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Sample records for leu fuel conversion

  1. Neutronic Analyses for HEU to LEU fuel conversion of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, E. H.; Newton, T. H.; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. G (Nuclear Engineering Division); ( NS)

    2011-03-02

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) reactor (MITR-II), based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is a research reactor designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on a mixture of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of compact high performance reactors like the MITR-II. This report presents the results of steady state neutronic safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of U-Mo LEU fuel. The objective of this work was to demonstrate that the safety analyses meet current requirements for an LEU core replacement of MITR-II.

  2. Preliminary Multiphysics Analyses of HFIR LEU Fuel Conversion using COMSOL

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    Freels, James D [ORNL; Bodey, Isaac T [ORNL; Arimilli, Rao V [ORNL; Curtis, Franklin G [ORNL; Ekici, Kivanc [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    4 of this report. The HFIR LEU conversion project has also obtained the services of Dr. Prashant K. Jain of the Reactor & Nuclear Systems Division (RNSD) of ORNL. Prashant has quickly adapted to the COMSOL tools and has been focusing on thermal-structure interaction (TSI) issues and development of alternative 3D model approaches that could yield faster-running solutions. Prashant is the primary contributor to Section 5 of the report. And finally, while incorporating findings from all members of the COMSOL team (i.e., the team) and contributing as the senior COMSOL leader and advocate, Dr. James D. Freels has focused on the 3D model development, cluster deployment, and has contributed primarily to Section 3 and overall integration of this report. The team has migrated to the current release of COMSOL at version 4.1 for all the work described in this report, except where stated otherwise. Just as in the performance of the research, each of the respective sections has been originally authored by the respective authors. Therefore, the reader will observe a contrast in writing style throughout this document.

  3. Status of core conversion with LEU silicide fuel in JRR-4

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    Nakajima, Teruo; Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Shirai, Eiji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    Japan Research Reactor No.4 (JRR-4) is a light water moderated and cooled, 93% enriched uranium ETR-type fuel used and swimming pool type reactor with thermal output of 3.5MW. Since the first criticality was achieved on January 28, 1965, JRR-4 has been used for shielding experiments, radioisotope production, neutron activation analyses, training for reactor engineers and so on for about 30 years. Within the framework of the RERTR Program, the works for conversion to LEU fuel are now under way, and neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations emphasizing on safety and performance aspects are being carried out. The design and evaluation for the core conversion are based on the Guides for Safety Design and Evaluation of research and testing reactor facilities in Japan. These results show that the JRR-4 will be able to convert to use LEU fuel without any major design change of core and size of fuel element. LEU silicide fuel (19.75%) will be used and maximum neutron flux in irradiation hole would be slightly decreased from present neutron flux value of 7x10{sup 13}(n/cm{sup 2}/s). The conversion works are scheduled to complete in 1998, including with upgrade of the reactor building and utilization facilities.

  4. Conceptual Design Parameters for HFIR LEU U-Mo Fuel Conversion Experimental Irradiations

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    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL

    2013-03-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a versatile research reactor that is operated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HFIR core is loaded with high-enriched uranium (HEU) and operates at a power level of 85 MW. The primary scientific missions of the HFIR include cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, and isotope production. An engineering design study of the conversion of the HFIR from HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The LEU fuel considered is based on a uranium-molybdenum alloy that is 10 percent by weight molybdenum (U-10Mo) with a 235U enrichment of 19.75 wt %. The LEU core design discussed in this report is based on the design documented in ORNL/TM-2010/318. Much of the data reported in Sections 1 and 2 of this document was derived from or taken directly out of ORNL/TM-2010/318. The purpose of this report is to document the design parameters for and the anticipated normal operating conditions of the conceptual HFIR LEU fuel to aid in developing requirements for HFIR irradiation experiments.

  5. The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center conversion from HEU to LEU fuel

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    Tehan, Terry

    2000-09-27

    The 2-MW Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) open pool reactor was converted from 93% UAL-High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to 20% enrichment U3Si2-AL Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The conversion included redesign of the core to a more compact size and the addition of beryllium reflectors and a beryllium flux trap. A significant increase in thermal flux level was achieved due to greater neutron leakage in the new compact core configuration. Following the conversion, a second cooling loop and an emergency core cooling system were installed to permit operation at 5 MW. After re-licensing at 2 MW, a power upgrade request will be submitted to the NRC.

  6. Supplemental Thermal-Hydraulic Transient Analyses of BR2 in Support of Conversion to LEU Fuel

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    Licht, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sikik, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is a research and test reactor located in Mol, Belgium and is primarily used for radioisotope production and materials testing. The Materials Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is supporting the conversion of the BR2 reactor from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The RELAP5/Mod 3.3 code has been used to perform transient thermal-hydraulic safety analyses of the BR2 reactor to support reactor conversion. A RELAP5 model of BR2 has been validated against select transient BR2 reactor experiments performed in 1963 by showing agreement with measured cladding temperatures. Following the validation, the RELAP5 model was then updated to represent the current use of the reactor; taking into account core configuration, neutronic parameters, trip settings, component changes, etc. Simulations of the 1963 experiments were repeated with this updated model to re-evaluate the boiling risks associated with the currently allowed maximum heat flux limit of 470 W/cm2 and temporary heat flux limit of 600 W/cm2. This document provides analysis of additional transient simulations that are required as part of a modern BR2 safety analysis report (SAR). The additional simulations included in this report are effect of pool temperature, reduced steady-state flow rate, in-pool loss of coolant accidents, and loss of external cooling. The simulations described in this document have been performed for both an HEU- and LEU-fueled core.

  7. The HOR HEU/LEU core conversion

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    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Vries, J.W. de [Department of HOR-Development, IRI, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Leege, P.F.A. de [Department of Reactor Physics, IRI, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    1999-07-01

    On March 16, 1998 the first two LEU (low enriched uranium) fuel elements were introduced in the HOR reactor of the Interfaculty Reactor Institute (IRI). At the moment the core consists of 5 LEU and 19 HEU (highly enriched uranium) fuel elements. It is anticipated that after about 13 core reload operations the HOR will be fully converted from HEU to LEU to a so called LEU compact core consisting of about 21 LEU fuel assemblies and as many beryllium reflector elements. The HOR HEU/LEU core conversion program, progress of the step-by-step transition phase, including comparisons of calculations and measurements, as well as the impact on the utilization of the reactor are discussed. (author)

  8. Fabrication of uranium dioxide fuel pellets in support of a SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor HEU to LEU core conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, A. [Aomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences (ICENS) at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica operates a SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor that is currently fuelled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU). As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. has been subcontracted to fabricate low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for the ICENS SLOWPOKE-2. The low enriched uranium core consists of a fuel cage containing uranium dioxide fuelled elements. This paper describes the fabrication of the low-enriched uranium dioxide fuel pellets for the SLOWPOKE-2 core conversion. (author)

  9. Impact of the High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU to LEU Fuel Conversion on Cold Source Nuclear Heat Generation Rates

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    Chandler, David [ORNL

    2014-03-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, staff members at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducting studies to determine whether the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. As part of these ongoing studies, an assessment of the impact that the HEU to LEU fuel conversion has on the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source system and its moderator vessel was performed and is documented in this report. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions and few-group neutron fluxes in the cold source moderator were also estimated. Neutronics calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo N-Particle code to determine the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source and its vessel for the HEU core operating at a full reactor power (FP) of 85 MW(t) and the reference LEU core operating at an FP of 100 MW(t). Calculations were performed with beginning-of-cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) conditions to bound typical irradiation conditions. Average specific BOC heat generation rates of 12.76 and 12.92 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the hemispherical region of the cold source liquid hydrogen (LH2) for the HEU and LEU cores, and EOC heat generation rates of 13.25 and 12.86 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the HEU and LEU cores. Thus, the greatest heat generation rates were calculated for the EOC HEU core, and it is concluded that the conversion from HEU to LEU fuel and the resulting increase of FP from 85 MW to 100 MW will not impact the ability of the heat removal equipment to remove the heat deposited in the cold source system. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions are estimated to be about 12.0% greater at BOC and 2.7% greater at EOC for the LEU core in comparison to the HEU core. Silicon is aluminum s major transmutation product and

  10. Feasibility analyses for HEU to LEU fuel conversion of the LAUE Langivin Institute (ILL) High Flux Reactor (RHF).

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    Stevens, J.; Tentner. A.; Bergeron, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-08-19

    The High Flux Reactor (RHF) of the Laue Langevin Institute (ILL) based in Grenoble, France is a research reactor designed primarily for neutron beam experiments for fundamental science. It delivers one of the most intense neutron fluxes worldwide, with an unperturbed thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}/s in its reflector. The reactor has been conceived to operate at a nuclear power of 57 MW but currently operates at 52 MW. The reactor currently uses a Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most worldwide research and test reactors have already started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on a mixture of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of compact high performance reactors like the RHF. This report presents the results of reactor design, performance and steady state safety analyses for conversion of the RHF from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel. The objective of this work was to show that is feasible, under a set of manufacturing assumptions, to design a new RHF fuel element that could safely replace the HEU element currently used. The new proposed design has been developed to maximize performance, minimize changes and preserve strong safety margins. Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics models of the RHF have been developed and qualified by benchmark against experiments and/or against other codes and models. The models developed were then used to evaluate the RHF performance if LEU UMo were to replace the current HEU fuel 'meat' without any geometric change to the fuel plates. Results of these direct replacement analyses have shown a significant degradation of the RHF performance, in terms of both neutron flux and cycle

  11. Initial Neutronics Analyses for HEU to LEU Fuel Conversion of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at the Idaho National Laboratory

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    Kontogeorgakos, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Derstine, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wright, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bauer, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stevens, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the TREAT reactor is to generate large transient neutron pulses in test samples without over-heating the core to simulate fuel assembly accident conditions. The power transients in the present HEU core are inherently self-limiting such that the core prevents itself from overheating even in the event of a reactivity insertion accident. The objective of this study was to support the assessment of the feasibility of the TREAT core conversion based on the present reactor performance metrics and the technical specifications of the HEU core. The LEU fuel assembly studied had the same overall design, materials (UO2 particles finely dispersed in graphite) and impurities content as the HEU fuel assembly. The Monte Carlo N–Particle code (MCNP) and the point kinetics code TREKIN were used in the analyses.

  12. SAFARI-1: adjusting priorities during the LEU conversion program

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    Piani, C.S.B. [SAFARI-1 Research Reactor, South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa) (South Africa)

    2007-07-01

    In July 2005, the South African Department of Minerals and Energy authorised the conversion to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) of the South African Research Reactor (SAFARI-1) and the associated fuel manufacturing at Pelindaba. At that stage the proposed scheduling allowed approximately three years for the full conversion of the reactor, anticipating simultaneous manufacturing ability from the fuel production plant. Initial priorities and regulatory agreements were allocated with the intention to manufacture and produce two Lead Test Assemblies (LTAs) from the Pelindaba plant (Phase I) and use these as qualification of manufacturer as well as initiation of the SAFARI-1 conversion (Phase II). Delays in the demonstration of sufficient confidence in the manufacturing ability to enable local fuel licensing and qualification have resulted in minor readjustments of these Phases. Delays in the initial schedule that allowed for the insertion of the two South African LTAs during the first quarter of 2006 were preempted by the acquisition of 2 LEU silicide elements of South African design manufactured by AREVA-CERCA. These two LTAs are currently undergoing testing in SAFARI-1 and have to-date completed up to 8 cycles of irradiation. As a further precaution to the potential delays in the fuel-manufacturing Phase, a reload (760 plates) of LEU silicide element fuel plates were purchased and will be assembled locally to enable the SAFARI-1 conversion program to continue according to schedule. This paper will trace the developments of the above in order to reflect the current status and the planned correlation of the Phase I and Phase II programs according to latest expectations. (author)

  13. The whole-core LEU silicide fuel demonstration in the JMTR

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    Aso, Tomokazu; Akashi, Kazutomo; Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The JMTR was fully converted to LEU silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel with cadmium wires as burnable absorber in January, 1994. The reduced enrichment program for the JMTR was initiated in 1979, and the conversion to MEU (enrichment ; 45%) aluminide fuel was carried out in 1986 as the first step of the program. The final goal of the program was terminated by the present LEU conversion. This paper describes the results of core physics measurement through the conversion phase from MEU fuel core to LEU fuel core. Measured excess reactivities of the LEU fuel cores are mostly in good agreement with predicted values. Reactivity effect and burnup of cadmium wires, therefore, were proved to be well predicted. Control rod worth in the LEU fuel core is mostly less than that in the MEU fuel core. Shutdown margin was verified to be within the safety limit. There is no significant difference in temperature coefficient of reactivity between the MEU and LEU fuel cores. These results verified that the JMTR was successfully and safely converted to LEU fuel. Extension of the operating cycle period was achieved and reduction of spend fuel elements is expected by using the fuel with high uranium density.

  14. Neutronic analysis for core conversion (HEU–LEU of the low power research reactor using the MCNP4C code

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    Aldawahra Saadou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies for conversion of the fuel from HEU to LEU in the miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR have been performed using the MCNP4C code. The HEU fuel (UAl4-Al, 90% enriched with Al clad and LEU (UO2 12.6% enriched with zircaloy-4 alloy clad cores have been analyzed in this study. The existing HEU core of MNSR was analyzed to validate the neutronic model of reactor, while the LEU core was studied to prove the possibility of fuel conversion of the existing HEU core. The proposed LEU core contained the same number of fuel pins as the HEU core. All other structure materials and dimensions of HEU and LEU cores were the same except the increase in the radius of control rod material from 0.195 to 0.205 cm and keeping the outer diameter of the control rod unchanged in the LEU core. The effective multiplication factor (keff, excess reactivity (ρex, control rod worth (CRW, shutdown margin (SDM, safety reactivity factor (SRF, delayed neutron fraction (βeff and the neutron fluxes in the irradiation tubes for the existing and the potential LEU fuel were investigated. The results showed that the safety parameters and the neutron fluxes in the irradiation tubes of the LEU fuels were in good agreements with the HEU results. Therefore, the LEU fuel was validated to be a suitable choice for fuel conversion of the MNSR in the future.

  15. Reprocessing of LEU U-Mo Dispersion and Monolithic Fuels

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    Vandegrift, G.F.; Jerden, J.; Stepinski, D.C.; Figueroa, J.; Williamson, M.A.; Kleeck, M.A. Van; Blaskovitz, R.J.; Ziegler, A.J.; Maggos, L.E.; Swanson, J.; Fortner, J.; Bakel, A.J. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    For conversion of high-performance research reactors from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, a fuel material with a higher density than uranium aluminide is required. Development studies are underway to develop U-Mo dispersion and monolithic fuels for conversion of several high- performance reactors. For dispersion fuels, development is narrowing down to a composition of U-7Mo dispersed in an aluminium matrix containing {approx}5% silicon. For monolithic fuels to be used in high performance research reactors in the United States, a zirconium-bonded U-10Mo foil appears to be the fuel of choice. For conversion to be realized a back-end disposition path is required for both fuels; one disposition pathway is reprocessing. Argonne National Laboratory is developing a pyroprocess for reprocessing spent monolithic fuel. Pyroprocessing was chosen over conventional aqueous solvent extraction due to the necessity of adding fluoride to the fuel-dissolution solution in order to dissolve the zirconium bonding layer on the U-Mo fuel. The proposed flowsheet and development activities will be described. A literature survey points to the ability to reprocess U-Mo dispersion fuels by an aqueous process, but due to several special characteristics of the fuel, the solvent-extraction flowsheets will be a departure from that normally used for the reprocessing of power reactor fuel. Special concerns that must be addressed in reprocessing these fuels are, for example, the low solubilities of uranyl molybdate, molybdic acid, and silicic acid in nitric acid solutions. This paper will address these concerns and development activities required to overcome them. (author)

  16. Neutronic analysis for core conversion (HEU–LEU) of the low power research reactor using the MCNP4C code

    OpenAIRE

    Aldawahra Saadou; Khattab Kassem; Saba Gorge

    2015-01-01

    Comparative studies for conversion of the fuel from HEU to LEU in the miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) have been performed using the MCNP4C code. The HEU fuel (UAl4-Al, 90% enriched with Al clad) and LEU (UO2 12.6% enriched with zircaloy-4 alloy clad) cores have been analyzed in this study. The existing HEU core of MNSR was analyzed to validate the neutronic model of reactor, while the LEU core was studied to prove the possibility of fuel conversion of the existing HEU core. The propos...

  17. Radiological consequence analysis with HEU and LEU fuels

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    Woodruff, W.L.; Warinner, D.K.; Matos, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A model for estimating the radiological consequences from a hypothetical accident in HEU and LEU fueled research and test reactors is presented. Simple hand calculations based on fission product yield table inventories and non-site specific dispersion data may be adequate in many cases. However, more detailed inventories and site specific data on meteorological conditions and release rates and heights can result in substantial reductions in the dose estimates. LEU fuel gives essentially the same doses as HEU fuel. The plutonium buildup in the LEU fuel does not significantly increase the radiological consequences. The dose to the thyroid is the limiting dose. 10 references, 3 figures, 7 tables.

  18. Neutronic feasibility studies for LEU conversion of the HFR Petten Reactor.

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    Hanan, N. A.; Deen, J. R.; Matos, J. E.

    2000-09-26

    Design and safety analyses to determine an optimum LEU fuel assembly design using U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel with up to 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} for conversion of the HFR Petten reactor were performed by the RERTR program in cooperation with the Joint Research Centre and NRG. Credibility of the calculational methods and models were established by comparing calculations with recent measurements by NRG for a core configuration setup for this purpose. This model and methodology were then used to study various LEU fissile loading and burnable poison options that would satisfy specific design criteria.

  19. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

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    Ilas, Dan [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  20. The manufacture of LEU fuel elements at Dounreay

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    Gibson, J.

    1997-08-01

    Two LEU test elements are being manufactured at Dounreay for test irradiation in the HFR at Petten, The Netherlands. This paper describes the installation of equipment and the development of the fabrication and inspection techniques necessary for the manufacture of LEU fuel plates. The author`s experience in overcoming the technical problems of stray fuel particles, dog-boning, uranium homogeneity and the measurement of uranium distribution is also described.

  1. Preliminary Results of Ancillary Safety Analyses Supporting TREAT LEU Conversion Activities

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    Brunett, A. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fei, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Strons, P. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papadias, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kontogeorgakos, D. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Connaway, H. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wright, A. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a test facility designed to evaluate the performance of reactor fuels and materials under transient accident conditions. The facility, an air-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor designed to utilize fuel containing high-enriched uranium (HEU), has been in non-operational standby status since 1994. Currently, in support of the missions of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program, a new core design is being developed for TREAT that will utilize low-enriched uranium (LEU). The primary objective of this conversion effort is to design an LEU core that is capable of meeting the performance characteristics of the existing HEU core. Minimal, if any, changes are anticipated for the supporting systems (e.g. reactor trip system, filtration/cooling system, etc.); therefore, the LEU core must also be able to function with the existing supporting systems, and must also satisfy acceptable safety limits. In support of the LEU conversion effort, a range of ancillary safety analyses are required to evaluate the LEU core operation relative to that of the existing facility. These analyses cover neutronics, shielding, and thermal hydraulic topics that have been identified as having the potential to have reduced safety margins due to conversion to LEU fuel, or are required to support the required safety analyses documentation. The majority of these ancillary tasks have been identified in [1] and [2]. The purpose of this report is to document the ancillary safety analyses that have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory during the early stages of the LEU design effort, and to describe ongoing and anticipated analyses. For all analyses presented in this report, methodologies are utilized that are consistent with, or improved from, those used in analyses for the HEU Final Safety Analysis

  2. The ORR Whole-Core LEU Fuel Demonstration

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    Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The ORR Whole-Core LEU Fuel Demonstration, conducted as part of the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program, has been successfully completed. Using commercially-fabricated U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al 20%-enriched fuel elements (4.8 g U/cc) and fuel followers (3.5 g U/cc), the 30-MW Oak Ridge Research Reactor was safely converted from an all-HEU core, through a series of HEU/LEU mixed transition cores, to an all-LEU core. There were no fuel element failures and average discharge burnups were measured to be as high as 50% for the standard elements and 75% for the fuel followers. Experimental results for burnup-dependent critical configurations, cycle-averaged fuel element powers, and fuel-element-averaged {sup 235}U burnups validated predictions based on three-dimensional depletion calculations. Calculated values for plutonium production and isotopic mass ratios as functions of {sup 235}U burnup support the corresponding measured quantities. In general, calculations for reaction rate distributions, control rod worths, prompt neutron decay constants, and isothermal temperature coefficients were found to agree with corresponding measured values. Experimentally determined critical configurations for fresh HEU and LEU cores radially reflected with water and with beryllium are well-predicted by both Monte Carlo and diffusion calculations. 17 refs.

  3. Fuel Management Strategies for a Possible Future LEU Core of a TRIGA Mark II Vienna

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    Khan, R.; Villa, M.; Steinhauser, G.; Boeck, H. [Vienna University of Technology-Atominstitut (Austria)

    2011-07-01

    The Vienna University of Technology/Atominstitut (VUT/ATI) operates a TRIGA Mark II research reactor. It is operated with a completely mixed core of three different types of fuel. Due to the US fuel return program, the ATI have to return its High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel latest by 2019. As an alternate, the Low Enrich Uranium (LEU) fuel is under consideration. The detailed results of the core conversion study are presented at the RRFM 2011 conference. This paper describes the burn up calculations of the new fuel to predict the future burn up behavior and core life time. It also develops an effective and optimized fuel management strategy for a possible future operation of the TRIGA Mark II with a LEU core. This work is performed by the combination of MCNP5 and diffusion based neutronics code TRIGLAV. (author)

  4. US Progress on Property Characterization to Support LEU U-10 Mo Monolithic Fuel Development

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    Cole, James Irvin [Idaho National Laboratory; Rabin, Barry H [Idaho National Laboratory; Smith, James Arthur [Idaho National Laboratory; Scott, Clark Landon [Idaho National Laboratory; Benefiel, Bradley Curtis [Idaho National Laboratory; Larsen, Eric David [Idaho National Laboratory; Lind, Robert Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Sell, David Alan [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    The US High Performance Research Reactor program is pursuing development and qualification of a new high density monolithic LEU fuel to facilitate conversion of five higher power research reactors located in the US (ATR, HFIR, NBSR, MIT and MURR). In order to support fabrication development and fuel performance evaluations, new testing capabilities are being developed to evaluate the properties of fuel specimens. Residual stress and fuel-cladding bond strength are two characteristics related to fuel performance that are being investigated. In this overview, new measurement capabilities being developed to assess these characteristics in both fresh and irradiated fuel are described. Progress on fresh fuel testing is summarized and on-going hot-cell implementation efforts to support future PIE campaigns are detailed. It is anticipated that benchmarking of as-fabricated fuel characteristics will be critical to establishing technical bases for specifications that optimize fuel fabrication and ensure acceptable in-reactor fuel performance.

  5. Performance and Fabrication Status of TREAT LEU Conversion Conceptual Design Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IJ van Rooyen; SR Morrell; AE Wright; E. P Luther; K Jamison; AL Crawford; HT III Hartman

    2014-10-01

    Resumption of transient testing at the TREAT facility was approved in February 2014 to meet U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) objectives. The National Nuclear Security Administration’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative Convert Program is evaluating conversion of TREAT from its existing highly enriched uranium (HEU) core to a new core containing low enriched uranium (LEU). This paper describes briefly the initial pre-conceptual designs screening decisions with more detailed discussions on current feasibility, qualification and fabrication approaches. Feasible fabrication will be shown for a LEU fuel element assembly that can meet TREAT design, performance, and safety requirements. The statement of feasibility recognizes that further development, analysis, and testing must be completed to refine the conceptual design. Engineering challenges such as cladding oxidation, high temperature material properties, and fuel block fabrication along with neutronics performance, will be highlighted. Preliminary engineering and supply chain evaluation provided confidence that the conceptual designs can be achieved.

  6. ATR LEU Monolithic Foil-Type Fuel with Integral Cladding Burnable Absorber – Neutronics Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray Chang

    2012-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), currently operating in the United States, is used for material testing at very high neutron fluxes. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting HEU driven reactor cores to low-enriched uranium (LEU) cores. The burnable absorber - 10B, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and to improve the peak ratio of the inner/outer heat flux. The present work investigates the LEU Monolithic foil-type fuel with 10B Integral Cladding Burnable Absorber (ICBA) design and evaluates the subsequent neutronics operating effects of this proposed fuel designs. The proposed LEU fuel specification in this work is directly related to both the RERTR LEU Development Program and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) LEU Conversion Project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  7. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the WWR-SM research reactor in Uzbekistan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhmanov, A.

    1998-10-19

    The WWR-SM research reactor in Uzbekistan has operated at 10 MW since 1979, using Russian-supplied IRT-3M fuel assemblies containing 90% enriched uranium. Burnup tests of three full-sized IRT-3M FA with 36% enrichment were successfully completed to a burn up of about {approximately}50% in 1987-1989. In August 1998, four IRT-3M FA with 36% enriched uranium were loaded into the core to initiate conversion of the entire core to 36% enriched fuel. This paper presents the results of equilibrium fuel cycle comparisons of the reactor using HEU (90%) and HEU (36%) IRT-3M fuel and compares results with the performance of IRT-4M FA containing LEU (19.75%). The results show that an LEU (19.75%) density of 3.8 g/cm{sup 3} is required to match the cycle length of the HEU (90%) core and an LEU density 3.9 g/cm{sup 3} is needed to match the cycle length of the HEU (36%) core.

  8. Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR using a U7Mo Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2014-06-30

    A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The LEU fuel may be a monolithic foil (LEUm) of U10Mo (10% molybdenum by weight in an alloy with uranium) or a dispersion of U7Mo in aluminum (LEUd). A previous report provided neutronic calculations for the LEUm fuel and this report presents the neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel. The neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel are compared to those previously obtained for the present HEU fuel and the proposed LEUm fuel. The results show no significant differences between the LEUm and the LEUd other than the LEUd fuel requires slightly less uranium than the LEUm fuel due to less molybdenum being present. The calculations include kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions under normal operation and with misloaded fuel elements.

  9. Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Division of URS

    2008-07-01

    This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

  10. Production of LEU Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Irradiation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Kiggans Jr, James O [ORNL; McMurray, Jake W [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL; Trammell, Michael P [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles embedded inside a SiC matrix. This fuel inherently possesses multiple barriers to fission product release, namely the various coating layers in the TRISO fuel particle as well as the dense SiC matrix that hosts these particles. This coupled with the excellent oxidation resistance of the SiC matrix and the SiC coating layer in the TRISO particle designate this concept as an accident tolerant fuel (ATF). The FCM fuel takes advantage of uranium nitride kernels instead of oxide or oxide-carbide kernels used in high temperature gas reactors to enhance heavy metal loading in the highly moderated LWRs. Production of these kernels with appropriate density, coating layer development to produce UN TRISO particles, and consolidation of these particles inside a SiC matrix have been codified thanks to significant R&D supported by US DOE Fuel Cycle R&D program. Also, surrogate FCM pellets (pellets with zirconia instead of uranium-bearing kernels) have been neutron irradiated and the stability of the matrix and coating layer under LWR irradiation conditions have been established. Currently the focus is on production of LEU (7.3% U-235 enrichment) FCM pellets to be utilized for irradiation testing. The irradiation is planned at INL s Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This is a critical step in development of this fuel concept to establish the ability of this fuel to retain fission products under prototypical irradiation conditions.

  11. The status of HEU to LEU core conversion activities at the Jamaica SLOWPOKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, J.; Grant, C., E-mail: john.preston@uwimona.edu.jm [Univ. of the West Indies, Mona Campus, International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences, Mona (Jamaica)

    2012-12-15

    The SLOWPOKE reactor in Jamaica has been operated by the International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences, University of the West Indies since 1984, mainly for the purpose of Neutron Activation Analysis. The HEU core with current utilization has another 14 years of operation, before the addition of a large beryllium annulus would be required to further extend the life-time by 15 years. However, in keeping with the spirit of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, the decision was taken in 2003 to convert the core from HEU to LEU, in line with those at the Ecole Polytechnic and RMC SLOWPOKE facilities. This paper reports on the current status of the conversion activities, including key fuel manufacture and regulatory issues, which have seen substantial progress during the last year. A timetable for the complete process is given, and provided that the fuel fabrication can be completed in the estimated 18 months, the core conversion should be accomplished by the end of 2014. (author)

  12. The status of HEU and LEU core conversion activities at the Jamaica SLOWPOKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, J.; Grant, C., E-mail: john.preston@uwimona.edu.jm [Univ. of the West Indies, Mona Campus, International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences, Kingston (Jamaica)

    2013-07-01

    The SLOWPOKE reactor in Jamaica has been operated by the International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences, University of the West Indies since 1984, mainly for the purpose of Neutron Activation Analysis. The HEU core with current utilization has another 14 years of operation, before the addition of a large beryllium annulus would be required to further extend the life-time by 15 years. However, in keeping with the spirit of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, the decision was taken in 2003 to convert the core from HEU to LEU, inline with those at the Ecole Polytechnic and RMC SLOWPOKE facilities. This paper reports on the current status of the conversion activities, including key fuel manufacture and regulatory issues, which have seen substantial progress during the last year. A timetable for the complete process is given, and provided that the fuel fabrication can be completed in the estimated 18 months, the core conversion should be accomplished by the end of 2014. (author)

  13. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deen, J. R.

    1998-10-22

    Equilibrium fuel cycle comparisons for the IR-8 research reactor were made for HEU(90%), HEU(36%), and LEU (19.75%) fuel assembly (FA) designs using three dimensional multi-group diffusion theory models benchmarked to detailed Monte Carlo models of the reactor. Comparisons were made of changes in reactivity, cycle length, average {sup 235}U discharge burnup, thermal neutron flux, and control rod worths for the 90% and 36% enriched IRT-3M fuel assembly and the 19.75% enriched IRT-4M fuel assembly with the same fuel management strategy. The results of these comparisons showed that a uranium density of 3.5 g/cm{sup 3} in the fuel meat would be required in the LEU IRT-4M fuel assembly to match the cycle length of the HEU(90%) IRT-3M FA and an LEU density of 3.7 g/cm{sup 3} is needed to match the cycle length of the HEU(36%) IRT-3M FA.

  14. Catalytic Fuel Conversion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility enables unique catalysis research related to power and energy applications using military jet fuels and alternative fuels. It is equipped with research...

  15. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Brown, N. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Baek, J. S [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Hanson, A. L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Cuadra, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Cheng, L. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.; Diamond, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Nuclear Science and Technology Dept.

    2014-04-30

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-Enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size-Plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). A summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented. Fuel element tolerance assumptions and hot channel factors used in the safety analysis are also given.

  16. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown N. R.; Brown,N.R.; Baek,J.S; Hanson, A.L.; Cuadra,A.; Cheng,L.Y.; Diamond, D.J.

    2013-03-31

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. . The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). In addition, a summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented.

  17. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Kalcheva, S [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Sikik, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-09-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water. The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident. A feasibility study for the conversion of the BR2 reactor from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel was previously performed to verify it can operate safely at the same maximum nominal steady-state heat flux. An assessment was also performed to quantify the heat fluxes at which the onset of flow instability and critical heat flux occur for each fuel type. This document updates and expands these results for the current representative core configuration (assuming a fresh beryllium matrix) by evaluating the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB), onset of fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB), onset of flow instability (OFI) and critical heat flux (CHF).

  18. Evaluation of HFIR LEU Fuel Using the COMSOL Multiphysics Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ruggles, Arthur [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

    2009-03-01

    A finite element computational approach to simulation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Core Thermal-Fluid behavior is developed. These models were developed to facilitate design of a low enriched core for the HFIR, which will have different axial and radial flux profiles from the current HEU core and thus will require fuel and poison load optimization. This report outlines a stepwise implementation of this modeling approach using the commercial finite element code, COMSOL, with initial assessment of fuel, poison and clad conduction modeling capability, followed by assessment of mating of the fuel conduction models to a one dimensional fluid model typical of legacy simulation techniques for the HFIR core. The model is then extended to fully couple 2-dimensional conduction in the fuel to a 2-dimensional thermo-fluid model of the coolant for a HFIR core cooling sub-channel with additional assessment of simulation outcomes. Finally, 3-dimensional simulations of a fuel plate and cooling channel are presented.

  19. Fuel depletion calculation in MTR-LEU NUR reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeggar Foudil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present the results of a few energy groups calculations for the NUR reactor fuel depletion analysis up to 45 000 MWd/tU taken as the maximum fuel burn up. The WIMSD-4 cell code has been employed as a calculation tool. In this study, we are interested in actinides such as the uranium and plutonium isotopes, as well as fission products Xe-135, Sm-149, Sm-151, Eu-155, and Gd-157. Calculation results regarding the five energy groups are in a good agreement with those obtained with only two energy groups which can, therefore, be used in all subsequent calculations. Calculation results presented in this article can be used as a microscopic data base for estimating the amount of radioactive sources randomly dispersed in the environment. They can also be used to monitor the fuel assemblies inventory at the core level.

  20. Neutronics, steady-state, and transient analyses for the Poland MARIA reactor for irradiation testing of LEU lead test fuel assemblies from CERCA : ANL independent verification results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-06-07

    The MARIA reactor at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) in Swierk (30 km SE of Warsaw) in the Republic of Poland is considering conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies (FA). The FA design in MARIA is rather unique; a suitable LEU FA has never been designed or tested. IAE has contracted with CERCA (the fuel supply portion of AREVA in France) to supply 2 lead test assemblies (LTA). The LTAs will be irradiated in MARIA to burnup level of at least 40% for both LTAs and to 60% for one LTA. IAE may decide to purchase additional LEU FAs for a full core conversion after the test irradiation. The Reactor Safety Committee within IAE and the National Atomic Energy Agency in Poland (PAA) must approve the LTA irradiation process. The approval will be based, in part, on IAE submitting revisions to portions of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) which are affected by the insertion of the LTAs. (A similar process will be required for the full core conversion to LEU fuel.) The analysis required was established during working meetings between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and IAE staff during August 2006, subsequent email correspondence, and subsequent staff visits. The analysis needs to consider the current high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and 4 core configurations containing 1 and 2 LEU LTAs in various core positions. Calculations have been performed at ANL in support of the LTA irradiation. These calculations are summarized in this report and include criticality, burn-up, neutronics parameters, steady-state thermal hydraulics, and postulated transients. These calculations have been performed at the request of the IAE staff, who are performing similar calculations to be used in their SAR amendment submittal to the PAA. The ANL analysis has been performed independently from that being performed by IAE and should only be used as one step in the verification process.

  1. Preliminary Thermohydraulic Analysis of a New Moderated Reactor Utilizing an LEU-Fuel for Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Choi, Jae Young; Venneria, Paolo F.; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket utilizing an LEU fuel (KANUTER-LEU) is a non-proliferative and comparably efficient NTR engine with relatively low thrust levels of 40 - 50 kN for in-space transportation. The small modular engine can expand mission versatility, when flexibly used in a clustered engine arrangement, so that it can perform various scale missions from low-thrust robotic science missions to high-thrust manned missions. In addition, the clustered engine system can enhance engine redundancy and ensuing crew safety as well as the thrust. The propulsion system is an energy conversion system to transform the thermal energy of the reactor into the kinetic energy of the propellant to produce the powers for thrust, propellant feeding and electricity. It is mainly made up of a propellant Feeding System (PFS) comprising a Turbo-Pump Assembly (TPA), a Regenerative Nozzle Assembly (RNA), etc. For this core design study, an expander cycle is assumed to be the propulsion system. The EGS converts the thermal energy of the EHTGR in the idle operation (only 350 kW{sub th} power) to electric power during the electric power mode. This paper presents a preliminary thermohydraulic design analysis to explore the design space for the new reactor and to estimate the referential engine performance. The new non-proliferative NTR engine concept, KANUTER-LEU, is under designing to surmount the nuclear proliferation obstacles on allR and Dactivities and eventual commercialization for future generations. To efficiently implement a heavy LEU fuel for the NTR engine, its reactor design innovatively possesses the key characteristics of the high U density fuel with high heating and H{sub 2} corrosion resistances, the thermal neutron spectrum core and also minimizing non-fission neutron loss, and the compact reactor design with protectively cooling capability. To investigate feasible design space for the moderated EHTGR-LEU and resultant engine performance, the

  2. Irradiation Tests Supporting LEU Conversion of Very High Power Research Reactors in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolstenhulme, N. E.; Cole, J. I.; Glagolenko, I.; Holdaway, K. K.; Housley, G. K.; Rabin, B. H.

    2016-10-01

    The US fuel development team is developing a high density uranium-molybdenum alloy monolithic fuel to enable conversion of five high-power research reactors. Previous irradiation tests have demonstrated promising behavior for this fuel design. A series of future irradiation tests will enable selection of final fuel fabrication process and provide data to qualify the fuel at moderately-high power conditions for use in three of these five reactors. The remaining two reactors, namely the Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor, require additional irradiation tests to develop and demonstrate the fuel’s performance with even higher power conditions, complex design features, and other unique conditions. This paper reviews the program’s current irradiation testing plans for these moderately-high irradiation conditions and presents conceptual testing strategies to illustrate how subsequent irradiation tests will build upon this initial data package to enable conversion of these two very-high power research reactors.

  3. CERCA LEU fuel assemblies testing in Maria Reactor - safety analysis summary and testing program scope.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pytel, K.; Mieleszczenko, W.; Lechniak, J.; Moldysz, A.; Andrzejewski, K.; Kulikowska, T.; Marcinkowska, A.; Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Institute of Atomic Energy (Poland)

    2010-03-01

    The presented paper contains neutronic and thermal-hydraulic (for steady and unsteady states) calculation results prepared to support annex to Safety Analysis Report for MARIA reactor in order to obtain approval for program of testing low-enriched uranium (LEU) lead test fuel assemblies (LTFA) manufactured by CERCA. This includes presentation of the limits and operational constraints to be in effect during the fuel testing investigations. Also, the scope of testing program (which began in August 2009), including additional measurements and monitoring procedures, is described.

  4. RHF RELAP5 model and preliminary loss-of-offsite-power simulation results for LEU conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Dionne, B. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Thomas, F. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble (Switzerland). RHF Reactor Dept.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the RELAP5 model for the Institut Laue-Langevin High Flux Reactor (RHF) located in Grenoble, France, and provide an update to the key information required to complete, for example, simulations for a loss of offsite power (LOOP) accident. A previous status report identified a list of 22 items to be resolved in order to complete the RELAP5 model. Most of these items have been resolved by ANL and the RHF team. Enough information was available to perform preliminary safety analyses and define the key items that are still required. Section 2 of this document describes the RELAP5 model of RHF. The final part of this section briefly summarizes previous model issues and resolutions. Section 3 of this document describes preliminary LOOP simulations for both HEU and LEU fuel at beginning of cycle conditions.

