144), 71% deaths were attributed to disease progression, 7% treatment-related AEs, 14% treatment-unrelated and 7% unspecified AEs. Annual death rates for second- and third-line therapy were significantly higher than for general population in similar age group. Our findings suggest death attributed to disease progression is approximately 10 times that due to treatment-related AEs in patients with CP-CML receiving second- or third-line therapy. Therefore, the potential benefits of effective treatment for these patients with the currently available TKIs outweigh the risks of treatment-induced AEs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Is an Effective Salvage Therapy for Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Presenting with Advanced Disease or Failing Treatment with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anish P; Barnett, Michael J; Broady, Raewyn C; Hogge, Donna E; Song, Kevin W; Toze, Cynthia L; Nantel, Stephen H; Power, Maryse M; Sutherland, Heather J; Nevill, Thomas J; Abou Mourad, Yasser; Narayanan, Sujaatha; Gerrie, Alina S; Forrest, Donna L

    2015-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the only known curative therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML); however, it is rarely utilized given the excellent long-term results with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. The purpose of this study is to examine HSCT outcomes for patients with CML who failed TKI therapy or presented in advanced phase and to identify predictors of survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). Fifty-one patients with CML underwent HSCT for advanced disease at diagnosis (n = 15), TKI resistance as defined by the European LeukemiaNet guidelines (n = 30), TKI intolerance (n = 2), or physician preference (n = 4). At a median follow-up of 71.9 months, the 8-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), relapse, and NRM were 68%, 46%, 41%, and 23%, respectively. In univariate analysis, predictors of OS included first chronic phase (CP1) disease status at HSCT (P = .0005), European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation score 1 to 4 (P = .04), and complete molecular response (CMR) to HSCT (P treatment to optimize transplantation outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hyperphosphatemia during spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome culminate in severe hyphosphatemia at the time of blast crisis of Phneg CML to acute myelomoncytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomon Ophira

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extreme swing of phosphor from severe hyperphosphatemia to severe hypophosphatemia in a patient with blast crisis of myeloid origin was the result of imbalance between massive apoptosis of leukemic cells in the context of spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome and massive production of leukemic cells with only 1% of blast in peripheral blood. The mutated p53 protein suggested acting as oncogene in the presented case and possibly affecting phosphor status.

  15. Combination of pegylated IFN-α2b with imatinib increases molecular response rates in patients with low- or intermediate-risk chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Bengt; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Markevärn, Berit

    2011-01-01

    Biologic and clinical observations suggest that combining imatinib with IFN-a may improve treatment outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We randomized newly diagnosed chronic-phase CML patients with a low or intermediate Sokal risk score and in imatinib-induced complete hematologic remission......%) discontinued imatinib treatment (1 because of blastic transformation in imatinib arm). In addition, in the combination arm, 34 patients (61%) discontinued Peg-IFN-a2b, most because of toxicity. The MMR rate at 12 months was significantly higher in the imatinib plus Peg-IFN-a2b arm (82%) compared...... with the imatinib monotherapy arm (54%; intention-to-treat, P = .002). The MMR rate increased with the duration of Peg-IFN-a2b treatment ( 12-week MMR rate 91%). Thus, the addition of even relatively short periods of Peg-IFN-a2b to imatinib markedly increased the MMR rate at 12 months...

  16. Naturally occurring CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ T-regulatory cells are increased in chronic myeloid leukemia patients not in complete cytogenetic remission and can be immunosuppressive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Jose M; Wang, Lihui; Owen, Sally; Knight, Katy; Watmough, Sarah J; Clark, Richard E

    2010-12-01

    Clinical presentation of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) requires not only the deregulated tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL, but also the failure of an immune response against BCR-ABL-expressing cells. T-cell responses against BCR-ABL and other antigens are well-described, but their relevance to the in vivo control of CML is unclear. The suppressive role of naturally occurring T regulatory (T-reg) cells in antitumor immunity is well-established, although little is known about their role in modulating the T-cell response to BCR-ABL. Naturally occurring T-reg cells were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry in 39 CML patients and 10 healthy donors. Their function was studied by observing their effect on responses to purified protein derivative, a recall antigen, and on the response of an autologous T-cell line recognizing BCR-ABL. T-reg cells were CD4(+), CD25(+), FOXP3(+), CD127(low), and CD62L(high). T-reg numbers in patients in complete cytogenetic remission were significantly lower than in patients not in complete cytogenetic remission (p T-reg cell depletion using anti-CD25 selection enhanced proliferative responses to purified protein derivative. Furthermore, the interferon-γ and/or granzyme-B production of effector cells specific for viral peptides or a BCR-ABL HLA-A3-restricted peptide was inhibited when autologous T-reg cells were present. Taken together, these data suggest a role for T-reg cells in limiting immune responses in CML patients and this may include immune responses to BCR-ABL. The increased frequency of T-reg cells in patients with high levels of BCR-ABL transcripts indicates that an immune mechanism may be important in the control of CML. Copyright © 2010 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fatal Candidemia in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-16

    Profoosionaf 7 ,0 Fatal Candidemia in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Brittany Lenz, MD, Arturo Dominguez, MD, Adnan Mir, MD, PhD Objectives...with pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia was admitted for presumed septic shock secondary to an unknown infectious etiology. The patient was...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Fatal Candidcn1ia in a Patient \\\\ith Acute Lympboblastic Leukemia Brittany Lenz. MD. Arturo Dominguez.. MD. Adnan J’vlir. MD, PhD

  18. Correlation of Cadmium and Magnesium in the Blood and Serum Samples of Smokers and Non-Smokers Chronic Leukemia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Noman; Afridi, Hasan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Arain, Muhammad Balal; Bilal, Muhammad; Akhtar, Asma; Khan, Mustafa

    2017-03-01

    It was studied that cancer-causing processes are related with the disproportions of essential and toxic elements in body tissues and fluid. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the levels of magnesium (Mg) and cadmium (Cd) in serum and blood samples of smokers and nonsmokers who have chronic myeloid (CML) and lymphocytic (CLL) leukemia, age ranged 31-50 years. For comparative study, age-matched smokers and nonsmoker males were chosen as controls/referents. The levels of elements in patient were analyzed before any treatment by atomic absorption spectrophotometer, after microwave assisted acid digestion. The validation of the method was done by using certified reference materials of serum and blood samples. The resulted data indicated that the adult male smokers and nonsmokers have two- to fourfold higher levels of Cd in the blood and sera samples as compared to the referents (p blood and serum samples of both types of leukemia patients as related to referent values. The resulted data indicates significant negative correlation among Mg and Cd in leukemia patients and smoker referents. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of these elements in pathogenesis of chronic leukemia.

  19. Diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demitrovicova, L.; Mikuskova, E.; Copakova, L.; Leitnerova, M.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was the first cancer associated with the specific chromosomal aberration. Philadelphia chromosome due to translocation (9, 22) is present in 95% cases, fusion gene BCR/ABL is present in 100% cases at the time of diagnosis. Disease has its own characteristics detectable by physical examination, by the examination of blood count and differential and by cytomorhologic examination of bone marrow, however the diagnosis of CML is determined by cytogenetics and molecular genetics. If the diagnosis of Ph+ BCR/ABL positive CML is confirmed, the disease is treated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). TKI don´t affect formation of leukemic gene BCR/ABL, but they can stop the action of this gene. The target therapy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors markedly improved the survival of patients with CML by inhibition the proliferation of leukemic clone on the clinically safety level of minimal disease, although probably this treatment cannot cure the CML. Cytogenetics and molecular genetics are very important at the monitoring of residual disease with sensitivity 10"-"6. (author)

  20. Molecular measurement of BCR-ABL transcript variations in chronic myeloid leukemia patients in cytogenetic remission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Juliana

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The monitoring of BCR-ABL transcript levels by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR has become important to assess minimal residual disease (MRD and standard of care in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. In this study, we performed a prospective, sequential analysis using RT-qPCR monitoring of BCR-ABL gene rearrangements in blood samples from 91 CML patients in chronic phase (CP who achieved complete cytogenetic remission (CCyR and major molecular remission (MMR throughout imatinib treatment. Methods The absolute level of BCR-ABL transcript from peripheral blood was serially measured every 4 to 12 weeks by RT-qPCR. Only level variations > 0.5%, according to the international scale, was considered positive. Sequential cytogenetic analysis was also performed in bone marrow samples from all patients using standard protocols. Results Based on sequential analysis of BCR-ABL transcripts, the 91 patients were divided into three categories: (A 57 (62.6% had no variation on sequential analysis; (B 30 (32.9% had a single positive variation result obtained in a single sample; and (C 4 (4.39% had variations of BCR-ABL transcripts in at least two consecutive samples. Of the 34 patients who had elevated levels of transcripts (group B and C, 19 (55.8% had a BCR-ABL/BCR ratio, 13 (38.2% patients had a 1% to 10% increase and 2 patients had a >10% increase of RT-qPCR. The last two patients had lost a CCyR, and none of them showed mutations in the ABL gene. Transient cytogenetic alterations in Ph-negative cells were observed in five (5.5% patients, and none of whom lost CCyR. Conclusions Despite an increase levels of BCR-ABL/BCR ratio variations by RT-qPCR, the majority of CML patients with MMR remained in CCyR. Thus, such single variations should neither be considered predictive of subsequent failure and nor an indication for altering imatinib dose or switching to second generation therapy. Changing of

  1. Severe depression following á-interferon usage in a patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... following á-interferon usage in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia. ... Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), with a median age of 40 years, is one of the ... as a side effect of á-IFN in the treatment of CML Method: Clinical and laboratory ...

  2. Lymphocytosis after treatment with dasatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia: Effects on response and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Charles A; Cortes, Jorge E; Hochhaus, Andreas; Saglio, Giuseppe; le Coutre, Philipp; Porkka, Kimmo; Mustjoki, Satu; Mohamed, Hesham; Shah, Neil P

    2016-05-01

    The proliferation of clonal cytotoxic T-cells or natural killer cells has been observed after dasatinib treatment in small studies of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The incidence of lymphocytosis and its association with response, survival, and side effects were assessed in patients from 3 large clinical trials. Overall, 1402 dasatinib-treated patients with newly diagnosed CML in chronic phase (CML-CP), CML-CP refractory/intolerant to imatinib, or with CML in accelerated or myeloid-blast phase were analyzed. Lymphocytosis developed in 32% to 35% of patients and persisted for >12 months. This was not observed in the patients who received treatment with imatinib. Dasatinib-treated patients in all stages of CML who developed lymphocytosis were more likely to achieve a complete cytogenetic response, and patients who had CML-CP with lymphocytosis were more likely to achieve major and deep molecular responses. Progression-free and overall survival rates were significantly longer in patients with CML-CP who were refractory to or intolerant of imatinib and had lymphocytosis. Pleural effusions developed more commonly in patients with lymphocytosis. Overall, lymphocytosis occurred and persisted in many dasatinib-treated patients in all phases of CML. Its presence was associated with higher response rates, significantly longer response durations, and increased overall survival, suggesting an immunomodulatory effect. Prospective studies are warranted to characterize the functional activity of these cells and to assess whether an immunologic effect against CML is detectable. Cancer 2016;122:1398-1407. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  3. Second tyrosine kinase inhibitor discontinuation attempt in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, Laurence; Nicolini, Franck E; Etienne, Gabriel; Rousselot, Philippe; Rea, Delphine; Giraudier, Stéphane; Guerci-Bresler, Agnès; Huguet, Françoise; Gardembas, Martine; Escoffre, Martine; Ianotto, Jean-Christophe; Noël, Marie-Pierre; Varet, Bruno R; Pagliardini, Thomas; Touitou, Irit; Morisset, Stéphane; Mahon, Francois-Xavier

    2017-11-15

    Several studies have demonstrated that approximately one-half of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who receive treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and achieve and maintain a deep molecular response (DMR) are able to successfully discontinue therapy. In patients who have a molecular relapse, a DMR is rapidly regained upon treatment re-initiation. The authors report the results from RE-STIM, a French observational, multicenter study that evaluated treatment-free remission (TFR) in 70 patients who re-attempted TKI discontinuation after a first unsuccessful attempt. After the second TKI discontinuation attempt, the trigger for treatment re-introduction was the loss of a major molecular response in all patients. The median follow-up was 38.3 months (range, 4.7-117 months), and 45 patients (64.3%) lost a major molecular response after a median time off therapy of 5.3 months (range, 2-42 months). TFR rates at 12, 24, and 36 months were 48% (95% confidence interval [CI], 37.6%-61.5%), 42% (95% CI, 31.5%-55.4%), and 35% (95% CI, 24.4%-49.4%), respectively. No progression toward advanced-phase CML occurred, and no efficacy issue was observed upon TKI re-introduction. In univariate analysis, the speed of molecular relapse after the first TKI discontinuation attempt was the only factor significantly associated with outcome. The TFR rate at 24 months was 72% (95% CI, 48.8%-100%) in patients who remained in DMR within the first 3 months after the first TKI discontinuation and 36% (95% CI, 25.8%-51.3%) for others. This study is the first to demonstrate that a second TKI discontinuation attempt is safe and that a first failed attempt at discontinuing TKI does not preclude a second successful attempt. Cancer 2017;123:4403-10. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  4. Analysis of clinical characteristics and efficacy of chronic myeloid leukemia onset with extreme thrombocytosis in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitors

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    Liu Z

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhihe Liu, Hongqiong Fan, Yuying Li, Chunshui Liu Department of Hematology, Cancer Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and efficacy of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML onset with extreme thrombocytosis. A total of 121 newly diagnosed and untreated CML patients in chronic phase with complete clinical information from the First Hospital of Jilin University, from January 2010 to December 2014 were retrospectively recruited. Based on the platelet (PLT count, 22 patients were assigned into CML with thrombocytosis (CML-T group (PLT >1,000×109/L and 65 patients were classified into CML without extreme thrombocytosis (CML-N group (PLT ≤1,000×109/L. Fifty-four point five percent of patients in the CML-T group were female, which was higher than that in the CML-N group (27.7% (P=0.022. Except for gender, there was no significant difference for clinical information of patients between the two groups. For Sokal and Hasford scoring systems, the percentage of patients at high risk in the CML-T group were higher than those in the CML-N group, 95.5% vs 52.3% (P=0.000 and 68.2% vs 41.5% (P=0.031, respectively; however, there was no significant difference for European Treatment and Outcome Study (EUTOS score system between the two groups (P=0.213. In terms of major molecular response (MMR rate, the percent of patients with MMR in CML-T group was lower than that in CML-N group at 36 months after tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy (P=0.037. Up until December 2016, the median of event-free survival was 21 months in the CML-T group, however, that was not reached in the CML-N group (P=0.027. The majority of CML patients with extreme thrombocytosis were females, and compared to patients in the CML-N group, the percentage of high risk patients based on the Sokal and Hasford scoring systems was higher in the CML-T group, and the median

  5. Additional chromosome abnormalities in chronic myeloid leukemia

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    Hui-Hua Hsiao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Philadelphia (Ph chromosome and/or Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson leukemia virus oncogene transcript are unique markers for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. However, CML demonstrates heterogeneous presentations and outcomes. We analyzed the cytogenetic and molecular results of CML patients to evaluate their correlation with clinical presentations and outcome. A total of 84 newly diagnosed CML patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were treated according to disease status. Bone marrow samples were obtained to perform cytogenetic and molecular studies. Clinical presentations, treatment courses, and survival were reviewed retrospectively. Among 84 patients, 72 had chronic phase and 12 had accelerated phase CML. Cytogenetic study showed 69 (82.1% with the classic Ph chromosome, 6 (7.2% with a variant Ph chromosome, and 9 (10.7% with additional chromosome abnormalities. Fifty-four (64.3% cases harbored b3a2 transcripts, 29 (34.5% had b2a2 transcript, and 1 had e19a2 transcript. There was no difference in clinical presentations between different cytogenetic and molecular groups; however, additional chromosome abnormalities were significantly associated with the accelerated phase. Imatinib therapy was an effective treatment, as measured by cytogenetic response, when administered as first- and second-line therapy in chronic phase patients. Survival analysis showed that old age, additional chromosome abnormalities, high Sokal score, and no cytogenetic response in second-line therapy had a significant poor impact (p<0.05. In conclusion, we presented the cytogenetic and molecular pattern of CML patients and demonstrated that the additional chromosome abnormality was associated with poor outcome.

  6. Treatment patterns and prognostic indicators of response to therapy among patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in Australia, Canada, and South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Jennifer; Iyer, Shrividya; Candrilli, Sean D; Kaye, James A

    2015-02-01

    Given the multiple options for treatment of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, our objective was to understand treatment patterns in routine practice and prognostic indicators of response. We conducted a retrospective medical record review of 681 patients with CML in Australia, Canada, and South Korea. Eligible patients had a diagnosis of chronic-phase CML, were Philadelphia chromosome and/or BCR-ABL positive, were aged 18 years or older, and had been treated with first-line imatinib therapy between January 2005 and September 2010. Data on patient demographics, medical history (e.g., comorbidities, Sokal score), and treatment characteristics (e.g., time to initiation, therapy duration) were abstracted. Descriptive analyses were stratified by country and therapy line. Prognostic indicators of response to imatinib were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for country, patient demographics, medical history, treatment characteristics, and side effects. Hematologic, cytogenetic, and molecular responses at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months following initiation of each therapy line. Patients' average age was 57 years, and 59% were male. Overall, imatinib was initiated approximately 4 months following CML diagnosis. Complete or major molecular response (C/MMR) at 6 months following imatinib initiation was 54% in Australia, 22% in Canada, and 38% in South Korea. At 18 months, over 60% of patients achieved C/MMR. Approximately 30% of patients discontinued imatinib primarily due to intolerance and lack of response. Among patients who received second-line treatment, dasatinib was used more frequently than nilotinib. Multivariable regression results indicated Sokal score was identified as a prognostic indicator of response to imatinib therapy at several time points. There are several limitations to this study. First, we selected a convenience sample of patients and physicians and therefore results may not be

  7. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-01-01

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  8. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Rao, Qing, E-mail: raoqing@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  9. Long-term outcome of patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia: a randomized comparison of stem cell transplantation with drug treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratwohl, A; Pfirrmann, M; Zander, A; Kröger, N; Beelen, D; Novotny, J; Nerl, C; Scheid, C; Spiekermann, K; Mayer, J; Sayer, H G; Falge, C; Bunjes, D; Döhner, H; Ganser, A; Schmidt-Wolf, I; Schwerdtfeger, R; Baurmann, H; Kuse, R; Schmitz, N; Wehmeier, A; Fischer, J Th; Ho, A D; Wilhelm, M; Goebeler, M-E; Lindemann, H W; Bormann, M; Hertenstein, B; Schlimok, G; Baerlocher, G M; Aul, C; Pfreundschuh, M; Fabian, M; Staib, P; Edinger, M; Schatz, M; Fauser, A; Arnold, R; Kindler, T; Wulf, G; Rosselet, A; Hellmann, A; Schäfer, E; Prümmer, O; Schenk, M; Hasford, J; Heimpel, H; Hossfeld, D K; Kolb, H-J; Büsche, G; Haferlach, C; Schnittger, S; Müller, M C; Reiter, A; Berger, U; Saußele, S; Hochhaus, A; Hehlmann, R

    2016-03-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent today's treatment of choice in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is regarded as salvage therapy. This prospective randomized CML-study IIIA recruited 669 patients with newly diagnosed CML between July 1997 and January 2004 from 143 centers. Of these, 427 patients were considered eligible for HSCT and were randomized by availability of a matched family donor between primary HSCT (group A; N=166 patients) and best available drug treatment (group B; N=261). Primary end point was long-term survival. Survival probabilities were not different between groups A and B (10-year survival: 0.76 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69-0.82) vs 0.69 (95% CI: 0.61-0.76)), but influenced by disease and transplant risk. Patients with a low transplant risk showed superior survival compared with patients with high- (Ptreatment (56% vs 6%; P<0.001). Differences in symptoms and Karnofsky score were not significant. In the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, HSCT remains a valid option when both disease and transplant risk are considered.

  10. Chronic myeloid leukemia with variation of translocation at (Ph) [ins (22;9) (q11;q21q34)]: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiong; Zen, Wen; Meng, Fankai; Xin, Xing; Luo, Li; Sun, Hanying; Zhou, Jianfeng; Huang, Lifang

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is most frequently observed in middle-aged individuals. In most patients, normal marrow cells are replaced by cells with an abnormal G-group chromosome, the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. The Ph chromosome that is characterized by the translocation (9;22) (q34;q11) is noted in 90-95% of patients diagnosed with CML. Studies have also shown that CML can be associated with various other cytogenetic abnormalities, with 5-10% of these cases showing complex translocation involving another chromosome in addition to the Ph chromosome. Here, we report the case of a Ph(+) CML patient with an inserted karyotype who presented clinically in the chronic phase but with atypical features. This case highlights the significance of cytogenetic abnormalities on the prognosis in CML.

  11. Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Kusumi, Shizuyo

    1992-01-01

    Leukemia is the first malignant disease found among A-bomb survivors. Leukemia registration has greatly contributed to epidemiological and hematological studies on A-bomb radiation-related leukemia and other hematopoietic diseases, consisting of community population and the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) sample (approximately 120,000 persons containing A-bomb survivors). Using the fixed LSS cohort, the prevalence rate of leukemia reached the peak during the years 1950-1954, and thereafter, it has been gradually decreased. However, risk patterns for leukemia are still unsolved: has leukemia risk increased in recent years?; are serial changes in leukemia risk influenced by age at the time of exposure (ATE)?; is there variation between Hiroshima and Nagasaki?; and others. To solve these questions, leukemia data are now under analysis using the revised DS86. Relative risk for leukemia, especially chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), is found to be linearly increased with increasing bone marrow doses. Serial patterns of both excess risk and excess relative risk have revealed that leukemia risk is high at 5-10 years after A-bombing in younger A-bomb survivors ATE. The influence of age ATE on serial changes is noticeable in ALL. Another factor involved in the prevalence of leukemia is background (spontaneously developed leukemia), which is the recent interest because young A-bomb survivors ATE reach the cancer-prone age. (N.K.)

  12. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a chronic myelocytic leukemia patient treated with imatinib

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    Semra Paydaş

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib is an important example of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs used in clinical practice. Imatinib blocks the ATP binding site of the Bcr-Abl fusion protein and selectively inhibits Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase (TK activity. Treatment of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML with imatinib is encouraging and it has an acceptable toxicity profile, and as such has changed the management of CML during the last decade. As with all drugs used in clinical practice, side effects of imatinib have been reported in studies with extended follow-up periods. In addition, some neoplastic disorders have been reported to occur during imatinib therapy. Herein we present a CML case that developed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL while receiving imatinib treatment.

  13. [Molecular characterization of atypical chronic myeloid leukemia and chronic neutrophilic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senín, Alicia; Arenillas, Leonor; Martínez-Avilés, Luz; Fernández-Rodríguez, Concepción; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Florensa, Lourdes; Besses, Carles; Álvarez-Larrán, Alberto

    2015-06-08

    Atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) and chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) display similar clinical and hematological characteristics. The objective of the present study was to determine the mutational status of SETBP1 and CSF3R in these diseases. The mutational status of SETBP1 and CSF3R was studied in 7 patients with aCML (n = 3), CNL (n = 1) and unclassifiable myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN-u) (n = 3). Additionally, mutations in ASXL1, SRSF2, IDH1/2, DNMT3A, and RUNX1 were also analyzed. SETBP1 mutations (G870S and G872R) were detected in 2 patients with MPN-u, and one of them also presented mutations in SRSF2 (P95H) and ASXL1 (E635fs). The CNL case showed mutations in CSFR3 (T618I), SETBP1 (G870S) and SRSF2 (P95H). No patient classified as aCML had mutations in SETBP1 or CSF3R. One of the patients with mutations evolved to acute myeloid leukemia, while the other 2 had disease progression without transformation to overt leukemia. The knowledge of the molecular alterations involved in these rare diseases is useful in the diagnosis and may have an impact on both prognosis and therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The acute monocytic leukemias: multidisciplinary studies in 45 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, D J; Mertelsmann, R; Koziner, B; McKenzie, S; de Harven, E; Arlin, Z A; Kempin, S; Broxmeyer, H; Moore, M A; Menendez-Botet, C J; Gee, T S; Clarkson, B D

    1980-11-01

    The clinical and laboratory features of 37 patients with variants of acute monocytic leukemia are described. Three of these 37 patients who had extensive extramedullary leukemic tissue infiltration are examples of true histiocytic "lymphomas." Three additional patients with undifferentiated leukemias, one patient with refractory anemia with excess of blasts, one patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, one patient with B-lymphocyte diffuse "histiocytic" lymphoma and one patient with "null" cell, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-positive lymphoblastic lymphoma had bone marrow cells with monocytic features. Another patient had dual populations of lymphoid and monocytoid leukemic cells. The true monocytic leukemias, acute monocytic leukemia (AMOL) and acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMOL), are closely related to acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) morphologically and by their response to chemotherapy. like AML, the leukemic cells from the AMMOL and AMOL patients form leukemic clusters in semisolid media. Cytochemical staining of leukemic cells for nonspecific esterases, presence of Fc receptor on the cell surface, phagocytic ability, low TdT activity, presence of surface "ruffles" and "ridges" on scanning EM, elevations of serum lysozyme, and clinical manifestations of leukemic tissue infiltration are features which accompanied monocytic differentiation in these cases.

  15. Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  16. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 in patients with monocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, A; Kruithof, E K; Grob, J P

    1991-06-01

    Plasma and tumor cells from 103 patients with leukemia or lymphoma at initial presentation were investigated for the presence of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) antigen, a potent inhibitor of urokinase. PAI-2 was detected in plasma and leukemic cells of the 21 patients with leukemia having a monocytic component [acute myelomonocytic (M4), acute monoblastic (M5), and chronic myelomonocytic leukemias], and in the three patients with acute undifferentiated myeloblastic leukemia (M0). In contrast, this serine protease inhibitor was undetectable in 79 patients with other subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia or other hematological malignancies. Serial serum PAI-2 determinations in 16 patients with acute leukemia at presentation, during therapy, remission, and relapse revealed that in the five patients with M4-M5, elevated PAI-2 levels rapidly normalized under therapy and during remission, but increased again in the patients with a relapse associated with an M4-M5 phenotype. Thus, PAI-2 seems to be a marker highly specific for the active stages of monocytic leukemia, i.e. presentation and relapse. The presence of PAI-2 in the plasma and cells of patients with M0 may give a clue to a monocytic origin of these cells.

  17. Evaluation of the Safety of Imatinib Mesylate in 200 Iraqi Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in the Chronic Phase: Single-Center Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam Francis Matti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Imatinib mesylate, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is presently the drug of choice for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. During therapy, a few patients may develop hematological and non-hematological adverse effects. METHODS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of imatinib therapy in patients with CML. Between December 2007 and October 2009 two hundred patients with CML in chronic phase were included in the study. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients prior to the start of the study. Imatinib was started at 400 mg orally daily. Patients were monitored carefully for any adverse effects. Complete blood count, liver, and renal function tests were done once in 2 weeks during the first month and on a monthly basis during follow-up. Toxicities that encountered were graded as per the National Cancer Institute common toxicity criteria version 2. Both hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities were managed with short interruptions of treatment and supportive measures, but the daily dose of imatinib was not reduced below 300 mg/day. RESULTS: Two hundred CML patients in chronic phase were included in this study; the male: female ratio was 0.7: 1 with mean age 39.06±13.21 years (ranged from 15-81 years. The study showed that the commonest hematological side effects were grade 2 anemia (12.5% followed by leukopenia (8% and thrombocytopenia (4%, while the most common non-hematological adverse effects were superficial edema and weight gain (51.5%, followed by musculoskeletal pain (35.5%, then gastro-intestinal symptoms (vomiting, diarrhea (19%. Fluid retention was the commonest side effect, which responded to low-dose diuretics. The drug was safe and well tolerated. There were no deaths due to toxicity. CONCLUSION: Imatinib mesylate a well-tolerated drug, and all undesirable effects could be ameliorated easily. The most common hematological and non-hematological side effects were anemia and fluid retention, respectively.

  18. Combined Targeting of BCL-2 and BCR-ABL Tyrosine Kinase Eradicates Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Po Yee; Mu, Hong; Zhou, Hongsheng; Mak, Duncan H.; Schober, Wendy; Leverson, Joel D.; Zhang, Bin; Bhatia, Ravi; Huang, Xuelin; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are effective against chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but they rarely eliminate CML stem cells. Disease relapse is common upon therapy cessation, even in patients with complete molecular responses. Furthermore, once CML progresses to blast crisis (BC), treatment outcomes are dismal. We hypothesized that concomitant targeting of BCL-2 and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase could overcome these limitations. We demonstrate increased BCL-2 expression at the protein level in bone marrow cells, particularly in Lin−Sca-1+cKit+ cells of inducible CML in mice as determined by CyTOF mass cytometry. Further, selective inhibition of BCL-2, aided by TKI-mediated MCL-1 and BCL-XL inhibition, markedly decreased leukemic Lin−Sca-1+cKit+ cell numbers and long-term stem cell frequency, and prolonged survival in a murine CML model. Additionally, this combination effectively eradicated CD34+CD38−, CD34+CD38+, and quiescent stem/progenitor CD34+ cells from BC CML patient samples. Our results suggest that BCL-2 is a key survival factor for CML stem/progenitor cells and that combined inhibition of BCL-2 and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase has the potential to significantly improve depth of response and cure rates of chronic phase and BC CML. PMID:27605552

  19. Chronic myeloid leukemia may be associated with several bcr-abl transcripts including the acute lymphoid leukemia-type 7 kb transcript

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selleri, L.; von Lindern, M.; Hermans, A.; Meijer, D.; Torelli, G.; Grosveld, G.

    1990-01-01

    In the majority of Philadelphia (Ph)-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, the c-abl gene is fused to the bcr gene, resulting in the transcription of an 8.5 kb chimeric bcr-abl mRNA, which is translated into a p210bcr-abl fusion protein. In about 50% of the Ph-positive acute lymphoid

  20. Leukemoid reaction in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia following the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Yokuş

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of persistent neutrophilic leukocytosisabove 50,000 cells/μL for reasons other thanleukemia is defined as leukemoid reaction. Chronicmyelogenous leukemia (CML and chronic neutrophilicleukemia (CNL should be excluded, and underlyingdiseases or causes should be examined,in differential diagnosis. The most commonly observedcauses of leukemoid reactions are severeinfections, intoxications, malignancies, severe hemorrhage,or acute hemolysis [1]. J Clin Exp Invest2013; 4 (2: 258-259

  1. Dasatinib-Induced Rhabdomyolysis in a 33-Year-Old Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Stevenson Joel Chandranesan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is a life-threatening syndrome due to breakdown of the skeletal muscle. It can be caused by massive trauma and crush injuries or occur as a side effect of medications. Here, we describe a case of a 33-year-old male with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML with severe life-threatening rhabdomyolysis due to a rare offending agent.

  2. [Patient reported outcome of tyrosine kinase inhibitor related side effects and their impact on daily life in Chinese patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L; Wang, H B; Jiang, Q

    2016-11-14

    Objective: To explore the impact of patient reported outcome of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) related side effects on daily life in Chinese patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase (CP). Methods: From May to November in 2014, anonymous questionnaires were distributed to adult CML patients who were receiving TKI treatment in China. The impact of TKI-related side effects on daily life were assessed by the score of 1 (no impact) to 5 (high impact) from patient self-report. Results: Data from 731 respondents in the CP who reported the score of the impact of TKI-related side effects on daily life were collected. 407 (56%) were male. The median age was 41 years (range, 18 to 88 years). 560 (77%) started TKI treatment within 1 year after diagnosis. With a median treatment duration of 3 years (range, effects were edema ( n =323, 44% ), fatigue ( n =277, 38% ), gastrointestinal disorders ( n =235, 32% ), skin color changes ( n =142, 19% ), muscle cramps ( n =137, 19% ), rash ( n =105, 14% ), hepatic function abnormalities ( n =91, 12%), weight gain ( n =86, 12%), and cytopenia ( n =59, 8%). Multivariate analyses showed that TKI treatment duration effects on daily life in 218 (30%)respondents (1 score). 375 (51%)respondents reported their daily life were slightly or moderately decreased (2 or 3 score), while 138 (19%) significantly decreased (4 or 5 score). Multivariate analyses showed that female, ≥40 years old, use of generic TKI, TKI treatment duration negative effect on their daily life. When taking TKI related side-effects into considderation, secondary school and below, use of generic TKI, TKI treatment duration negative effect on their daily life. Conclusion: Edema, fatigue, gastrointestinal disorders, rash, skin color changes and hepatic function abnormalities were common TKI-related side effects and influenced CML patients' daily life in China. In addition, female, older age, lower education level, use of generic TKI and shorter TKI

  3. Patient-reported adverse drug reactions and their influence on adherence and quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia patients on per oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekäle M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Meri Kekäle,1 Marikki Peltoniemi,2 Marja Airaksinen1 1Clinical Pharmacy Group, Division of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, 2Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Purpose: To evaluate adverse drug reactions (ADRs experienced by chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients during per oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI treatment and correlation of ADR symptoms with medication adherence and perceived quality of life (QoL.Patients and methods: Eighty-six adult, chronic-phase CML patients who had been on TKI treatment (79% on imatinib, 10.5% dasatinib, and 10.5% nilotinib for at least 6 months participated in the study (mean age: 57.8 years, 52% males. The mean time from diagnosis was 5.1 years. All patients were interviewed, and patient-reported ADRs were obtained using a structured list. Adherence was assessed using Morisky’s 8-item Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS. The symptoms’ interference with patient’s daily QoL was measured by asking patients about the influence of symptom(s on their mood, general condition, enjoyment of life, walking, relationships, and work.Results: Ninety-seven percent of the patients were suffering from at least one ADR. The mean number of different symptoms was seven (range: 0–15, median 6. The most commonly perceived ADRs were muscle soreness or cramp (69/86, 80%; swelling of hands, legs, feet, or around the eyes (59/86, 69%; and fatigue (43/86, 50%. No correlation was found between adherence and ADRs, because symptoms were equally common in each MMAS adherence class. Half of the patients felt that the ADRs had a negative influence on their daily QoL. A quarter of the patients reported that ADRs affected either their mood, general condition, or enjoyment of life. The incidence of almost all ADRs was much higher among patients reporting negative influence of ADRs on their daily life compared to total study population (P=0.016.Conclusion

  4. Modeling chronic myeloid leukemia in immunodeficient mice reveals expansion of aberrant mast cells and accumulation of pre-B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askmyr, M; Ågerstam, H; Lilljebjörn, H; Hansen, N; Karlsson, C; Palffy, S von; Landberg, N; Högberg, C; Lassen, C; Rissler, M; Richter, J; Ehinger, M; Järås, M; Fioretos, T

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm that, if not treated, will progress into blast crisis (BC) of either myeloid or B lymphoid phenotype. The BCR-ABL1 fusion gene, encoding a constitutively active tyrosine kinase, is thought to be sufficient to cause chronic phase (CP) CML, whereas additional genetic lesions are needed for progression into CML BC. To generate a humanized CML model, we retrovirally expressed BCR-ABL1 in the cord blood CD34 + cells and transplanted these into NOD-SCID (non-obese diabetic/severe-combined immunodeficient) interleukin-2-receptor γ-deficient mice. In primary mice, BCR-ABL1 expression induced an inflammatory-like state in the bone marrow and spleen, and mast cells were the only myeloid lineage specifically expanded by BCR-ABL1. Upon secondary transplantation, the pronounced inflammatory phenotype was lost and mainly human mast cells and macrophages were found in the bone marrow. Moreover, a striking block at the pre-B-cell stage was observed in primary mice, resulting in an accumulation of pre-B cells. A similar block in B-cell differentiation could be confirmed in primary cells from CML patients. Hence, this humanized mouse model of CML reveals previously unexplored features of CP CML and should be useful for further studies to understand the disease pathogenesis of CML

  5. Clinical relevance of the breakpoint sites within the M-BCR in 50 patients from Argentina with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giere, I A; Larripa, I B

    1996-08-01

    Fifty patients from Argentina with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) were studied in order to characterize the breakpoint site within the major breakpoint cluster region (M-BCR) and its relationship with the duration of the chronic phase (CP). The DNA digestion with the restriction enzymes: Bgl II, BAM HI and Hind III and hybridization with the 1.2Kb Hind III-Bgl II bcr probe showed that 56% of cases had the breakpoint in 5'M-bcr region and the remaining 44% in 3'M-bcr region. The duration of chronic phase from diagnosis to the onset of the blast crisis (BC) was correlated with the location of the breakpoint within the M-bcr and no statistical differences were observed between the 5' and the 3' groups. These data indicate that the breakpoint site within the bcr gene is not a prognostic indicator of the duration of CP of the disease.

  6. Reassessment of diagnosis and subtyping of leukemias among atomic bomb survivors, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomonaga, Masao; Kuriyama, Kazutaka; Ichimaru, Michito; Matsuo, Tatsuki; Finch, S.C.; Imanaka, Fumio; Kuramoto, Atsushi; Kamada, Nanao.

    1988-01-01

    In evaluable 456 (60 %) of 750 leukemic patients exposed at ≤9,000 m from the hypocenter, diagnosis and subtypes of leukemia were reevaluated in relation to radiation doses and age at the time of bombing using a new classification method of French-American-British (FAB). The FAB classification diagnosed 63 patients (13.5 %) as acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), 181 (39.0 %) as acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 26 (5.6 %) as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 106 (22.8 %) as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), 39 (7.5 %) as adult T-cell leukemia, and 5 (0.8 %) as chronic lymphocytic leukemia. According to radiation doses, the incidence of CML increased in the group exposed to one to 99 cGy; the incidences of ALL and MDS increased in the group exposed to ≥100 cGy. The incidence of CML was definitively higher in Hiroshima than Nagasaki in all groups; this was noted in the group exposed to 0 cGy (approximately 2.5 times higher). The incidences of ALL and MDS showed a tendency to increase in proportion to radiation doses. In the group exposed to ≥100 cGy, the incidences of ALL, CML, and MDS increased in patients younger than 15 years, those aged 16 - 35 years, and those older than 36 years, respectively, at the time of the bombing. In this group, there were also differences in latent period (10 yr in ALL and CML, 15 yr in AML, and 17 yr in MDS). None of the AML patients in the group exposed to ≥100 cGy had M3. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Human monoclonal antibodies reactive with human myelomonocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, M R; Santos, D J; Elboim, H S; Tumber, M B; Frackelton, A R

    1989-04-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), in remission, were depleted of CD8-positive T-cells and cultured with Epstein-Barr virus. Four of 20 cultures (20%) secreted human IgG antibodies selectively reactive with the cell surfaces of certain human leukemia cell lines. Three polyclonal, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed, B-cell lines were expanded and fused with the human-mouse myeloma analogue HMMA2.11TG/O. Antibody from secreting clones HL 1.2 (IgG1), HL 2.1 (IgG3), and HL 3.1 (IgG1) have been characterized. All three react with HL-60 (promyelocytic), RWLeu4 (CML promyelocytic), and U937 (monocytic), but not with KG-1 (myeloblastic) or K562 (CML erythroid). There is no reactivity with T-cell lines, Burkitt's cell lines, pre-B-leukemia cell lines, or an undifferentiated CML cell line, BV173. Leukemic cells from two of seven patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and one of five with acute lymphocytic leukemia react with all three antibodies. Normal lymphocytes, monocytes, polymorphonuclear cells, red blood cells, bone marrow cells, and platelets do not react. Samples from patients with other diverse hematopoietic malignancies showed no reactivity. Immunoprecipitations suggest that the reactive antigen(s) is a lactoperoxidase iodinatable series of cell surface proteins with molecular weights of 42,000-54,000 and a noniodinatable protein with a molecular weight of 82,000. Based on these data these human monoclonal antibodies appear to react with myelomonocytic leukemic cells and may detect a leukemia-specific antigen or a highly restricted differentiation antigen.

  8. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: from genome to patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolenova, A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common malignant disease in childhood. During recent decades prognosis for children with acute leukemia has greatly improved, including the patients treated in the Slovak Republic. The prognosis for these patients has improved as a result of the systematic and well-organized international research efforts and clinical trials. The advent of new genomic technologies has provided new insights into leukemogenesis, identified many novel subtypes of leukemia, and triggered development of new therapeutic formulations. The success of treatment depends on stratifying patients into risk group and incorporating novel treatment strategies.The Slovak pediatric leukemia group is actively incorporated into these international clinical trials and the outcome for our patients is comparable to the results published in Western Europe. (author)

  9. Downregulated microRNA-148b in circulating PBMCs in chronic myeloid leukemia patients with undetectable minimal residual disease: a possible biomarker to discontinue imatinib safely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohyashiki JH

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Junko H Ohyashiki,1 Kazushige Ohtsuki,1 Izuru Mizoguchi,2 Takayuki Yoshimoto,2 Seiichiro Katagiri,3 Tomohiro Umezu,1,4 Kazuma Ohyashiki3,4 1Department of Molecular Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, 2Department of Immunoregulation, Institute of Medical Science, 3Department of Hematology, 4Department of Molecular Science, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan Background: A subset of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML can sustain a complete molecular response after discontinuing imatinib mesylate (IM. We focused on microRNAs (miRNAs, with the aim of finding a molecular biomarker to discriminate which patients can safely and successfully discontinue IM use. Methods: To identify miRNAs that showed altered expression in patients who had discontinued IM (STOP-IM group, we first screened miRNA expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by using a TaqMan miRNA array on samples from five unselected patients from the STOP-IM group, seven CML patients receiving IM (IM group, and five healthy volunteers. We then performed miRNA quantification in 49 CML patients with deep molecular response. Mann–Whitney U and chi-square tests were used to determine statistical significance for comparisons between the control (healthy volunteers and test groups (STOP-IM and IM groups. Multiple groups were compared by one-way analysis of variance. Results: Downregulation of miR-148b was noted in patients in the STOP-IM group and in a subset of the IM group. We then subdivided the IM patients into two groups: one with downregulated miR-148b expression (IM-1; less than the cut-off value and the other without downregulated miR-148b expression (IM-2; greater than the cut-off value. The number of patients who had a sustained stable molecular response was significantly lower in IM-2 group. This group also had a significantly lower percentage of natural killer cells. Conclusion: Downregulated miR-148 may contribute to immune surveillance in STOP-IM patients

  10. Aberrant DNA Methylation in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Cell Fate Control, Prognosis, and Therapeutic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Masumeh Maleki; Shahrabi, Saeid; Jaseb, Kaveh; Bertacchini, Jessika; Ketabchi, Neda; Saki, Najmaldin

    2018-01-31

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematopoietic stem cell malignancy characterized by the expression of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene with different chimeric transcripts. Despite the crucial impact of constitutively active tyrosine kinase in CML pathogenesis, aberrant DNA methylation of certain genes plays an important role in disease progression and the development of drug resistance. This article reviews recent findings relevant to the effect of DNA methylation pattern of regulatory genes on various cellular activities such as cell proliferation and survival, as well as cell-signaling molecules in CML. These data might contribute to defining the role of aberrant DNA methylation in disease initiation and progression. However, further studies are needed on the validation of specific aberrant methylation markers regarding the prognosis and prediction of response among the CML patients.

  11. Dasatinib rapidly induces deep molecular response in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients who achieved major molecular response with detectable levels of BCR-ABL1 transcripts by imatinib therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiseki, Masayuki; Yoshida, Chikashi; Takezako, Naoki; Ohwada, Akira; Kumagai, Takashi; Nishiwaki, Kaichi; Horikoshi, Akira; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Takano, Hina; Kouzai, Yasuji; Tanaka, Junji; Morita, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Junichi; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2017-10-01

    With the introduction of imatinib, a first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) to inhibit BCR-ABL1 kinase, the outcome of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) has improved dramatically. However, only a small proportion of CP-CML patients subsequently achieve a deep molecular response (DMR) with imatinib. Dasatinib, a second-generation TKI, is more potent than imatinib in the inhibition of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase in vitro and more effective in CP-CML patients who do not achieve an optimal response with imatinib treatment. In the present study, we attempted to investigate whether switching the treatment from imatinib to dasatinib can induce DMR in 16 CP-CML patients treated with imatinib for at least two years who achieved a major molecular response (MMR) with detectable levels of BCR-ABL1 transcripts. The rates of achievement of DMR at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after switching to dasatinib treatment in the 16 patients were 44% (7/16), 56% (9/16), 63% (10/16) and 75% (12/16), respectively. The cumulative rate of achieving DMR at 12 months from initiation of dasatinib therapy was 93.8% (15/16). The proportion of natural killer cells and cytotoxic T cells in peripheral lymphocytes increased after switching to dasatinib. In contrast, the proportion of regulatory T cells decreased during treatment. The safety profile of dasatinib was consistent with previous studies. Switching to dasatinib would be a therapeutic option for CP-CML patients who achieved MMR but not DMR by imatinib, especially for patients who wish to discontinue TKI therapy.