  5. RHF RELAP5 Model and Preliminary Loss-Of-Offsite-Power Simulation Results for LEU Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Dionne, B. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Thomas, F. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble (Switzerland). RHF Reactor Dept.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the RELAP5 model for the Institut Laue-Langevin High Flux Reactor (RHF) located in Grenoble, France, and provide an update to the key information required to complete, for example, simulations for a loss of offsite power (LOOP) accident. A previous status report identified a list of 22 items to be resolved in order to complete the RELAP5 model. Most of these items have been resolved by ANL and the RHF team. Enough information was available to perform preliminary safety analyses and define the key items that are still required. Section 2 of this document describes the RELAP5 model of RHF. The final part of this section briefly summarizes previous model issues and resolutions. Section 3 of this document describes preliminary LOOP simulations for both HEU and LEU fuel at beginning of cycle conditions.

  6. Radiological effects of an aircraft crash into the BER II research reactor. Comparison of effects for HEU and LEU fuels; Radiologische Auswirkungen eines Flugzeugabsturzes auf den Forschungsreaktor BER II. Vergleich der Auswirkungen bei HEU- und LEU-Brennstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axmann, A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung Reaktor; Boehnert, R. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik; Ehrhardt, J. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik; Hasemann, I. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik; Roedder, P. [Roedder (Peter) Ingenieurberatung, Aachen (Germany)

    1994-03-01

    Within the framework of the approval procedure for conversion from high enriched uranium (HEU, ca. 90% U-235, UAl{sub 4}-Al) to low enriched uranium (LEU, ca. < 20% U-235, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al, dispersion fuel), a verification was made for the BER II, whether or not and in how far this would have any influence on the previously known potential risk of the research reactor in case of any involvement in the crash of a high-speed military aircraft. In addition to this, the influence of the UFOMOD (effective 1984) and the current COSYMA program systems on an estimate of accident consequences were investigated. For this purpose a LEU source term was determined for activity release in case of a drained, melting core (27.4 fuel rods as compared to 34.4 in a HEU core). Updated accident consequence assessments were also carried out for the former HEU source term. (HP) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen des Genehmigungsverfahrens zur Umstellung von hochangereichertem Uran (HEU, ca. 90% U-235, UAl{sub 4}-Al) auf niedrigangereichertem Uran (LEU, <20% U-235, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al, Dispersionsbrennstoff) wurde fuer den BER-II geprueft, ob und inwieweit dies Einfluss auf das bisher bekannte Risikopotential des Forschungsreaktors durch Absturz einer schnellfliegenden Militaermaschine hat. Darueberhinaus wurde der Einfluss der Programmsysteme UFOMOD (Stand 1984) und des aktuellen COSYMA auf die Ergebnisse zur Abschaetzung der Unfallfolgen untersucht. Dazu wurde ein LEU-Quellterm fuer die Aktivitaetsfreisetzungen fuer den trockenfallenden schmelzenden Kern (27.4 Brennelemente gebenueber 34.4 in einem HEU-Kern) bestimmt. Aktualisierte Unfallfolgenabschaetzungen wurden auch fuer den frueheren HEU-Quellterm durchgefuehrt. (HP)

  7. Preliminary plan for the qualification of the LEU/Th fuel cycle for the Fort St. Vrain HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulden, T.D.; Gainey, B.W.; Altschwager, C.J. (comps.)

    1980-03-01

    This plan was prepared to ensure that low-enriched uranium/thorium (LEU/Th) would be available as a backup to the highly enriched uranium/thorium (HEU/Th) fuel cycle currently being used in the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in the event that the US nonproliferation policies require it. It describes the program that would be required to develop, qualify, and introduce an LEU/Th fuel cycle into the FSV HTGR on the earliest possible and most optimistic schedule. The results of the study indicate that licensing of the LEU/Th fuel cycle for FSV could be completed and fuel manufacturing could begin about 4.5 years from inception of the program.

  8. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  9. Loss-of-Flow and Loss-of-Pressure Simulations of the BR2 Research Reactor with HEU and LEU Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sikik, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is a research and test reactor located in Mol, Belgium and is primarily used for radioisotope production and materials testing. The Materials Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is supporting the conversion of the BR2 reactor from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The reactor core of BR2 is located inside a pressure vessel that contains 79 channels in a hyperboloid configuration. The core configuration is highly variable as each channel can contain a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Because of this variability, a representative core configuration, based on current reactor use, has been defined for the fuel conversion analyses. The code RELAP5/Mod 3.3 was used to perform the transient thermal-hydraulic safety analyses of the BR2 reactor to support reactor conversion. The input model has been modernized relative to that historically used at BR2 taking into account the best modeling practices developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and BR2 engineers.

  10. Loss-of-Flow and Loss-of-Pressure Simulations of the BR2 Research Reactor with HEU and LEU Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sikik, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is a research and test reactor located in Mol, Belgium and is primarily used for radioisotope production and materials testing. The Materials Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is supporting the conversion of the BR2 reactor from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The reactor core of BR2 is located inside a pressure vessel that contains 79 channels in a hyperboloid configuration (Figure 1). The core configuration is highly variable as each channel can contain a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Because of this variability, a representative core configuration (Figure 2), based on current reactor use, has been defined for the fuel conversion analyses [1]. The code RELAP5/Mod 3.3 [2] was used to perform the transient thermal-hydraulic safety analyses of the BR2 reactor to support reactor conversion. The input model has been modernized relative to that historically used at BR2 taking into account the best modeling practices developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and BR2 engineers.

  11. Nuclear and radiological safety in the substitution process of the fuel HEU to LEU 30/20 in the Reactor TRIGA Mark III of the ININ; Seguridad nuclear y radiologica en el proceso de sustitucion del combustible HEU a LEU 30/20 en el Reactor TRIGA Mark III del Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez G, J., E-mail: jaime.hernandez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    Inside the safety initiative in the international ambit, with the purpose of reducing the risks associated with the use of high enrichment nuclear fuels (HEU) for different proposes to the peaceful uses of the nuclear energy, Mexico contributes by means of the substitution of the high enrichment fuel HEU for low enrichment fuel LEU 30/20 in the TRIGA Mark III Reactor, belonging to Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ). The conversion process was carried out by means of the following activities: analysis of the proposed core, reception and inspection of the fuel LEU 30/20, the discharge of the fuels of the mixed reactor core, shipment of the fuels HEU fresh and irradiated to the origin country, reload activities with the fuels LEU 30/20 and parameters measurement of the core operation. In order to maintaining the personnel's integrity and infrastructure associated to the Reactor, during the whole process the measurements of nuclear and radiological safety were controlled to detail, in execution with the license requirements of the installation. This work describes the covering activities and radiological inspections more relevant, as well as the measurements of radiological control implemented with base in the estimate of the equivalent dose of the substitution process. (Author)

  12. Fuel nitrogen conversion in solid fuel fired systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Glarborg; A.D. Jensen; J.E. Johnsson [Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Understanding of the chemical and physical processes that govern formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in combustion of solid fuels continues to be a challenge. There are still unresolved issues that may limit the potential of primary measures for NOx control. In most solid fuel fired systems oxidation of fuel-bound nitrogen constitutes the dominating source of nitrogen oxides. The paper reviews some fundamental aspects of fuel nitrogen conversion in these systems, emphasizing combustion of coal since most previous work deal with this fuel. Results on biomass combustion are also discussed. Homogeneous and heterogeneous pathways in fuel NO formation and destruction are discussed and the effect of fuel characteristics, devolatilization conditions and combustion mode on the oxidation selectivity towards NO and N{sub 2} is evaluated. Results indicate that even under idealized conditions, such as a laminar pulverized-fuel flame, the governing mechanisms for fuel nitrogen conversion are not completely understood. Light gases, tar, char and soot may all be important vehicles for fuel-N conversion, with their relative importance depending on fuel rank and reaction conditions. Oxygen availability and fuel-nitrogen level are major parameters determining the oxidation selectivity of fuel-N towards NO and N{sub 2}, but also the ability of char and soot to reduce NO is potentially important. The impact of fuel/oxidizer mixing pattern on NO formation appears to be less important in solid-fuel flames than in homogeneous flames. 247 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Regulation of Power Conversion in Fuel Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Mu-zhong; ZHANG J.; K. Scott

    2004-01-01

    Here we report a regulation about power conversion in fuel cells. This regulation is expressed as that total power produced by fuel cells is always proportional to the square of the potential difference between the equilibrium potential and work potential. With this regulation we deduced fuel cell performance equation which can describe the potential vs. the current performance curves, namely, polarization curves of fuel cells with three power source parameters: equilibrium potential E0; internal resistance R; and power conversion coefficient K. The concept of the power conversion coefficient is a new criterion to evaluate and compare the characteristics and capacity of different fuel cells. The calculated values obtained with this equation agree with practical performance of different types of fuel cells.

  14. Simulated fission product-SiC interaction in Triso-coated LEU or MEU HTGR fuel particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, R.L.; Lindemer, T.B.; Beahm, E.C.

    1980-11-01

    Proliferation issues relating to the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) have led to an evaluation of the fission product-SiC interaction problems that might arise if low enriched uranium (LEU) or medium enriched uranium (MEU) were used as fissile fuel in HTGR systems. Simulated Triso-coated UO/sub 2/, UC/sub 2/, and UO/sub 2//UC/sub 2/ particles mixed with varying amounts of Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, and Cd were prepared. These fission products were chosen because, after full burnup, their concentrations are higher in LEU and MEU fuels than in HEU fuel. After the particles were heat treated in the laboratory, their behavior was examined by use of metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe x-ray analysis.

  15. Calculation of parameters for inspection planning and evaluation: low enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reardon, P.T.; Mullen, M.F.; Harms, N.L.

    1981-02-01

    As part of Task C.35 (Calculation of Parameters for Inspection Planning and Evaluation) of the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has performed some quantitative analyses of IAEA inspection activities at low-enriched uranium (LEU) conversion and fuel fabrication facilities. This report presents the results and conclusions of those analyses. Implementation of IAEA safeguards at LEU conversion and fuel fabrication facilities must take into account a variety of practical problems and constraints. One of the key concerns is the problem of flow verification, especially product verification. The objective of this report is to help put the problem of flow verification in perspective by presenting the results of some specific calculations of inspection effort and probability of detection for various product measurement strategies. In order to provide quantitative information about the advantages and disadvantages of the various strategies, eight specific cases were examined.

  16. Fuel nitrogen conversion in solid fuel fired systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glarborg, P.; Jensen, A.D.; Johnsson, J.E. [Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Understanding of the chemical and physical processes that govern formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in combustion of solid fuels continues to be a challenge. Even though this area has been the subject of extensive research over the last three decades, there are still unresolved issues that may limit the potential of primary measures for NO{sub x} control. In most solid fuel fired systems oxidation of fuel-bound nitrogen constitutes the dominating source of nitrogen oxides. The present paper reviews some fundamental aspects of fuel nitrogen conversion in these systems, emphasizing mostly combustion of coal since most previous work deal with this fuel. However, also results on biomass combustion is discussed. Homogeneous and heterogeneous pathways in fuel NO formation and destruction are discussed and the effect of fuel characteristics, devolatilization conditions and combustion mode on the oxidation selectivity towards NO and N{sub 2} is evaluated. Results indicate that even under idealized conditions, such as a laminar pulverized-fuel flame, the governing mechanisms for fuel nitrogen conversion are not completely understood. Light gases, tar, char and soot may all be important vehicles for fuel-N conversion, with their relative importance depending on fuel rank and reaction conditions. Oxygen availability and fuel-nitrogen level are major parameters determining the oxidation selectivity of fuel-N towards NO and N{sub 2}, but also the ability of char and soot to reduce NO is potentially important. The impact of fuel/oxidizer mixing pattern on NO formation appears to be less important in solid-fuel flames than in homogeneous flames. (author)

  17. Application of the successive linear programming technique to the optimum design of a high flux reactor using LEU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    The successive linear programming technique is applied to obtain the optimum thermal flux in the reflector region of a high flux reactor using LEU fuel. The design variables are the reactor power, core radius and coolant channel thickness. The constraints are the cycle length, average heat flux and peak/average power density ratio. The characteristics of the optimum solutions with various constraints are discussed.

  18. Application of the successive linear programming technique to the optimum design of a high flux reactor using LEU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    The successive linear programming technique is applied to obtain the optimum thermal flux in the reflector region of a high flux reactor using LEU fuel. The design variables are the reactor power, core radius and coolant channel thickness. The constraints are the cycle length, average heat flux and peak/average power density ratio. The characteristics of the optimum solutions with various constraints are discussed.

  19. Main activities carried out for the conversion of the reactor core TRIGA, from HEU 8.5/70 / LEU 8.5/20 to LEU 30/20; Principales actividades llevadas a cabo para la conversion del nucleo del reactor TRIGA, de HEU 8.5/70 / LEU 8.5/20 a LEU 30/20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores C, J., E-mail: jorge.floresc@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    In agreement with the policies of the global initiative of threats reduction (GTRI), Mexico committed that inside the reduction program of the fuel enrichment in research and test reactors (RERTR), the conversion of the core reactor TRIGA (in the nuclear centre) would be made, to use solely fuel with low enrichment ({<=} 20% U{sup 235}). To support to the execution of this commitment, a series of accords and agreements were established. The Project Agreement and Supply among the IAEA, the United States of America and Mexico was the more relevant. In this work the main activities carried out in the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) with this purpose are presented. (Author)

  20. Production Cycle for Large Scale Fission Mo-99 Separation by the Processing of Irradiated LEU Uranium Silicide Fuel Element Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Hadi Ali Sameh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uranium silicide fuels proved over decades their exceptional qualification for the operation of higher flux material testing reactors with LEU elements. The application of such fuels as target materials, particularly for the large scale fission Mo-99 producers, offers an efficient and economical solution for the related facilities. The realization of such aim demands the introduction of a suitable dissolution process for the applied U3Si2 compound. Excellent results are achieved by the oxidizing dissolution of the fuel meat in hydrofluoric acid at room temperature. The resulting solution is directly behind added to an over stoichiometric amount of potassium hydroxide solution. Uranium and the bulk of fission products are precipitated together with the transuranium compounds. The filtrate contains the molybdenum and the soluble fission product species. It is further treated similar to the in-full scale proven process. The generated off gas stream is handled also as experienced before after passing through KOH washing solution. The generated alkaline fluoride containing waste solution is noncorrosive. Nevertheless fluoride can be selectively bonded as in soluble CaF2 by addition of a mixture of solid calcium hydroxide calcium carbonate to the sand cement mixture used for waste solidification. The generated elevated amounts of LEU remnants can be recycled and retargeted. The related technology permits the minimization of the generated fuel waste, saving environment, and improving processing economy.

  1. Assessing the Effect of Fuel Burnup on Control Rod Worth for HEU and LEU Cores of Gharr-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.K. Boafo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An important parameter in the design and analysis of a nuclear reactor is the reactivity worth of the control rod which is a measure of the efficiency of the control rod to absorb excess reactivity. During reactor operation, the control rod worth is affected by factors such as the fuel burnup, Xenon concentration, Samarium concentration and the position of the control rod in the core. This study investigates the effect of fuel burnup on the control rod worth by comparing results of a fresh and an irradiated core of Ghana's Miniature Neutron Source Reactor for both HEU and LEU cores. In this study, two codes have been utilized namely BURNPRO for fuel burnup calculation and MCNP5 which uses densities of actinides of the irradiated fuel obtained from BURNPRO. Results showed a decrease of the control rod worth with burnup for the LEU while rod worth increased with burnup for the HEU core. The average thermal flux in both inner and outer irradiation sites also decreased significantly with burnup for both cores.

  2. Solar to fuels conversion technologies: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuller, Harry L

    2017-01-01

    To meet increasing energy needs, while limiting greenhouse gas emissions over the coming decades, power capacity on a large scale will need to be provided from renewable sources, with solar expected to play a central role. While the focus to date has been on electricity generation via photovoltaic (PV) cells, electricity production currently accounts for only about one-third of total primary energy consumption. As a consequence, solar-to-fuel conversion will need to play an increasingly important role and, thereby, satisfy the need to replace high energy density fossil fuels with cleaner alternatives that remain easy to transport and store. The solar refinery concept (Herron et al. in Energy Environ Sci 8:126-157, 2015), in which captured solar radiation provides energy in the form of heat, electricity or photons, used to convert the basic chemical feedstocks CO2 and H2O into fuels, is reviewed as are the key conversion processes based on (1) combined PV and electrolysis, (2) photoelectrochemically driven electrolysis and (3) thermochemical processes, all focused on initially converting H2O and CO2 to H2 and CO. Recent advances, as well as remaining challenges, associated with solar-to-fuel conversion are discussed, as is the need for an intensive research and development effort to bring such processes to scale.

  3. Analysis of the TREAT LEU Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaway, H. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kontogeorgakos, D. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papadias, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mo, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Strons, P. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fei, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wright, A. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Analyses were performed to evaluate the performance of the low enriched uranium (LEU) conceptual design fuel for the conversion of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) from its current highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. TREAT is an experimental nuclear reactor designed to produce high neutron flux transients for the testing of reactor fuels and other materials. TREAT is currently in non-operational standby, but is being restarted under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Resumption of Transient Testing Program. The conversion of TREAT is being pursued in keeping with the mission of the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration’s Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program. The focus of this study was to demonstrate that the converted LEU core is capable of maintaining the performance of the existing HEU core, while continuing to operate safely. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic simulations have been performed to evaluate the performance of the LEU conceptual-design core under both steady-state and transient conditions, for both normal operation and reactivity insertion accident scenarios. In addition, ancillary safety analyses which were performed for previous LEU design concepts have been reviewed and updated as-needed, in order to evaluate if the converted LEU core will function safely with all existing facility systems. Simulations were also performed to evaluate the detailed behavior of the UO2-graphite fuel, to support future fuel manufacturing decisions regarding particle size specifications. The results of these analyses will be used in conjunction with work being performed at Idaho National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, in order to develop the Conceptual Design Report project deliverable.

  4. Non-destructive evaluation of the cladding thickness in LEU fuel plates by accurate ultrasonic scanning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borring, J.; Gundtoft, H.E.; Borum, K.K.; Toft, P. [Riso National Lab. (Denmark)

    1997-08-01

    In an effort to improve their ultrasonic scanning technique for accurate determination of the cladding thickness in LEU fuel plates, new equipment and modifications to the existing hardware and software have been tested and evaluated. The authors are now able to measure an aluminium thickness down to 0.25 mm instead of the previous 0.35 mm. Furthermore, they have shown how the measuring sensitivity can be improved from 0.03 mm to 0.01 mm. It has now become possible to check their standard fuel plates for DR3 against the minimum cladding thickness requirements non-destructively. Such measurements open the possibility for the acceptance of a thinner nominal cladding than normally used today.

  5. Depletion Analysis of Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Loaded with LEU/Thorium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

    2013-02-01

    Thorium based fuel has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (Thorium is more widely available when compared to Uranium). The fertile isotope of Thorium (Th-232) can be converted to fissile isotope U-233 by neutron capture during the operation of a suitable nuclear reactor such as High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). However, the fertile Thorium needs a fissile supporter to start and maintain the conversion process such as U-235 or Pu-239. This report presents the results of a study that analyzed the thorium utilization in a prismatic HTGR, namely Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that was designed by General Atomics (GA). The collected for the modeling of this design come from Chapter 4 of MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document that GA sent to Department of Energy (DOE) on 1995. Both full core and unit cell models were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1 and Serpent 1.1.18. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were set to match the spectral index between unit cell and full core domains. It was found that for the purposes of this study an adjusted unit cell model is adequate. Discharge isotopics and one-group cross-sections were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations

  6. Conversion of wood residues to diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuester, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The basic approach is indirect liquefaction, i.e., thermal gasification followed by catalytic liquefaction. The indirect approach results in separation of the oxygen in the biomass feedstock, i.e., oxygenated compounds do not appear in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel product. The general conversion scheme is shown. The process is capable of accepting a wide variety of feedstocks. Potential products include medium quality gas, normal propanol, paraffinic fuel and/or high octane gasoline. A flow diagram of the continuous laboratory unit is shown. A fluidized bed pyrolysis system is used for gasification. Capacity is about 10 lbs/h of feedstock. The pyrolyzer can be fluidized with recycle pyrolysis gas, steam or recycle liquefaction system off gas or some combination thereof. Tars are removed in a wet scrubber. Unseparated pyrolysis gases are utilized as feed to a modified Fischer-Tropsch reactor. The liquid condensate from the reactor consists of a normal propanol-water phase and a paraffinic hydrocarbon phase. The reactor can be operated to optimize for either product. If a high octane gasoline is desired, the paraffinic fuel is passed through a conventional catalytic reformer. The normal propanol could be used as a fuel extender if blended with the hydrocarbon fuel products. Off gases from the downstream reactors are of high quality due to the accumulation of low molecular weight paraffins.

  7. Conversion program in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, E.B. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    The conversion of the Swedish 50 MW R2 reactor from HEU to LEU fuel has been successfully accomplished over a 16 cycles long process. The conversion started in January 1991 with the introduction of 6 LEU assemblies in the 8*8 core. The first all LEU core was loaded in March 1993 and physics measurements were performed for the final licensing reports. A total of 142 LEU fuel assemblies have been irradiated up until September 1994 without any fuel incident. The operating licence for the R2 reactor was renewed in mid 1994 taking into account new fuel type. The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate (SKI) pointed out one crucial problem with the LEU operation, that the back end of the LEU fuel cycle has not yet been solved. For the HEU fuel Sweden had the reprocessing alternative. The country is now relying heavily on the success of the USDOEs Off Site Fuels Policy to take back the spent fuel from the research reactors. They have in the meantime increased their intermediate storage facilities. There is, however, a limit both in time and space for storage of MTR-type of assemblies in water. The penalty of the lower thermal neutron flux in LEU cores has been reduced by improvements of the new irradiation rigs and by fine tuning the core calculations. The Studsvik code package, CASMO-SIMULATE, widely used for ICFM in LWRs has been modified to suit the compact MTR type of core.

  8. Fuel handling accident analysis for the University of Missouri Research Reactor's High Enriched Uranium to Low Enriched Uranium fuel conversion initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Benjamin

    In accordance with the 1986 amendment concerning licenses for research and test reactors, the MU Research Reactor (MURR) is planning to convert from using High-Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. Since the approval of a new LEU fuel that could meet the MURR's performance demands, the next phase of action for the fuel conversion process is to create a new Safety Analysis Report (SAR) with respect to the LEU fuel. A component of the SAR includes the Maximum Hypothetical Accident (MHA) and accidents that qualify under the class of Fuel Handling Accidents (FHA). In this work, the dose to occupational staff at the MURR is calculated for the FHAs. The radionuclide inventory for the proposed LEU fuel was calculated using the ORIGEN2 point-depletion code linked to the MURR neutron spectrum. The MURR spectrum was generated from a Monte Carlo Neutron transPort (MCNP) simulation. The coupling of these codes create MONTEBURNS, a time-dependent burnup code. The release fraction from each FHA within this analysis was established by the methodology of the 2006 HEU SAR, which was accepted by the NRC. The actual dose methodology was not recorded in the HEU SAR, so a conservative path was chosen. In compliance to NUREG 1537, when new methodology is used in a HEU to LEU analysis, it is necessary to re-evaluate the HEU accident. The Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) values were calculated in addition to the whole body dose and thyroid dose to operation personnel. The LEU FHA occupational TEDE dose was 349 mrem which is under the NRC regulatory occupational dose limit of 5 rem TEDE, and under the LEU MHA limit of 403 mrem. The re-evaluated HEU FHA occupational TEDE dose was 235 mrem, which is above the HEU MHA TEDE dose of 132 mrem. Since the new methodology produces a dose that is larger than the HEU MHA, we can safely assume that it is more conservative than the previous, unspecified dose.

  9. Progess in technology development for conversion of {sup 99}Mo production--BATAN's (Indonesia) conversion program, progress in the CNEA (Argentina) LEU foil/base-side process, and development of inorganic sorbents for {sup 99}Mo production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakel, A. J.; Stepinski, D. C.; Vandegrift, G. F.; Leyva, A.; Gelis, A. V.; Bond, A. H.; Mayes, H.; Chemical Engineering

    2005-01-01

    Currently, nearly all of the world's supply of {sup 99}Mo is produced fiom the fissioning of {sup 235}U in targets of high-enriched uranium (HEU). Conversion of these targets to low-enriched uranium (LEU) would ease worldwide concern over the use and transport of this weapons-grade material. This paper reviews three projects: (1) the ongoing conversion of BATAN's {sup 99}Mo production process from HEU oxide targets (Cintichem processing) to LEU foil targets (Cintichem processing), (2) demonstration of LEU foil targets and base-side processing in CNEA's facility, and (3) the evaluation of two inorganic Thermoxid sorbents for Mo recovery and purification in acidic U-bearing solutions.

  10. Biomass Conversion into Solid Composite Fuel for Bed-Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabakaev Roman B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is the conversion of different types of biomass into solid composite fuel. The subject of research is the heat conversion of biomass into solid composite fuel. The research object is the biomass of the Tomsk region (Russia: peat, waste wood, lake sapropel. Physical experiment of biomass conversion is used as method of research. The new experimental unit for thermal conversion of biomass into carbon residue, fuel gas and pyrolysis condensate is described. As a result of research such parameters are obtained: thermotechnical biomass characteristics, material balances and product characteristics of the heat-technology conversion. Different methods of obtaining solid composite fuel from the products of thermal technologies are considered. As a result, it is established: heat-technology provides efficient conversion of the wood chips and peat; conversion of the lake sapropel is inefficient since the solid composite fuel has the high ash content and net calorific value.

  11. Data Compilation for AGR-3/4 Designed-to-Fail (DTF) Fuel Particle Batch LEU04-02DTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    This document is a compilation of coating and characterization data for the AGR-3/4 designed-to-fail (DTF) particles. The DTF coating is a high density, high anisotropy pyrocarbon coating of nominal 20 {micro}m thickness that is deposited directly on the kernel. The purpose of this coating is to fail early in the irradiation, resulting in a controlled release of fission products which can be analyzed to provide data on fission product transport. A small number of DTF particles will be included with standard TRISO driver fuel particles in the AGR-3 and AGR-4 compacts. The ORNL Coated Particle Fuel Development Laboratory 50-mm diameter fluidized bed coater was used to coat the DTF particles. The coatings were produced using procedures and process parameters that were developed in an earlier phase of the project as documented in 'Summary Report on the Development of Procedures for the Fabrication of AGR-3/4 Design-to-Fail Particles', ORNL/TM-2008/161. Two coating runs were conducted using the approved coating parameters. NUCO425-06DTF was a final process qualification batch using natural enrichment uranium carbide/uranium oxide (UCO) kernels. After the qualification run, LEU04-02DTF was produced using low enriched UCO kernels. Both runs were inspected and determined to meet the specifications for DTF particles in section 5 of the AGR-3 & 4 Fuel Product Specification (EDF-6638, Rev.1). Table 1 provides a summary of key properties of the DTF layer. For comparison purposes, an archive sample of DTF particles produced by General Atomics was characterized using identical methods. This data is also summarized in Table 1.

  12. Study on the Conversion of Fuel Nitrogen Into NOx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raminta Plečkaitienė

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate NOx regularities combusting fuels having high concentration of nitrogen and to develop methods that will reduce the conversion of fuel nitrogen into NOx. There are three solutions to reducing NOx concentration: the combustion of fuel mixing it with other types of “clean” fuel containing small amounts of nitrogen, laundering fuel and the combustion of fuel using carbon additives. These solutions can help with reducing the amount of nitrogen in the wood waste of furniture by about 30% by washing fuel with water. Therefore, NOx value may decrease by about 35%.Article in Lithuanian

  13. Vehicle conversion to hybrid gasoline/alternative fuel operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    The alternative fuels considered are compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and methanol; vehicles were required to operate in a hybrid or dual-fuel gasoline/alternative fuel mode. Economic feasibility was determined by comparing the costs of continued use of gasoline fuel with the use of alternative fuel and retrofitted equipment. Differences in the amounts of future expenditures are adjusted by means of a total life-cycle costing. All fuels studied are technically feasible to allow a retrofit conversion to hybrid gasoline/alternative fuel operation except for methanol. Conversion to LPG is not recommended for vehicles with more than 100,000 km (60,000 miles) of prior use. Methanol conversion is not recommended for vehicles with more than 50,00 km (30,000 miles).

  14. Fuel cells for electrochemical energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hayre, Ryan P.

    2017-07-01

    This short article provides an overview of fuel cell science and technology. This article is intended to act as a "primer" on fuel cells that one can use to begin a deeper investigation into this fascinating and promising technology. You will learn what fuel cell are, how they work, and what significant advantages and disadvantages they present.

  15. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  16. Review of Biojet Fuel Conversion Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei-Cheng [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tao, Ling [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Markham, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Yanan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Batan, Liaw [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Warner, Ethan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biddy, Mary [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Biomass-derived jet (biojet) fuel has become a key element in the aviation industry’s strategy to reduce operating costs and environmental impacts. Researchers from the oil-refining industry, the aviation industry, government, biofuel companies, agricultural organizations, and academia are working toward developing commercially viable and sustainable processes that produce long-lasting renewable jet fuels with low production costs and low greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, jet fuels must meet ASTM International specifications and potentially be a 100% drop-in replacement for the current petroleum jet fuel. The combustion characteristics and engine tests demonstrate the benefits of running the aviation gas turbine with biojet fuels. In this study, the current technologies for producing renewable jet fuels, categorized by alcohols-to-jet, oil-to-jet, syngas-to-jet, and sugar-to-jet pathways, are reviewed. The main challenges for each technology pathway, including feedstock availability, conceptual process design, process economics, life-cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions, and commercial readiness, are discussed. Although the feedstock price and availability and energy intensity of the process are significant barriers, biomass-derived jet fuel has the potential to replace a significant portion of conventional jet fuel required to meet commercial and military demand.

  17. Zeolite-catalyzed biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taarning, Esben; Osmundsen, Christian Mårup; Yang, Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysts have been a central element in the efficient conversion of fossil resources to fuels and chemicals, but their role in biomass utilization is more ambiguous. Zeolites constitute a promising class of heterogeneous catalysts and developments in recent years have demonstrated ...... as conversion of sugars using Lewis acidic zeolites to produce useful chemicals....

  18. Power Conversion System Strategies for Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaushik Rajashekara

    2005-01-01

    Power electronics is an enabling technology for the development of environmental friendly fuel cell vehicles, and to implement the various vehicle electrical architectures to obtain the best performance. In this paper, power conversion strategies for propulsion and auxiliary power unit applications are described. The power electronics strategies for the successful development of the fuel cell vehicles are presented. The fuel cell systems for propulsion and for auxiliary power unit applications are also discussed.

  19. Fuel Economy and Emissions of a Vehicle Equipped with an Aftermarket Flexible-Fuel Conversion Kit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, John F [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

    2012-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grants Certificates of Conformity for alternative fuel conversion systems and also offers other forms of premarket registration of conversion kits for use in vehicles more than two model years old. Use of alternative fuels such as ethanol, natural gas, and propane are encouraged by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) produce emissions-certified vehicles capable of using alternative fuels, and several alternative fuel conversion system manufacturers produce EPA-approved conversion systems for a variety of alternative fuels and vehicle types. To date, only one manufacturer (Flex Fuel U.S.) has received EPA certifications for ethanol fuel (E85) conversion kits. This report details an independent evaluation of a vehicle with a legal installation of a Flex Fuel U.S. conversion kit. A 2006 Dodge Charger was baseline tested with ethanol-free certification gasoline (E0) and E20 (gasoline with 20 vol % ethanol), converted to flex-fuel operation via installation of a Flex Box Smart Kit from Flex Fuel U.S., and retested with E0, E20, E50, and E81. Test cycles included the Federal Test Procedure (FTP or city cycle), the highway fuel economy test (HFET), and the US06 test (aggressive driving test). Averaged test results show that the vehicle was emissions compliant on E0 in the OEM condition (before conversion) and compliant on all test fuels after conversion. Average nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions exceeded the Tier 2/Bin 5 intermediate life NO{sub X} standard with E20 fuel in the OEM condition due to two of three test results exceeding this standard [note that E20 is not a legal fuel for non-flexible-fuel vehicles (non-FFVs)]. In addition, one E0 test result before conversion and one E20 test result after conversion exceeded the NOX standard, although the average result in these two cases was below the standard. Emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde increased with increasing ethanol

  20. Novel Redox Processes for Carbonaceous Fuel Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng

    The current study investigates oxygen carrier development, process intensification, and oxygen carrier attrition behaviors for a number of novel, redox-based energy conversion schemes. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  1. Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

    2012-09-30

    Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

  2. Catalytic conversion of biomass to fuels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garten, R. L.; Ushiba, K. K.; Cooper, M.; Mahawili, I.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents an assessment and perspective concerning the application of catalytic technologies to the thermochemical conversion of biomass resources to fuels. The major objectives of the study are: to provide a systematic assessment of the role of catalysis in the direct thermochemical conversion of biomass into gaseous and liquid fuels; to establish the relationship between potential biomass conversion processes and catalytic processes currently under development in other areas, with particular emphasis on coal conversion processes; and to identify promising catalytic systems which could be utilized to reduce the overall costs of fuels production from biomass materials. The report is divided into five major parts which address the above objectives. In Part III the physical and chemical properties of biomass and coal are compared, and the implications for catalytic conversion processes are discussed. With respect to chemical properties, biomass is shown to have significant advantages over coal in catalytic conversion processes because of its uniformly high H/C ratio and low concentrations of potential catalyst poisons. The physical properties of biomass can vary widely, however, and preprocessing by grinding is difficult and costly. Conversion technologies that require little preprocessing and accept a wide range of feed geometries, densities, and particle sizes appear desirable. Part IV provides a comprehensive review of existing and emerging thermochemical conversion technologies for biomass and coal. The underlying science and technology for gasification and liquefaction processes are presented.

  3. Catalytic conversion of biomass to fuels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garten, R. L.; Ushiba, K. K.; Cooper, M.; Mahawili, I.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents an assessment and perspective concerning the application of catalytic technologies to the thermochemical conversion of biomass resources to fuels. The major objectives of the study are: to provide a systematic assessment of the role of catalysis in the direct thermochemical conversion of biomass into gaseous and liquid fuels; to establish the relationship between potential biomass conversion processes and catalytic processes currently under development in other areas, with particular emphasis on coal conversion processes; and to identify promising catalytic systems which could be utilized to reduce the overall costs of fuels production from biomass materials. The report is divided into five major parts which address the above objectives. In Part III the physical and chemical properties of biomass and coal are compared, and the implications for catalytic conversion processes are discussed. With respect to chemical properties, biomass is shown to have significant advantages over coal in catalytic conversion processes because of its uniformly high H/C ratio and low concentrations of potential catalyst poisons. The physical properties of biomass can vary widely, however, and preprocessing by grinding is difficult and costly. Conversion technologies that require little preprocessing and accept a wide range of feed geometries, densities, and particle sizes appear desirable. Part IV provides a comprehensive review of existing and emerging thermochemical conversion technologies for biomass and coal. The underlying science and technology for gasification and liquefaction processes are presented.

  4. Conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuester, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    The current status and future plans for a project to convert waste cellulosic (biomass) materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels is described. The basic approach is indirect liquefaction, i.e., thermal gasification followed by catalytic liquefaction. The indirect approach results in separation of the oxygen in the biomass feedstock, i.e., oxygenated compounds do not appear in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel product. The process is capable of accepting a wide variety of feedstocks. Potential products include medium quality gas, normal propanol, diesel fuel and/or high octane gasoline. A fluidized bed pyrolysis system is used for gasification. The pyrolyzer can be fluidized with recycle pyrolysis gas, steam or recycle liquefaction system off gas or some combination thereof. Tars are removed in a wet scrubber. Unseparated pyrolysis gases are utilized as feed to a modified Fischer-Tropsch reactor. The liquid condensate from the reactor consists of a normal propanol-water phase and a paraffinic hydrocarbon phase. The reactor can be operated to optimize for either product. The following tasks were specified in the statement of work for the contract period: (1) feedstock studies; (2) gasification system optimization; (3) waste stream characterization; and (4) liquid fuels synthesis. In addition, several equipment improvements were implemented.

  5. Woody Biomass Conversion to JP-8 Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-15

    the downstream hydrotreating required to produce a drop-in transportation fuel. Furthermore, this process does not use a catalyst, making it tolerant...Approximately 40% of the hydrotreated TDO oil mass is in the JP-8 (180-250C), and 60% is in the F-76 (150-325C) boiling point range, respectively

  6. Conversion of fuel-oil in gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payamaras, Jahangir; Payamara, Aria [Shahed University, Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], Email: jahangirpayamara@yahoo.com

    2011-07-01

    Refining heavy petroleum requires significant amounts of energy, up to 4800 MJ/t. This energy is traditionally provided by petroleum with up to 18% of it being burnt down for heat support, resulting in the emission of large amounts of greenhouse gases. Currently research is focused on developing other energy sources such as solar energy to power refineries. The aim of this paper is to study the pyrolysis and gasification processes of fuel-oil in a solar furnace. This study was carried out over a temperature range of 500 to 1000 degrees celsius and with the use of a concentrator for solar radiation. Results showed that 65% of fuel-oil is converted at pyrolysis and 84% at gasification and that the gaseous products are 20% hydrogen and 40% olefin; the processes reached 67% power efficiency. This study presented the use of solar energy to power heavy oil refineries.

  7. Gas Conversion Systems Reclaim Fuel for Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A human trip to Mars will require astronauts to utilize resources on the Red Planet to generate oxygen and fuel for the ride home, among other things. Lakewood, Colorado-based Pioneer Energy has worked under SBIR agreements with Johnson Space Center to develop technology for those purposes, and now uses a commercialized version of the technology to recover oil and gas that would otherwise be wasted at drilling sites.

  8. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Kalcheva, S. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Sikik, E. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Koonen, E. [SCK CEN (Belgium)

    2015-12-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water (Figure 1). The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident.

  9. Enzymantic Conversion of Coal to Liquid Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Troiano

    2011-01-31

    The work in this project focused on the conversion of bituminous coal to liquid hydrocarbons. The major steps in this process include mechanical pretreatment, chemical pretreatment, and finally solubilization and conversion of coal to liquid hydrocarbons. Two different types of mechanical pretreatment were considered for the process: hammer mill grinding and jet mill grinding. After research and experimentation, it was decided to use jet mill grinding, which allows for coal to be ground down to particle sizes of 5 {mu}m or less. A Fluid Energy Model 0101 JET-O-MIZER-630 size reduction mill was purchased for this purpose. This machine was completed and final testing was performed on the machine at the Fluid Energy facilities in Telford, PA. The test results from the machine show that it can indeed perform to the required specifications and is able to grind coal down to a mean particle size that is ideal for experimentation. Solubilization and conversion experiments were performed on various pretreated coal samples using 3 different approaches: (1) enzymatic - using extracellular Laccase and Manganese Peroxidase (MnP), (2) chemical - using Ammonium Tartrate and Manganese Peroxidase, and (3) enzymatic - using the live organisms Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Spectral analysis was used to determine how effective each of these methods were in decomposing bituminous coal. After analysis of the results and other considerations, such as cost and environmental impacts, it was determined that the enzymatic approaches, as opposed to the chemical approaches using chelators, were more effective in decomposing coal. The results from the laccase/MnP experiments and Phanerochaete chrysosporium experiments are presented and compared in this final report. Spectra from both enzymatic methods show absorption peaks in the 240nm to 300nm region. These peaks correspond to aromatic intermediates formed when breaking down the coal structure. The peaks then decrease in absorbance over time

  10. Renewable energy based catalytic CH4 conversion to fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Jansen, I.; Schuttlefield, J.D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Natural gas is envisioned as a primary source of hydrocarbons in the foreseeable future. With the abundance of shale gas, the main concerns have shifted from the limited hydrocarbon availability to the sustainable methods of CH4 conversion to fuels. This is necessitated by high costs of natural gas

  11. Conversion of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Kammer Hansen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, a number of papers about direct oxidation of methane and hydrocarbon in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) at relatively low temperatures (about 700degreesC) have been published. Even though the conversion of almost dry CH4 at 1000degreesC on ceramic anodes was demonstrated more than 10 years...