  12. Cumulative clinical experience from a decade of use: imatinib as first-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Y

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Yusuf Baran,1 Guray Saydam21Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Izmir Institute of Technology, Izmir, Turkey; 2Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, Ege University, Izmir, TurkeyAbstract: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a malignant disease that originates in the bone marrow and is designated by the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph+ chromosome, a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22. Targeted therapy against CML commenced with the development of small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs exerting their effect against the oncogenic breakpoint cluster region (BCR-ABL fusion protein. Imatinib emerged as the first successful example of a TKI used for the treatment of chronic-phase CML patients and resulted in significant improvements in response rate and overall survival compared with previous treatments. However, a significant portion of patients failed to respond to the therapy and developed resistance against imatinib. Second-generation TKIs nilotinib and dasatinib were to have higher efficiency in clinical trials in imatinib- resistant or intolerant CML patients compared with imatinib. Identification of novel strategies such as dose escalation, drug combination therapy, and use of novel BCR-ABL inhibitors may eventually overcome resistance against BCR-ABL TKIs. This article reviews the history of CML, including the treatment strategies used prediscovery of TKIs and the preclinical and clinical data obtained after the use of imatinib, and the second-generation TKIs developed for the treatment of CML.Keywords: drug resistance, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, chronic myeloid leukemia, imatinib, BCR/ABL

  13. Frequency of ABL gene mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant to imatinib and results of treatment switch to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcé, Silvia; Zamora, Lurdes; Cabezón, Marta; Xicoy, Blanca; Boqué, Concha; Fernández, Cristalina; Grau, Javier; Navarro, José-Tomás; Fernández de Sevilla, Alberto; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Feliu, Evarist; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-08-04

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, a significant proportion of patients do not achieve the optimal response or are resistant to TKI. ABL kinase domain mutations have been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of TKI resistance. Treatment with second-generation TKI has produced high rates of hematologic and cytogenetic responses in mutated ABL patients. The aim of this study was to determine the type and frequency of ABL mutations in patients who were resistant to imatinib or had lost the response, and to analyze the effect of second-generation TKI on their outcome. The presence of ABL mutations in 45 CML patients resistant to imatinib was evaluated by direct sequencing and was correlated with the results of the cytogenetic study (performed in 39 cases). The outcome of these patients after therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib was analyzed. ABL mutations were detected in 14 out of 45 resistant patients. Patients with clonal cytogenetic evolution tended to develop mutations more frequently than those without clonal evolution. Nine out of the 15 patients with ABL mutation responded to a treatment switch to nilotinib (n=4), dasatinib (n=2), interferon (n=1) or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (n=2). The frequency of ABL mutations in CML patients resistant to imatinib is high and is more frequent among those with clonal cytogenetic evolution. The change to second-generation TKI can overcome imatinib resistance in most of the mutated patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. New Drugs for CML

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    to a fulminant acute leukemic disorder in which patients die of bleeding and infection (1). Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation was the first...acetylenes were created in one step by the coupling of a propiolate anion and isocyanate. These acetylenes were then used as a precursor in the synthesis of...the furans. The furan synthesis was based on early research in the Austin laboratory, which was centered on the concept of adapting the 1,3-dipolar

  15. Optimized Treatment Schedules for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qie He

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, several targeted therapies (e.g. imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib have been developed to treat Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML. Despite an initial response to therapy, drug resistance remains a problem for some CML patients. Recent studies have shown that resistance mutations that preexist treatment can be detected in a substantial number of patients, and that this may be associated with eventual treatment failure. One proposed method to extend treatment efficacy is to use a combination of multiple targeted therapies. However, the design of such combination therapies (timing, sequence, etc. remains an open challenge. In this work we mathematically model the dynamics of CML response to combination therapy and analyze the impact of combination treatment schedules on treatment efficacy in patients with preexisting resistance. We then propose an optimization problem to find the best schedule of multiple therapies based on the evolution of CML according to our ordinary differential equation model. This resulting optimization problem is nontrivial due to the presence of ordinary different equation constraints and integer variables. Our model also incorporates drug toxicity constraints by tracking the dynamics of patient neutrophil counts in response to therapy. We determine optimal combination strategies that maximize time until treatment failure on hypothetical patients, using parameters estimated from clinical data in the literature.

  16. Personal history and quality of life in chronic myeloid leukemia patients: a cross-sectional study using narrative medicine and quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breccia, Massimo; Graffigna, Guendalina; Galimberti, Sara; Iurlo, Alessandra; Pungolino, Ester; Pizzuti, Michele; Maggi, Alessandro; Falzetti, Franca; Capalbo, Silvana Franca; Intermesoli, Tamara; Maffioli, Margherita; Elena, Chiara; Melosi, Alessandro; Simonetti, Federico; Capochiani, Enrico; Seta, Roberta Della; Pacilli, Matteo; Luppi, Mario; Di Renzo, Nicola; Mastrullo, Lucia; Trabacchi, Elena; Vallisa, Daniele; Rapezzi, Davide; Orlandi, Ester Maria; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Efficace, Fabio; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) drastically changed the outcome of patients diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Several reports indicated the advantage of continue long-term adherence associated with positive outcome. Therefore, it is important to better understand from the patient's standpoint the experience of living with the disease and the related treatment. In this study, quantitative analysis and narrative medicine were combined to get insights on this issue in a population of 257 patients with CML in chronic phase treated with TKIs (43 % men, with a median age of 58 years, 27 % aged 31-50 years), followed for a median time of 5 years. Sixty-one percent of patients enrolled were treated in first line, whereas 37 % were treated in second line. The results showed more positive perceptions and acceptance in males compared to females, without impact of disease on relationships. Level of positive acceptance was more evident in elderly compared to younger patients, with a close connection with median time from diagnosis. Overall, female patients reported negative perceptions and an impact of disease on family daily living. The majority of patients understood the importance of continue adherence to treatment, with 27 % resulting less adherent (60 % for forgetfulness), even if well informed and supported by his/her physician. Narrative medicine, in association to quantitative analysis, can help physicians to understand needs of their patients in order to improve communication.

  17. Cessation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia following durable complete molecular response: a single center facing the dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliakis, Theodoros; Papadopoulou, Vasiliki; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis T; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Zervakis, Konstantinos; Giannakopoulou, Nefeli; Tilimidos, Gerassimos; Angelopoulou, Maria; Siakantaris, Marina P; Pangalis, Gerassimos; Mantzourani, Marina; Variami, Eleni; Viniou, Nora Athina

    2013-08-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), namely imatinib mesylate (IM) and recently approved second-generation TKIs dasatinib and nilotinib, are currently considered the treatment of choice for newly-diagnosed chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CP-CML). Although treatment with TKIs has not yet been proven curative, it certainly accomplishes a sustained control of the disease in the vast majority of patients. More than a decade after the successful launching of IM in first-line treatment of CP-CML and the subsequent introduction of second-generation TKIs in this setting, the question of the possibility of TKI cessation in a specific subset of patients has emerged. Side-effects of TKIs, along with some patients' wish to abandon the drugs and the rising financial burden upon healthcare systems, have led to the dilemma whether IM can be safely withdrawn after achieving deep molecular remissions and which patients are suitable for this discontinuation. We examined the data of our patients with CML in search of potential canditates for cessation of TKI therapy and identified their characteristics. We also performed a thorough review of the relevant literature. Eight out of fifty patients were discriminated on grounds of sustained complete molecular response (CMR) exceeding 12 months, most of them with a low or intermediate Sokal score at diagnosis. The median interval from IM initiation to CMR was almost 2 years and the median duration of detected CMR reached 6.5 years. Based on the promising results of prospective clinical trials reporting successful cessation of treatment with TKIs on selected subgroups of patients, we decided to proceed to interruption of therapy in the specific subset of our patients and closely monitor their response.

  18. Immune Effector Recovery in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Treatment-Free Remission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes S. M. Yong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a hematological cancer, characterized by a reciprocal chromosomal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 [t(9;22], producing the Bcr-Abl oncogene. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs represent the standard of care for CML patients and exert a dual mode of action: direct oncokinase inhibition and restoration of effector-mediated immune surveillance, which is rendered dysfunctional in CML patients at diagnosis, prior to TKI therapy. TKIs such as imatinib, and more potent second-generation nilotinib and dasatinib induce a high rate of deep molecular response (DMR, BCR-ABL1 ≤ 0.01% in CML patients. As a result, the more recent goal of therapy in CML treatment is to induce a durable DMR as a prelude to successful treatment-free remission (TFR, which occurs in approximately half of all CML patients who cease TKI therapy. The lack of overt relapse in such patients has been attributed to immunological control of CML. In this review, we discuss an immunological timeline to successful TFR, focusing on the immunology of CML during TKI treatment; an initial period of immune suppression, limiting antitumor immune effector responses in newly diagnosed CML patients, linked to an expansion of immature myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells and aberrant expression of immune checkpoint signaling pathways, including programmed death-1/programmed death ligand-1. Commencement of TKI treatment is associated with immune system re-activation and restoration of effector-mediated [natural killer (NK cell and T cell] immune surveillance in CML patients, albeit with differing frequencies in concert with differing levels of molecular response achieved on TKI. DMR is associated with maximal restoration of immune recovery in CML patients on TKI. Current data suggest a net balance between both the effector and suppressor arms of the immune system, at a minimum involving mature, cytotoxic CD56dim NK cells may be important

  19. Immune Effector Recovery in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Treatment-Free Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amy; Yong, Agnes S. M.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematological cancer, characterized by a reciprocal chromosomal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 [t(9;22)], producing the Bcr-Abl oncogene. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) represent the standard of care for CML patients and exert a dual mode of action: direct oncokinase inhibition and restoration of effector-mediated immune surveillance, which is rendered dysfunctional in CML patients at diagnosis, prior to TKI therapy. TKIs such as imatinib, and more potent second-generation nilotinib and dasatinib induce a high rate of deep molecular response (DMR, BCR-ABL1 ≤ 0.01%) in CML patients. As a result, the more recent goal of therapy in CML treatment is to induce a durable DMR as a prelude to successful treatment-free remission (TFR), which occurs in approximately half of all CML patients who cease TKI therapy. The lack of overt relapse in such patients has been attributed to immunological control of CML. In this review, we discuss an immunological timeline to successful TFR, focusing on the immunology of CML during TKI treatment; an initial period of immune suppression, limiting antitumor immune effector responses in newly diagnosed CML patients, linked to an expansion of immature myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells and aberrant expression of immune checkpoint signaling pathways, including programmed death-1/programmed death ligand-1. Commencement of TKI treatment is associated with immune system re-activation and restoration of effector-mediated [natural killer (NK) cell and T cell] immune surveillance in CML patients, albeit with differing frequencies in concert with differing levels of molecular response achieved on TKI. DMR is associated with maximal restoration of immune recovery in CML patients on TKI. Current data suggest a net balance between both the effector and suppressor arms of the immune system, at a minimum involving mature, cytotoxic CD56dim NK cells may be important in mediating

  20. Reassessment of diagnosis and subtyping of leukemias among atomic bomb survivors, 4. Combined analysis of Hiroshima and Nagasaki cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomonaga, Masao; Kuriyama, Kazutaka; Ichimaru, Michito; Matsuo, Tatsuki; Finch, S C; Imanaka, Fumio; Kuramoto, Atsushi; Kamada, Nanao

    1988-03-01

    In evaluable 456 (60 %) of 750 leukemic patients exposed at less than or equal to9,000 m from the hypocenter, diagnosis and subtypes of leukemia were reevaluated in relation to radiation doses and age at the time of bombing using a new classification method of French-American-British (FAB). The FAB classification diagnosed 63 patients (13.5 %) as acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), 181 (39.0 %) as acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 26 (5.6 %) as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 106 (22.8 %) as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), 39 (7.5 %) as adult T-cell leukemia, and 5 (0.8 %) as chronic lymphocytic leukemia. According to radiation doses, the incidence of CML increased in the group exposed to one to 99 cGy; the incidences of ALL and MDS increased in the group exposed to greater than or equal to100 cGy. The incidence of CML was definitively higher in Hiroshima than Nagasaki in all groups; this was noted in the group exposed to 0 cGy (approximately 2.5 times higher). The incidences of ALL and MDS showed a tendency to increase in proportion to radiation doses. In the group exposed to greater than or equal to100 cGy, the incidences of ALL, CML, and MDS increased in patients younger than 15 years, those aged 16 - 35 years, and those older than 36 years, respectively, at the time of the bombing. In this group, there were also differences in latent period (10 yr in ALL and CML, 15 yr in AML, and 17 yr in MDS). None of the AML patients in the group exposed to greater than or equal to100 cGy had M3. (Namekawa, K.).

  1. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Further phenotypic characterization of the primitive lineage− CD34+CD38−CD90+CD45RA− hematopoietic stem cell/progenitor cell sub-population isolated from cord blood, mobilized peripheral blood and patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisniewski, D; Affer, M; Willshire, J; Clarkson, B

    2011-01-01

    The most primitive hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)/progenitor cell (PC) population reported to date is characterized as being Lin−CD34+CD38−CD90+CD45R. We have a long-standing interest in comparing the characteristics of hematopoietic progenitor cell populations enriched from normal subjects and patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In order to investigate further purification of HSCs and for potential targetable differences between the very primitive normal and CML stem/PCs, we have phenotypically compared the normal and CML Lin−CD34+CD38−CD90+CD45RA− HSC/PC populations. The additional antigens analyzed were HLA-DR, the receptor tyrosine kinases c-kit and Tie2, the interleukin-3 cytokine receptor, CD33 and the activation antigen CD69, the latter of which was recently reported to be selectively elevated in cell lines expressing the Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase. Notably, we found a strikingly low percentage of cells from the HSC/PC sub-population isolated from CML patients that were found to express the c-kit receptor (<1%) compared with the percentages of HSC/PCs expressing the c-kitR isolated from umbilical cord blood (50%) and mobilized peripheral blood (10%). Surprisingly, Tie2 receptor expression within the HSC/PC subset was extremely low from both normal and CML samples. Using in vivo transplantation studies, we provide evidence that HLA-DR, c-kitR, Tie2 and IL-3R may not be suitable markers for further partitioning of HSCs from the Lin−CD34+CD38−CD90+CD45RA− sub-population

  3. Cost-utility analysis of dasatinib and nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia refractory to first-line treatment with imatinib in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulpeng, Wantanee; Sompitak, Sumalai; Jootar, Saengsuree; Chansung, Kanchana; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2014-04-01

    Recently, the second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors dasatinib and nilotinib have emerged as alternative treatments in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who are resistant to or intolerant of imatinib. This article aimed to assess the cost utility and budget impact of using dasatinib or nilotinib, rather than high-dose (800-mg/d) imatinib, in patients with chronic phase (CP) CML who are resistant to standard-dose (400-mg/d) imatinib in Thailand. A Markov simulation model was developed and used to estimate the lifetime costs and outcomes of treating patients aged ≥38 years with CP-CML. The efficacy parameters were synthesized from a systematic review. Utilities using the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions tool and costs were obtained from the Thai CML population. Costs and outcomes were compared and presented as the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in 2011 Thai baht (THB) per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to estimate parameter uncertainty. From a societal perspective, treatment with dasatinib was found to yield more QALYs (2.13) at a lower cost (THB 1,631,331) per person than high-dose imatinib. Nilotinib treatment was also found to be more cost-effective than high-dose imatinib, producing an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of THB 83,328 per QALY gained. This treatment option also resulted in the highest number of QALYs gained of all of the treatment options. The costs of providing dasatinib, nilotinib, and high-dose imatinib were estimated at THB 5 billion, THB 6 billion, and THB 7 billion, respectively. Treatment with dasatinib or nilotinib is likely to be more cost-effective than treatment with high-dose imatinib in CP-CML patients who do not respond positively to standard-dose imatinib in the Thai context. Dasatinib was found to be more cost-effective than nilotinib. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SLC22A1-ABCB1 haplotype profiles predict imatinib pharmacokinetics in Asian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onkar Singh

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the influence of SLC22A1, PXR, ABCG2, ABCB1 and CYP3A5 3 genetic polymorphisms on imatinib mesylate (IM pharmacokinetics in Asian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Healthy subjects belonging to three Asian populations (Chinese, Malay, Indian; n = 70 each and CML patients (n = 38 were enrolled in a prospective pharmacogenetics study. Imatinib trough (C(0h and clearance (CL were determined in the patients at steady state. Haplowalk method was applied to infer the haplotypes and generalized linear model (GLM to estimate haplotypic effects on IM pharmacokinetics. Association of haplotype copy numbers with IM pharmacokinetics was defined by Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS: Global haplotype score statistics revealed a SLC22A1 sub-haplotypic region encompassing three polymorphisms (rs3798168, rs628031 and IVS7+850C>T, to be significantly associated with IM clearance (p = 0.013. Haplotype-specific GLM estimated that the haplotypes AGT and CGC were both associated with 22% decrease in clearance compared to CAC [CL (10(-2 L/hr/mg: CAC vs AGT: 4.03 vs 3.16, p = 0.017; CAC vs CGC: 4.03 vs 3.15, p = 0.017]. Patients harboring 2 copies of AGT or CGC haplotypes had 33.4% lower clearance and 50% higher C(0h than patients carrying 0 or 1 copy [CL (10(-2 L/hr/mg: 2.19 vs 3.29, p = 0.026; C(0h (10(-6 1/ml: 4.76 vs 3.17, p = 0.013, respectively]. Further subgroup analysis revealed SLC22A1 and ABCB1 haplotypic combinations to be significantly associated with clearance and C(0h (p = 0.002 and 0.009, respectively. CONCLUSION: This exploratory study suggests that SLC22A1-ABCB1 haplotypes may influence IM pharmacokinetics in Asian CML patients.

  5. Splenic irradiation in the treatment of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia. Results of daily and intermittent fractionation with and without concomitant hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H. Jr.; McKeough, P.G.; Desforges, J.; Madoc-Jones, H.

    1986-01-01

    Seventeen patients with either chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia (MMM) received 24 courses of splenic irradiation at this institution from 1973 to 1982. Eleven of the 17 patients had received prior chemotherapy. Patients were treated with 60 Co gamma rays or 6 MV photons. The fraction size ranged from 15 to 100 rad and the total dose per treatment course from 15 to 650 rad, with the exception of one patient who received 1650 rad. Fourteen of 19 courses (71%) given for splenic pain yielded significant subjective relief while 17 of 26 courses given for splenomegaly obtained at least 50% regression of splenic size. Blood counts were carefully monitored before each treatment to limit hematologic toxicity. From this experience, the authors conclude that splenic irradiation effectively palliates splenic pain and reverses splenomegaly in the majority of patients with CML and MMM. Intermittent fractionation (twice or thrice weekly) is more convenient for the patient, appears to be as effective as daily treatment, and may be associated with less hematologic toxicity. Preliminary results of concurrent treatment with splenic irradiation and oral hydroxyurea show promise and warrant further study

  6. Review of clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular aspects of Ph-negative CML

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van der Plas (D.); G.C. Grosveld (Gerard); A. Hagemeijer (Anne)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Between 1985 and 1989, many cases of Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome negative chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) were reported. For this review, the following selection criteria were used: the original articles on Ph-negative cases should provide clinical, hematologic,

  7. Evaluation of chronic myeloid leukemia patients and their molecular responses to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in Erbil city, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawa Muhamedamin Hasan

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: In the current study, CML patients were at a younger age of onset, and more high EUTOS score. The majority of patients achieved MMR with frontline Imatinib or Nilotinib and those who switched from Imatinib to Nilotinib as well.

  8. Circulating endothelial cells are increased in chronic myeloid leukemia blast crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R.T. Godoy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We measured circulating endothelial precursor cells (EPCs, activated circulating endothelial cells (aCECs, and mature circulating endothelial cells (mCECs using four-color multiparametric flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 84 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients and 65 healthy controls; and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF by quantitative real-time PCR in 50 CML patients and 32 healthy controls. Because of an increase in mCECs, the median percentage of CECs in CML blast crisis (0.0146% was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (0.0059%, P0.05. In addition, VEGF gene expression was significantly higher in all phases of CML: 0.245 in blast crisis, 0.320 in the active phase, and 0.330 in chronic phase patients than it was in healthy subjects (0.145. In conclusion, CML in blast crisis had increased levels of CECs and VEGF gene expression, which may serve as markers of disease progression and may become targets for the management of CML.

  9. Single-cell transcriptomics uncovers distinct molecular signatures of stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustacchini, Alice; Thongjuea, Supat; Barkas, Nikolaos; Woll, Petter S; Povinelli, Benjamin J; Booth, Christopher A G; Sopp, Paul; Norfo, Ruggiero; Rodriguez-Meira, Alba; Ashley, Neil; Jamieson, Lauren; Vyas, Paresh; Anderson, Kristina; Segerstolpe, Åsa; Qian, Hong; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Mustjoki, Satu; Sandberg, Rickard; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Mead, Adam J

    2017-06-01

    Recent advances in single-cell transcriptomics are ideally placed to unravel intratumoral heterogeneity and selective resistance of cancer stem cell (SC) subpopulations to molecularly targeted cancer therapies. However, current single-cell RNA-sequencing approaches lack the sensitivity required to reliably detect somatic mutations. We developed a method that combines high-sensitivity mutation detection with whole-transcriptome analysis of the same single cell. We applied this technique to analyze more than 2,000 SCs from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) throughout the disease course, revealing heterogeneity of CML-SCs, including the identification of a subgroup of CML-SCs with a distinct molecular signature that selectively persisted during prolonged therapy. Analysis of nonleukemic SCs from patients with CML also provided new insights into cell-extrinsic disruption of hematopoiesis in CML associated with clinical outcome. Furthermore, we used this single-cell approach to identify a blast-crisis-specific SC population, which was also present in a subclone of CML-SCs during the chronic phase in a patient who subsequently developed blast crisis. This approach, which might be broadly applied to any malignancy, illustrates how single-cell analysis can identify subpopulations of therapy-resistant SCs that are not apparent through cell-population analysis.

  10. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Comorbidity and performance status in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostgård, L S G; Nørgaard, J M; Sengeløv, H

    2015-01-01

    As the world population ages, the comorbidity burden in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients increases. Evidence on how to integrate comorbidity measures into clinical decision-making is sparse. We determined the prognostic impact of comorbidity and World Health Organization Performance Status (PS...... with an increased short- and long-term mortality (adjusted 90 day MR, PS⩾2=3.43 (95%CI=2.30-5.13); adjusted 91 day-3 year MR=1.35 (95%CI=1.06-1.74)). We propose that more patients with comorbidity may benefit from intensive chemotherapy.Leukemia advance online publication, 2 September 2014; doi:10.1038/leu.2014.234....

  12. Interphase FISH for BCR-ABL1 rearrangement on neutrophils: A decisive tool to discriminate a lymphoid blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia from a de novo BCR-ABL1 positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balducci, Estelle; Loosveld, Marie; Rahal, Ilhem; Boudjarane, John; Alazard, Emilie; Missirian, Chantal; Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina; Michel, Gérard; Zattara, Hélène

    2018-02-01

    Discrimination between lymphoid blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and de novo BCR-ABL1 positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents a diagnostic challenge because this distinction has a major incidence on the management of patients. Here, we report an uncommon pediatric case of ALL with cryptic ins(22;9)(q11;q34q34) and p190-type BCR-ABL1 transcript. We performed interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for BCR-ABL1 rearrangement on blood neutrophils, which was positive consistent with the diagnosis of lymphoid blast crisis of CML. This case illustrates the major interest of interphase FISH for BCR-ABL1 rearrangement on blood neutrophils as a decisive method to discriminate a lymphoid blast crisis of CML from a de novo BCR-ABL1 positive ALL. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. [The impact of Glivec related side effects on daily life in Chinese patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L; Wang, H B; Huang, X J; Jiang, Q

    2016-07-01

    To explore the impact of Glivec related side effects on daily life in Chinese patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase (CP). From May to November in 2014, anonymous questionnaires were distributed to adult CML patients who were receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) treatment in China. The impact of TKI related side effects on daily life were assessed by the score of 1 (no impact) to 5 (high impact) from patient self- report. Data from 548 respondents in the CP on Glivec were collected. 303(55%) cases were male with the median age of 40 years (range, 18 to 88 years). 437 (80% ) cases started Glivec treatment within one year after diagnosis with a median treatment duration of 3 years (range, effects were edema (n=278, 51% ), fatigue (n=218, 40% ), gastrointestinal disorders (n=190, 35%), muscle cramps (n=118, 22%), skin color changes (n=118, 22%), weight gain (n=71, 13%), rash (n=60, 11%), hepatic function abnormality (n=55, 10%), and cytopenia (n=38, 7%). Among the 548 respondents, the mean score of Glivec-related side effects on daily life was 2.4±1.2. There was no negative impact of Glivec related side effects on daily life in 161(29%) respondents. 295 (54% ) and 92 (17% ) respondents reported slightly or moderately (2- 3 score) and significantly decreased (4-5 score) daily life, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that Glivec treatment duration effects including fatigue (OR=2.9, 95% CI 2.1-4.1;Pnegative effect on daily life. Daily life was impaired seriously in a minority of Chinese CML patients who received Glivec, especially in the first 4 years of treatment. Fatigue, edema, gastrointestinal disorders, rash and hepatic function abnormality were side effects associated with negative impact on patients' daily life.

  14. Do polymorphisms in MDR1 and CYP3A5 genes influence the risk of cytogenetic relapse in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia on imatinib therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harivenkatesh, Natarajan; Kumar, Lalit; Bakhshi, Sameer; Sharma, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Velpandian, Thirumurthy; Gogia, Ajay; Shastri, Shivaram S; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Influence of polymorphisms in the genes coding for imatinib transporters and metabolizing enzymes on cytogenetic relapse in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is not known. One hundred and four patients (52 cases with cytogenetic relapse and 52 controls without relapse) with chronic-phase CML on imatinib therapy and have completed 5 years of follow-up were enrolled. The following single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped; C1236T, C3435T, G2677T/A in MDR1 gene and A6986G in CYP3A5 gene, using PCR-RFLP method and validated by direct gene sequencing. Imatinib trough levels were measured using LC-MS/MS. Patients with CC genotype for MDR1-C1236T polymorphism were at significantly higher risk for cytogenetic relapse [OR =4.382, 95% CI (1.145, 16.774), p = .022], while those with TT genotype for MDR1-C3435T polymorphism had significantly lower risk of relapse [OR =0.309, 95% CI (0.134, 0.708), p = .005]. Imatinib trough levels were lower in patients with relapse compared to those without relapse (1551.4 ± 1324.1 vs. 2154.2 ± 1358.3 ng/mL; p = .041). MDR1-C3435T genotype [adjusted-OR: 0.266; 95% CI (0.111, 0.636); p = .003] and trough levels (p = .014) were independent predictors of relapse in multivariate analysis. To conclude, C1236T and C3435T polymorphisms in MDR1 gene and trough levels significantly influence the risk of cytogenetic relapse. MDR1-C3435T genotype might emerge as a potential biomarker to predict the risk of cytogenetic relapse in patients with CML.

  15. Inhibition of Siah2 Ubiquitin Ligase by Vitamin K3 Attenuates Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Chemo-Resistance in Hypoxic Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jixian; Lu, Ziyuan; Xiao, Yajuan; He, Bolin; Pan, Chengyun; Zhou, Xuan; Xu, Na; Liu, Xiaoli

    2018-02-05

    BACKGROUND A hypoxic microenvironment is associated with resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and a poor prognosis in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah2 plays a vital role in the regulation of hypoxia response, as well as in leukemogenesis. However, the role of Siah2 in CML resistance is unclear, and it is unknown whether vitaminK3 (a Siah2 inhibitor) can improve the chemo-sensitivity of CML cells in a hypoxic microenvironment. MATERIAL AND METHODS The expression of Siah2 was detected in CML patients (CML-CP and CML-BC), K562 cells, and K562-imatinib-resistant cells (K562-R cells). We measured the expression of PHD3, HIF-1α, and VEGF in both cell lines under normoxia and hypoxic conditions, and the degree of leukemic sensitivity to imatinib and VitaminK3 were evaluated. RESULTS Siah2 was overexpressed in CML-BC patients (n=9) as compared to CML-CP patients (n=13). Similarly, K562-imatinib-resistant cells (K562-R cells) showed a significantly higher expression of Siah2 as compared to K562 cells in a hypoxic microenvironment. Compared to normoxia, under hypoxic conditions, both cell lines had lower PHD3, higher HIF-1α, and higher VEGF expression. Additionally, Vitamin K3 (an inhibitor of Siah2) reversed these changes and promoted a higher degree of leukemic sensitivity to imatinib. CONCLUSIONS Our findings indicate that the Siah2-PHD3- HIF-1α-VEGF axis is an important hypoxic signaling pathway in a leukemic microenvironment. An inhibitor of Siah2, combined with TKIs, might be a promising therapy for relapsing and refractory CML patients.

  16. Identification of chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib who are potentially eligible for treatment discontinuation by assessing real-life molecular responses on the international scale in a EUTOS-certified lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Amélie; Dessars, Barbara; El Housni, Hakim; Pluymers, Wim; Peeters, Karen; Benghiat, Fleur S; Heimann, Pierre

    2018-04-01

    A retrospective study was performed to describe molecular responses (MR) on the international scale (IS) in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treated with imatinib in routine clinical practice in Belgium and to identify patients potentially eligible for treatment discontinuation. The analysis included 116 patients with CML in chronic phase at treatment centers sending blood samples for molecular follow-up to a single EUTOS-certified laboratory. IS MR from the last patient visit between October 2014 and April 2015 were retrospectively collected. Most patients (93.1%) had an IS MR corresponding to an optimal response per European LeukemiaNet 2013 guidelines; 53.4% (62/116) of patients were in deep molecular responses ≥MR 4.5 at their last visit (mean treatment duration: 91.0 months) among whom 36.2% (42/116) had been receiving imatinib for >5.8 years and 26.7% (31/116) for >8 years (margins of error: 8.74% and 8.05%, respectively). These patients would likely have the highest chance of staying in treatment-free remission (TFR) upon discontinuation, based on published TFR trial data. Although our study only provides a snapshot in time of a patient's last MR reported, without precise information regarding MR duration, the study settings could nevertheless support the feasibility of attempting TFR outside clinical trials in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical features in accelerated phase of chronic myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqi, N.; Ayub, M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To identify the clinical indicators of accelerated phase in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) diagnosed on hematological findings. Design: An observational and prospective study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Oncology department of Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology from April 1998 to April 1999. Subjects and Methods: The study on 51 patients of Philadelphia positive CML in chronic phase and on hydroxyurea therapy were carried out. Clinical features and hematological parameters in the peripheral blood examination were recorded and statistical analysis carried out to document reliable clinically indicators of accelerated phase of CML in reference to those reported in the literature. Results: Clinical, presence of unexplained fever, re-enlargement of spleen after successful regression with hydroxyurea therapy, and bleeding diathesis were found to be statistically significant pointers of progression into accelerated phase of CML. In the hematological features, with the exception of peripheral basophilia, the findings in the peripheral blood were consistent with those reported in the literature. Conclusion: It is concluded that the occurrences of the clinical features in the follow-up of chronic myeloid leukemia patients herald the accelerated phase of the disease. (author)

  18. Radioisotope examination of hairy-cell leukemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortynova, J.; Friedmann, B.; Bakos, K.; Malaskova, V.; Voslarova, Z.; Vopatova, M.

    1983-01-01

    13 patients with hairy-cell leukemia were simultaneously tested using different radioisotope methods (scintiscan of the spleen and bone marrow, total blood volume and erythrocytic pool in the spleen, erythrocyte and platelet kinetics). Some of the methods (bone marrow scintiscan, total blood volume and erythrocytic pool in the spleen, and kinetic studies) produced characteristic results in those patients: they could add precision to the diagnosis of the disease, and they could also be used for better elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms of other clinical signs characteristic of hairy-cell leukemia. In spite of the undeniably significant value of the said methods for precise diagnosis of hairy-cell leukemia, histological tests of the bioptic material of bone marrow and spleen and bone marrow needle biopsy remain better and indispensable methods. (author)

  19. Flow Cytometric Immunobead Assay for Detection of BCR-ABL1 Fusion Proteins in Chronic Myleoid Leukemia: Comparison with FISH and PCR Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Anna Grazia; Caruso, Nadia; Bossio, Sabrina; Pellicanò, Mariavaleria; De Stefano, Laura; Franzese, Stefania; Palummo, Angela; Abbadessa, Vincenzo; Lucia, Eugenio; Gentile, Massimo; Vigna, Ernesto; Caracciolo, Clementina; Agostino, Antolino; Galimberti, Sara; Levato, Luciano; Stagno, Fabio; Molica, Stefano; Martino, Bruno; Vigneri, Paolo; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Morabito, Fortunato

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is characterized by a balanced translocation juxtaposing the Abelson (ABL) and breakpoint cluster region (BCR) genes. The resulting BCR-ABL1 oncogene leads to increased proliferation and survival of leukemic cells. Successful treatment of CML has been accompanied by steady improvements in our capacity to accurately and sensitively monitor therapy response. Currently, measurement of BCR-ABL1 mRNA transcript levels by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) defines critical response endpoints. An antibody-based technique for BCR-ABL1 protein recognition could be an attractive alternative to RQ-PCR. To date, there have been no studies evaluating whether flow-cytometry based assays could be of clinical utility in evaluating residual disease in CML patients. Here we describe a flow-cytometry assay that detects the presence of BCR-ABL1 fusion proteins in CML lysates to determine the applicability, reliability, and specificity of this method for both diagnosis and monitoring of CML patients for initial response to therapy. We show that: i) CML can be properly diagnosed at onset, (ii) follow-up assessments show detectable fusion protein (i.e. relative mean fluorescent intensity, rMFI%>1) when BCR-ABL1IS transcripts are between 1–10%, and (iii) rMFI% levels predict CCyR as defined by FISH analysis. Overall, the FCBA assay is a rapid technique, fully translatable to the routine management of CML patients. PMID:26111048

  20. Flow Cytometric Immunobead Assay for Detection of BCR-ABL1 Fusion Proteins in Chronic Myleoid Leukemia: Comparison with FISH and PCR Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Grazia Recchia

    Full Text Available Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is characterized by a balanced translocation juxtaposing the Abelson (ABL and breakpoint cluster region (BCR genes. The resulting BCR-ABL1 oncogene leads to increased proliferation and survival of leukemic cells. Successful treatment of CML has been accompanied by steady improvements in our capacity to accurately and sensitively monitor therapy response. Currently, measurement of BCR-ABL1 mRNA transcript levels by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR defines critical response endpoints. An antibody-based technique for BCR-ABL1 protein recognition could be an attractive alternative to RQ-PCR. To date, there have been no studies evaluating whether flow-cytometry based assays could be of clinical utility in evaluating residual disease in CML patients. Here we describe a flow-cytometry assay that detects the presence of BCR-ABL1 fusion proteins in CML lysates to determine the applicability, reliability, and specificity of this method for both diagnosis and monitoring of CML patients for initial response to therapy. We show that: i CML can be properly diagnosed at onset, (ii follow-up assessments show detectable fusion protein (i.e. relative mean fluorescent intensity, rMFI%>1 when BCR-ABL1IS transcripts are between 1-10%, and (iii rMFI% levels predict CCyR as defined by FISH analysis. Overall, the FCBA assay is a rapid technique, fully translatable to the routine management of CML patients.

  1. The concept of treatment-free remission in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saußele, S; Richter, J; Hochhaus, A; Mahon, F-X

    2016-01-01

    The advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) into the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has profoundly improved prognosis. Survival of responders is approaching that of the general population but lifelong treatment is still recommended. In several trials, TKI treatment has been stopped successfully in approximately half of the patients with deep molecular response. This has prompted the development of a new concept in the evaluation of CML patients known as ‘treatment-free remission'. The future in CML treatment will be to define criteria for the safe and most promising discontinuation of TKI on one hand, and, on the other, to increase the number of patients available for such an attempt. Until safe criteria have been defined, discontinuation of therapy is still experimental and should be restricted to clinical trials or registries. This review will provide an overview of current knowledge as well as an outlook on future challenges. PMID:27133824

  2. Proposal for Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-based Clinical Decision Support System) to Aid Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    clinical research studies. The importance of meta-analysis stems from the necessity to combine research findings that if considered separately they would...patient data collected from nine randomized trials studying the effect of Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem -cell transplantation (PBSCT) compared to Bone...leukemia ( CLL ) Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) Hodgkin’s disease (HD) Idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) Myelodysplastic symdrome (MDS) Multiple

  3. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, M; Tomonaga, M; Amenomori, T; Matsuo, T [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1991-12-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5{approx}0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author).

  4. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Amenomori, T.; Matsuo, T.

    1991-01-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5∼0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author)

  5. Homozygous HLA-C1 is Associated with Reduced Risk of Relapse after HLA-Matched Transplantation in Patients with Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Nobuyoshi; Kanda, Junya; Tanaka, Junji; Yabe, Toshio; Morishima, Yasuo; Kim, Sung-Won; Najima, Yuho; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Eto, Tetsuya; Kanamori, Heiwa; Mori, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Naoki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Uchida, Naoyuki; Inoue, Masami; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2018-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells assume graft-versus-leukemia alloreactivity after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) through their inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). KIR2D family members recognize HLA-C alleles with Asn80 (HLA-C1) or Lys80 (HLA-C2). The predominance of HLA-C1 over HLA-C2 and the frequent presence of KIR2DL1 are characteristic of Japanese people. We compared clinical outcomes among homozygous HLA-C1 (HLA-C1/C1) patients and heterozygous HLA-C1/C2 patients who underwent HLA-matched HSCT for hematologic malignancies by assessing the data of 10,638 patients from the Japanese national registry. HLA-C1/C1 recipients had a lower rate of relapse than HLA-C1/C2 recipients after transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) (hazard ratio [HR], .79; P = .006) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) (HR, .48; P = .025), but not for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (HR, 1.36), lymphoma (HR, .97), or low-grade myelodysplastic syndrome (HR, 1.40). We then grouped AML and CML patients together and divided them into several subgroups. Advantages of HLA-C1/C1 recipients over HLA-C1/C2 recipients regarding relapse were observed irrespective of donor relation (related: HR, .79, P = .069; unrelated: HR, .77, P = .022), preparative regimen (myeloablative: HR, .79, P = .014; reduced intensity: HR, .73, P = .084), and occurrence of acute graft-versus-host disease (yes: HR, .70, P = .122; no, HR .71, P = .026) or cytomegalovirus reactivation (reactivated: HR .67,P = .054; nonreactivated: HR .71, P = .033); however, these advantages were not observed in recipients with a delay in achieving complete chimerism (HR, 1.06). The advantage of decreasing relapse and extending relapse-free survival of C1/1 over C1/2 KIR-ligand status was most pronounced in T cell-depleted HSCT (HR, .27; P < .001 and HR, .30; P = .002, respectively) and in children age <15 years (HR, .29; P < .001 and HR .31; P

  6. Hematologic Relapse after 2 Years on a Non-Authorized Copy Version of Imatinib in a Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic Phase: A Case Report

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    Zoubir Chouffai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib (Gleevec®/Glivec® has demonstrated high and durable hematologic and cytogenetic response rates, favorable safety and toxicity profiles, and prolonged survival when used for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Imatinib copy drugs are currently available in some countries; however, the safety and efficacy of these compounds have not been widely assessed. We present a patient who received the copy drug imatinib-COPER, lost hematologic response while on therapy, and was subsequently treated with branded Glivec. This report, and other published cases, suggests that imatinib copy drugs may not be equivalent to branded Glivec in pharmacology, safety, and efficacy. The case was a 42-year-old Moroccan male with CML. Initial therapy with hydroxyurea alone followed by hydroxyurea in combination with interferon-α resulted in durable complete hematologic remission (CHR. Due to adverse effects, the patient was switched to imatinib-COPER at 400 mg/day. Despite compliance with therapy, he lost his CHR after 2 years and presented with aplasia requiring a blood transfusion. Administration of Glivec in combination with hydroxyurea resulted in re-achievement of complete hematologic remission that was stable at last follow-up. Data from large-scale trials demonstrating high and durable responses and favorable safety have resulted in Glivec being considered as standard frontline therapy for patients with CML. Such trials have not been conducted for imatinib copy drugs. In the absence of clinical trial data, information from individual cases is critical to assessing the utility of copy drugs. This report suggests that initial treatment with an imatinib copy drug may compromise efficacy.

  7. Pneumatosis Intestinalis in a Patient with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

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    Abhishek Mangaonkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatosis Intestinalis is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas within the intestinal wall. We describe a case of a 33-year-old woman with acute promyelocytic leukemia who developed nausea and nonbloody diarrhea. CT showed intramural air in transverse and descending colon. Patient clinically improved with conservative management.

  8. Disappearance of Ph1 chromosome with intensive chemotherapy and detection of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction in a patient with blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, H; Miyagawa, K; Endo, M; Takaku, F; Yazaki, Y; Hirai, H

    1993-06-01

    We diagnosed a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP) on the basis of clinical findings, Ph1 chromosome detected by cytogenetic analysis, and bcr-abl fusion mRNA detected by reverse transcriptase-dependent polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). One month after diagnosis, the patient developed extramedullary blast crisis in the lymph nodes, and then medullary blast crisis in the bone marrow, in which different surface markers were shown. Combination chemotherapy with BH-AC, VP16, and mitoxantrone was administered; this resulted in rapid disappearance of the lymphadenopathy, restoration of normal hematopoiesis, and no Ph1 chromosome being detected by cytogenetic analysis. RT-PCR performed to detect the residual Ph1 clone revealed that although the Ph1 clone was preferentially suppressed, it was still residual. The intensive chemotherapy regimen preferentially suppressed the Ph1-positive clone and led to both clinical and cytogenetic remission in this patient with BC of CML; we suggest that RT-PCR is a sensitive and useful method for detecting minimal residual disease during the clinical course of this disease.

  9. 32P and acute leukemia: development of leukemia in a patient with hemoglobin Yakima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagby, G.C. Jr.; Richert-Boe, K.; Koler, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    In 1954 a then 31-yr-old male was found to have erythrocytosis. Over the ensuing decade he received 72 mCi 32 P. In 1964 his daughters were found to have erythrocytosis. Further investigation led to the discovery of hemoglobin Yakima, a variant with high oxygen affinity. He received no further therapy and was well until 1975, when he developed the preleukemic syndrome. Within 12 mo he developed acute nonlymphocytic leukemia accompanied by fetal erythropoiesis. Because the initial discovery of this type of hemoglobinopathy came 27 yr after the introduction of 32 P for use in the treatment of polycythemia vera, and because there are now known to be more than 39 different high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobins, we anticipate that more patients such as ours have been exposed to 32 P. The exposed population should be closely followed, since this will likely permit assessment of the risk of 32 P-induced leukemia in a nonneoplastic condition

  10. The HDAC inhibitor SB939 overcomes resistance to BCR-ABL kinase Inhibitors conferred by the BIM deletion polymorphism in chronic myeloid leukemia.

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    Muhammad Rauzan

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML treatment has been improved by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs such as imatinib mesylate (IM but various factors can cause TKI resistance in patients with CML. One factor which contributes to TKI resistance is a germline intronic deletion polymorphism in the BCL2-like 11 (BIM gene which impairs the expression of pro-apoptotic splice isoforms of BIM. SB939 (pracinostat is a hydroxamic acid based HDAC inhibitor with favorable pharmacokinetic, physicochemical and pharmaceutical properties, and we investigated if this drug could overcome BIM deletion polymorphism-induced TKI resistance. We found that SB939 corrects BIM pre-mRNA splicing in CML cells with the BIM deletion polymorphism, and induces apoptotic cell death in CML cell lines and primary cells with the BIM deletion polymorphism. More importantly, SB939 both decreases the viability of CML cell lines and primary CML progenitors with the BIM deletion and restores TKI-sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that SB939 overcomes BIM deletion polymorphism-induced TKI resistance, and suggest that SB939 may be useful in treating CML patients with BIM deletion-associated TKI resistance.

  11. Imatinib mesylate in chronic myeloid leukemia: frontline treatment and long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagno, Fabio; Stella, Stefania; Spitaleri, Antonio; Pennisi, Maria Stella; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Vigneri, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor Imatinib Mesylate has dramatically improved the clinical outcome of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in the chronic phase of the disease, generating unprecedented rates of complete hematologic and cytogenetic responses and sustained reductions in BCR-ABL transcripts. Here, we present an overview on the efficacy and safety of Imatinib and describe the most important clinical studies employing this drug for the frontline treatment of chronic phase CML. We also discuss recent reports describing the long-term outcome of patients receiving Imatinib for their disease. The imminent availability of generic forms of Imatinib coupled with the approval of expensive second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors underlines an unmet need for early molecular parameters that may distinguish CML patients likely to benefit from the drug from those that should receive alternative forms of treatment.

  12. Final 5-Year Study Results of DASISION: The Dasatinib Versus Imatinib Study in Treatment-Naïve Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Jorge E; Saglio, Giuseppe; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Baccarani, Michele; Mayer, Jiří; Boqué, Concepción; Shah, Neil P; Chuah, Charles; Casanova, Luis; Bradley-Garelik, Brigid; Manos, George; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2016-07-10

    We report the 5-year analysis from the phase III Dasatinib Versus Imatinib Study in Treatment-Naïve Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients (DASISION) trial, evaluating long-term efficacy and safety outcomes of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP) treated with dasatinib or imatinib. Patients with newly diagnosed CML-CP were randomly assigned to receive dasatinib 100 mg once daily (n = 259) or imatinib 400 mg once daily (n = 260). At the time of study closure, 61% and 63% of dasatinib- and imatinib-treated patients remained on initial therapy, respectively. Cumulative rates of major molecular response and molecular responses with a 4.0- or 4.5-log reduction in BCR-ABL1 transcripts from baseline by 5 years remained statistically significantly higher for dasatinib compared with imatinib. Rates for progression-free and overall survival at 5 years remained high and similar across treatment arms. In patients who achieved BCR-ABL1 ≤ 10% at 3 months (dasatinib, 84%; imatinib, 64%), improvements in progression-free and overall survival and lower rates of transformation to accelerated/blast phase were reported compared with patients with BCR-ABL1 greater than 10% at 3 months. Transformation to accelerated/blast phase occurred in 5% and 7% of patients in the dasatinib and imatinib arms, respectively. Fifteen dasatinib-treated and 19 imatinib-treated patients had BCR-ABL1 mutations identified at discontinuation. There were no new or unexpected adverse events identified in either treatment arm, and pleural effusion was the only drug-related, nonhematologic adverse event reported more frequently with dasatinib (28% v 0.8% with imatinib). First occurrences of pleural effusion were reported with dasatinib, with the highest incidence in year 1. Arterial ischemic events were uncommon in both treatment arms. These final results from the DASISION trial continue to support dasatinib 100 mg once daily as a safe and effective first-line therapy for the long

  13. Clinical roundtable monograph: Emerging treatment options for TKI-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Jorge; Radich, Jerald; Mauro, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    The development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that inhibit signaling of the constitutive BCR-ABL protein revolutionized the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). These agents have dramatically changed the treatment landscape for CML, shifting the use of allogeneic stem cell transplantation to selected patients in the salvage setting. Four BCR-ABL TKIs are now commercially available for the treatment of CML: the first-generation TKI imatinib, and the second-generation TKIs dasatinib, nilotinib, and bosutinib. Continuous treatment with these agents induces durable responses in a high proportion of patients with chronic-phase CML. Research is focused on identifying which patients can discontinue therapy without a recurrence of disease. For the group of patients with resistance to TKIs, multiple alternative therapies are being evaluated. The third-generation TKI ponatinib is a BCR-ABL inhibitor that has demonstrated significant activity, including in patients with the TKI resistance mutation T315I. The homoharringtonine derivative omacetaxine mepesuccinate, which inhibits protein synthesis, has also demonstrated clinical activity in CML, including in patients with TKI resistance due to T315I and in patients who have TKI resistance despite no evidence of ABL mutations. It is essential that clinicians implement these new agents with care and change therapies only when appropriate in order to preserve as many options as possible for future use if needed.

  14. Managing chronic myeloid leukemia: a coordinated team care perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Stacie; Lord, Katharine; Bethelmie-Bryan, Beverly; Shepard, Marian W; Neely, Jessica; McLemore, Morgan; Reddy, Satyanarayan K; Montero, Aldemar; Jonas, William S; Gladney, Sara Pierson; Khanwani, Shyam L; Reddy, Silpa C; Lahiry, Anup K; Heffner, Leonard T; Winton, Elliott; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has seen dramatic progress in recent years with the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). To take maximum advantage of therapy with TKIs, compliance and good understanding of monitoring response to therapy are essential. We established a team that included a hematologist, a physician assistant (PA), and a nurse who work closely with a social worker, a pharmacist, and a research coordinator to assist patients throughout their journey with CML. The patient and the referring community oncologist were incorporated into this team. This coordinated team care approach takes advantage of each member's specific skills to provide patients with education about CML, encourage patients' strong involvement in tracking/monitoring results/response to therapy, and support patients with issues that arise throughout the long course of the disease. A low rate of noncompliance with clinic visits (3%) was an indirect measure of the impact of this approach. The inclusion of the referring oncologist in the team extended the tracking of monitoring results to the community practice. We conclude that a coordinated team care approach is feasible in the management of patients with CML. This approach provided patients with education and a good understanding of response to therapy and improved relations with the health care team. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous regression of Philadelphia chromosome and multiple nonrecurrent clonal chromosomal abnormalities with imatinib mesylate in a patient autografted 22 years before for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Akker, J; Coppo, P; Portnoï, M F; Barbu, V; Bories, D; Gorin, N C

    2007-09-01

    A 31-year-old patient developed chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in November, 1983. In November 1984, following a diagnosis of acceleration, he received an autologous hemopoietic transplant after conditioning with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation. The autologous marrow was purged with mafosfamide. Over 20 years, the patient remained in chronic phase of CML. Multiple nonrecurrent clonal chromosomal abnormalities appeared leading to a very complex karyotype, including among others involvement of chromosomes 1, 7, 9, 13, 19, and X. Fluorescent in situ hybridization showed that the two chromosomes 9 were involved. Acute myeloid crisis was diagnosed in February, 2004. Treatment with imatinib mesylate resulted within 6 months in a total disappearance of all chromosomal abnormalities with a complete cytogenetic and molecular response, which persists 3 years later. We question whether the ex vivo purging procedure with mafosfamide has favored the occurrence of these particular cytogenetic abnormalities (with no independent oncogenic potential) within the original leukemic stem cell pool. It remains unclear whether the autologous transplantation has indeed resulted into some prolongation of the duration of the chronic phase, which lasted for 20 years. At time of acute crisis, the dramatic response to imatinib mesylate leading to a complete cytogenetic and molecular response is noteworthy.

  16. Molecular techniques for the personalised management of patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikian, Mary; Gale, Robert Peter; Apperley, Jane F; Foroni, Letizia

    2017-03-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is the paradigm for targeted cancer therapy. RT-qPCR is the gold standard for monitoring response to tyrosine kinase-inhibitor (TKI) therapy based on the reduction of blood or bone marrow BCR-ABL1 . Some patients with CML and very low or undetectable levels of BCR-ABL1 transcripts can stop TKI-therapy without CML recurrence. However, about 60 percent of patients discontinuing TKI-therapy have rapid leukaemia recurrence. This has increased the need for more sensitive and specific techniques to measure residual CML cells. The clinical challenge is to determine when it is safe to stop TKI-therapy. In this review we describe and critically evaluate the current state of CML clinical management, different technologies used to monitor measurable residual disease (MRD) focus on comparingRT-qPCR and new methods entering clinical practice. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of new methods.

  17. Conditional survival in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Koji; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Jain, Preetesh; Jabbour, Elias J; Ravandi, Farhad; Konopleva, Marina; Borthakur, Gautam; Takahashi, Koichi; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Daver, Naval; Pierce, Sherry A; O'Brien, Susan M; Cortes, Jorge E

    2016-01-15

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) significantly improve survival in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Conditional probability provides survival information in patients who have already survived for a specific period of time after treatment. Cumulative response and survival data from 6 consecutive frontline TKI clinical trials were analyzed. Conditional probability was calculated for failure-free survival (FFS), transformation-free survival (TFS), event-free survival (EFS), and overall survival (OS) according to depth of response within 1 year of the initiation of TKIs, including complete cytogenetic response, major molecular response, and molecular response with a 4-log or 4.5-log reduction. A total of 483 patients with a median follow-up of 99.4 months from the initiation of treatment with TKIs were analyzed. Conditional probabilities of FFS, TFS, EFS, and OS for 1 additional year for patients alive after 12 months of therapy ranged from 92.0% to 99.1%, 98.5% to 100%, 96.2% to 99.6%, and 96.8% to 99.7%, respectively. Conditional FFS for 1 additional year did not improve with a deeper response each year. Conditional probabilities of TFS, EFS, and OS for 1 additional year were maintained at >95% during the period. In the era of TKIs, patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase who survived for a certain number of years maintained excellent clinical outcomes in each age group. Cancer 2016;122:238-248. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  18. Complex Variant t(9;22 Chromosome Translocations in Five Cases of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Valencia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Philadelphia (Ph1 chromosome arising from the reciprocal t(9;22 translocation is found in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients and results in the formation of the chimeric fusion gene BCR-ABL. However, a small proportion of patients with CML have simple or complex variants of this translocation, involving various breakpoints in addition to 9q34 and 22q11. We report five CML cases carrying variant Ph translocations involving both chromosomes 9 and 22 as well as chromosomes 3, 5, 7, 8, or 10. G-banding showed a reciprocal three-way translocation involving 3q21, 5q31, 7q32, 8q24, and 10q22 bands. BCR-ABL fusion signal on der(22 was found in all of the cases by FISH.

  19. Prolonged T1 relaxation of the hemopoietic bone marrow in patients with chronic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Sørensen, P G; Thomsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Eleven patients with chronic leukemia (7 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and 4 with chronic myeloid leukemia) were evaluated with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and T1 relaxation time measurements by use of a 1.5 tesla whole body MR scanner. Bone marrow biopsies were obtained from the posterior...

  20. Leukemia among atomic bomb survivors during the 1980s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusumi, Shizuyo; Matsuo, Tatsuki

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of the dosimetry system 1986, exposure doses were determined in a cohort of 86,502 subjects for the Life Span Study during the period 1950-1985. A total of 248 people were found to develop leukemia in Hiroshima and Nagasaki cities. This is an analysis of the 248 patients with leukemia in connection with exposure doses, years after A-bombing, age at the time of A-bombing, relative risk, and background. An average exposure dose was 0.20 Gy for Hiroshima and 0.22 Gy for Nagasaki. Relative risk for leukemia tended to show a linear increase in proportion to exposure doses. This was significant for acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), regardless of whether A-bomb survivors came from Hiroshima or Nagasaki. The younger the age at the time of A-bombing was, the higher excess relative risk for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) was. For AML, however, it was independent of the age at that time. These findings were similar in Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors, irrespective of age. As for non-exposed group, the incidence of CML was three times higher in Hiroshima citizen than Nagasaki citizen. Similarly, Hiroshima citizen had a 1.6 fold incidence of AML. There was no significant difference in the incidence of ALL between the cities. The incidences of both AML and ALL tended to increase more and more with aging, but the prevalences tended to increase in younger generation. An increased incidence of CML was associated with aging alone. (N.K.)

  1. Sensitive detection of pre-existing BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in CD34+ cells of newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients is associated with imatinib resistance: implications in the post-imatinib era.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Iqbal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations are infrequently detected in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients. Recent studies indicate the presence of pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations in a higher percentage of CML patients when CD34+ stem/progenitor cells are investigated using sensitive techniques, and these mutations are associated with imatinib resistance and disease progression. However, such studies were limited to smaller number of patients. METHODS: We investigated BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in CD34+ cells from 100 chronic-phase CML patients by multiplex allele-specific PCR and sequencing at diagnosis. Mutations were re-investigated upon manifestation of imatinib resistance using allele-specific PCR and direct sequencing of BCR-ABL kinase domain. RESULTS: Pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations were detected in 32/100 patients and included F311L, M351T, and T315I. After a median follow-up of 30 months (range 8-48, all patients with pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations exhibited imatinib resistance. Of the 68 patients without pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations, 24 developed imatinib resistance; allele-specific PCR and BCR-ABL kinase domain sequencing detected mutations in 22 of these patients. All 32 patients with pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations had the same mutations after manifestation of imatinib-resistance. In imatinib-resistant patients without pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations, we detected F311L, M351T, Y253F, and T315I mutations. All imatinib-resistant patients except T315I and Y253F mutations responded to imatinib dose escalation. CONCLUSION: Pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations can be detected in a substantial number of chronic-phase CML patients by sensitive allele-specific PCR technique using CD34+ cells. These mutations are associated with imatinib resistance if affecting drug binding directly or indirectly. After the recent approval of nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib and ponatinib for treatment of chronic myeloid

  2. Determination of cDNA encoding BCR/ABL fusion gene in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia using a novel FRET-based quantum dots-DNA nanosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Nasirian, Vahid; Barati, Ali; Mansouri, Kamran; Vaisi-Raygani, Asad; Kashanian, Soheila

    2017-05-08

    In the present study, we developed a sensitive method based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for the determination of the BCR/ABL fusion gene, which is used as a biomarker to confirm the clinical diagnosis of both chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). For this purpose, CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were conjugated to amino-modified 18-mer oligonucleotide ((N)DNA) to form the QDs-(N)DNA nanosensor. In the presence of methylene blue (MB) as an intercalator, the hybridization of QDs-(N)DNA with the target BCR/ABL fusion gene (complementary DNA), brings the MB (acceptor) at close proximity of the QDs (donor), leading to FRET upon photoexcitation of the QDs. The enhancement in the emission intensity of MB was used to follow up the hybridization, which was linearly proportional to concentration of the target complementary DNA in a range from 1.0 × 10 -9 to 1.25 × 10 -7  M. The detection limit of the proposed method was obtained to be 1.5 × 10 -10  M. Finally, the feasibility and selectivity of the proposed nanosensor was evaluated by the analysis of derived nucleotides from both mismatched sequences and clinical samples of patients with leukemia as real samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bone marrow transplantation in severe aplastic anemia and acute or chronic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, U W; Mahmoud, H K; Beelen, D W; Hoffmann, W; Becher, R; Schmidt, C G; Bamberg, M; Quast, U; Haralambie, E; Linzenmeier, G

    1986-04-01

    In Essen 121 bone marrow transplantations were carried out. The indications were severe aplastic anemia, acute leukemia in relapse, acute leukemia in remission or chronic myeloid leukemia. The conditioning regimen consisted of cyclophosphamide or the combination of cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation. All patients were treated under strict gnotobiotic care. To mitigate the risk of CMV infections intravenous CMV-hyperimmunoglobulin and CMV-negative blood products have been applied routinely since two years. MTX was used as prophylaxis against GVH-disease. In case of severe aplastic anemia 13 patients (72%) are still alive with a median observation time of 24 months. In the prognostically unfavourable group of acute leukemia in relapse only one patient showed long term survival. In this patient leukemic relapse occurred six years after transplantation. The survival rate of AML patients grafted during the first remission is 55% with a median observation time of 40 months. For patients grafted in the first consecutive remission of ALL the survival rate is 42% with a maximal observation time of 29 months. Out of 37 patients grafted because of CML, eight were in an advanced stage of the disease. 13 patients are still alive, the maximal observation time is 37 months. The overall incidence of GVHD in patients at risk was 28% in aplastic anemia, 26% in AML, 9% in ALL and 63% in CML. In aplastic anemia no patient developed an interstitial pneumonia. In leukemia the risk of fatal interstitial pneumonia was 34%.

  4. Bone marrow transplantation in severe aplastic anemia and acute or chronic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, U.W.; Mahmoud, H.K.; Beelen, D.W.; Hoffmann, W.; Becher, R.; Schmidt, C.G.; Bamberg, M.; Quast, U.; Haralambie, E.; Linzenmeier, G.; Stollmann, B.; Grosse-Wilde, H.; Richter, H.J.; Hantschke, D.; Henneberg, K.; Luboldt, W.

    1986-01-01

    In Essen 121 bone marrow transplantations were carried out. The indications were severe aplastic anemia, acute leukemia in relapse, acute leukemia in remission or chronic myeloid leukemia. The conditioning regimen consisted of cyclophosphamide or the combination of cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation. All patients were treated under strict gnotobiotic care. To mitigate the risk of CMV infections intravenous CMV-hyperimmunoglobulin and CMV-negative blood products have been applied routinely since two years. MTX was used as prophylaxis against GVH-disease. In case of severe aplastic anemia 13 patients (72%) are still alive with a median observation time of 24 months. In the prognostically unfavourable group of acute leukemia in relapse only one patient showed long term survival. In this patient leukemic relapse occurred six years after transplantation. The survival rate of AML patients grafted during the first remission is 55% with a median observation time of 40 months. For patients grafted in the first consecutive remission of ALL the survival rate is 42% with a maximal observation time of 29 months. Out of 37 patients grafted because of CML, eight were in an advanced stage of the disease. 13 patients are still alive, the maximal observation time is 37 months. The overall incidence of GVHD in patients at risk was 28% in aplastic anemia, 26% in AML, 9% in ALL and 63% in CML. In aplastic anemia no patient developed an interstitial pneumonia. In leukemia the risk of fatal interstitial pneumonia was 34%. (orig.) [de

  5. Evaluation of cooperative antileukemic effects of nilotinib and vildagliptin in Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Michael; Sadovnik, Irina; Eisenwort, Gregor; Entner, Martin; Bernthaler, Tina; Stefanzl, Gabriele; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Berger, Daniela; Herrmann, Harald; Hoermann, Gregor; Valent, Peter; Rülicke, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a stem cell (SC) neoplasm characterized by the BCR/ABL1 oncogene. Although the disease can be kept under control using BCR/ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in most cases, some patients relapse or have resistant disease, so there is a need to identify new therapeutic targets in this malignancy. Recent data suggest that leukemic SCs (LSCs) in CML display the stem-cell (SC)-mobilizing cell surface enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV = CD26) in an aberrant manner. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of the DPPIV blocker vildagliptin as single agent or in combination with the BCR/ABL1 TKI imatinib or nilotinib on growth and survival of CML LSCs in vitro and on LSC engraftment in an in vivo xenotransplantation nonobese diabetic SCID-IL-2Rγ -/- (NSG) mouse model. We found that nilotinib induces apoptosis in CML LSCs and inhibits their engraftment in NSG mice. In contrast, no substantial effects were seen with imatinib or vildagliptin. Nevertheless, vildagliptin was found to reduce the "mobilization" of CML LSCs from a stroma cell layer consisting of mouse fibroblasts in an in vitro co-culture model, suggesting reduced disease expansion. However, although vildagliptin and nilotinib produced cooperative effects in individual experiments, overall, no significant effects of coadministered vildagliptin over nilotinib or imatinib treatment alone were seen on the engraftment of CML cells in NSG mice. Gliptins may be interesting drugs in the context of CML and nilotinib therapy, but our preclinical studies did not reveal a major cooperative effect of the drug-combination vildagliptin + nilotinib on engraftment of CML cells in NSG mice. Copyright © 2018 ISEH – Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Aureobasidium pullulans infection in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Rodrigues de Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Saprophytic fungi are being increasingly recognized as etiologic agents of mycoses in immunosuppressed patients. We report a case of subcutaneous infiltration by Aureobasidium pullulans, likely due to traumatic inoculation, in a neutropenic patient during chemotherapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The patient was treated with amphotericin B deoxycholate but was subsequently switched to itraconazole, which improved the lesion. This case highlights the importance of considering unusual fungal infections in critically ill patients such as those who are immunosuppressed due to chemotherapy. Diagnostic techniques and effective antifungal therapy have improved the prognosis of these cases.

  7. Trends in the treatment changes and medication persistence of chronic myeloid leukemia in Taiwan from 1997 to 2007: a longitudinal population database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chao-Sung

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have examined the longitudinal changes in the patterns, selection, and utilization of treatments for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML in routine clinical practice since the introduction of imatinib. Therefore, we investigated the trends in CML therapy, including changes, patterns, and persistence to imatinib therapy among patients with newly diagnosed CML. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of 11 years of claims data for patients with newly diagnosed CML included in the Taiwan National Health Insurance program. Pharmacy and diagnosis claims for newly diagnosed CML recorded between 1997 and 2007 year were extracted from the database. Annual overall use, new use of CML therapy, and persistence to imatinib therapy were estimated. The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical codes for CML therapy [i.e., imatinib and conventional therapy: busulfan, hydroxyurea, interferon-α (IFNα, and cytarabine], and the process code for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were used to categorize treatment patterns. Associations with patients characteristics were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. Results Overall, the proportion of patients with newly diagnosed CML to all patients with CML increased by approximately 4-fold between 1998 and 2007. There were steady increases in the proportions of all treated patients and those starting therapy from 2003 to 2007. Fewer comorbid conditions and lower severity of CML were associated with treatment initiation. Medication persistence varied according to treatment duration, as 38.7% patients continued imatinib for ≥ 18 months without interruption but only 7.7% continued imatinib for ≥ 5 years. Factors associated with persistence to imatinib therapy were removal of the need for prior authorization for imatinib, and prior use of hydroxyurea and IFNα, whereas having undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation led to reduced likelihood

  8. Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) account for about 20% of childhood myeloid leukemias. Other myeloid malignancies include transient abnormal myelopoiesis and myelodysplastic syndrome. Get detailed information about the classification, clinical presentation, diagnostic and molecular evaluation, prognosis, and treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent disease in this summary for clinicians.

  9. Splenic function in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covas, D.T.; Zago, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Spleen function was evaluated by measurement of the clearance of autologous heat-damaged /sup 99m/Tc-labelled erythrocytes from the circulation and into the spleen and the enumeration of pitted erythrocytes by interference contrast microscopy, and the spleen area was determined by scintillation scanning. All measurements were performed on 12 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia and compared with 10 controls with apparently normal spleens, 6 splenectomized subjects and 9 patients with a reactive splenomegaly. Patients with CML had spleen function test results similar to normal controls in spite of having enlarged spleens whose projection area did not differ from that of the patients with reactive splenomegaly. Thus, patients with CML have a decreased spleen function per unit volume and signs of splenic hypofunction in the peripheral blood. The reduction of spleen function per unit volume in CML is the result of a severe decrease of the splenic blood perfusion which could result from the combined effects of the myeloid metaplasia and the increased whole-blood viscosity due to high white-cell counts.

  10. Splenic function in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covas, D.T.; Zago, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Spleen function was evaluated by measurement of the clearance of autologous heat-damaged 99m Tc-labelled erythrocytes from the circulation and into the spleen and the enumeration of pitted erythrocytes by interference contrast microscopy, and the spleen area was determined by scintillation scanning. All measurements were performed on 12 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia and compared with 10 controls with apparently normal spleens, 6 splenectomized subjects and 9 patients with a reactive splenomegaly. Patients with CML had spleen function test results similar to normal controls in spite of having enlarged spleens whose projection area did not differ from that of the patients with reactive splenomegaly. Thus, patients with CML have a decreased spleen function per unit volume and signs of splenic hypofunction in the peripheral blood. The reduction of spleen function per unit volume in CML is the result of a severe decrease of the splenic blood perfusion which could result from the combined effects of the myeloid metaplasia and the increased whole-blood viscosity due to high white-cell counts. (author)

  11. Effectiveness of Quantitative Real Time PCR in Long-Term Follow-up of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasoglu, Kaan; Payzin, Kadriye Bahriye; Ozdemirkiran, Fusun; Berber, Belgin

    2015-08-01

    To determine the use of the Quantitative Real Time PCR (RQ-PCR) assay follow-up with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) patients. Cross-sectional observational. Izmir Ataturk Education and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey, from 2009 to 2013. Cytogenetic, FISH, RQ-PCR test results from 177 CMLpatients' materials selected between 2009 - 2013 years was set up for comparison analysis. Statistical analysis was performed to compare between FISH, karyotype and RQ-PCR results of the patients. Karyotyping and FISH specificity and sensitivity rates determined by ROC analysis compared with RQ-PCR results. Chi-square test was used to compare test failure rates. Sensitivity and specificity values were determined for karyotyping 17.6 - 98% (p=0.118, p > 0.05) and for FISH 22.5 - 96% (p=0.064, p > 0.05) respectively. FISH sensitivity was slightly higher than karyotyping but there was calculated a strong correlation between them (p 0.05); however, karyotyping and FISH test failure rate was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Besides, the situation needed for karyotype analysis, RQ-PCR assay can be used alone in the follow-up of CMLdisease.

  12. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in the Era of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: An Evolving Paradigm of Molecularly Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohamed A M

    2016-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm, characterized by the unrestrained expansion of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. CML was the first malignancy in which a unique chromosomal abnormality was identified and a pathophysiologic association was suggested. The hallmark of CML is a reciprocal chromosomal translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 9 and 22, t(9; 22)(q34; q11), creating a derivative 9q+ and a shortened 22q-. The latter, known as the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, harbors the breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR-ABL) fusion gene, encoding the constitutively active BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase that is necessary and sufficient for initiating CML. The successful implementation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for the treatment of CML remains a flagship for molecularly targeted therapy in cancer. TKIs have changed the clinical course of CML; however, some patients nonetheless demonstrate primary or secondary resistance to such therapy and require an alternative therapeutic strategy. Therefore, the assessment of early response to treatment with TKIs has become an important tool in the clinical monitoring of CML patients. Although mutations in the BCR-ABL have proven to be the most prominent mechanism of resistance to TKIs, other mechanisms-either rendering the leukemic cells still dependent on BCR-ABL activity or supporting oncogenic properties of the leukemic cells independent of BCR-ABL signaling-have been identified. This article provides an overview of the current understanding of CML pathogenesis; recommendations for diagnostic tools, treatment strategies, and management guidelines; and highlights the BCR-ABL-dependent and -independent mechanisms that contribute to the development of resistance to TKIs.

  13. The long-term clinical implications of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Choi, Soo Young; Bang, Ju-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Jang, Eun-Jung; Byeun, Ji-Young; Park, Jin Eok; Jeon, Hye-Rim; Oh, Yun Jeong; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical significance of an additional chromosomal abnormality (ACA), variant Philadelphia chromosome (vPh) at diagnosis, and newly developed other chromosomal abnormalities (OCA) in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) on imatinib (IM) therapy. Sequential cytogenetic data from 281 consecutive new chronic phase CML patients were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 78.6 months, the 22 patients with vPh (P = 0.034) or ACA (P = 0.034) at diagnosis had more events of IM failure than did the patients with a standard Ph. The 5-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and failure-free survival (FFS) rates for patients with vPh at diagnosis were 77.8%, 75.0%, and 53.3%, respectively; for patients with ACA at diagnosis, 100%, 66.3%, and 52.1%, respectively; and for patients with a standard Ph, 96.0%, 91.3%, and 83.7%, respectively. During IM therapy, eight patients developed an OCA, which had no impact on outcomes as a time-dependent covariate in our Cox proportional hazards regression models. This study showed that vPh was associated with poor OS and FFS and that ACA had adverse effects on EFS and FFS. In addition, no OCA, except monosomy 7, had any prognostic impact, suggesting that the development of OCA may not require a change in treatment strategy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Distinction of leukemia patients' and healthy persons' serum using FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Daping; Liu, Xingcun; Li, Weizu; Wang, Yuchan; Chen, Xianliang; Wang, Xin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, FTIR spectroscopy was applied to compare the serum from leukemia patients with the serum from healthy persons. IR spectra of leukemia patients' serum were similar with IR spectra of healthy persons' serum, and they were all made up of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, etc. In order to identify leukemia patients' serum and healthy persons' serum, the H1075/H1542, H1045/H1467, H2959/H2931 ratios were measured. The H2959/H2931 ratio had the highest significant difference among these ratios and might be a useful factor for identifying leukemia patients' serum and healthy persons' serum. Furthermore, from curve fitting, the RNA/DNA (A1115/A1028) ratios were observed to be lower in leukemia patients' serum than those in healthy persons' serum. The results indicated FTIR spectroscopic study of serum might be a useful tool in the field of leukemia research and diagnosis.

  15. Ultrasound and MR Findings of Aleukemic Leukemia Cutis in a Patient with Complete Remission of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Sung; Jee, Won Hee; Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, So Yeon; Lim, Gye Yeon; Park, Gyeong Sin; Lee, Seok

    2010-01-01

    Aleukemic leukemia cutis is an extremely rare condition characterized by the infiltration of leukemic cells in skin without blasts in the peripheral blood. Leukemia cutis is considered a grave prognostic sign, thus early diagnosis is important. Leukemia cutis usually occurs in patients with myeloid leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report regarding the radiological findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, which is probably due to the presence of the skin changes in most patients. We report the ultrasound and MR findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, even without the skin manifestation in patients with a history of complete remission of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia following an allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

  16. Ultrasound and MR Findings of Aleukemic Leukemia Cutis in a Patient with Complete Remission of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Sung; Jee, Won Hee; Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, So Yeon; Lim, Gye Yeon; Park, Gyeong Sin; Lee, Seok [Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Aleukemic leukemia cutis is an extremely rare condition characterized by the infiltration of leukemic cells in skin without blasts in the peripheral blood. Leukemia cutis is considered a grave prognostic sign, thus early diagnosis is important. Leukemia cutis usually occurs in patients with myeloid leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report regarding the radiological findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, which is probably due to the presence of the skin changes in most patients. We report the ultrasound and MR findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, even without the skin manifestation in patients with a history of complete remission of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia following an allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

  17. RESULTS OF HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mousavi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT is an accepted treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML in first remission, the treatment of choice for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and high risk groups of ALL who relapse with conventional chemotherapy. We assessed results of HCT for pediatric leukemia in our center. A total of 92 children, 63 with diagnose of AML, 23 with ALL and 6 with CML received allogeneic transplantation from HLA full matched siblings (57.6% and autologous transplantation (42.4%. Source of hematopoietic cells were peripheral blood 83.7%, bone marrow 15.2% and cord blood 1.6%. The median transplanted nucleated cells were 6.4 ± 4.7 ×108 /Kg (body weight of patients and mononuclear cells were 5.5 ± 2.9×108/Kg. The most common conditioning regimens were cyclophosphamide + busulfan. Prophylaxis regimen for GVHD was cyclosporin ± methotrexate. GVHD occurred in 50 (54.3% patients. Eighty five of children had engraftment, 26 (28.6% relapsed and 57 (62% are alive. The most common cause of death was relapse (68.6%. Five years overall survival of patients with AML and ALL were 49% and 44% respectively and disease free survival of them were 52% and 49%. One year overall survival and disease free survival of CML was 57%. Overall survival increased with increasing age of patients at transplantation time (P = 0.06. Longer survival significantly related to earlier WBC and platelet recovery (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.006 respectively. Considering acceptable overall and disease free survival of patients after HCT, we concluded that is a good modality in treatment of leukemia of children.

  18. Ibrutinib-induced lymphocytosis in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herman, S E M; Niemann, C U; Farooqui, M

    2014-01-01

    Ibrutinib and other targeted inhibitors of B-cell receptor signaling achieve impressive clinical results for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). A treatment-induced rise in absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) has emerged as a class effect of kinase inhibitors in CLL and warrants further...... investigation. Here we report correlative studies in 64 patients with CLL treated with ibrutinib. We quantified tumor burden in blood, lymph nodes (LNs), spleen and bone marrow, assessed phenotypic changes of circulating cells and measured whole-blood viscosity. With just one dose of ibrutinib, the average...

  19. [Molecular genetics in chronic myeloid leukemia with variant Ph translocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Li, Jian-yong; Zhu, Yu; Qiu, Hai-rong; Pan, Jin-lan; Xu, Wei; Chen, Li-juan; Shen, Yun-feng; Xue, Yong-quan

    2007-08-01

    To explore the value of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) techniques in the detection of genetic changes in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with variant Philadelphia translocation (vPh). Cytogenetic preparations from 10 CML patients with vPh confirmed by R banding were assayed with dual color dual fusion FISH technique. If only one fusion signal was detected in interphase cells, metaphase cells were observed to determine if there were derivative chromosome 9[der (9)] deletions. Meanwhile, the same cytogenetic preparations were assayed with M-FISH technique. Of the 10 CML patients with vPh, 5 were detected with der (9) deletions by FISH technique. M-FISH technique revealed that besides the chromosome 22, chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11 and 17 were also involved in the vPh. M-FISH technique also detected the abnormalities which were not found with conventional cytogenetics (CC), including two never reported abnormalities. The combination of CC, FISH and M-FISH technique could refine the genetic diagnosis of CML with vPh.

  20. Bone marrow transplantation for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, J.M.; Apperley, J.F.; Jones, L.

    1986-01-01

    Between February 1981 and December 1984 we treated 52 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase and 18 patients with more advanced disease by high-dose chemoradiotherapy followed by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation using marrow cells from HLA-identical sibling donors. In addition, the 40 patients who had not previously undergone splenectomy received radiotherapy to the spleen. To prevent graft versus host disease, cyclosporine was given either alone or in conjunction with donor marrow depleted of T cells. Of the 52 patients treated in the chronic phase, 38 are alive after a median follow-up of 25 months (range, 7 to 50); the actuarial survival at two years was 72%, and the actuarial risk of relapse was 7%. Of the 18 patients with more advanced disease, 4 have survived; the actuarial two-year survival was 18%, and the actuarial risk of relapse was 42%. We conclude that the probability of cure is highest if transplantation is performed while the patient remains in the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia. T-cell depletion may have reduced the incidence and severity of graft versus host disease. The value of irradiation to the spleen before transplantation has not been established

  1. Pilot study of erlotinib in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Hamid; Czader, Magdalena; Amin, Chirag; Cangany, Mary; Konig, Heiko; Cripe, Larry D

    2015-02-01

    We conducted a pilot study to investigate clinical efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A total of 11 patients with de novo AML were treated, including 2 with relapsed and/or refractory disease and 9 older patients with previously untreated AML. Patients with high baseline leukocyte count were excluded. Erlotinib was given orally at 150 mg per day continuously in 28-day cycles. The treatment was tolerated well, and no toxicities were observed. An initial reduction in circulating blasts, followed by disease progression, was observed in 2 patients. Nine other patients did not demonstrate any response in blood or bone marrow. Baseline and post-cycle 1 flow-cytometry were performed on bone marrow blasts to investigate signs of differentiation. No immunophenotypic changes suggestive of differentiation were observed. This pilot study did not demonstrate response to standard doses of erlotinib in patients with AML. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical pathway for patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia: The Euriclea Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Stefano; Gargiulo, Gianpaolo; Bombaci, Felice; Artioli, Giovanna; Cosentino, Chiara; Pignatelli, Adriana Concetta; Torino, Daniela; Lionetti, Maria Marcella; Samarani, Emanuela; Cappucciati, Lorella; Bordiga, Paola; Diodati, Antonella; Caffarri, Cristiana; Rosini, Irene; Pane, Fabrizio

    2017-07-18

    The use of Tirosine Kinase Ihnibitors (TKIs) for the treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) has definitely represented a turning point in the treatment of the onco-hematological diseases. Over the years, the interest of physicians, nurses, patients and caregivers has increasingly focused on the aspects of the humanization of care, the management of side effects and on the full and constant therapeutic adherence. The aim of the project was to define patient-oriented care processes, based on a proactive approach that can fully respond to the new health needs of CML patients. A nursing expert Working Group (WG) was established. WG reviewed literature about CML patients assistance and then it was conducted a survey on organizational models for the treatment of CML patients, adopted by Italian haematologic and transplant centers.  Finally, the main issues regarding CML patients care were identified and discussed on a multiprofessional basis. Euriclea Project for care of CML patients with the description of a new and expanded nurse role was defined. The Nurse Case Manager or Nursing Clinical Experts were identified as key people for the management of the side effects of treatment, the promotion of the therapeutic adherence and the evaluation of efficacy and effectiveness of the process through the identification of specific indicators for structure, process and outcome. The focal areas of the care process were identified so as to define a different approach to the CML patient, through a holistic view of care and the multidisciplinary interventions.

  3. Coexistance of JAK2V617F mutation and BCR/ABL translocation in one patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Albayrak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor,The myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs constitute a subcategory of chronic myeloid disorders and include chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, essential thrombocytemia (ET, polycythemia vera (PV and myelofibrosis (MF. In 1960, the discovery of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph became a cornerstone in CML treatment and led to the development of moleculary targeted therapy. Recently, an acquired mutation in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 gene has been discovered in nearly all patents with PV and approximately half of the patients with primary MF and ET. Subsequently, the mutation has been demonstrated in atypical MPDs (chronic neutrophilic leukemia, unclassified, de novo myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia.1 It has been hoped that targeted inhibition of JAK2V617F should achieve similar disease control as thyrosine kinases has produced in CML.

  4. Therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tothova, E.

    2012-01-01

    Although chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was probably first described in the early nineteenth century, there was little progress in understanding its biology until the discovery of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome in 1960. Subsequent important landmarks were the recognition that the Ph chromosome results from a t(9;22) translocation and subsequently of BCR-ABL fusion gene. Between 1980 and 2000, allo grafting, despite the risks of morbidity and mortality, was the recommended initial treatment for younger patients with HLA-matched donors. Therapy has now been „revolutionized“ by the introduction on imatinib mesylate (IM), the original Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) which was used first in the clinic in 1998. This paper will attempt to define approaches to management of the newly diagnosed patient with CML in chronic phase that are favored in 2012, but it is most probable these recommendations will need to be updated as further experience in gained with the use of TKI. (author)

  5. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced immune thrombocytopenia in chronic myeloid leukemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital F. Barak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The outcome and quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients has remarkably changed with the treatment of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. Currently, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is considered mainly as a third line salvage therapy in cases of TKIs resistance or intolerance. Here we describe a patient with chronic phase CML who developed both resistance and late occurrence of s severe thrombocytopenia on first and second generation TKIs and eventually underwent HSCT. Although the mechanism of the myelosuppression is not fully understood, we showed for the first time the development of dose dependent platelet antibodies in the presence of TKIs, suggesting the possibility of TKIs induced thrombocytopenia. Our case emphasizes that late development of severe myelosuppression during imatinib treatment is probably an important indication for consideration of early HSCT.

  6. Dasatinib in the treatment of imatinib refractory chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Ramchandren

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Radhakrishnan Ramchandren, Charles A SchifferDivision of Hematology/Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: The development of imatinib for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML has proven to be an example of medical success in the era of targeted therapy. However, imatinib resistance or intolerance occurs in a substantial number of patients. Additionally, patients who have progressed beyond the chronic phase of CML do relatively poorly with imatinib therapy. Mechanisms of imatinib resistance include BCR-ABL point mutations resulting in decreased imatinib binding, as well as mutation-independent causes of resistance such as SRC family kinase dysregulation, BCR-ABL gene amplification, drug influx/efflux mechanisms and other poorly understood processes. The options for therapy in these patients include stem cell transplantation, imatinib dose escalation as well as the use of second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Dasatinib is a second-generation multi-kinase inhibitor with several theoretical and mechanistic advantages over imatinib. Moreover, several studies have evaluated dasatinib in patients who have progressed on imatinib therapy with encouraging results. Other novel agents such as mTOR inhibitors, bosutinib and INNO 406 have also shown promise in this setting. Although treatment options have increased, the choice of second-line therapy in patients with CML is influenced by concerns surrounding the duration of response as well as toxicity. Consequently, there is no agreed upon optimal second-line agent. This paper reviews the current data and attempts to address these issues. Keywords: chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, dasatinib, imatinib, resistance (imatinib resistance, nilotinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitor

  7. Outcomes for Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambaro, Francesco Paolo; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; O’Brien, Susan M.; Faderl, Stefan H.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Burger, Jan A.; Pierce, Sherry; Wang, Xuemei; Do, Kim-Anh; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Keating, Michael J.; Wierda, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia (AL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are uncommon in CLL. We retrospectively identified 95 patients with CLL also diagnosed with AL (n=38) or MDS (n=57), either concurrently (n=5) or subsequent (n=90) to CLL diagnosis and report their outcomes. Median number of CLL treatments prior to AL and MDS was 2(0–9) and 1(0–8), respectively; the most common regimen was purine analogue combined with alkylating agent±CD20 mAb. Twelve had no prior CLL treatment. Among 38 with AL, 33 had AML, 3 had ALL (1Ph+), 1 had biphenotypic, and 1 had extramedullary (bladder) AML. Unfavorable AML karyotype was noted in 26, intermediate-risk in 7. There was no association between survival from AL and number of prior CLL regimens or karyotype. Expression of CD7 on blasts was associated with shorter survival. Among MDS cases, all IPSS were represented; karyotype was unfavorable in 36, intermediate in 6, and favorable in 12 patients; 10 experienced transformation to AML. Shorter survival from MDS correlated with higher-risk IPSS, poor-risk karyotype, and increased number of prior CLL treatments. Overall, outcomes for patients with CLL subsequently diagnosed with AL or MDS were poor; AL/MDS occurred without prior CLL treatment. Effective therapies for these patients are desperately needed. PMID:26290497

  8. Linking Costs and Survival in the Treatment of Older Adults With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Analysis of SEER-Medicare Data From 1995 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Jung; Winn, Aaron N; Parsons, Susan K; Neumann, Peter J; Weiss, Elisa S; Cohen, Joshua T

    2016-04-01

    The high prices of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) therapy are well recognized, but less discussion has focused on the value of health care spending on the disease. This study examined whether the added costs have been "worth" the benefits among older adults with CML. We analyzed trends in health care costs and survival over time of 2164 CML patients over age 65 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare-linked database. We estimated life expectancy over a 15-year duration after diagnosis using a Weibull survival model and projected the corresponding costs using a 2-part model, adjusting for patient characteristics. We estimated population-level survival, total health care costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (expressed as cost per life year gained) over the period of 1995-2007. We found that therapeutic improvements in the treatment of CML have been associated with survival gains among older adults. Mean life expectancy was 2.2 years in 1995 and increased to 4.2 years in 2007. During the same timeframe, CML care costs have increased, from $127,000 in 1995 to $278,000 in 2007 (2010 dollars), mostly due to increasing tyrosine kinase inhibitor costs. The aggregated incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $74,000/life year gained. Our findings showed that, despite high costs, CML care may provide reasonable value for money among older patients between 1995-2007. Our study sheds light on the value of health care spending on CML by considering both the costs and the benefits. Future research should investigate strategies to improve treatment adherence to maximize the value of CML care.

  9. Prolonged T1 relaxation of the hemopoietic bone marrow in patients with chronic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, K.E.; Soerensen, P.G.; Thomsen, C.; Christoffersen, P.; Henriksen, O.; Karle, H.; Hvidovre Hospital; Hvidovre Hospital; Gentofte Hospital

    1990-01-01

    Eleven patients with chronic leukemia (7 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and 4 with chronic myeloid leukemia) were evaluated with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and T1 relaxation time measurements by use of a 1.5 tesla whole body MR scanner. Bone marrow biopsies were obtained from the posterior iliac crest (within 72 hours of the MR examination) in order to provide data on bone marrow cellularity and differential counts. The patients with chronic leukemia all showed a significant prolongation of the T1 relaxation times compared with the normal range for hemopoietic bone marrow. (orig.)