  12. Fleet Conversion in Local Government: Determinants of Driver Fuel Choice for Bi-Fuel Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Kimberly D.; Khovanova, Kseniya M.; Welch, Eric W.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the conversion of one local government's fleet from gasoline to bi-fuel E-85, compressed natural gas, and liquid propane gas powered vehicles at the midpoint of a 10-year conversion plan. This study employs a behavioral model based on the theory of reasoned action to explore factors that influence an individual's perceived and…

  13. LIEKKI and JALO: Combustion and fuel conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Thomas M.; Renz, Ulrich; Sarofim, Adel F.

    LIEKKI and JALO are well conceived and structured programs designed to strengthen Finland's special needs in combustion and gasification to utilize a diversity of fuels, increase the ratio of electrical to heat output, and to support the export market. Started in 1988, these two programs provide models of how universities, Technical research center's laboratories (VTT's), and industry can collaborate successfully in order to achieve national goals. The research is focused on long term goals in certain targeted niche areas. This is an effective way to use limited resources. The niche areas were chosen in a rational manner and appear to be appropriate for Finland. The LIEKKl and JALO programs have helped pull together research efforts that were previously more fragmented. For example, the combustion modeling area still appears fragmented. Individual project objectives should be tied to program goals at a very early stage to provide sharper focusing to the research. Both the LIEKKl and JALO programs appear to be strongly endorsed by industry. Industrial members of the Executive Committees were very supportive of these programs. There are good mechanisms for technology transfer in place, and the programs provide opportunities to establish good interfaces between industrial people and the individual researchers. The interest of industry is shown by the large number of applied projects that are supported by industry. This demonstrates the relevancy of the programs. There is a strong interaction between the JALO program and industry in black liquor gasification.

  14. Sustainable energy conversion: fuel cells - the competitive option?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, D. [Energy-Environment Policy Research Group, TH Huxley School, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2000-03-01

    The definition of sustainability is still under discussion, but it is becoming increasingly clear that present practices of energy supply and distribution are causing severe environmental pressures, and that they cannot be continued indefinitely. The fuel cell has been undergoing rapid development and is now at a stage immediately prior to commercialisation for a number of markets. It is expected to be economically competitive with many other energy conversion technologies within the next 5 years. However, introduction of the fuel cell may also speed the economic introduction of emissions-free energy carriers such as hydrogen, linking directly to renewably generated electricity. Hydrogen could be used as a form of energy storage in cases where electricity demand and supply were not matched. The fuel cell would then be complementary to, rather than competitive with, renewable generation technologies. Ultimately, the fuel cell, in both its high and low-temperature derivatives, could become one of the pillars of a future sustainable energy system. (orig.)

  15. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHWINKENDORF, K.N.

    2006-05-12

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements. The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprising two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with ''green'' (fresh) fuel and one with spent fuel. Both the green and spent fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, 3 green fuel and 4 spent fuel loading configurations were considered to serve as benchmark models. However, shortcomings in experimental data failed to meet the high standards for a benchmark problem. Nevertheless, the data provided by these subcritical measurements can

  16. Power distributions in fresh and depleted LEU and HEU cores of the MITR reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, E.H.; Horelik, N.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Newton, T.H., Jr.; Hu, L.; Stevens, J.G. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (2MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory and Nuclear Science and Engineering Department)

    2012-04-04

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Toward this goal, core geometry and power distributions are presented. Distributions of power are calculated for LEU cores depleted with MCODE using an MCNP5 Monte Carlo model. The MCNP5 HEU and LEU MITR models were previously compared to experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. This same model was used with a finer spatial depletion in order to generate power distributions for the LEU cores. The objective of this work is to generate and characterize a series of fresh and depleted core peak power distributions, and provide a thermal hydraulic evaluation of the geometry which should be considered for subsequent thermal hydraulic safety analyses.

  17. Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2011-09-30

    A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Previously, the design of the LEU fuel had been determined in order to provide the users of the NBSR with the same cycle length as exists for the current HEU fueled reactor. The fuel composition at different points within an equilibrium fuel cycle had also been determined. In the present study, neutronics parameters have been calculated for these times in the fuel cycle for both the existing HEU and the proposed LEU equilibrium cores. The results showed differences between the HEU and LEU cores that would not lead to any significant changes in the safety analysis for the converted core. In general the changes were reasonable except that the figure-of-merit for neutrons that can be used by experimentalists shows there will be a 10% reduction in performance. The calculations included kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions.

  18. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOFFER, H.

    2006-07-18

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Fuel that had experienced a neutron environment in a reactor is known as spent, exposed, or irradiated fuel. In contrast fuel that has not yet been placed in a reactor is known as green, unexposed, or unirradiated fuel. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled (References 1 and 2) and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements (Reference 3). The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprised of two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with unirradiated fuel and one with irradiated fuel. Both the unirradiated and irradiated fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, three (3) green fuel

  19. Developments in fluidized bed conversion of solid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leckner Bo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A summary is given on the development of fluidized bed conversion (combustion and gasification of solid fuels. First, gasification is mentioned, following the line of development from the Winkler gasifier to recent designs. The combustors were initially bubbling beds, which were found unsuitable for combustion of coal because of various drawbacks, but they proved more useful for biomass where these drawbacks were absent. Instead, circulating fluidized bed boilers became the most important coal converters, whose design now is quite mature, and presently the increments in size and efficiency are the most important development tasks. The new modifications of these conversion devices are related to CO2 capture. Proposed methods with this purpose, involving fluidized bed, are single-reactor systems like oxy-fuel combustion, and dual-reactor systems, including also indirect biomass gasifiers.

  20. Neutronics, Steady-State, and Transient Analyses for the Kazakhstan VVR-K Reactor with LEU Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanan, N.A.; Garner, P.L.

    2015-01-01

    Calculations have been performed for steady state and postulated transients in the VVRK reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) in Alatau, Kazakhstan. These calculations have been performed at the request of staff of the INP who have performed similar calculations. Calculations were performed for the fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) core and for four subsequent cores as beryllium is added as a radial reflector to maintain criticality during the first 15 cycles of operation. The calculations include neutronics parameters, steady-state power and temperature distributions, and response to transients. These calculations have been performed independently from those being performed by INP and serve as one step in the verification process.

  1. Chemical looping combustion. Fuel conversion with inherent CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandvoll, Oeyvind

    2005-07-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a new concept for fuel energy conversion with CO2 capture. In CLC, fuel combustion is split into separate reduction and oxidation processes, in which a solid carrier is reduced and oxidized, respectively. The carrier is continuously recirculated between the two vessels, and hence direct contact between air and fuel is avoided. As a result, a stoichiometric amount of oxygen is transferred to the fuel by a regenerable solid intermediate, and CLC is thus a variant of oxy-fuel combustion. In principle, pure CO2 can be obtained from the reduction exhaust by condensation of the produced water vapour. The thermodynamic potential and feasibility of CLC has been studied by means of process simulations and experimental studies of oxygen carriers. Process simulations have focused on parameter sensitivity studies of CLC implemented in 3 power cycles; CLC-Combined Cycle, CLC-Humid Air Turbine and CLC-Integrated Steam Generation. Simulations indicate that overall fuel conversion ratio, oxidation temperature and operating pressure are among the most important process parameters in CLC. A promising thermodynamic potential of CLC has been found, with efficiencies comparable to, - or better than existing technologies for CO2 capture. The proposed oxygen carrier nickel oxide on nickel spinel (NiONiAl) has been studied in reduction with hydrogen, methane and methane/steam as well as oxidation with dry air. It has been found that at atmospheric pressure and temperatures above 600 deg C, solid reduction with dry methane occurs with overall fuel conversion of 92%. Steam methane reforming is observed along with methane cracking as side reactions, yielding an overall selectivity of 90% with regard to solid reduction. If steam is added to the reactant fuel, coking can be avoided. A methodology for long-term investigation of solid chemical activity in a batch reactor is proposed. The method is based on time variables for oxidation. The results for Ni

  2. Catalytic conversion of renewable biomass resources to fuels and chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Ruiz, Juan Carlos; West, Ryan M; Dumesic, James A

    2010-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is renewable and cheap, and it has the potential to displace fossil fuels in the production of fuels and chemicals. Biomass-derived carboxylic acids are important compounds that can be used as platform molecules for the production of a variety of important chemicals on a large scale. Lactic acid, a prototypical biomass derivative, and levulinic acid, an important chemical feedstock produced by hydrolysis of waste cellulosic materials, can be upgraded using bifunctional catalysts (those containing metal and acid sites), which allows the integration of several transformations (e.g., oxygen removal and C-C coupling) in a single catalyst bed. This coupling between active sites is beneficial in that it reduces the complexity and cost of the biomass conversion processes. Deoxygenation of biomass derivatives is a requisite step for the production of fuels and chemicals, and strategies are proposed to minimize the consumption of hydrogen from an external source during this process.

  3. Examination of spent fuel radiation energy conversion for electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Man-Sung, E-mail: msyim@kaist.ac.kr

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Utilizing conversion of radiation energy of spent fuel to electric energy. • MCNPX modeling and experiment were used to estimate energy conversion. • The converted energy may be useful for nuclear security applications. • The converted energy may be utilized for safety applications through energy storage. - Abstract: Supply of electricity inside nuclear power plant is one of the most important considerations for nuclear safety and security. In this study, generation of electric energy by converting radiation energy of spent nuclear fuel was investigated. Computational modeling work by using MCNPX 2.7.0 code along with experiment was performed to estimate the amount of electric energy generation. The calculation using the developed modeling work was validated through comparison with an integrated experiment. The amount of electric energy generation based on a conceptual design of an energy conversion module was estimated to be low. But the amount may be useful for nuclear security applications. An alternative way of utilizing the produced electric energy could be considered for nuclear safety application through energy storage. Further studies are needed to improve the efficiency of the proposed energy conversion concept and to examine the issue of radiation damage and economic feasibility.

  4. Microstructural Characterization of Burnable Absorber Materials Being Evaluated for Application in LEU U-Mo Fuel Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. F. Jue; B. Miller; B. Yao; E. Perez; Y. H. Sohn

    2011-03-01

    The starting microstructure of a fuel plate will impact how it performs during irradiation. As a result, microstructural characterization has been performed on as-fabricated monolithic fuel plates to determine the changes in fuel plate microstructure that may result from changes in fabrication parameters. Particular focus has been given to the fuel plate U-10Mo/Zr and Zr/AA6061 cladding interfaces, since the integrity of these interfaces will play a big role in determining the overall performance of the fuel plate during irradiation. In addition, burnable absorber materials for potential incorporation into monolithic fuel plates have been characterized to identify their as-fabricated microstructures. This information will be important when trying to understand the PIE data from fuel plates with burnable absorbers that are irradiated in future irradiation experiments. This paper will focus on the microstructures observed using optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy for monolithic fuel plates exposed to different fabrication parameters and for as-fabricated burnable absorber materials.

  5. Development of new ORIGEN2 data library sets for research reactors with light water cooled oxide and silicide LEU (20 w/o) fuels based on JENDL-3.3 nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liem, Peng Hong, E-mail: liemph@nais.ne.jp [Nippon Advanced Information Service (NAIS Co., Inc.), 416 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1112 (Japan); Sembiring, Tagor Malem [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety Indonesian National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Puspiptek Complex, Building No. 80, Serpong, Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We developed new ORIGEN2 data library sets for research reactors based on JENDL-3.3. • The sets cover oxide and silicide LEU fuels with meat density up to 4.74 g U/cm{sup 3}. • Two kinds of data library sets are available: fuel region and non-fuel regions. • We verified the new data library sets with other codes. • We validated the new data library against a non-destructive test. -- Abstract: New sets of ORIGEN2 data library dedicated to research/testing reactors with light water cooled oxide and silicide LEU fuel plates based on JENDL-3.3 nuclear data were developed, verified and validated. The new sets are considered to be an extension of the most recent release of ORIGEN2.2UPJ code, i.e. the ORLIBJ33 library sets. The newly generated ORIGEN2 data library sets cover both oxide and silicide LEU fuels with fuel meat density range from 2.96 to 4.74 g U/cm{sup 3} used in the present and future operation of the Indonesian 30 MWth RSG GAS research reactor. The new sets are expected applicable also for other research/testing reactors which utilize similar fuels or have similar neutron spectral indices. In addition to the traditional ORIGEN2 library sets for fuel depletion analyses in fuel regions, in the new data library sets, new ORIGEN2 library sets for irradiation/activation analyses were also prepared which cover all representative non-fuel regions of RSG GAS such as reflector elements, irradiation facilities, etc. whose neutron spectra are significantly softer than fuel regions. Verification with other codes as well as validation with a non-destructive test result showed promising results where a good agreement was confirmed.

  6. Conversion of microalgae to jet fuel: process design and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Yuan; Bluck, David; Van Wie, Bernard J

    2014-09-01

    Microalgae's aquatic, non-edible, highly genetically modifiable nature and fast growth rate are considered ideal for biomass conversion to liquid fuels providing promise for future shortages in fossil fuels and for reducing greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions from combustion. We demonstrate adaptability of PRO/II software by simulating a microalgae photo-bio-reactor and thermolysis with fixed conversion isothermal reactors adding a heat exchanger for thermolysis. We model a cooling tower and gas floatation with zero-duty flash drums adding solids removal for floatation. Properties data are from PRO/II's thermodynamic data manager. Hydrotreating is analyzed within PRO/II's case study option, made subject to Jet B fuel constraints, and we determine an optimal 6.8% bioleum bypass ratio, 230°C hydrotreater temperature, and 20:1 bottoms to overhead distillation ratio. Process economic feasibility occurs if cheap CO2, H2O and nutrient resources are available, along with solar energy and energy from byproduct combustion, and hydrotreater H2 from product reforming.

  7. Direct Logistic Fuel JP-8 Conversion in a Liquid Tin Anode Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LTA-SOFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-09

    demonstrated the ability of the Liquid Tin Anode Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LTA SOFC) to direct convert logistic fuel, JP-8. The demonstration of direct JP-8...conversion without fuel processing or reforming was unprecedented in fuel cell technology. The DOD has a broad interest in power generation using

  8. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

  9. Key metrics for HFIR HEU and LEU models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chandler, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Renfro, David G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davidson, Eva E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-25

    This report compares key metrics for two fuel design models of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The first model represents the highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel currently in use at HFIR, and the second model considers a low-enriched uranium (LEU) interim design fuel. Except for the fuel region, the two models are consistent, and both include an experiment loading that is representative of HFIR's current operation. The considered key metrics are the neutron flux at the cold source moderator vessel, the mass of 252Cf produced in the flux trap target region as function of cycle time, the fast neutron flux at locations of interest for material irradiation experiments, and the reactor cycle length. These key metrics are a small subset of the overall HFIR performance and safety metrics. They were defined as a means of capturing data essential for HFIR's primary missions, for use in optimization studies assessing the impact of HFIR's conversion from HEU fuel to different types of LEU fuel designs.

  10. Technical basis in support of the conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) core from highly-enriched to low-enriched uranium - core neutron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Foyto, L [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; McKibben, J C [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Peters, N. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Stevens, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report contains the results of reactor design and performance for conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support of the U. S. government.

  11. Microbial conversion of coals to clean fuel forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, S.; Isbister, J.; Hawley, B.; Forgacs, T.; Reed, L.; Anspach, G.; Middaugh, T.

    1988-01-01

    Anaerobic cultures have been used for the production of methane and alcohols from coal. Cultures were adapted from natural inocula collected from sources such as sewage sludge and horse manure. A 1% (w/v) slurry of leonardite, lignite, or subbituminous coal was used in the incubations. Methane was produced from all cultures, including some untreated coals, to a greater extent than in control cultures. Over several months of adaptation, methane production capacity increased considerably. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were identified as intermediates in the conversion of coal to methane. A proposed scheme for the conversion is breakdown of the coal polymer by a series of organisms and metabolism of the fragments to methane precursors such as VFAs. A mixture of short chain alcohols was produced by cultures grown in the presence of methane inhibitors. These cultures after prolonged adaptation show potential for use in larger scale bioreactors for the production of gaseous and liquid fuels.

  12. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  13. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  14. Conversion of Molybdenum-99 production process to low enriched uranium: Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analyses of HEU and LEU target plates for irradiation in Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Ahmad; Iqbal, Masood; Bokhari, Ishtiaq Hussain; Mahmood, Tayyab; Muhammad, Atta

    2012-09-01

    Technetium-99m, the daughter product of Molybdenum-99 is the most widely needed radionuclide for diagnostic studies in Pakistan. Molybdenum-99 Production Facility has been established at PINSTECH. Highly enriched uranium (93% 235U) U/Al alloy targets have been irradiated in Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) for the generation of fission Mo-99, while basic dissolution technique is used for separation of Mo-99 from target matrix activity. In line with the international objective of minimizing and eventually eliminating the use of HEU in civil commerce, national and international efforts have been underway to shift the production of medical isotopes from HEU to LEU (LEU; uranium is needed. LEU aluminum uranium dispersion target has been developed, which may replace existing HEU aluminum/uranium alloy targets for production of 99Mo using basic dissolution technique. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic calculations were performed for safe irradiation of targets in the core of PARR-1.

  15. Energy Conversion Analysis of a Novel Solar Thermochemical System Coupled with Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vinck, Ian; Ozalp, Nesrin

    2015-01-01

    Fossil fuels have been the main supply of power generation for use in manufacturing, transportation, residential and commercial sectors. However, environmentally adverse effects of fossil fuel conversion systems combined with pending shortage raise major concerns. As a promising approach to tackle these challenges, this paper presents a novel energy conversion system comprising of a solar thermal reactor coupled with hydrogen fuel cell and carbon fuel cell for electricity generation. The syst...

  16. Evaluation of LANL Capabilities for Fabrication of TREAT Conversion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luther, Erik Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leckie, Rafael M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dombrowski, David E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-06

    This report estimates costs and schedule associated with scale up and fabrication of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) core for the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) reactor. This study considers facilities available at Los Alamos National Laboratory, facility upgrades, equipment, installation and staffing costs. Not included are costs associated with raw materials and off-site shipping. These estimates are considered a rough of magnitude. At this time, no specifications for the LEU core have been made and the final schedule needed by the national program. The estimate range (+/-100%) reflects this large uncertainty and is subject to change as the project scope becomes more defined.

  17. Analysis of LOCA Scenarios in the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cheng, L. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Diamond, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-08-30

    An analysis has been done of hypothetical loss-of-coolant-accidents (LOCAs) in the research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The purpose of the analysis is to determine if the peak clad temperature remains below the Safety Limit, which is the blister temperature for the fuel. The configuration of the NBSR considered in the analysis is that projected for the future when changes will be made so that shutdown pumps do not operate when a LOCA signal is detected. The analysis was done for the present core with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and with the proposed low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel that would be used when the NBSR is converted from one to the other. The analysis consists of two parts. The first examines how the water would drain from the primary system following a break and the possibility for the loss of coolant from within the fuel element flow channels. This work is performed using the TRACE system thermal-hydraulic code. The second looks at the fuel clad temperature as a function of time given that the water may have drained from many of the flow channels and the water in the vessel is in a quasi-equilibrium state. The temperature behavior is investigated using the three-dimensional heat conduction code HEATING7.3. The results in all scenarios considered for both HEU and LEU fuel show that the peak clad temperature remains below the blister temperature.

  18. Research and Development of Multiphysics Models in Support of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodey, Isaac T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Curtis, Franklin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Arimilli, Rao V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ekici, Kivanc [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Freels, James D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-11-01

    ABSTRACT The findings presented in this report are results of a five year effort lead by the RRD Division of the ORNL, which is focused on research and development toward the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). This report focuses on the tasks accomplished by the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK) team from the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering (MABE) that provided expert support in multiphysics modeling of complex problems associated with the LEU conversion of the HFIR reactor. The COMSOL software was used as the main computational modeling tool, whereas Solidworks was also used in support of computer-aided-design (CAD) modeling of the proposed LEU fuel design. The UTK research has been governed by a statement of work (SOW), which was updated annually to clearly define the specific tasks reported herein. Ph.D. student Isaac T. Bodey has focused on heat transfer and fluid flow modeling issues and has been aided by his major professor Dr. Rao V. Arimilli. Ph.D. student Franklin G. Curtis has been focusing on modeling the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena caused by the mechanical forces acting on the fuel plates, which in turn affect the fluid flow in between the fuel plates, and ultimately the heat transfer, is also affected by the FSI changes. Franklin Curtis has been aided by his major professor Dr. Kivanc Ekici. M.Sc. student Adam R. Travis has focused two major areas of research: (1) on accurate CAD modeling of the proposed LEU plate design, and (2) reduction of the model complexity and dimensionality through interdimensional coupling of the fluid flow and heat transfer for the HFIR plate geometry. Adam Travis is also aided by his major professor, Dr. Kivanc Ekici. We must note that the UTK team, and particularly the graduate students, have been in very close collaboration with Dr. James D. Freels (ORNL technical monitor and mentor

  19. Research and Development of Multiphysics Models in Support of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodey, Isaac T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Curtis, Franklin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Arimilli, Rao V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ekici, Kivanc [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Freels, James D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The findings presented in this report are results of a five year effort led by the RRD Division of the ORNL, which is focused on research and development toward the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). This report focuses on the tasks accomplished by the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK) team from the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering (MABE) that provided expert support in multiphysics modeling of complex problems associated with the LEU conversion of the HFIR reactor. The COMSOL software was used as the main computational modeling tool, whereas Solidworks was also used in support of computer-aided-design (CAD) modeling of the proposed LEU fuel design. The UTK research has been governed by a statement of work (SOW), which was updated annually to clearly define the specific tasks reported herein. Ph.D. student Isaac T. Bodey has focused on heat transfer and fluid flow modeling issues and has been aided by his major professor Dr. Rao V. Arimilli. Ph.D. student Franklin G. Curtis has been focusing on modeling the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena caused by the mechanical forces acting on the fuel plates, which in turn affect the fluid flow in between the fuel plates, and ultimately the heat transfer, is also affected by the FSI changes. Franklin Curtis has been aided by his major professor Dr. Kivanc Ekici. M.Sc. student Adam R. Travis has focused two major areas of research: (1) on accurate CAD modeling of the proposed LEU plate design, and (2) reduction of the model complexity and dimensionality through interdimensional coupling of the fluid flow and heat transfer for the HFIR plate geometry. Adam Travis is also aided by his major professor, Dr. Kivanc Ekici. We must note that the UTK team, and particularly the graduate students, have been in very close collaboration with Dr. James D. Freels (ORNL technical monitor and mentor) and have

  20. Feasibility study on AFR-100 fuel conversion from uranium-based fuel to thorium-based fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidet, F.; Kim, T.; Grandy, C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-07-30

    Although thorium has long been considered as an alternative to uranium-based fuels, most of the reactors built to-date have been fueled with uranium-based fuel with the exception of a few reactors. The decision to use uranium-based fuels was initially made based on the technology maturity compared to thorium-based fuels. As a result of this experience, lot of knowledge and data have been accumulated for uranium-based fuels that made it the predominant nuclear fuel type for extant nuclear power. However, following the recent concerns about the extent and availability of uranium resources, thorium-based fuels have regained significant interest worldwide. Thorium is more abundant than uranium and can be readily exploited in many countries and thus is now seen as a possible alternative. As thorium-based fuel technologies mature, fuel conversion from uranium to thorium is expected to become a major interest in both thermal and fast reactors. In this study the feasibility of fuel conversion in a fast reactor is assessed and several possible approaches are proposed. The analyses are performed using the Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR-100) design, a fast reactor core concept recently developed by ANL. The AFR-100 is a small 100 MW{sub e} reactor developed under the US-DOE program relying on innovative fast reactor technologies and advanced structural and cladding materials. It was designed to be inherently safe and offers sufficient margins with respect to the fuel melting temperature and the fuel-cladding eutectic temperature when using U-10Zr binary metal fuel. Thorium-based metal fuel was preferred to other thorium fuel forms because of its higher heavy metal density and it does not need to be alloyed with zirconium to reduce its radiation swelling. The various approaches explored cover the use of pure thorium fuel as well as the use of thorium mixed with transuranics (TRU). Sensitivity studies were performed for the different scenarios envisioned in order to determine the

  1. Plasmolysis for efficient CO2 -to-fuel conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    The strong non-equilibrium conditions provided by the plasma phase offer the opportunity to beat traditional thermal process energy efficiencies via preferential excitation of molecular vibrational modes. It is therefore a promising option for creating artificial solar fuels from CO2as raw material using (intermittently available) sustainable energy surpluses, which can easily be deployed within the present infrastructure for conventional fossil fuels. In this presentation, a common microwave reactor approach is evaluated experimentally with Rayleigh scattering and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to assess gas temperatures and conversion degrees, respectively. The results are interpreted on basis of estimates of the plasma dynamics obtained with electron energy distribution functions calculated with a Boltzmann solver. It indicates that the intrinsic electron energies are higher than is favourable for preferential vibrational excitation due to dissociative excitation, which causes thermodynamic equilibrium chemistry still to dominate the initial experiments. Novel reactor approaches are proposed to tailor the plasma dynamics to achieve the non-equilibrium in which vibrational excitation is dominant. In collaboration with Dirk van den Bekerom, Niek den Harder, Teofil Minea, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Eindhoven, Netherlands; Gield Berden, Institute for Molecules and Materials, FELIX facility, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands; Richard Engeln, Applied Physics, Plasma en Materials Processing, Eindhoven University of Technology; and Waldo Bongers, Martijn Graswinckel, Erwin Zoethout, Richard van de Sanden, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Eindhoven, Netherlands.

  2. 75 FR 29605 - Clean Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Engine Conversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... Exceptions b. Heavy-Duty Engine Types and Gross Vehicle Weight Classes c. Dual-Fuel Standards 2. Useful Life... first type, dedicated alternative fueled vehicles or engines, are only capable of operating on one type of fuel. Dual-fueled vehicles or engines, the second type, can operate on two types of fuel,...

  3. Maximum hypothetical accident analysis for HEU to LEU fuel conversion at the University of Missouri Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowherd, Wilson

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women with a very high incident rate, especially for those women who are between 40-60 years old. Most drugs are large or non-polar macromolecules, which cannot get into cancer cells autonomously, so a method that can deliver those drugs is very important. Optoporation method has been facilitated with gold nanoparticles, which are bound to breast cancer cells, and then absorb the optical energy to improve the membrane permeabilization. Long-term dietary consumption of fruits and vegetables high in beta-carotene and other phytochemicals has been shown beneficial in terms of anti-cancer, anti-aging, preventing cardiovascular disease and cataract. However they are large non-polar molecules that are difficult to enter the cancer cells. Here in this study, we applied optoporation method by using beta-carotene, and tetracycline as anti-cancer drugs in various concentrations to optimize highest selective cell death/best potential for T47D breast cancer cell lines.

  4. Development of Low-Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cells for Direct Conversion of Methane to Methanol Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torabi, Alireza; Barton, Joseph D.; Willman, Carl; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Li, Na; Poozhikunnath, Abhinav; Maric, Radenka; Marina, Olga A.

    2017-09-26

    The objective of this project is development of a durable, low-cost, and high performance Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LT-SOFC) for direct conversion of methane to methanol and other liquids, characterized by: a) operating temperature < 500oC, b) current density of > 100 mA/cm2 in liquid hydrocarbon production mode, c) continuous operation of > 100 h, d) cell area >100 cm2, e) cell cost per rate of product output < 100,000/bpd, f) process intensity of > 0.1 bpd/ft3, g) product yield and carbon efficiency > 50%, and h) volumetric output per cell > 30 L/day.

  5. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    several obsolete components of the current analytical tool set used for ATR neutronics support. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). It will also greatly facilitate the LEU conversion effort, since the upgraded computational capabilities are now at a stage where they can be, and in fact have been, used for the required physics analysis from the beginning. In this context, extensive scoping neutronics analyses were completed for six preconceptual candidate LEU fuel element designs for the ATR (and for its companion critical facility, ATRC). Of these, four exhibited neutronics performance in what is believed to be an acceptable range. However, there are currently some concerns with regard to fabricability and mechanical performance that have emerged for one of the four latter concepts. Thus three concepts have been selected for more comprehensive conceptual design analysis during the upcoming fiscal year.

  6. CONVERSION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC MATERIAL TO CHEMICALS AND FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin S. Olson

    2001-06-30

    A direct conversion of cellulosic wastes, including resin-bonded furniture and building waste, to levulinate esters is being investigated with the view to producing fuels, solvents, and chemical intermediates as well as other useful by-products in an inexpensive process. The acid-catalyzed reaction of cellulosic materials with ethanol or methanol at 200 C gives good yields of levulinate and formate esters, as well as useful by-products, such as a solid residue (charcoal) and a resinous lignin residue. An initial plant design showed reasonable rates of return for production of purified ethyl levulinate and by-products. In this project, investigations have been performed to identify and develop reactions that utilize esters of levulinic acid produced during the acid-catalyzed ethanolysis reaction. We wish to develop uses for levulinate esters that allow their marketing at prices comparable to inexpensive polymer intermediates. These prices will allow a sufficient rate of return to justify building plants for utilizing the waste lignocellulosics. If need is demonstrated for purified levulinate, the initial plant design work may be adequate, at least until further pilot-scale work on the process is performed.

  7. Accident Analyses for Conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from Highly-Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Feldman, E. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Wilson, E. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Foyto, L. P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; McKibben, J. C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Peters, N. J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Cowherd, W. M. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program; Rickman, B. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program

    2014-12-01

    This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the MURR Facility, and the Nuclear Engineering Program – College of Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the MURR Facility, and the Nuclear Engineering Program – College of Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. In the framework of non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context most research and test reactors, both domestic and international, have started a program of conversion to the use of LEU fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (U-Mo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like MURR. This report presents the results of a study of core behavior under a set of accident conditions for MURR cores fueled with HEU U-Alx dispersion fuel or LEU monolithic U-Mo alloy fuel with 10 wt% Mo

  8. Benchmark Evaluation of the NRAD Reactor LEU Core Startup Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Bess; T. L. Maddock; M. A. Marshall

    2011-09-01

    The Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250-kW TRIGA-(Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics)-conversion-type reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory; it is primarily used for neutron radiography analysis of irradiated and unirradiated fuels and materials. The NRAD reactor was converted from HEU to LEU fuel with 60 fuel elements and brought critical on March 31, 2010. This configuration of the NRAD reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment and is available in the 2011 editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) and the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Significant effort went into precisely characterizing all aspects of the reactor core dimensions and material properties; detailed analyses of reactor parameters minimized experimental uncertainties. The largest contributors to the total benchmark uncertainty were the 234U, 236U, Er, and Hf content in the fuel; the manganese content in the stainless steel cladding; and the unknown level of water saturation in the graphite reflector blocks. A simplified benchmark model of the NRAD reactor was prepared with a keff of 1.0012 {+-} 0.0029 (1s). Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5 and KENO-VI and various neutron cross section libraries were performed and compared with the benchmark eigenvalue for the 60-fuel-element core configuration; all calculated eigenvalues are between 0.3 and 0.8% greater than the benchmark value. Benchmark evaluations of the NRAD reactor are beneficial in understanding biases and uncertainties affecting criticality safety analyses of storage, handling, or transportation applications with LEU-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  9. Conversion of atactic polypropylene waste to fuel oil. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, J.

    1981-04-01

    A stable, convenient thermal pyrolysis process was demonstrated on a large scale pilot plant. The process successfully converted high viscosity copolymer atactic polypropylene to predominantly liquid fuels which could be burned in commercial burners. Energy yield of the process was very high - in excess of 93% including gas phase heating value. Design and operating data were obtained to permit design of a commercial size atactic conversion plant. Atactic polypropylene can be cracked at temperatures around 850/sup 0/F and residence time of 5 minutes. The viscosity of the cracked product increases with decrease in time/temperature. A majority of the pyrolysis was carried out at a pressure of 50 psig. Thermal cracking of atactic polypropylene is seen to result in sigificant coke formation (0.4% to 0.8% on a weight of feed basis) although the coke levels were of an order of magnitude lower than those obtained during catalytic cracking. The discrepancy between batch and continuous test data can be atrributed to lowered heat transfer and diffusion rates. Oxidative pyrolysis is not seen as a viable commercial alternative due to a significant amount of water formation. However, introduction of controlled quantities of oxygen at lower temperatures to affect change in feedstock viscosity could be considered. It is essential to have a complete characterization of the polymer composition and structure in order to obtain useful and duplicable data because the pyrolysis products and probably the pyrolysis kinetics are affected by introduction of abnormalities into the polymer structure during polymerization. The polymer products from continuous testing contained an olefinic content of 80% or higher. This suggests that the pyrolysis products be investigated for use as olefinic raw materials. Catalytic cracking does not seem to result in any advantage over the Thermal Cracking process in terms of reaction rates or temperature of operation.

  10. Overview and Current Status of Analyses of Potential LEU Design Concepts for TREAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaway, H. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kontogeorgakos, D. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papadias, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wright, A. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses have been performed to evaluate the performance of different low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design concepts for the conversion of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) from its current high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. TREAT is an experimental reactor developed to generate high neutron flux transients for the testing of nuclear fuels. The goal of this work was to identify an LEU design which can maintain the performance of the existing HEU core while continuing to operate safely. A wide variety of design options were considered, with a focus on minimizing peak fuel temperatures and optimizing the power coupling between the TREAT core and test samples. Designs were also evaluated to ensure that they provide sufficient reactivity and shutdown margin for each control rod bank. Analyses were performed using the core loading and experiment configuration of historic M8 Power Calibration experiments (M8CAL). The Monte Carlo code MCNP was utilized for steady-state analyses, and transient calculations were performed with the point kinetics code TREKIN. Thermal analyses were performed with the COMSOL multi-physics code. Using the results of this study, a new LEU Baseline design concept is being established, which will be evaluated in detail in a future report.

  11. Conversion of hydrocarbon fuel in thermal protection reactors of hypersonic aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranov, A. L.; Mikhaylov, A. M.; Korabelnikov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal protection of heat-stressed surfaces of a high-speed vehicle flying in dense layers of atmosphere is one of the topical issues. Not of a less importance is also the problem of hydrocarbon fuel combustion in a supersonic air flow. In the concept under development, it is supposed that in the most high-stressed parts of airframe and engine, catalytic thermochemical reactors will be installed, wherein highly endothermic processes of steam conversion of hydrocarbon fuel take place. Simultaneously with heat absorption, hydrogen generation will occur in the reactors. This paper presents the results of a study of conversion of hydrocarbon fuel in a slit reactor.

  12. Comparison of thermal conversion methods of different biomass types into gaseous fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, O. M.; Sinelshchikov, V. A.; Sytchev, G. A.

    2016-11-01

    Thermal conversion methods of different biomass types into gaseous fuel are considered. The comparison of the gas mixtures characteristics (volume yield, composition and calorific value) that can be produced from the main biomass types by gasification and pyrolysis is presented. The merits and demerits of these methods are discussed. It is shown that the two-stage pyrolysis technology, which consists of the biomass pyrolysis and the consequent high-temperature conversion of pyrolysis gases and vapors into synthesis gas by filtration through a porous carbon medium, allows to achieve both a high degree of biomass conversion into gaseous fuel and a high energy efficiency.

  13. Conversion of Solar Energy to Fuels by Inorganic Heterogeneous Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kimfung LI; David MARTIN; Junwang TANG

    2011-01-01

    Over the last several years, the need to find clean and renewable energy sources has increased rapidly because current fossil fuels will not only eventually be depleted, but their continuous combustion leads to a dramatic increase in the carbon dioxide amount in atmosphere. Utilisation of the Sun's radiation can provide a solution to both problems. Hydrogen fuel can be generated by using solar energy to split water, and liquid fuels can be produced via direct CO2 photoreduction. This would create an essentially free carbon or at least carbon neutral energy cycle. In this tutorial review, the current progress in fuels' generation directly driven by solar energy is summarised. Fundamental mechanisms are discussed with suggestions for future research.

  14. A survey of Opportunities for Microbial Conversion of Biomass to Hydrocarbon Compatible Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, Iva; Jones, Susanne B.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Dai, Ziyu; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2010-09-01

    Biomass is uniquely able to supply renewable and sustainable liquid transportation fuels. In the near term, the Biomass program has a 2012 goal of cost competitive cellulosic ethanol. However, beyond 2012, there will be an increasing need to provide liquid transportation fuels that are more compatible with the existing infrastructure and can supply fuel into all transportation sectors, including aviation and heavy road transport. Microbial organisms are capable of producing a wide variety of fuel and fuel precursors such as higher alcohols, ethers, esters, fatty acids, alkenes and alkanes. This report surveys liquid fuels and fuel precurors that can be produced from microbial processes, but are not yet ready for commercialization using cellulosic feedstocks. Organisms, current research and commercial activities, and economics are addressed. Significant improvements to yields and process intensification are needed to make these routes economic. Specifically, high productivity, titer and efficient conversion are the key factors for success.

  15. MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY_

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. A. Moore; F. J. Rice; N. E. Woolstenhulme; J-F. Jue; B. H. Park; S. E. Steffler; N. P. Hallinan; M. D. Chapple; M. C. Marshall; B. L. Mackowiak; C. R. Clark; B. H. Rabin

    2009-11-01

    Full-size/prototypic U10Mo monolithic fuel-foils and aluminum clad fuel plates are being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). These efforts are focused on realizing Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) high density monolithic fuel plates for use in High Performance Research and Test Reactors. The U10Mo fuel foils under development afford a fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort, including application of a zirconium barrier layer on fuel foils, fabrication scale-up efforts, and development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fuel plate clad bonding processes to be discussed include: Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB).

  16. Fuel-nitrogen conversion in the combustion of small amines using dimethylamine and ethylamine as biomass-related model fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucassen, Arnas; Zhang, Kuiwen; Warkentin, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Laminar premixed flames of the two smallest isomeric amines, dimethylamine and ethylamine, were investigated under one-dimensional low-pressure (40mbar) conditions with the aim to elucidate pathways that may contribute to fuel-nitrogen conversion in the combustion of biomass. For this, identical...

  17. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R. Crable

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production.

  18. 76 FR 19829 - Clean Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Engine Conversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... software. Furthermore, manufacturers often change components and strategies between model years as...). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is streamlining the process by which manufacturers of clean alternative... Engineering Judgment C. Vehicle/Engine Groupings and Emission Data Vehicle/Engine Selection D. Mixed-Fuel...