  10. Chemical changes in the blood of leukemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Y.; Shah, S.; Khan, S.A.; Khan, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Blood samples of 10 patients of blood cancer were collected from Combined Military Hospital (CMH), Rawalpindi. These samples of leukemia patients before and after treatments were analyzed for hemoglobin, creatinine, urea, glucose, uric acid, bilirubin, protein, sodium, and potassium using different methods. The mean values for various tested parameters were found to be 8.8 m.mol/L (urea), 214.9 Jimol/L (creatinine), 7.4 m. mol/L (glucose), 40.2 g/L (albumin), 410.2 micro mol/L (uric acid), 24.6 micro mol/L (bilirubin), 138.2 m.mol/L (sodium), 5.04 m.mol/L (potassium) and 9.6 g/dL (hemoglobin). The data revealed that levels of glucose and sodium were within the normal range in all patients whereas blood spectrum for hemoglobin, creatinine, urea, uric acid, bilirubin and potassium showed abnormal results. The results predict that leukemia in the body lead to appreciable and detectable changes in the chemical profile of blood. Some of these changes are mainly caused because of the disease only while others may be due to the disease as well as the treatment phenomenon i.e. effect of medicines. The findings thus obtained provide useful information to the researchers and the specialist doctors of the disease. (author)

  11. Total body irradiation in the bone marrow transplantation in leukemia:an experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapatero, A.; Martin de Vidales, C.; Pinar, B.; Marin, A.; Cerezo, L.; Dominguez, P.; Perez, A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to evaluate long-term survival and morbidity of fractioned total body irradiation (TBI) prior to allogeneicbone marrow transplantation (BMT) for leukemia. From June 1985 to May 1992, 94 patients with acute leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), were treated with high dose cyclophosphamide(CY) and fractionated TBI to a total dose of 12 Gy in six fractions prior to allogeneic BMT. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival were 53% +-6 and 48%+- respectively for patients with standard risk disease (first remission of acute leukemia and first chronic phase of CML), and 24%+-7 and 21%+-6 for patients with more advanced disease (p=3D0.01). The incidence of interstitial pneumonitis (IP), venoocclusive disease of the liver (VOD) and grade=3D>II acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were respectively 15%, 29% and 51%. Fractionated TBI combined with high dose CY before allogeneic BMT for leukemia is an effective treatment in prolonging relapse-free survival witha low incidence of lung toxicity. (Author) 13 refs

  12. Telomere length shortening is associated with treatment-free remission in chronic myeloid leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Caocci

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We studied telomere length in 32 CML patients who discontinued imatinib after achieving complete molecular remission and 32 age-sex-matched controls. The relative telomere length (RTL was determined by q-PCR as the telomere to single copy gene (36B4 ratio normalized to a reference sample (K-562 DNA. Age-corrected RTL (acRTL was also obtained. The 36-month probability of treatment-free remission (TFR was 59.4 %. TFR patients showed shorter acRTL compared to relapsed (mean ± SD = 0.01 ± 0.14 vs 0.20 ± 0.21; p = 0.01. TFR was significantly higher in CML patients with acRTL ≤0.09 (78.9 vs 30.8 %, p = 0.002. CML stem cells harboring longer telomeres possibly maintain a proliferative potential after treatment discontinuation.

  13. Imatinib Intolerance Is Associated With Blastic Phase Development in Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles-Velázquez, Jorge Luis; Hurtado-Monroy, Rafael; Vargas-Viveros, Pablo; Carrillo-Muñoz, Silvia; Candelaria-Hernández, Myrna

    2016-08-01

    Over the past years, the survival of patients with Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML Ph(+)) has increased as a result of therapy with tyrosin kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Intolerance to TKIs has been described in approximately 20% of patients receiving treatment. We studied the incidence of imatinib intolerance in patients with CML Ph(+) and their outcome in our CML reference site, as there is no information about the evolution of patients intolerant to TKIs. A group of 86 patients with CML Ph(+) receiving imatinib monotherapy who abandoned treatment were the basis for this study. We present the trends of their disease evolution. The median of age at diagnosis was 42 years. Within a year, 19 (22%) of 86 patients developed imatinib intolerance, all of them with grade III or IV disease that required imatinib dose reduction or discontinuation. Of these patients, 16 (84%) of 19 developed transformation to blastic phase. The cumulative incidences of blastic phase development were 47% in the nonintolerant group and 84% in the intolerant group. There was a relative risk for those with imatinib intolerance to develop blastic phase of 1.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.28 to 2.42) (P treatment is available. Future research should to determine whether the origin of this evolution is really due to the intolerance itself or whether it is due to a more aggressive form of the disease, perhaps related to genetic transformation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Successful Treatment of Disseminated Cryptococcal Infection in a Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patient During Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Jessica L.; Yin, Dwight E.; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Turner, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcal infection is rarely reported in the setting of pediatric acute leukemia, despite the immunocompromised state of these patients. However, when present, disseminated cryptococcal infection poses treatment challenges and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment of invasive fungal disease in a child with acute leukemia requires a delicate balance between anti-fungal and anti-neoplastic therapy. This balance is particularly important early in the course of leukemia, since both the underlying disease and overwhelming infection can be life threatening. We describe the successful management of life-threatening disseminated cryptococcosis in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during induction therapy. PMID:22258349

  15. Imatinib-loaded polyelectrolyte microcapsules for sustained targeting of BCR-ABL+ leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamà, Ilaria E; Leporatti, Stefano; de Luca, Emanuela; Di Renzo, Nicola; Maffia, Michele; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Rinaldi, Ross; Gigli, Giuseppe; Cingolani, Roberto; Coluccia, Addolorata M L

    2010-04-01

    The lack of sensitivity of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) stem cells to imatinib mesylate (IM) commonly leads to drug dose escalation or early disease relapses when therapy is stopped. Here, we report that packaging of IM into a biodegradable carrier based on polyelectrolyte microcapsules increases drug retention and antitumor activity in CML stem cells, also improving the ex vivo purging of malignant progenitors from patient autografts. Microparticles/capsules were obtained by layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly of oppositely charged polyelectrolyte multilayers on removable calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) templates and loaded with or without IM. A leukemic cell line (KU812) and CD34(+) cells freshly isolated from healthy donors or CML patients were tested. Polyelectrolyte microcapsules (PMCs) with an average diameter of 3 microm, fluorescently labelled multilayers sensitive to the action of intracellular proteases and 95-99% encapsulation efficiency of IM, were prepared. Cell uptake efficiency of such biodegradable carriers was quantified in KU812, leukemic and normal CD34(+) stem cells (range: 70-85%), and empty PMCs did not impact cell viability. IM-loaded PMCs selectively targeted CML cells, by promoting apoptosis at doses that exert only cytostatic effects by IM alone. More importantly, residual CML cells from patient leukapheresis products were reduced or eliminated more efficiently by using IM-loaded PMCs compared with freely soluble IM, with a purging efficiency of several logs. No adverse effects on normal CD34(+) stem-cell survival and their clonogenic potential was noticed in long-term cultures of hematopoietic progenitors in vitro. This pilot study provides the proof-of-principle for the clinical application of biodegradable IM-loaded PMC as feasible, safe and effective ex vivo purging agents to target CML stem cells, in order to improve transplant outcome of resistant/relapsed patients or reduce IM dose escalation.

  16. Dasatinib for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia: patient selection and special considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Dilek; Sadri, Sevil; Eskazan, Ahmet Emre

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib is one of the second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors used in imatinib resistance and/or intolerance, as well as in the frontline setting in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia-chronic phase, and also in patients with advanced disease. It is also utilized in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphocytic leukemia. While choosing the appropriate tyrosine kinase inhibitor (ie, dasatinib) for each individual patient, comorbidities and BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations should always be taken into consideration, among other things. This review mainly focuses on patient selection prior to dasatinib administration in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia.

  17. Health Care Resource Utilization and Costs in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia with Better Adherence to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Increased Molecular Monitoring Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latremouille-Viau, Dominick; Guerin, Annie; Gagnon-Sanschagrin, Patrick; Dea, Katherine; Cohen, Benjamin G; Joseph, George J

    2017-02-01

    Frequent molecular monitoring (qPCR tests), as recommended by evidence-based monitoring guidelines, is associated with higher adherence to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the management of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML); both factors have been associated with better clinical and economic outcomes. To (a) estimate the effect of more frequent qPCR tests on health care resource utilization (HRU) and associated costs, including direct (effect of qPCR test frequency on HRU) and indirect (through TKI adherence) effects, and (b) develop an economic model applicable to multiple clinical practice scenarios. Adult patients newly diagnosed with CML who started TKI firstline therapy were identified from U.S. administrative claims data (2010-2015). TKI adherence (medication possession ratio [MPR]), number of inpatient days, emergency room (ER) visits, outpatient service days, and mean costs per HRU event were measured during the first year of CML treatment. Direct and indirect effects of qPCR test frequency were estimated using multivariate regression models. Subsequently, an economic model was developed to assess the overall effect of varying qPCR test frequency on HRU and associated costs during the first year of CML treatment under different clinical practice scenarios; the scenario reported is the increase from 1 to 2 qPCR tests. Of the 1,431 patients included, 36% had no qPCR tests, the average qPCR test frequency was 1.6, and the average MPR was 0.86 during the first year of CML treatment. The direct effect of increasing qPCR test frequency by 1 was associated with 13.0% fewer inpatient days (adjusted incidence rate ratio [adjusted IRR] = 0.87; P = 0.010); 8.3% fewer ER visits (adjusted IRR = 0.92; P = 0.043); and 3.0% more outpatient service days (adjusted IRR = 1.03; P = 0.002). Each increase of 1 test was associated with an increase in TKI adherence by 2.2 percentage points (adjusted MPR difference = 0.022; P better adherence to TKIs were associated with lower HRU

  18. Report of chronic myeloid leukemia SMS Medical College Hospital, Jaipur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Hemant; Sharma, Rajesh; Singh, Yogender; Chaturvedi, Hemant

    2013-07-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of patients of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) registered and under treatment at the Leukemia Lymphoma Clinic at the Birla Cancer Center, SMS Medical College Hospital, Jaipur. Approximately, two-thirds of the patients are getting imatinib mesylate (IM) through the Glivec International Patient Assistance Program while the rest are on generic IM. In addition to comparison of hematological and molecular responses in the Glivec versus the genetic group, in this analysis, an attempt is also made to assess the socio-economic (SE) status of the patients and its effect on the response rates. Of the 213 patients studied, most (28.6%) are in the age group between 30 years and 40 years and the mean age of the patients in 39 years, a good decade younger that in the west. There is a suggestion that patients in lower SE class present with higher Sokal scores and with more disease burden. Possibly hematological responses are similar with both Glivec and generic IM. No comment can be made with regards to molecular response between the two groups as a significant number of patients in the Glivec arm (42%) do not have molecular assessment because of economic reasons. CML is a common and challenging disease in the developing world with patients presenting at an earlier age with more advanced disease. SE factors play a significant role in therapy and disease monitoring decision making and may impact on response rates and prognosis.

  19. Tetrasomy 8 in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Fábio Morato; Brandão, Renata Amorim; Leite-Cueva, Sabrina Dias; de Paula Careta, Francisco; Simões, Belinda Pinto; Rego, Eduardo Magalhães; Falcão, Roberto Passetto

    2010-04-15

    We report a case of a 47-year-old man diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with two extra copies of chromosome 8. Classical cytogenetic analysis by the immunostimulatory combination of DSP30 and interleukin 2 showed tetrasomy of chromosome 8 in 60% of the metaphase cells (48,XY,+8,+8[12]/46,XY[8]). Spectral karyotype analysis confirmed the abnormality previously seen by G banding. Additionally, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization using an LSI CEP 8 probe performed on peripheral blood cells without any stimulant agent showed tetrasomy of chromosome 8 in 54% of analyzed cells (108 of 200). To our knowledge, tetrasomy 8 as the sole chromosomal abnormality in CLL has not been previously described. The prognostic significance of tetrasomy 8 in CLL remains to be elucidated. However, the patient has been followed up in the outpatient hospital since 2004 without any therapeutic intervention and has so far remained stable. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Frequency and Reasons for Return to Acute Care in Leukemia Patients Undergoing Inpatient Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jack Brian; Lee, Jay; Smith, Dennis W.; Bruera, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the frequency and reasons for return to the primary acute care service among leukemia patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. Design Retrospective study of all patients with leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, aplastic anemia, or myelofibrosis admitted to inpatient rehabilitation at a tertiary referral-based cancer center between January 1, 2005, and April 10, 2012. Items analyzed from patient records included return to the primary acute care service with demographic information, leukemia characteristics, medications, hospital admission characteristics, and laboratory values. Results 225 patients were admitted a total of 255 times. 93/255 (37%) of leukemia inpatient rehabilitation admissions returned to the primary acute care service. 18/93 (19%) and 42/93 (45%) of these patients died in the hospital and were discharged home respectively. Statistically significant factors (p<.05) associated with return to the primary acute care service include peripheral blast percentage and the presence of an antifungal agent on the day of inpatient rehabilitation transfer. Using an additional two factors (platelet count and the presence of an antiviral agent both with a p<.11), a Return To Primary (RTP) - Leukemia index was formulated. Conclusions Leukemia patients with the presence of circulating peripheral blasts and/or antifungal agent may be at increased risk of return to the primary acute care service. The RTP-Leukemia index should be tested in prospective studies to determine its usefulness. PMID:23117267

  1. Reanalysis of atomic bomb survivors' leukemia based on the recent classification for leukemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao.

    1990-01-01

    Four hundred and ninety-three A-bomb survivors developing leukemia, who had been exposed within 9,000 m from the hypocenter, were entered on the study for reanalysis of their disease based on the new classification. Chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) showed the highest concordance rate (95%) between the previous and new classifications. For 10 survivors previously diagnosed as having chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a new classification diagnosed CLL as well in 3 and adult T-cell leukemia in the other 7. None of the A-bomb survivors exposed to one Gy or more had subtype M3 of acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), although the exposed group had almost the same distribution pattern of AML subtypes as the naturally induced leukemic group. The incidence of CML was significantly lower than that of AML in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. As A-bomb survivors were older at the time of A-bombing, the relative risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was decreased; that of CML and other types of leukemia was increased. An increased relative risk of ALL and CML tended to be associated with larger doses. A significantly shortened interval between A-bomb exposure and the development of leukemia was also associated with larger doses. (N.K.)

  2. Leukemia -- Eosinophilic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Leukemia - Eosinophilic Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Stages Treatment Options About Clinical Trials Latest Research ...

  3. Real world treatment patterns in chronic myeloid leukemia patients newly initiated on tyrosine kinase inhibitors in an U.S. integrated healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nazia; Koh, Han A; Lin, Kathy J; Stwalley, Brian; Felber, Eugene

    2018-06-01

    Purpose To evaluate treatment patterns in patients diagnosed with incident chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) newly initiating therapy with imatinib, dasatinib, or nilotinib. Patients were followed to determine switching and discontinuation rates. Factors associated with switching or discontinuation from index TKI therapy, reasons for discontinuation based on electronic chart notes, and frequency of laboratory monitoring were assessed during the follow-up period. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients aged ≥ 18 years who were identified from the Kaiser Permanente Southern California (KPSC) Cancer Registry database during the study time period of 1 January 2007 to 12 December 2013. The index date was defined as the date of the first TKI prescription (imatinib, dasatinib, or nilotinib) identified during the study time period with no prior history of TKI use within 12 months. Patients had to have continuous membership with drug benefit eligibility and no prior history of stem cell transplant (SCT) or other cancers during the 12 months prior to the index date. Baseline characteristics were identified during 12 months prior to the index date and outcomes were identified during the follow-up period after the index date. All patients were followed from index TKI therapy until end of study time period (12 December 2014), death, stem cell transplant, or disenrollment from the health plan unless one of the following occurred first: a patient switched their index therapy, or a patient discontinued their index therapy. Forward stepwise selection multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate factors associated with patients who continued therapy compared to those who switched or discontinued therapy with the index TKI. Chart notes were reviewed 30 days prior and 30 days post index TKI discontinuation to evaluate reasons for discontinuation. Molecular and cytogenetic testing frequency was also assessed

  4. Regional variations in age at diagnosis and overall survival among patients with chronic myeloid leukemia from low and middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendizabal, Adam M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Pat; Levine, Paul H

    2013-06-01

    The epidemiology of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in low and middle income countries is limited. As a result, we analyzed a contemporary cohort of patients from low and middle income countries treated with Imatinib through The Glivec(®) International Patient Assistance Program (GIPAP). Generalized estimating equations (GEE) and Kaplan-Meier estimation were utilized to test for regional variations in age at diagnosis and overall survival among 33,985 patients from 94 countries. Patients participated from Asia (79.2%), Africa (9.4%), Latin America (8.7%) and Southern/Eastern Europe (2.5%). Sixty-one (61.2%) percent were male. Mean age at diagnosis was 38.5 years (9.4% 1 year; decreasing to 15.5% in 2010 (p 1-year (p 400 mg (p age at diagnosis and overall survival exist within and between regions. Additional epidemiological studies should be conducted to assess for possible environmental factors associated with the earlier age at onset. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairy cell leukemia treatment options include watchful waiting when there are no symptoms, chemotherapy, biologic therapy, surgery, and targeted therapy. Learn more about the diagnosis and treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent hairy cell leukemia in this expert-reviewed summary.

  6. Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; also called acute lymphocytic leukemia) is a blood cancer that often gets worse quickly if it is not treated. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, stem cell transplant, and targeted therapy. Get detailed information about ALL in this expert-reviewed summary.

  7. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-22

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guldane Cengiz Seval

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this review were to discuss standard and investigational treatment strategies for adolescent and young adult with acute myeloid leukemia, excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML in adolescent and young adult patients (AYAs may need a different type of therapy than those currently used in children and older patients. As soon as AML is diagnosed, AYA patient should be offered to participate in well-designed clinical trials. The standard treatment approach for AYAs with AML is remission induction chemotherapy with an anthracycline/cytarabine combination, followed by either consolidation chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation, depending on the ability of the patient to tolerate intensive treatment and cytogenetic features. Presently, continuing progress of novel drugs targeting specific pathways in acute leukemia may bring AML treatment into a new era.

  9. Imaging of liver and spleen candidiasis in patients with acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Yasuo; Tamakawa, Y.; Kato, T.; Kimura, Y.; Miyazaki, S.; Miura, R.; Ishida, H.

    1988-01-01

    Four patients with acute leukemia were found to have candidal abscess of liver and spleen. CT and US showed hepatosplenomegaly and microabscess. These findings might be useful in diagnosis of visceral candidiasis. (author)

  10. Imaging of liver and spleen candidiasis in patients with acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seino, Yasuo; Tamakawa, Y.; Kato, T.; Kimura, Y.; Miyazaki, S.; Miura, R.; Ishida, H.

    1988-01-01

    Four patients with acute leukemia were found to have candidal abscess of liver and spleen. CT and US showed hepatosplenomegaly and microabscess. These findings might be useful in diagnosis of visceral candidiasis.

  11. Acute myelomonocytic leukemia following splenectomy in a patient with long-standing Hodgkin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbloom, B.E.; Klein, E.J.; Uszler, J.M.; Ellis, R.; Block, J.B.; Tanaka, K.R.

    1978-01-01

    The association of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia with Hodgkin disease has been recorded in more than 100 instances. In most of these cases the patient has had long-standing Hodgkin disease and radiotherapy has been carried out. The combination of previous radiotherapy and chemotherapy appears to further increase the risk of leukemia developing. In a patient under our care with Hodgkin disease acute myelomonocytic leukemia developed following splenectomy for hypersplenism. The onset of acute leukemia immediately following splenectomy in a patient with Hodgkin disease has not previously been noted. In addition, because the patient's usual bone marrow sampling sites were hypoplastic, we utilized an 111 In-chloride bone marrow scan to find a site that was accessible for aspiration

  12. Cardiac Surgery Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanjia; Toth, Andrew J; Lowry, Ashley M; Blackstone, Eugene H; Hill, Brian T; Mick, Stephanie L

    2018-04-01

    Surgical outcomes of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) undergoing cardiac surgery are limited. Our objectives were to investigate hospital morbidity and mortality after open cardiac surgery in CLL versus non-CLL patients. From May 1995 to May 2015, 157 patients with CLL and 55,917 without and older than 47 years underwent elective cardiac surgery at Cleveland Clinic. By Rai criteria, 79 CLL patients (56%) were low risk (class 0), 13 (9.1%) intermediate risk (classes I and II), and 38 (27%) high risk (classes III and IV); 12 (8.5%) were in remission. Mean age of CLL patients was 72 ± 9.0 years, and 18% were women. CLL patients were propensity-score matched to 3 non-CLL patients to compare surgical outcomes. High-risk CLL patients received more blood products than matched non-CLL patients (33/38 [87%] versus 74/114 [65%], p = 0.01), but were less likely to receive cryoprecipitate (0% versus 15/114 [13%], p = .02). Intermediate-risk CLL patients received more platelet units, mean 12 versus 4.6 (p = 0.008). Occurrence of deep sternal wound infection (0% versus 5/471 [1.1%]), septicemia (5/157 [3.2%] versus 14/471 [3.0%]), and hospital mortality (4/157 [2.5%] versus 14/471 [3.0%]) were similar (p > 0.3), independent of prior chemotherapy treatment for CLL. Although CLL patients did not have higher hospital mortality than non-CLL patients, high-risk CLL patients were more likely to receive blood products. Risks associated with transfusion should be considered when evaluating CLL patients for elective cardiac surgery. Appropriate preoperative management, such as blood product transfusions, and alternative treatment options that decrease blood loss, should be considered for high-risk patients. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Study Gaps Relevant to Use of Complementary Medicine in Patients With Leukemia: A Review Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladinia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Context A review of the literature of recent decades has shown that few studies have been conducted on the effects of various types of complementary medicine on patients with leukemia. Therefore, the present study aimed to find research gaps in the use of different types of complementary medicine in patients with leukemia to be applied in future studies. Evidence Acquisition The present study was a review-type design based on a review of the literature on different types of complementary medicine in patients with leukemia, up to 2015. The search was conducted through electronic databases and search engines. According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 8 studies which had been conducted on the use of complementary medicine in patients with leukemia were selected for the identification of gaps. Results The overall results showed that few studies have been conducted on the use of exercise, massage therapy, music therapy, acupressure, and healing touch in patients with leukemia, and these subjects are potential research areas for many different studies. However, no studies have been carried out on the effects of acupuncture, relaxation, and yoga on these patients. Conclusions The results of this review showed that the number of studies on the use of complementary medicine in leukemia patients is very limited (especially in Iran, and it can be the subject of numerous studies in the future.

  14. Bilateral Proliferative Retinopathy as the Initial Presentation of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Mafalda S. F.; Figueiredo, Ana R. M.; Ferreira, Natália N.; Barbosa, Irene M. A.; Furtado, Maria João F. B. S.; Correia, Nuno F. C. B. A.; Gomes, Miguel P.; Lume, Miguel R. B.; Menéres, Maria João S.; Santos, Marinho M. N.; Meireles S., M. Angelina C.

    2013-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of a 48-year-old male with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who initially presented with a bilateral proliferative retinopathy. The patient complained of recent visual loss and floaters in both eyes (BE). Ophthalmologic evaluation revealed a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20/50 in the right eye and 20/200 in the left eye (LE). Fundoscopy showed the presence of bilateral peripheral capillary dropout with multiple retinal sea fan neovascularisations, which were confirmed on fluorescein angiography. Full blood count revealed hyperleukocytosis, thrombocytosis, anemia, and hyperuricemia. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy showed the reciprocal chromosomal translocation t (9;22), diagnostic of CML. The patient was started on hydroxyurea, allopurinol and imatinib mesylate. He received bilateral panretinal laser photocoagulation and a vitrectomy was performed in the LE. The patient has been in complete hematologic, cytogenetic, and major molecular remission while on imatinib and his BCVA is 20/25 in BE. PMID:24339689

  15. Dose Dependent Survival Response in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia under Continuous and Pulsed Targeted Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzolato, N.; Valenti, D.; Spagnolo, B.; Persano Adorno, D.

    2010-01-01

    A simulative study of cancer growth dynamics in patients affected by Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML), under the effect of a targeted dose dependent continuous or pulsed therapy, is presented. We have developed a model for the dynamics of CML in which the stochastic evolution of white blood cell populations are simulated by adopting a Monte Carlo approach. Several scenarios in the evolutionary dynamics of white blood cells, as a consequence of the efficacy of the different modelled therapies, pulsed or continuous, are described. The best results, in terms of a permanent disappearance of the leukemic phenotype, are achieved with a continuous therapy and higher dosage. However, our findings demonstrate that an intermittent therapy could represent a valid choice in patients with high risk of toxicity, when a long-term therapy is considered. A suitably tuned pulsed therapy can enhance the treatment efficacy and reduce the percentage of patients developing resistance. (authors)

  16. Deep molecular responses for treatment-free remission in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulucq, Stéphanie; Mahon, Francois-Xavier

    2016-09-01

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated that some patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) who achieve sustained deep molecular responses on tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy can safely suspend therapy and attempt treatment-free remission (TFR). Many TFR studies to date have enrolled imatinib-treated patients; however, the feasibility of TFR following nilotinib or dasatinib has also been demonstrated. In this review, we discuss available data from TFR trials and what these data reveal about the molecular biology of TFR. With an increasing number of ongoing TFR clinical trials, TFR may become an achievable goal for patients with CML-CP. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Towards Comprehension of the ABCB1/P-Glycoprotein Role in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel C. Maia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The introduction of imatinib (IM, a BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, has represented a significant advance in the first-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. However, approximately 30% of patients need to discontinue IM due to resistance or intolerance to this drug. Both resistance and intolerance have also been observed in treatment with the second-generation TKIs—dasatinib, nilotinib, and bosutinib—and the third-generation TKI—ponatinib. The mechanisms of resistance to TKIs may be BCR-ABL1-dependent and/or BCR-ABL1-independent. Although the role of efflux pump P-glycoprotein (Pgp, codified by the ABCB1 gene, is unquestionable in drug resistance of many neoplasms, a longstanding question exists about whether Pgp has a firm implication in TKI resistance in the clinical scenario. The goal of this review is to offer an overview of ABCB1/Pgp expression/activity/polymorphisms in CML. Understanding how interactions, associations, or cooperation between Pgp and other molecules—such as inhibitor apoptosis proteins, microRNAs, or microvesicles—impact IM resistance risk may be critical in evaluating the response to TKIs in CML patients. In addition, new non-TKI compounds may be necessary in order to overcome the resistance mediated by Pgp in CML.

  18. Risk of leukemia in first degree relatives of patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo GONÇALVES

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of leukemia in parents of patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate (NSCL/P. This case-control study evaluated first-degree family members of 358 patients with NSCL/P and 1,432 subjects without craniofacial alterations or syndromes. Statistical analysis was carried out using Fisher’s test. From the 358 subjects with NSCL/P, 3 first-degree parents had history of leukemia, while 2 out of 1,432 subjects from the unaffected group had a family history of leukemia. The frequency of positive family history of leukemia was not significantly increased in first-degree relatives of patients with NSCL/P.

  19. Quantitative analysis of DNA methylation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyko, Frank; Stach, Dirk; Brenner, Axel; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Döhner, Hartmut; Wirtz, Michaela; Wiessler, Manfred; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2004-06-01

    Changes in the genomic DNA methylation level have been found to be closely associated with tumorigenesis. In order to analyze the relation of aberrant DNA methylation to clinical and biological risk factors, we have determined the cytosine methylation level of 81 patients diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The analysis was based on DNA hydrolysis followed by derivatization of the 2'-desoxyribonucleoside-3'-monophosphates with BODIPY FL EDA. Derivatives were separated by micellar electrokinetic chromatography, and laser-induced fluorescence was used for detection. We analyzed potential correlations between DNA methylation levels and numerous patient parameters, including clinical observations and biological data. As a result, we observed a significant correlation with the immunoglobulin variable heavy chain gene (VH) mutation status. This factor has been repeatedly proposed as a reliable prognostic marker for CLL, which suggests that the methylation level might be a valuable factor in determining the prognostic outcome of CLL. We are now in the process of refining our method to broaden its application potential. In this context, we show here that the oxidation of the fluorescence marker in the samples and the evaporation of methanol in the electrolytes can be prevented by a film of paraffin oil. In summary, our results thus establish capillary electrophoresis as a valuable tool for analyzing the DNA methylation status of clinical samples.

  20. A study on stability and medical implications for a complex delay model for CML with cell competition and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rădulescu, I R; Cândea, D; Halanay, A

    2014-12-21

    We study a mathematical model describing the dynamics of leukemic and normal cell populations (stem-like and differentiated) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). This model is a system of four delay differential equations incorporating three types of cell division. The competition between normal and leukemic stem cell populations for the common microenvironment is taken into consideration. The stability of one steady state is investigated. The results are discussed via their medical interpretation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Oral Effects and Early Implant Survival Results After Imatinib Discontinuation Therapy for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Douglas R; Yassin, Alaa

    2017-08-01

    Little is known regarding the success, failure, or complication rates of advanced implant procedures in patients after discontinuation therapy of long-term medications for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). This case report presents initial results of a case involving implant placement in the mandible and maxilla as well as reduction of palatal oral pigmentation in a patient discontinuing long-term tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy for CML. A 57-year-old male was referred to the Department of Periodontics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, for an assessment of edentulous areas (tooth sites #3 and #14) and failing tooth #19. Previous medical treatment included oral administration (>10 years) of TKI for the treatment of CML. Systemic complications arising from long-term TKI therapy were treated with discontinuation of this medication. Concurrently, after multispecialty dental and medical consultation, extraction of tooth #19 with immediate implant placement and bilateral sinus augmentation with simultaneous implant placement were successfully performed during three separate surgical appointments. Additionally, marked reduction of oral palatal pigmentation was observed during the surgical and restorative phases after TKI discontinuation. Patients with a history of long-term TKIs for CML are at risk for developing complications that result in discontinuation of therapy. Long-term benefits of therapy may allow these patients to enjoy remission with an extended and improved quality of life. Patients undergoing discontinuation therapy may seek dental care. Therefore, dental providers need to understand these systemic interactions and, with multispecialty consultation, may help effectively treat these individuals.

  2. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

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    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang, E-mail: wangjx@ihcams.ac.cn

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  3. Specific receptors for phorbol diesters on freshly isolated human myeloid and lymphoid leukemia cells: comparable binding characteristics despite different cellular responses.

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    Goodwin, B J; Moore, J O; Weinberg, J B

    1984-02-01

    Freshly isolated human leukemia cells have been shown in the past to display varying in vitro responses to phorbol diesters, depending on their cell type. Specific receptors for the phorbol diesters have been demonstrated on numerous different cells. This study was designed to characterize the receptors for phorbol diesters on leukemia cells freshly isolated from patients with different kinds of leukemia and to determine if differences in binding characteristics for tritium-labeled phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (3H-PDBu) accounted for the different cellular responses elicited in vitro by phorbol diesters. Cells from 26 patients with different kinds of leukemia were studied. PDBu or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) caused cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), acute promyelocytic (APML), acute myelomonocytic (AMML), acute monocytic (AMoL), acute erythroleukemia (AEL), chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) in blast crisis (myeloid), acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL), and hairy cell leukemia (HCL) (n = 15) to adhere to plastic and spread. However, they caused no adherence or spreading and only slight aggregation of cells from patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), or CML-blast crisis (lymphoid) (n = 11). All leukemia cells studied, irrespective of cellular type, displayed specific receptors for 3H-PDBu. The time courses for binding by all leukemia types were similar, with peak binding at 5-10 min at 37 degrees C and 120 min at 4 degrees C. The binding affinities were similar for patients with ALL (96 +/- 32 nM, n = 4), CLL (126 +/- 32 nM, n = 6), and acute nonlymphoid leukemia (73 +/- 14 nM, n = 11). Likewise, the numbers of specific binding sites/cell were comparable for the patients with ALL (6.2 +/- 1.3 X 10(5) sites/cell, n = 4), CLL (5.0 +/- 2.0 X 10(5) sites/cell, n = 6), and acute nonlymphoid leukemia (4.4 +/- 1.9 X 10(5) sites/cell, n = 11). Thus, the differing responses to phorbol diesters of

  4. Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

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    Treatment options for adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, stem cell transplant, and other medications. Get detailed information about the treatment of new and recurrent AML in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

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    Childhood acute myeloid leukemia and other myeloid malignancies treatment may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, stem cell transplant, and targeted therapy. Learn more about AML and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative diseases in this expert-reviewed summary.

  6. Therapeutic options for chronic myeloid leukemia: focus on imatinib (Glivec®, Gleevec™

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    Martin Henkes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available 1Martin Henkes, 2Heiko van der Kuip, 1Walter E Aulitzky12nd Department of Internal Medicine, Oncology and Hematology, Robert Bosch Hospital, Auerbachstr. 110, Stuttgart, Germany; 2Dr Margarete Fischer-Bosch Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Auerbachstr. 112, Stuttgart, and University of Tuebingen, GermanyAbstract: Treatment options for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML have changed dramatically during the last decades. Interferon-α treatment and stem cell transplantation (SCT clearly improved survival over conventional chemotherapy and offered the possibility of complete and durable responses. With the advent of the small molecule inhibitor imatinib mesylate (Glivec®, GleevecTM targeting the causative Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, the era of molecular cancer therapy began with remarkable success especially in chronic phase patients. Today, imatinib is the first-line treatment for CML. However, imatinib does not appear to be capable to eliminate all leukemia cells in the patients and pre-existing as well as acquired resistance to the drug has been increasingly recognized. To overcome these problems, several strategies involving dose escalation, combinations with other agents, and novel Bcr-Abl inhibitors have been developed.Keywords: CML therapy, imatinib, SCT, novel kinase inhibitors

  7. The efficiency of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia exposed to ionizing radiation due to the Chornobyl nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrenko, Yi.V.; Fedorenko, V.G.; Shlyakhtichenko, T.Yu.; And Others

    2014-01-01

    Additional chromosomal abnormalities as well as special pattern of BCR/ABL transcripts were not revealed in CML patients exposed to ionizing radiation. Complete cytogenetic response (CCR) was shown in 50 and 48.5 % of patients from study and comparison group, respectively. Major molecular response (MMR) was achieved in 20 % of patients with radiation exposure in anamnesis and in 27.6 % of patients from comparison group. The vast majority of CCR and MMR was reached in patients with the pretreatment term up to 6 months, when imatinib was used as a first line therapy. There were less cases of primary imatinib resistance in the same group of patients. In CML patients who had a history of radiation exposure, secondary resistance developed more frequently than in the comparison group and was 25 %. Laboratory monitoring based on the registration of CCR and MMR demonstrated high efficiency of TKI in the CML treatment of patients, exposed due to Chornobyl accident. Extension of pretreatment term leads to the loss of TKI therapy efficiency and increases the likelihood of primary resistance. CML patients exposed to ionizing radiation develop secondary resistance more often than CML patients without radiation exposure in anamnesis

  8. Leucemia Mielóide Crônica em pediatria: perspectivas atuais Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in pediatrics patients: current approach

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    Maria Lucia M. Lee

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A Leucemia Mielóide Crônica (LMC constitui evento raro na infância, representando menos de 5% das leucemias nesta faixa etária. Caracteriza-se pela presença de um marcador citogenético específico, cromossomo Ph+, que é responsável por grande parte da etiopatogenia da doença. Possui, portanto, características clínicas e evolutivas que não diferem dos pacientes adultos. Sua abordagem terapêutica em pediatria é baseada principalmente na experiência obtida com os estudos em adultos. Tem no TMO sua única opção de tratamento curativo, sendo este mais efetivo em pacientes com doador aparentado compatível, realizado durante a fase crônica inicial da doença. A grande eficácia antileucêmica observada com o mesilato de imatinibe fez com que a droga fosse aprovada para uso pediátrico em pacientes intolerantes ou refratários ao interferon a, ou recidivados pós-transplante de medula óssea. Seu uso em pacientes pediátricos com LMC de diagnóstico recente, com doador disponível, tornou-se um grande dilema, não existindo até o momento um consenso em relação à melhor forma de se utilizar a droga ou, mesmo, se esta irá em algum momento substituir o TMO. Estudos mais concretos com um seguimento maior ainda necessitam ser realizados.Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a rare event in childhood, comprising of less than 5% of all leukemia cases in this age group. CML is characterized by the presence of a specific molecular marker, the Ph+ chromosome, which is responsible for almost all etiopathogenesis, hence, it has clinical and course characteristics that do not differ from the adult population. In pediatrics the therapeutic approach is based mainly on the experience obtained with adult protocols. With bone marrow transplantation (BMT being the only cure option, this procedure is more effective in patients with compatible related donors and performed during the initial chronic phase of the disease. The great anti-leukemic efficacy

  9. Mixed phenotype (T/B/myeloid) extramedullary blast crisis as an initial presentation of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Xin; Qing, Annie; Ji, Ping; French, Samuel W; Mason, Holli

    2018-04-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome generated by the reciprocal translocation t(9,22)(q34;q11). The natural progression of the disease follows a biphasic or triphasic course. Most cases of CML are diagnosed in the chronic phase. Extramedullary blast crisis rarely occurs during the course of CML, and is extremely rare as the initial presentation of CML. Here, we report the case of a 32-year-old female with enlarged neck lymph nodes and fatigue. She was diagnosed with B-lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma with possible mixed phenotype (B/myeloid) by right neck lymph node biopsy at an outside hospital. However, review of her peripheral blood smear and her bone marrow aspirate and biopsy showed features consistent with CML, which was confirmed by PCR and karyotyping. An ultrasound-guided right cervical lymph node core biopsy showed a diffuse infiltrate of blasts, near totally replacing the normal lymph node tissue, admixed with some hematopoietic cells including megakaryocytes, erythroid precursors and maturing myeloid cells. By flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, the blasts expressed CD2, cytoplasmic CD3, CD5, CD7, CD56, TdT, CD10 (weak, subset), CD19 (subset), CD79a, PAX-5 (subset), CD34, CD38, CD117 (subset), HLA-DR (subset), CD11b, CD13 (subset), CD33 (subset), and weak cytoplasmic myeloperoxidase, without co-expression of surface CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD22, CD14, CD15, CD16 and CD64, consistent with blasts with mixed phenotype (T/B/myeloid). A diagnosis of extramedullary blast crisis of CML was made. Chromosomal analysis performed on the lymph node biopsy tissue revealed multiple numerical and structural abnormalities including the Ph chromosome (46-49,XX,add(1)(p34),add(3)(p25),add(5)(q13),-6,t(9;22)(q34;q11.2),+10,-15,add(17)(p11.2),+19, +der(22)t(9;22),+mar[cp8]). After completion of one cycle of combined chemotherapy plus dasatinib treatment, she was transferred to City of Hope

  10. Myeloid Leukemia while on Dasatinib Therapy

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    Monika Conchon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the case of an 18-year-old woman with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML who became pregnant while undergoing treatment with dasatinib. Before pregnancy, she received imatinib mesylate therapy but could not tolerate the treatment. The regimen was then changed to dasatinib at a dose of 70 mg b.i.d. While she was in hematological remission and on dasatinib therapy, she became pregnant. The unplanned pregnancy was identified after the patient had experienced four weeks of amenorrhea. Because the patient elected to continue the pregnancy to term, dasatinib was stopped immediately. Meanwhile, CML hematological relapse occurred and then she was treated with interferon- (IFN- (9 million IU/day throughout the pregnancy without a complete hematological response. She successfully gave birth to a male baby at 33 weeks by cesarean section delivery with no sequelae or malformations. Although this experience is limited to a single patient, it provides a useful contribution for counselling patients inadvertently exposed to dasatinib during pregnancy.

  11. Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, A; Österroos, A; Hassan, S; Gullbo, J; Rickardson, L; Jarvius, M; Nygren, P; Fryknäs, M; Höglund, M; Larsson, R

    2015-01-01

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC 1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 μM drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low activity in normal PBMCs and was therefore selected for further preclinical evaluation. Mining the NCI-60 and the NextBio databases demonstrated leukemia sensitivity and the ability of quinacrine to reverse myeloid leukemia gene expression. Mechanistic exploration was performed using the NextBio bioinformatic software using gene expression analysis of drug exposed acute myeloid leukemia cultures (HL-60) in the database. Analysis of gene enrichment and drug correlations revealed strong connections to ribosomal biogenesis nucleoli and translation initiation. The highest drug–drug correlation was to ellipticine, a known RNA polymerase I inhibitor. These results were validated by additional gene expression analysis performed in-house. Quinacrine induced early inhibition of protein synthesis supporting these predictions. The results suggest that quinacrine have repositioning potential for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia by targeting of ribosomal biogenesis

  12. Secondary Intracranial Hypertension in Pediatric Patients With Leukemia.

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    Fernández-García, Miguel Ángel; Cantarín-Extremera, Verónica; Andión-Catalán, Maitane; Duat-Rodríguez, Anna; Jiménez-Echevarría, Saioa; Bermejo-Arnedo, Ignacio; Hortigüela-Saeta, Montesclaros; Rekarte-García, Saray; Babín-López, Lara; Ruano Domínguez, David

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the clinical characteristics of a pediatric population with hemato-oncological disease and intracranial hypertension, analyze the therapeutic response and outcome, and compare its characteristics with respect to a control group with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. We retrospectively analyzed patients with hemato-oncological disease and secondary intracranial hypertension in our center during the past five years. We compared these individuals with a historical cohort with idiopathic intracranial hypertension from our institution (control group). We identified eight patients, all with leukemia, and 21 controls. Mean age at diagnosis was 10.6 years, and 62% of individuals were female. Most of them were under treatment with drugs (62% corticosteroids, 75% active chemotherapy). Mean opening pressure of cerebrospinal fluid was 35 cm H 2 O. All had headache, but only 28% complained of visual symptoms. Only 12.5% exhibited papilledema at the time of diagnosis (versus 71% in controls). All of them were treated with acetazolamide, with average therapy duration of nine months, and all had a favorable outcome (versus 57% of controls who needed second-line treatment). None of them showed long-term visual complications (versus 20% of controls). Patients with hemato-oncological disease and secondary intracranial hypertension may not develop typical symptomatology. Thus, diagnosis and recognition of this entity among this cohort may be difficult. Associated factors are diverse and do not show an obvious causal relationship. A high index of suspicion must be maintained for diagnosis, because a favorable outcome is expected with prompt treatment. Acetazolamide is effective as a first-line therapy and caused few side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pristimerin induces apoptosis in imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia cells harboring T315I mutation by blocking NF-κB signaling and depleting Bcr-Abl

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the chimeric tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl. Bcr-Abl-T315I is the notorious point mutation that causes resistance to imatinib and the second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, leading to poor prognosis. CML blasts have constitutive p65 (RelA NF-κB) transcriptional activity, and NF-κB may be a potential target for molecular therapies in CML that may also be effective against CML cells with Bcr-Abl-T315I. Results In this report, we discovered that pristimerin, a quinonemethide triterpenoid isolated from Celastraceae and Hippocrateaceae, inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in CML cells, including the cells harboring Bcr-Abl-T315I mutation. Additionally, pristimerin inhibited the growth of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl-T315I xenografts in nude mice. Pristimerin blocked the TNFα-induced IκBα phosphorylation, translocation of p65, and expression of NF-κB-regulated genes. Pristimerin inhibited two steps in NF-κB signaling: TAK1→IKK and IKK→IκBα. Pristimerin potently inhibited two pairs of CML cell lines (KBM5 versus KBM5-T315I, 32D-Bcr-Abl versus 32D-Bcr-Abl-T315I) and primary cells from a CML patient with acquired resistance to imatinib. The mRNA and protein levels of Bcr-Abl in imatinib-sensitive (KBM5) or imatinib-resistant (KBM5-T315I) CML cells were reduced after pristimerin treatment. Further, inactivation of Bcr-Abl by imatinib pretreatment did not abrogate the TNFα-induced NF-κB activation while silencing p65 by siRNA did not affect the levels of Bcr-Abl, both results together indicating that NF-κB inactivation and Bcr-Abl inhibition may be parallel independent pathways. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that pristimerin is effective in vitro and in vivo against CML cells, including those with the T315I mutation. The mechanisms may involve inhibition of NF-κB and Bcr-Abl. We concluded that pristimerin could be a lead compound for further drug development to

  14. The Effect of Aromatherapy on Insomnia and Other Common Symptoms Among Patients With Acute Leukemia

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    Blackburn, Lisa; Achor, Sara; Allen, Betty; Bauchmire, Nicole; Dunnington, Danielle; Klisovic, Rebecca; Naber, Steven; Roblee, Kirsten; Samczak, Angela; Tomlinson-Pinkham, Kelly; Chipps, Esther

    2017-07-01

    To determine if the use of aromatherapy improves insomnia and other common symptoms in hospitalized patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia. A randomized, crossover, washout trial. An inpatient acute leukemia unit at the Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard L. Solove Research Institute of the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University in Columbus. 50 patients who were newly diagnosed with acute leukemia and hospitalized to receive their initial four weeks of intensive induction chemotherapy. Patients were offered a choice of three scents to be used during the trial: lavender, peppermint, or chamomile. Each patient was randomized to receive either the chosen aromatherapy intervention or a placebo intervention during alternate weeks, with a washout period in between. Sleep quality and other common symptoms were measured. Aromatherapy, sleep, insomnia, pain, tiredness, drowsiness, nausea, lack of appetite, shortness of breath, depression, anxiety, and well-being. Most patients reported poor quality sleep at baseline, but aromatherapy had a statistically significant positive impact. Improvements were noted in tiredness, drowsiness, lack of appetite, depression, anxiety, and well-being because of aromatherapy. Aromatherapy is a viable intervention for improving insomnia and other symptoms commonly experienced by patients with acute leukemia. Oncology nurses can employ aromatherapy safely and inexpensively, and with minimal training, as an effective tool in decreasing many symptoms that plague patients with leukemia. Patients can exercise a greater sense of control over their treatment environments through the use of aromatherapy.