  19. Catalytic Conversion of Bio-oil to Fuel for Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard

    The incitement for decreasing the modern society's dependency on fossil based fuel and energy is both environmentally and politically driven. Development of biofuels could be part of the future solution. The combination of ash pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of the produced bio-oil has been ide...

  20. Metal Nanoshells for Enhanced Solar-to-Fuel Photocatalytic Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    presence of metal nanoshells can absorb the solar energy in the IR range. However, the broad absorption of metal nanoshells also covered the visible...solar to heat), and photosynthesis (solar to fuel). In the latter technology, artificial photosynthesis mimics natural photosynthesis by converting...high enough to reduce water. (AgIn)xZnyS2x+y solid solution, derived from ZnS is a narrower band gap semiconductor. The absorption of the solid

  1. Task 3.3: Warm Syngas Cleanup and Catalytic Processes for Syngas Conversion to Fuels Subtask 3: Advanced Syngas Conversion to Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Li, J.; Taylor, Charles E.; Wang, Yong; Dagle, Robert A.; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Bao, Xinhe

    2014-03-31

    activity was to develop methods and enabling materials for syngas conversion to SNG with readily CO2 separation. Suitable methanation catalyst and CO2 sorbent materials were developed. Successful proof-of-concept for the combined reaction-sorption process was demonstrated, which culminated in a research publication. With successful demonstration, a decision was made to switch focus to an area of fuels research of more interest to all three research institutions (CAS-NETL-PNNL). Syngas-to-Hydrocarbon Fuels through Higher Alcohol Intermediates There are two types of processes in syngas conversion to fuels that are attracting R&D interest: 1) syngas conversion to mixed alcohols; and 2) syngas conversion to gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline process developed by Exxon-Mobil in the 1970s. The focus of this task was to develop a one-step conversion technology by effectively incorporating both processes, which is expected to reduce the capital and operational cost associated with the conversion of coal-derived syngas to liquid fuels. It should be noted that this work did not further study the classic Fischer-Tropsch reaction pathway. Rather, we focused on the studies for unique catalyst pathways that involve the direct liquid fuel synthesis enabled by oxygenated intermediates. Recent advances made in the area of higher alcohol synthesis including the novel catalytic composite materials recently developed by CAS using base metal catalysts were used.

  2. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; John Noetzel; Larry Chick

    2003-12-08

    The objective of Phase I under this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from January 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; and Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate.

  3. Reactivity insertion transient analysis for KUR low-enriched uranium silicide fuel core

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Xiuzhong; Nakajima, Ken; Unesaki, Hironobu; Mishima, Kaichiro

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to realize the full core conversion from the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuels to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuels in Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). Although the conversion of nuclear energy sources is required to keep the safety margins and reactor reliability based on KUR HEU core, the uranium density (3.2 gU/cm3) and enrichment (20%) of LEU fuel (U3Si2–AL) are quite different from the uranium density (0.58 gU/cm3) and enrichment (93%...

  4. Light Absorbers and Catalysts for Solar to Fuel Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornienko, Nikolay I.

    Increasing fossil fuel consumption and the resulting consequences to the environment has propelled research into means of utilizing alternative, clean energy sources. Solar power is among the most promising of renewable energy sources but must be converted into an energy dense medium such as chemical bonds to render it useful for transport and energy storage. Photoelectrochemistry (PEC), the splitting of water into oxygen and hydrogen fuel or reducing CO 2 to hydrocarbon fuels via sunlight is a promising approach towards this goal. Photoelectrochemical systems are comprised of several components, including light absorbers and catalysts. These parts must all synergistically function in a working device. Therefore, the continual development of each component is crucial for the overall goal. For PEC systems to be practical for large scale use, the must be efficient, stable, and composed of cost effective components. To this end, my work focused on the development of light absorbing and catalyst components of PEC solar to fuel converting systems. In the direction of light absorbers, I focused of utilizing Indium Phosphide (InP) nanowires (NWs) as photocathodes. I first developed synthetic techniques for InP NW solution phase and vapor phase growth. Next, I developed light absorbing photocathodes from my InP NWs towards PEC water splitting cells. I studied cobalt sulfide (CoSx) as an earth abundant catalyst for the reductive hydrogen evolution half reaction. Using in situ spectroscopic techniques, I elucidated the active structure of this catalyst and offered clues to its high activity. In addition to hydrogen evolution catalysts, I established a new generation of earth abundant catalysts for CO2 reduction to CO fuel/chemical feedstock. I first worked with molecularly tunable homogeneous catalysts that exhibited high selectivity for CO2 reduction in non-aqueous media. Next, in order to retain molecular tunability while achieving stability and efficiency in aqueous

  5. Coal conversion and the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryburgh, E.

    1980-01-01

    The Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (PIFUA) is designed to conserve domestic natural gas by requiring certain electric power plants to use alternate fuels. The author feels that the environmental implications of increasing coal use will not be made worse by PIFUA because best available control technology requirements will meet Clean Air Act standards and because market forces will increase coal use anyway. By favoring coal conversion, however, PIFUA supports industry efforts to weaken the standards. 58 references. (DCK)

  6. Numerical simulation of ion transport membrane reactors: Oxygen permeation and transport and fuel conversion

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2012-07-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) based reactors have been suggested as a novel technology for several applications including fuel reforming and oxy-fuel combustion, which integrates air separation and fuel conversion while reducing complexity and the associated energy penalty. To utilize this technology more effectively, it is necessary to develop a better understanding of the fundamental processes of oxygen transport and fuel conversion in the immediate vicinity of the membrane. In this paper, a numerical model that spatially resolves the gas flow, transport and reactions is presented. The model incorporates detailed gas phase chemistry and transport. The model is used to express the oxygen permeation flux in terms of the oxygen concentrations at the membrane surface given data on the bulk concentration, which is necessary for cases when mass transfer limitations on the permeate side are important and for reactive flow modeling. The simulation results show the dependence of oxygen transport and fuel conversion on the geometry and flow parameters including the membrane temperature, feed and sweep gas flow, oxygen concentration in the feed and fuel concentration in the sweep gas. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

    2011-03-02

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU

  8. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; Larry Chick

    2004-05-07

    The objective of this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from July 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate; and Task 10 Technology Transfer from SECA CORE Technology Program. In this reporting period, unless otherwise noted Task 6--System Fabrication and Task 7--System Testing will be reported within Task 1 System Design and Integration. Task 8--Program Management, Task 9--Stack Testing with Coal Based Reformate, and Task 10--Technology Transfer from SECA CORE Technology Program will be reported on in the Executive Summary section of this report.

  9. Energy conversion and fuel production from electrochemical interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Nenad

    2012-02-01

    Design and synthesis of energy efficient and stable electrochemical interfaces (materials and double layer components) with tailor properties for accelerating and directing chemical transformations is the key to developing new alternative energy systems -- fuel cells, electrolizers and batteries. In aqueous electrolytes, depending on the nature of the reacting species, the supporting electrolyte, and the metal electrodes, two types of interactions have traditionally been considered: (i) direct -- covalent - bond formation between adsorbates and electrodes, involving chemisorption, electron transfer, and release of the ion hydration shell; and (ii) relatively weak non-covalent metal-ion forces that may affect the concentration of ions in the vicinity of the electrode but do not involve direct metal-adsorbate bonding. The range of physical phenomena associated with these two classes of bonds is unusually broad, and are of paramount importance to understand activity of both metal-electrolyte two phase interfaces and metal-Nafion-electrolyte three phase interfaces. Furthermore, in the past, researcher working in the field of fuel cells (converting hydrogen and oxygen into water) and electrolyzers (splitting water back to H2 and O2) ) seldom focused on understanding the electrochemical compliments of these reactions in battery systems, e.g., the lithium-air system. In this lecture, we address the importance of both covalent and non-covalent interactions in controlling catalytic activity at the two-phase and three-phase interfaces. Although the field is still in its infancy, a great deal has already been learned and trends are beginning to emerge that give new insight into the relationship between the nature of bonding interactions and catalytic activity/stability of electrochemical interfaces. In addition, to bridge the gap between the ``water battery'' (fuel cell electrolyzer) and the Li-air battery systems we demonstrate that this would require fundamentally new

  10. Neutronic, steady-state, and transient analyses for the Kazakhstan VVR-K reactor with LEU fuel: ANL independent verification results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanan, Nelson A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Garner, Patrick L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Calculations have been performed for steady state and postulated transients in the VVR-K reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP), Kazakhstan. (The reactor designation in Cyrillic is BBP-K; transliterating characters to English gives VVR-K but translating words gives WWR-K.) These calculations have been performed at the request of staff of the INP who are performing similar calculations. The selection of the transients considered started during working meetings and email correspondence between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and INP staff. In the end the transient were defined by the INP staff. Calculations were performed for the fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) core and for four subsequent cores as beryllium is added to maintain critically during the first 15 cycles. These calculations have been performed independently from those being performed by INP and serve as one step in the verification process.

  11. Method and apparatus for conversion of carbonaceous materials to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lux, Kenneth W.; Namazian, Mehdi; Kelly, John T.

    2015-12-01

    Embodiments of the invention relates to conversion of hydrocarbon material including but not limited to coal and biomass to a synthetic liquid transportation fuel. The invention includes the integration of a non-catalytic first reaction scheme, which converts carbonaceous materials into a solid product that includes char and ash and a gaseous product; a non-catalytic second reaction scheme, which converts a portion of the gaseous product from the first reaction scheme to light olefins and liquid byproducts; a traditional gas-cleanup operations; and the third reaction scheme to combine the olefins from the second reaction scheme to produce a targeted fuel like liquid transportation fuels.

  12. Bi-fuel conversion a viable alternative for a power-strapped industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, K. [Whitby Hydro, Withby, ON (Canada)

    2004-04-01

    In light of the looming shortage of electric power generation capacity in Ontario, and given the long lead times required to build new capacity, distributed generation is gaining favour in the industry. This article explores the use of bi-fuel conversion, one of the promising solutions, in which standby diesel generation is converted for use with natural gas as an optional fuel. This short-term technology has been used over a long period in Europe and the United States; as such it has become a proven efficient and cost-effective means to utilize existing resources, reduce emissions from diesel generators and relieve pressure on the existing grid, at a cost far less than wholesale expansion. A bi-fuel conversion system (BFCS) injects natural gas into the air supply of an existing diesel engine. Gas percentages usually range from 40 per cent to 90 per cent. No modification to the internal components of the engine is required. The article describes the three integrated major sub-systems associated with BFCS, namely the gas control sub-system, the diesel control sub-system, and the electronic control and monitoring sub-system. It also provides an economic rationale for bi-fuel generation, complete with tables to calculate (1) cost savings using bi-fuel versus diesel fuel, and (2) cost savings using bi-fuel generator to displace utility power. Information is also provided on emission reductions associated with BFCS. 2 tabs.

  13. Shutdown Margin for High Conversion BWRs Operating in Th-233U Fuel Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Shaposhnik, Yaniv; Elias, Ezra

    2013-01-01

    Several reactivity control system design options are explored in order to satisfy shutdown margin (SDM) requirements in a high conversion BWRs operating in Th-233U fuel cycle (Th-RBWR). The studied has an axially heterogeneous fuel assembly structure with a single fissile zone sandwiched between two fertile blanket zones. The utilization of an originally suggested RBWR Y-shape control rod in Th-RBWR is shown to be insufficient for maintaining adequate SDM to balance the high negative reactivity feedbacks, while maintaining fuel breeding potential, core power rating, and minimum Critical Power Ratio (CPR). Instead, an alternative assembly design, also relying on heterogeneous fuel zoning, is proposed for achieving fissile inventory ratio (FIR) above unity, adequate SDM and meeting minimum CPR limit at thermal core output matching the ABWR power. The new concept was modeled as a single 3-dimensional fuel assembly having reflective radial boundaries, using the BGCore system, which consists of the MCNP code coupl...

  14. A reload and startup plan for conversion of the NIST research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology operates a 20 MW research reactor for neutron-based research. The heavy-water moderated and cooled reactor is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) but a program to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is underway. Among other requirements, a reload and startup test plan must be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for their approval. The NRC provides guidance for what should be in the plan to ensure that the licensee has sufficient information to operate the reactor safely. Hence, a plan has been generated consisting of two parts. The reload portion of the plan specifies the fuel management whereby initially only two LEU fuel elements are in the core for eight fuel cycles. This is repeated until a point when the optimum approach is to place four fresh LEU elements into the reactor each cycle. This final transition is repeated and after eight cycles the reactor is completely fueled with LEU. By only adding two LEU fuel elements initially, the plan allows for the consumption of HEU fuel elements that are expected to be in storage at the time of conversion and provides additional qualification of production LEU fuel under actual operating conditions. Because the reload is to take place over many fuel cycles, startup tests will be done at different stages of the conversion. The tests, to be compared with calculations to show that the reactor will operate as planned, are the measurement of critical shim arm position and shim arm and regulating rod reactivity worths. An acceptance criterion for each test is specified based on technical specifications that relate to safe operation. Additional tests are being considered that have less safety significance but may be of interest to bolster the validation of analysis tools.

  15. A single step methane conversion into synthetic fuels using microplasma reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Agiral, A.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Yuzawa, Shuhei; Okazaki, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Direct conversion of natural gas into synthetic fuels such as methanol attracts keen attention because direct process can reduce capital and operating costs of high temperature, energy intensive, multi-step processes. We report a direct and selective synthesis of organic oxygenates such as methanol,

  16. One-Pot Catalytic Conversion of Cellulose and of Woody Biomass Solids to Liquid Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matson, Theodore D.; Barta, Katalin; Iretskii, Alexei V.; Ford, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient methodologies for converting biomass solids to liquid fuels have the potential to reduce dependence on imported petroleum while easing the atmospheric carbon dioxide burden. Here, we report quantitative catalytic conversions of wood and cellulosic solids to liquid and gaseous products in a

  17. Direct Conversion of Chemically De-Ashed Coal in Fuel Cells (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J F

    2005-07-25

    We review the technical challenges associated with the production and use of various coal chars in a direct carbon conversion fuel cell. Existing chemical and physical deashing processes remove material below levels impacting performance at minimal cost. At equilibrium, sulfur entrained is rejected from the melt as COS in the offgas.

  18. Recent developments in the production of liquid fuels via catalytic conversion of microalgae: experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Fan; Wang, Pin; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize ‘‘food versus fuel’’ concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

  19. Bed models for solid fuel conversion process in grate-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M.; Massarotti, N.; Indrizzi, V.

    2013-01-01

    to describe the thermo-chemical conversion process of a solid fuel bed in a grate-fired boiler is presented. In this work both models consider the incoming solid fuel as subjected to drying, pyrolysis, gasification and combustion. In the first approach the biomass bed is treated as a 0D system, but the thermo......Because of the complexity to describe and solve thermo-chemical processes occurring in a fuel bed in grate-fired boiler, it is often necessary to simplify the process and use modeling techniques based on overall mass, energy and species conservation. A comparison between two numerical models......-chemical processes are divided in two successive sections: drying and conversion (which includes pyrolysis, gasification and combustion). The second model is an empirical 1D approach. The two models need input data such as composition, temperature and feeding rate of biomass and primary air. Temperature, species...

  20. Rationale for continuing R&D in direct coal conversion to produce high quality transportation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, R.D.; McIlvried, H.G. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gray, D. [Mitre Corp, McLean, VA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    For the foreseeable future, liquid hydrocarbon fuels will play a significant role in the transportation sector of both the United States and the world. Factors favoring these fuels include convenience, high energy density, and the vast existing infrastructure for their production and use. At present the U.S. consumes about 26% of the world supply of petroleum, but this situation is expected to change because of declining domestic production and increasing competition for imports from countries with developing economies. A scenario and time frame are developed in which declining world resources will generate a shortfall in petroleum supply that can be allieviated in part by utilizing the abundant domestic coal resource base. One option is direct coal conversion to liquid transportation fuels. Continued R&D in coal conversion technology will results in improved technical readiness that can significantly reduce costs so that synfuels can compete economically in a time frame to address the shortfall.

  1. Radiation-initiated conversion of paraffins to engine fuel: Direct and indirect initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metreveli, A. K.; Ponomarev, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Formation of gasoline and diesel fuel has been investigated using three various radiation-induced ways: (1) cracking of wax, (2) synthesis from methane, (3) high-temperature conversion of wax dilute solution in methane. The wax, synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch method, initially contained a mixture of C17-C120 linear paraffins. The yield of wax conversion to liquid mixture (C4-C27 alkenes and 61.5% alkanes) via mode (1) was 0.83±0.09 μmole/J, whereas yield of gas conversion to liquid mixture (C5-C13 alkanes) via mode (2) was 0.95±0.02 μmole/J. In the dilute solution wax underwent indirect action of radiation. In comparison with (1) the mode (3) produces similar amount of lighter fuel containing 80% of alkanes (C5-C15). At the same time degree of methane fixation is almost three times higher.

  2. A novel thin film solid oxide fuel cell for microscale energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowiski, A F; Morse, J D

    1999-05-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication and assembly of a solid oxide fuel cell system is described which enables effective scaling of the fuel delivery, mainfold, and fuel cell stack components for applications in miniature and microscale energy conversion. Electrode materials for solid oxide fuel cells are developed using sputter deposition techniques. A thin film anode is formed by codeposition of nickel and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). This approach provides a mixed conducting interfacial layer between the nickel electrode and electrolyte layer. Similarly, a thin film cathode is formed by co-deposition of silver and yttria-stabilized zirconia. Additionally, sputter deposition of yttria-stabilized zirconia thin film electrolyte enables high quality, continuous films to be formed having thickness on the order of 1-2 {micro}m. This will effectively lower the temperature of operation for the fuel cell stack significantly below the traditional ranges at which solid oxide electrolyte systems are operated (600--1000 C), thereby rendering this fuel cell system suitable for miniaturization. Scaling towards miniaturization is accomplished by utilizing novel micromaching approaches which allow manifold channels and fuel delivery system to be formed within the substrate which the thin film fuel cell stack is fabricated on, thereby circumventing the need for bulky manifold components which are not directly scalable.

  3. Perspectives of Biogas Conversion into Bio-CNG for Automobile Fuel in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for liquid and gaseous fuel for transportation application is growing very fast. This high consumption trend causes swift exhaustion of fossil fuel reserve as well as severe environment pollution. Biogas can be converted into various renewable automobile fuels such as bio-CNG, syngas, gasoline, and liquefied biogas. However, bio-CNG, a compressed biogas with high methane content, can be a promising candidate as vehicle fuel in replacement of conventional fuel to resolve this problem. This paper presents an overview of available liquid and gaseous fuel commonly used as transportation fuel in Bangladesh. The paper also illustrates the potential of bio-CNG conversion from biogas in Bangladesh. It is estimated that, in the fiscal year 2012-2013, the country had about 7.6775 billion m3 biogas potential equivalent to 5.088 billion m3 of bio-CNG. Bio-CNG is competitive to the conventional automobile fuels in terms of its properties, economy, and emission.

  4. Effective conversion of biomass tar into fuel gases in a microwave reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Samsudin; Zainal, Z. A.

    2016-06-01

    This work deals with conversion of naphthalene (C10H8) as a biomass tar model compound by means of thermal and catalytic treatments. A modified microwave oven with a maximum output power of 700 W was used as the experimental reactor. Experiments were performed in a wide temperature range of 450-1200°C at a predetermined residence time of 0.24-0.5 s. Dolomite and Y-zeolite were applied to convert naphthalene catalytically into useful gases. Experimental results on naphthalene conversion showed that conversion efficiency and yield of gases increased significantly with the increase of temperature. More than 90% naphthalene conversion efficiency was achieved by thermal treatment at 1200°C and 0.5 s. Nevertheless, this treatment was unfavorable for fuel gases production. The main product of this treatment was soot. Catalytic treatment provided different results with that of thermal treatment in which fuel gases formation was found to be the important product of naphthalene conversion. At a high temperature of 900°C, dolomite had better conversion activity where almost 40 wt.% of naphthalene could be converted into hydrogen, methane and other hydrocarbon gases.

  5. Effective conversion of biomass tar into fuel gases in a microwave reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anis, Samsudin, E-mail: samsudin-anis@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universitas Negeri Semarang, Kampus Sekaran, Gunungpati, 50229 Semarang, 8508101 (Indonesia); Zainal, Z. A., E-mail: mezainal@usm.my [School of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-06-03

    This work deals with conversion of naphthalene (C{sub 10}H{sub 8}) as a biomass tar model compound by means of thermal and catalytic treatments. A modified microwave oven with a maximum output power of 700 W was used as the experimental reactor. Experiments were performed in a wide temperature range of 450-1200°C at a predetermined residence time of 0.24-0.5 s. Dolomite and Y-zeolite were applied to convert naphthalene catalytically into useful gases. Experimental results on naphthalene conversion showed that conversion efficiency and yield of gases increased significantly with the increase of temperature. More than 90% naphthalene conversion efficiency was achieved by thermal treatment at 1200°C and 0.5 s. Nevertheless, this treatment was unfavorable for fuel gases production. The main product of this treatment was soot. Catalytic treatment provided different results with that of thermal treatment in which fuel gases formation was found to be the important product of naphthalene conversion. At a high temperature of 900°C, dolomite had better conversion activity where almost 40 wt.% of naphthalene could be converted into hydrogen, methane and other hydrocarbon gases.

  6. Conversion from film to image plates for transfer method neutron radiography of nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, Aaron E.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.

    2017-02-01

    This paper summarizes efforts to characterize and qualify a computed radiography (CR) system for neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). INL has multiple programs that are actively developing, testing, and evaluating new nuclear fuels. Irradiated fuel experiments are subjected to a number of sequential post-irradiation examination techniques that provide insight into the overall behavior and performance of the fuel. One of the first and most important of these exams is neutron radiography, which provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Results from neutron radiography are often the driver for subsequent examinations of the PIE program. Features of interest that can be evaluated using neutron radiography include irradiation-induced swelling, isotopic and fuel-fragment redistribution, plate deformations, and fuel fracturing. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique with film for imaging fuel. INL is pursuing multiple efforts to advance its neutron imaging capabilities for evaluating irradiated fuel and other applications, including conversion from film to CR image plates. Neutron CR is the current state-of-the-art for neutron imaging of highly-radioactive objects. Initial neutron radiographs of various types of nuclear fuel indicate that radiographs can be obtained of comparable image quality currently obtained using film. This paper provides neutron radiographs of representative irradiated fuel pins along with neutron radiographs of standards that informed the qualification of the neutron CR system for routine use. Additionally, this paper includes evaluations of some of the CR scanner parameters and their effects on image quality.

  7. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE (SECA) SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Minh; Jim Powers

    2003-10-01

    This report summarizes the work performed for April 2003--September 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid oxide Fuel Cell Program''. During this reporting period, the conceptual system design activity was completed. The system design, including strategies for startup, normal operation and shutdown, was defined. Sealant and stack materials for the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack were identified which are capable of meeting the thermal cycling and degradation requirements. A cell module was tested which achieved a stable performance of 0.238 W/cm{sup 2} at 95% fuel utilization. The external fuel processor design was completed and fabrication begun. Several other advances were made on various aspects of the SOFC system, which are detailed in this report.

  8. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 3: Energy conversion subsystems and components. Part 3: Gasification, process fuels, and balance of plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothe, W. A.; Corman, J. C.; Johnson, G. G.; Cassel, T. A. V.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation of gasification and clean fuels from coal. Factors discussed include: coal and coal transportation costs; clean liquid and gas fuel process efficiencies and costs; and cost, performance, and environmental intrusion elements of the integrated low-Btu coal gasification system. Cost estimates for the balance-of-plant requirements associated with advanced energy conversion systems utilizing coal or coal-derived fuels are included.

  9. EDITORIAL: Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Gutsol, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    This special issue is based on the symposium on Non-thermal Plasma Assisted Fuel Conversion for Green Chemistry, a part of the 240th ACS National Meeting & Exposition held in Boston, MA, USA, 22-26 August 2010. Historically, the Division of Fuel Chemistry of the American Chemical Society (ACS) has featured three plasma-related symposia since 2000, and has launched special issues in Catalysis Today on three occasions: 'Catalyst Preparation using Plasma Technologies', Fall Meeting, Washington DC, USA, 2000. Special issue in Catalysis Today 72 (3-4) with 12 peer-reviewed articles. 'Plasma Technology and Catalysis', Spring Meeting, New Orleans, LA, USA, 2003. Special issue in Catalysis Today 89 (1-2) with more than 30 peer-reviewed articles. 'Utilization of Greenhouse Gases II' (partly focused on plasma-related technologies), Spring Meeting, Anaheim, CA, USA, 2004. Special issue in Catalysis Today 98 (4) with 25 peer-reviewed articles. This time, selected presentations are published in this Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics special issue. An industrial material and energy conversion technology platform is established on thermochemical processes including various catalytic reactions. Existing industry-scale technology is already well established; nevertheless, further improvement in energy efficiency and material saving has been continuously demanded. Drastic reduction of CO2 emission is also drawing keen attention with increasing recognition of energy and environmental issues. Green chemistry is a rapidly growing research field, and frequently highlights renewable bioenergy, bioprocesses, solar photocatalysis of water splitting, and regeneration of CO2 into useful chemicals. We would also like to emphasize 'plasma catalysis' of hydrocarbon resources as an important part of the innovative next-generation green technologies. The peculiarity of non-thermal plasma is that it can generate reactive species almost independently of reaction temperature. Plasma

  10. Shutdown margin for high conversion BWRs operating in Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaposhnik, Y., E-mail: shaposhy@bgu.ac.il [NRCN – Nuclear Research Center Negev, POB 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shwageraus, E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Elias, E. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City 32000, Haifa (Israel)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • BWR core operating in a closed self-sustainable Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle. • Shutdown Margin in Th-RBWR design. • Fully coupled MC with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules. • Thermal–hydraulic analysis includes MCPR observation. - Abstract: Several reactivity control system design options are explored in order to satisfy shutdown margin (SDM) requirements in a high conversion BWRs operating in Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle (Th-RBWR). The studied core has an axially heterogeneous fuel assembly structure with a single fissile zone “sandwiched” between two fertile blanket zones. The utilization of an originally suggested RBWR Y-shape control rod in Th-RBWR is shown to be insufficient for maintaining adequate SDM to balance the high negative reactivity feedbacks, while maintaining fuel breeding potential, core power rating, and minimum Critical Power Ratio (CPR). Implementation of alternative reactivity control materials, reducing axial leakage through non-uniform enrichment distribution, use of burnable poisons, reducing number of pins as well as increasing pin diameter are also shown to be incapable of meeting the SDM requirements. Instead, an alternative assembly design, based on Rod Cluster Control Assembly with absorber rods was investigated. This design matches the reference ABWR core power and has adequate shutdown margin. The new concept was modeled as a single three-dimensional fuel assembly having reflective radial boundaries, using the BGCore system, which consists of the MCNP code coupled with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules.

  11. Hydrothermal Conversion in Near-Critical Water – A Sustainable Way of Producing Renewable Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Jessica; Pedersen, Thomas Helmer; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Liquid fuels from biomass will form an essential part of meeting the grand challenges within energy. The need for renewable and sustainable energy sources is triggered by a number of factors; like increase in global energy demand, depletion of conventional resources, climate issues and the desire...... for national/regional energy independence. Especially in marine, aviation and heavy land transport suitable carbon neutral drop-in fuels from biomass are needed, since electrification of those is rather unlikely. Hydrothermal conversion (HTC) of biomass offers a solution and is a sustainable way of converting...

  12. Hydrothermal Conversion in Near-Critical Water – A Sustainable Way of Producing Renewable Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Jessica; Pedersen, Thomas Helmer; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Liquid fuels from biomass will form an essential part of meeting the grand challenges within energy. The need for renewable and sustainable energy sources is triggered by a number of factors; like increase in global energy demand, depletion of conventional resources, climate issues and the desire...... for national/regional energy independence. Especially in marine, aviation and heavy land transport suitable carbon neutral drop-in fuels from biomass are needed, since electrification of those is rather unlikely. Hydrothermal conversion (HTC) of biomass offers a solution and is a sustainable way of converting...

  13. Engineering bed models for solid fuel conversion process in grate-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M.; Massarotti, N.; Indrizzi, V.

    2014-01-01

    A comparison between two numerical models describing the thermo-chemical conversion process of a solid fuel bed in a grate-fired boiler is presented. Both models consider the incoming biomass as subjected to drying, pyrolysis, gasification and combustion. In the first approach the biomass bed...... of the syngas predicted by the two models is equal to about 7%. The application to different types of biomass shows that the difference in the predictions increases as the carbon content grows. The phenomenological model, in fact, generally considers higher conversion rates of this element to volatiles...

  14. Analysis of magma-thermal conversion of biomass to gaseous fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, T.M.

    1982-02-01

    A wide range of magma types and pluton geometries believed to occur within the upper 10 km of the crust provide suitable sources of thermal energy for conversion of water-biomass mixtures to higher quality gaseous fuel. Gaseous fuel can be generated within a magma body, within the hot subsolidus margins of a magma body, or within surface reaction vessels heated by thermal energy derived from a magma body. The composition, amount, and energy content of the fuel gases generated from water-biomass mixtures are not sensitive to the type, age, depth, or temperature of a magma body thermal source. The amount and energy content of the generated fuel is almost entirely a function of the proportion of biomass in the starting mixture. CH/sub 4/ is the main gas that can be generated in important quantities by magma thermal energy under most circumstances. CO is never an important fuel product, and H/sub 2/ generation is very limited. The rates at which gaseous fuels can be generated are strongly dependent on magma type. Fuel generation rates for basaltic magmas are at least 2 to 3 times those for andesitic magmas and 5 to 6 times those for rhyolitic magmas. The highest fuel generation rates, for any particular magma body, will be achieved at the lowest possible reaction vessel operating temperature that does not cause graphite deposition from the water-biomass starting mixture. The energy content of the biomass-derived fuels is considerably greater than that consumed in the generation and refinement process.

  15. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Conversion Pathway: Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons The 2017 Design Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of a range of liquid fuels and fuel blendstocks from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass collection, conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL conducted a campaign to quantify the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from standing in the field or stand to the throat of the biomass conversion process. The goal of this program was to establish the current costs based on conventional equipment and processes, design improvements to the current system, and to mark annual improvements based on higher efficiencies or better designs. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a delivered biomass logistics cost of $35/dry ton. This goal was successfully achieved in 2012 by implementing field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model. Looking forward to 2017, the programmatic target is to supply biomass to the conversion facilities at a total cost of $80/dry ton and on specification with in-feed requirements. The goal of the 2017 Design Case is to enable expansion of biofuels production beyond highly productive resource areas by breaking the reliance of cost-competitive biofuel production on a single, abundant, low-cost feedstock. If this goal is not achieved, biofuel plants are destined to be small and/or clustered in select regions of the country that have a lock on low-cost feedstock. To put the 2017 cost target into perspective of past accomplishments of the cellulosic ethanol pathway, the $80 target encompasses total delivered feedstock cost, including both grower payment and logistics costs, while meeting all

  16. RERTR progress in Mo-99 production from LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Conner, C.; Aase, S.; Bakel, A.; Bowers, D.; Freiberg, E.; Gelis, A.; Quigley, K.J.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The ANL RERTR program is performing R and D supporting conversion of {sup 99}Mo production from HEU to LEU targets. Irradiation and processing of LEU targets were demonstrated at the Argentine Ezeiza Atomic Center. Target irradiation and disassembly were flawless, but the processing is not fully developed. In addition to preparing for, assisting in, and analyzing results of the demonstration, we performed other R and D related to LEU conversion: (1) designing a prototype production dissolver for digesting irradiated LEU foils in alkaline solutions and developing means to simplify digestion, (2) modifying ion-exchange columns used in the CNEA recovery and purification of {sup 99}Mo to deal with the lower volumes generated from LEU-foil digestion, (3) measuring the performance of new inorganic sorbents that outperform alumina for recovering Mo(VI) from nitric acid solutions containing high concentrations of uranium nitrate, and (4) developing means to facilitate the concentration and calcination of waste nitric-acid/LEU-nitrate solutions from {sup 99} Mo production. (author)

  17. Prospects for conversion of solar energy into chemical fuels: the concept of a solar fuels industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriman, Anthony

    2013-08-13

    There is, at present, no solar fuels industry anywhere in the world despite the well-publicized needs to replace our depleting stock of fossil fuels with renewable energy sources. Many obstacles have to be overcome in order to store sunlight in the form of chemical potential, and there are severe barriers to surmount in order to produce energy on a massive scale, at a modest price and in a convenient form. It is also essential to allow for the intermittent nature of sunlight, its diffusiveness and variability and to cope with the obvious need to use large surface areas for light collection. Nonetheless, we have no alternative but to devise viable strategies for storage of sunlight as biomass or chemical feedstock. Simple alternatives, such as solar heating, are attractive in terms of quick demonstrations but are not the answer. Photo-electrochemical devices might serve as the necessary machinery by which to generate electronic charge but the main problem is to couple these charges to the multi-electron catalysis needed to drive energy-storing chemical reactions. Several potential fuels (CO, H₂, HCOOH, NH₃, O₂, speciality organics, etc.) are possible, but the photochemical reduction of CO₂ deserves particular mention because of ever-growing concerns about overproduction of greenhouse gases. The prospects for achieving these reactions under ambient conditions are considered herein.

  18. Development of Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading Technologies for Lipid-Extracted Algae Conversion to Liquid Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-10-01

    Bench-scale tests were performed for lipid-extracted microalgae (LEA) conversion to liquid fuels via hydrotreating liquefaction (HTL) and upgrading processes. Process simulation and economic analysis for a large-scale LEA HTL and upgrading system were developed based on the best available test results. The system assumes an LEA feed rate of 608 dry metric ton/day and that the feedstock is converted to a crude HTL bio-oil and further upgraded via hydrotreating and hydrocracking to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels, mainly alkanes. Performance and cost results demonstrate that HTL would be an effective option to convert LEA to liquid fuel. The liquid fuels annual yield was estimated to be 26.9 million gallon gasoline-equivalent and the overall energy efficiency at higher heating value basis was estimated to be 69.5%. The minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) was estimated to be $0.75/L with LEA feedstock price at $33.1 metric ton at dry basis and 10% internal rate of return. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the largest effects to production cost would come from the final products yields and the upgrading equipments cost. The impact of plant scale on MFSP was also investigated.

  19. Wabash Valley Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Coal to Fischer Tropsch Jet Fuel Conversion Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Jayesh [Lummus Technology Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (United States); Hess, Fernando [Lummus Technology Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (United States); Horzen, Wessel van [Lummus Technology Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (United States); Williams, Daniel [Lummus Technology Inc., Bloomfield, NJ (United States); Peevor, Andy [JM Davy, London (United Kingdom); Dyer, Andy [JM Davy, London (United Kingdom); Frankel, Louis [Canonsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This reports examines the feasibility of converting the existing Wabash Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant into a liquid fuel facility, with the goal of maximizing jet fuel production. The fuels produced are required to be in compliance with Section 526 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007 §526) lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions requirements, so lifecycle GHG emissions from the fuel must be equal to or better than conventional fuels. Retrofitting an existing gasification facility reduces the technical risk and capital costs associated with a coal to liquids project, leading to a higher probability of implementation and more competitive liquid fuel prices. The existing combustion turbine will continue to operate on low cost natural gas and low carbon fuel gas from the gasification facility. The gasification technology utilized at Wabash is the E-Gas™ Technology and has been in commercial operation since 1995. In order to minimize capital costs, the study maximizes reuse of existing equipment with minimal modifications. Plant data and process models were used to develop process data for downstream units. Process modeling was utilized for the syngas conditioning, acid gas removal, CO2 compression and utility units. Syngas conversion to Fischer Tropsch (FT) liquids and upgrading of the liquids was modeled and designed by Johnson Matthey Davy Technologies (JM Davy). In order to maintain the GHG emission profile below that of conventional fuels, the CO2 from the process must be captured and exported for sequestration or enhanced oil recovery. In addition the power utilized for the plant’s auxiliary loads had to be supplied by a low carbon fuel source. Since the process produces a fuel gas with sufficient energy content to power the plant’s loads, this fuel gas was converted to hydrogen and exported to the existing gas turbine for low carbon power production. Utilizing low carbon fuel gas and

  20. Planning the HEU to LEU Transition for the NBSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2011-10-24

    A study has been carried out to understand how the NIST research reactor (NBSR) might be converted from using high-enriched uranium (HEU) to using low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. An LEU fuel design had previously been determined which provides an equilibrium core with the desirable fuel cycle length—a very important parameter for maintaining the experimental, scientific program supported by the NBSR. In the present study two options for getting to the equilibrium state are considered. One option starts with the loading of an entire core of fresh fuel. This was determined to be unacceptable. The other option makes use of the current fuel management scheme wherein four fresh fuel elements are loaded at the beginning of each cycle. However, it is shown that without some alterations to the fuel cycle, none of the transition cores containing both HEU and LEU fuel have sufficient excess reactivity to enable reactor operation for the required amount of time. It was determined that operating the first mixed cycle for a sufficiently reduced length of time provides the excess reactivity which enables subsequent transition cycles to be run for the desired number of days.

  1. Conversion of Fuel-N to N2O and NOx during Coal Combustion in Combustors of Different Scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周昊; 黄燕; 莫桂源; 廖子昱; 岑可法

    2013-01-01

    With focus on investigating the effect of combustor scale on the conversion of fuel-N to NOx and N2O, experiments are carried out in three combustors, including single coal particle combustion test rig, laboratory scale circulating fluidized-bed boiler (CFB) and full scale CFB in this work. For single coal particle combustion, the ma-jority of fuel-N (65%-82%) is released as NOx, while only a little (less than 8%) fuel-N yields N2O. But in labora-tory scale CFB, the conversion of fuel-N to N2O is increases, but the conversion of fuel-N to NOx is quite less than that of single coal particle combustion. This is because much char in CFB can promote the NOx reduction by in-creasing N2O formation. In full scale CFB, both of the conversion of fuel-N to NOx and the conversion of fuel-N to N2O are smaller than laboratory scale CFB.

  2. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  3. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  4. On-board fuel conversion: Dimethyl ether from methanol for compression ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, H.; Stucki, S.

    2002-03-01

    One example of an on-board fuel conversion system is the fumigation of dimethyl ether. In this concept, a fraction of the methanol used as fuel is catalytically converted on-board to DME and water. The rate-determining step of the catalytic reaction with {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a catalyst is found to be the reaction of adsorbed intermediates; mass transfer is limited by Knudsen diffusivity. Providing DME for fumigation in a 180 kW engine will require approx. 0,7 kg of catalyst. The transient behavior of a pilot fixed-bed reactor has been estimated using simplified models, which show that the cold start should be manageable in less than one minute. This is an acceptable time for cold-starting an engine in heavy-duty vehicles. (author)

  5. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE (SECA) SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2003-06-01

    This report summarizes the progress made during the September 2001-March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program''. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate a modular SOFC system that can be configured to create highly efficient, cost-competitive, and environmentally benign power plants tailored to specific markets. When fully developed, the system will meet the efficiency, performance, life, and cost goals for future commercial power plants.

  6. One-pot catalytic conversion of cellulose and of woody biomass solids to liquid fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Theodore D; Barta, Katalin; Iretskii, Alexei V; Ford, Peter C

    2011-09-07

    Efficient methodologies for converting biomass solids to liquid fuels have the potential to reduce dependence on imported petroleum while easing the atmospheric carbon dioxide burden. Here, we report quantitative catalytic conversions of wood and cellulosic solids to liquid and gaseous products in a single stage reactor operating at 300-320 °C and 160-220 bar. Little or no char is formed during this process. The reaction medium is supercritical methanol (sc-MeOH) and the catalyst, a copper-doped porous metal oxide, is composed of earth-abundant materials. The major liquid product is a mixture of C(2)-C(6) aliphatic alcohols and methylated derivatives thereof that are, in principle, suitable for applications as liquid fuels.

  7. Efficient powder blending in support of plutonium conversion for mixed oxide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennison, D.K.; Brucker, J.P.; Martinez, H.E.

    1999-06-07

    This paper describes a unique system that is used to mix and blend multiple batches of plutonium oxide powder of various consistencies into an equivalent number of identical and homogeneously mixed batches. This system is being designed and built to support the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) at the Los Alamos TA-55 Plutonium Facility. The ARIES program demonstrates dismantlement of nuclear pits, retrieval of the plutonium components, and conversion of the plutonium into an oxide for eventual use in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for nuclear reactors. The purpose of this powder blending work is to assure that ARIES oxide is converted into an unclassified homogeneous mixture and that consistent feed material is available for MOX fuel assembly. This blending system is being assembled in a selected glovebox a TA-55 using an LANL designed split/combine apparatus, a commercial Turbula blending unit, and several additional supporting hardware components.

  8. Aqueous processing of U-10Mo scrap for high performance research reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youker, Amanda J.; Stepinski, Dominique C.; Maggos, Laura E.; Bakel, Allen J.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2012-08-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Conversion program, which is part of the US government's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), supports the conversion of civilian use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel and targets. The reason for conversion is to eliminate the use of any material that may pose a threat to the United States or other foreign countries. High performance research reactors (HPRRs) cannot make the conversion to a standard LEU fuel because they require a more dense fuel to meet their performance requirements. As a result, a more dense fuel consisting of a monolithic uranium-molybdenum alloy containing 10% (w/w) Mo with Al cladding and a Zr bonding-layer is being considered. Significant losses are expected in the fabrication of this fuel, so a means to recycle the scrap pieces is needed. Argonne National Laboratory has developed an aqueous-processing flowsheet for scrap recovery in the fuel fabrication process for high-density LEU-monolithic fuel based on data found in the literature. Experiments have been performed to investigate dissolution conditions for solutions containing approximately 20 g-U/L and 50 g-U/L with and without Fe(NO3)3. HNO3 and HF concentrations have been optimized for timely dissolution of the fuel scrap and prevention of the formation of the U-Zr2 intermetallic, explosive complex, while meeting the requirements needed for further processing.

  9. Bi-fuel conversion a key to tapping into hidden power sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, K.

    2004-07-01

    A solution to bridge the ever-widening gap between electricity supply and demand is discussed. The solution proposed involves bi-fuel conversion of diesel generators using natural gas. The system is claimed to play a key role in preserving resources and reducing the burden on electrical systems. Benefits of the system include reduced emissions, reduced operating costs, extended run time for stored diesel fuel, high efficiency electric grid support, reliable operation of equipment for peak sharing/shaving, and higher return on investment as a result of higher utilization of capitalized equipment. The system works with all grades of diesel fuel and with all methane gas types. It can be manually returned to 100 per cent diesel operation, or it can be set to automatically return in the event of any fault condition. The system consists of three integrated major sub-systems, namely the gas control sub-system, the diesel control sub-system, and the electronic control and monitoring sub-system. Operating principles and each of these sub-systems are described, followed by an explanation of how the environmental benefits and economic savings are generated. A typical example for a 500 kW bi-fuel peak-shaving project is provided to further illustrate potential cost savings. 1 fig.

  10. Power conversion and quality of the Santa Clara 2 MW direct carbonate fuel cell demonstration plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skok, A.J. [Fuel Cell Engineering Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Abueg, R.Z. [Basic Measuring Instruments, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Schwartz, P. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is the first application of a commercial-scale carbonate fuel cell power plant on a US electric utility system. It is also the largest fuel cell power plant ever operated in the United States. The 2MW plant, located in Santa Clara, California, utilizes carbonate fuel cell technology developed by Energy Research Corporation (ERC) of Danbury, Connecticut. The ultimate goal of a fuel cell power plant is to deliver usable power into an electrical distribution system. The power conversion sub-system does this for the Santa Clara Demonstration Plant. A description of this sub-system and its capabilities follows. The sub-system has demonstrated the capability to deliver real power, reactive power and to absorb reactive power on a utility grid. The sub-system can be operated in the same manner as a conventional rotating generator except with enhanced capabilities for reactive power. Measurements demonstrated the power quality from the plant in various operating modes was high quality utility grade power.

  11. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Final report No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  12. Developing Lactic Acid Bacteria for the conversion of brown macroalgae into green chemicals and fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosma, Elleke Fenna; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    or sea weed, which do not contain lignin, do not require fresh water, are not a major food source, and contain a higher sugar fraction. The main sugars are mannitol, laminarin (glucose) and alginate (guluronate and mannuronate). We will use metabolic engineering and laboratory evolution of Lactic Acid...... Bacteria (LAB) for the conversion of brown macroalgae into green chemicals and fuels. To select the best-suited production platform, we are screening Lactobacillus and Pediococcus strains for traits like genetic accessibility, substrate utilization and several stress tolerances. Most microorganisms...

  13. Graphene-based electrochemical energy conversion and storage: fuel cells, supercapacitors and lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Junbo; Shao, Yuyan; Ellis, Michael W; Moore, Robert B; Yi, Baolian

    2011-09-14

    Graphene has attracted extensive research interest due to its strictly 2-dimensional (2D) structure, which results in its unique electronic, thermal, mechanical, and chemical properties and potential technical applications. These remarkable characteristics of graphene, along with the inherent benefits of a carbon material, make it a promising candidate for application in electrochemical energy devices. This article reviews the methods of graphene preparation, introduces the unique electrochemical behavior of graphene, and summarizes the recent research and development on graphene-based fuel cells, supercapacitors and lithium ion batteries. In addition, promising areas are identified for the future development of graphene-based materials in electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems.

  14. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Final report No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  15. A guide to the emissions certification procedures for alternative fuel aftermarket conversions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    Emissions certification is still relatively new to the aftermarket vehicle conversion industry. Many in the industry think that as soon as a vehicle is converted to operate on compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied petroleum gas (LFG), it automatically runs as clean as or cleaner than it did on the conventional fuel. However, recent studies have shown that aftermarket conversions may not always reduce emissions. To achieve emissions benefits, the conversion equipment must be designed and calibrated specifically for the engine and emissions control system on which it has been installed, and the installation and setup must be performed so as to not adversely affect the vehicle`s original emissions performance. The reason for certification, then, is to ensure that these criteria are met, that the vehicle continues to perform properly, and that it continues to satisfy all appropriate emissions standards throughout its useful life. The authors have prepared this guide to help equipment manufacturers, distributors, and installers understand the emissions certification process for aftermarket conversions. The guide gives an overview of the certification requirements established by the US EPA and by the state of California.

  16. Direct Conversion of Carbon Fuels in a Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, N J; Fiet, K J; Krueger, R; Jankowski, A F; Cooper, J F

    2004-01-28

    Anodes of elemental carbon may be discharged in a galvanic cell using a molten carbonate electrolyte, a nickel-foam anode-current collector, and a porous nickel air cathode to achieve power densities of 40-100 mW/cm{sup 2}. We report cell and anode polarization, surface area, primary particle size and a crystallization index for nine particulate carbon samples derived from fuel oil, methane, coal, charred biological material and petroleum coke. At 800 C, current densities of 50-125 mA/cm{sup 2} were measured at a representative cell voltage of 0.8 V. Power densities for cells with two carbon-anode materials were found to be nearly the same on scales of 2.8- and 60 cm{sup 2} active area. Constant current operation of a small cell was accompanied by constant voltage during multiple tests of 10-30 hour duration. Cell voltage fell off after the carbon inventory was consumed. Three different cathode structures are compared, indicating that an LLNL fabricated porous nickel electrode with <10 {micro}m pores provides improved rates compared with nickel foam with 100-300 {micro}m pores. Petroleum coke containing substantial sulfur and ash discharges at a slightly lower rate than purified petroleum coke. The sulfur leads to degradation of the anode current collector over time. A conceptual model for electrochemical reactivity of carbon is presented which indicates the importance of (1) bulk lattice disorder, which continually provides surface reactive sites during anodic dissolution and (2) electrical conductivity, which lowers the ohmic component of anode polarization.

  17. The coupling effect of gas-phase chemistry and surface reactions on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion in ITM reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2015-08-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The effect of the coupling between heterogeneous catalytic reactions supported by an ion transport membrane (ITM) and gas-phase chemistry on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation in ITM reactors is examined. In ITM reactors, thermochemical reactions take place in the gas-phase and on the membrane surface, both of which interact with oxygen permeation. However, this coupling between gas-phase and surface chemistry has not been examined in detail. In this study, a parametric analysis using numerical simulations is conducted to investigate this coupling and its impact on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation rates. A thermochemical model that incorporates heterogeneous chemistry on the membrane surface and detailed chemical kinetics in the gas-phase is used. Results show that fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are strongly influenced by the simultaneous action of both chemistries. It is shown that the coupling somewhat suppresses the gas-phase kinetics and reduces fuel conversion, both attributed to extensive thermal energy transfer towards the membrane which conducts it to the air side and radiates to the reactor walls. The reaction pathway and products, in the form of syngas and C2 hydrocarbons, are also affected. In addition, the operating regimes of ITM reactors in which heterogeneous- or/and homogeneous-phase reactions predominantly contribute to fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are elucidated.

  18. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Minh

    2006-07-31

    This report summarizes the work performed for Phase I (October 2001 - August 2006) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled 'Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program'. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. During Phase I of the program significant progress has been made in the area of SOFC technology. A high-efficiency low-cost system was designed and supporting technology developed such as fuel processing, controls, thermal management, and power electronics. Phase I culminated in the successful demonstration of a prototype system that achieved a peak efficiency of 41%, a high-volume cost of $724/kW, a peak power of 5.4 kW, and a degradation rate of 1.8% per 500 hours. . An improved prototype system was designed, assembled, and delivered to DOE/NETL at the end of the program. This prototype achieved an extraordinary peak efficiency of 49.6%.

  19. Biochemical Conversion Processes of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brethauer, Simone; Studer, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass - such as wood, agricultural residues or dedicated energy crops - is a promising renewable feedstock for production of fuels and chemicals that is available at large scale at low cost without direct competition for food usage. Its biochemical conversion in a sugar platform biorefinery includes three main unit operations that are illustrated in this review: the physico-chemical pretreatment of the biomass, the enzymatic hydrolysis of the carbohydrates to a fermentable sugar stream by cellulases and finally the fermentation of the sugars by suitable microorganisms to the target molecules. Special emphasis in this review is put on the technology, commercial status and future prospects of the production of second-generation fuel ethanol, as this process has received most research and development efforts so far. Despite significant advances, high enzyme costs are still a hurdle for large scale competitive lignocellulosic ethanol production. This could be overcome by a strategy termed 'consolidated bioprocessing' (CBP), where enzyme production, enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation is integrated in one step - either by utilizing one genetically engineered superior microorganism or by creating an artificial co-culture. Insight is provided on both CBP strategies for the production of ethanol as well as of advanced fuels and commodity chemicals.

  20. Systems and processes for conversion of ethylene feedstocks to hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Cooper, Alan R.; Frye, John G.; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan Kallupalayam

    2017-05-30

    Systems, processes, and catalysts are disclosed for obtaining fuel and fuel blends containing selected ratios of open-chain and closed-chain fuel-range hydrocarbons suitable for production of alternate fuels including gasolines, jet fuels, and diesel fuels. Fuel-range hydrocarbons may be derived from ethylene-containing feedstocks and ethanol-containing feedstocks.

  1. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  2. Design of electrolyzer for carbon dioxide conversion to fuels and chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Jonathan S.

    The stabilization of global atmospheric CO2 levels requires a transition towards a renewable energy based economy as well as methods for handling current CO2 output from fossil fuels. Challenges with renewable energy intermittency have thus far limited the use of these alternative energy sources to only a fraction of the current energy portfolio. To enable more widespread use of renewable energy systems, methods of large scale energy storage must be developed to store excess renewable energy when demand is low and allow for combined use of energy storage and renewable systems when demand is high. To date, no one technique has demonstrated energy storage methods on the gigawatt scale needed for integration with renewable sources; therefore the development of suitable energy storage technologies, such as CO2 electrolysis to fuels is needed. In this work, research efforts have focused on two major thrusts related to electrochemical methods of CO 2 conversion to fuels. The first thrust focuses on the synthesis and design of highly efficient anode and cathode catalysts with emphasis on understanding structure-property relationships. A second thrust focuses on the design of novel electrochemical devices for CO2 conversion and integration of synthesized materials into flow cell systems. On the anode side, the synthesis of highly active catalysts using abundant transition metals is crucial to reducing capital costs and enabling widespread use of electrochemical CO2 conversion devices. Highly active mesoporous Co3O4 and metal-substituted Co3O4 water oxidation catalysts were designed to investigate the role of the spinel structure on water oxidation activity. Further analysis of metal substituted samples reveal the importance of the octahedral sites in the spinel structure, which was later used to design an Mg-Co3O4 sample with improved water oxidation activity. The design of efficient cathode materials which can selectivity reduce CO2 to fuels and chemicals is critical to

  3. Pyrolytic conversion of lipid feeds for bio-chemical and bio-fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, K.D.; Kirkwood, K.M.; Bressler, D.C. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Sciences

    2009-07-01

    The production of renewable fuels and chemicals through pyrolysis of lipid feedstock was investigated with particular focus on the effect of unsaturation on thermal cracking behaviour and product distribution. The feasibility of producing deoxygenated liquid hydrocarbons for renewable fuel and chemical applications was studied using oleic acid and linoleic acid as unsaturated model free fatty acids. These were pyrolyzed in 15 mL batch micro-reactors under a nitrogen atmosphere. The analyzed products were compared to previous work investigating pyrolysis of a fully saturated free fatty acid, stearic acids, as well as fatty acids hydrolyzed from animal fats and vegetable oils. The primary reaction in oleic acid pyrolysis was decarboxylation to heptadecene and carbon dioxide, which is consistent with stearic acid pyrolysis. Some hydrogen addition was indicated by the presence of n-heptacecane. Cracking at the double bond was found to be a dominant reaction because only the C9 and lower alkane/alkenes were present in notable concentrations. In addition, the C10-C20 alkanes/alkenes were not easily distinguishable from other compounds that were found to be alkane isomers. The product mixture was highly influenced by reaction temperatures (350-500 degrees C) and time (0.5-8 hours). Lower temperatures and shorter reaction times resulted in low acid conversion. Although higher temperatures and longer reaction times increased conversion, they eventually caused degeneration into aromatic compounds. Pyrolysis of fatty acids from hydrolyzed beef tallow, poultry tallow and canola oil yielded a similar series of alkanes and alkenes where the product distribution was consistent with an additive effect of the constituent saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

  4. Direct Conversion of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R

    1964-01-01

    Topics include: direct versus dynamic energy conversion; laws governing energy conversion; thermoelectricity; thermionic conversion; magnetohydrodynamic conversion; chemical batteries; the fuel cell; solar cells; nuclear batteries; and advanced concepts including ferroelectric conversion and thermomagnetic conversion.

  5. Preliminary Accident Analyses for Conversion of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR) from Highly Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Floyd E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Olson, Arne P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wilson, Erik H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sun, Kaichao S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Newton, Jr., Thomas H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context most research and test reactors, both domestic and international, have started a program of conversion to the use of LEU fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (U-Mo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like MITR. This report presents the preliminary accident analyses for MITR cores fueled with LEU monolithic U-Mo alloy fuel with 10 wt% Mo. Preliminary results demonstrate adequate performance, including thermal margin to expected safety limits, for the LEU accident scenarios analyzed.

  6. Corrosion Evaluation of RERTR Uranium Molybdenum Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A K Wertsching

    2012-09-01

    As part of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) mandate to replace the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel for low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, research into the development of LEU fuel for research reactors has been active since the late 1970’s. Originally referred to as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program the new effort named Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is nearing the goal of replacing the standard aluminum clad dispersion highly enriched uranium aluminide fuel with a new LEU fuel. The five domestic high performance research reactors undergoing this conversion are High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR), Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reactor, Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor II (MITR-II). The design of these reactors requires a higher neutron flux than other international research reactors, which to this point has posed unique challenges in the design and development of the new mandated LEU fuel. The new design utilizes a monolithic fuel configuration in order to obtain sufficient 235U within the LEU stoichoimetry to maintain the fission reaction within the domestic test reactors. The change from uranium aluminide dispersion fuel type to uranium molybdenum (UMo) monolithic configuration requires examination of possible corrosion issues associated with the new fuel meat. A focused analysis of the UMo fuel under potential corrosion conditions, within the ATR and under aqueous storage indicates a slow and predictable corrosion rate. Additional corrosion testing is recommended for the highest burn-up fuels to confirm observed corrosion rate trends. This corrosion analysis will focus only on the UMo fuel and will address corrosion of ancillary components such as cladding only in terms of how it affects the fuel. The calculations and corrosion scenarios are weighted with a conservative bias to

  7. Development of a Monolithic Research Reactor Fuel Type at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C.R.; Briggs, R.J.

    2004-10-06

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has been tasked with the conversion of research reactors from highly enriched to low-enriched uranium (LEU). To convert several high power reactors, monolithic fuel, a new fuel type, is being developed. This fuel type replaces the standard fuel dispersion with a fuel alloy foil, which allows for fuel densities far in excess of that found in dispersion fuel. The single-piece fuel foil also contains a significantly lower interface area between the fuel and the aluminum in the plate than the standard fuel type, limiting the amount of detrimental fuel-aluminum interaction that can occur. Implementation of monolithic fuel is dependant on the development of a suitable fabrication method as traditional roll-bonding techniques are inadequate.

  8. Conversion of solar energy into electricity by using duckweed in Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenova, Yolina; Mitov, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In the present study we demonstrate for the first time the possibility for conversion of solar energy into electricity on the principles of Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell (DPPFC) technology by using aquatic higher plants. Lemna minuta duckweed was grown autotrophically in specially constructed fuel cells under sunlight irradiation and laboratory lighting. Current and power density up to 1.62±0.10 A.m(-2) and 380±19 mW.m(-2), respectively, were achieved under sunlight conditions. The influence of the temperature, light intensity and day/night sequencing on the current generation was investigated. The importance of the light intensity was demonstrated by the higher values of generated current (at permanently connected resistance) during daytime than those through the nights, indicating the participation of light-dependent photosynthetic processes. The obtained DPPFC outputs in the night show the contribution of light-independent reactions (respiration). The electron transfer in the examined DPPFCs is associated with a production of endogenous mediator, secreted by the duckweed. The plants' adaptive response to the applied polarization is also connected with an enhanced metabolism resulting in an increase of the protein and carbohydrate intracellular content. Further investigations aiming at improvement of the DPPFC outputs and elucidation of the electron transfer mechanism are required for practical application.

  9. Rapid technique for characterization and proximate analysis of refuse-derived fuels and its implications for thermal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, R.K.

    1988-09-01

    A thermogravimetric procedure is described for obtaining information on the proximate analysis of refuse-derived fuel (RDF). In order to estimate the heating value of municipal solid waste (MSW), the concept of characterizing the combustible portion of MSW into low-calorific fuel (LCF) and high-calorific fuel (HCF) fractions is suggested. Based on the evolution of volatiles at low temperatures (LTV) and high temperatures (HTV), a technique to estimate the amounts of LCF and HCF fraction in RDF is proposed. The usefulness of LTV and HTV in designing and optimizing the operation of thermal conversion systems is also discussed briefly.

  10. Conversion of Russian weapon-grade plutonium into oxide for mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glagovski, E.; Zakharkin, B. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Russian Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kolotilov, Y. [Specialized State Design Institute, GSPI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Glagolenko, Y.; Skobtsov, A. [Mayak Production Association, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Zygmunt, S.; Mason, C.; Hahn, W.; Durrer, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., Nuclear Materials and Technology Div. NMT, Los Alamos, N.M. (United States); Thomas, S. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Washington DC (United States); Sicard, B.; Brossard, P.; Herlet, N. [CEA Marcoule 30 (France); Fraize, G.; Villa, A. [Cogema, 78 - Saint Quentin en Yvelines (France)

    2001-07-01

    Progress has been made in the Russian Federation towards the conversion of Russian weapons-grade plutonium (W-Pu) into plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) suitable for further manufacture into mixed oxide (MOX) fuels. This program is funded both by French Commissariat at the Atomic Energy (CEA) and the US National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The French program was started in the frame of the two cooperation agreements signed between Russian Federation and France in November 1992 concerning dismantling of nuclear weapons and the use of their nuclear materials for civilian purposes. The US program was started in 1998 in response to US proliferation concerns and the acknowledged international need to decrease available W-Pu. Russia has selected both the conversion process and the manufacturing site. This paper discusses the present state of development towards fulfilling this mission: the demonstration plant designed to process small amounts of Pu and validate all process stages and the industrial plant that will process up to 5 metric tons of Pu per year. (author)

  11. Molecular Breeding Algae For Improved Traits For The Conversion Of Waste To Fuels And Commodities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagwell, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-14

    This Exploratory LDRD aimed to develop molecular breeding methodology for biofuel algal strain improvement for applications in waste to energy / commodity conversion technologies. Genome shuffling technologies, specifically protoplast fusion, are readily available for the rapid production of genetic hybrids for trait improvement and have been used successfully in bacteria, yeast, plants and animals. However, genome fusion has not been developed for exploiting the remarkable untapped potential of eukaryotic microalgae for large scale integrated bio-conversion and upgrading of waste components to valued commodities, fuel and energy. The proposed molecular breeding technology is effectively sexual reproduction in algae; though compared to traditional breeding, the molecular route is rapid, high-throughput and permits selection / improvement of complex traits which cannot be accomplished by traditional genetics. Genome fusion technologies are the cutting edge of applied biotechnology. The goals of this Exploratory LDRD were to 1) establish reliable methodology for protoplast production among diverse microalgal strains, and 2) demonstrate genome fusion for hybrid strain production using a single gene encoded trait as a proof of the concept.

  12. Analysis of irradiated U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel microstructures using automated image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, R.; King, J.; Buesch, C.; Keiser, D. D.; Williams, W.; Miller, B. D.; Schulthess, J.

    2016-07-01

    The High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development (HPPRFD) program is responsible for developing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel substitutes for high performance reactors fueled with highly enriched uranium (HEU) that have not yet been converted to LEU. The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel system was selected for this effort. In this study, fission gas pore segmentation was performed on U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel samples at three separate fission densities using an automated image processing interface developed in MATLAB. Pore size distributions were attained that showed both expected and unexpected fission gas behavior. In general, it proved challenging to identify any dominant trends when comparing fission bubble data across samples from different fuel plates due to varying compositions and fabrication techniques. The results exhibited fair agreement with the fission density vs. porosity correlation developed by the Russian reactor conversion program.

  13. Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

  14. Optimization of methane conversion to liquid fuels over W-Cu/ZSM-5 catalysts by response surface methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Didi Dwi Anggoro; Istadi

    2008-01-01

    The conversion of methane to liquid fuels is still in the development process. The modified HZSM-5 by loading with Tungsten (W) enhanced its heat resistant performance, and the high reaction temperature (800 ℃) did not lead to the loss of W component by sublimation. The loading of ZSM-5 with Tungsten and Copper (Cu) resulted in an increment in the methane conversion, CO2, and C5+ selectivities. The high methane conversion and C5+ selectivity, and low H2O selectivity are obtained by using W/3.OCu/ZSM-5. The optimization of methane conversion over 3.0 W/3.0Cu/ZSM-5 under different temperature and oxygen concentration using response surface methodology (RSM) are studied. The optimum point for methane conversion is 19% when temperature is 753 ℃, and oxygen concentration is 12%. The highest C5+ selectivity is 27% when temperature is 751 ℃, and oxygen concentration is 11%.

  15. Municipal solid waste conversion to transportation fuels: a life-cycle estimation of global warming potential and energy consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pressley, Phillip N.; Aziz, Tarek N.; DeCarolis, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    of default assumptions, the model estimates that 1 Mg of MSW entering the RDF facility yields 123 L of gasoline, 57 L of diesel, 79 kg of other FT products, and 193 kWh of gross electricity production. For each Mg of MSW, the conversion process consumes 4.4 GJ of primary energy while creating fuels...

  16. Regenerative Fuel Cells for Space Power and Energy Conversion (NaBH4/H2O2 Fuel Cell Development)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Miley, George H.; Luo, Nie; Burton, Rodney; Mather, Joseph; Hawkins, Glenn; Byrd, Ethan; Gu, Lifeng; Shrestha, Prajakti Joshi

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing hydrogen peroxide and sodium borohydride development is shown. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 4) MEA Optimization; 5) 500-Watt Stack Testing; 6) System Modeling: Fuel Cell Power Source for Lunar Rovers; and 7) Conclusions

  17. Planning Document for an NBSR Conversion Safety Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond D. J.; Baek J.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

    2013-09-25

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR). The NBSR is a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a planning document for the conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to, and approved by, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) before the reactor could be converted.This report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis herein is on the SAR chapters that require significant changes as a result of conversion, primarily Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis. The document provides information on the proposed design for the LEU fuel elements and identifies what information is still missing. This document is intended to assist ongoing fuel development efforts, and to provide a platform for the development of the final conversion SAR. This report contributes directly to the reactor conversion pillar of the GTRI program, but also acts as a boundary condition for the fuel development and fuel fabrication pillars.

  18. Fuel cycle analysis of TRU or MA burner fast reactors with variable conversion ratio using a new algorithm at equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvatores, Massimo [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Argonne National Laboratory, NE Division, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: massimo.salvatores@cea.fr; Chabert, Christine [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Fazio, Concetta [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hill, Robert [Argonne National Laboratory, NE Division, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Peneliau, Yannick; Slessarev, Igor [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Yang, Won Sik [Argonne National Laboratory, NE Division, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) strategies assessment and implementation play a key role in the definition of advanced fuel cycles, in order to insure both sustainability and waste minimization. Several options are under study worldwide, and their impact on core design and associated fuel cycles are under investigation, to offer a rationale to down selection and to streamline efforts and resources. Interconnected issues like fuel type, minor actinide content, conversion ratio values, etc. need to be understood and their impact quantified. Then, from a practical point of view, studies related to advanced fuel cycles require a considerable amount of analysis to assess performances both of the reactor cores and of the associated fuel cycles. A physics analysis should provide a sound understanding of major trends and features, in order to provide guidelines for more detailed studies. In this paper, it is presented an improved version of a generalization of the Bateman equation that allows performing analysis at equilibrium for a large number of systems. It is shown that the method reproduces very well the results obtained with full depletion calculations. The method is applied to explore the specific issue of the features of the fuel cycle parameters related to fast reactors with different fuel types, different conversion ratios (CR) and different ratios of Pu over minor actinide (Pu/MA) in the fuel feed. As an example of the potential impact of such analysis, it is shown that for cores with CR below {approx}0.8, the increase of neutron doses and decay heat can represent a significant drawback to implement the corresponding reactors and associated fuel cycles.

  19. Interactions between oxygen permeation and homogeneous-phase fuel conversion on the sweep side of an ion transport membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2013-02-01

    The interactions between oxygen permeation and homogeneous fuel oxidation reactions on the sweep side of an ion transport membrane (ITM) are examined using a comprehensive model, which couples the dependency of the oxygen permeation rate on the membrane surface conditions and detailed chemistry and transport in the vicinity of the membrane. We assume that the membrane surface is not catalytic to hydrocarbon or syngas oxidation. Results show that increasing the sweep gas inlet temperature and fuel concentration enhances oxygen permeation substantially. This is accomplished through promoting oxidation reactions (oxygen consumption) and the transport of the products and reaction heat towards the membrane, which lowers the oxygen concentration and increases the gas temperature near the membrane. Faster reactions at higher fuel concentration and higher inlet gas temperature support substantial fuel conversion and lead to a higher oxygen permeation flux without the contribution of surface catalytic activity. Beyond a certain maximum in the fuel concentration, extensive heat loss to the membrane (and feed side) reduces the oxidation kinetic rates and limits oxygen permeation as the reaction front reaches the membrane. The sweep gas flow rate and channel height have moderate impacts on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion due to the residence time requirements for the chemical reactions and the location of the reaction zone relative to the membrane surface. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Accident Analyses for Conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from Highly-Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jaluvka, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wilson, E. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Foyto, L. P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Kutikkad, K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); McKibben, J. C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Peters, N. J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members in the Research and Test Reactor Department at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. MURR LEU conversion is part of an overall effort to develop and qualify high-density fuel within the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Conversion (USHPRR) program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3).

  1. Thermal hydraulic analysis of the JMTR improved LEU-core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, Toshio; Nagao, Yoshiharu; Komukai, Bunsaku; Naka, Michihiro; Fujiki, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Takeda, Takashi [Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Technology Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    After the investigation of the new core arrangement for the JMTR reactor in order to enhance the fuel burn-up and consequently extend the operation period, the ''improved LEU core'' that utilized 2 additional fuel elements instead of formerly installed reflector elements, was adopted. This report describes the results of the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the improved LEU core as a part of safety analysis for the licensing. The analysis covers steady state, abnormal operational transients and accidents, which were described in the annexes of the licensing documents as design bases events. Calculation conditions for the computer codes were conservatively determined based on the neutronic analysis results and others. The results of the analysis, that revealed the safety criteria were satisfied on the fuel temperature, DNBR and primary coolant temperature, were used in the licensing. The operation license of the JMTR with the improved LEU core was granted in March 2001, and the reactor operation with new core started in November 2001 as 142nd operation cycle. (author)

  2. Feedstock Supply System Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels Conversion Pathway: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway "The 2017 Design Case"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin L. Kenney; Kara G. Cafferty; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ian J. Bonner; Garold L. Gresham; J. Richard Hess; William A. Smith; David N. Thompson; Vicki S. Thompson; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Neal Yancey

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy promotes the production of liquid fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass sustainable supply, logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) investigates the feedstock logistics economics and sustainability of these fuels. Between 2000 and 2012, INL quantified and the economics and sustainability of moving biomass from the field or stand to the throat of the conversion process using conventional equipment and processes. All previous work to 2012 was designed to improve the efficiency and decrease costs under conventional supply systems. The 2012 programmatic target was to demonstrate a biomass logistics cost of $55/dry Ton for woody biomass delivered to fast pyrolysis conversion facility. The goal was achieved by applying field and process demonstration unit-scale data from harvest, collection, storage, preprocessing, handling, and transportation operations into INL’s biomass logistics model.

  3. Diffusion and Gas Conversion Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells at Loads via AC Impedance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert U. Payne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impedance measurements were conducted under practical load conditions in solid oxide fuel cells of differing sizes. For a 2 cm2 button cell, impedance spectra data were separately measured for the anode, cathode, and total cell. Improved equivalent circuit models are proposed and applied to simulate each of measured impedance data. Circuit elements related to the chemical and physical processes have been added to the total-cell model to account for an extra relaxation process in the spectra not measured at either electrode. The processes to which elements are attributed have been deduced by varying cell temperature, load current, and hydrogen concentration. Spectra data were also obtained for a planar stack of five 61 cm2 cells and the individual cells therein, which were fitted to a simplified equivalent circuit model of the total button cell. Similar to the button cell, the planar cells and stack exhibit a pronounced low-frequency relaxation process, which has been attributed to concentration losses, that is, the combined effects of diffusion and gas conversion. The simplified total-cell model approximates well the dynamic behavior of the SOFC cells and the whole stack.

  4. Catalytic conversion of biomass-derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is one of the biggest global threats of the 21st century. Fossil fuels constitute by far the most important energy source for transportation and the different governments are starting to take action to promote the use of cleaner fuels. Biomass-derived fuels are a promising alternative for diversifying fuel sources, reducing fossil fuel dependency and abating greenhouse gas emissions. The research interest has quickly shifted from first-generation biofuels, obtained from food co...

  5. Valorization of Waste Lipids through Hydrothermal Catalytic Conversion to Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels with in Situ Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongwook; Vardon, Derek R.; Murali, Dheeptha; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2016-03-07

    We demonstrate hydrothermal (300 degrees C, 10 MPa) catalytic conversion of real waste lipids (e.g., waste vegetable oil, sewer trap grease) to liquid hydrocarbon fuels without net need for external chemical inputs (e.g., H2 gas, methanol). A supported bimetallic catalyst (Pt-Re/C; 5 wt % of each metal) previously shown to catalyze both aqueous phase reforming of glycerol (a triacylglyceride lipid hydrolysis coproduct) to H2 gas and conversion of oleic and stearic acid, model unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, to linear alkanes was applied to process real waste lipid feedstocks in water. For reactions conducted with an initially inert headspace gas (N2), waste vegetable oil (WVO) was fully converted into linear hydrocarbons (C15-C17) and other hydrolyzed byproducts within 4.5 h, and H2 gas production was observed. Addition of H2 to the initial reactor headspace accelerated conversion, but net H2 production was still observed, in agreement with results obtained for aqueous mixtures containing model fatty acids and glycerol. Conversion to liquid hydrocarbons with net H2 production was also observed for a range of other waste lipid feedstocks (animal fat residuals, sewer trap grease, dry distiller's grain oil, coffee oil residual). These findings demonstrate potential for valorization of waste lipids through conversion to hydrocarbons that are more compatible with current petroleum-based liquid fuels than the biodiesel and biogas products of conventional waste lipid processing technologies.

  6. Terminology used for renewable liquid and gaseous fuels based on the conversion of electricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridjan, Iva; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Connolly, David

    2016-01-01

    As the transport sector transitions away from fossil fuels and renewable fuels shift into focus, it is important that the terminology around renewable fuels is clarified. A number of terms such as synthetic fuel and electrofuel are used to describe both renewable and alternative fuels. The aim...... of this article is to identify and review these terms to avoid any potential misuse. An integrative review of terminology has been made. This review did not differentiate the articles in terms of the methodologies applied, but had the main objective to identify the terminology used and its definition. The results...... confirm that the term synthetic fuel is used generically in the majority of articles, without providing information about the production process of the fuel or differentiating between fossil-based and renewable-based synthetic fuels. The majority of the articles use the term synthetic fuel to describe...

  7. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Biofuels: Algal Biomass Fractionation to Lipid-and Carbohydrate-Derived Fuel Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes the production of a range of liquid fuels and fuel blendstocks from biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass production, conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) investigates the conceptual production economics of these fuels. This includes fuel pathways from lignocellulosic (terrestrial) biomass, as well as from algal (aquatic) biomass systems.

  8. Study on Conversion of Municipal Plastic Wastes into Liquid Fuel Compounds, Analysis of Crdi Engine Performance and Emission Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divakar Shetty, A. S.; Kumar, R. Ravi; Kumarappa, S.; Antony, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The rate of economic evolution is untenable unless we save or stops misusing the fossil fuels like coal, crude oil or fossil fuels. So we are in need of start count on the alternate or renewable energy sources. In this experimental analysis an attempt has been made to investigate the conversion of municipal plastic wastes like milk covers and water bottles are selected as feed stocks to get oil using pyrolysis method, the performance analysis on CRDI diesel engine and to assess emission characteristics like HC, CO, NOX and smoke by using blends of Diesel-Plastic liquid fuels. The plastic fuel is done with the pH test using pH meter after the purification process and brought to the normal by adding KOH and NaOH. Blends of 0 to 100% plastic liquid fuel-diesel mixture have been tested for performance and emission aspect as well. The experimental results shows the efficiently convert weight of municipal waste plastics into 65% of useful liquid hydrocarbon fuels without emitting much pollutants.

  9. Modifying woody plants for efficient conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinus, R.J.; Dimmel, D.R.; Feirer, R.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Malcolm, E.W. (Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-07-01

    The Short Rotation Woody Crop Program (SRWCP), Department of Energy, is developing woody plant species as sources of renewable energy. Much progress has been made in identifying useful species, and testing site adaptability, stand densities, coppicing abilities, rotation lengths, and harvesting systems. Conventional plant breeding and intensive cultural practices have been used to increase above-ground biomass yields. Given these and foreseeable accomplishments, program leaders are now shifting attention to prospects for altering biomass physical and chemical characteristics, and to ways for improving the efficiency with which biomass can be converted to gaseous and liquid fuels. This report provides a review and synthesis of literature concerning the quantity and quality of such characteristics and constituents, and opportunities for manipulating them via conventional selection and breeding and/or molecular biology. Species now used by SRWCP are emphasized, with supporting information drawn from others as needed. Little information was found on silver maple (Acer saccharinum), but general comparisons (Isenberg 1981) suggest composition and behavior similar to those of the other species. Where possible, conclusions concerning means for and feasibility of manipulation are given, along with expected impacts on conversion efficiency. Information is also provided on relationships to other traits, genotype X environment interactions, and potential trade-offs or limitations. Biomass productivity per se is not addressed, except in terms of effects that may by caused by changes in constituent quality and/or quantity. Such effects are noted to the extent they are known or can be estimated. Likely impacts of changes, however effected, on suitability or other uses, e.g., pulp and paper manufacture, are notes. 311 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Using Fermentation and Catalysis to Make Fuels and Products: Biochemical Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-09-01

    Information about the Biomass Program's collaborative projects to improve processing routes for biochemical conversion, which entails breaking down biomass to make the carbohydrates available for conversion into sugars.

  11. Biochemical Conversion: Using Enzymes, Microbes, and Catalysis to Make Fuels and Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-07-26

    This fact sheet describes the Bioenergy Technologies Office's biochemical conversion work and processes. BETO conducts collaborative research, development, and demonstration projects to improve several processing routes for the conversion of cellulosic biomass.

  12. Conversion of uranium nuclear fuel into U 3O 8 at the head end of HTR reprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogen, N.; Aschhoff, H. G.; Staib, G.

    1984-04-01

    Corresponding to the reference procedure for the head-end treatment of HTR fuel elements, separation of the moderator graphite from the materials uranium and plutonium is envisaged by combustion in the fluidized bed. Due to the defective silicon carbide layers of the uranium fuel particles a chemical conversion of the UO 2 kernel into U 3O 8 takes place in the oxidizing atmosphere of the combustion process. This reaction proceeds spontaneously and quantitatively, and causes a disintegration of the heavy metal kernel. It is observed that the degree of hardness of the kernel fragments is clearly dependent on the heat-up rate. In the commercial design of the head-end process step, attention must be paid to the cross-over of fuel from the stationary fluidized bed into the dust discharge.

  13. One-step catalytic conversion of biomass-derived carbohydrates to liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ayusman; Yang, Weiran

    2014-03-18

    The invention relates to a method for manufacture of hydrocarbon fuels and oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels such as alkyl substituted tetrahydrofurans such as 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, 5-methylfurfural and mixtures thereof. The method generally entails forming a mixture of reactants that includes carbonaceous material, water, a metal catalyst and an acid reacting that mixture in the presence of hydrogen. The reaction is performed at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce a furan type hydrocarbon fuel. The process may be adapted to provide continuous manufacture of hydrocarbon fuels such as a furan type fuel.