  15. Firstline treatment for chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients should be based on a holistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breccia, Massimo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2015-02-01

    New selective and more potent drugs for the cure of chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients are now available: physicians in some countries must decide the best option, selecting one of the drugs available. What the main prognostic factors are in order to make this selection remains a matter of discussion. Introducing a 'holistic approach' for the first time in chronic myeloid leukemia, as practiced in other diseases, and looking at the patient in a complete picture, considering several variables, such as comorbidities, age, concomitant drugs, lifestyle and patient expectations, may be of help to understand, patient by patient, the best therapeutic strategy.

  16. Ibrutinib as Initial Therapy for Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Jan A; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Barr, Paul M; Robak, Tadeusz; Owen, Carolyn; Ghia, Paolo; Bairey, Osnat; Hillmen, Peter; Bartlett, Nancy L; Li, Jianyong; Simpson, David; Grosicki, Sebastian; Devereux, Stephen; McCarthy, Helen; Coutre, Steven; Quach, Hang; Gaidano, Gianluca; Maslyak, Zvenyslava; Stevens, Don A; Janssens, Ann; Offner, Fritz; Mayer, Jiří; O'Dwyer, Michael; Hellmann, Andrzej; Schuh, Anna; Siddiqi, Tanya; Polliack, Aaron; Tam, Constantine S; Suri, Deepali; Cheng, Mei; Clow, Fong; Styles, Lori; James, Danelle F; Kipps, Thomas J

    2015-12-17

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) primarily affects older persons who often have coexisting conditions in addition to disease-related immunosuppression and myelosuppression. We conducted an international, open-label, randomized phase 3 trial to compare two oral agents, ibrutinib and chlorambucil, in previously untreated older patients with CLL or small lymphocytic lymphoma. We randomly assigned 269 previously untreated patients who were 65 years of age or older and had CLL or small lymphocytic lymphoma to receive ibrutinib or chlorambucil. The primary end point was progression-free survival as assessed by an independent review committee. The median age of the patients was 73 years. During a median follow-up period of 18.4 months, ibrutinib resulted in significantly longer progression-free survival than did chlorambucil (median, not reached vs. 18.9 months), with a risk of progression or death that was 84% lower with ibrutinib than that with chlorambucil (hazard ratio, 0.16; PIbrutinib significantly prolonged overall survival; the estimated survival rate at 24 months was 98% with ibrutinib versus 85% with chlorambucil, with a relative risk of death that was 84% lower in the ibrutinib group than in the chlorambucil group (hazard ratio, 0.16; P=0.001). The overall response rate was higher with ibrutinib than with chlorambucil (86% vs. 35%, Pibrutinib. Adverse events of any grade that occurred in at least 20% of the patients receiving ibrutinib included diarrhea, fatigue, cough, and nausea; adverse events occurring in at least 20% of those receiving chlorambucil included nausea, fatigue, neutropenia, anemia, and vomiting. In the ibrutinib group, four patients had a grade 3 hemorrhage and one had a grade 4 hemorrhage. A total of 87% of the patients in the ibrutinib group are continuing to take ibrutinib. Ibrutinib was superior to chlorambucil in previously untreated patients with CLL or small lymphocytic lymphoma, as assessed by progression-free survival, overall

  17. Profile of bosutinib and its clinical potential in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller-von Amsberg G

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gunhild Keller-von Amsberg,1 Steffen Koschmieder21Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Cancer Center Hamburg, University Hospital Hamburg Eppendorf, 2Department of Medicine (Hematology, Oncology, and Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center of Aachen and RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, GermanyAbstract: Bosutinib (SKI-606 is an orally available, once-daily, dual Src and Abl kinase inhibitor with promising clinical potential in first-, second-, and third-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Bosutinib effectively inhibits wild-type BCR-ABL and most imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL mutations except for V299L and T315I. Low hematologic toxicity is a remarkable characteristic of this novel second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and this has been ascribed to its minimal activity against the platelet-derived growth factor receptor and KIT. Low-grade, typically self-limiting diarrhea, which usually appears within the first few weeks after treatment initiation, represents the predominant toxicity of bosutinib. Other treatment-associated adverse events are mostly mild to moderate. Bosutinib has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of chronic, accelerated, or blast phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive CML in adult patients with resistance or intolerance to prior therapy. This review summarizes the main properties of bosutinib and the currently available data on its clinical potential in the treatment of CML.Keywords: bosutinib, chronic myeloid leukemia, BCR-ABL, Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, point mutation, imatinib resistance

  18. Development of chronic myelocytic leukemia in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, N; Oguma, N; Tanaka, R; Kuramoto, A; Ohkita, T [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1978-04-01

    On the basis of the evaluation of laboratory findings in 102 cases including 20 cases which were diagnosed as very early stage chronic myelogenic leukemia (CML), chronological orders of the histopathological pictures of CML were shown as follows; myeloid occupation with Ph/sup 1/-positive cells (leucocyte count 10/sup 10//L)--basophilic leucocytosis thrombocytosis and low activity of neutrocyte-AP (1 - 2 x 10/sup 10//L)--appearance of immature granulocytes more than 5% in the peripheral blood (2 x 10/sup 10//L)--increase of serum Vit. B/sub 12/ (2.5 x 10/sup 10//L)--splenomegaly (5 x 10/sup 10//L)--appearance of subjective symptoms (7 x 10/sup 10//L or more). The relation between an actual number of Ph/sup 1/-positive cells and time of their appearance (months) can be expressed as log Y = 0.053 + 10.023. It was estimated that it takes about 8 years since one Ph/sup 1/-positive cell appears in the body until the leucocyte count becomes 10/sup 11//L and the patient consult a doctor. The idea that Ph/sup 1/-positive cells can be transformed to more malignant clones is helpful to understand the pathological feature of acute transformation of CML.

  19. Granulomatous rosacea: Like leukemid in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škiljević Dušan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Skin findings in leukemias may be divided into specific lesions (leukemia cutis and non-specific lesions (leukemids which may be found in up to 80% of all patients with leukemias. The leukemids vary clinically and they are usually a manifestation of bone marrow or immunologic impairment, but also Sweet syndrome, pyoderma gangrenosum, erythroderma, maculopapular exanthema, prurigo-like papules, generalized pigmentation, follicular mucinosis, generalized pruritus may be found during the course of leukemia. Case report. We report a 70-year-old male with a 3-month history of erythema, papules and pustules on the face, ears and neck and over a month history of refractory anemia, anorexia, weight loss, malaise, and fever. Physical examination revealed symmetric erythematous, violaceous papules, papulo-nodules and plaques with slate scale and sparse, small pustules on the face, earlobes and neck. Histopathologic findings of involved skin showed diffuse mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate with perifollicular accentuation and focal granulomatous inflammation in the papillary and upper reticular dermis. Extensive checkup revealed the presence of acute myeloid leukemia French- American-British (FAB classification subtype M2, with signs of three-lineage dysplasia. The patient was treated by L6 protocol which led to complete remission, both in bone marrow and skin, but after seven months he had relapse of leukemia with the fatal outcome. Conclusion. This case indicates the importance of skin eruptions in the context of hematological malignancies.

  20. Interferon alpha 2 maintenance therapy may enable high rates of treatment discontinuation in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchert, A; Saussele, S; Eigendorff, E; Müller, M C; Sohlbach, K; Inselmann, S; Schütz, C; Metzelder, S K; Ziermann, J; Kostrewa, P; Hoffmann, J; Hehlmann, R; Neubauer, A; Hochhaus, A

    2015-06-01

    A minority of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients is capable of successfully discontinuing imatinib. Treatment modalities to increase this proportion are currently unknown. Here, we assessed the role of interferon alpha 2a (IFN) on therapy discontinuation in a previously reported cohort of 20 chronic phase CML patients who were treated upfront with IFN alpha plus imatinib followed by IFN monotherapy to maintain cytogenetic or molecular remission (MR) after imatinib discontinuation. After a median follow-up of 7.9 years (range, 5.2-12.2), relapse-free survival was 73% (8/11 patients) and 84% (5/6 patients) for patients who discontinued imatinib in major MR (MMR) and MR4/MR4.5, respectively. Ten patients discontinued IFN after a median of 4.5 years (range, 0.24-9.3). After a median of 2.8 years (range, 0.7-5.1), nine of them remain in ongoing treatment-free remission with MR5 (n=6) and MR4.5 (n=3). The four patients who still administer IFN are in stable MR5, MR4.5, MR4, and MMR, respectively. In conclusion, an IFN/imatinib induction treatment followed by a temporary IFN maintenance therapy may enable a high rate of treatment discontinuation in CML patients in at least MMR when stopping imatinib.

  1. Phase I Study of INNO-406, a Dual Abl/Lyn Kinase Inhibitor, in Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Leukemias Post-Imatinib Resistance or Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarjian, H.; le Coutre, P.; Cortes, J.; Pinilla-Ibarz, J.; Nagler, A.; Hochhaus, A.; Kimura, S.; Ottmann, O.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND INNO-406, an oral dual Abl/Lyn tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), demonstrates specific Lyn kinase activity with no or limited activity against other Src-family member kinases. Several Bcr-Abl kinase domain mutations are sensitive to INNO-406 in vitro, including the F317L and F317V mutations. In this study, we evaluated INNO-406 in Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome–positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) post-imatinib resistance or intolerance. METHODS A dose escalation study was conducted with a starting dose of 30mg administered orally once daily. Cohorts of at least 3 patients were treated at each dose level until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was reached. Twice-daily (BID) dosing was also evaluated. Therapy was allowed for a maximum of 24 months. RESULTS INNO-406 was administered to 56 patients with imatinib resistance (n=40) or intolerance (n=16). Other previous treatments included nilotinib (n=20), dasatinib (n=26), and dasatinib/nilotinib (n=9). Common mutations upon study entry included Y253H (n=6), G250E (n=4), T315I (n=4) and F317L (n=3). Among 31 patients with CML in chronic phase treated with INNO-406, the major cytogenetic response rate was 19%. In this study, no responses were seen in patients with CML-AP, CML-BP, or Ph-positive ALL. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) at INNO-406 480mg BID were liver function abnormalities and thrombocytopenia. CONCLUSIONS INNO-406 showed anti-CML efficacy in this heavily pretreated study population. Based on the classical determinations of both DLT and MTD, the recommended phase 2 dose of INNO-406 is 240mg orally BID. Lower doses of INNO-406 may be equally effective and should be explored. PMID:20310049

  2. The treatment of pediatric chronic myelogenous leukemia in the imatinib era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Wook Lee

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Childhood chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is a rare hematologic disease, with limited literature on the methods of treatment. Previously, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT was considered the only curative treatment for this disease. Treatment with imatinib, a selective inhibitor of the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase (TKI, has resulted in prolonged molecular response with limited drug toxicity. Imatinib is now implemented in the primary treatment regimen for children, but the paucity of evidence on its ability to result in permanent cure and the potential complications that may arise from long-term treatment with TKIs have prevented imatinib from superseding HSCT as the primary means of curative treatment in children. The results of allogeneic HSCT in children with CML are similar to those observed in adults; HSCT-related complications such as transplant-related mortality and graft-versus-host disease remain significant challenges. An overall consensus has been formed with regards to the need for HSCT in patients with imatinib resistance or those with advanced-phase disease. However, issues such as when to undertake HSCT in chronic-phase CML patients or how best to treat patients who have relapsed after HSCT are still controversial. The imatinib era calls for a reevaluation of the role of HSCT in the treatment of CML. Specific guidelines for the treatment of pediatric CML have not yet been formulated, underscoring the importance of prospective studies on issues such as duration of imatinib treatment, optimal timing of HSCT and the type of conditioning utilized, possible treatment preand post-HSCT, and the role of second-generation TKIs.

  3. Uranium concentration in blood samples of Southern Iraqi leukemia patients using CR-39 track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hamzawi, A.A.; Al-Qadisiyah University, Qadisiyah; Jaafar, M.S.; Tawfiq, N.F.

    2014-01-01

    The simple and effective technique of fission track etch has been applied to determine trace concentration of uranium in human blood samples taken from two groups of male and female participants: leukemia patients and healthy subjects group. The blood samples of leukemia patients and healthy subjects were collected from three key southern governorates namely, Basrah, Muthanna and Dhi-Qar. These governorates were the centers of intensive military activities during the 1991 and 2003 Gulf wars, and the discarded weapons are still lying around in these regions. CR-39 track detector was used for registration of induced fission tracks. The results show that the highest recorded uranium concentration in the blood samples of leukemia patients was 4.71 ppb (female, 45 years old, from Basrah) and the minimum concentration was 1.91 ppb (male, 3 years old, from Muthanna). For healthy group, the maximum uranium concentration was 2.15 ppb (female, 55 years old, from Basrah) and the minimum concentration was 0.86 ppb (male, 5 years old, from Dhi-Qar). It has been found that the uranium concentrations in human blood samples of leukemia patients are higher than those of the healthy group. These uranium concentrations in the leukemia patients group were significantly different (P < 0.001) from those in the healthy group. (author)

  4. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-28

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Influence of different chromosomal abnormalities in Ph-positive bone marrow cells on the chronic myeloid leukemia course during tyrosine kinase inhibitors therapy

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    O. Yu. Vinogradova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The additional molecular and chromosomal abnormalities (ACA in Phositive cells usually considered as a genetic marker of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML progression. 457 patients in different CML phases received tyrosine kinase inhibitors (1st and 2nd generation were studied. During therapy 50 cases with additional chromosomal abnormalities in Ph+ clone (22 of them in chronic CML phase were revealed (median follow-up from CML diagnosis – 117 months, median imatinib therapy – 62 months. 86 % of patients in chronic phase with Ph+- cell abnormalities were cytogenetic resistance, and their 5-years overall survival was 80 % which was significantly lower than in patients without ACA (p < 0.005. The treatment results depend on chromosomal abnormalities detected. In patients with additional chromosome 8 imatinib therapy is effective, although complete cytogenetic response (CCR is achieved only in the later therapy stages. In patients with additional translocations CCR also achieved with imatinib or 2nd generation TKI. Only a third of patients with additional Ph-chromosome or BCR/ABL amplification achieved complete suppression of Ph+ clone using 2nd generation TKI. The presence of additional chromosome 7 abnormalities and complex karyotype disorders involving isochromosome i(17(q10 are poor prognostic factors of TKI treatment failures.

  6. Management of CML in the Pediatric Age Group: Imatinib Mesylate or SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Alfy, Mohsen S; Al-Haddad, Alaa M; Hamed, Ahmed A

    2010-12-01

    Management of CML has changed markedly since the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However stem cell transplantation (SCT) remains a valid therapeutic modality especially in developing countries due to its relatively lower cost. We aim to compare between imatinib mesylate and SCT as regard outcome in CML in the pediatric age group. Forty-eight patients with newly diagnosed CML in the chronic phase, aged 3 to 18 years were enrolled in this prospective study. Patients without a matched donor (Group I; N=30) were assigned to receive imatinib mesylate at a dose of 340mg÷m2÷day, while patients with a fully matched related donor (Group II; N=18), were offered SCT. Response (hematologic, cytogenetic and molecular), side effects and survival were analyzed. Complete hematologic response was obtained in 97% of the patients in group I and 94% in group II. Major cytogenetic response (CyR) was obtained in 80% of patients in group I and 100% in group II. Complete CyR was 57% in group I and 64% in group II. Major molecular response (MMR) was 36% in group I and 50% in group II with no significant difference between both groups. Six years overall survival (OS) was 87% in the 1st group and 61% in the 2nd group (pSCT group (55% had GVHD and 78% had infection). Imatinib mesylate has a superior OS and EFS than SCT in children. It is generally safe and well tolerated. Imatinib mesylate should be the 1st line treatment of pediatric patients with CML in the chronic phase. CML- Imatinib- SCT- Pediatrics.

  7. Reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation combined with imatinib has comparable event-free survival and overall survival to long-term imatinib treatment in young patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanmin; Wang, Jiasheng; Luo, Yi; Shi, Jimin; Zheng, Weiyan; Tan, Yamin; Cai, Zhen; Huang, He

    2017-08-01

    The relative merits of reduced intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (RIST) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the first chronic phase (CP) in imatinib era have not been evaluated. The study was designed to compare the outcomes of combination therapy of RIST plus imatinib (RIST + IM) vs. imatinib (IM) alone for young patients with early CP (ECP) and late CP (LCP). Of the patients, 130 were non-randomly assigned to treatment with IM alone (n = 88) or RIST + IM (n = 42). The 10-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) were comparable between RIST + IM and IM groups. LCP, high Sokal score, and no complete cytogenetic response at 3 months were adverse prognostic factors for survival, but only the time from diagnosis to IM was an independent predictor after multivariate analysis. For ECP, IM was similar to RIST + IM, with 10-year EFS rates of 77.2 vs. 81.6% (p = 0.876) and OS rates of 93.8 vs. 87.9% (p = 0.102), respectively. For LCP, both treatments resulted in similar survival, but more patients in the imatinib group experienced events (10-year EFS 40.8 vs. 66.7%, p = 0.047). The patients with higher EBMT risk scores had an inferior survival than those with lower scores (69.2 vs. 92.9%, p = 0.04). We concluded that RIST + IM was comparable to IM in terms of OS and EFS. However, RIST + IM was more affordable than IM alone in a 10-year scale. Thus, RIST + IM could be considered as an alternative treatment option, especially when the patients have low EBMT risk scores and demand a definite cure for CML.

  8. Clinical roundtable monograph: Unmet needs in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias J; Bixby, Dale; Akard, Luke P

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 5,000 cases of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) are diagnosed each year in the United States. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has dramatically improved survival time for many CML patients. Current first-line treatment options include imatinib and the second-generation agents nilotinib and dasatinib. Second- and third-line agents include nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib, and the new agent ponatinib. Despite the effectiveness of TKIs, some patients develop resistance or intolerance to these agents. A number of mutations of the BCR-ABL gene have been identified and are associated with TKI resistance. Patients may benefit from switching to a second-line TKI, undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant, or receiving newly emerging agents. Although early response is associated with improved patient outcome, clinicians lack tests that can determine which patients will benefit from which therapies. To ensure adequate response, patients should be monitored by both polymerase chain reaction and cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow. This roundtable monograph reviews key unmet needs in patients with CML related to disease management and treatment options.

  9. Severe Rotavirus gastroenteritis in a patient with infant leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Uygun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Reports about the clinical relevance of rotavirus in immunocompromised children are rare. We herein presented a case of life-threatening Rotavirus gastroenteritis in an infant with acute myeloblastic leukemia which could be prevented by recently recommended Rotavirus vaccination.

  10. Atypical chronic myeloid leukaemia: A case of an orphan disease-A multicenter report by the Polish Adult Leukemia Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd-Sokołowska, Joanna; Mądry, Krzysztof; Waszczuk-Gajda, Anna; Biecek, Przemysław; Szwedyk, Paweł; Budziszewska, Katarzyna; Raźny, Magdalena; Dutka, Magdalena; Obara, Agata; Wasilewska, Ewa; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Piekarska, Agnieszka; Bober, Grażyna; Krzemień, Helena; Stella-Hołowiecka, Beata; Kapelko-Słowik, Katarzyna; Sawicki, Waldemar; Paszkowska-Kowalewska, Małgorzata; Machowicz, Rafał; Dwilewicz-Trojaczek, Jadwiga

    2018-03-07

    Atypical chronic myeloid leukaemia (aCML) belongs to myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. Because of its rarity and changing diagnostic criteria throughout subsequent classifications, data on aCML are very scarce. Therefore, we at the Polish Adult Leukemia Group performed a nationwide survey on aCML. Eleven biggest Polish centres participated in the study. Altogether, 45 patients were reported, among whom only 18 patients (40%) fulfilled diagnostic criteria. Among misdiagnosed patients, myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative syndrome unclassifiable and chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia were the most frequent diagnoses. Thirteen patients were male, median age 64.6 years (range 40.4-80.9). The median parameters at diagnosis were as follows: white blood cell count 97 × 10 9 /L (23.8-342) with immature progenitors amounting at 27.5% (12-72), haemoglobin 8.6 g/dL (3.9-14.9), and platelet count 66 × 10 9 /L (34-833). Cytoreductive treatment was used in all patients, and 2 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The median overall survival was 14.1 months (95% CI, 7.2), with median acute myeloid leukaemia-free survival of 13.3 months (95% CI, 3.6-22.6). Cumulative incidence of acute myeloid leukaemia transformation after 1 year in aCML group was 12.5% (95% CI, 0%-29.6%). To conclude, aCML harbours a poor prognosis. Treatment options are limited, with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation being the only curative method at present, although only a minority of patients are transplant eligible. Educational measures are needed to improve the quality of diagnoses. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Omitting cytogenetic assessment from routine treatment response monitoring in chronic myeloid leukemia is safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelen, Inge G P; Thielen, Noortje; Janssen, Jeroen J W M; Hoogendoorn, Mels; Roosma, Tanja J A; Valk, Peter J M; Visser, Otto; Cornelissen, Jan J; Westerweel, Peter E

    2018-04-01

    The monitoring of response in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is of great importance to identify patients failing their treatment in order to adjust TKI choice and thereby prevent progression to advanced stage disease. Cytogenetic monitoring has a lower sensitivity, is expensive, and requires invasive bone marrow sampling. Nevertheless, chronic myeloid leukemia guidelines continue to recommend performing routine cytogenetic response assessments, even when adequate molecular diagnostics are available. In a population-based registry of newly diagnosed CML patients in the Netherlands, all simultaneous cytogenetic and molecular assessments performed at 3, 6, and 12 months were identified and response of these matched assessments was classified according to European Leukemia Net (ELN) recommendations. The impact of discrepant cytogenetic and molecular response classifications and course of patients with additional chromosomal abnormalities were evaluated. The overall agreement of 200 matched assessments was 78%. In case of discordant responses, response at 24 months was consistently better predicted by the molecular outcome. Cytogenetic response assessments provided relevant additional clinical information only in some cases of molecular "warning." The development of additional cytogenetic abnormalities was always accompanied with molecular failure. We conclude that it is safe to omit routine cytogenetics for response assessment during treatment and to only use molecular monitoring, in order to prevent ambiguous classifications, reduce costs, and reduce the need for invasive bone marrow sampling. Cytogenetic re-assessment should still be performed when molecular response is suboptimal. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. One hundred patients with acute leukemia treated by chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and allogeneic marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.D.; Buckner, C.D.; Banaji, M.

    1977-01-01

    One hundred patients, 54 with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and 46 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), considered to be in the end stages of their disease, after combination chemotherapy were treated by marrow transplantation. All patients were given a marrow graft from an HLA-identical sibling after receiving 1000-rad total body irradiation (TBI). One group of 43 patients was given cyclophosphamide (CY), 60 mg/kg on each of 2 days, 5 and 4 days before TBI. In a second group of 31 patients, additional chemotherapy was given before CY and TBI. In a third group of 19 patients, BCNU was given before CY and TBI. A fourth group of 7 patients received other chemotherapy regimens before TBI. Six patients died 3 to 17 days after marrow infusion without evidence of engraftment. Ninety-four patients were engrafted rejected and only one patient rejected the graft. Thirteen patients are alive with a marrow graft, on no maintenance antileukemic therapy, and without recurrent leukemia 1--4 1 / 2 yr after transplantation. Three have chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The relapse rate appeared to be relatively constant over the first 2 yr and was extremely low after that time. Neither survival nor leukemic relapse appeared to be influenced by the type of leukemia nor by the preparative chemotherapy regimen given before TBI. Patients in fair clinical condition at the time of transplantation showed significantly longer survival times than patients in poor condition (p = 0.001). This observation, coupled with the observation that some patients may be cured of their disease, indicates that marrow transplantation should now be undertaken earlier in the management of patients with acute leukemia who have an HLA-matched sibling marrow donor

  13. Role of L-asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: focus on adult patients

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    Rytting ME

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael E RyttingDepartment of Pediatrics and Leukemia, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Asparaginase preparations deplete asparagine in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL blasts. Asparaginase in its various forms is an important component of treatment regimens for pediatric ALL. Recently, interest and use of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL has increased, particularly in young adults. There is much less information on asparaginase use and toxicity in adult compared with pediatric populations. This review surveys prior published studies of the three most commonly used asparagine preparations as used in adult patients, and discusses important toxicities encountered in adult patients who receive asparaginase preparations.Keywords: asparaginase, leukemia, adults, children

  14. Assessing Compliance With Mercaptopurine Treatment in Younger Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in First Remission | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This randomized phase III trial studies compliance to a mercaptopurine treatment intervention compared to standard of care in younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission. Assessing ways to help patients who have acute lymphoblastic leukemia to take their medications as prescribed may help them in taking their medications more consistently and may improve

  15. Addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin to induction chemotherapy improves survival in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnett, Alan K; Russell, Nigel H; Hills, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE There has been little survival improvement in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the last two decades. Improving induction treatment may improve the rate and quality of remission and consequently survival. In our previous trial, in younger patients, we showed improved...

  16. Radiobiological heterogeneity of leukemic lymphocyte precursors from acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckun, F.M.; Kim, T.H.; Ramsay, N.C.; Min, W.S.; Song, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    The report outlines the authors' findings on the radiobiological features of leukemic lymphocyte precursors from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. A marked heterogeneity existed between different cell lines, with a remarkable radioresistance and repair capacity in some ALL patients and an acute radiosensitivity in the absence of a detectable repair capacity in others. (U.K.)

  17. Improved survival for patients diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the era of chemo-immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, C; Simonsen, J; Rostgaard, K

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is in rapid transition, and during recent decades both combination chemotherapy and immunotherapy have been introduced. To evaluate the effects of this development, we identified all CLL patients registered in the nation-wide Danish Cancer...... for patients treated with chemo-immunotherapy demonstrated in clinical studies....

  18. Phenotypic complexity of T regulatory subsets in patients with B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancotto, Angélique; Dagur, Pradeep K; Fuchs, John C; Wiestner, Adrian; Bagwell, C Bruce; McCoy, J Philip

    2012-02-01

    Increased numbers of T regulatory (T(reg)) cells are found in B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but the nature and function of these T(regs) remains unclear. Detailed characterization of the T(regs) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia has not been performed and the degree of heterogeneity of among these cells has not been studied to date. Using 15-color flow cytometry we show that T(reg) cells, defined using CD4, CD25, and forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), can be divided into multiple complex subsets based on markers used for naïve, memory, and effector delineation as well as markers of T(reg) activation. Furthermore FOXP3(+) cells can be identified among CD4(+)CD25(-) as well as CD8(+)CD4(-) populations in increased proportions in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia compared with healthy donors. Significantly different frequencies of naïve and effector T(regs) populations are found in healthy donor controls compared with donors with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A population of CCR7(+)CD39(+) T(regs) was significantly associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This population demonstrated slightly reduced suppressive activity compared with total T(regs) or T(regs) of healthy donors. These data suggest that FOXP3-expressing cells, particularly in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia are much more complex for T(reg) sub-populations and transitions than previously reported. These findings demonstrate the complexity of regulation of T-cell responses in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and illustrate the use of high-dimensional analysis of cellular phenotypes in facilitating understanding of the intricacies of cellular immune responses and their dysregulation in cancer.

  19. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourigan, Christopher S.; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances in the laboratory have lead to substantial improvements in clinical decision-making by the use of pre-treatment prognostic risk stratification factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Unfortunately similar progress has not been made in treatment response criteria, with the definition of “complete remission” in AML largely unchanged for over half a century. Several recent clinical trials have demonstrated that higher sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden during or after treatment can be performed, that results are predictive for clinical outcome and can be used to improve outcomes by guiding additional therapeutic intervention to patients in clinical complete remission but at increased relapse risk. We review here these recent trials, the characteristics and challenges of the modalities currently used to detect minimal residual disease (MRD), and outline opportunities to both refine detection and better clinically utilize MRD measurements. MRD measurement is already the standard of care in other myeloid malignancies such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). It is our belief that response criteria for non-APL AML should be updated to include assessment for molecular complete remission (mCR) and that recommendations for post-consolidation surveillance should include regular monitoring for molecular relapse as a standard of care. PMID:23799371

  20. Determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and Bcr-Abl transcript in the follow-up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia = Determinação da lactate desidrogenase (LDH e do transcrito Bcr-Abl em pacientes com leucemia mielóide crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Iemitsu Tatakihara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a malignant myeloproliferative disorder that originates from a pluripotent stem cell characterized by abnormal release of the expanded, malignant stem cell clone from the bone marrow into the bloodstream. The vast majority of patients with CML present Bcr-Abl transcripts. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH is considered a biochemical marker common for tumor growth, anaerobic glycolysis and has been considered a poor prognostic factor for acute myeloid leukemia. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the concentration of LDH in plasma and the detection of the Bcr-Abl transcripts in patients with CML and healthy donors. We analyzed 22 patients demonstrably diagnosed with CML and 56 healthy donors. LDH concentration in plasma was higher in patients with CML. All patients with CML in this study were under treatment, but even so four patients had the Bcr-Abl (b3a2 transcript in peripheral blood. Two out of the four patients with b3a2 showed higher LDH (486 U L-1 and 589 U L-1. Thus, although the study was conducted with small numbers of samples, it is possible to suggest therapy alteration for two patients who presented transcript b3a2 in the peripheral blood samples and whose LDH concentration was high, in order to improve the disease. Leucemia mieloide crônica (LMC é uma desordem mieloproliferativa maligna que é originada de célula-tronco pluripotente caracterizada por expansão anormal, maligna de clones de células tronco da medula óssea na circulação. A grande maioria dos pacientes com LMC apresentam transcritos Bcr-Abl. Lactato desidrogenase (LDH,considerado um marcador bioquímico para crescimento tumoral, glicólise anaeróbica, e tem sido considerado um fator de pior prognóstico da LMC. Portanto, este estudo visa avaliar a concentraçãode LDH no plasma e a detecção do transcrito Bcr-Abl em 22 pacientes com LMC e 56 indivíduos saudáveis. Foram avaliados 22 pacientes com LMC e 56 doadores saudáveis. A

  1. In chronic myeloid leukemia patients on second-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, deep sequencing of BCR-ABL1 at the time of warning may allow sensitive detection of emerging drug-resistant mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soverini, Simona; De Benedittis, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fausto; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Mancini, Manuela; Bavaro, Luana; Machova Polakova, Katerina; Linhartova, Jana; Iurlo, Alessandra; Russo, Domenico; Pane, Fabrizio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Rosti, Gianantonio; Cavo, Michele; Baccarani, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2016-08-02

    Imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients receiving second-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy with dasatinib or nilotinib have a higher risk of disease relapse and progression and not infrequently BCR-ABL1 kinase domain (KD) mutations are implicated in therapeutic failure. In this setting, earlier detection of emerging BCR-ABL1 KD mutations would offer greater chances of efficacy for subsequent salvage therapy and limit the biological consequences of full BCR-ABL1 kinase reactivation. Taking advantage of an already set up and validated next-generation deep amplicon sequencing (DS) assay, we aimed to assess whether DS may allow a larger window of detection of emerging BCR-ABL1 KD mutants predicting for an impending relapse. a total of 125 longitudinal samples from 51 CML patients who had acquired dasatinib- or nilotinib-resistant mutations during second-line therapy were analyzed by DS from the time of failure and mutation detection by conventional sequencing backwards. BCR-ABL1/ABL1%(IS) transcript levels were used to define whether the patient had 'optimal response', 'warning' or 'failure' at the time of first mutation detection by DS. DS was able to backtrack dasatinib- or nilotinib-resistant mutations to the previous sample(s) in 23/51 (45 %) pts. Median mutation burden at the time of first detection by DS was 5.5 % (range, 1.5-17.5 %); median interval between detection by DS and detection by conventional sequencing was 3 months (range, 1-9 months). In 5 cases, the mutations were detectable at baseline. In the remaining cases, response level at the time mutations were first detected by DS could be defined as 'Warning' (according to the 2013 ELN definitions of response to 2nd-line therapy) in 13 cases, as 'Optimal response' in one case, as 'Failure' in 4 cases. No dasatinib- or nilotinib-resistant mutations were detected by DS in 15 randomly selected patients with 'warning' at various timepoints, that later turned into optimal

  2. A novel dic (17;18 (p13.1;q11.2 with loss of TP53 and BCR/ABL rearrangement in an Imatinib resistant chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-achkar Walid

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The so-called Philadelphia (Ph chromosome is present in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML cases. It results in juxtaposition of the 5′ part of the BCR gene on chromosome 22 to the 3′ part of the ABL gene on chromosome 9. Since the majority of CML cases are currently treated with Imatinib, variant rearrangements in general have no specific prognostic significance, although the mechanisms involved in resistance to therapy have yet to be investigated. The T315I mutation within the abl-gene is the most frequent one associated with resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Results This study evaluated a Ph chromosome positive CML case resistant to imatinib mesylate. A dic(17;18, loss of TP53 gene, co-expression of b2a2 and b3a2 fusions transcript and a T315I mutation were found. Conclusions We reported here a novel case of a Ph chromosome positive CML with a secondary abnormality [dic(17;18], resulting to Glivec resistance but good response to nilotinib. The dic(17;18 might be a marker for poor prognosis in CML. Our finding indicated for an aggressive progression of the disease. The patient died under the treatment due to unknown reasons.

  3. [The role of genetic polymorphisms of interleukins in chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients of different ages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotina, S S; Tikunova, T S; Proshchaev, K I; Efremova, O A; Batlutskaia, I V; Iakunchenko, T I; Sobianin, F I; Churnosov, M I; Alekseev, S M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a multifactorial disease, in which development the important role played the cytokine genes, in particular interleukins. This type of leukemia is more common in the elderly. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association of genetic polymorphisms of interleukin with the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia among residents of the Central Chernozem region of Russia. Genotyping of the -889C/T IL-1A, -590C/T IL-4 and VNTR IL-1 Ra was conducted in 206 patients with CLL and 307 individuals of the control group. The study found that the genetic risk factor for the development of CLL is allele -590T IL-4 (OR=-1,45). The development of thrombocytopenia in patients with CLL is associated with genetic variants -889T IL-1A (OR=1,95), -889TT IL-1A (OR=6,2) and IL-1Ra*1 (OR=-2,32).

  4. [Clinical and biological prognostic factors in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yébenes-Ramírez, Manuel; Serrano, Josefina; Martínez-Losada, Carmen; Sánchez-García, Joaquín

    2016-09-02

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most frequent type of acute leukemia in adults. Despite recent advances in the characterization of pathogenesis of AML, the cure rates are under 40%, being leukemia relapse the most common cause of treatment failure. Leukaemia relapse occurs due to clonal evolution or clonal escape. In this study, we aimed to analyze the clinical and biological factors influencing outcomes in patients with AML relapse. We included a total of 75 AML patients who experienced leukaemia relapse after achieving complete remission. We performed complete immunophenotyping and conventional karyotyping in bone marrow aspirates obtained at diagnosis and at leukemia relapse. Overall survival (OS) of the series was 3.7%±2.3, leukaemia progression being the most common cause of death. Patients relapsing before 12 months and those with adverse cytogenetic-molecular risk had statistically significant worse outcomes. A percentage of 52.5 of patients showed phenotypic changes and 50% cytogenetic changes at relapse. We did not find significant clinical factors predicting clonal evolution. The presence of clonal evolution at relapse did not have a significant impact on outcome. Patients with relapsed AML have a dismal prognosis, especially those with early relapse and adverse cytogenetic-molecular risk. Clonal evolution with phenotypic and cytogenetic changes occurred in half of the patients without predictive clinical factors or impact on outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effectiveness of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Treating Patients with Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is the most common malignancy among all childhood cancers and is associated with a low survival rate in adult patients. Since 1995, the National Health Insurance (NHI program in Taiwan has been offering insurance coverage for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM, along with conventional Western medicine (WM. This study analyzes the status of TCM utilization in Taiwan, in both pediatric and adult patients with leukemia. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using population-based National Health Insurance Research Database of Registry of Catastrophic Illness, involving patient data from 2001 to 2010 and follow-up data through 2011. The effectiveness of TCM use was evaluated. Relevant sociodemographic data showed that both pediatric and adult patients who were TCM users one year prior to leukemia diagnosis were more likely to utilize TCM services for cancer therapy. A greater part of medical expenditure of TCM users was lower than that of TCM nonusers, except little discrepancy in drug fee of adult patients. The survival rate is also higher in TCM users. Altogether, these data show that TCM has the potential to serve as an adjuvant therapy when combined with conventional WM in the treatment of patients with leukemia.

  6. Incidence of leukemias in children from El Salvador and Mexico City between 1996 and 2000: Population-based data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernáldez-Ríos Roberto

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are very few studies that report the incidence of acute leukemias in children in Latin America. This work assesses the incidence of acute leukemias, between 1996 and 2000, in children from 0–14 years old who were attended at the Mexican Social Security Institute in Mexico City and in children from 0–11 years old in El Salvador. Methods Design: Population-based data. Hospitals: In San Salvador, El Salvador, Hospital Nacional de Niños "Benjamín Bloom", the only center in El Salvador which attends all children, younger than 12 years, with oncologic disease. The Pediatric Hospital and the General Hospital of the Mexican Social Security Institute in Mexico City, the only centers in Mexico City which attend all those children with acute leukemia who have a right to this service. Diagnosis: All patients were diagnosed by bone marrow smear and were divided into acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL, acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, and unspecified leukemias (UL. The annual incidence rate (AIR and average annual incidence rate (AAIR were calculated per million children. Cases were stratified by age and assigned to one of four age strata: 1 Results The number of cases was 375 and 238 in El Salvador and Mexico City, respectively. AAIRs in Mexico City were 44.9, 10.6, 2.5, 0.5, and 58.4 per million children for ALL, AML, CML, UL, and total leukemias, respectively. The AAIRs in El Salvador could not be calculated because the fourth age stratum in El Salvador included children only from 0–11 years old. The incidence rates for the Salvadoran group of 0–11 year olds were 34.2, 7.1, 0.6, 0.2, and 43.2 per million children for ALL, AML, CML, UL, and total leukemias, respectively. Conclusion Reported AIRs for each age group in El Salvador were similar to those from other American countries. The AAIR of ALL in Mexico City is one of the highest reported for North America.

  7. 5-Fluoro-2'-Deoxycytidine and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Leukemia, multiple myeloma, and malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, M.; Ishimaru, T.; Ohkita, T.

    1986-01-01

    Excess risk of leukemia among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors increased with radiation dose in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The incidence of all types of leukemia, except chronic lymphocytic leukemia, has increased among A-bomb survivors. However, chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is thought to be the most characteristic type of the A-bomb induced leukemias. The highest risk of leukemia among A-bomb survivors was recognized in 1951 and has not yet disappeared in survivors in Hiroshima. Excess risk of leukemia in the younger age at time of bomb (ATB) groups appeared early; however, in older age ATB groups it appeared much later especially among Hiroshima survivors. In both cities the effect of radiation exposure on the occurrence of CML was more clearly observable in the younger age ATB groups and occurred more frequently in Hiroshima. Leukemia among individuals exposed in utero and children of A-bomb survivors has not increased significantly. The relationship between radiation induced leukemia and chromosome abnormalities is discussed. Twenty years after the A-bomb, the risk of multiple myeloma (MM) increased among survivors aged 20-59 years ATB. Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma also increased among A-bomb survivors and showed roughly the same tendency as MM

  9. Leukemia, multiple myeloma, and malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, Michito; Ohkita, Takeshi; Ishimaru, Toranosuke.

    1986-01-01

    Excess risk of leukemia among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors increased with radiation dose in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The incidence of all types of leukemia, except chronic lymphocytic leukemia, has increased among A-bomb survivors. However, chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is thought to be the most characteristic type of the A-bomb induced leukemias. The highest risk of leukemia among A-bomb survivors was recognized in 1951 and has not yet disappeared in survivors in Hiroshima. Excess risk of leukemia in the younger age at time of bomb (ATB) groups appeared early; however, in the older age ATB groups it appeared much later especially among Hiroshima survivors. In both cities the effect of radiation exposure on the occurrence of CML was more clearly observable in the younger age ATB groups and occurred more frequently in Hiroshima. Leukemia among individuals exposed in utero and children of A-bomb survivors has not increased significantly. The relationship between radiation induced leukemia and chromosome abnormalities is discussed. Twenty years after the A-bomb, the risk of multiple myeloma (MM) increased among survivors aged 20 - 59 years ATB. Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma also increased among A-bomb survivors and showed roughly the same tendency as MM. (author)

  10. Persistence of chromosomal abnormalities additional to the Philadelphia chromosome after Philadelphia chromosome disappearance during imatinib therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccaria, Alfonso; Valenti, Anna Maria; Donti, Emilio; Gozzetti, Alessandro; Ronconi, Sonia; Spedicato, Francesco

    2007-04-01

    Five Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients with additional chromosome abnormalities at diagnosis have been followed during Imatinib therapy. In all, the Ph chromosome disappeared, while the 5 cases, additional abnormalities [dup(1); del(5), +8 (2 patients) and +14] persisted in the subsequent studies, performed over a period of 11 to 49 months, either alone or together with a karyotypically normal cell population. This finding is consistent with a secondary origin of the Ph chromosome in these patients. It is still to early to evaluate the possible prognostic value of these additional abnormalities.

  11. Total body irradiation in the bone marrow transplantation in leukemia: an experience; Irradiacion corporal total fraccionada en el transplante de medula osea ologenica en leucemias: experiencia de un centro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapatero, A; Martin de Vidales, C; Pinar, B; Marin, A; Cerezo, L; Dominguez, P; Perez, A [Servicio de Oncologia Radidoterapica Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this report was to evaluate long-term survival and morbidity of fractioned total body irradiation (TBI) prior to allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for leukemia. From June 1985 to May 1992, 94 patients with acute leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), were treated with high dose cyclophosphamide (CY) and fractionated TBI to a total dose of 12 Gy in six fractions prior to allogeneic BMT. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival were 53% +-6 and 48%+- respectively for patients with standard risk disease (first remission of acute leukemia and first chronic phase of CML), and 24%+-7 and 21%+-6 for patients with more advanced disease (p=0.01). The incidence of interstitial pneumonitis (IP), venoocclusive disease of the liver (VOD) and grade=>II acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were respectively 15%, 29% and 51%. Fractionated TBI combined with high dose CY before allogeneic BMT for leukemia is an effective treatment in prolonging relapse-free survival with a low incidence of lung toxicity. (Author) 13 refs.

  12. Ibrutinib as an antitumor immunomodulator in patients with refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Avendaño-Ortiz, Jose; Córdoba, Raúl; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Toledano, Victor; Pérez de Diego, Rebeca; López-Collazo, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Ibrutinib has emerged as a promising therapy for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who are nonresponsive to standard therapies. The refractory state of monocytes and T-cell exhaustion in patients with CLL could explain the morbidity and mortality reported in these patients. We studied the effect of ibrutinib on the immune response of four relapsed patients with CLL during the first treatment cycle. We observed the ability to recover the standard response against bacterial stimu...

  13. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  14. Radiogenic leukemia revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloney, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced leukemia is considered to be similar to the de novo disease. However, following an analysis of clinical and hematological findings in leukemia occurring in irradiated cervical cancer patients, adult Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, and spondylitics treated with x-ray, striking differences were noted. Acute leukemias in cervical cancer patients and Japanese survivors were similar in type to acute de novo leukemias in adults. Cell types among spondylitics were very dissimilar; rare forms, eg, acute erythromyelocytic leukemia (AEL) and acute megakaryocytic leukemia, were increased. Pancytopenia occurred in 25 of 35 cases and erythromyelodysplastic disorders were noted in seven of 35 acute cases. The leukemias and myelodysplastic disorders closely resembled those occurring in patients treated with alkylating agents. This similarity suggests a common pathogenesis involving marrow stem cell injury and extra-medullary mediators of hematopoiesis. Investigation of early acute leukemias and myelodysplastic disorders with newer techniques may provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of leukemia in humans

  15. Infection pattern of neutropenic patients in post-chemotherapy phase of acute leukemia treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ahmadzadeh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutropenia following chemotherapy regimens in leukemia patients is of major concern since it makes these patients vulnerable to infections. If we can identify which germs are causing these infections, they can be annihilated or, at least, the most appropriate antibiotic therapy can be started immediately, even before we have the results of the culture. This retrospective multi-center study took place in 2012 and included patients with acute leukemia who had already undergone chemotherapy and who had been febrile for at least 16 hours. In order to assess the type of infection, different environments were chosen and the results were compared by t-test and x2 tests. This study took place in four hospitals in Tehran and Ahwaz, Iran. The study population was made up of 89 patients: 37 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 52 with acute myeloid leukemia. The results revealed that blood was the most common site of infection. From all our positive cultures, it was seen that 85.4% of them had gram-negative bacteria with a dominance of E. coli of 25.8% over the other colonies. Also, antibiograms revealed the sensitivity of almost all the gram-negatives to amino glycosides. In contrast with most of the literature, in our patients, gram-negatives are the most common cause of infection and, therefore, administering amino glycosides would be the safest antibiotic therapy to prescribe before culture results are available.