  14. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 1: Executive summary. [using coal or coal derived fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A data base for the comparison of advanced energy conversion systems for utility applications using coal or coal-derived fuels was developed. Estimates of power plant performance (efficiency), capital cost, cost of electricity, natural resource requirements, and environmental intrusion characteristics were made for ten advanced conversion systems. Emphasis was on the energy conversion system in the context of a base loaded utility power plant. All power plant concepts were premised on meeting emission standard requirements. A steam power plant (3500 psig, 1000 F) with a conventional coal-burning furnace-boiler was analyzed as a basis for comparison. Combined cycle gas/steam turbine system results indicated competitive efficiency and a lower cost of electricity compared to the reference steam plant. The Open-Cycle MHD system results indicated the potential for significantly higher efficiency than the reference steam plant but with a higher cost of electricity.

  15. Hydrogen Production from Water by Photosynthesis System I for Use as Fuel in Energy Conversion Devices (a.k.a. Understanding Photosystem I as a Biomolecular Reactor for Energy Conversion)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen Production from Water by Photosynthesis System I for Use as Fuel in Energy Conversion Devices (a.k.a. Understanding Photosystem I as...Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-6904 April 2014 Hydrogen Production from Water by Photosynthesis System I for Use as Fuel in Energy...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 10/1/2010–10/1/2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hydrogen Production from Water by Photosynthesis System I for Use as Fuel

  16. Aqueous processing of U-10Mo scrap for high performance research reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youker, Amanda J., E-mail: youker@anl.gov [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Stepinski, Dominique C.; Maggos, Laura E.; Bakel, Allen J.; Vandegrift, George F. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GTRI program supports conversion from HEU to LEU. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High performance research reactors require a dense LEU fuel such as U-10Mo foils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dissolution conditions for U-10Mo foils in acidic media have been optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solvent-extraction processing can be used to recover U lost in fuel fabrication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flowsheets were developed using Argonne-design contactors but other contactors can be used as well. - Abstract: The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Conversion program, which is part of the US government's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), supports the conversion of civilian use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel and targets. The reason for conversion is to eliminate the use of any material that may pose a threat to the United States or other foreign countries. High performance research reactors (HPRRs) cannot make the conversion to a standard LEU fuel because they require a more dense fuel to meet their performance requirements. As a result, a more dense fuel consisting of a monolithic uranium-molybdenum alloy containing 10% (w/w) Mo with Al cladding and a Zr bonding-layer is being considered. Significant losses are expected in the fabrication of this fuel, so a means to recycle the scrap pieces is needed. Argonne National Laboratory has developed an aqueous-processing flowsheet for scrap recovery in the fuel fabrication process for high-density LEU-monolithic fuel based on data found in the literature. Experiments have been performed to investigate dissolution conditions for solutions containing approximately 20 g-U/L and 50 g-U/L with and without Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. HNO{sub 3} and HF concentrations have been optimized for timely dissolution of the fuel scrap and prevention of the formation of the U-Zr{sub 2} intermetallic, explosive complex, while

  17. Investigation of the Performance of D2O-Cooled High-Conversion Reactors for Fuel Cycle Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2013-09-01

    This report presents FY13 activities for the analysis of D2O cooled tight-pitch High-Conversion PWRs (HCPWRs) with U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores aiming at break-even or near breeder conditions while retaining the negative void reactivity. The analyses are carried out from several aspects which could not be covered in FY12 activities. SCALE 6.1 code system is utilized, and a series of simple 3D fuel pin-cell models are developed in order to perform Monte Carlo based criticality and burnup calculations. The performance of U-Pu fueled cores with axial and internal blankets is analyzed in terms of their impact on the relative fissile Pu mass balance, initial Pu enrichment, and void coefficient. In FY12, Pu conversion performances of D2O-cooled HCPWRs fueled with MOX were evaluated with small sized axial/internal DU blankets (approximately 4cm of axial length) in order to ensure the negative void reactivity, which evidently limits the conversion performance of HCPWRs. In this fiscal year report, the axial sizes of DU blankets are extended up to 30 cm in order to evaluate the amount of DU necessary to reach break-even and/or breeding conditions. Several attempts are made in order to attain the milestone of the HCPWR designs (i.e., break-even condition and negative void reactivity) by modeling of HCPWRs under different conditions such as boiling of D2O coolant, MOX with different 235U enrichment, and different target burnups. A similar set of analyses are performed for Th-U fueled cores. Several promising characteristics of 233U over other fissile like 239Pu and 235U, most notably its higher fission neutrons per absorption in thermal and epithermal ranges combined with lower ___ in the fast range than 239Pu allows Th-U cores to be taller than MOX ones. Such an advantage results in 4% higher relative fissile mass balance than that of U-Pu fueled cores while retaining the negative void reactivity until the target burnup of 51 GWd/t. Several other distinctions between U-Pu and

  18. Magnesium carbide synthesis from methane and magnesium oxide - a potential methodology for natural gas conversion to premium fuels and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, A.F.; Modestino, A.J.; Howard, J.B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Diversification of the raw materials base for manufacturing premium fuels and chemicals offers U.S. and international consumers economic and strategic benefits. Extensive reserves of natural gas in the world provide a valuable source of clean gaseous fuel and chemical feedstock. Assuming the availability of suitable conversion processes, natural gas offers the prospect of improving flexibility in liquid fuels and chemicals manufacture, and thus, the opportunity to complement, supplement, or displace petroleum-based production as economic and strategic considerations require. The composition of natural gas varies from reservoir to reservoir but the principal hydrocarbon constituent is always methane (CH{sub 4}). With its high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio, methane has the potential to produce hydrogen or hydrogen-rich products. However, methane is a very chemically stable molecule and, thus, is not readily transformed to other molecules or easily reformed to its elements (H{sub 2} and carbon). In many cases, further research is needed to augment selectivity to desired product(s), increase single-pass conversions, or improve economics (e.g. there have been estimates of $50/bbl or more for liquid products) before the full potential of these methodologies can be realized on a commercial scale. With the trade-off between gas conversion and product selectivity, a major challenge common to many of these technologies is to simultaneously achieve high methane single-pass conversions and high selectivity to desired products. Based on the results of the scoping runs, there appears to be strong indications that a breakthrough has finally been achieved in that synthesis of magnesium carbides from MgO and methane in the arc discharge reactor has been demonstrated.

  19. Converting oil shale to liquid fuels: energy inputs and greenhouse gas emissions of the Shell in situ conversion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Adam R

    2008-10-01

    Oil shale is a sedimentary rock that contains kerogen, a fossil organic material. Kerogen can be heated to produce oil and gas (retorted). This has traditionally been a CO2-intensive process. In this paper, the Shell in situ conversion process (ICP), which is a novel method of retorting oil shale in place, is analyzed. The ICP utilizes electricity to heat the underground shale over a period of 2 years. Hydrocarbons are produced using conventional oil production techniques, leaving shale oil coke within the formation. The energy inputs and outputs from the ICP, as applied to oil shales of the Green River formation, are modeled. Using these energy inputs, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the ICP are calculated and are compared to emissions from conventional petroleum. Energy outputs (as refined liquid fuel) are 1.2-1.6 times greater than the total primary energy inputs to the process. In the absence of capturing CO2 generated from electricity produced to fuel the process, well-to-pump GHG emissions are in the range of 30.6-37.1 grams of carbon equivalent per megajoule of liquid fuel produced. These full-fuel-cycle emissions are 21%-47% larger than those from conventionally produced petroleum-based fuels.

  20. Energy Conversion Efficiency Potential for Forward-Deployed Generation Using Direct Carbon Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    et al. 2007). The DCFC can potentially convert carbon fuels (e.g., coal, charred biomass ) to electricity at 80% efficiency—well beyond the ef...to produce feasible-sized, operational units. It also explains problems encountered with partial oxidation of the carbon at high temperatures which...carbon fuel such as coal, biomass , and organic waste. Table 1 shows a general comparison of conventional fuel cells to DCFCs. At high temperatures

  1. High performance reversible electrochemical cell for H2O electrolysis or conversion of CO2 and H2O to fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a reversible electrochemical cell, such as an electrolysis cell for water splitting or for conversion of carbon dioxide and water into fuel. The present invention relates also to an electrochemical cell that when operated in reverse performs as a fuel cell...

  2. Development of an efficient catalyst for the pyrolytic conversion of biomass into transport fuel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.S.

    2014-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis is a promising technique to convert biomass into a liquid fuel/fuel precursor, known as bio-oil. However, compared to conventional crude oil, bio-oil has much higher oxygen content which results in various detrimental properties and limits its application. Thus the first part of this

  3. Methods for conversion of lignocellulosic-derived products to transportation fuel precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilga, Michael A.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2017-10-03

    Methods are disclosed for converting a biomass-derived product containing levulinic acid and/or gamma-valerolactone to a transportation fuel precursor product containing diesel like hydrocarbons. These methods are expected to produce fuel products at a reduced cost relative to conventional approaches.

  4. High-performance liquid-catalyst fuel cell for direct biomass-into-electricity conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Mu, Wei; Deng, Yulin

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we report high-performance fuel cells that are catalyzed solely by polyoxometalate (POM) solution without any solid metal or metal oxide. The novel design of the liquid-catalyst fuel cells (LCFC) changes the traditional gas-solid-surface heterogeneous reactions to liquid-catalysis reactions. With this design, raw biomasses, such as cellulose, starch, and even grass or wood powders can be directly converted into electricity. The power densities of the fuel cell with switchgrass (dry powder) and bush allamanda (freshly collected) are 44 mW cm(-2) and 51 mW cm(-2) respectively. For the cellulose-based biomass fuel cell, the power density is almost 3000 times higher than that of cellulose-based microbial fuel cells. Unlike noble-metal catalysts, POMs are tolerant to most organic and inorganic contaminants. Therefore, almost any raw biomass can be used directly to produce electricity without prior purification.

  5. Thermochemical Conversion of Lignin for Fuels and Chemicals: A Review Conversion thermochimique de la lignine en carburants et produits chimiques : une revue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joffres B.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is one of the biomass components potentially usable as renewable resource to produce fuels or chemicals. After separation from the lignocellulosic matrix, this macromolecule is nowadays essentially valorized by combustion in paper mills. If second generation ethanol is produced in the future from lignocellulosic biomass, some increasing reserves of lignin will be available in addition to the ones coming from the paper industry. The main thermochemical ways such as pyrolysis, solvolysis, hydrothermal conversion and hydroconversion considered for the valorization of the lignin are reviewed in this article. La lignine est une des composantes de la biomasse lignocellulosique potentiellement valorisable comme ressource renouvelable pour la production de carburants ou de produits chimiques. Après séparation de la matrice lignocellulosique, cette macromolécule est de nos jours essentiellement utilisée comme combustible dans l’industrie papetière. Outre cette filière papetière, la production d’éthanol de seconde génération à partir de la cellulose aura comme conséquence la mise à disponibilité d’encore plus grandes quantités de lignine. De nouvelles applications pourront donc être proposées pour l’utilisation de cette bio-ressource. Les différentes voies thermochimiques : pyrolyse, solvolyse, conversion hydrothermale et hydroconversion envisagées pour la valorisation de la lignine sont décrites dans cet article.

  6. Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, G. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology)

    1993-05-01

    The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H[sub 2] and CO, usually containing CO[sub 2]) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

  7. Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, G [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology

    1993-05-01

    The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H{sub 2} and CO, usually containing CO{sub 2}) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

  8. Pretreated Landfill Gas Conversion Process via a Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Renewable Combined Fuel Cell-Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Ziaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new landfill gas-based reforming catalytic processing system for the conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons, such as incoming methane to hydrogen and carbon oxide mixtures, is described and analyzed. The exit synthesis gas (syn-gas is fed to power effectively high-temperature fuel cells such as SOFC types for combined efficient electricity generation. The current research work is also referred on the description and design aspects of permreactors (permeable reformers carrying the same type of landfill gas-reforming reactions. Membrane reactors is a new technology that can be applied efficiently in such systems. Membrane reactors seem to perform better than the nonmembrane traditional reactors. The aim of this research includes turnkey system and process development for the landfill-based power generation and fuel cell industries. Also, a discussion of the efficient utilization of landfill and waste type resources for combined green-type/renewable power generation with increased processing capacity and efficiency via fuel cell systems is taking place. Moreover, pollution reduction is an additional design consideration in the current catalytic processors fuel cell cycles.

  9. Effect of size and structure of a bacteria fuel cell on the electricity production and energy conversion rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiachang; Halme, A.

    1997-12-31

    The direct conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy can be realized by using microorganisms as catalyst in a microbial fuel cell. A relative big size bacteria fuel cell is investigated and compared to a smaller one constructed and tested previously. The big cell consists of a anode chamber and two cathode chambers. A packed bed of graphite particles was used as the anode and an oxygen gas diffusion electrode was used as the cathode in both devices. The cation permeable ion-exchange membrane from DuPont was used to separate anodic and cathodic chambers. Batch and self-circulation operation modes were applied in both devices. The apparent anode volume of the bigger device is 145.3 ml which is 2.7 times of the smaller cell volume (53.3 ml). The purpose of this study is to know what size of a bacteria fuel cell is suitable for the fuel cell to obtain maximum power output per volume. (orig.) 18 refs.

  10. Understanding of Electrochemical Mechanisms for CO2 Capture and Conversion into Hydrocarbon Fuels in Transition-Metal Carbides (MXenes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Neng; Chen, Xingzhu; Ong, Wee-Jun; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Zhao, Xiujian; Cheetham, Anthony K; Sun, Chenghua

    2017-09-13

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal (groups IV, V, VI) carbides (MXenes) with formulas M3C2 have been investigated as CO2 conversion catalysts with well-resolved density functional theory calculations. While MXenes from the group IV to VI series have demonstrated an active behavior for the capture of CO2, the Cr3C2 and Mo3C2 MXenes exhibit the most promising CO2 to CH4 selective conversion capabilities. Our results predicted the formation of OCHO(•) and HOCO(•) radical species in the early hydrogenation steps through spontaneous reactions. This provides atomic level insights into the computer-aided screening for high-performance catalysts and the understanding of electrochemical mechanisms for CO2 reduction to energy-rich hydrocarbon fuels, which is of fundamental significance to elucidate the elementary steps for CO2 fixation.

  11. Recovery Act. Demonstration of a Pilot Integrated Biorefinery for the Efficient, Direct Conversion of Biomass to Diesel Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetzle, Dennis [Renewable Energy Institute International, Sacramentao, CA (United States); Tamblyn, Greg [Renewable Energy Institute International, Sacramentao, CA (United States); Caldwell, Matt [Renewable Energy Institute International, Sacramentao, CA (United States); Hanbury, Orion [Renewable Energy Institute International, Sacramentao, CA (United States); Schuetzle, Robert [Greyrock Energy, Sacramento, CA (United States); Rodriguez, Ramer [Greyrock Energy, Sacramento, CA (United States); Johnson, Alex [Red Lion Bio-Energy, Toledo, OH (United States); Deichert, Fred [Red Lion Bio-Energy, Toledo, OH (United States); Jorgensen, Roger [Red Lion Bio-Energy, Toledo, OH (United States); Struble, Doug [Red Lion Bio-Energy, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-05-12

    The Renewable Energy Institute International, in collaboration with Greyrock Energy and Red Lion Bio-Energy (RLB) has successfully demonstrated operation of a 25 ton per day (tpd) nameplate capacity, pilot, pre-commercial-scale integrated biorefinery (IBR) plant for the direct production of premium, “drop-in”, synthetic fuels from agriculture and forest waste feedstocks using next-generation thermochemical and catalytic conversion technologies. The IBR plant was built and tested at the Energy Center, which is located in the University of Toledo Medical Campus in Toledo, Ohio.

  12. Decomposing Fuel Economy and Greenhouse Gas Regulatory Standards in the Energy Conversion Efficiency and Tractive Energy Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannone, Greg [Novation Analytics; Thomas, John F [ORNL; Reale, Michael [Novation Analytics; Betz, Brian [Novation Analytics

    2017-01-01

    The three foundational elements that determine mobile source energy use and tailpipe carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are the tractive energy requirements of the vehicle, the on-cycle energy conversion efficiency of the propulsion system, and the energy source. The tractive energy requirements are determined by the vehicle's mass, aerodynamic drag, tire rolling resistance, and parasitic drag. Oncycle energy conversion of the propulsion system is dictated by the tractive efficiency, non-tractive energy use, kinetic energy recovery, and parasitic losses. The energy source determines the mobile source CO2 emissions. For current vehicles, tractive energy requirements and overall energy conversion efficiency are readily available from the decomposition of test data. For future applications, plausible levels of mass reduction, aerodynamic drag improvements, and tire rolling resistance can be transposed into the tractive energy domain. Similarly, by combining thermodynamic, mechanical efficiency, and kinetic energy recovery fundamentals with logical proxies, achievable levels of energy conversion efficiency can be established to allow for the evaluation of future powertrain requirements. Combining the plausible levels of tractive energy and on-cycle efficiency provides a means to compute sustainable vehicle and propulsion system scenarios that can achieve future regulations. Using these principles, the regulations established in the United States (U.S.) for fuel consumption and CO2 emissions are evaluated. Fleet-level scenarios are generated and compared to the technology deployment assumptions made during rule-making. When compared to the rule-making assumptions, the results indicate that a greater level of advanced vehicle and propulsion system technology deployment will be required to achieve the model year 2025 U.S. standards for fuel economy and CO2 emissions.

  13. Techno-economic Analysis for the Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Liquid Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Tjokro Rahardjo, Sandra A.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Machinal, Michelle A.

    2011-06-01

    ). This study is part of an ongoing effort within the Department of Energy to meet the renewable energy goals for liquid transportation fuels. The objective of this report is to present a techno-economic evaluation of the performance and cost of various biomass based thermochemical fuel production. This report also documents the economics that were originally developed for the report entitled “Biofuels in Oregon and Washington: A Business Case Analysis of Opportunities and Challenges” (Stiles et al. 2008). Although the resource assessments were specific to the Pacific Northwest, the production economics presented in this report are not regionally limited. This study uses a consistent technical and economic analysis approach and assumptions to gasification and liquefaction based fuel production technologies. The end fuels studied are methanol, ethanol, DME, SNG, gasoline and diesel.

  14. Conversion of crop seed oils to jet fuel and associated methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Thompson, David N.

    2010-05-18

    Aspects of the invention include methods to produce jet fuel from biological oil sources. The method may be comprised of two steps: hydrocracking and reforming. The process may be self-sufficient in heat and hydrogen.

  15. Status of the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development at Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S and DTU Energy Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, N.; Primdahl, S.; Wandel, Marie

    2013-01-01

    and manufacturing of materials, cells and stacks based on state of the art as well as innovative strategies. Today TOFC provides the SOFC technology platform: Cells, stacks, integrated multi stack module and PowerCore units that integrate stack modules with hot fuel processing units for high electrical efficiency....... TOFC collaborates with integrator partners to develop, test and demonstrate possibilities and challenges in case of CHP, distributed generation, transportation application and electrolysis. Aiming at improved reliability, robustness and low material cost, TOFC has in the collaboration with DTU...

  16. Integrated process for the catalytic conversion of biomass-derived syngas into transportation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, Vanessa Lebarbier; Smith, Colin; Flake, Matthew; Albrecht, Karl O.; Gray, Michel J.; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient synthesis of renewable fuels that will enable cost competitiveness with petroleum-derived fuels remains a grand challenge for U.S. scientists. In this paper, we report on an integrated catalytic approach for producing transportation fuels from biomass-derived syngas. The composition of the resulting hydrocarbon fuel can be modulated to meet specified requirements. Biomass-derived syngas is first converted over an Rh-based catalyst into a complex aqueous mixture of condensable C2+ oxygenated compounds (predominantly ethanol, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate). This multi-component aqueous mixture then is fed to a second reactor loaded with a ZnxZryOz mixed oxide catalyst, which has tailored acid-base sites, to produce an olefin mixture rich in isobutene. The olefins then are oligomerized using a solid acid catalyst (e.g., Amberlyst-36) to form condensable olefins with molecular weights that can be targeted for gasoline, jet, and/or diesel fuel applications. The product rich in long-chain olefins (C7+) is finally sent to a fourth reactor that is needed for hydrogenation of the olefins into paraffin fuels. Simulated distillation of the hydrotreated oligomerized liquid product indicates that ~75% of the hydrocarbons present are in the jet-fuel range. Process optimization for the oligomerization step could further improve yield to the jet-fuel range. All of these catalytic steps have been demonstrated in sequence, thus providing proof-of-concept for a new integrated process for the production of drop-in biofuels. This unique and flexible process does not require external hydrogen and also could be applied to non-syngas derived feedstock, such as fermentation products (e.g., ethanol, acetic acid, etc.), other oxygenates, and mixtures thereof containing alcohols, acids, aldehydes and/or esters.

  17. Modification of base-side {sup 99}MO production processes for LEU metal-foil targets.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, G. F.; Leonard, R. A.; Aase, S.; Sedlet, J.; Koma, Y.; Conner, C.; Clark, C. R.; Meyer, M. K.

    1999-09-30

    Argonne National Laboratory is cooperating with the National Atomic Energy Commission of the Argentine Republic (CNEA) to convert their {sup 99}Mo production process, which uses high enriched uranium (HEU), to low-enriched uranium (LEU), The program is multifaceted; however, discussed in this paper are (1) results of laboratory experiments to develop means for substituting LEU metal-foil targets into the current process and (2) preparation of uranium-alloy or uranium-metal/aluminum-dispersion targets. Although {sup 99}Mo production is a multi-step process, the first two steps (target dissolution and primary molybdenum recovery) are by far the most important in the conversion. Commonly, once molybdenum is separated from the bulk of the uranium, the remainder of the process need not be modified. Our results show that up to this point in our study, conversion of the CNEA process to LEU appears viable.

  18. Low-enriched fuel particle performance review. [UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, F.; Nabielek, H.; Yang, L.

    1978-08-01

    The available data on low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel particles were reviewed under the United States-Federal Republic of Germany Agreement. The most influential factors controlling the irradiation performance of LEU fuel particles were found to be plutonium transport, fission product transport, fuel particle mechanical performance, and fuel particle chemical performance.

  19. A new design method for fluidized bed conversion of largely heterogeneous binary fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szentannai Pal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Binary fuels of a fluidized bed combustor or gasifier are solids composed of two groups of particles. Their optimal handling in the same bed becomes rather difficult if their hydrodynamic properties differ by two orders of magnitude or more. Both of these fuel classes are directly fed into the reactor in most cases but the rather homogeneous fuel originally fed switches into a binary character inside the reactor in some others. A typical example of the latter case is the thermal utilization of rubber wastes. A novel design is proposed in the present paper by setting up a non-mixing, non-elutriated binary bed. Design criteria and procedure are formulated as well. One of the known calculation methods is proposed to be applied for assuring a segregated bed by means of choosing the bed components, geometry, and gas velocity conveniently. Cold model experiments are proposed to be applied for assuring no elutriation of the fine fuel particles and no sinking of the coarse fuel particles in the same time. A simple experiment is proposed for determining the common minimum fluidization velocity of the binary bed because known calculation methods can not be applied here.

  20. Biomass Conversion to Produce Hydrocarbon Liquid Fuel Via Hot-vapor Filtered Fast Pyrolysis and Catalytic Hydrotreating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huamin; Elliott, Douglas C; French, Richard J; Deutch, Steve; Iisa, Kristiina

    2016-12-25

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion to produce biofuels has received significant attention because of the quest for a replacement for fossil fuels. Among the various thermochemical and biochemical routes, fast pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrotreating is considered to be a promising near-term opportunity. This paper reports on experimental methods used 1) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to produce bio-oils in a fluidized-bed reactor and 2) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for catalytic hydrotreating of bio-oils in a two-stage, fixed-bed, continuous-flow catalytic reactor. The configurations of the reactor systems, the operating procedures, and the processing and analysis of feedstocks, bio-oils, and biofuels are described in detail in this paper. We also demonstrate hot-vapor filtration during fast pyrolysis to remove fine char particles and inorganic contaminants from bio-oil. Representative results showed successful conversion of biomass feedstocks to fuel-range hydrocarbon biofuels and, specifically, the effect of hot-vapor filtration on bio-oil production and upgrading. The protocols provided in this report could help to generate rigorous and reliable data for biomass pyrolysis and bio-oil hydrotreating research.

  1. Sustainability of an energy conversion system in Canada involving large-scale integrated hydrogen production using solid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal V. Gnanapragasam, Bale V. Reddy, Marc A. Rosen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The sustainability of a large-scale hydrogen production system is assessed qualitatively. The system uses solid fuels and aims to increase the sustainability of the energy system in Canada through the use of alternative energy forms. The system involves significant technology integration, with various energy conversion processes (e.g., gasification, chemical looping combustion, anaerobic digestion, combustion power cycles-electrolysis and solar-thermal convertors interconnected to increase the utilization of solid fuels as much as feasible in a sustainable manner within cost, environmental and other constraints. The qualitative analysis involves ten different indicators for each of the three dimensions of sustainability: ecology, sociology and technology, applied to each process in the system and assessed based on a ten-point quality scale. The results indicate that biomasses have better sustainability than coals while newer secondary processes are essential for primary conversion to be sustainable, especially when using coals. Also, new developments in CO2 use (for algae-to-oil and commercial applications and storage will in time help improve sustainability.

  2. Conversion of Indigenous Agricultural Waste Feedstocks to Fuel Ethanol. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-504

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elander, Richard [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-27

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a world leader in biomass conversion research and Ecopetrol American Inc., Ecopetrol S.A.'s U.S. subsidiary. The research and development efforts described in the Joint Work Statement (JWS) will take advantage of the strengths of both parties. NREL will use its Integrated Biorefinery Facility and vast experience in the conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to fuel ethanol to develop processes for the conversion of Ecopetrol's feedstocks. Ecopetrol will establish the infrastructure in Columbia to commercialize the conversion process.

  3. Neutronics Conversion Analyses of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL) High Flux Reactor (RHF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Calzavara, Y. [Inst. Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble (France)

    2014-09-30

    The following report describes the neutronics results obtained with the MCNP model of the RHF U7Mo LEU reference design that has been established in 2010 during the feasibility analysis. This work constitutes a complete and detailed neutronics analysis of that LEU design using models that have been significantly improved since 2010 and the release of the feasibility report. When possible, the credibility of the neutronics model is tested by comparing the HEU model results with experimental data or other codes calculations results. The results obtained with the LEU model are systematically compared to the HEU model. The changes applied to the neutronics model lead to better comparisons with experimental data or improved the calculation efficiency but do not challenge the conclusion of the feasibility analysis. If the U7Mo fuel is commercially available, not cost prohibitive, a back-end solution is established and if it is possible to manufacture the proposed element, neutronics analyses show that the performance of the reactor would not be challenged by the conversion to LEU fuel.

  4. The upgrade and conversion of the ET-RR-1 research reactor using plate type fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashoub, N. [Reactor Physics Dept., Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Saleh, H.G. [Faculty of Girls for Arts and Education, Ain-Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt)

    2001-11-01

    The ET-RR-1 research reactor has been operated at 2 MW since 1961 using EK-10 fuel elements with 10% enriched uranium. The reactor has been used for nuclear applied research and isotope production. In order to upgrade the reactor power to a reasonable limit facing up-to-date uses, core conversion by a new type of fuel element available is necessary. Two fuel elements in plate type are suggested in this study to be used in the ET-RR-1 reactor core rather than the utilized ones. The first element has a dimension of 8 x 8 x 50 cm and consists of 19.7% enriched uranium, which is typical for that utilized in the ET-RR-2 reactor, but with a different length. The other element is proposed with a dimension of 7 x 7 x 50 cm and has the same uranium enrichment. To accomplish safety requirements for these fuel elements, thermal-hydraulic evaluation has been carried out using the PARET code. To reach a core conversion of the ET-RR-1 reactor with the above two types of fuel elements, neutronic calculations have been performed using WIMSD4, DIXY2 and EREBUS codes. Some important nuclear parameters needed in the physical design of the reactor were calculated and included in this study. (orig.) [German] Der ET-RR-1 Forschungsreaktor wird seit 1961 unter Verwendung von EK-10 Brennelementen mit einer Leistung von 2 MW betrieben. Der Reaktor wird in der angewandten Forschung und zur Isotopenherstellung eingesetzt. Um die Reaktorleistung im Hinblick auf eine zeitgemaesse Nutzung der Anlage in einem vernuenftigen Mass zu erhoehen, ist eine Umwandlung des Kerns durch Verwendung neuartiger Brennelemente noetig. In der vorliegenden Untersuchung wird vorgeschlagen, anstelle der z. Z. verwendeten Elemente zwei neue, plattenfoermige Brennelemente zu verwenden. Das erste Element hat eine Groesse von 8 x 8 x 50 cm und besteht aus 19,7% angereichertem Uran, was den im ET-RR-2 Reaktor verwendeten Elementen entspricht, allerdings mit einer anderen Groesse. Das zweite Element hat die gleiche

  5. Teamwork in microbial fuels cells: symbiotic conversion of sugars into electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    A binary culture of Lactococcus lactis and Shewanella oneidensis was studied for an efficient conversion of glucose into electricity in a continuously-operated chemostatic electrochemical reactor. The homolactic fermentation bacterium L. lactis fermented glucose almost exclusively to lactate – the ...

  6. Low Emission Conversion of Fossil Fuels with Simultaneous or Consecutive Storage of Carbon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eftekhari, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the possibility of using underground coal gasification with a low CO2 footprint. The thesis consists of two parts. In the first part, by using the concept of exergy, a framework was constructed through which the practicality (feasibility) of an energy conversion/extraction meth

  7. Low Emission Conversion of Fossil Fuels with Simultaneous or Consecutive Storage of Carbon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eftekhari, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the possibility of using underground coal gasification with a low CO2 footprint. The thesis consists of two parts. In the first part, by using the concept of exergy, a framework was constructed through which the practicality (feasibility) of an energy conversion/extraction

  8. Selective conversion of butane into liquid hydrocarbon fuels on alkane metathesis catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Szeto, Kaï Chung

    2012-01-01

    We report a selective direct conversion of n-butane into higher molecular weight alkanes (C 5+) by alkane metathesis reaction catalysed by silica-alumina supported tungsten or tantalum hydrides at moderate temperature and pressure. The product is unprecedented, asymmetrically distributed towards heavier alkanes. This journal is © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals Using Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei; Zheng, Richard; Brown, Heather; Li, Joanne; Holladay, John; Cooper, Alan; Rao, Tony

    2012-04-13

    This project provides critical innovations and fundamental understandings that enable development of an economically-viable process for catalytic conversion of biomass (sugar) to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). A low-cost ionic liquid (Cyphos 106) is discovered for fast conversion of fructose into HMF under moderate reaction conditions without any catalyst. HMF yield from fructose is almost 100% on the carbon molar basis. Adsorbent materials and adsorption process are invented and demonstrated for separation of 99% pure HMF product and recovery of the ionic liquid from the reaction mixtures. The adsorbent material appears very stable in repeated adsorption/regeneration cycles. Novel membrane-coated adsorbent particles are made and demonstrated to achieve excellent adsorption separation performances at low pressure drops. This is very important for a practical adsorption process because ionic liquids are known of high viscosity. Nearly 100% conversion (or dissolution) of cellulose in the catalytic ionic liquid into small molecules was observed. It is promising to produce HMF, sugars and other fermentable species directly from cellulose feedstock. However, several gaps were identified and could not be resolved in this project. Reaction and separation tests at larger scales are needed to minimize impacts of incidental errors on the mass balance and to show 99.9% ionic liquid recovery. The cellulose reaction tests were troubled with poor reproducibility. Further studies on cellulose conversion in ionic liquids under better controlled conditions are necessary to delineate reaction products, dissolution kinetics, effects of mass and heat transfer in the reactor on conversion, and separation of final reaction mixtures.

  10. White Paper – Use of LEU for a Space Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcclure, Patrick Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-11

    Historically space reactors flown or designed for the U.S. and Russia used Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) for fuel. HEU almost always produces a small and lighter reactor. Since mass increases launch costs or decreases science payloads, HEU was the natural choice. However in today’s environment, the proliferation of HEU has become a major concern for the U.S. government and hence a policy issue. In addition, launch costs are being reduced as the space community moves toward commercial launch vehicles. HEU also carries a heavy security cost to process, test, transport and launch. Together these issues have called for a re-investigation into space reactors the use Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel.

  11. Biotic conversion of sulphate to sulphide and abiotic conversion of sulphide to sulphur in a microbial fuel cell using cobalt oxide octahedrons as cathode catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Pritha; Ghangrekar, M M; Rao, Surampalli; Kumar, Senthil

    2017-02-08

    Varying chemical oxygen demand (COD) and sulphate concentrations in substrate were used to determine reaction kinetics and mass balance of organic matter and sulphate transformation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). MFC with anodic chamber volume of 1 L, fed with wastewater having COD of 500 mg/L and sulphate of 200 mg/L, could harvest power of 54.4 mW/m(2), at a Coulombic efficiency of 14%, with respective COD and sulphate removals of 90 and 95%. Sulphide concentration, even up to 1500 mg/L, did not inhibit anodic biochemical reactions, due to instantaneous abiotic oxidation to sulphur, at high inlet sulphate. Experiments on abiotic oxidation of sulphide to sulphur revealed maximum oxidation taking place at an anodic potential of -200 mV. More than 99% sulphate removal could be achieved in a MFC with inlet COD/sulphate of 0.75, giving around 1.33 kg/m(3) day COD removal. Bioelectrochemical conversion of sulphate facilitating sulphur recovery in a MFC makes it an interesting pollution abatement technique.

  12. The influence of external source intensity in accelerator/target/blanket system on conversion ratio and fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochurov, Boris P.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of neutron balance relation for a subcritical system with external source shows that a high ratio of neutron utilization (conversion ratio, breeding ratio) much exceeding similar values for nuclear reactors (both thermal or fast spectrum) is reachable in accelerator/target/blanket system with high external neutron source intensity. An accelerator/target/blanket systems with thermal power in blanket about 1850 Mwt and operating during 30 years have been investigated. Continual feed up by plutonium (fissile material) and Tc-99 (transmuted material) was assumed. Accelerator beam intensity differed 6.3 times (16 mA-Case 1, and 100 mA-Case 2). Conversion ratio (CR) was defined as the ratio of Tc-99 nuclei transmuted to the number of Pu nuclei consumed. The results for two cases are as follows: Case 1Case 2CR 0.77 1.66N(LWR) 8.6 19.1Power MWt(el) 512 225 where N(LWR)-number of LWRs(3000 MWt(th)) from which yearly discharge of Tc-99 is transmuted during 30 years. High value of conversion ratio considerably exceeding 1 (CR=1.66) was obtained in the system with high source intensity as compared with low source system (CR=0.77). Net output of electric power of high source intensity system is about twice lower due to consumption of electric power for accelerator feed up. The loss of energy for Tc-99 transmutation is estimated as 40 Mev(el)/nuclei. Yet high conversion ratio (or breeding ratio) achievable in electronuclear installations with high intensity of external source can effectively be used to close fuel cycle (including incineration of wastes) or to develop growing nuclear power production system.

  13. Study on an environmental-friendly and high-efficient fuel cell energy conversion system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The kinds and the distribution of the coal in China areinvestigated in this paper. The results indicated that the 80% coalin China is used by the method of the coal gasification. Thepossibility of utilization and development of the fuel cell powerplant in China is analyzed. A combined cycle generation system isdesigned. Its net electrical efficiency is about 55%(LHV), which ishigher than that of the fire power plant. So it isenvironmental-friendly and high-efficient generation mode.

  14. Conversion Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the NIST Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Baek, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hanson, A. L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cheng, L-Y [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cuadra, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-30

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the NIST research reactor (aka NBSR); a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a preliminary version of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for approval prior to conversion. The report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis in any conversion SAR is to explain the differences between the LEU and HEU cores and to show the acceptability of the new design; there is no need to repeat information regarding the current reactor that will not change upon conversion. Hence, as seen in the report, the bulk of the SAR is devoted to Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis.

  15. CONCEPTUAL PROCESS DESCRIPTION FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM-MOLYBDENUM FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Curtis R. Clark; Randall J. Dunavant

    2008-02-01

    The National Nuclear Security Agency Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is tasked with minimizing the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) worldwide. A key component of that effort is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. The GTRI Convert Fuel Development program, previously known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program was initiated in 1978 by the United States Department of Energy to develop the nuclear fuels necessary to enable these conversions. The program cooperates with the research reactors’ operators to achieve this goal of HEU to LEU conversion without reduction in reactor performance. The programmatic mandate is to complete the conversion of all civilian domestic research reactors by 2014. These reactors include the five domestic high-performance research reactors (HPRR), namely: the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory, the National Bureau of Standards Reactor at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Missouri University Research Reactor at the University of Missouri–Columbia, and the MIT Reactor-II at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Characteristics for each of the HPRRs are given in Appendix A. The GTRI Convert Fuel Development program is currently engaged in the development of a novel nuclear fuel that will enable these conversions. The fuel design is based on a monolithic fuel meat (made from a uranium-molybdenum alloy) clad in Al-6061 that has shown excellent performance in irradiation testing. The unique aspects of the fuel design, however, necessitate the development and implementation of new fabrication techniques and, thus, establishment of the infrastructure to ensure adequate fuel fabrication capability. A conceptual fabrication process description and rough estimates of the total facility throughput are described in this document as a basis for

  16. Nature-Inspired Design of Artificial Solar-to-Fuel Conversion Systems based on Copper Phosphate Microflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhu, Ting; Ho, Ghim Wei

    2016-07-07

    Phosphates play significant roles in plant photosynthesis by mediating electron transportation and furnishing energy for CO2 reduction. Motivated by this, we demonstrate herein an artificial solar-to-fuel conversion system, involving versatile copper phosphate microflowers as template and titanium dioxide nanoparticles as host photocatalyst. The elaborate flowerlike architectures, coupled with a unique proton-reduction cycle from interchangeability of different species of orthophosphate ions, not only offer a 2D nanosheet platform for an optimal heterostructure interface but also effectively augment charge-carrier transfer, thereby contributing to enhanced photoactivity and hydrogen generation. These nature-inspired, phosphate-derived nanocomposites advance the synthesis of a large variety of functional materials, which holds great potential for photochemical, photoelectric and catalytic applications.

  17. Evaluation of research in plant biomass production for liquid fuel conversion: The case of India, Brazil and Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, S.M. (Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom))

    1992-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify research activities in the field of plant biomass production for liquid fuel conversion and to evaluate research in areas outside the USA and EEC. Results are presented for three countries: Japan, India and Brazil. Research groups were identified from a range of information sources. Data were collected by interview and related to funding, information access, staffing, publication policy and degree of awareness of other research groups in the field. Bibliometric analysis and peer review were used as indicators in an attempt to assess research output. The findings are discussed in relation to agro-industrial policy in Japan, the use of marginal land in India and the Proalcohol program in Brazil.

  18. Conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Progress report, January-February 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuester, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The following materials were processed thru gasification: sugarcane bagasse, smooth sumac, coralberry, wild bergamot, pokeweed, cornstarch, Portugese oak cork and hog fuel. A data summary is given. The high H/sub 2//CO ratio at low temperature for pokeweed is of significance (>T, >H/sub 2/). Also the high olefin content of Portugese oak cork (commercial cork) is of major interest. The most promising feedstock to date with regard to synthesis gas composition has been guayule cork. A comparison of data for the two cork materials is given. A detailed breakdown for corn starch is given revealing an exceptionally high methane content (35.50 mole %). (MHR)

  19. Thermal conversion of biomass to valuable fuels, chemical feedstocks and chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, William A.; Howard, Jack B.; Modestino, Anthony J.; Vogel, Fredreric; Steffin, Carsten R.

    2009-02-24

    A continuous process for the conversion of biomass to form a chemical feedstock is described. The biomass and an exogenous metal oxide, preferably calcium oxide, or metal oxide precursor are continuously fed into a reaction chamber that is operated at a temperature of at least 1400.degree. C. to form reaction products including metal carbide. The metal oxide or metal oxide precursor is capable of forming a hydrolizable metal carbide. The reaction products are quenched to a temperature of 800.degree. C. or less. The resulting metal carbide is separated from the reaction products or, alternatively, when quenched with water, hydolyzed to provide a recoverable hydrocarbon gas feedstock.

  20. LDRD final report on "fundamentals of synthetic conversion of CO2 to simple hydrocarbon fuels" (LDRD 113486).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maravelias, Christos T. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kemp, Richard Alan; Mavrikakis, Manos (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Miller, James Edward; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2009-11-01

    Energy production is inextricably linked to national security and poses the danger of altering the environment in potentially catastrophic ways. There is no greater problem than sustainable energy production. Our purpose was to attack this problem by examining processes, technology, and science needed for recycling CO{sub 2} back into transportation fuels. This approach can be thought of as 'bio-inspired' as nature employs the same basic inputs, CO{sub 2}/energy/water, to produce biomass. We addressed two key deficiencies apparent in current efforts. First, a detailed process analysis comparing the potential for chemical and conventional engineering methods to provide a route for the conversion of CO{sub 2} and water to fuel has been completed. No apparent 'showstoppers' are apparent in the synthetic route. Opportunities to improve current processes have also been identified and examined. Second, we have also specifically addressed the fundamental science of the direct production of methanol from CO{sub 2} using H{sub 2} as a reductant.

  1. Assessment of the potential for conversion of TP-108 boilers to firing natural gas and fuel oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugov, A. N.; Supranov, V. M.; Izyumov, M. A.; Vereshchetin, V. A.; Usman, Yu. M.; Natal'in, A. S.

    2017-03-01

    TP-108 boilers were initially designed to burn milled peat. In the 1980s, they were reconstructed for conversion to burning natural gas as well. However, operation of these boilers revealed problems due to low reheat temperature and great air inleakage in the furnace. The initial design of the boiler and its subsequent reconstruction are described in the paper. Measures are presented for further modernization of TP-108 boilers to eliminate the above-mentioned problems and enable natural gas or fuel oil only to be burned in them. Thermal design calculations made using a specially developed adapted model (AM) suggest that replacement of the existing burners with new oil/gas burners, installation of steam-to-steam heat exchangers (SSHE), and sealing of the boiler gas path to make it gas tight will allow the parameters typical of gas-and-oil fired boilers to be attained. It is demonstrated that SSHEs can yield the design secondary steam reheat temperature, although this solution is not typical for natural circulation boilers with steam reheat. The boiler equipped with SSHEs can operate on fuel oil or natural gas with flue gas recirculation or without it. Moreover, operation of the boiler with flue gas recirculation to the air duct in combination with staged combustion enables the required environmental indicators to be attained.

  2. Conversion of waste polypropylene to liquid fuel using acid-activated kaolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Achyut K; Singh, R K

    2014-10-01

    Waste polypropylene was subjected to thermal degradation in the presence of kaolin and acid-treated kaolin, with different catalyst-to-plastics ratios, in a semi-batch reactor at a temperature range of 400-550°C to obtain optimized process conditions for the production of liquid fuels. The effects of process temperature, catalyst and feed composition on yield and quality of the oil were determined. For a thermal decomposition reaction at up to 450°C, the major product is volatile oil; and the major products at a higher temperature (475-550°C) are either viscous liquid or wax. The highest yield of condensed fraction in the thermal reaction is 82.85% by weight at 500°C. Use of kaolin and acid-treated kaolin as a catalyst decreased the reaction time and increased the yield of liquid fraction. The major product of catalysed degradation at all temperatures is highly volatile liquid oil. The maximum oil yield using kaolin and acid-treated kaolin is 87.5% and 92%, respectively, at 500°C. The oil obtained was characterized using GC-MS for its composition and different fuel properties by IS methods. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Photocatalytic conversion of CO2 into value-added and renewable fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lan; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2015-07-01

    The increasing energy crisis and the worsening global climate caused by the excessive utilization of fossil fuel have boosted tremendous research activities about CO2 capture, storage and utilization. Artificial photosynthesis that uses solar light energy to convert CO2 to form value-added and renewable fuels such as methane or methanol has been consistently drawing increasing attention. It is like killing two birds with one stone since it can not only reduce the greenhouse effects caused by CO2 emission but also produce value added chemicals for alternative energy supplying. This review provides a brief introduction about the basic principles of artificial photosynthesis of CO2 and the progress made in exploring more efficient photocatalysts from the viewpoint of light harvesting and photogenerated charge carriers boosting. Moreover, the undergoing mechanisms of CO2 photoreduction are discussed with selected examples, in terms of adsorption of reactants, CO2 activation as well as the possible reaction pathways. Finally, perspectives on future research directions and open issues in CO2 photoreduction are outlined.

  4. Catalytic conversion of palm oil over mesoporous aluminosilicate MCM-41 for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twaiq, Farouq A.; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Bhatia, Subhash [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, SPS, Pinang (Malaysia); Zabidi, Noor Asmawati M. [Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Sri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2003-11-15

    The catalytic cracking of palm oil to liquid hydrocarbon fuels was studied in a fixed bed micro-reactor operated at atmospheric pressure, reaction temperature of 723 K and weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 2.5 h{sup -1} over the synthesized mesoporous molecular sieve MCM-41 materials. Mesoporous aluminosilicate with Si/Al ratio of 50 was synthesized using the hydrothermal method. Different pore sizes were obtained by changing the type of template and organic directing agent (ODA) used. The synthesized materials were characterized using various analytical methods such as X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), BET surface area, inductive coupled plasma (ICP), MAS NMR, FTIR and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The materials exhibit a crystalline structure of MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieves with surface area varying from 550 to 1200 m{sup 2}/g and an average pore size (APS) ranging from 1.8 to 2.8 nm. The synthesized MCM-41 catalysts show high activity for palm oil cracking. The conversion of palm kernel oil, lower-molecular-weight oil, was higher as compared to higher-molecular-weight, palm olein oil. MCM-41 materials were selective for the formation of linear hydrocarbons, particularly, C{sub 13} when palm kernel oil was used and C{sub 17} when palm olein oil was fed. The yield of liquid product decreased with the increase of surface area of the catalyst. The gasoline selectivity increased whereas diesel selectivity decreased with the conversion of palm oil.

  5. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Elsa; Coppi, Maddalena V.; Hayes, James C.; Tolonen, Andrew C.; Warnick, Thomas; Latouf, William G.; Amisano, Danielle; Biddle, Amy; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Lykidis, Athanassios; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos; Henrissat, Bernard; Lau, Joanne; Schnell, Danny J.; Church, George M.; Leschine, Susan B.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of the present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. These characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels. PMID:26035711

  6. Genome and Transcriptome of Clostridium phytofermentans, Catalyst for the Direct Conversion of Plant Feedstocks to Fuels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Petit

    Full Text Available Clostridium phytofermentans was isolated from forest soil and is distinguished by its capacity to directly ferment plant cell wall polysaccharides into ethanol as the primary product, suggesting that it possesses unusual catabolic pathways. The objective of the present study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of biomass conversion to ethanol in a single organism, Clostridium phytofermentans, by analyzing its complete genome and transcriptome during growth on plant carbohydrates. The saccharolytic versatility of C. phytofermentans is reflected in a diversity of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette sugar transporters and glycoside hydrolases, many of which may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These genes are frequently organized as operons that may be controlled individually by the many transcriptional regulators identified in the genome. Preferential ethanol production may be due to high levels of expression of multiple ethanol dehydrogenases and additional pathways maximizing ethanol yield. The genome also encodes three different proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments with the capacity to compartmentalize pathways that divert fermentation intermediates to various products. These characteristics make C. phytofermentans an attractive resource for improving the efficiency and speed of biomass conversion to biofuels.

  7. Conversion of solvent refined lignite into premium liquid fuels. Annual report, January-December, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltisberger, R.J.; Stenberg, V.I.; Klabunde, K.J.; Woolsey, N.F.

    1981-04-01

    Comparison of three preasphaltene samples separated from three lignite derived samples obtained from GFETC prepared at 404, 460 and 480/sup 0/C shows that increased temperature tends to produce higher molecular weight preasphaltene fractions containing more aromatic carbons with fewer acid (phenolic) sites per molecule. Ether cleavage studies of the model compounds; diphenyl ether, bibenzothiophene, dibenzofuran and anisole, show that partial or complete ether cleavage was obtained with sodium in hexamethyl phosphoramide solvent. Thus a careful consideration of acidity before and after cleavage can now give a measure of the diaryl ether content of a mixture. This reaction may be useful in coal liquid analysis. Denitrification of N,N-Dimethylamine without aromatic ring reduction occurs with CO-H/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/ at 425/sup 0/C in about 13% conversion. The optimum of 21 conditions gave a 19% conversion which occurs at 150 psi H/sub 2/S and 750 psi H/sub 2/. Thus, H/sub 2/S enhances nitrogen removal from this model compound. Using ESR dispersion techniques we have shown the presence of a second CO radical species on MgO, probably CO-.. observed by ESR, treatment of carbon monoxide radical species on both CO and MgO with CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O causes a destruction of one of the radical species at a rate greater than that of the other.

  8. Photocatalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} into value-added and renewable fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Lan [State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); College of Chemistry, New Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China); Xu, Yi-Jun, E-mail: yjxu@fzu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); College of Chemistry, New Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China)

    2015-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Artificial photosynthesis that uses solar light energy to convert CO{sub 2} to form value-added and renewable fuels is considered to be a promising avenue to solve the problems relating to CO{sub 2}. However, the state-of-the-art photocatalytic efficiency of CO{sub 2} reduction is far from being optimal as a viable economical process. The present review is mainly focused on the progress made in exploring more efficient photocatalysts for CO{sub 2} photoreduction and the undergoing mechanisms, which is anticipated to contribute to further advancement in CO{sub 2} photoreduction with on-going efforts. - Highlights: • Brief introduction about the basic principle of artificial photosynthesis of CO{sub 2}. • Progress made in exploring more efficient photocatalysts for CO{sub 2} reduction. • Efforts devoted to excavate the in-depth mechanism of CO{sub 2} photoreduction. • Perspectives on future research directions and open issues in CO{sub 2} photoreduction. - Abstract: The increasing energy crisis and the worsening global climate caused by the excessive utilization of fossil fuel have boosted tremendous research activities about CO{sub 2} capture, storage and utilization. Artificial photosynthesis that uses solar light energy to convert CO{sub 2} to form value-added and renewable fuels such as methane or methanol has been consistently drawing increasing attention. It is like killing two birds with one stone since it can not only reduce the greenhouse effects caused by CO{sub 2} emission but also produce value added chemicals for alternative energy supplying. This review provides a brief introduction about the basic principles of artificial photosynthesis of CO{sub 2} and the progress made in exploring more efficient photocatalysts from the viewpoint of light harvesting and photogenerated charge carriers boosting. Moreover, the undergoing mechanisms of CO{sub 2} photoreduction are discussed with selected examples, in terms of adsorption of

  9. Thermochemical Conversion of Woody Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendse, Hemant P. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Maine and its industries identified more efficient utilization of biomass as a critical economic development issue. In Phase I of this implementation project, a research team was assembled, research equipment was implemented and expertise was demonstrated in pyrolysis, hydrodeoxygenation of pyrolysis oils, catalyst synthesis and characterization, and reaction engineering. Phase II built upon the infrastructure to innovate reaction pathways and process engineering, and integrate new approaches for fuels and chemical production within pulp and paper and other industries within the state. This research cluster brought together chemists, engineers, physicists and students from the University of Maine, Bates College, and Bowdoin College. The project developed collaborations with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory. The specific research projects within this proposal were of critical interest to the DoE - in particular the biomass program within EERE and the catalysis/chemical transformations program within BES. Scientific and Technical Merit highlights of this project included: (1) synthesis and physical characterization of novel size-selective catalyst/supports using engineered mesoporous (1-10 nm diameter pores) materials, (2) advances in fundamental knowledge of novel support/ metal catalyst systems tailored for pyrolysis oil upgrading, (3) a microcalorimetric sensing technique, (4) improved methods for pyrolysis oil characterization, (5) production and characterization of woody biomass-derived pyrolysis oils, (6) development of two new patented bio oil pathways: thermal deoxygenation (TDO) and formate assisted pyrolysis (FASP), and (7) technoeconomics of pyrolysis of Maine forest biomass. This research cluster has provided fundamental knowledge to enable and assess pathways to thermally convert biomass to hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals.

  10. Conversion of 2,3-butanediol to 2-butanol, olefins and fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilga, Michael A.; Lee, Guo-Shuh; Lee, Suh-Jane

    2016-12-13

    Embodiments of an integrated method for step-wise conversion of 2,3-butanediol to 2-butanol, and optionally to hydrocarbons, are disclosed. The method includes providing an acidic catalyst, exposing a composition comprising aqueous 2,3-butanediol to the acidic catalyst to produce an intermediate composition comprising methyl ethyl ketone, providing a hydrogenation catalyst that is spatially separated from the acidic catalyst, and subsequently exposing the intermediate composition to the hydrogenation catalyst to produce a composition comprising 2-butanol. The method may further include subsequently exposing the composition comprising 2-butanol to a deoxygenation catalyst, and deoxygenating the 2-butanol to form hydrocarbons. In some embodiments, the hydrocarbons comprise olefins, such as butenes, and the method may further include subsequently exposing the hydrocarbons to a hydrogenation catalyst to form saturated hydrocarbons.

  11. Study concerning the utilization of the ocean spreading center environment for the conversion of biomass to a liquid fuel. (Includes Appendix A: hydrothermal petroleum genesis). [Supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steverson, M.; Stormberg, G.

    1985-01-01

    This document contains a report on the feasibility of utilizing energy obtained from ocean spreading centers as process heat for the conversion of municipal solid wastes to liquid fuels. The appendix contains a paper describing hydrothermal petroleum genesis. Both have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  12. Criticality Calculations of Fresh LEU and MOX Assemblies for Transport and Storage at the Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goluoglu, S.

    2001-01-11

    Transportation of low-enriched uranium (LEU) and mixed-oxide (MOX) assemblies to and within the VVER-1000-type Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant is investigated. Effective multiplication factors for fresh fuel assemblies on the railroad platform, fresh fuel assemblies in the fuel transportation vehicle, and fresh fuel assemblies in the spent fuel storage pool are calculated. If there is no absorber between the units, the configurations with all MOX assemblies result in higher effective multiplication factors than the configurations with all LEU assemblies when the system is dry. When the system is flooded, the configurations with all LEU assemblies result in higher effective multiplication factors. For normal operating conditions, effective multiplication factors for all configurations are below the presumed upper subcritical limit of 0.95. For an accident condition of a fully loaded fuel transportation vehicle that is flooded with low-density water (possibly from a fire suppression system), the presumed upper subcritical limit is exceeded by configurations containing LEU assemblies.

  13. Pyrolysis kinetics study of three biomass solid wastes for thermochemical conversion into liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuly, S. S.; Parveen, M.; Islam, M. R.; Rahman, M. S.; Haniu, H.

    2017-06-01

    Pyrolysis has been considered as the most efficient way of producing liquid fuel from biomass and its wastes. In this study the thermal degradation characteristics and pyrolysis kinetics of three selected biomass samples of Jute stick (Corchorus capsularis), Japanese cedar wood (Cryptomeria japonica) and Tamarind seed (Tamarindus indica) have been investigated in a nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates of 10°C/min and 60°C/min over a temperature range of 30°C to 800°C. The weight loss region for the three biomass solid wastes has shifted to a higher temperature range and the weight loss rate has increased with increasing heating rate. In this case, the three biomass samples have represented the similar behavior. The initial reaction temperature has decreased with increasing heating rate but the reaction range and reaction rate have increased. The percentage of total weight loss is higher for cedar wood than jute stick and tamarind seed. For the three biomass wastes, the overall rate equation has been modeled properly by one simplified equation and from here it is possible to determine kinetic parameters of unreacted materials based on Arrhenious form. The calculated rate equation compares thoroughly well with the measured TG and DTG data.

  14. Fossil fuel and hydrocarbon conversion using hydrogen-rich plasmas. Topical report February 1994--February 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    Experiments were made on use of H and CH plasmas for converting waste materials and heavy oils to H-rich transportation fuels. Batch and continuous experiments were conducted with an industrial microwave generator and a commercial microwave oven. A continuously circulating reactor was constructed for conducting experiments on flowing oils. Experiments on decomposition of scrap tires showed that microwave plasmas can be used to decompose scrap tires into potentially useful liquid products. In a batch experiment using a commercial microwave oven, about 20% of the tire was converted to liquid products in about 9 minutes. Methane was decomposed in a microwave plasma to yield a liquid products composed of various compound types; GC/MS analyses identified unsaturated compounds including benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, methyl and ethyl naphthalene, small amounts of larger aromatic rings, and olefinic compounds. Experiments on a crude oil in a continuously flowing reactor showed that distillate materials are produced using H and CH plasmas. Also, the recycle oils had an overall carbon aromaticity lower than that of starting feed material, indicating that some hydrogenation and methanation had taken place in the recycle oils.

  15. Waste management in the meat processing industry: Conversion of paunch and DAF sludge into solid fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamawand, Ihsan; Pittaway, Pam; Lewis, Larry; Chakrabarty, Sayan; Caldwell, Justin; Eberhard, Jochen; Chakraborty, Arpita

    2017-02-01

    This article addresses the novel dewatering process of immersion-frying of paunch and dissolved air flotation (DAF) sludge to produce high energy pellets. Literature have been analysed to address the feasibility of replacing conventional boiler fuel at meat processing facilities with high energy paunch-DAF sludge pellets (capsules). The value proposition of pelleting and frying this mixture into energy pellets is based on a Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA). The CBA is based on information derived from the literature and consultation with the Australian Meat Processing Industry. The calorific properties of a mixture of paunch cake solids and DAF sludge were predicted from literature and industry consultation to validate the product. This study shows that the concept of pelletizing and frying paunch is economically feasible. The complete frying and dewatering of the paunch and DAF sludge mixture produces pellets with energy content per kilogram equivalent to coal. The estimated cost of this new product is half the price of coal and the payback period is estimated to be between 1.8 and 3.2years. Further research is required for proof of concept, and to identify the technical challenges associated with integrating this technology into existing meat processing plants. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Variant 3 Compact Lot LEU01-49T-Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D [ORNL; Montgomery, Fred C [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL

    2006-08-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 vriant 3 fuel compact lot LEU01-49T-Z. The compacts were produced by ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program for the first AGR irradiation test train (AGR-1). This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite LEU01-49T, which was a composite of three batches of TRISO-coated 350 {micro}m diameter 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with an {approx} 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a SiC layer (35 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by another dense outer pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73D-20-69302. The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified as LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). A data compilation for the AGR-1 variant 3 coated particle composite LEU01-49t CAN BE FOUND IN ornl/tm-2006/022.

  17. Mechanism of conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid fuels in alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molton, P.M.; Demmitt, T.F.; Donovan, J.M.; Miller, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    Conversion of cellulosic wastes into liquid oils is being practiced on a pilot plant scale at Albany, OR, but the fundamental chemistry of the process is poorly understood. We report our findings on the aqueous alkaline digestion of pure cellulose, on a laboratory scale, in a closely related system. Our intent is to elucidate the reaction mechanisms involved in oil and tar formation, and to identify products of potential value. A 30 wt % aqueous slurry of pure cellulose in up to 1.2 N alkali (sodium hydroxide or carbonate), heated to 350/sup 0/C over a 3.5 hour period showed a sharp discontinuity in heating rate at 265 to 270/sup 0/C, indicating the onset of a discrete liquefaction reaction not hitherto observed. A series of 129 autoclave experiments analyzed by statistical methods indicated that carbon monoxide, while it promotes the attainment of high yields as claimed by the Bureau of Mines, is not necessary for the reaction to proceed. Analysis of the products by /sup 13/C-NMR, GC/MS, and gel permeation chromatography indicated that the nonvolatile fraction of the oil consists of 44% aromatic carbon and 7% aromatic hydrogen, corresponding to a benzenoid polyaromatic with a substitution ratio of 5:1. However, oxygen content of the nonvolatile fraction and distillable oil is approximately the same. Since the oil contains a series of polyalkylated furans, this suggests that the char is a poly-furan rather than a conventional asphaltene derivative. Volatile products from the oil fraction consist of furans, cyclic ketones, linear and branched alkenes, and phenolics. The high proportion of phenolics relative to normal crude oil could explain the observed highly corrosive nature of the biomass-derived oils.

  18. Conversion of a micro, glow-ignition, two-stroke engine from nitromethane-methanol blend fuel to military jet propellant (JP-8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Andrew L.

    The goal of the thesis "Conversion of a Micro, Glow-Ignition, Two-Stroke Engine from Nitromethane-Methanol Blend Fuel to Military Jet Propellant (JP-8)" was to demonstrate the ability to operate a small engine on JP-8 and was completed in two phases. The first phase included choosing, developing a test stand for, and baseline testing a nitromethane-methanol-fueled engine. The chosen engine was an 11.5 cc, glow-ignition, two-stroke engine designed for remote-controlled helicopters. A micro engine test stand was developed to load and motor the engine. Instrumentation specific to the low flow rates and high speeds of the micro engine was developed and used to document engine behavior. The second phase included converting the engine to operate on JP-8, completing JP-8-fueled steady-state testing, and comparing the performance of the JP-8-fueled engine to the nitromethane-methanol-fueled engine. The conversion was accomplished through a novel crankcase heating method; by heating the crankcase for an extended period of time, a flammable fuel-air mixture was generated in the crankcase scavenged engine, which greatly improved starting times. To aid in starting and steady-state operation, yttrium-zirconia impregnated resin (i.e. ceramic coating) was applied to the combustion surfaces. This also improved the starting times of the JP-8-fueled engine and ultimately allowed for a 34-second starting time. Finally, the steady-state data from both the nitromethane-methanol and JP-8-fueled micro engine were compared. The JP-8-fueled engine showed signs of increased engine friction while having higher indicated fuel conversion efficiency and a higher overall system efficiency. The minimal ability of JP-8 to cool the engine via evaporative effects, however, created the necessity of increased cooling air flow. The conclusion reached was that JP-8-fueled micro engines could be viable in application, but not without additional research being conducted on combustion phenomenon and

  19. RERTR Fuel Developmemt and Qualification Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Wachs

    2007-01-01

    In late 2003 it became evident that U-Mo aluminum fuels under development exhibited significant fuel performance problems under the irradiation conditions required for conversion of most high-powered research reactors. Solutions to the fuel performance issue have been proposed and show promise in early testing. Based on these results, a Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program strategy has been mapped to allow generic fuel qualification to occur prior to the end of FY10 and reactor conversion to occur prior to the end of FY14. This strategy utilizes a diversity of technologies, test conditions, and test types. Scoping studies using miniature fuel plates will be completed in the time frame of 2006-2008. Irradiation of larger specimens will occur in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in the United States, the Belgian Reactor-2 (BR2) reactor in Belgium, and in the OSIRIS reactor in France in 2006-2009. These scoping irradiation tests provide a large amount of data on the performance of advanced fuel types under irradiation and allow the down selection of technology for larger scale testing during the final stages of fuel qualification. In conjunction with irradiation testing, fabrication processes must be developed and made available to commercial fabricators. The commercial fabrication infrastructure must also be upgraded to ensure a reliable low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel supply. Final qualification of fuels will occur in two phases. Phase I will obtain generic approval for use of dispersion fuels with density less than 8.5 g-U/cm3. In order to obtain this approval, a larger scale demonstration of fuel performance and fabrication technology will be necessary. Several Materials Test Reactor (MTR) plate-type fuel assemblies will be irradiated in both the High Flux Reactor (HFR) and the ATR (other options include the BR2 and Russian Research Reactor, Dmitrovgrad, Russia [MIR] reactors) in 2008-2009. Following postirradiation examination, a report

  20. Electrochemical, interfacial, and surface studies of the conversion of carbon dioxide to liquid fuels on tin electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingjie

    The electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) into liquid fuels especially coupling with the intermittent renewable electricity offers a promising means of storing electricity in chemical form, which reduces the dependence on fossil fuels and mitigates the negative impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on the planet. Although converting CO2 to fuels is not in itself a new concept, the field has not substantially advanced in the last 30 years primarily because of the challenge of discovery of structural electrocatalysts and the development of membrane architectures for efficient collection of reactants and separation of products. An efficient catalyst for the electrochemical conversion of CO2 to fuels must be capable of mediating a proton-coupled electron transfer reaction at low overpotentials, reducing CO2 in the presence of water, selectively converting CO 2 to desirable chemicals, and sustaining long-term operations (Chapter 1). My Ph.D. research was an investigation of the electroreduction of CO2 on tin-based electrodes and development of an electrochemical cell to convert CO2 to liquid fuels. The initial study focused on understanding the CO2 reduction reaction chemistry in the electrical double layer with an emphasis on the effects of electrostatic adsorption of cations, specific adsorption of anion and electrolyte concentration on the potential and proton concentration at outer Helmholtz plane at which reduction reaction occurs. The variation of potential and proton concentration at outer Helmholtz plane accounts for the difference in activity and selectivity towards CO2 reduction when using different electrolytes (Chapter 2). Central to the highly efficient CO2 reduction is an optimum microstructure of catalyst layer in the Sn gas diffusion electrode (GDE) consisting of 100 nm Sn nanoparticles to facilitate gas diffusion and charge transfer. This microstructure in terms of the proton conductor fraction and catalyst layer thickness was optimized to

  1. Basic mechanisms of photosynthesis and applications to improved production and conversion of biomass to fuels and chemical products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed, M. [Georgia Institute of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States); Greenbaum, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Wasielewski, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Natural photosynthesis, the result of 3.5 billion years of evolutionary experimentation, is the best proven, functional solar energy conversion technology. It is responsible for filling the vast majority of humanity`s energy, nutritional, and materials needs. Understanding the basic physical chemical principles underlying photosynthesis as a working model system is vital to further exploitation of this natural technology. These principles can be used to improve or modify natural photosynthesis so that it is more efficient or so that it can produce unusual products such as hydrogen, methane, methanol, ethanol, diesel fuel substitutes, biodegradable materials, or other high value chemical products. Principles garnered from the natural process can also be used to design artificial photosynthetic devices that employ analogs of natural antenna and reaction center function, self-assembly and repair concepts, photoinduced charge transfer processes, photoprotection, and dark reactions that facilitate catalytic action to convert light into, useful chemical or electrical energy. The present broad understanding of many structural and functional aspects of photosynthesis has resulted from rapid recent research progress. X-ray structures of several key photosynthetic reaction centers and antenna systems are available, and the overall principles controlling photoinduced energy and electron transfer are being established.

  2. Conversion of residual organics in corn stover-derived biorefinery stream to bioenergy via a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Y; Schell, Daniel J

    2013-01-02

    A biorefinery process typically uses about 4-10 times more water than the amount of biofuel generated. The wastewater produced in a biorefinery process contains residual sugars, 5-furfural, phenolics, and other pretreatment and fermentation byproducts. Treatment of the wastewater can reduce the need for fresh water and potentially add to the environmental benefits of the process. Use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for conversion of the complete range of phenolic compounds and furan aldehyde derivatives present in a postfermentation biorefinery stream is reported here. The consortium was capable of removing the molecules simultaneously with sugars, which were present at 2 orders of magnitude higher concentrations. Organic loading in a fed-batch MFC affected Coulombic efficiency, which decreased from 40% at 0.66 g/L loading to 1.8% at 66.4 g/L loading. Power density increased with loading reaching 1180 mW/m(2) at 5.3 g/L (8% dilution), but decreased thereafter. Excessive loading leads to poor electrogenic performance; therefore, operation of an MFC at an intermediate loading using dilution and recirculation of the process stream can enable effective treatment with bioenergy recovery.

  3. [Leu31, Pro34]neuropeptide Y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhlendorff, J; Gether, U; Aakerlund, L;

    1990-01-01

    Two types of binding sites have previously been described for 36-amino acid neuropeptide Y (NPY), called Y1 and Y2 receptors. Y2 receptors can bind long C-terminal fragments of NPY-e.g., NPY-(13-36)-peptide. In contrast, Y1 receptors have until now only been characterized as NPY receptors that do...... not bind such fragments. In the present study an NPY analog is presented, [Leu31, Pro34]NPY, which in a series of human neuroblastoma cell lines and on rat PC-12 cells can displace radiolabeled NPY only from cells that express Y1 receptors and not from those expressing Y2 receptors. The radiolabeled analog......, [125I-Tyr36] monoiodo-[Leu31, Pro34]NPY, also binds specifically only to cells with Y1 receptors. The binding of this analog to Y1 receptors on human neuroblastoma cells is associated with a transient increase in cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations similar to the response observed with NPY. [Leu31...

  4. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Biofuels: Algal Biomass Fractionation to Lipid- and Carbohydrate-Derived Fuel Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Kinchin, C.; Markham, J.; Tan, E.; Laurens, L.; Sexton, D.; Knorr, D.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.

    2014-09-01

    Beginning in 2013, NREL began transitioning from the singular focus on ethanol to a broad slate of products and conversion pathways, ultimately to establish similar benchmarking and targeting efforts. One of these pathways is the conversion of algal biomass to fuels via extraction of lipids (and potentially other components), termed the 'algal lipid upgrading' or ALU pathway. This report describes in detail one potential ALU approach based on a biochemical processing strategy to selectively recover and convert select algal biomass components to fuels, namely carbohydrates to ethanol and lipids to a renewable diesel blendstock (RDB) product. The overarching process design converts algal biomass delivered from upstream cultivation and dewatering (outside the present scope) to ethanol, RDB, and minor coproducts, using dilute-acid pretreatment, fermentation, lipid extraction, and hydrotreating.

  5. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Tan, Eric; Dutta, Abhijit; Jacobson, Jacob; Cafferty, Kara

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

  6. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-oil Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.; Meyer, P.; Snowden-Swan, L.; Padmaperuma, A.; Tan, E.; Dutta, A.; Jacobson, J.; Cafferty, K.

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a proposed thermochemical process for converting biomass into liquid transportation fuels via fast pyrolysis followed by hydroprocessing of the condensed pyrolysis oil. As such, the analysis does not reflect the current state of commercially-available technology but includes advancements that are likely, and targeted to be achieved by 2017. The purpose of this study is to quantify the economic impact of individual conversion targets to allow a focused effort towards achieving cost reductions.

  7. Investigation of the low enrichment conversion of the Texas A and M Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuscher, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The use of highly enriched uranium as a fuel research reactors is of concern due to the possibility of diversion for nuclear weapons applications. The Texas A M TRIGA reactor currently uses 70% enriched uranium in a FLIP (Fuel Life Improvement Program) fuel element manufactured by General Atomics. Thus fuel also contains 1.5 weight percent of erbium as a burnable poison to prolong useful core life. US university reactors that use highly enriched uranium will be required to covert to 20% or less enrichment to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements for the next core loading if the fuel is available. This investigation examined the feasibility of a material alternate to uranium-zirconium hydride for LEU conversion of a TRIGA reactor. This material is a beryllium oxide uranium dioxide based fuel. The theoretical aspects of core physics analyses were examined to assess the potential advantages of the alternative fuel. A basic model was developed for the existing core configuration since it is desired to use the present fuel element grid for the replacement core. The computing approach was calibrated to the present core and then applied to a core of BeO-UO{sub 2} fuel elements. Further calculations were performed for the General Atomics TRIGA low-enriched uranium zirconium hydride fuel.

  8. Global Threat Reduction Initiative Fuel-Thermo-Physical Characterization Project Quality Assurance Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Mario M.; Slonecker, Bruce D.

    2012-06-01

    The charter of the Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project is to ready Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) facilities and processes for the receipt of unirradiated and irradiated low enriched uranium (LEU) molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel element samples, and to perform analysis to support the Global Threat Reduction Initiative conversion program. PNNL’s support for the program will include the establishment of post-irradiation examination processes, including thermo-physical properties, unique to the U.S. Department of Energy laboratories. These processes will ultimately support the submission of the base fuel qualification (BFQ) to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and revisions to High Performance Research Reactor Safety Analysis Reports to enable conversion from highly enriched uranium to LEU fuel. This quality assurance plan (QAP) provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that support the NRC BFQ. This QAP is designed to be used by project staff, and prescribes the required management control elements that are to be met and how they are implemented. Additional controls are captured in Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project plans, existing procedures, and procedures to be developed that provide supplemental information on how work is conducted on the project.

  9. Thorium utilization in a small long-life HTR. Part I: Th/U MOX fuel blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Ming, E-mail: dingm2005@gmail.com [Delft University of Technology, Reactor Institute Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands); Harbin Engineering University, Nantong Street 145, 150001 Harbin (China); Kloosterman, Jan Leen, E-mail: j.l.kloosterman@tudelft.nl [Delft University of Technology, Reactor Institute Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • We propose thorium MOX (TMOX) fuel blocks for a small block-type HTR. • The TMOX fuel blocks with low-enriched uranium are recommended. • More thorium decreases the reactivity swing of the TMOX fuel blocks. • Thorium reduces the negative temperature coefficient of the TMOX fuel blocks. • Thorium increases the conversion ratio of the TMOX fuel blocks. - Abstract: The U-Battery is a small, long-life and transportable high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR). The neutronic features of a typical fuel block with uranium and thorium have been investigated for a application of the U-Battery, by parametrically analyzing the composition and geometric parameters. The type of fuel block is defined as Th/U MOX fuel block because uranium and thorium are assumed to be mixed in each fuel kernel as a form of (Th,U)O{sub 2}. If the initially loaded mass of U-235 is mostly consumed in the early period of the lifetime of Th/U MOX fuel block, low-enriched uranium (LEU) as ignited fuel will not largely reduce the neutronic performance of the Th/U MOX fuel block, compared with high-enriched uranium. The radii of fuel kernels and fuel compacts and packing fraction of TRISO particles determine the atomic ratio of the carbon to heavy metal. When the ratio is smaller than 400, the difference among them due to double heterogeneous effects can be neglected for the Th/U MOX fuel block. In the range between 200 and 400, the reactivity swing of the Th/U MOX fuel block during 10 years is sufficiently small. The magnitude of the negative reactivity temperature coefficients of the Th/U MOX fuel block decreases by 20–45%, which is positive to reduce temperature defect of the Th/U MOX fuel block. The conversion ratio (CR) of the fuel increases from 0.48 (typical CR of the LEU-fueled U-Battery) to 0.78. The larger conversion ratio of the Th/U MOX fuel block reduces the reactivity swing during 10 years for the U-Battery.

  10. Cellulosic Biomass Sugars to Advantaged Jet Fuel – Catalytic Conversion of Corn Stover to Energy Dense, Low Freeze Point Paraffins and Naphthenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortright, Randy [Virent, Inc., Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the technical and commercial feasibility of producing liquid fuels, particularly jet fuel, from lignocellulosic materials, such as corn stover. This project was led by Virent, Inc. (Virent) which has developed a novel chemical catalytic process (the BioForming® platform) capable of producing “direct replacement” liquid fuels from biomass-derived feedstocks. Virent has shown it is possible to produce an advantaged jet fuel from biomass that meets or exceeds specifications for commercial and military jet fuel through Fuel Readiness Level (FRL) 5, Process Validation. This project leveraged The National Renewable Energy Lab’s (NREL) expertise in converting corn stover to sugars via dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. NREL had previously developed this deconstruction technology for the conversion of corn stover to ethanol. In this project, Virent and NREL worked together to condition the NREL generated hydrolysate for use in Virent’s catalytic process through solids removal, contaminant reduction, and concentration steps. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was contracted in this project for the procurement, formatting, storage and analysis of corn stover and Northwestern University developed fundamental knowledge of lignin deconstruction that can help improve overall carbon recovery of the combined technologies. Virent conducted fundamental catalytic studies to improve the performance of the catalytic process and NREL provided catalyst characterization support. A technoeconomic analysis (TEA) was conducted at each stage of the project, with results from these analyses used to inform the direction of the project.

  11. Energy conversion, storage and balancing. Great potential of hydrogen and fuel cells; Energikonvertering, lagring og balancering. Stort potentiale i brint og braendselsceller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-12-15

    This document is the Danish strategy for hydrogen technology research, development and demonstration. Work on a new strategy was launched in early 2012 by the Partnership for hydrogen and fuel cells. The new national strategy complements the Partnership's former national strategy ''Hydrogen Technologies - strategy for research, development and demonstration in Denmark'' from June 2005. The former strategy describes the challenges and costs by the technological development of hydrogen and fuel cells until 2016 - and is valid until 2016. The Partnership's strategy anno 2012 describes the energy technology challenges for hydrogen technology development until 2016 - and in some years thereafter. The strategy provides an updated status of hydrogen and fuel cells, describes the area's future potential, and specifies future needs for technological development. The strategy's main focus is to define how electrolysis, hydrogen and fuel cells can help to meet Denmark's future energy policy objectives. In the strategy the term ''hydrogen technologies'' overall means: Electrolysis and fuel cells as conversion technologies, and hydrogen and hydrogen-containing fuels, such as methanol, as energy carriers. (LN)

  12. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 12: Fuel cells. [energy conversion efficiency of, for use in electric power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warde, C. J.; Ruka, R. J.; Isenberg, A. O.

    1976-01-01

    A parametric assessment of four fuel cell power systems -- based on phosphoric acid, potassium hydroxide, molten carbonate, and stabilized zirconia -- has shown that the most important parameters for electricity-cost reduction and/or efficiency improvement standpoints are fuel cell useful life and power density, use of a waste-heat recovery system, and fuel type. Typical capital costs, overall energy efficiencies (based on the heating value of the coal used to produce the power plant fuel), and electricity costs are: phosphoric acid $350-450/kWe, 24-29%, and 11.7 to 13.9 mills/MJ (42 to 50 mills/kWh); alkaline $450-700/kWe, 26-31%, and 12.8 to 16.9 mills/MJ (46 to 61 mills/kWh); molten carbonate $480-650/kWe, 32-46%, and 10.6 to 19.4 mills/MJ (38 to 70 mills/kWh), stabilized zirconia $420-950/kWe, 26-53%, and 9.7 to 16.9 mills/MJ (35 to 61 mills/kWh). Three types of fuel cell power plants -- solid electrolytic with steam bottoming, molten carbonate with steam bottoming, and solid electrolyte with an integrated coal gasifier -- are recommended for further study.