  16. The mortality and response rate after FLANG regimen in patients with refractory/relapsed acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vali A Mehrzad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oncologists today are greatly concerned about the treatment of relapsed/refractory acute leukemia. FLANG regimen, combination of novantron, cytarabine, fludarabine, and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, has been used in treatment of refractory/relapsed acute leukemia since 1990s. The present study has evaluated mortality and response rate of this regimen. Materials and Methods: In this study, 25 patients with refractory/relapsed acute leukemia aged 15-55 years underwent FLANG regimen at Seyed-Al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran during 2008-2009. One month later, bone marrow samples were taken to evaluate the responsiveness to treatment. Participants were followed for a year. The data was analyzed by student-t and chi-square tests, logistic, and Cox regression analysis, and Kaplan-Meier curves in SPSS 19. Results: Out of the 25 patients, 8 patients (32% had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (5 refractory and 3 relapsed cases and 17 subjects had acute myeloid leukemia (7 refractory and 10 relapsed cases. According to the bone marrow biopsies taken one month after FLANG regimen, 10 patients (40% had responded to treatment. Five patients of the 10 responders underwent successful bone marrow transplantation (BMT. On the other hand, 13 patients (52%, who had not entered the CR period, died during the follow-up. Logistic regression analysis did not reveal any significant associations between disease type and responsiveness to treatment. Conclusion: This study indicated higher rates of unresponsiveness to treatment while its mortality rate was comparable with other studies. Overall, according to limitations for BMT (as the only chance for cure in Iran, it seems that FLANG therapy is an acceptable choice for these patients.

  17. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Tumor suppressors BTG1 and IKZF1 cooperate during mouse leukemia development and increase relapse risk in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheijen, Blanca; Boer, Judith M; Marke, René; Tijchon, Esther; van Ingen Schenau, Dorette; Waanders, Esmé; van Emst, Liesbeth; van der Meer, Laurens T; Pieters, Rob; Escherich, Gabriele; Horstmann, Martin A; Sonneveld, Edwin; Venn, Nicola; Sutton, Rosemary; Dalla-Pozza, Luciano; Kuiper, Roland P; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; den Boer, Monique L; van Leeuwen, Frank N

    2017-03-01

    Deletions and mutations affecting lymphoid transcription factor IKZF1 (IKAROS) are associated with an increased relapse risk and poor outcome in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, additional genetic events may either enhance or negate the effects of IKZF1 deletions on prognosis. In a large discovery cohort of 533 childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, we observed that single-copy losses of BTG1 were significantly enriched in IKZF1 -deleted B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia ( P =0.007). While BTG1 deletions alone had no impact on prognosis, the combined presence of BTG1 and IKZF1 deletions was associated with a significantly lower 5-year event-free survival ( P =0.0003) and a higher 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse ( P =0.005), when compared with IKZF1 -deleted cases without BTG1 aberrations. In contrast, other copy number losses commonly observed in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, such as CDKN2A/B, PAX5, EBF1 or RB1 , did not affect the outcome of IKZF1 -deleted acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. To establish whether the combined loss of IKZF1 and BTG1 function cooperate in leukemogenesis, Btg1 -deficient mice were crossed onto an Ikzf1 heterozygous background. We observed that loss of Btg1 increased the tumor incidence of Ikzf1 +/- mice in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, murine B cells deficient for Btg1 and Ikzf1 +/- displayed increased resistance to glucocorticoids, but not to other chemotherapeutic drugs. Together, our results identify BTG1 as a tumor suppressor in leukemia that, when deleted, strongly enhances the risk of relapse in IKZF1 -deleted B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and augments the glucocorticoid resistance phenotype mediated by the loss of IKZF1 function. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  19. Acquired hemoglobin H disease in a patient with aplastic anemia evolving into acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stella Figueiredo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The prognosis of severe aplastic anemia has improved since the introduction of bone marrow transplantation and treatment with antithymocyte globulin. In contrast to the success of these protocols, studies with long term follow-up have shown the occurrence of clonal diseases such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia in aplastic anemia. CASE REPORT: We report the first case of a Brazilian patient with aplastic anemia who developed myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia showing acquired hemoglobin H and increased fetal hemoglobin.

  20. Epidemiologic study on survival of chronic myeloid leukemia and Ph(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck E; Mauro, Michael J; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    The BCR-ABL T315I mutation represents a major mechanism of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The objectives of this retrospective observational study were to estimate overall and progression-free survival for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic-phase (CP), accelerated-phase (AP......), or blastic-phase (BP) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph)(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with T315I mutation. Medical records of 222 patients from 9 countries were reviewed; data were analyzed using log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazard models. Median age at T315I mutation...

  1. First case of breakthrough pneumonia due to Aspergillus nomius in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caira, Morena; Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; de Carolis, Elena; Leone, Giuseppe; Pagano, Livio

    2012-10-01

    We report the first known case of a breakthrough pulmonary infection caused by Aspergillus nomius in an acute myeloid leukemia patient receiving caspofungin therapy. The isolate was identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and sequencing-based methods. The organism was found to be fully susceptible, in vitro, to echinocandin antifungal agents.

  2. Efficacy of escalated imatinib combined with cytarabine in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenik, Wendy; Janssen, Jeroen J. W. M.; van der Holt, Bronno; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Smit, Willem M.; Kersten, Marie José; Daenen, Simon M. G. J.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Ferrant, Augustin; Schattenberg, Anton V. M. B.; Sonneveld, Pieter; van Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Wittebol, Shulamit; Willemze, Roelof; Wijermans, Pierre W.; Beverloo, H. Berna; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J. M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Cornelissen, Jan J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve the molecular response rate and prevent resistance to treatment, combination therapy with different dosages of imatinib and cytarabine was studied in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the HOVON-51 study. Having reported feasibility previously, we hereby

  3. Efficacy of escalated imatinib combined with cytarabine in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenik, W.; Janssen, J.J.W.M.; van der Holt, B.; Verhoef, G.E.G.; Smit, W.M.; Kersten, M.J.; Daenen, S.M.G.J.; Verdouck, L.F.; Ferrant, A.; Schattenberg, A.V.M.B.; Sonneveld, P.; Kooy, M.V.M.; Wittebol, S.; Willemze, R.; Wijermans, P.W.; Beverloo, H.B.; Lowenberg, B.; Valk, P.J.M.; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Cornelissen, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background In order to improve the molecular response rate and prevent resistance to treatment, combination therapy with different dosages of imatinib and cytarabine was studied in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the HOVON-51 study. Design and Methods Having reported

  4. Efficacy of escalated imatinib combined with cytarabine in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenik, Wendy; Janssen, Jeroen J. W. M.; van der Holt, Bronno; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Smit, Willem M.; Kersten, Marie Jose; Daenen, Simon M. G. J.; Verdouck, Leo F.; Ferrant, Augustin; Schattenberg, Anton V. M. B.; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kooy, Marinus van Marwijk; Wittebol, Shulamit; Willemze, Roelof; Wijermans, Pierre W.; Beverloo, H. Berna; Lowenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J. M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Cornelissen, Jan J.

    Background In order to improve the molecular response rate and prevent resistance to treatment, combination therapy with different dosages of imatinib and cytarabine was studied in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the HOVON-51 study. Design and Methods Having reported

  5. Increased regulatory T cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Siti-Zuleha; Hassan, Norfarazieda; Lee, Le-Jie; Md Noor, Sabariah; Osman, Raudhawati; Abdul-Jalil, Marsitah; Nordin, Abdul-Jalil; Abdullah, Maha

    2015-10-01

    Regulation in adaptive immune response balances a fine line that prevents instigation of self-damage or fall into unresponsiveness permitting abnormal cell growth. Mechanisms that keep this balance in check include regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs consist of a small but heterogeneous population which may be identified by the phenotype, CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127-. Role of Tregs in pathogenesis of cancers is thus far supported by evidence of increased Tregs in various cancers and may contribute to poorer prognosis. Tregs may also be important in acute leukemias. A review of the literature on Tregs in acute leukemias was conducted and Tregs were determined in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs). Studies on Tregs in B-cell ALL are few and controversial. We observed a significantly increased percentage of Tregs (mean ± SD, 9.72 ± 3.79% vs. 7.05 ± 1.74%; P = 0.047) in the bone marrow/peripheral blood of ALL (n = 17) compared to peripheral blood of normal controls (n = 35). A positive trend between Tregs and age (R = 0.474, P = 0.055, n = 17) implicates this factor of poor prognosis in B-cell ALL. Tregs in cancer are particularly significant in immunotherapy. The manipulation of the immune system to treat cancer has for a long time ignored regulatory mechanisms inducible or in place. In lymphoma studies tumor-specific mechanisms that are unlike conventional methods in the induction of Tregs have been hypothesized. In addition, tumor-infiltrating Tregs may present different profiles from peripheral blood pictures. Tregs will continue to be dissected to reveal their mysteries and their impact on clinical significance.

  6. ANTIBODIES TO LEUKEMIA DIFFERENTIATION FACTOR (HLDF IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Autenshlus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies to leukemia differentiation factor (HLDF in patients with gastrointestinal cancer Abstract. Patients with gastric cancer exhibit higher levels of IgG4-antibodies to human leukemia differentiation factor (HLDF, as compared with healthy individuals, whereas, in patients with colorectal cancer, one may detect high levels of IgA anti-HDLF antibodies, along with lower levels of IgG1 class antibodies against HLDF than in control group. Among patients with gastrointestinal cancer, a positive correlation is revealed between contents of highly differentiated cells in the tumor, and IgM antibodies to HDLF. Meanwhile, a reverse relationship is noted between low differentiation of tumor cells and levels of IgG2 antibodies to HDLF in gastric cancer patients, or IgG3 antibodies to HDLF in patients with colorectal cancer.

  7. Rationale and motivating factors for treatment-free remission in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldemeyer, Lauren; Akard, Luke P

    2016-12-01

    With BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib, and ponatinib, many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) can expect to live near-normal life spans. Current treatment recommendations of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and the European LeukemiaNet state that patients with CML-CP should remain on TKI therapy indefinitely. However, there is increasing evidence from clinical trials that some patients with sustained deep molecular responses may be able to achieve treatment-free remission (TFR), whereby they can suspend TKI therapy without losing previously achieved responses. With many patients achieving deep molecular responses to TKI therapy, there is growing interest in whether such patients can achieve TFR. In addition, adverse events (AEs) with long-term TKI therapy, including both the potential for later-emerging AEs and chronic, low-grade AEs, represent a major motivator for oncologists and their patients to investigate the feasibility of TFR. In this review, we provide an overview of data from TFR clinical trials, discuss the importance of achieving a deep molecular response to TKI treatment, and consider potential reasons for investigating TFR following TKI therapy.

  8. Molecular relapse in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients after bone marrow transplantation detected by polymerase chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyers, C.L.; Timson, L.; Clark, S.S.; Witte, O.N.; Champlin, R.; Kawasaki, E.S.

    1990-01-01

    Relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia after bone marrow transplantation can be detected by using clinical, cytogenetic, or molecular tools. A modification of the polymerase chain reaction can be used in patients to detect low levels of the BCR-ABL-encoded mRNA transcript, a specific marker for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Early detection of relapse after bone marrow transplantation could potentially alter treatment decisions. The authors prospectively evaluated 19 patients for evidence of molecular relapse, cytogenetic relapse, and clinical relapse after bone marrow transplantation. They used the polymerase chain reaction to detect residual BCR-ABL mRNA in patients followed up to 45 months after treatment and found 4 patients with BCR-ABL mRNA expression following bone marrow transplantation. Fifteen patients did not express detectable BCR-ABL mRNA. All 19 patients remain in clinical remission. In this prospective study of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients treated with bone marrow transplantation, molecular relapse preceded cytogenetic relapse in those patients who persistently express BCR-ABL mRNA. They recommend using standard clinical and cytogenetic testing to make patient care decisions until further follow-up determines the clinical outcome of those patients with residual BCR-ABL mRNA transcripts detected by polymerase chain reaction

  9. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-12

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. [Bone marrow autotransplantation in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia in primary remission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, C; Iriondo, A; Baro, J; Conde, E; Hermosa, V; Alsar, M J; Gómez Casares, M T; Muruzabal, M J; Pérez Encinas, M; Zubizarreta, A

    1990-09-22

    Fifteen bone marrow autotransplants (BMAT) in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) were performed after the first remission. The mean age was 37 years (range 12 to 60 years). According to the morphological classification FAB, 8 patients had monocytic leukemia (M4, M5) and 7 myeloid leukemia (M1, M2, M3). The mean interval elapsed between the date of complete remission and the BMAT was 3.9 months (range 1 to 5-9 months). In 8 patients this interval was longer than 6 months and in 7 cases it was shorter than 6 months. After achievement of the complete remission all patients underwent certain cycles of intensification before the BMAT. Eight patients received only a cycle whereas 7 patients received more than one cycle (between 2 and 4). The conditioning protocol consisted of cyclophosphamide (CP) (60 mg/kg x 2) and total body radiotherapy (TBR) (10 Gy) in 9 patients; CP and busulfan in five; and CP, cytarabine at high doses and melphalan in one case. Marrow extraction was performed after completion of chemotherapy of intensification. In 5 cases the bone marrow was depleted of leukemic cells by previous in vitro treatment with ASTA-Z. There are at present 8 alive patients. The survival free of illness was 51.8%. Seven patients died: 3 cases because relapse of the leukemia, 3 due to attachment failure of the transplantation, and one patient suffered a viral myocarditis. The survival free of illness was significantly longer in those patients transplanted after 6 months of the complete remission.

  11. OUTCOME OF FRONTLINE TREATMENT WITH “GENERIC” IMATINIB IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA IN ALGERIAN POPULATION: A MULTICENTER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Amine BEKADJA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In a developing country like Algeria, such expensive therapy is not available. Alternative approaches are needed to help these adult. In Algeria ‘imatib’ (CIPLA-India was introduced in 2006; but no study has been published yet in the North Africa region regarding response and outcome of this copy in CML patients. The goal of this multicenter study is to characterize newly adult CML in the western region of Algeria and to assess the effectiveness and safety of imatib (IM, copy as frontline therapy for patients with CML. Patients and Methods: The study was carried out in 7 hematology centers in the western Algeria. Patients, who were diagnosed to be suffering from CML between January 1st, 2007 and  December 31st, 2014 were selected for data analysis. All patients received a copy preparation, consisting of the alpha crystal form of imatinib, (IM, copy at a oral dose of 400 mg daily and monitored for tolerance and side effects while on therapy. Results: Between January 2007 and December 2014, 355 patients with CML were treated with imatib (Copy. The median follow- up of the study was 46 months (range: 13–107 months. Complete hematological response (CHR was seen in 83% of patients within 3 months. According to the Sokal score, 72% patients with low, 78% with intermediate and 69% with high risk disease achieved a CHR in 3 months (p=0.26 and according to the EUTOS score, 81% of patients with low and 70% with high risk disease achieved a CHR in 3 months (p=0.08. The major molecular response (MMR at six months (M6, M9, M12, M18 and M24 was 21%, 38%, 35%, 51% and 67% respectively and 34% of patients achieved a complete molecular response (CMR. The projected 5-year overall survival (OS rate was 83%. Side effects of imatib (copy in this study were similar to those reported previously for the entire imatinib mesylate treatment study and only 8% of patients were intolerant to imatib (copy and treated with a second generation of BCR

  12. Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in family caregivers of adult patients with acute leukemia from a dyadic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Mutian; Li, Jie; Chen, Chunyan; Cao, Fenglin

    2015-12-01

    Acute leukemia is a fatal disease in adults that not only affects the patients who suffer from it but also their family caregivers. No studies have investigated post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS) in family caregivers of adult patients with acute leukemia using a matched sample. The current study examined PTSS in adult patients with acute leukemia and their family caregivers and investigated the factors associated with caregivers' PTSS. A total of 163 patient-caregiver dyads completed questionnaires assessing their PTSS, psychological resilience, and perceived social support. Hierarchical linear regression was used to explore the related factors of caregivers' PTSS. More caregivers than patients met caseness criteria for PTSS (36.8% vs. 18.4%, p caregivers, being more closely related to the patients (e.g., spouses and parents), having patients with higher PTSS and having lower psychological resilience were independently associated with more severe PTSS. Caregivers of acute leukemia patients had significantly more severe PTSS than did their patients. This study is the first to investigate PTSS among family caregivers of adult patients with acute leukemia and its related factors in a matched sample. More attention should be paid to the caregivers of patients with acute leukemia to minimize their PTSS and thus improve mental health of caregivers and reduce potential negative consequences for the patients themselves. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Phase 1 study of INNO-406, a dual Abl/Lyn kinase inhibitor, in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias after imatinib resistance or intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarjian, Hagop; le Coutre, Phillipp; Cortes, Jorge; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Nagler, Arnon; Hochhaus, Andreas; Kimura, Shinya; Ottmann, Oliver

    2010-06-01

    : INNO-406, a dual v-abl Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog (Abl)/v-yes-1 Yamaguchi sarcoma viral-related oncogene homolog (Lyn) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), has demonstrated specific Lyn kinase inhibitory activity with no or limited activity against other sarcoma (Src) family member kinases. Several breakpoint cluster region (Bcr)-Abl kinase domain mutations are sensitive to INNO-406 in vitro, including mutations that involve a phenylalanine-to-leucine or phenylalanine-to-valine substitution at codon 317 (F317L and F317V, respectively). In the current study, the authors evaluated the use of INNO-406 in patients with Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) after imatinib resistance or intolerance. : A dose-escalation study was conducted at a starting dose of oral INNO-406 30 mg once daily. Cohorts of at least 3 patients were treated at each dose level until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was reached. Twice-daily dosing also was evaluated. Therapy was allowed to continue for a maximum of 24 months. : INNO-406 was administered to 56 patients with imatinib resistance (n = 40) or intolerance (n = 16). Other previous treatments included nilotinib (n = 20 patients), dasatinib (n = 26 patients), and dasatinib/nilotinib (n = 9 patients). Common mutations at the time of study entry included a tyrosine-to-histidine substitution at codon 253 (Y253H) (n = 6 patients), a glycine-to-glutamic acid substitution at codon 250 (G250E) (n = 4 patients), a threonine-to-isoleucine substitution at codon 315 (T315I) (n = 4 patients), and F317L (n = 3 patients). Of 31 patients with CML in chronic phase who received INNO-406, the major cytogenetic response rate was 19%. No responses were observed in patients who had CML in accelerated phase, CML in blastic phase, or Ph-positive ALL. The dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) at an INNO-406 dose of 480 mg twice daily were liver function abnormalities and

  14. An Exercise in Extrapolation: Clinical Management of Atypical CML, MDS/MPN-Unclassifiable, and MDS/MPN-RS-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Chetasi; Padron, Eric

    2016-12-01

    According to the recently published 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of myeloid malignancies, myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) include atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML), MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN-U), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), and MDS/MPN ring sideroblasts with thrombocytosis (MDS/MPN-RS-T). MDS/MPN-RS-T was previously a provisional category known as refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts with thrombocytosis (RARS-T) which has now attained a distinct designation in the 2016 WHO classification. In this review, we focus on biology and management of aCML, MDS/MPN-U, and MDS/MPN-RS-T. There is considerable overlap between these entities which we attempt to further elucidate in this review. We also discuss recent advances in the field of molecular landscape that further defines and characterizes this heterogeneous group of disorders. The paucity of clinical trials available secondary to unclear pathogenesis and rarity of these diseases makes the management of these entities clinically challenging. This review summarizes some of the current knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis and suggested treatment guidelines based on the available data.

  15. Clinical activity of azacitidine in patients who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craddock, Charles; Labopin, Myriam; Robin, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Disease relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, yet treatment options for such patients remain extremely limited. Azacitidine is an important new therapy in high-risk myelodysplastic...... syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia but its role in patients who relapse post allograft has not been defined. We studied the tolerability and activity of azacitidine in 181 patients who relapsed after an allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (n=116) or myelodysplastic syndromes (n=65). Sixty-nine patients...... conclude that azacitidine represents an important new therapy in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies to confirm optimal treatment options in this challenging patient population are required....

  16. Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise – Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) – a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarden, Mary; Møller, Tom; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    and treatment related symptoms and side effects. To date, there are no clinical practice exercise guidelines for patients with acute leukemia undergoing induction and consolidation chemotherapy. A randomized controlled trial is needed to determine if patients with acute leukemia can benefit by a structured...... and supervised counseling and exercise program.Methods/design: This paper presents the study protocol: Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise -- Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) trial, a two center, randomized controlled trial of 70 patients with acute leukemia (35 patients/study arm) following induction...... chemotherapy in the outpatient setting. Eligible patients will be randomized to usual care or to the 12 week exercise and counseling program. The intervention includes 3 hours + 30 minutes per week of supervised and structured aerobic training (moderate to high intensity 70 - 80%) on an ergometer cycle...

  17. Daunorubicin Hydrochloride, Cytarabine and Oblimersen Sodium in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Expression and distribution of PPP2R5C gene in leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, we clarified at the molecular level novel chromosomal translocation t(14;14(q11;q32 in a case of Sézary syndrome, which caused a rearrangement from TRAJ7 to the PPP2R5C gene. PPP2R5C is one of the regulatory B subunits of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A. It plays a crucial role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. To characterize the expression and distribution of five different transcript variants of the PPP2R5C gene in leukemia, we analyzed the expression level of PPP2R5C in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 77 patients with de novo leukemia, 26 patients with leukemia in complete remission (CR, and 20 healthy individuals by real-time PCR and identified the different variants of PPP2R5C by RT-PCR. Findings Significantly higher expression of PPP2R5C was found in AML, CML, T-ALL, and B-CLL groups in comparison with healthy controls. High expression of PPP2R5C was detected in the B-ALL group; however, no significant difference was found compared with the healthy group. The expression level of PPP2R5C in the CML-CR group decreased significantly compared with that in the de novo CML group and was not significantly different from the level in the healthy group. By using different primer pairs that covered different exons, five transcript variants of PPP2R5C could be identified. All variants could be detected in healthy samples as well as in all the leukemia samples, and similar frequencies and distributions of PPP2R5C were indicated. Conclusions Overexpression of PPP2R5C in T-cell malignancy as well as in myeloid leukemia cells might relate to its proliferation and differentiation. Investigation of the effect of target inhibition of this gene might be beneficial to further characterization of molecular mechanisms and targeted therapy in leukemia.

  19. Cytarabine and daunorubicin or idarubicin in induction therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eivazi-Ziaei, J.; Kermani, I.A.; Nikanfar, A.; Maljaie, H.; Mahmoudpour, A.; Dolatkhah, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most common form of acute leukemia, is treated by remission induction and post-remission therapy. Remission induction is usually achieved by administration of cytarabine along with an anthracycline such as Daunorubicin (DAU) or Idarubicin (IDA). Our objective was see the benefits if any of IDA over DAU in AML therapy. Methodology: Eighty adult AML patients were enrolled in this study, where 40 received DAU and 40 were treated with IDA. Remission status in each subject was studied and response to therapy was subsequently analyzed using SPSS. Results: Complete remission, partial remission and no responsive status were 15, 19, and 14 respectively for patients on DAU and 14, 18, and 11 for patients on IDA protocol. No significant benefit was detected for IDA compared to DAU in response to therapy. Conclusion: We found no benefit in using IDA over DAU in induction therapy for AML patients treated in northwest of Iran. (author)

  20. Expression, prognostic significance and mutational analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Vasiliki; Kontandreopoulou, Elina; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Roumelioti, Maria; Angelopoulou, Maria; Kyriazopoulou, Lydia; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis T; Vaiopoulos, George; Variami, Eleni; Kotsianidis, Ioannis; Athina Viniou, Nora

    2016-05-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 dephosphorylates BCR-ABL1, thereby serving as a potential control mechanism of BCR-ABL1 kinase activity. Pathways regulating SHP-1 expression, which could be exploited in the therapeutics of TKI-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), remain unknown. Moreover, the questions of whether there is any kind of SHP-1 deregulation in CML, contributing to disease initiation or evolution, as well as the question of prognostic significance of SHP-1, have not been definitively answered. This study shows moderately lower SHP-1 mRNA expression in chronic phase CML patients in comparison to healthy individuals and no change in SHP-1 mRNA levels after successful TKI treatment. Mutational analysis of the aminoterminal and phosphatase domains of SHP-1 in patients did not reveal genetic lesions. This study also found no correlation of SHP-1 expression at diagnosis with response to treatment, although a trend for lower SHP-1 expression was noted in the very small non-responders' group of the 3-month therapeutic milestone.

  1. Arsenic speciation in saliva of acute promyelocytic leukemia patients undergoing arsenic trioxide treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Baowei; Cao, Fenglin; Yuan, Chungang; Lu, Xiufen; Shen, Shengwen; Zhou, Jin; Le, X. Chris

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide has been successfully used as a therapeutic in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Detailed monitoring of the therapeutic arsenic and its metabolites in various accessible specimens of APL patients can contribute to improving treatment efficacy and minimizing arsenic-induced side effects. This article focuses on the determination of arsenic species in saliva samples from APL patients undergoing arsenic treatment. Saliva samples were collected from nine APL pa...

  2. Psychological Impact of Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on Patients and Their Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Sherief, Laila M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; Abdalrahman, Hadel M.; Youssef, Doaa M.; Alhady, Mohamed A Abd; Ali, Adel SA; Elbasset, Maha Aly Abd; Hashim, Hiatham M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To assess the self-esteem of pediatric patients on chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and psychological status of their parents. The psychological status of 178 children receiving chemotherapy for ALL and their parents was assessed using parenting stress index (PSI) to determine the degree of stress the parents are exposed to using parent's and child's domains. Self-esteem Scale was used to determine the psychological status of patients. The study revealed significan...

  3. Leukemic meningitis in a patient with hairy cell leukemia. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, D.W.; Scopelliti, J.A.; Boselli, B.D.

    1984-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement has not previously been described in patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL). A patient is reported who presented with meningeal involvement as his initial symptom of HCL. Diagnosis was established by morphologic and cytochemical studies of his cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and bone marrow. Treatment with whole-brain irradiation and intrathecal chemotherapy was successful in clearing leukemic cells from the CSF with resolution of symptoms

  4. Unusual distribution of red marrow mimicking chloroma in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, M.N.; Claussen, C.D.; Horger, M.S. [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Vogel, W. [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Internal Medicine-Oncology, Tuebingen (Germany); Bares, R. [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany); Wehrmann, M. [Eberhard-Karls University, Department of Pathology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    We present a case of unusual distribution of red marrow in a patient with extramedullary acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). In adults, hematopoietic marrow is usually located in the axial skeleton and the proximal aspects of the limbs, except for the epiphyses. Nodular islets of red marrow located in the epiphyseal and distal parts of the limbs may mimic tumoral infiltration and be mistaken for chloroma in a patient with AML. (orig.)

  5. Increased Incidence of T-Cell Malignancies in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Goda; van den Broek, Esther C; Stam, Olga CG; van Noesel, C.J.M.; Tonino, Sanne H.; Kater, Armon P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a patient with chemotherapy-refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) in whom postmortem examination showed hepatosplenomegaly, with both multiple small-cellular CLL lesions and large-cellular, monoclonal T-cell infiltrates. Following this case, the co-incidence of T-cell malignancies and CLL was studied using Dutch and American cancer registry databases. Analysis showed an excess risk for T-cell malignancies in CLL patients, with increased standardized incidence ratios compare...

  6. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Selecting the Best Frontline Treatment in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Musa; Abaza, Yasmin; Jabbour, Elias

    2017-01-01

    With the discovery of Philadelphia chromosome, understanding of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) pathobiology has tremendously increased. Development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) targeting the BCR/ABL1 oncoprotein has changed the landscape of the disease. Today, the expected survival of CML patients, if properly managed, is likely to be similar to the general population. Imatinib is the first approved TKI in CML treatment, and for several years, it was the only option in the frontline setting. Four years ago, second generation TKIs (nilotinib and dasatinib) were approved as alternative frontline options. Now, clinicians are faced the challenge of making decision for which TKI to chose upfront. Second generation TKIs have been demonstrated to induce deeper and faster responses compared to imatinib, however, none of 3 TKIs have been shown to have a clear survival advantage, they all are reasonable options. In contrast, when considering therapy in individual patients, the case may be stronger for a specific TKI. Co-morbidities of the patient and side effect profile of the TKI of interest should be an important consideration in decision making. At present, the cost nilotinib or dasatinib is not remarkably different from imatinib. However, patent for imatinib is expected to expire soon, and it will be available as a generic. Clinicians, then, need to weigh the advantages some patients gain with nilotinib or dasatinib in the frontline setting against the difference in cost. Whatever TKI is chosen as frontline, intolerance, non-compliance or treatment failure should be recognized early as a prompt intervention increases the chance of achieving best possible response. PMID:25921387

  8. MR imaging of the bone marrow in myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Comparison of the lumbar spine and femur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Ichikawa, Tamaki; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Nagai, Jun; Takagi, Shojiro

    1995-01-01

    MR imaging of the lumber spine and the femur was performed with T1-weighted SE sequence and comparison of the MRI findings of the lumber vertebral body and the femoral marrow was made in 15 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 5 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and 9 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The MRI appearance of the bone marrow was classified into four patterns: 1) fatty marrow; 2) faint signal; 3) heterogeneous infiltration; and 4) diffuse infiltration. The MRI of the lumber vertebral body showed a diffuse marrow infiltration pattern in over the half of the cases of AML and MDS. On the MRI of the femoral marrow, the signal intensity alteration, a low signal on T1-weighted SE image, began in the proximal femurs almost symmetrically. The abnormal low signal intensity area tended to gradually extend towards the distal portion of the femoral marrow with progression of the disease in the patients with AML and MDS. M2 type of AML tended to be demonstrated as a faint signal pattern, which was significantly different from the other types of AML. In all the cases of CML, a diffuse cellular infiltration pattern was noted with total replacement of the fatty marrow on both lumbar spinal and femoral MRI, and the femoral marrow involvement was more downwardly extended than AML. We concluded that MRI of the femoral marrow was more efficient than that of the lumbar spine in the assessment of myeloid leukemia and MDS. (author)

  9. A Preliminary Study of the Suitability of Archival Bone Marrow and Peripheral Blood Smears for Diagnosis of CML Using FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Charwudzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. FISH is a molecular cytogenetic technique enabling rapid detection of genetic abnormalities. Facilities that can run fresh/wet samples for molecular diagnosis and monitoring of neoplastic disorders are not readily available in Ghana and other neighbouring countries. This study aims to demonstrate that interphase FISH can successfully be applied to archival methanol-fixed bone marrow and peripheral blood smear slides transported to a more equipped facility for molecular diagnosis of CML. Methods. Interphase FISH was performed on 22 archival methanol-fixed marrow (BM and 3 peripheral blood (PB smear slides obtained at diagnosis. The BM smears included 20 CML and 2 CMML cases diagnosed by morphology; the 3 PB smears were from 3 of the CML patients at the time of diagnosis. Six cases had known BCR-ABL fusion results at diagnosis by RQ-PCR. Full blood count reports at diagnosis were also retrieved. Result. 19 (95% of the CML marrow smears demonstrated the BCR-ABL translocation. There was a significant correlation between the BCR-ABL transcript detected at diagnosis by RQ-PCR and that retrospectively detected by FISH from the aged BM smears at diagnosis (r=0.870; P=0.035. Conclusion. Archival methanol-fixed marrow and peripheral blood smears can be used to detect the BCR-ABL transcript for CML diagnosis.

  10. Reclassification of leukemia among A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki using French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao; Bennett, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The concordance rate for diagnoses of atomic bomb-related cases of leukemia in Nagasaki was determined using the French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) hematologists and one of the members (JMB) of the FAB cooperative group reviewed independently the peripheral blood and/or bone marrow smears from 193 people with leukemia or a related disorder. There was 85 % agreement in the identification of types and subtypes of acute leukemia. There was almost complete agreement for the diagnoses of non-FAB disorders (chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and others) resulting in overall concordance of 88.2 %. The present study suggest that the previously established leukemia types for about a quarter of the cases of acute leukemia and related disorders except CML should be changed. Considerable numbers of cases of ATL and MDS were involved in this series. The frequency of the former disease was not high in the high-dose irradiated group, but that of the latter was considerably high. All subtypes of AML except M3 and M6 were present in the high-dose group. The striking difference in CML incidence between Nagasaki and Hiroshima may continue to be a problem in relation to biological response to radiation exposure. (author)

  11. Reclassification of leukemia among A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki using French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao; Bennett, J.M. and others

    1988-06-01

    The concordance rate for diagnoses of atomic bomb-related cases of leukemia in Nagasaki was determined using the French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) hematologists and one of the members (JMB) of the FAB cooperative group reviewed independently the peripheral blood and/or bone marrow smears from 193 people with leukemia or a related disorder. There was 85 % agreement in the identification of types and subtypes of acute leukemia. There was almost complete agreement for the diagnoses of non-FAB disorders (chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and others) resulting in overall concordance of 88.2 %. The present study suggest that the previously established leukemia types for about a quarter of the cases of acute leukemia and related disorders except CML should be changed. Considerable numbers of cases of ATL and MDS were involved in this series. The frequency of the former disease was not high in the high-dose irradiated group, but that of the latter was considerably high. All subtypes of AML except M3 and M6 were present in the high-dose group. The striking difference in CML incidence between Nagasaki and Hiroshima may continue to be a problem in relation to biological response to radiation exposure.

  12. Isolation and killing of candidate chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells by antibody targeting of IL-1 receptor accessory protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järås, Marcus; Johnels, Petra; Hansen, Nils Gunder

    2010-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is genetically characterized by the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, formed through a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 and giving rise to the constitutively active tyrosine kinase P210 BCR/ABL1. Therapeutic strategies aiming for a cure of CML...... will require full eradication of Ph chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) CML stem cells. Here we used gene-expression profiling to identify IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP) as up-regulated in CML CD34(+) cells and also in cord blood CD34(+) cells as a consequence of retroviral BCR/ABL1 expression. To test...

  13. [MPLW515L point mutation in patients with myeloproliferative disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Su-Jiang; Fan, Lei; Qiao, Chun; Li, Jian-Yong

    2008-12-01

    In order to investigate the frequency of MPLW515L and JAK2V617F point mutations of the patients with myeloproliferative disease (MPD) in Nanjing area, MPLW515L and JAK2V617F point mutations were simultaneously detected by alleles specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) and sequencing in 190 MPD patients. The results showed that MPLW515L point mutation was detected in 1 out of 102 essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients (1.0%) and was not detected in 32 polycythemia vera (PV) patients, 13 idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) patients, 43 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. JAK2V617F point mutation was detected in 20 out of 32 PV patients (62.5%), 43 out of 102 ET patients (42.2%), 5 out of 13 IMF patients (38.5%), and was not detected in 43 CML patients. It is concluded that MPLW515L point mutation exists in ET patient, but is not found in PV, IMF and CML. JAK2V617F point mutation exists in PV, ET and IMF, but not in CML.

  14. Impact of cytomegalovirus reactivation on relapse and survival in patients with acute leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Lee, Seok; Kim, Hee-Je; Jeon, Young-Woo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Lee, Dong-Gun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Min, Woo-Sung; Lee, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-reactivation is associated with graft-vs-leukemia (GVL) effect by stimulating natural-killer or T-cells, which showed leukemia relapse prevention after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We enrolled patients with acute myeloid leukemia (n = 197) and acute lymphoid leukemia (n = 192) who underwent allogeneic-HSCT in first remission. We measured RQ-PCR weekly to detect CMV-reactivation and preemptively used ganciclovir (GCV) when the titer increased twice cons...

  15. European LeukemiaNet recommendations for the management and avoidance of adverse events of treatment in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steegmann, J L; Baccarani, M; Breccia, M; Casado, L F; García-Gutiérrez, V; Hochhaus, A; Kim, D-W; Kim, T D; Khoury, H J; Le Coutre, P; Mayer, J; Milojkovic, D; Porkka, K; Rea, D; Rosti, G; Saussele, S; Hehlmann, R; Clark, R E

    2016-08-01

    Most reports on chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) focus on efficacy, particularly on molecular response and outcome. In contrast, adverse events (AEs) are often reported as infrequent, minor, tolerable and manageable, but they are increasingly important as therapy is potentially lifelong and multiple TKIs are available. For this reason, the European LeukemiaNet panel for CML management recommendations presents an exhaustive and critical summary of AEs emerging during CML treatment, to assist their understanding, management and prevention. There are five major conclusions. First, the main purpose of CML treatment is the antileukemic effect. Suboptimal management of AEs must not compromise this first objective. Second, most patients will have AEs, usually early, mostly mild to moderate, and which will resolve spontaneously or are easily controlled by simple means. Third, reduction or interruption of treatment must only be done if optimal management of the AE cannot be accomplished in other ways, and frequent monitoring is needed to detect resolution of the AE as early as possible. Fourth, attention must be given to comorbidities and drug interactions, and to new events unrelated to TKIs that are inevitable during such a prolonged treatment. Fifth, some TKI-related AEs have emerged which were not predicted or detected in earlier studies, maybe because of suboptimal attention to or absence from the preclinical data. Overall, imatinib has demonstrated a good long-term safety profile, though recent findings suggest underestimation of symptom severity by physicians. Second and third generation TKIs have shown higher response rates, but have been associated with unexpected problems, some of which could be irreversible. We hope these recommendations will help to minimise adverse events, and we believe that an optimal management of them will be rewarded by better TKI compliance and thus better CML outcomes, together with better

  16. The Basel experience with total body irradiation for conditioning patients with acute leukemia for allogenic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speck, B.; Cornu, P.; Nissen, C.; Gratwohl, A.; Sartorius, J.

    1979-01-01

    We are reporting our experience with 13 patients suffering from end stage acute leukemia that were prepared for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by combined chemotherapy followed by high dose cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI). Only one patient became a long term survivor. Of the evaluable 12 patients, 6 died of interstitial pneumonia, 4 of GvH and 1 of recurrent leukemia. We conclude that adding combined chemotherapy to the standard conditioning program with Cy and TBI probably increases the risk of developing fatal interstitial pneumonia without eliminating the risk of recurrent leukemia. We suggest that allogenic marrow grafts should be performed earlier in the course of refractory acute leukemias, because in patients with end stage disease its chances of being curative are small

  17. Brain Function in Young Patients Receiving Methotrexate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-19

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Long-Term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Central nervous system leukemia in a patient with concurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma and acute myeloid leukaemia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Qing; Mai, Wen-Yuan; Wang, Si-Ben; Lou, Yin-Jun; Yan, Sen-Xiang; Jin, Jie; Xu, Wei-Lai

    2017-12-01

    Concurrent case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been reported. Here, we report a case of NPC, who was concurrently suffered from AML one mother after the NPC diagnosis. The patient was a 45-year-old male who presented with a mass on his right side neck. The patient was diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus negative type-2 non-keratinizing carcinoma with clivus involvement and unilateral metastasis to the cervical lymph node. He was treated with one cycle of cisplatin and 69.76 Gy of concurrent external-beam radiation. Three months after completion of chemo-radiotherapy, the patient was diagnosed as acute myeloid leukemia, which achieved complete remission after one course induction chemotherapy. Two months later, however, the patient was diagnosed as central nervous system leukemia. He ultimately died of relapsed leukemia. The overall survival of the patient was 10 months. The co-occurrence of NPC and AML is rare and prognosis is poor. Radiotherapy in NPC can disrupt the blood-brain barrier, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of central nervous system leukemia. Early alert and prevention of central nervous system leukemia following radiotherapy in NPC patient is recommended. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Red cells with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-phenotype in patients with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meletis, John; Terpos, Evangelos; Samarkos, Michalis; Meletis, Christos; Apostolidou, Effie; Komninaka, Veroniki; Anargyrou, Konstantinos; Korovesis, Konstantinos; Mavrogianni, Despina; Variami, Eleni; Viniou, Nora; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2002-04-01

    CD55 and CD59 are complement regulatory proteins that are linked to the cell membrane via a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. They are reduced mainly in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and in other hematological disorders. However, there are very few reports in the literature concerning their expression in patients with acute leukemias (AL). We studied the CD55 and CD59 expression in 88 newly diagnosed patients with AL [65 with acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) and 23 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)] using the sephacryl gel test, the Ham and sucrose lysis tests and we compared the results with patients' clinical data and disease course. Eight patients with PNH were also studied as controls. Red cell populations deficient in both CD55 and CD59 were detected in 23% of ANLL patients (especially of M(0), M(2) and M(6) FAB subtypes), 13% of ALL and in all PNH patients. CD55-deficient erythrocytes were found in 6 ANLL patients while the expression of CD59 was decreased in only 3 patients with ANLL. No ALL patient had an isolated deficiency of these antigens. There was no correlation between the existence of CD55 and/or CD59 deficiency and the percentage of bone marrow infiltration, karyotype or response to treatment. However no patient with M(3), M(5), M(7) subtype of ANLL and mature B- or T-cell ALL showed a reduced expression of both antigens. The deficient populations showed no alteration after chemotherapy treatment or during disease course. This study provides evidence about the lower expression of CD55 and CD59 in some AL patients and the correlation with their clinical data. The possible mechanisms and the significance of this phenotype are discussed.

  20. Prevention of Resistance in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: the role of combination therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Deenik (Wendy)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractChronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a rare disease with a worldwide incidence of approximately 1-2 cases per 100,000 individuals. Chronic myeloid leukemia occurs slightly more frequently in men than in women. The median age at diagnosis is approximately 60 years, and although the incidence

  1. Secondary Leukemia in a non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patient Presenting as Myeloid Sarcoma of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Pitini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As defined by the World Health Organization classification of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissue, myeloid sarcoma (MS is a tumor mass of myeloblasts or immature myeloid cells that can arise before, concurrent with, or following acute myeloid leukaemia. We describe a case of secondary leukemia presenting itself as MS of the breast in a patient previously treated for a non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

  2. Disseminated Cryptococcal Disease in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia on Ibrutinib

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Koh; Proia, Laurie A.; Demarais, Patricia L.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus is a unique environmental fungus that can cause disease most often in immunocompromised individuals with defective cell-mediated immunity. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is not known to be a risk factor for cryptococcal disease although cases have been described mainly in patients treated with agents that suppress cell-mediated immunity. Ibrutinib is a new biologic agent used for treatment of CLL, mantle cell lymphoma, and Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia. It acts by inhibitin...

  3. Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: a Single-Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakucs Enikő

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT is an important treatment modality for patients with acute myeloid leukemia with low and intermediate risk disease. It has served advantages over allogenic transplantation, because it does not need a matched donor, there is no graft versus host disease, there are less complications and a faster immune reconstitution than in the allo-setting. The disadvantage is the lack of the graft versus leukaemia effect.

  4. Parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis for a mathematical model with time delays of leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cândea, Doina; Halanay, Andrei; Rǎdulescu, Rodica; Tǎlmaci, Rodica

    2017-01-01

    We consider a system of nonlinear delay differential equations that describes the interaction between three competing cell populations: healthy, leukemic and anti-leukemia T cells involved in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) under treatment with Imatinib. The aim of this work is to establish which model parameters are the most important in the success or failure of leukemia remission under treatment using a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters. For the most significant parameters of the model which affect the evolution of CML disease during Imatinib treatment we try to estimate the realistic values using some experimental data. For these parameters, steady states are calculated and their stability is analyzed and biologically interpreted.

  5. Platelet Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Does Imatinib Mesylate Improve It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Meltem Akay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of imatinib mesylate on platelet aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP release in chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Materials and Methods: Platelet aggregation and ATP release induced by 5.0 mM adenosine diphosphate, 0.5 mM arachidonic acid, 1.0 mg/ mL ristocetin, and 2 µg/mL collagen were studied by whole blood platelet lumi-aggregometer in 20 newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia patients before and after imatinib mesylate treatment. Results: At the time of diagnosis, 17/20 patients had abnormal platelet aggregation results; 8 (40% had hypoactivity, 6 (30% had hyperactivity, and 3 (15% had mixed hypo- and hyperactivity. Repeat platelet aggregation studies were performed after a mean of 19 months (min: 5 months-max: 35 months in all patients who received imatinib mesylate during this period. After therapy, 18/20 (90% patients had abnormal laboratory results; 12 (60% had hypoactive platelets, 4 (20% had mixed hypo- and hyperactive platelets, and 2 (10% had hyperactive platelets. Three of the 8 patients with initial hypoactivity remained hypoactive, while 2 developed a mixed picture, 2 became hyperactive, and 1 normalized. Of the 6 patients with initial hyperactivity, 4 became hypoactive and 2 developed a mixed pattern. All of the 3 patients with initial hypo- and hyperactivity became hypoactive. Finally, 2 of the 3 patients with initial normal platelets became hypoactive while 1 remained normal. There was a significant decrease in ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation after therapy (p0.05. Conclusion: These findings indicate that a significant proportion of chronic myeloid leukemia patients have different patterns of platelet function abnormalities and imatinib mesylate has no effect on these abnormalities, with a significant impairment in ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation.

  6. Quantification of newly produced B and T lymphocytes in untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimi Luigi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immune defects occurring in chronic lymphocytic leukemia are responsible for the frequent occurrence of infections and autoimmune phenomena, and may be involved in the initiation and maintenance of the malignant clone. Here, we evaluated the quantitative defects of newly produced B and T lymphocytes. Methods The output of B and T lymphocytes from the production and maturation sites was analyzed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients and healthy controls by quantifying kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (KRECs and T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs by a Real-Time PCR assay that simultaneously detects both targets. T-lymphocyte subsets were analyzed by six-color flow cytometric analysis. Data comparison was performed by two-sided Mann-Whitney test. Results KRECs level was reduced in untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients studied at the very early stage of the disease, whereas the release of TRECs+ cells was preserved. Furthermore, the observed increase of CD4+ lymphocytes could be ascribed to the accumulation of CD4+ cells with effector memory phenotype. Conclusions The decreased number of newly produced B lymphocytes in these patients is likely related to a homeostatic mechanism by which the immune system balances the abnormal B-cell expansion. This feature may precede the profound defect of humoral immunity characterizing the later stages of the disease.

  7. Prior history of non-melanoma skin cancer is associated with increased mortality in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Jorge R.; Blake, Patrick W.; Björkholm, Magnus; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Wang, Zhuoqiao; Landgren, Ola

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether a previous diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer among chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients is a predictor of poor outcome. Using the Swedish Cancer Registry, we conducted a population-based study to evaluate the survival patterns among chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with and without non-melanoma skin cancer. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used and Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed. Of a total of 12,041 chronic lymphocytic leukemia cases identified, 236 cases, including 111 squamous cell cancer, had a prior history of non-melanoma skin cancer. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with a prior history of non-melanoma skin cancer had a 1.29-fold (95% CI 1.10–1.52; p=0.0024) increased risk of dying; and those with a history of squamous cell cancer had a further elevated 1.86-fold (95% CI 1.46–2.36; p<0.0001) risk of dying. Kaplan-Meier plots showed that patients with a history of non-melanoma skin cancer, particularly those with squamous cell cancer, had significantly poorer survival than chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients without non-melanoma skin cancer (p<0.0001; log-rank test). Non-melanoma skin cancer may be a novel clinical predictor of worse chronic lymphocytic leukemia outcome. PMID:19794092

  8. Morbidity associated to the transfusion support in pediatric patients with acute leukemia in the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino Valderrama, Martha; Suarez Mattos, Amaranto; Hernandez Kunzel, Jorge Alberto; Restrepo, Alexandra

    2002-01-01

    Acute leukemia represents the most common cancer in pediatrics. The current treatments made necessary a hematological support which increases the risks of complications, like fever, immunologic reaction, infections and, graft versus host disease. The objective of the present study was to determine the morbidity associated with transfusion support in pediatric patients with acute leukemia. In the pediatric population with diagnosis of acute leukemia in the INC during one and half year, the morbidity associated with transfusions was low and couldn't be related to the treatment given to the transfused products

  9. Cryptococcal infections in two patients receiving ibrutinib therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankowicz, Matthew; Banaszynski, Megan; Crawford, Russell

    2018-01-01

    Cryptococcal infections are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Reports of these infections in patients on small molecular kinase inhibitors have not been widely reported in clinical trials. We describe one case of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis and one case of cryptococcal pneumonia in two patients who were receiving ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Despite different sites of cryptococcal infection, both patients had similar presentations of acute illness. Patient 1 was worked up for health care-associated pneumonia, as well as acute sinusitis prior to the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. He also had a more complex past medical history than patient 2. Patient 2 developed atrial fibrillation from ibrutinib prior to admission for presumed health care-associated pneumonia. Cryptococcal antigen testing was done sooner in this patient due to patient receiving high-dose steroids for the treatment of underlying hemolytic anemia. We conclude that patients who develop acute illness while receiving ibrutinib should be considered for cryptococcal antigen testing.

  10. Interferon alpha induced cytogenetic remissions of chronic myelocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, Nobuo; Shigeta, Chiharu; Tanaka, Kimio; Kamada, Nanao; Kuramoto, Atsushi; Ito, Chikako.

    1994-01-01

    In two heavily exposed A-bomb survivors, Philadelphia (Ph 1 ) chromosomes completed disappeared by the treatment with interferon (IFN)-α for chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML). One is a 55-year-old man exposed at 2.0 km in Hiroshima at the age of 13. Periodic mass screening in 1987 showed the presence of Ph 1 chromosomes, in addition to an increased number of leukocytes and the presence of neocytes. Subcutaneous injection of IFN-α (6,000,000 units/day) was started with a diagnosis of CML, and 5 months later Ph 1 chromosomes disappeared. Then, because Ph 1 chromosomes were found in 2.8% of 143 cells one year and 6 months after the termination of IFN-α, re-injection of IFN-α was started. The other patient is a 53-year-old woman exposed at 2.0 km in Hiroshima at the age of 6. She was pointed out to have leukocytosis in 1992; bone marrow examination showed the presence of Ph 1 chromosomes in 88.1% of 88 cells analyzed, leading to a diagnosis of CML. Subcutaneous injection of IFN-α (6,000,000 units/day) was started and 5 months later Ph 1 chromosomes disappeared. As of 11 months after the start of injection, no Ph 1 chromosomes were observed, but the patient is still treated with IFN-α injection. Effects of IFN-α and problems of residual Ph 1 chromosomes are discussed in a review of the literature. (N.K.)

  11. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABLT315I mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and pre-clinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multi-targeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABLT315I-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML. PMID:19878872

  12. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, III, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim; (OHSU- Cancer Instit.); (ARIAD)

    2010-09-07

    Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABL{sup T315I} mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and preclinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multitargeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABL{sup T315I}-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML.

  13. Bacillus Cereus catheter related bloodstream infection in a patient in a patient with acute lymphblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lütfiye Öksüz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus infection is rarely associated with actual infection and for this reason single positive blood culture is usually regarded as contamination . However it may cause a number of infections, such catheter-related blood stream infections. Significant catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI caused by Bacillus spp. are mainly due to B.cereus and have been predominantly reported in immunocompromised hosts1 . Catheter removal is generally advised for management of infection. In this report, catheter-related bacteremia caused by B.cereus in a patient with acute lymphoblastıc leukemia (ALL in Istanbul Medical Faculty was presented.A 44-year old man presented with fatigue, weight loss, epistaxis and high fever. A double-lumen Hickman–catheter (Bard 12.0 Fr, Round Dual Lumen was inserted by surgical cut-down to access the right subclavian vein which would be necessary for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Three weeks later the patient presented with high fever and headache. Bacillus spp. was isolated from the cathether while blood culture obtained from the peripheral vein remained negative. The bacterial identification was confirmed as B.cereus using VITEK identification system It has been reported Bacillus cereus septicemia may be fatal in immunocompromised hosts despite broad-spectrum appropriate treatment10. Catheter removal is essential for prevention of recurrent bacteremia. Long-term cathater salvage should be reserved for appropriate patient group.

  14. Bosutinib in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller-von Amsberg G

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Gunhild Keller-von Amsberg, Philippe SchafhausenDepartment of Hematology and Oncology and, Stem Cell Transplantation and Pulmonology Division, Oncological Center, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: Bosutinib (SKI-606 is an orally available, once-daily dual Src and Abl kinase inhibitor, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of adults with chronic, accelerated, or blast-phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia who are intolerant of or resistant to first- or second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Bosutinib effectively overcomes the majority of imatinib-resistance-conferring BCR-ABL mutations except V299L and T315I. In the Bosutinib Efficacy and Safety in chronic myeloid LeukemiA (BELA trial, bosutinib attained a faster and deeper molecular response than imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Treatment-emergent adverse events are usually very manageable. Low grade, mostly self-limiting diarrhea represents the most frequently observed toxicity of bosutinib. Anti-diarrheal drugs, antiemetic agents, and/or fluid replacement should be used to treat these patients. The improved hematological toxicity of bosutinib compared with other tyrosine kinase inhibitors has been ascribed to its minimal activity against platelet-derived growth factor receptor and KIT. In this review, we give an overview on the profile of bosutinib, the clinical potential and treatment-emergent adverse events.Keywords: CML, BCR-ABL, SRC/ABL kinase inhibitor, resistance-conferring mutation

  15. A power-efficient switchable CML driver at 10 Gbps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Peipei; Li Lei; Liu Huihua

    2016-01-01

    High static power limits the application of conventional current-mode logic(CML). This paper presents a power-efficient switchable CML driver, which achieves a significant current saving by 75% compared with conventional ones. Implemented in the 130 nm CMOS technology process, the proposed CML driver just occupies an area about 0.003 mm 2 and provides a robust differential signal of 1600 mV for 10 Gbps optical line terminal (OLT) with a total current of 10 mA. The peak-to-peak jitter is about 4 ps (0.04T UI ) and the offset voltage is 347.2 mV @ 1600 mV PP . (paper)

  16. A power-efficient switchable CML driver at 10 Gbps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peipei, Chen; Lei, Li; Huihua, Liu

    2016-02-01

    High static power limits the application of conventional current-mode logic(CML). This paper presents a power-efficient switchable CML driver, which achieves a significant current saving by 75% compared with conventional ones. Implemented in the 130 nm CMOS technology process, the proposed CML driver just occupies an area about 0.003 mm2 and provides a robust differential signal of 1600 mV for 10 Gbps optical line terminal (OLT) with a total current of 10 mA. The peak-to-peak jitter is about 4 ps (0.04TUI) and the offset voltage is 347.2 mV @ 1600 mVPP.

  17. Association between regular molecular monitoring and tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy adherence in chronic myelogenous leukemia in the chronic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, Annie; Chen, Lei; Dea, Katherine; Wu, Eric Q; Goldberg, Stuart L

    2014-07-01

    Adherence with oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy over prolonged timeframes is required for successful outcomes among patients with chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CP-CML). Since quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) monitoring may identify early suboptimal responses, and thereby permit detection of non-adherence to therapy, we sought to assess the association between frequency of molecular monitoring and medication adherence. This is a retrospective cohort study design of diagnosed CP-CML obtained from two large US administrative claims databases. Patients were grouped into cohorts based on the number of qPCR tests they had. Adherence was assessed both by medication possession ratio (MPR) and proportion of days covered (PDC) and was compared between qPCR cohorts. A sensitivity analysis was performed by adjusting for the number of oncology outpatient visits not due to routine molecular monitoring. Over the 12 month study period, 1205 CML patients met the selection criteria; 41.0% had no qPCR tests, 31.9% had 1-2 tests, and 27.1% had 3-4 tests; 88.9% of patients were initiated on imatinib. Patients in the 3-4 qPCR tests cohort had an average MPR that was 10.22 (p sensitivity analysis were consistent with core analysis findings, excluding number of physician visits as a potential driver of adherence. These findings demonstrate an association, not causation, between molecular monitoring frequency and adherence. Frequent molecular monitoring (3-4 times per year as recommended in current guidelines) is associated with greater TKI treatment adherence for patients diagnosed with CML. Since TKI adherence >80% has been associated with better clinical outcomes, this study underscores the importance of molecular monitoring.

  18. BCR-ABL1 mutation development during first-line treatment with dasatinib or imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, T P; Saglio, G; Quintás-Cardama, A; Mauro, M J; Kim, D-W; Lipton, J H; Bradley-Garelik, M B; Ukropec, J; Hochhaus, A

    2015-09-01

    BCR-ABL1 mutations are a common, well-characterized mechanism of resistance to imatinib as first-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Less is known about mutation development during first-line treatment with dasatinib and nilotinib, despite increased use because of higher response rates compared with imatinib. Retrospective analyses were conducted to characterize mutation development in patients with newly diagnosed CML-CP treated with dasatinib (n=259) or imatinib (n=260) in DASISION (Dasatinib versus Imatinib Study in Treatment-Naive CML-CP), with 3-year minimum follow-up. Mutation screening, including patients who discontinued treatment and patients who had a clinically relevant on-treatment event (no confirmed complete cytogenetic response (cCCyR) and no major molecular response (MMR) within 12 months; fivefold increase in BCR-ABL1 with loss of MMR; loss of CCyR), yielded a small number of patients with mutations (dasatinib, n=17; imatinib, n=18). Dasatinib patients had a narrower spectrum of mutations (4 vs 12 sites for dasatinib vs imatinib), fewer phosphate-binding loop mutations (1 vs 9 mutations), fewer multiple mutations (1 vs 6 patients) and greater occurrence of T315I (11 vs 0 patients). This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00481247.

  19. A comprehensive cytogenetic classification of 1466 Chinese patients with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Li, Juan; Hu, Yanjie; Xie, Wei; Du, Wen; Liu, Wei; Li, Xiaoqing; Chen, Xiangjun; Li, Hongrui; Wang, Junfeng; Zhang, Lannan; Huang, Shiang

    2012-06-01

    Cytogenetics and molecular cytogenetics of 1466 Chinese patients with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were studied. Cytogenetic results were available in 1175 patients. Cross-correlations of 23 subclasses of cytogenetic abnormalities were described. Childhood cases had higher incidences of normal karyotype, t(1;19), +8, 12q-, +21, +22 and high hyperdiploidy with 51-65 chromosomes, and lower incidences of t(9;22) and -5/5q- than adult ones (all pcytogenetic subclasses with immunophenotyping subgroups of ALL were studied. Our study presents the cytogenetic characteristics of a large series of Chinese ALL patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cytogenetic Profile of de novo Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chin Yuet; Noor, Puteri J; Ismail, Azli; Ahid, Mohd Fadly Md; Zakaria, Zubaidah

    2013-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease in terms of cytogenetics and molecular genetics. AML is the most common acute leukemia in adults and its incidence increases with age. Diagnostic cytogenetics is an important prognostic indicator for predicting outcome of AML. We examined the karyotypic patterns of 480 patients with de novo AML seen at government hospitals throughout the country and evaluated the association of chromosome aberrations with the age of patient. Chromosome abnormalities were detected in 146 (30.4%) patients. The most common cytogenetic abnormality was balanced translocation t (8; 21), followed by trisomy 8 (as sole abnormality) and t (15; 17). The age of our Malaysian patients at diagnosis ranged from four months to 81 years, with a median age of 39 years. The normal karyotype was found mainly in patients aged 15-30 years. About 75% of patients with t (8; 21) were below 40 years of age, and the complex karyotype was found with the highest frequently (34.3%) in elderly patients (age above 60 years). More than half of the patients with complex karyotype were above 50 years of age. The deletion 5q was detected only in patients aged above 50 years. Different cytogenetic abnormalities in AML show different frequencies with increasing age. Probably different genetic mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of AML and these mechanisms might occur at different frequencies over lifetime.

  1. The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML): dictionaries and conventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The semantic architecture of CML consists of conventions, dictionaries and units. The conventions conform to a top-level specification and each convention can constrain compliant documents through machine-processing (validation). Dictionaries conform to a dictionary specification which also imposes machine validation on the dictionaries. Each dictionary can also be used to validate data in a CML document, and provide human-readable descriptions. An additional set of conventions and dictionaries are used to support scientific units. All conventions, dictionaries and dictionary elements are identifiable and addressable through unique URIs. PMID:21999509

  2. The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML): dictionaries and conventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Rust, Peter; Townsend, Joe A; Adams, Sam E; Phadungsukanan, Weerapong; Thomas, Jens

    2011-10-14

    The semantic architecture of CML consists of conventions, dictionaries and units. The conventions conform to a top-level specification and each convention can constrain compliant documents through machine-processing (validation). Dictionaries conform to a dictionary specification which also imposes machine validation on the dictionaries. Each dictionary can also be used to validate data in a CML document, and provide human-readable descriptions. An additional set of conventions and dictionaries are used to support scientific units. All conventions, dictionaries and dictionary elements are identifiable and addressable through unique URIs.

  3. Considering baseline factors and early response rates to optimize therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akard, Luke P; Bixby, Dale

    2016-05-01

    Multiple BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are available for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP), and several baseline and on-treatment predictive factors have been identified that can be used to help guide TKI selection for individual patients. In particular, early molecular response (EMR; BCR-ABL ≤10% on the International Scale at 3 months) has become an accepted benchmark for evaluating whether patients with CML-CP are responding optimally to frontline TKI therapy. Failure to achieve EMR is considered an inadequate initial response according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines and a warning response according to the European LeukemiaNet recommendations. Here we review data supporting the importance of achieving EMR for improving patients' long-term outcomes and discuss key considerations for selecting a frontline TKI in light of these data. Because a higher proportion of patients achieve EMR with second-generation TKIs such as nilotinib and dasatinib than with imatinib, these TKIs may be preferable for many patients, particularly those with known negative prognostic factors at baseline. We also discuss other considerations for frontline TKI choice, including toxicities, cost-effectiveness, and the emerging goals of deep molecular response and treatment-free remission.

  4. Polycythemia vera treated with /sup 32/P and myleran: Development of chronic granulocytic leukemia with chromosomal abnormalities in one patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stavem, P; Sandnes, K [Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Hagen, C.B. van der [Oslo Univ. (Norway); Vogt, E [Statens Institutt for Folkehelse, Oslo, Norway

    1975-01-01

    Chronic granulocytic leukemia developed in a 59-year-old woman who had previously received a total of 21 mCl /sup 32/P for polycythemia vera. She was treated with Myleran (busulphan) for her chronic granulocytic leukemia. Cytogenetic studies revealed deletion of chromosomes No. 8 and 12, and translocation between 1 and 8. The patient also developed a severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia, for which she received prednisone treatment. She died with a perforated stomach ulcer. (INIS)

  5. Clinical Efficacy and Safety of First-Line Dasatinib Therapy and the Relevance of Velocity of BCR-ABL1 Transcript Decline for Achievement of Molecular Responses in Newly Diagnosed Chronic-Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Report from the Juntendo Yamanashi Cooperative Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Tomoiku; Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Mitsumori, Toru; Sato, Eriko; Gotoh, Akihiko; Kirito, Keita; Noguchi, Masaaki; Koike, Michiaki; Sakamoto, Junichi; Oba, Koji; Komatsu, Norio

    2018-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors led to an improvement in the prognoses of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The aims of this study were to investigate the efficacy and safety of dasatinib in Japanese patients and to explore the factors that affect the achievement of molecular responses. The primary endpoint was a major molecular response (MMR) by 12 months. The halving time for BCR-ABL1 transcripts was calculated using transcript levels. Thirty-two patients with chronic-phase CML (CML-CP) were enrolled and 30 received 100 mg dasatinib once daily. At 24 months of follow-up, 21 (72%) and 24 (83%) patients achieved an MMR by 12 and 24 months, respectively; the rates of a deep molecular response (DMR) by 12 and 24 months were 48 and 59%, respectively. A shorter halving time of BCR-ABL1 transcripts (≤10.6 days) accurately predicted both an MMR and a DMR. The incidence of pleural effusion was 50%. Our study reconfirmed the efficacy and safety of dasatinib treatment in Japanese patients with newly diagnosed CML-CP. In addition, the usefulness of the halving time of BCR-ABL1 transcripts was validated. These data emphasize the significance of an early treatment response in achieving a DMR during dasatinib therapy. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Effect of Linezolid on Hematologic Recovery in Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Following Induction Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedved, Adrienne N; DeFrates, Sean R; Hladnik, Lindsay M; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E

    2016-10-01

    Assess the effects of linezolid on hematologic outcomes in newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) following induction chemotherapy. Single-center, retrospective, observational, cohort study. Large, tertiary care academic medical center. A total of 225 patients ≥ 18 years admitted between December 2010 and 2013 with newly diagnosed AML were assessed for inclusion. Patients were identified through the use of ICD-9 codes and chemotherapy ordered via the computerized physician order entry system. Sixty-eight patients met inclusion criteria and were grouped into two arms based on antimicrobial treatment: LZD group (linezolid plus gram-negative antimicrobial, n=21) or control group (vancomycin or daptomycin plus gram-negative antimicrobial, n=47). The LZD group received linezolid ≥ 72 hours. The control group received vancomycin or daptomycin ≥ 72 hours. If patients switched extended gram-positive therapy, they were included in the LZD group as long as they had received ≥ 72 hours of linezolid. The primary end point of time to neutrophil recovery was not statistically different (28 days for LZD group vs 26 days for control group; p=0.675). The preplanned subgroup analysis of patients who received ≥ 14 days of linezolid demonstrated statistically similar median times to neutrophil recovery (29 days for LZD group vs 26 days for control group; p=0.487). Total duration of extended gram-positive antimicrobial therapy was significantly longer in the LZD group (27 days vs 16 days; plinezolid for extended gram-positive antimicrobial coverage following induction chemotherapy. This study provides new insight with a primary focus on the effects of hematologic outcomes when using linezolid in a well-defined acute leukemia population. Further study is warranted with larger populations to assess the potential adverse effects linezolid may have in patients with acute leukemia. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  7. Hyperfractionated total body irradiation for bone marrow transplantation. Results in seventy leukemia patients with allogeneic transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shank, B.; Chu, F.C.H.; Dinsmore, R.

    1983-01-01

    From May, 1979 to March, 1981, 76 leukemia patients were prepared for bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with a new hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) regimen (1320 cGy in 11 fractions, 3x/day), followed by cyclophosphamide, 60 mg/kg, for two days. Partial lung shielding was done on each treatment, with supplemental electron beam treatments of the chest wall to compensate, and of the testes, a sanctuary site. This regimen was initiated to potentially reduce fatal interstitial pneumonitis as well as decrease leukemic relapse. Overall actuarial survival at 1 year for acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) patients is 63%, while relapse-free survival at 1 year is 53%. On the other hand, for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patients, there is no significant difference between relapse or remission patients with regard to overall survival or relapse-free survival, when relapse is defined as > 5% blasts in the marrow at the time of cytoreduction. Overall actuarial survival at 1 year for ALL is 61% and relapse-free survival is 45% at 1 year. Fatal interstitial pneumonitis has dropped to 18% compared with 50% in our previous single-dose TBI regimen (1000 cGy), in which the same doses of cyclophosphamide were given prior to TBI. In conclusion, not only has fatal interstitial pneumonitis been reduced by hyperfractionation and partial lung blocking, but there may be a survival advantage in ALL patients in relapse, who have a survival equal to that of remission patients. This may indicate a greater cell kill with the higher dose (1320 cGy) attained with this regimen, in these patients with a higher leukemic cell burden

  8. Clinical and prognostic implications of Roundabout 4 (robo4 in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Kai Chen

    Full Text Available Robo4 is involved in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell homeostasis and essential for tumor angiogenesis. Expression of Robo4 was recently found in solid tumors and leukemia stem cells. However, the clinical implications of Robo4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML remain unclear.We investigated the clinical and prognostic relevance of mRNA expression of Robo4 in bone marrow (BM mononuclear cells from 218 adult patients with de novo AML. We also performed immunohistochemical staining to assess the Robo4 protein expression in the BM biopsy specimens from 30 selected AML patients in the cohort.Higher Robo4 expression was closely associated with lower white blood cell counts, expression of HLA-DR, CD13, CD34 and CD56 on leukemia cells, t(8;21 and ASXL1 mutation, but negatively correlated with t(15;17 and CEBPA mutation. Compared to patients with lower Robo4 expression, those with higher expression had significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS. This result was confirmed in an independent validation cohort. Furthermore, multivariate analyses showed that higher Robo4 expression was an independent poor prognostic factor for DFS and OS in total cohort and patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics, irrespective of age, WBC count, karyotype, and mutation status of NPM1/FLT3-ITD, and CEBPA.BM Robo4 expression can serve as a new biomarker to predict clinical outcomes in AML patients and Robo4 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in patients with higher Robo4 expression.

  9. ALLOGENEIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR ADULT PATIENTS WITH ACUTE LEUKEMIA – 14 YEARS EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Pretnar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of various prognostic factors on long-term survival and event free survival after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with acute leukemia.Methods and patients. Between years 1989 and 2002 44 patients with acute leukemia (30 with AML and 14 with ALL were transplanted. Survival curves using the Kaplan-Meier method were calculated for patients transplanted with two different sources of stem cells – bone marrow and peripheral blood and separately for patients with female donor.Results. Estimated 10 years survival for AML is 43% and 64% for ALL patients which is not statistically different. There are no significant differences in outcome regarding source of stem cells and in donors’ gender.Conclusions. To conclude, our results show that neither source of stem cells nor donor’s gender has impact on the long-term survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. As published previously patients transplanted beyond the first remission have significantly worse outcome.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow in patients with acute leukemia during and after chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, K.E.; Grundtvig Soerensen, P.; Thomsen, C.; Christoffersen, P.; Henriksen, O.; Karle, H.; Hvidovre Hospital; Hvidovre Hospital; Gentofte Hospital

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with acute leukemia were examined at the time of diagnosis with MR imaging and in vivo T1 relaxation time measurements of the hemopoietic bone marrow. A 1.5 T whole body magnetic resonance scanner was used. Twenty of the patients had follow-up examinations in relation to chemotherapy. Bone marrow biopsies from the posterior iliac crest were obtained within a short time interval of all MR examinations. At the time of diagnosis, T1 relaxation times were increased significantly in all the leukemic patients, compared with 24 age-matched controls. A decrease in T1 relaxation time towards or into the normal range was observed in 10 patients who obtained remission. The T1 relaxation time remained prolonged in 6 patients who failed to obtain remission during chemotherapy. Four patients, who obtained remission with concomitant decrease of T1 values towards or into the normal range, also showed prolongation of T1 relaxation time in relation to leukemic relapse. The results indicate that changes observed in T1 relaxation times of the hemopoietic bone marrow in patients with acute leukemia reflect changes in disease activity, and, that serial measurements of T1 values may provide clinically useful information with the possibility for identification of residual disease in regions inaccessible for biopsy. (orig.)

  11. Trends in adult leukemia incidence and survival in Denmark, 1943-2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Nielsen, Ove Juul; Johansen, Christoffer

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of leukemia is largely unknown. Ecological data indicating trends in incidence and survival can provide information about changes in risk factors, can reflect underlying changes in diagnostic classification, and can measure therapeutic advances. From the records of the Danish Cancer...... Registry with registration starting from 1943, we calculated age-specific, period-specific, and age-standardized (world standard) incidence rates of chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL), acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for persons above the age...... of 18. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and median survival times were calculated. Between 1943 and 2003, there were 26,036 cases of leukemia reported. The age-specific incidence rates of CLL, CML, and AML were higher for older men and women, while the incidence rates of ALL by age were more homogeneous...

  12. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients harboring T315I BCR-ABL mutated leukemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck Emmanuel; Basak, Grzegorz W; Soverini, Simona

    2011-01-01

    T315I(+) Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias are inherently resistant to all licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and therapeutic options remain limited. We report the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in 64 patients with documented BCR-ABL(T315I) mutations. Median follow......) as unfavorable factors. We conclude that allogeneic stem cell transplantation represents a valuable therapeutic tool for eligible patients with BCR-ABL(T315I) mutation, a tool that may or may not be replaced by third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors....

  13. Invasive fungal infection (IFI) in two pediatric patients with acute leukemia. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derwich, K.; Andrzejewska, M.; Wachowiak, J.; Mankowski, P.

    2009-01-01

    At present over 70% of children with malignancies can be successfully cured although this is achieved at the cost of increased incidence of major complications. Fungal infections account for some 10% of all infections and, in severely immunosuppressed patients, they are still the cause of a high mortality rate (50-95%). As a result the prevention and treatment of adverse effects of antineoplastic therapy is of the most importance and can be a factor determining the success of such treatment. This paper contains two case reports of adolescent female patients diagnosed with acute leukemia who developed invasive fungal infections (IFI) in the course of intensive chemotherapy. (authors)

  14. Residuals in post-chemotherapy, non-depressed patients with leukemia that is in remission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson K. Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Debate persists regarding the occurrence and etiology of neurocognitive deficits associated with the utilization of chemotherapeutic agents, commonly referred to as “chemobrain”. While some have previously attributed these features to other factors such as fatigue, emotional reactivity, etc., growing literature suggests that in fact chemotherapeutic agents may be the cause. Although research has investigated these deficits, greater investigation is warranted. The current study investigated the presence of residual neurocognitive deficits in non-depressed patients post-chemotherapy with a history of leukemia that was in remission in comparison to healthy controls. Methods: participants included 16 individuals with a history of leukemia post-chemotherapy, in remission and without depression and 48 healthy controls. Participants were assessed using the WJ-III with data from the first seven subtests entered for analysis. A multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant differences existed between groups. By way of a discriminant function analysis, subtest/domain specific discrepancies were noted. Specifically, participants with a history of leukemia who were post-chemotherapy and without depression were found to perform significantly worse on visual-auditory learning, concept formations, and sound blending than did healthy controls. Findings are seen as additional support of the idea that neurocognitive deficits do in fact occur following chemotherapy. However, they are particularly of interest as they are seen even in the absence of emotional distress and outside the active treatment phase. Additional findings of importance and clinical relevance will be discussed.

  15. Heterogeneity of chromosome 22 breakpoint in Philadelphia-positive (Ph+) acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erikson, J.; Griffin, C.A.; Ar-Rushdi, A.

    1986-01-01

    In chronic myelogenous leukemias (CML) with the t(9;22)(q34;q11) chromosome translocation the breakpoints on chromosome 22 occur within a 5.8-kilobase segment of DNA referred to as breakpoint cluster region (bcr). The same cytogenetically indinstinguishable translocation occurs in approximately 10% of patients with acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALL). In this study the authors have investigated the chromosome breakpoints in several cases of ALL carrying the t(9;22) translocation. In three of five cases of ALL they found that the bcr region was not involved in the chromosome rearrangement and that the 22q11 chromosome breakpoints were proximal (5') to the bcr region at band 22q11. In addition, they observed normal size bcr and c-alb transcripts in an ALL cell line carrying the t(9;22) translocation. They conclude, therefore, that if c-alb is inappropriately expressed in ALL cells without bcr rearrangements, the genetic mechanism of activation must be different from that reported for CML

  16. Potent anti-leukemia activities of humanized CD19-targeted CAR-T cells in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiang; Wang, Gang; Cheng, Hai; Wei, Chen; Qi, Kunming; Sang, Wei; Zhenyu, Li; Shi, Ming; Li, Huizhong; Qiao, Jianlin; Pan, Bin; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Qingyun; Zeng, Lingyu; Niu, Mingshan; Jing, Guangjun; Zheng, Junnian; Xu, Kailin

    2018-04-10

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has shown promising results for relapsed/refractory (R/R) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The immune response induced by murine single-chain variable fragment (scFv) of the CAR may limit CAR-T cell persistence and thus increases the risk of leukemia relapse. In this study, we developed a novel humanized scFv from the murine FMC63 antibody. A total of 18 R/R ALL patients with or without prior murine CD19 CAR-T therapy were treated with humanized CD19-targeted CAR-T cells (hCART19s). After lymphodepletion chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, the patients received a single dose (1 × 10 6 /kg) of autologous hCART19s infusion. Among the 14 patients without previous CAR-T therapy, 13 (92.9%) achieved complete remission (CR) or CR with incomplete count recovery (CRi) on day 30, whereas 1 of the 3 patients who failed a second murine CAR-T infusion achieved CR after hCART19s infusion. At day 180, the overall and leukemia-free survival rates were 65.8% and 71.4%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of relapse was 22.6%, and the non-relapse mortality rate was 7.1%. During treatment, 13 patients developed grade 1-2 cytokine release syndrome (CRS), 4 patients developed grade 3-5 CRS, and 1 patient experienced reversible neurotoxicity. These results indicated that hCART19s could induce remission in patients with R/R B-ALL, especially in patients who received a reinfusion of murine CAR-T. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Secondary acute non lymphoid leukemia in patients treated for non Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimino, G.; Anselma, A.; Cartoni, C.

    1987-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the frequency, characteristics and actual risk of secondary acute non lymphoid leukemia (s-ANLL) in 141 patients treated for non Hodgkin's lymphoma with different modalities. One hundred and twenty-four patients received chemotherapy according to PROVECIP protocol (9). Of these, 15 also received as induction treatment a local nodal irradiation and 33 an extended field radiotherapy. Seventeen out of 141 were treated by total body irradiation. Of these, 15 relapsed and received salvage chemotherapy. Sixteen of the 124 patients trated with PROVECIP also underwent different chemotherapeutic programs as salvage treatment. Of the entire population studied, 2 patients significantly affected the occurrence of s-ANLL, since both leukemias occurred in patients treated with total body irradiation, given alone or followed by chemotherapy. The actuarial risk at 8 years was 5.24% in the whole group, whereas it greatly increased in the group of patients treated with total body irradiation (24%). Conversely, no risk was found in the group treated with PROVECIP, alone, with additional chemotherapy, or with associated local or extended field radiotherapy

  18. Localized in vivo proton spectroscopy of the bone marrow in patients with leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Jensen, M; Grundtvig, P

    1990-01-01

    Volume selective magnetic resonance (MR) proton spectroscopy was used to investigate the haemopoietic (iliac bone) and fatty bone marrow (tibia) in patients with leukemia and polycythaemia vera. Selective measurements of the relaxation times T1 and T2 for the "water" and "fat" resonances in the b......Volume selective magnetic resonance (MR) proton spectroscopy was used to investigate the haemopoietic (iliac bone) and fatty bone marrow (tibia) in patients with leukemia and polycythaemia vera. Selective measurements of the relaxation times T1 and T2 for the "water" and "fat" resonances...... to chemotherapeutic treatment. Nine patients with polycythaemia vera and 21 normal control subjects were examined with identical methods for comparison. All patients had bone marrow biopsies performed prior to every MR examination. Significant differences could be detected in the spectral patterns from iliac bone...... decrease in marrow fat content. The T1 relaxation times of the "water" resonance in the spectra from the iliac bone marrow of the leukemic patients were significantly prolonged at diagnosis, compared to the normal controls and the patients with polycythaemia vera. After chemotherapeutic induction...

  19. Expression, purification and preliminary diffraction studies of CmlS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, Ryan; Podzelinska, Kateryna; Soares, Alexei; Bhattacharya, Anupam; Vining, Leo C.; Jia, Zongchao; Zechel, David L.

    2009-01-01

    CmlS from S. venezuelae is a flavin-dependent halogenase that is involved in the biosynthesis of the widely used antibiotic chloramphenicol. Here, the crystallization of CmlS and analysis of the initial diffraction data are reported. CmlS, a flavin-dependent halogenase (FDH) present in the chloramphenicol-biosynthetic pathway in Streptomyces venezuelae, directs the dichlorination of an acetyl group. The reaction mechanism of CmlS is of considerable interest as it will help to explain how the FDH family can halogenate a wide range of substrates through a common mechanism. The protein has been recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method was used to produce crystals that were suitable for X-ray diffraction. Data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 208.1, b = 57.7, c = 59.9 Å, β = 97.5°

  20. Profile of Infections in Newly Diagnosed Patients with Acute Leukemia During the Induction Phase of Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayed, H.A.; Talaat, S.M.; El-Mahallawy, H.A.; Kaddah, A.M.; Ismael, H.T.

    2009-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common pediatric malignancy. Despite the significant progress in the treatment of infectious complications, infection-related morbidity and mortality continue to be of great importance. Prompt initiation of the appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment has improved infection outcome. The aim of the present study is to assess the type, frequency, and severity of infectious complications in a cohort of pediatric cancer patients treated at a single medical institution. We also aim to identify factors affecting bloodstream infections in newly diagnosed ALL and AML pediatric patients during the induction phase of treatment. Patients and Methods: This study was carried out at the Department of Pediatric Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, during the time period from January 1st to June 30th 2007. Inclusion criteria were pediatric age group (from 0-16 years), newly diagnosed acute leukemia, positive blood culture and documented site of infection. Data were analyzed using the SPSS package version 15. A p-value £0.05 was considered significant. Results: This is a retrospective study including 100 newly diagnosed cases of acute leukemia. Fifty-four patients had ALL, and 46 patients had AML. 348 infectious episodes were recorded. Blood stream infections (BSI) occurred once or twice in 32%, 3-4 episodes in 58%, and five or more episodes in 10% of the cases. Gram-positive cocci were the most frequently observed cause of BSI, accounting for 77.9% of the total isolates followed by Gram negative organisms seen in 18.9% and mixed infections in 8%. The majority of the episodes (n= 208, 58.4%) responded to first-line empirical antibiotic therapy. Conclusion: Clinical and laboratory risk factors could be identified and can help prediction of serious BSI.

  1. Mucormycosis of the paranasal sinuses in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Invasive fungal infection is among the leading causes of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia after induction of chemotherapy. In the past few decades, the incidence of invasive fungal infection has increased dramatically. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. Mucorales. Neutropenic patients are at a high risk of developing an invasive mucormycosis with fulminant course and high mortality rate (35-100%. Case Outline. We are presenting the case of a 72-year-old male with an acute monoblastic leukemia. The patient was treated during five days with hydroxycarbamide 2 × 500 mg/day, followed by cytarabine 2 × 20 mg/sc over the next 10 days. He developed febrile neutropenia, headache, and edema of the right orbital region of the face. Computed tomography of the sinuses revealed shadow in sinuses with thickening of mucosa of the right paranasal sinuses. Lavage and aspirate from the sinuses revealed Rhizopus oryzae. Mucormycosis was successfully treated with amphotericin B (5 mg/kg/day followed by ketoconazole (400 mg/day. Two months later the patient died from primary disease. Conclusion. In patients with acute leukemia who developed aplasia, febrile neutropenia, and pain in paranasal sinuses, fungal infection should be taken into consideration. New and non-invasive methods for taking samples from sinuses should be standardized in order to establish an early and accurate diagnosis of mucormycosis with the source in paranasal sinuses, and to start early treatment by a proper antifungal drug. Clear communication between physician and mycologist is critical to ensure proper and timely sampling of lavage and aspirate from sinuses and correct specimen processing when mucormycosis is suspected clinically. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 175034

  2. [A clinical study of chronic disseminated candidiasis in patients with acute leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Guo, Xu-Tao; Wei, Yong-Qiang; Meng, Fan-Yi; Liu, Qi-Fa; Zhou, Shu-Yun

    2008-06-01

    To deepen the understanding of chronic disseminated candidiasis (CDC) in patients with acute leukemia (AL). CDC was investigated in 119 AL patients who received induction chemotherapy from August 2004 to May 2005. Clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, imaging modalities, diagnosis and treatment were investigated retrospectively. Three patients (2.5%) were identified to be suffering from CDC. All the three patients had an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) nodular patchy shadows in lungs. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple abnormal signal in liver, spleen and kidneys in one of the patients. Two patients had positive bleed fungal cultures and histologic examination in one of the patients were positive for Candida tropicalis. Two patients received amphotericin B therapy empirically, but it was replaced by amphotericin B colloid dispersion (ABCD) later in one and combined with voriconazole in another because of unresponsiveness to the drug. One patient took a favorable turn after receiving ABCD therapy for 45 d, which was replaced by voriconazole because of the emergence of fever after discontinuation of ABCD. All the three patients received further chemotherapy smoothly after the diagnosis of CDC. The diagnosis of CDC remains difficult. Fungal blood cultures and histologic examination have been considered in many studies as the golden standard for the diagnosis of CDC. Amphotericin B is the cornerstone of treatment in patients with CDC and lipid formulations of amphotericin B can be used in CDC patients who are intolerant of or refractory to conventional amphotericin B. Voriconazole has a favorable response for refractory/relapse patients and could be used for second line treatment. The development of CDC in patients with acute leukemia does not preclude further chemotherapy.

  3. Bacillus Cereus catheter related bloodstream infection in a patient in a patient with acute lymphblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lütfiye Öksüz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Bacillus cereus infection is rarely associated with actual infection and for this reason single positive blood culture is usually regarded as contamination . However it may cause a number of infections, such catheter-related blood stream infections. Significant catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI caused by Bacillus spp. are mainly due to B.cereus and have been predominantly reported in immunocompromised hosts1 . Catheter removal is generally advised for management of infection. In this report, catheter-related bacteremia caused by B.cereus in a patient with acute lymphoblastıc leukemia (ALL in Istanbul Medical Faculty was presented.A 44-year old man presented with fatigue, weight loss, epistaxis and high fever. A double-lumen Hickman–catheter (Bard 12.0 Fr, Round Dual Lumen was inserted by surgical cut-down to access the right subclavian vein which would be necessary for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Three weeks later the patient presented with high fever and headache. Bacillus spp. was isolated from the cathether while blood culture obtained from the peripheral vein remained negative. The bacterial identification was confirmed as B.cereus using VITEK identification system

    It has been reported Bacillus cereus septicemia may be fatal in immunocompromised hosts despite broad-spectrum appropriate treatment10. Catheter removal is essential for prevention of recurrent bacteremia. Long-term cathater salvage should be reserved for appropriate patient group.

  4. Role of Setbp1 in Myeloid Leukemia Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-05

    Nhu Nguyen1,Vijay Negi1, Kevin Oakley1, Bartlomiej Przychodzen2, Jaroslaw P. Maciejewski2,3, and Yang Du1,3 1Department of Pediatrics, Uniformed...Sozer S, Ashton J, Rossi RM, et al. 2007. Leukemia stem cells in a genetically defined murine model of blast-crisis CML. Blood 110:2578- 85 86

  5. Effect of low dose radiation on expression of p16 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longzhen; Ding Xin; Li Xiangyang; Cen Jiannong; Shen Hongjie; Chen Zixing

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose radiation on the expression on p16 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Methods: Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) which expressed CD34 +, CD38 - and CD123 + were isolated from bone marrow cells obtained from twenty patients newly-diagnosedas chronic myeloid leukemia with EasySep TM magnet beads. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) which expressed CD34 + and CD38 - were isolated from human cord blood cells obtained from twenty full-term deliveries with EasySep TM magnet beads as control. HSCs vs LSCs samples were further divided into three dose groups, including 0, 12.5 and 50 cGy, respectively. RT-PCR and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods were used to detect mRNA expression of p16 gene in HSCs and LSCs after irradiation. Cells were harvested at different time for detection of cell cycle and apoptosis by flow cytometer. Results: p16 mRNA level in CML-LSCs was increased slightly at 12.5 cGy, and significantly increased at 50 cGy (Z=-3.39, P 0 /G 1 stagewas increased 48 h after 12.5 cGy irradiation, and 72 h post-irradiation with 50 cGy. The apoptosis rate of CML-LSCs was gradually raised after LDR, especially at 72 h post-irradiation of 50 cGy [(17.75±11.760% vs (6.13±4.71)%, Z=-2.37, P<0.01]. Conclusions: p16 gene transcription could be up-regulated by low dose radiation, which might provide a theoretical evidence for CML therapy and LDR in leukemic clinical application. (authors)

  6. Growth of chronic myeloid leukemia cells is inhibited by infection with Ad-SH2-HA adenovirus that disrupts Grb2-Bcr-Abl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhi; Luo, Hong-Wei; Yuan, Ying; Shi, Jing; Huang, Shi-Feng; Li, Chun-Li; Cao, Wei-Xi; Huang, Zong-Gan; Feng, Wen-Li

    2011-05-01

    The persistence of Bcr-Abl-positive cells in patients on imatinib therapy indicates that inhibition of the Bcr-Abl kinase activity alone might not be sufficient to eradicate the leukemia cells. Many downstream effectors of Bcr-Abl have been described, including activation of both the Grb2-SoS-Ras-MAPK and Grb2-Gab2-PI3K-Akt pathways. The Bcr-Abl-Grb2 interaction, which is mediated by the direct interaction of the Grb2 SH2 domain with the phospho-Bcr-Abl Y177, is required for activation of these signaling pathways. Therefore, disrupting their interaction represents a potential therapeutic strategy for inhibiting the oncogenic downstream signals of Bcr-Abl. Adenovirus Ad-SH2-HA expressing the Grb2 SH2 domain was constructed and applied in this study. As expected, Ad-SH2-HA efficiently infected CML cells and functioned by binding to the phospho-Bcr-Abl Y177 site, competitively disrupting the Grb2 SH2-phospho-Bcr-Abl Y177 complex. They induced potent anti-proliferation and apoptosis-inducing effects in CML cell lines. Moreover, the Ras, MAPK and Akt activities were significantly reduced in the Ad-SH2-HA treated cells. These were not observed with the point-mutated control adenovirus Ad-Sm-HA with abolished phospho-Bcr-Abl Y177 binding sites. These data indicate that, in addition to the direct targeting of Bcr-Abl, selective inhibition of its downstream signaling pathways may be a therapeutic option for CML, and the Ad-SH2-HA-mediated killing strategy could be explored as a promising anti-leukemia agent in CML.

  7. Blockade of Y177 and Nuclear Translocation of Bcr-Abl Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianyin; Huang, Zhenglan; Gao, Miao; Cao, Weixi; Xiao, Qin; Luo, Hongwei; Feng, Wenli

    2017-03-02

    The gradual emerging of resistance to imatinib urgently calls for the development of new therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The fusion protein Bcr-Abl, which promotes the malignant transformation of CML cells, is mainly located in the cytoplasm, while the c-Abl protein which is expressed in the nucleus can induce apoptosis. Based on the hetero-dimerization of FKBP (the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein) and FRB (the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain of the protein kinase, mTOR) mediated by AP21967, we constructed a nuclear transport system to induce cytoplasmic Bcr-Abl into nuclear. In this study, we reported the construction of the nuclear transport system, and we demonstrated that FN3R (three nuclear localization signals were fused to FRBT2098L with a FLAG tag), HF2S (two FKBP domains were in tandem and fused to the SH2 domain of Grb2 with an HA tag) and Bcr-Abl form a complexus upon AP21967. Bcr-Abl was imported into the nucleus successfully by the nuclear transport system. The nuclear transport system inhibited CML cell proliferation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathways mainly by HF2S. It was proven that nuclear located Bcr-Abl induced CML cell (including imatinib-resistant K562G01 cells) apoptosis by activation of p73 and its downstream molecules. In summary, our study provides a new targeted therapy for the CML patients even with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI)-resistance.

  8. Blockade of Y177 and Nuclear Translocation of Bcr-Abl Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianyin Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The gradual emerging of resistance to imatinib urgently calls for the development of new therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. The fusion protein Bcr-Abl, which promotes the malignant transformation of CML cells, is mainly located in the cytoplasm, while the c-Abl protein which is expressed in the nucleus can induce apoptosis. Based on the hetero-dimerization of FKBP (the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein and FRB (the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain of the protein kinase, mTOR mediated by AP21967, we constructed a nuclear transport system to induce cytoplasmic Bcr-Abl into nuclear. In this study, we reported the construction of the nuclear transport system, and we demonstrated that FN3R (three nuclear localization signals were fused to FRBT2098L with a FLAG tag, HF2S (two FKBP domains were in tandem and fused to the SH2 domain of Grb2 with an HA tag and Bcr-Abl form a complexus upon AP21967. Bcr-Abl was imported into the nucleus successfully by the nuclear transport system. The nuclear transport system inhibited CML cell proliferation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5 pathways mainly by HF2S. It was proven that nuclear located Bcr-Abl induced CML cell (including imatinib-resistant K562G01 cells apoptosis by activation of p73 and its downstream molecules. In summary, our study provides a new targeted therapy for the CML patients even with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI-resistance.

  9. Development and validation of a prognostic scoring system for patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Such, Esperanza; Germing, Ulrich; Malcovati, Luca; Cervera, José; Kuendgen, Andrea; Della Porta, Matteo G; Nomdedeu, Benet; Arenillas, Leonor; Luño, Elisa; Xicoy, Blanca; Amigo, Mari L; Valcarcel, David; Nachtkamp, Kathrin; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Lorenzo, Ignacio; Cazzola, Mario; Sanz, Guillermo

    2013-04-11

    The natural course of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is highly variable but a widely accepted prognostic scoring system for patients with CMML is not available. The main aim of this study was to develop a new CMML-specific prognostic scoring system (CPSS) in a large series of 558 patients with CMML (training cohort, Spanish Group of Myelodysplastic Syndromes) and to validate it in an independent series of 274 patients (validation cohort, Heinrich Heine University Hospital, Düsseldorf, Germany, and San Matteo Hospital, Pavia, Italy). The most relevant variables for overall survival (OS) and evolution to acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) were FAB and WHO CMML subtypes, CMML-specific cytogenetic risk classification, and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion dependency. CPSS was able to segregate patients into 4 clearly different risk groups for OS (P < .001) and risk of AML evolution (P < .001) and its predictive capability was confirmed in the validation cohort. An alternative CPSS with hemoglobin instead of RBC transfusion dependency offered almost identical prognostic capability. This study confirms the prognostic impact of FAB and WHO subtypes, recognizes the importance of RBC transfusion dependency and cytogenetics, and offers a simple and powerful CPSS for accurately assessing prognosis and planning therapy in patients with CMML.

  10. Early invasive pulmonary aspergillosis with fatal outcome in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, M.; Poczova, M.; Sladekova, M.; Drgona, L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this publication is to highlight the complexity of the issue of care for patients with hemato-oncological disease, with a focus on infectious complication - invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Case: We present a case report of a 49-year-old patient treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In the early post-transplant period, in spite of combined antimicrobial treatment, an onset of fever and dyspnoea occurred. Because of the clinical condition of our immunosuppressed patient, as well as radiological finding of suspected inflammatory changes in the lung, antibiotic and antifungal therapy was changed. Respiratory symptoms progressed and the state extorted artificial ventilation. Realized bronchoscopy showed structural changes in bronchial mucosa. The results of laboratory analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage testified to fungal infection - pulmonary aspergillosis, with the cultures of Aspergillus flavus. Despite intensive complex treatment, the patient's condition led to multiple organ failure and on the Day D +27 after transplantation physicians stated exitus letalis. Autopsy confirmed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Conclusion: Acute leukemia and its treatment is an increased risk of systemic fungal infections in those patients - especially invasive aspergillosis. The fatality rate for invasive aspergillosis in this risk group represents on average 50 %. With this in mind, it is necessary for life-saving to diagnose the infection in time and treat it appropriately. (author)

  11. Treatments for chronic myeloid leukemia: a qualitative systematic review

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    Ferdin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Roxanne Ferdinand,1 Stephen A Mitchell,2 Sarah Batson,2 Indra Tumur11Pfizer, Tadworth, UK; 2Abacus International, Bicester, UKBackground: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative disorder of blood stem cells. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI imatinib was the first targeted therapy licensed for patients with chronic-phase CML, and its introduction was associated with substantial improvements in response and survival compared with previous therapies. Clinical trial data are now available for the second-generation TKIs (nilotinib, dasatinib, and bosutinib in the first-, second-, and third-line settings. A qualitative systematic review was conducted to qualitatively compare the clinical effectiveness, safety, and effect on quality of life of TKIs for the management of chronic-, accelerated-, or blast-phase CML patients.Methods: Included studies were identified through a search of electronic databases in September 2011, relevant conference proceedings and the grey literature.Results: In the first-line setting, the long-term efficacy (up to 8 years of imatinib has been confirmed in a single randomized controlled trial (International Randomized Study of Interferon [IRIS]. All second-generation TKIs reported lower rates of transformation, and comparable or superior complete cytogenetic response (CCyR, major molecular response (MMR, and complete molecular response rates compared with imatinib by 2-year follow-up. Each of the second-generation TKIs was associated with a distinct adverse-event profile. Bosutinib was the only second-generation TKI to report quality-of-life data (no significant difference compared with imatinib treatment. Data in the second- and third-line setting confirmed the efficacy of the second-generation TKIs in either imatinib-resistant or -intolerant patients, as measured by CCyR and MMR rates.Conclusion: Data from first-line randomized controlled trials reporting up to 2-year follow-up indicate superior response

  12. CRUSTED SCABIES IN A PATIENT WITH ACUTE LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

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    Mamatha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A 17 year s old male patient presented with diffuse, ill defined, hyperpigmented, scaly plaques on the body, for the past 15 days. Lesions were more over the groin and also on both elbows and wrists. Patient is a known case of acute lymphocytic leukaemia, diagnosed a t the age of 13 years and has been on treatment ever since. A KOH ( 10% mount of the scales showed the presence of sarcoptes scabiei and skin biopsy with haematoxylin and eosin showed fragments of mite in the excised skin.

  13. Trichosporon fungemia in a pediatric patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Luke Maxfield; Juliana J. Matthews; David Ryan Ambrosetti; Issa E. Ephtimios

    2015-01-01

    Trichosporon fungemia is a life-threatening opportunistic infection that is increasing in frequency. Invasive disease occurs almost exclusively in immunocompromised hosts, particularly in neutropenic adults with hematological malignancies and uncommonly in children. We report the case of a pediatric patient where disseminated trichosporonosis progressed while on micafungin, between treatments with voriconazole and amphotericin B, demonstrating the difficulty with and importance of prolonged a...

  14. Respective contribution of CML8 and CML9, two arabidopsis calmodulin-like proteins, to plant stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang; Perez, Manon; Aldon, Didier; Galaud, Jean-Philippe

    2017-05-04

    In their natural environment, plants have to continuously face constraints such as biotic and abiotic stresses. To achieve their life cycle, plants have to perceive and interpret the nature, but also the strength of environmental stimuli to activate appropriate physiological responses. Nowadays, it is well established that signaling pathways are crucial steps in the implementation of rapid and efficient plant responses such as genetic reprogramming. It is also reported that rapid raises in calcium (Ca 2+ ) levels within plant cells participate in these early signaling steps and are essential to coordinate adaptive responses. However, to be informative, calcium increases need to be decoded and relayed by calcium-binding proteins also referred as calcium sensors to carry-out the appropriate responses. In a recent study, we showed that CML8, an Arabidopsis calcium sensor belonging to the calmodulin-like (CML) protein family, promotes plant immunity against the phytopathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (strain DC3000). Interestingly, other CML proteins such as CML9 were also reported to contribute to plant immunity using the same pathosystem. In this addendum, we propose to discuss about the specific contribution of these 2 CMLs in stress responses.

  15. Differential effects of atomic bomb irradiation in inducing major leukemia types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomonaga, Masao; Matsuo, Tatsuki; Carter, R.L.

    1993-05-01

    In this report we utilize data from the additional 517 cases from the leukemia registry together with the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort data to study the effects of atomic bomb irradiation on major leukemia types. The French-American-British classification and other improved diagnostic methods were used to reclassify cases into 21 categories, including new disease entities such as adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). These categories were then grouped into four major types for analysis: (1) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), (2) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), (3) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and (4) OTHER types including ATL. Analyses of radiation effects were based on the updated Dosimetry System 1986(DS86). Incidence rates of all four leukemia types increased with increasing exposure level. The effects of radiation were significantly greater on the incidence of ALL and CML than on that of AML and OTHER. In the two lowest dose categories (1-49 and 50-499 mGy), estimated incidence either remained constant or increased slightly as the population of survivors aged. In the two highest dose categories (500-1,499 and ≥ 1,500 mGy). Among unexposed persons, the estimated risk of CML in Nagasaki relative to Hiroshima was significantly less than that of AML, whereas that of OTHER types was significantly greater. The time to onset of ALL, AML, and CML declined with increasing dose. The rate of decline, however, was greater for ALL and CML than for AML. The resulting differences at high doses reflect shorter incubation times for atomic-bomb-induced ALL and CML than for AML. (J.P.N.)

  16. Role of STAT3 in Transformation and Drug Resistance in CML

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Rajesh R.; Tolentino, Joel H.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is initially driven by the bcr–abl fusion oncoprotein. The identification of bcr–abl led to the discovery and rapid translation into the clinic of bcr–abl kinase inhibitors. Although, bcr–abl inhibitors are efficacious, experimental evidence indicates that targeting bcr–abl is not sufficient for elimination of minimal residual disease found within the bone marrow (BM). Experimental evidence indicates that the failure to eliminate the leukemic stem cell contributes to persistent minimal residual disease. Thus curative strategies will likely need to focus on strategies where bcr–abl inhibitors are given in combination with agents that specifically target the leukemic stem cell or the leukemic stem cell niche. One potential target to be exploited is the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway. Recently using STAT3 conditional knock-out mice it was shown that STAT3 is critical for initiating the disease. Interestingly, in the absence of treatment, STAT3 was not shown to be required for maintenance of the disease, suggesting that STAT3 is required only in the tumor initiating stem cell population (Hoelbl et al., 2010). In the context of the BM microenvironment, STAT3 is activated in a bcr–abl independent manner by the cytokine milieu. Activation of JAK/STAT3 was shown to contribute to cell survival even in the event of complete inhibition of bcr–abl activity within the BM compartment. Taken together, these studies suggest that JAK/STAT3 is an attractive therapeutic target for developing strategies for targeting the JAK–STAT3 pathway in combination with bcr–abl kinase inhibitors and may represent a viable strategy for eliminating or reducing minimal residual disease located in the BM in CML.

  17. Role of STAT3 in Transformation and Drug Resistance in CML

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Rajesh R.; Tolentino, Joel H.; Hazlehurst, Lori A., E-mail: lori.hazlehurst@moffitt.org [Molecular Oncology Program, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2012-04-10

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is initially driven by the bcr–abl fusion oncoprotein. The identification of bcr–abl led to the discovery and rapid translation into the clinic of bcr–abl kinase inhibitors. Although, bcr–abl inhibitors are efficacious, experimental evidence indicates that targeting bcr–abl is not sufficient for elimination of minimal residual disease found within the bone marrow (BM). Experimental evidence indicates that the failure to eliminate the leukemic stem cell contributes to persistent minimal residual disease. Thus curative strategies will likely need to focus on strategies where bcr–abl inhibitors are given in combination with agents that specifically target the leukemic stem cell or the leukemic stem cell niche. One potential target to be exploited is the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway. Recently using STAT3 conditional knock-out mice it was shown that STAT3 is critical for initiating the disease. Interestingly, in the absence of treatment, STAT3 was not shown to be required for maintenance of the disease, suggesting that STAT3 is required only in the tumor initiating stem cell population (Hoelbl et al., 2010). In the context of the BM microenvironment, STAT3 is activated in a bcr–abl independent manner by the cytokine milieu. Activation of JAK/STAT3 was shown to contribute to cell survival even in the event of complete inhibition of bcr–abl activity within the BM compartment. Taken together, these studies suggest that JAK/STAT3 is an attractive therapeutic target for developing strategies for targeting the JAK–STAT3 pathway in combination with bcr–abl kinase inhibitors and may represent a viable strategy for eliminating or reducing minimal residual disease located in the BM in CML.

  18. Heme oxygenase-1: A new druggable target in the management of chronic and acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Loredana; Romeo, Giuseppe; Modica, Maria N; Amata, Emanuele; Sorrenti, Valeria; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Pittalà, Valeria

    2017-12-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is the enzyme catalyzing the rate-limiting oxidative degradation of cellular heme into free iron, carbon monoxide (CO), and biliverdin, which is then rapidly converted into bilirubin. By means of these catabolic end-products and by removal of pro-oxidant heme, HO-1 exerts antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and immune-modulating effects, leading to overall cytoprotective and beneficial functions in mammalian cells. Therefore, HO-1 is considered a survival molecule in various stress-related conditions. By contrast, growing evidence suggests that HO-1 is a survival-enhancing molecule also in various solid and blood cancers, such as various types of leukemia, promoting carcinogenesis, tumor progression, and chemo-resistance. Among leukemias, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is currently therapeutically well treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as Imatinib (IM) and its congeners; nevertheless, resistance to all kinds of current drugs persist in a number of patients. Moreover, treatment outcomes for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain unsatisfactory, despite progress in chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Therefore, identification of new eligible targets that may improve leukemias therapy is of general interest. Several recent papers prove that inhibition of HO-1 through HO-1 inhibitors as well as modulation of other pathways involving HO-1 by a number of different new or known molecules, are critical for leukemia treatment. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pro-tumorigenic role of HO-1 and its potential as a molecular target for the treatment of leukemias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Trichosporon fungemia in a pediatric patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Maxfield

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichosporon fungemia is a life-threatening opportunistic infection that is increasing in frequency. Invasive disease occurs almost exclusively in immunocompromised hosts, particularly in neutropenic adults with hematological malignancies and uncommonly in children. We report the case of a pediatric patient where disseminated trichosporonosis progressed while on micafungin, between treatments with voriconazole and amphotericin B, demonstrating the difficulty with and importance of prolonged and continuous treatment.

  20. Constitutional NRAS mutations are rare among patients with Noonan syndrome or juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraoua, Lilia; Journel, Hubert; Bonnet, Philippe; Amiel, Jeanne; Pouvreau, Nathalie; Baumann, Clarisse; Verloes, Alain; Cavé, Hélène

    2012-10-01

    Recently, germline mutations of NRAS have been shown to be associated with Noonan syndrome (NS), a relatively common developmental disorder characterized by short stature, congenital heart disease, and distinctive facial features. We report on the mutational analysis of NRAS in a cohort of 125 French patients with NS and no known mutation for PTPN11, KRAS, SOS1, MEK1, MEK2, RAF1, BRAF, and SHOC2. The c.179G>A (p.G60E) mutation was identified in two patients with typical NS, confirming that NRAS germline mutations are a rare cause of this syndrome. We also screened our cohort of 95 patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). Among 17 patients with NRAS-mutated JMML, none had clinical features suggestive of NS. None of the 11 JMML patients for which germline DNA was available had a constitutional NRAS mutation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Laboratory determination of chemotherapeutic drug resistance in tumor cells from patients with leukemia, using a fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, R; Kristensen, J; Sandberg, C; Nygren, P

    1992-01-21

    An automated fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA) based on the measurement of fluorescence generated from cellular hydrolysis of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) to fluorescein was employed for chemotherapeutic-drug-sensitivity testing of tumor-cell suspensions from patients with leukemia. Fluorescence was linearly related to cell number, and reproducible measurements of drug sensitivity could be performed using fresh or cryopreserved leukemia cells. A marked heterogeneity with respect to chemotherapeutic drug sensitivity was observed for a panel of cytotoxic drugs tested in 43 samples from 35 patients with treated or untreated acute and chronic leukemia. For samples obtained from patients with chronic lymphocytic and acute myelocytic leukemia, sensitivity profiles for standard drugs corresponded to known clinical activity and the assay detected primary and acquired drug resistance. Individual in vitro/in vivo correlations indicated high specificity with respect to the identification of drug resistance. The results suggest that the FMCA may be a simple and rapid method for in vivo-representative determinations of chemotherapeutic drug resistance in tumor cells obtained from patients with leukemia.

  2. Changing trends of chronic myeloid leukemia in greater Mumbai, India over a period of 30 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Rajesh P.; Nagrani, Rajini; Yeole, Balkrishna; Koyande, Shravani; Banawali, Shripad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known about burden of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in India. There is a recent interest to observe incidence and mortality because of advent of new diagnostic and treatment policies for CML. Materials and Methods: We extracted data from the oldest population-based cancer registry of Mumbai for 30 years period from 1976−2005 to observe incidence and mortality rates of CML. We classified the data into four age groups 0–14, 15–29, 30–54 and 55–74 to observe incidence rates in the respective age groups. Results: The age specific rates were highest for the age group of 55–74 years. No significant change in trends of CML was observed for 30 years period. However, there was a significant reduction in incidence rate for recent 15-years period (Estimated average annual percentage change=-3.9). No significant reduction in mortality rate was observed till 2005. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that age-specific rates for CML are highest in age group of 55-74 years, although they are lower compared to western populations. Significant reduction in incidence of CML in recent periods might be because of reduced misclassification of leukemias. The data of CML has to be observed for another decade to witness reduction in mortality because of changes in treatment management. PMID:22174498

  3. Treatment Sequencing in a Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patient with Central Nervous System Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Mousinho

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL with neurologic involvement is a rare condition and should require a careful follow-up. Although no standard protocol exists for this condition, intrathecal chemotherapy, combined with systemic chemoimmunotherapy, has been used previously. This case describes the treatment of a patient with CLL and symptomatic compromise of the central nervous system. Our results suggest that a combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and ibrutinib, administered sequentially over a 2-year period, led to a near-complete resolution of the cerebral spinal fluid neoplastic infiltration. Importantly, this response has been maintained with ibrutinib monotherapy for more than 12 months.

  4. Hypercalcemia and acute pancreatitis in a male patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia and pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Ali S; Adel, Ahmad M; Hussein, Radwa M; Abdullah, Mohammed Aj; Yousaf, Anil; Mudawi, Deena; Mohamed, Shehab F; Nashwan, Abdulqadir J; Soliman, Dina; Ibrahim, Feryal; Yassin, Mohamed A

    2018-04-03

    We report a rare case of hypercalcemia and acute pancreatitis in a subject with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and pulmonary tuberculosis, during all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment. Both associated complications were potentially due to several causes. A careful monitoring and exclusion of all causative factors must be addressed. Further research is necessary to improve our understanding of risk factors for these complications in patients with (APL). Studying these patterns may help us to improve outcomes for all children and young adults with hematologic malignancies.

  5. An Unusual Radiologic Pattern of Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia: Diffuse Pulmonary Nodules in a Leukemia Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kai Hsiung; Hsu, Hsian He; Kao, Woei Yau; Chang, Ching Feng; Cheng, Ming Fang; Huang, Guo Shu [Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei (China)

    2009-02-15

    The radiological appearance of diffuse discrete pulmonary nodules associated with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) has been rarely described. We describe a case of COP in 49-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukemia who developed diffuse pulmonary nodules during the second course of induction chemotherapy. The clinical status of the patient and imaging findings suggested the presence of a pulmonary metastasis or infectious disease. A video-assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy resulted in the unexpected diagnosis of COP as an isolated entity. Steroid therapy led to dramatic improvement of the clinical symptoms and the pulmonary lesions.

  6. Pattern of Occurrence of Leukemia at a Teaching Hospital in Eastern Region of Nepal - A Six Year Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Kulshrestha

    2009-01-01

    The data published in this study reflects the leukemia pattern in the eastern region of Nepal. The pattern and distribution of AML, CML, ALL was similar to that in the developed western countries while the lesser frequency of CLL was similar to that in Southeast Asian region Key Words:leukemia, pattern, eastern Nepal, seasonality.

  7. Azacitidine in combination with intensive induction chemotherapy in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia: The AML-AZA trial of the Study Alliance Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Tidow, C; Tschanter, P; Röllig, C; Thiede, C; Koschmieder, A; Stelljes, M; Koschmieder, S; Dugas, M; Gerss, J; Butterfaß-Bahloul, T; Wagner, R; Eveslage, M; Thiem, U; Krause, S W; Kaiser, U; Kunzmann, V; Steffen, B; Noppeney, R; Herr, W; Baldus, C D; Schmitz, N; Götze, K; Reichle, A; Kaufmann, M; Neubauer, A; Schäfer-Eckart, K; Hänel, M; Peceny, R; Frickhofen, N; Kiehl, M; Giagounidis, A; Görner, M; Repp, R; Link, H; Kiani, A; Naumann, R; Brümmendorf, T H; Serve, H; Ehninger, G; Berdel, W E; Krug, U

    2016-03-01

    DNA methylation changes are a constant feature of acute myeloid leukemia. Hypomethylating drugs such as azacitidine are active in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) as monotherapy. Azacitidine monotherapy is not curative. The AML-AZA trial tested the hypothesis that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors such as azacitidine can improve chemotherapy outcome in AML. This randomized, controlled trial compared the efficacy of azacitidine applied before each cycle of intensive chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in older patients with untreated AML. Event-free survival (EFS) was the primary end point. In total, 214 patients with a median age of 70 years were randomized to azacitidine/chemotherapy (arm-A) or chemotherapy (arm-B). More arm-A patients (39/105; 37%) than arm-B (25/109; 23%) showed adverse cytogenetics (P=0.057). Adverse events were more frequent in arm-A (15.44) versus 13.52 in arm-B, (P=0.26), but early death rates did not differ significantly (30-day mortality: 6% versus 5%, P=0.76). Median EFS was 6 months in both arms (P=0.96). Median overall survival was 15 months for patients in arm-A compared with 21 months in arm-B (P=0.35). Azacitidine added to standard chemotherapy increases toxicity in older patients with AML, but provides no additional benefit for unselected patients.

  8. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein a gene expression in Egyptian patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, N.; Fahmy, A.; Desoky, M.; Zawam, H.M.; Medhat, N.; Medhat, N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Transcription factors play a crucial role in myeloid differentiation and lineage determination. Tumor suppressor protein C/EBPa is a key regulator of granulocytic differentiation whose functional inactivation has become a pathophysiological signature of myeloid leukemia. Given the role that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP α) plays in myelopoiesis, we anticipated that their expression might be disrupted in myeloid neoplasms. Purpose: To estimate the expression of C/EBP α mRNA in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and correlate its expression with the pathogenesis of the disease. Patients and methods: Forty AML patients and 20 age and sex matched healthy controls were included in the study. Blood samples of patients and controls were analyzed for CEBP α mRNA expression by quantitative RT-real time PCR using TaqMan technology and δδct method for calculation of gene expression. Results: Twenty-nine (72.5%) patients out of the 40 showed low expression levels of CEBP α mRNA below the cutoff value with median of 0.19 (range:0-0.87). While eleven (27.5%) patients out of the 40 showed higher expression levels of CEBP α above the cutoff value with median of 1.52 (range: 1.07-2). Seven patients out of the 11 showed higher expression levels of CEBP α mRNA belong to the M3 subtype of AML harboring the t(15;17) PML-RARa translocation. Conclusion: We conclude that the majority of the AML patients analyzed, express low levels of C/EBPa mRN. However, a subset of patients represented by the M3 subtype, express higher levels of C/EBPa

  9. Pathologic rupture of the spleen in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and leukostasis

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    Gil Cunha De Santis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the spleen can be classified as spontaneous, traumatic, or pathologic. Pathologic rupture has been reported in infectious diseases such as infectious mononucleosis, and hematologic malignancies such as acute and chronic leukemias. Splenomegaly is considered the most relevant factor that predisposes to splenic rupture. A 66-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia evolved from an unclassified myeloproliferative neoplasm, complaining of fatigue and mild upper left abdominal pain. He was pale and presented fever and tachypnea. Laboratory analyses showed hemoglobin 8.3 g/dL, white blood cell count 278 × 109/L, platelet count 367 × 109/L, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT ratio 2.10, and international normalized ratio (INR 1.60. A blood smear showed 62% of myeloblasts. The immunophenotype of the blasts was positive for CD117, HLA-DR, CD13, CD56, CD64, CD11c and CD14. Lactate dehydrogenase was 2384 U/L and creatinine 2.4 mg/dL (normal range: 0.7-1.6 mg/dL. Two sessions of leukapheresis were performed. At the end of the second session, the patient presented hemodynamic instability that culminated in circulatory shock and death. The post-mortem examination revealed infiltration of the vessels of the lungs, heart, and liver, and massive infiltration of the spleen by leukemic blasts. Blood volume in the peritoneal cavity was 500 mL. Acute leukemia is a rare cause of splenic rupture. Male gender, old age and splenomegaly are factors associated with this condition. As the patient had leukostasis, we hypothesize that this, associated with other factors such as lung and heart leukemic infiltration, had a role in inducing splenic rupture. Finally, we do not believe that leukapheresis in itself contributed to splenic rupture, as it is essentially atraumatic.

  10. Relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in a hemodialysis-dependent patient treated with arsenic trioxide: a case report

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    Emmons Gregory S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In the relapsed setting, arsenic trioxide remains the backbone of treatment. Scant literature exists regarding treatment of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in patients with renal failure. To the best of our knowledge we are the first to report a safe and effective means of treatment for relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in the setting of advanced renal failure, employing titration of arsenic trioxide based on clinical parameters rather than arsenic trioxide levels. Case presentation A 33-year-old Caucasian man with a history of acute promyelocytic leukemia in remission for 3 years, as well as dialysis-dependent chronic renal failure secondary to a solitary kidney and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection, receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy presented to our hospital with bone marrow biopsy-confirmed relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Arsenic trioxide was begun at a low dose with dose escalation based only on side effect profile monitoring and not laboratory testing for induction as well as maintenance without undue toxicity. Our patient achieved and remains in complete hematologic and molecular remission as of this writing. Conclusion Arsenic trioxide can be used safely and effectively to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia in patients with advanced renal failure using careful monitoring of side effects rather than blood levels of arsenic to guide therapeutic dosing.

  11. Developing and piloting an instrument to prioritize the worries of patients with acute myeloid leukemia

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    Bridges JFP

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available John FP Bridges,1 Allison H Oakes,1 Crystal A Reinhart,2 Ernest Voyard,3 Bernadette O’Donoghue3 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Center for Prevention Research and Development, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA; 3The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Rye Brook, NY, USA Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a rapidly progressing blood cancer for which new treatments are needed. We sought to promote patient-focused drug development (PFDD for AML by developing and piloting an instrument to prioritize the worries of patients with AML.Patients and methods: An innovative community-centered approach was used to engage expert and community stakeholders in the development, pretesting, pilot testing, and dissemination of a novel best–worst scaling instrument. Patient worries were identified through individual interviews (n=15 and group calls. The instrument was developed through rigorous pretesting (n=13 and then piloted among patients and caregivers engaged in this study (n=25. Priorities were assessed using best–worst scores (spanning from +1 to -1 representing the relative number of times that items were endorsed as the most and the least worrying. All findings were presented at a PFDD meeting at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA that was attended by >80 stakeholders. Results: The final instrument included 13 worries spanning issues such as decision making, treatment delivery, physical impacts, and psychosocial effects. Patients and caregivers most prioritized worries about dying from their disease (best minus worst [BW] score=0.73, long-term side effects (BW=0.28, and time in hospital (BW=0.25.Conclusion: Community-centered approaches are valuable in designing and executing PFDD meetings and associated quantitative surveys to document the experience of patients. Expert and community stakeholders welcomed the opportunity to share

  12. Immature MEF2C-dysregulated T-cell leukemia patients have an early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia gene signature and typically have non-rearranged T-cell receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuurbier, Linda; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Mullighan, Charles G.; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Gevaert, A. Olivier; de Rooi, Johan; Li, Yunlei; Smits, Willem K.; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G.C.A.M.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Look, A. Thomas; Horstmann, Martin; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P.P.

    2014-01-01

    Three distinct immature T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia entities have been described including cases that express an early T-cell precursor immunophenotype or expression profile, immature MEF2C-dysregulated T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cluster cases based on gene expression analysis (immature cluster) and cases that retain non-rearranged TRG@ loci. Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases exclusively overlap with immature cluster samples based on the expression of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia signature genes, indicating that both are featuring a single disease entity. Patients lacking TRG@ rearrangements represent only 40% of immature cluster cases, but no further evidence was found to suggest that cases with absence of bi-allelic TRG@ deletions reflect a distinct and even more immature disease entity. Immature cluster/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases are strongly enriched for genes expressed in hematopoietic stem cells as well as genes expressed in normal early thymocyte progenitor or double negative-2A T-cell subsets. Identification of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases solely by defined immunophenotypic criteria strongly underestimates the number of cases that have a corresponding gene signature. However, early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia samples correlate best with a CD1 negative, CD4 and CD8 double negative immunophenotype with expression of CD34 and/or myeloid markers CD13 or CD33. Unlike various other studies, immature cluster/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated on the COALL-97 protocol did not have an overall inferior outcome, and demonstrated equal sensitivity levels to most conventional therapeutic drugs compared to other pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. PMID:23975177

  13. Ibrutinib efficacy and tolerability in patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia following allogeneic HCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Christine E; Sahaf, Bita; Logan, Aaron C; O'Brien, Susan; Byrd, John C; Hillmen, Peter; Brown, Jennifer R; Dyer, Martin J S; Mato, Anthony R; Keating, Michael J; Jaglowski, Samantha; Clow, Fong; Rezvani, Andrew R; Styles, Lori; Coutre, Steven E; Miklos, David B

    2016-12-22

    Ibrutinib, a potent and irreversible small-molecule inhibitor of both Bruton's tyrosine kinase and interleukin-2 inducible kinase (ITK), has been used to treat relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with prolongation of progression-free and overall survival. Here, we present 27 patients with relapsed CLL following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) who subsequently received ibrutinib salvage therapy. Sixteen of these patients were part of multi-institutional clinical trials and achieved an overall response rate of 87.5%. An additional 11 patients were treated at Stanford University following US Food and Drug Administration approval of ibrutinib; 7 (64%) achieved a complete response, and 3 (27%) achieved a partial response. Of the 9 patients treated at Stanford who had mixed chimerism-associated CLL relapse, 4 (44%) converted to full donor chimerism following ibrutinib initiation, in association with disease response. Four of 11 (36%) patients evaluated by ClonoSeq achieved minimal residual disease negativity with CLL ibrutinib was discontinued, in 1 case even after 26 months. None of the 27 patients developed graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) following ibrutinib initiation. We postulate that ibrutinib augments the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) benefit through a T-cell-mediated effect, most likely due to ITK inhibition. To investigate the immune modulatory effects of ibrutinib, we completed comprehensive immune phenotype characterization of peripheral B and T cells from treated patients. Our results show that ibrutinib selectively targets pre-germinal B cells and depletes Th2 helper cells. Furthermore, these effects persisted after drug discontinuation. In total, our results provide evidence that ibrutinib effectively augments GVL without causing GVHD. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. Stages of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  15. Ibrutinib Therapy Increases T Cell Repertoire Diversity in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qingsong; Sivina, Mariela; Robins, Harlan; Yusko, Erik; Vignali, Marissa; O'Brien, Susan; Keating, Michael J; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Estrov, Zeev; Jain, Nitin; Wierda, William G; Burger, Jan A

    2017-02-15

    The Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib is a highly effective, new targeted therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) that thwarts leukemia cell survival, growth, and tissue homing. The effects of ibrutinib treatment on the T cell compartment, which is clonally expanded and thought to support the growth of malignant B cells in CLL, are not fully characterized. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we characterized the diversity of TCRβ-chains in peripheral blood T cells from 15 CLL patients before and after 1 y of ibrutinib therapy. We noted elevated CD4 + and CD8 + T cell numbers and a restricted TCRβ repertoire in all pretreatment samples. After 1 y of ibrutinib therapy, elevated peripheral blood T cell numbers and T cell-related cytokine levels had normalized, and T cell repertoire diversity increased significantly. Dominant TCRβ clones in pretreatment samples declined or became undetectable, and the number of productive unique clones increased significantly during ibrutinib therapy, with the emergence of large numbers of low-frequency TCRβ clones. Importantly, broader TCR repertoire diversity was associated with clinical efficacy and lower rates of infections during ibrutinib therapy. These data demonstrate that ibrutinib therapy increases diversification of the T cell compartment in CLL patients, which contributes to cellular immune reconstitution. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. [The structure of the leukocyte DNA in leukemia patients during chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakanov, M P; Moskaleva, E Iu; Bezobrazova, L V; Semenova, O I; Korneva, E N; Telegin, L Iu

    1993-01-01

    The authors studied the degree of DNA damage in in vitro cultured human peripheral lymphocytes (PL) and Jurcat's human T-cell lymphoma cells exposed to a stabilized 4 OH-cyclophosphan-mamophosphatide (MA) derivative, as well as in the leukocytes from patients with leukemia who were treated with cyclophosphan. There was an increase in alkaline DNA denaturation rate of LP lysates and T-cell lymphoma cells, which was in proportion to MA concentrations, and a higher sensitivity of LP to the genotoxic effect of MA given in doses of 5-10 micrograms/ml than that of Jurcat's cells, as well as high peripheral lymphocyte and neutrophil DNA damages in patients with leukemia during chemotherapy. The authors consider that the accumulation of single-strand breaks and alkaline-labile sites, which was recorded from the increase in alkaline DNA denaturation rate of cell lysates, is a highly sensitive test for detecting DNA damages in resting and slowly proliferating cells and can be useful in revealing and evaluating the severity of human genotoxic effects.

  17. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-21

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  18. Managing inadequate responses to frontline treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia: a case-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixby, Dale L

    2013-05-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib are the standard of care for treating patients with newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Compared with interferon-based treatment, the previous standard of care, imatinib is associated with significantly higher cytogenetic response rates and prolonged overall survival. Nilotinib and dasatinib, both newer and more potent TKIs, significantly improve cytogenetic and molecular response rates compared with imatinib. Despite significant advances in CML treatment enabled by the TKIs, a fraction of patients who receive frontline treatment with a TKI demonstrate inadequate response. The reasons for this vary, but in many cases, inadequate response can be attributed to non-adherence to the treatment regimen, intolerance to the drug, intrinsic or acquired resistance to the drug, or a combination of reasons. More often than not, strategies to improve response necessitate a change in treatment plan, either a dose adjustment or a switch to an alternate drug, particularly in the case of drug intolerance or drug resistance. Improved physician-patient communication and patient education are effective strategies to address issues relating to adherence and intolerance. Because inadequate response to TKI treatment correlates with poor long-term outcomes, it is imperative that patients who experience intolerance or who fail to achieve appropriate responses are carefully evaluated so that appropriate treatment modifications can be made to maximize the likelihood of positive long-term outcome. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Deficient leukemia inhibitory factor signaling in muscle precursor cells from patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Christa; Brandt, Claus; Schultz, Ninna S

    2012-01-01

    The cytokine leukemia-inhibitory factor (LIF) is expressed by skeletal muscle and induces proliferation of muscle precursor cells, an important feature of skeletal muscle maintenance and repair. We hypothesized that muscle precursor cells from patients with type 2 diabetes had a deficient response...... nor proliferation rate was affected. In conclusion, although LIF and LIFR proteins were increased in muscle tissue and myoblasts from diabetic patients, LIF signaling and LIF-stimulated cell proliferation were impaired in diabetic myoblasts, suggesting a novel mechanism by which muscle function......RNA knockdown of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)3 in myoblast cultures established from healthy individuals and patients with type 2 diabetes. Myoblast proliferation rate was assessed by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. LIF and LIFR proteins were increased in both muscle tissue and cultured myoblasts...

  20. Diagnosis and Monitoring of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Chiang Mai University Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantiworawit, Adisak; Kongjarern, Supanat; Rattarittamrong, Ekarat; Lekawanvijit, Suree; Bumroongkit, Kanokkan; Boonma, Nonglak; Rattanathammethee, Thanawat; Hantrakool, Sasinee; Chai-Adisaksopha, Chatree; Norasetthada, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    A diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is made on discovery of the presence of a Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. The success of the treatment of this form of leukemia with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) is monitored by reduction of the Ph chromosome. To compare the role of conventional cytogenetic (CC) methods with a real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of CML patients. The secondary outcome was to analyze the treatment responses to TKI in CML patients. This was a retrospective study of CML patients who attended the Hematology clinic at Chiang Mai University Hospital from 2005-2010. Medical records were reviewed for demographic data, risk score, treatment response and the results of CC methods, FISH and RQ-PCR. One hundred and twenty three cases were included in the study, 57.7% of whom were male with a mean age of 46.9 years. Most of the patients registered as intermediate to high risk on the Sokal score. At diagnosis, 121 patients were tested using the CC method and 118 (95.9%) were identified as positive. Five patients failed to be diagnosed by CC methods but were positive for BCR-ABL1 using the FISH method. Imatinib was the first-line treatment used in 120 patients (97.6%). In most patients (108 out of 122, 88.5%), a complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) was achieved after TKI therapy and in 86 patients (70.5%) CCyR was achieved long term by the CC method. Five out of the 35 analyzed patients in which CCyR was achieved by the CC method had a positive FISH result. Out of the 76 patients in which CCyR was achieved, RQ-PCR classified patients to only CCyR in 17 patients (22.4%) with a deeper major molecular response (MMR) in 4 patients (5.3%) and complete molecular response (CMR) in 55 patients (72.4%). In the case of initial therapy, CCyR was achieved in 95 patients (79.1%) who received imatinib and in both patients who received dasatinib (100%). For the

  1. Addition of Arsenic Trioxide into Induction Regimens Could Not Accelerate Recovery of Abnormality of Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Patients with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Zhang

    Full Text Available All-trans retinoic acid combined to anthracycline-based chemotherapy is the standard regimen of acute promyelocytic leukemia. The advent of arsenic trioxide has contributed to improve the anti-leukemic efficacy in acute promyelocytic leukemia. The objectives of the current study were to evaluate if dual induction by all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide could accelerate the recovery of abnormality of coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia.Retrospective analysis was performed in 103 newly-diagnosed patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Hemostatic variables and the consumption of component blood were comparably analyzed among patients treated by different induction regimen with or without arsenic trioxide.Compared to patients with other subtypes of de novo acute myeloid leukemia, patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia had lower platelet counts and fibrinogen levels, significantly prolonged prothrombin time and elevated D-dimers (P<0.001. Acute promyelocytic leukemia patients with high or intermediate risk prognostic stratification presented lower initial fibrinogen level than that of low-risk group (P<0.05. After induction treatment, abnormal coagulation and fibrinolysis of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia was significantly improved before day 10. The recovery of abnormal hemostatic variables (platelet, prothrombin time, fibrinogen and D-dimer was not significantly accelerated after adding arsenic trioxide in induction regimens; and the consumption of transfused component blood (platelet and plasma did not dramatically change either. Acute promyelocytic leukemia patients with high or intermediate risk prognostic stratification had higher platelet transfusion demands than that of low-risk group (P<0.05.Unexpectedly, adding arsenic trioxide could not accelerate the recovery of abnormality of coagulation and fibrinolysis in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients who received all

  2. Time-series analysis in imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia K562-cells under different drug treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Xue-Fang; Zhao, Yan-Qiu; Bai, Fan; Qin, Fan; Sun, Jing; Dong, Ying

    2017-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by the accumulation of active BCR-ABL protein. Imatinib is the first-line treatment of CML; however, many patients are resistant to this drug. In this study, we aimed to compare the differences in expression patterns and functions of time-series genes in imatinib-resistant CML cells under different drug treatments. GSE24946 was downloaded from the GEO database, which included 17 samples of K562-r cells with (n=12) or without drug administration (n=5). Three drug treatment groups were considered for this study: arsenic trioxide (ATO), AMN107, and ATO+AMN107. Each group had one sample at each time point (3, 12, 24, and 48 h). Time-series genes with a ratio of standard deviation/average (coefficient of variation) >0.15 were screened, and their expression patterns were revealed based on Short Time-series Expression Miner (STEM). Then, the functional enrichment analysis of time-series genes in each group was performed using DAVID, and the genes enriched in the top ten functional categories were extracted to detect their expression patterns. Different time-series genes were identified in the three groups, and most of them were enriched in the ribosome and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Time-series genes in the three treatment groups had different expression patterns and functions. Time-series genes in the ATO group (e.g. CCNA2 and DAB2) were significantly associated with cell adhesion, those in the AMN107 group were related to cellular carbohydrate metabolic process, while those in the ATO+AMN107 group (e.g. AP2M1) were significantly related to cell proliferation and antigen processing. In imatinib-resistant CML cells, ATO could influence genes related to cell adhesion, AMN107 might affect genes involved in cellular carbohydrate metabolism, and the combination therapy might regulate genes involved in cell proliferation.

  3. The First Pentacyclic Triterpenoid Gypsogenin Derivative Exhibiting Anti-ABL1 Kinase and Anti-chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, Halil Ibrahim; Ozturk, Safiye Emirdag; Ali, Taha F S; Radwan, Mohamed O; Tateishi, Hiroshi; Koga, Ryoko; Ocak, Zeynep; Can, Mustafa; Otsuka, Masami; Fujita, Mikako

    2018-04-01

    The discovery of the chimeric tyrosine kinase breakpoint cluster region kinase-Abelson kinase (BCR-ABL)-targeted drug imatinib conceptually changed the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). However, some CML patients show drug resistance to imatinib. To address this issue, some artificial heterocyclic compounds have been identified as BCR-ABL inhibitors. Here we examined whether plant-derived pentacyclic triterpenoid gypsogenin and/or their derivatives show inhibitory activity against BCR-ABL. Among the three derivatives, benzyl 3-hydroxy-23-oxoolean-12-en-28-oate (1c) was found to be the most effective anticancer agent on the CML cell line K562, with an IC 50 value of 9.3 µM. In contrast, the IC 50 against normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells was 276.0 µM, showing better selectivity than imatinib. Compound 1c had in vitro inhibitory activity against Abelson kinase 1 (ABL1) (IC 50 =8.7 µM), the kinase component of BCR-ABL. In addition, compound 1c showed a different inhibitory profile against eight kinases compared with imatinib. The interaction between ATP binding site of ABL and 1c was examined by molecular docking study, and the binding mode was different from imatinib and newer generation inhibitors. Furthermore, 1c suppressed signaling downstream of BCR-ABL. This study suggests the possibility that plant extracts may be a source for CML treatment and offer a strategy to overcome drug resistance to known BCR-ABL inhibitors.