  13. Obtaining fuel oils from the low temperature conversion of biomass waste; Obtencao de oleo combustivel a partir da conversao a baixa temperatura de biomassa residual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Roberto Guimaraes; Cinelli, Leonardo Rodrigues [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: temrobe@vm.uff.br; Romeiro, Gilberto Alves; Damasceno, Raimundo Nonato [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Quimica Organica]. E-mail: gilbertoromeiro@ig.com.br; Senra, Paulo Mauricio de Albuquerque [Light Servicos de Eletricidade S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Estudos e Gestao de Geracao]. E-mail: paulo.senra@light.com.br

    2004-07-01

    This paper refers to the characterization and application of oil obtained through the 'Low Temperature Conversion Process' applied to industrial waste generated in the treatment of effluent from the petrochemical industry. Physical and chemical parameters, such as viscosity, density, sulfur content, flash point, point of fluidity were obtained. The characterization of the oil obtained indicates the possibility of classifying it as oil fuel. Also, studying the application of the oil in engines. Developed from studies on the feasibility of producing biodiesel from sludge of sewage treatment plants in Germany of the 1980s, the 'Low Temperature Conversion-LTC' technique, is a thermo chemical process, whose main goal is to extend the life of liabilities environment. The LTC is being applied in various biomass of urban, industrial and agricultural origin, looking up through the thermal conversion transform them into products of potential commercial value. Depending on the type of biomass used in the process, are obtained a fraction lipophilic and a carbonaceous solid waste in a varying of proportions, plus a fraction hydrophilic and conversion gas. The lipophilic fraction is targeted to studies about the feasibility of its application as fuel or other compounds with possible commercial application (such as greases, oils, resins, etc.), while the carbonaceous residue is directed to studies about its activation for the used as activated charcoal, in addition to the possible direct use as energy.

  14. CONVERSION OF DIESEL ENGINE INTO SPARK IGNITION ENGINE TO WORK WITH CNG AND LPG FUELS FOR MEETING NEW EMISSION NORMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Kaleemuddin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating fuel prices and associated pollution problems of largely exploited petroleum liquid fuel has stimulated the research on abundantly available gaseous fuels to keep the mobility industry intact. In the present work an air cooled diesel engine was modified suitably into a spark ignition engine incorporating electronic ignition and variable speed dependant spark timing to accommodate both LPG and CNG as fuels. Engine was optimized for stoichiometric operation on engine dynamometer. Materials of a few intricate engine components were replaced to suit LPG and CNG application. Ignition timing was mapped to work with gaseous fuels for different speeds. Compensation was done for recovering volumetric efficiency when operated with CNG by introducing more volume of air through resonator. Ignition timing was observed to be the pertinent parameter in achieving good performance with gaseous fuels under consideration. Performance and emission tests were carried out on engine dynamometer and chassis dynamometer. Under wide open throttle and at rated speed condition, it was observed that the peak pressure with LPG was lying between diesel fuel and CNG fuel operation due to slow burning nature of gaseous fuels. As compression ratio was maintained same for LPG and CNG fuel operation, low CO emissions were observed with LPG where as HC + NOx emissions were lower with CNG fuel operation. Chassis dynamometer based emission tests yielded lower CO2 levels with CNG operation.

  15. Study of combustion and emission characteristics of fuel derived from waste plastics by various waste to energy (W-t-E) conversion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrat, M. A.; Rasul, M. G.; Khan, M. M. K.

    2016-07-01

    Reduction of plastic wastes by means of producing energy can be treated as a good investment in the waste management and recycling sectors. In this article, conversion of plastics into liquid fuel by two thermo-chemical processes, pyrolysis and gasification, are reviewed. The study showed that the catalytic pyrolysis of homogenous waste plastics produces better quality and higher quantity of liquefied fuel than that of non-catalytic pyrolysis process at a lower operating temperature. The syngas produced from gasification process, which occurs at higher temperature than the pyrolysis process, can be converted into diesel by the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction process. Conducive bed material like Olivine in the gasification conversion process can remarkably reduce the production of tar. The waste plastics pyrolysis oil showed brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of about 27.75%, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) of 0.292 kg/kWh, unburned hydrocarbon emission (uHC) of 91 ppm and NOx emission of 904 ppm in comparison with the diesel for BTE of 28%, BSFC of 0.276 kg/kWh, uHC of 57 ppm and NOx of 855 ppm. Dissolution of Polystyrene (PS) into biodiesel also showed the potential of producing alternative transport fuel. It has been found from the literature that at higher engine speed, increased EPS (Expanded Polystyrene) quantity based biodiesel blends reduces CO, CO2, NOx and smoke emission. EPS-biodiesel fuel blend increases the brake thermal efficiency by 7.8%, specific fuel consumption (SFC) by 7.2% and reduces brake power (Pb) by 3.2%. More study using PS and EPS with other thermoplastics is needed to produce liquid fuel by dissolving them into biodiesel and to assess their suitability as a transport fuel. Furthermore, investigation to find out most suitable W-t-E process for effective recycling of the waste plastics as fuel for internal combustion engines is necessary to reduce environmental pollution and generate revenue which will be addressed in this article.

  16. Polystyrene (PS waste plastic conversion into aviation/kerosene category of fuel by using fractional column distillation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinuddin Sarker, Mohammad Mamunor Rashid, Muhammad Sadikur Rahman, Mohammed Molla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental degradation and depleting fuel reserves are matters of great concern around the global. Solid waste plastic is currently receiving renewed interest for fuel generation. Waste plastic to fuel is suitable for compression ignition engines and more attention is focused in the world because of its potential to generate large-scale employment and relatively low environmental degradation. A post-commercial PS polymer waste was thermal degradation and fractional distillation without catalysts using a steel reactor operating thermally at ambient pressure under fume hood without vacuum system. Two types of temperature profile was used for this experiment such as PS waste plastic liquefaction purposed temperature used 100-400 ºC and fractional column distillation temperature was used 180-305 ºC for collection kerosene or aviation grade fuel. Produced fuel was analyzed by using gas chromatography and mass spectrometer and fuel hydrocarbon range showed into GC/MS analysis is C6 to C16.

  17. Reactor Physics Scoping and Characterization Study on Implementation of TRIGA Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennifer Lyons; Wade R. Marcum; Mark D. DeHart; Sean R. Morrell

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is conducting feasibility studies for the conversion of its fuel from a highly enriched uranium (HEU) composition to a low enriched uranium (LEU) composition. These studies have considered a wide variety of LEU plate-type fuels to replace the current HEU fuel. Continuing to investigate potential alternatives to the present HEU fuel form, this study presents a preliminary analysis of TRIGA® fuel within the current ATR fuel envelopes and compares it to the functional requirements delineated by the Naval Reactors Program, which includes: greater than 4.8E+14 fissions/s/g of 235U, a fast to thermal neutron flux ratio that is less than 5% deviation of its current value, a constant cycle power within the corner lobes, and an operational cycle length of 56 days at 120 MW. Other parameters outside those put forth by the Naval Reactors Program which are investigated herein include axial and radial power profiles, effective delayed neutron fraction, and mean neutron generation time.

  18. Waste Treatment of Acidic Solutions from the Dissolution of Irradiated LEU Targets for 99-Mo Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakel, Allen J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Conner, Cliff [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-10-01

    One of the missions of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program (and now the National Nuclear Security Administrations Material Management and Minimization program) is to facilitate the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) targets for 99Mo production. The conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU targets will require five to six times more uranium to produce an equivalent amount of 99Mo. The work discussed here addresses the technical challenges encountered in the treatment of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH)/nitric acid solutions remaining after the dissolution of LEU targets. Specifically, the focus of this work is the calcination of the uranium waste from 99Mo production using LEU foil targets and the Modified Cintichem Process. Work with our calciner system showed that high furnace temperature, a large vent tube, and a mechanical shield are beneficial for calciner operation. One- and two-step direct calcination processes were evaluated. The high-temperature one-step process led to contamination of the calciner system. The two-step direct calcination process operated stably and resulted in a relatively large amount of material in the calciner cup. Chemically assisted calcination using peroxide was rejected for further work due to the difficulty in handling the products. Chemically assisted calcination using formic acid was rejected due to unstable operation. Chemically assisted calcination using oxalic acid was recommended, although a better understanding of its chemistry is needed. Overall, this work showed that the two-step direct calcination and the in-cup oxalic acid processes are the best approaches for the treatment of the UNH/nitric acid waste solutions remaining from dissolution of LEU targets for 99Mo production.

  19. LANL Experience Rolling Zr-Clad LEU-10Mo Foils for AFIP-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammon, Duncan L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clarke, Kester D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Alexander, David J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kennedy, Patrick K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Edwards, Randall L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Duffield, Andrew N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dombrowski, David E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-29

    The cleaning, canning, rolling and final trimming of Low Enriched Uranium-10 wt. pct. Molybdenum (LEU-10Mo) foils for ATR (Advanced Test Reactor) fuel plates to be used in the AFIP-7 (ATR Full Size Plate In Center Flux Trap Position) experiments are summarized. Six Zr-clad foils were produced from two LEU-10Mo castings supplied to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by Y-12 National Security Complex. Details of cleaning and canning procedures are provided. Hot- and cold-rolling results are presented, including rolling schedules, images of foils in-process, metallography and local compositions of regions of interest, and details of final foil dimensions and process yield. This report was compiled from the slides for the presentation of the same name given by Duncan Hammon on May 12, 2011 at the AFIP-7 Lessons Learned meeting in Salt Lake City, UT, with Los Alamos National Laboratory document number LA-UR 11-02898.

  20. Investigation of neutronic and safety parameters variation in 5 MW research reactor due to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}Al fuel conversion to ThO{sub 2} + U{sub 3}O{sub 8}Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Alipoor, Zahra; Mirvakili, Seyed Mohammad [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Reactor Research School; Feghhi, Seyed Amir Hossein [Shahid Beheshti Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Application; Vahedi, M.; Bagheri, H. [Univ. of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Energy Dept.; Tenreiro, Claudio [Talca Univ. (Chile). Energy Dept.

    2017-05-15

    Thorium-based fuels could comprise several advantages and are being investigated as a potentially competitive option with uranium-based fuels for research or power reactors. The present study investigates computationally the application of two different thorium-based fuels in a research reactor. Void and temperature reactivity coefficients, safety factor, power peaking factor, neutron generation time, effective delayed neutron fraction and {sup 135}Xe worth parameter were investigated for the fuel conversions. The results showed both the investigated fuels would not significantly disturb neutronic and safety parameters of the modeled core in comparison with its routine fuel loading. However, 235-enriched thorium based fuel concluded in noticeably reduction of High Level Waste (HLW) but 233-enriched type could be taken in attention because of its longer fuel cycle (∝15 %) and integrated neutron flux (∝23 %).

  1. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  2. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  3. Reduced bed temperature at thermo-chemical conversion of difficult fuels; Saenkt baeddtemperatur vid termokemisk omvandling av svaara braenslen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niklasson, Fredrik; Haraldsson, Conny; Johansson, Andreas; Claesson, Frida; Baefver, Linda; Ryde, Daniel

    2010-05-15

    needed to obtain reliable quantitative results. Under pyrolysis (in nitrogen), a strong coupling was found between temperature and measured concentrations of alkali and zinc in the flue gas, especially between 750 and 850 deg C. These findings imply that reactors for gasification (or pyrolysis) of waste and biofuels will benefit from being operated at temperatures below 850 deg C to reduce the alkali content in the product gas. On the other hand, there could be other advantages of operating a gasifier at higher temperatures. The influence of the reactor temperature on the release of alkali metals was found to be less pronounced during combustion as compared to pyrolysis. The reason for this could be that oxygen takes part in the reaction scheme controlling the release of the alkali metals, but it could also be a consequence of locally higher temperatures in the fuel particle while burning. The tests showed that a larger fraction of zinc was released during devolatilisation, compared to the alkali metals of which typically less than 10 % was found to be released during devolatilisation. Some additional tests where HCl was added to the fluidizing gas showed, as expected, that the presence of HCl increases the release of alkali metals from the bottom ash. Agglomeration temperatures were determined for two bed sand samples that had been extracted under operating bed temperatures of 870 and 750 deg C in a commercial waste fired FB-boiler. While sand samples were heated in order to find the agglomeration temperature, considerably more alkali metals were released from the sand sampled at 750 deg C. The agglomeration temperature was somewhat lower for this sand, but it was still considerably higher than normal operating bed temperature of the boiler. The present lab-scale study shows that the release of alkali metals and zinc into the flue gas from waste is reduced, or at least considerably decelerated, by a lowered fuel conversion temperature. However, the atmosphere and bed

  4. Reduced bed temperature at thermo-chemical conversion of difficult fuels; Saenkt baeddtemperatur vid termokemisk omvandling av svaara braenslen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niklasson, Fredrik; Haraldsson, Conny; Johansson, Andreas; Claesson, Frida; Baefver, Linda; Ryde, Daniel

    2010-05-15

    needed to obtain reliable quantitative results. Under pyrolysis (in nitrogen), a strong coupling was found between temperature and measured concentrations of alkali and zinc in the flue gas, especially between 750 and 850 deg C. These findings imply that reactors for gasification (or pyrolysis) of waste and biofuels will benefit from being operated at temperatures below 850 deg C to reduce the alkali content in the product gas. On the other hand, there could be other advantages of operating a gasifier at higher temperatures. The influence of the reactor temperature on the release of alkali metals was found to be less pronounced during combustion as compared to pyrolysis. The reason for this could be that oxygen takes part in the reaction scheme controlling the release of the alkali metals, but it could also be a consequence of locally higher temperatures in the fuel particle while burning. The tests showed that a larger fraction of zinc was released during devolatilisation, compared to the alkali metals of which typically less than 10 % was found to be released during devolatilisation. Some additional tests where HCl was added to the fluidizing gas showed, as expected, that the presence of HCl increases the release of alkali metals from the bottom ash. Agglomeration temperatures were determined for two bed sand samples that had been extracted under operating bed temperatures of 870 and 750 deg C in a commercial waste fired FB-boiler. While sand samples were heated in order to find the agglomeration temperature, considerably more alkali metals were released from the sand sampled at 750 deg C. The agglomeration temperature was somewhat lower for this sand, but it was still considerably higher than normal operating bed temperature of the boiler. The present lab-scale study shows that the release of alkali metals and zinc into the flue gas from waste is reduced, or at least considerably decelerated, by a lowered fuel conversion temperature. However, the atmosphere and bed

  5. Development of production of {sup 99}Mo from LEU target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adang, H.G.; Mutalib, A.; Lubis, H. [Radioisotope Production Centre, National Atomic Energy Agency, Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong (Indonesia)] [and others

    1998-10-01

    {sup 99}TC, the most popular radioisotope in nuclear medicine, is daughter of {sup 99}Mo. {sup 99}Mo is produced in research reactor by irradiating of high enriched uranium (HEU). However, in recent year, strict regulation that has been implemented by USA DOE and NPT has led to the difficulty in getting HEU. Therefore, BATAN has tried to develop the production of {sup 99}Mo by using low enriched uranium (LEU). The research involves the use of LEU in the production of {sup 99}Mo. This research was started in 1994 by joint-research between BATAN and Argonne National Laboratory USA. This program is divided into three research groups. The first group emphasizes its research on fabrication of LEU foil that is going to be irradiated. The second group studies the irradiation`s aspects and physical characteristic of irradiated LEU foils. The third group studies the radiochemical separation process of fission product {sup 99}Mo from solution of irradiated LEU foils. There are five steps that are carried out in studying of radiochemical separation of {sup 99}Mo from irradiated LEU. First is designing a dissolver that is going to be used in dissolving of LEU foil and testing its reliability. Second is dissolving LEU in the new design dissolver. Third is evaluation the modified of Cintichem`s radiochemical separation process of {sup 99}Mo from LEU. Forth is modifying the Cintichem`s radiochemical separation process of {sup 99}Mo from the solution of irradiated LEU. And fifth is using the modified of Cintichem`s radiochemical separation process for separation {sup 99}Mo from solution of irradiated LEU. The first through the forth steps of experiments were already carried out and will be reported in this workshop, whereas the fifth step of experiment is going to be conducted in February 1998. (author)

  6. Preliminary Assessment of the Impact on Reactor Vessel dpa Rates Due to Installation of a Proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Core in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    An assessment of the impact on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) reactor vessel (RV) displacements-per-atom (dpa) rates due to operations with the proposed low enriched uranium (LEU) core described by Ilas and Primm has been performed and is presented herein. The analyses documented herein support the conclusion that conversion of HFIR to low-enriched uranium (LEU) core operations using the LEU core design of Ilas and Primm will have no negative impact on HFIR RV dpa rates. Since its inception, HFIR has been operated with highly enriched uranium (HEU) cores. As part of an effort sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), conversion to LEU cores is being considered for future HFIR operations. The HFIR LEU configurations analyzed are consistent with the LEU core models used by Ilas and Primm and the HEU balance-of-plant models used by Risner and Blakeman in the latest analyses performed to support the HFIR materials surveillance program. The Risner and Blakeman analyses, as well as the studies documented herein, are the first to apply the hybrid transport methods available in the Automated Variance reduction Generator (ADVANTG) code to HFIR RV dpa rate calculations. These calculations have been performed on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Institutional Cluster (OIC) with version 1.60 of the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) computer code.

  7. 31 CFR 540.308 - Low Enriched Uranium (LEU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Low Enriched Uranium (LEU). 540.308... OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.308 Low Enriched Uranium (LEU). The term low...

  8. Physics and Control Assessment of AN 850 Mw(e) - Leu-Candu Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbone, Michelangelo

    The physics and control assessment of an 850 MW(e) Low Enriched Uranium CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (LEU -CANDU-PHW) reactor constitute the major objective of this thesis. The use of Low Enriched Uranium fuel in the present CANDU nuclear power generating stations is recognized as economically beneficial due to reduced fuelling costs. The LEU fuel cycle is also recognized as a stepping stone to transit from the present CANDU-PHW once-through natural Uranium cycle to advanced cycles such as those based on Plutonium recycle, once-through Th + U-235 cycle, Thorium with Uranium recycle and net U-235 feed, Thorium with Uranium recycle and Plutonium feed. However, although the use of Low Enriched Uranium in the present CANDU-PHW reactor has economic advantages, and it would act as a technical bridge between the present cycle and advanced cycles, technical problems in different areas of reactor physics and fuel management were anticipated. The present thesis research work adresses the areas of reactor physics, fuel management, and control (in particular, the spatial control of large CANDU-PHW reactors). The main conclusions that have been drawn following these studies are as follows: (1) The Low Enriched Uranium Cycle is feasible in a CANDU-PHW reactor of present design and provided that: (a) The enrichment is kept relatively low (that is, about 1% instead of 0.711%); (b) the number of bundles to be replaced at every refuelling operation is about one-half that of the natural Uranium fuel case; (c) The channels are refuelled in the same direction as the coolant. (2) The response of an LEU-CANDU-PHW reactor to reactivity perturbation such as single- and two-channel refuelling operation, shim transient, shutdown-start-up transient with enrichment levels of 0.9% and 1.2% is essentially very similar {provided that certain conditions in (1) are respected} to that of the natural uranium reactor core case without any reactor reoptimization. The general behaviour of the reactor

  9. Conceptual Process for the Manufacture of Low-Enriched Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sease, J.D.; Primm, R.T. III; Miller, J.H.

    2007-09-30

    The U.S. nonproliferation policy 'to minimize, and to the extent possible, eliminate the use of HEU in civil nuclear programs throughout the world' has resulted in the conversion (or scheduled conversion) of many of the U.S. research reactors from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). A foil fuel appears to offer the best option for using a LEU fuel in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) without degrading the performance of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to outline a proposed conceptual fabrication process flow sheet for a new, foil-type, 19.75%-enriched fuel for HFIR. The preparation of the flow sheet allows a better understanding of the costs of infrastructure modifications, operating costs, and implementation schedule issues associated with the fabrication of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preparation of a reference flow sheet is one of the first planning steps needed in the development of a new manufacturing capacity for low enriched fuels for U.S. research and test reactors. The flow sheet can be used to develop a work breakdown structure (WBS), a critical path schedule, and identify development needs. The reference flow sheet presented in this report is specifically for production of LEU foil fuel for the HFIR. The need for an overall reference flow sheet for production of fuel for all High Performance Research Reactors (HPRR) has been identified by the national program office. This report could provide a starting point for the development of such a reference flow sheet for a foil-based fuel for all HPRRs. The reference flow sheet presented is based on processes currently being developed by the national program for the LEU foil fuel when available, processes used historically in the manufacture of other nuclear fuels and materials, and processes used in other manufacturing industries producing a product configuration similar to the form required in manufacturing a foil fuel. The processes in the reference flow sheet are

  10. Substrate and drug binding sites in LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyola, Ajeeta; Karpowich, Nathan K; Zhen, Juan; Marden, Jennifer; Reith, Maarten E; Wang, Da-Neng

    2010-08-01

    LeuT is a member of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter family, which includes the neuronal transporters for serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. The original crystal structure of LeuT shows a primary leucine-binding site at the center of the protein. LeuT is inhibited by different classes of antidepressants that act as potent inhibitors of the serotonin transporter. The newly determined crystal structures of LeuT-antidepressant complexes provide opportunities to probe drug binding in the serotonin transporter, of which the exact position remains controversial. Structure of a LeuT-tryptophan complex shows an overlapping binding site with the primary substrate site. A secondary substrate binding site was recently identified, where the binding of a leucine triggers the cytoplasmic release of the primary substrate. This two binding site model presents opportunities for a better understanding of drug binding and the mechanism of inhibition for mammalian transporters.

  11. Selection of Nuclear Fuel for TREAT: UO2 vs U3O8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glazoff, Michael Vasily [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coryell, Benjamin David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Parga, Clemente Jose [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) that resides at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), first achieved criticality in 1959, and successfully performed many transient tests on nuclear fuel until 1994 when its operations were suspended. Resumption of operations at TREAT was approved in February 2014 to meet the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy’s objectives in transient testing of nuclear fuels. The National Nuclear Security Administration’s is converting TREAT from its existing highly enriched uranium (HEU) core to a new core containing low enriched uranium (LEU) (i.e., U-235< 20% by weight). The TREAT Conversion project is currently progressing with conceptual design phase activities. Dimensional stability of the fuel element assemblies, predictable fuel can oxidation and sufficient heat conductivity by the fuel blocks are some of the critical performance requirements of the new LEU fuel. Furthermore, to enable the design team to design fuel block and can specifications, it is amongst the objectives to evaluate TREAT LEU fuel and cladding material’s chemical interaction. This information is important to understand the viability of Zr-based alloys and fuel characteristics for the fabrication of the TREAT LEU fuel and cladding. Also, it is very important to make the right decision on what type of nuclear fuel will be used at TREAT. In particular, one has to consider different oxides of uranium, and most importantly, UO2 vs U3O8. In this report, the results are documented pertaining to the choice mentioned above (UO2 vs U3O8). The conclusion in favor of using UO2 was made based on the analysis of historical data, up-to-date literature, and self-consistent calculations of phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties in the U-O and U-O-C systems. The report is organized as follows. First, the criteria that were used to make the

  12. Conversion of deoxynivalenol to 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol in barley-derived fuel ethanol co-products with yeast expressing trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooks Wynse S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON may be concentrated in distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS; a co-product of fuel ethanol fermentation when grain containing DON is used to produce fuel ethanol. Even low levels of DON (≤ 5 ppm in DDGS sold as feed pose a significant threat to the health of monogastric animals. New and improved strategies to reduce DON in DDGS need to be developed and implemented to address this problem. Enzymes known as trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferases convert DON to 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3ADON, and may reduce its toxicity in plants and animals. Results Two Fusarium trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferases (FgTRI101 and FfTRI201 were cloned and expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae during a series of small-scale ethanol fermentations using barley (Hordeum vulgare. DON was concentrated 1.6 to 8.2 times in DDGS compared with the starting ground grain. During the fermentation process, FgTRI101 converted 9.2% to 55.3% of the DON to 3ADON, resulting in DDGS with reductions in DON and increases in 3ADON in the Virginia winter barley cultivars Eve, Thoroughbred and Price, and the experimental line VA06H-25. Analysis of barley mashes prepared from the barley line VA04B-125 showed that yeast expressing FfTRI201 were more effective at acetylating DON than those expressing FgTRI101; DON conversion for FfTRI201 ranged from 26.1% to 28.3%, whereas DON conversion for FgTRI101 ranged from 18.3% to 21.8% in VA04B-125 mashes. Ethanol yields were highest with the industrial yeast strain Ethanol Red®, which also consumed galactose when present in the mash. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential of using yeast expressing a trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferase to modify DON during commercial fuel ethanol fermentation.

  13. Life-Cycle Analysis of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Water Consumption – Effects of Coal and Biomass Conversion to Liquid Fuels as Analyzed with the GREET Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qianfeng [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cai, Hao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The vast reserves of coal in the U.S. provide a significant incentive for the development of processes for coal conversion to liquid fuels (CTL). Also, CTL using domestic coal can help move the U.S. toward greater energy independence and security. However, current conversion technologies are less economically competitive and generate greater greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than production of petroleum fuels. Altex Technologies Corporation (Altex, hereinafter) and Pennsylvania State University have developed a hybrid technology to produce jet fuel from a feedstock blend of coal and biomass. Collaborating with Altex, Argonne National Laboratory has expanded and used the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET®) model to assess the life-cycle GHG emissions and water consumption of this hybrid technology. Biomass feedstocks include corn stover, switchgrass, and wheat straw. The option of biomass densification (bales to pellets) is also evaluated in this study. The results show that the densification process generates additional GHG emissions as a result of additional biomass process energy demand. This process coproduces a large amount of char, and this study investigates two scenarios to treat char: landfill disposal (Char-LF) and combustion for combined heat and power (CHP). Since the CHP scenarios export excess heat and electricity as coproducts, two coproduct handling methods are used for well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis: displacement (Char-CHP-Disp) and energy allocation (Char-CHP-EnAllo). When the feedstock contains 15 wt% densified wheat straw and 85 wt% lignite coal, WTWa GHG emissions of the coal-and-biomass-to-liquid pathways are 116, 97, and 137 gCO2e per megajoule (MJ) under the Char-LF, Char-CHP-Disp, and Char-CHP-EnAllo scenarios, respectively, as compared to conventional jet fuel production at 84 gCO2e/MJ. WTWa water consumption values are 0.072, -0.046, and 0.044 gal/MJ for Char-LF, Char-CHP-Disp, and Char

  14. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Baseline Compact Lot LEU01-46T-Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D [ORNL; Montgomery, Fred C [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL

    2006-08-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 baseline compact lot LEU01-46T-Z. The compacts were produced by ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program for the first AGR irradiation test train (AGR-1). This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite LEU01-46T, which was a composite of four batches of TRISO-coated 350 {micro}m diameter 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with an {approx} 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a SiC layer (35 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by another dense outer pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73D-20-69302. The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified as LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). A data compilation for the AGR-1 baseline coated particle composite LEU01-46T can be found in ORNL/TM-2006/019. The AGR-1 Fuel product Specification and Characterization Guidance (INL EDF-4380) provides the requirements necessary for acceptance of the fuel manufactured for the AGR-1 irradiation test. Section 6.2 of EDF-4380 provides the property requirements for the heat treated compacts. The Statistical Sampling Plan for AGR Fuel materials (INL EDF-4542) provides additional guidance regarding statistical methods for product acceptance and recommended sample sizes. The procedures for characterizing and qualifying the compacts are outlined in ORNL product inspection plan AGR-CHAR-PIP-05. the inspection report forms generated by this product inspection plan document the product acceptance for the property requirements listed in section 6.2 of EDF-4380.

  15. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Variant 2 Compact Lot LEU01-48T-Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D [ORNL; Montgomery, Fred C [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL

    2006-08-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 variant 2 compact lot LEU01-48T-Z. The compacts were produced by ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program for the first AGR irradiation test train (AGR-1). This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite LEU01-48T, which was a composite of three batches of TRISO-coated 350 {micro}m diameter 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with an {approx} 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a SiC layer (35 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by another dense outer pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73D-20-69302. The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified as LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). A data compilation for the AGR-1 variant 2 coated particle composite LEU01-48T can be found in ORNL/TM-2006/021. The AGR-1 Fuel Product Specification and Characterization Guidance (INL EDF-4380) provides the requirements necessary for acceptance of the fuel manufactured for the AGR-1 irradiation test. Section 6.2 of EDF-4380 provides the property requirements for the heat treated compacts. The Statistical Sampling Plan for AGR Fuel materials (INL EDF-4542) provides additional guidance regarding statistical methods for product acceptance and recommended sample sizes. The procedures for characterizing and qualifying the compacts are outlined in ORNL product inspection plan AGR-CHAR-PIP-05. The inspection report forms generated by this product inspection plan document the product acceptance for the property requirements listed in section 6.2 of EDF-4380.

  16. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Variant 1 Compact Lot LEU01-47T-Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D [ORNL; Montgomery, Fred C [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL

    2006-08-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 variant 1 compact lot LEU01-47T-Z. The compacts were produced by ORNL for the ADvanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program for the first AGR irradiation test train (AGR-1). This compact lot was fabricated using particle composite LEU01-47T, which was a composite of three batches of TRISO-coated 350 {micro}m diameter 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with an {approx} 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a dense inner pyrocarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by a SiC layer (35 {micro}m nominal thickness), followed by another dense outer pyrcoarbon layer (40 {micro}m nominal thickness). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73D-20-69302. The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified at LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). A data compilation for the AGR-1 variant 1 coated particle composite LEU01-47T can be found in ORNL/TM-2006/020. The AGR-1 Fuel Product Specification and Characterization Guidance (INL EDF-4380) provides the requirements necessary for acceptance of the fuel manufactured for the AGR-1 irradiation test. Section 6.2 of EDF-4380 provides the property requirements for the heat treated compacts. The Statistical Sampling Plan for AGR Fuel Materials (INL EDF-4542) provides additional guidance regarding statistical methods for product acceptance and recommended sample sizes. The procedures for characterizing and qualifying the compacts are outlined in ORNL product inspection plan AGR-CHAR-PIP-05. The inspection report forms generated by this product inspection plan document the product acceptance for the property requirements listed in section 6.2 of EDF-4380.

  17. Efficient Conversion of Lignin to Electricity Using a Novel Direct Biomass Fuel Cell Mediated by Polyoxometalates at Low Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuebing; Zhu, J Y

    2016-01-01

    A novel polyoxometalates (POMs) mediated direct biomass fuel cell (DBFC) was used in this study to directly convert lignin to electricity at low temperatures with high power output and Faradaic efficiency. When phosphomolybdic acid H3 PMo12 O40 (PMo12) was used as the electron and proton carrier in the anode solution with a carbon electrode, and O2 was directly used as the final electron acceptor under the catalysis of Pt, the peak power density reached 0.96 mW cm(-2), 560 times higher than that of phenol-fueled microbial fuel cells (MFCs). When the cathode reaction was catalyzed by PMo12, the power density could be greatly enhanced to 5 mW cm(-2). Continuous operation demonstrated that this novel fuel cell was promising as a stable electrochemical power source. Structure analysis of the lignin indicated that the hydroxyl group content was reduced whereas the carbonyl group content increased. Both condensation and depolymerization takes place during the PMo12 oxidation of lignin.

  18. Direct Conversion of Wheat Straw into Electricity with a Biomass Flow Fuel Cell Mediated by Two Redox Ion Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Liu, Wei; Du, Xu; Liu, Congmin; Zhang, Zhe; Sun, Feifei; Yang, Le; Xu, Dong; Guo, Hua; Deng, Yulin

    2017-02-08

    In this paper, a biomass flow fuel cell to directly convert wheat straw to electricity at low temperature (80-90 °C) and atmospheric pressure is presented. Two redox ion pairs, Fe(3+) /Fe(2+) and VO2(+) /VO(2+) , acting as redox catalysts and charge carriers, were used in the anode and cathode flow tanks, respectively. The wheat straw was first oxidized by Fe(3+) in the anode tank at approximately 100 °C. The reduced Fe(2+) in the anode was used to construct a fuel cell with VO2(+) in the cathode. The VO2(+) ions were reduced to VO(2+) and regenerated to VO2(+) by oxygen oxidation. The wheat straw flow fuel cell showed a power output of 100 mW cm(-2) . Mediated with liquid Fe(3+) carriers, the solid powder of wheat straw could be gradually degraded into low-molecular-weight organic molecules and even oxidized to CO2 at the anode without using noble-metal catalysts. The overpotential for the electrodes of the flow fuel cell was examined and the energy cost was estimated.

  19. Energy landscape of LeuT from molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Mert; Zomot, Elia; Cheng, Mary Hongying; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial sodium-coupled leucine transporter (LeuT) has been broadly used as a structural model for understanding the structure-dynamics-function of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters as well as other solute carriers that share the same fold (LeuT fold), as the first member of the family crystallographically resolved in multiple states: outward-facing open, outward-facing occluded, and inward-facing open. Yet, a complete picture of the energy landscape of (sub)states visited along the LeuT transport cycle has been elusive. In an attempt to visualize the conformational spectrum of LeuT, we performed extensive simulations of LeuT dimer dynamics in the presence of substrate (Ala or Leu) and co-transported Na+ ions, in explicit membrane and water. We used both conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (with Anton supercomputing machine) and a recently introduced method, collective MD, that takes advantage of collective modes of motions predicted by the anisotropic network model. Free energy landscapes constructed based on ˜40 μs trajectories reveal multiple substates occluded to the extracellular (EC) and/or intracellular (IC) media, varying in the levels of exposure of LeuT to EC or IC vestibules. The IC-facing transmembrane (TM) helical segment TM1a shows an opening, albeit to a smaller extent and in a slightly different direction than that observed in the inward-facing open crystal structure. The study provides insights into the spectrum of conformational substates and paths accessible to LeuT and highlights the differences between Ala- and Leu-bound substates.

  20. Status and perspectives of CO2 conversion into fuels and chemicals by catalytic, photocatalytic and electrocatalytic processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kondratenko, E.V.; Mul, G.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Larrazábal, G.O.; Pérez-Ramírez, J.

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights recent developments and future perspectives in carbon dioxide usage for the sustainable production of energy and chemicals and to reduce global warming. We discuss the heterogeneously catalysed hydrogenation, as well as the photocatalytic and electrocatalytic conversion of CO2

  1. Advanced reactors and novel reactions for the conversion of triglyceride based oils into high quality renewable transportation fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnen, Michael James

    Sustainable energy continues to grow more important to all societies, leading to the research and development of a variety of alternative and renewable energy technologies. Of these, renewable liquid transportation fuels may be the most visible to consumers, and this visibility is further magnified by the long-term trend of increasingly expensive petroleum fuels that the public consumes. While first-generation biofuels such as biodiesel and fuel ethanol have been integrated into the existing fuel infrastructures of several countries, the chemical differences between them and their petroleum counterparts reduce their effectiveness. This gives rise to the development and commercialization of second generation biofuels, many of which are intended to have equivalent properties to those of their petroleum counterparts. In this dissertation, the primary reactions for a second-generation biofuel process, known herein as the University of North Dakota noncatalytic cracking process (NCP), have been studied at the fundamental level and improved. The NCP is capable of producing renewable fuels and chemicals that are virtually the same as their petroleum counterparts in performance and quality (i.e., petroleum-equivalent). In addition, a novel analytical method, FIMSDIST was developed which, within certain limitations, can increase the elution capabilities of GC analysis and decrease sample processing times compared to other high resolution methods. These advances are particularly useful for studies of highly heterogeneous fuel and/or organic chemical intermediates, such as those studied for the NCP. However the data from FIMSDIST must be supplemented with data from other methods such as for certain carboxylic acid, to provide accurate, comprehensive results, From a series of TAG cracking experiments that were performed, it was found that coke formation during cracking is most likely the result of excessive temperature and/or residence time in a cracking reactor. Based on this

  2. Conversion of Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) and Polypropylene (PP) Waste Plastics into Liquid Fuel Using Thermal Cracking Process

    OpenAIRE

    Sarker, Moinuddin; Rashid, Mohammad Mamunor; Rahman, Md. Sadikur; Molla, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    In every sector of the world today energy is essential. Energy has many forms such as electricity, transportation fuel and so on. A large amount of energy is produced from crude oil, which is used to produce petroleum and petroleum to produce daily usable plastics. The solution to the above mentioned problems can be solved through the utilization of the new develop technology. This new developed technology will remove these hazardous waste plastics from the environment and convert them into e...

  3. The Economics of Harvesting and Transporting Corn Stover for Conversion to Fuel Ethanol: A Case Study for Minnesota

    OpenAIRE

    Petrolia, Daniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Corn stover harvest and transport cost functions were estimated for two harvest operations for a proposed biomass-to-ethanol conversion facility located in southern Minnesota, USA. This work presents an alternative methodology to estimating corn stover quantities and harvest costs at the county level, taking into account county-specific yields, transportation distances, erosion constraints, machinery specifications, and other key variables. Monte Carlo simulation was also used to estimate the...

  4. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, M Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J; Jones, Patrik R

    2013-01-02

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C(6)-C(18)) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C(8)-C(16)) or fatty alkanes (C(7)-C(15)) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L(-1) was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C(8)-C(18)). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities.

  5. The Environment Shapes the Inner Vestibule of LeuT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohail, Azmat; Jayaraman, Kumaresan; Venkatesan, Santhoshkannan

    2016-01-01

    Human neurotransmitter transporters are found in the nervous system terminating synaptic signals by rapid removal of neurotransmitter molecules from the synaptic cleft. The homologous transporter LeuT, found in Aquifex aeolicus, was crystallized in different conformations. Here, we investigated...... the inward-open state of LeuT. We compared LeuT in membranes and micelles using molecular dynamics simulations and lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET). Simulations of micelle-solubilized LeuT revealed a stable and widely open inward-facing conformation. However, this conformation was unstable...... in a membrane environment. The helix dipole and the charged amino acid of the first transmembrane helix (TM1A) partitioned out of the hydrophobic membrane core. Free energy calculations showed that movement of TM1A by 0.30 nm was driven by a free energy difference of ~15 kJ/mol. Distance measurements by LRET...

  6. No association of the neuropeptide Y (Leu7Pro) and ghrelin gene (Arg51Gln, Leu72Met, Gln90Leu) single nucleotide polymorphisms with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Jochen; Bailer, Ursula; de Zwaan, Martina; Fuchs, Karoline; Leisch, Friedrich; Grün, Bettina; Strnad, Alexandra; Stojanovic, Mirjana; Windisch, Julia; Lennkh-Wolfsberg, Claudia; El-Giamal, Nadja; Sieghart, Werner; Kasper, Siegfried; Aschauer, Harald

    2011-06-01

    Genetic factors likely contribute to the biological vulnerability of eating disorders. Case-control association study on one neuropeptide Y gene (Leu7Pro) polymorphism and three ghrelin gene (Arg51Gln, Leu72Met and Gln90Leu) polymorphisms. 114 eating disorder patients (46 with anorexia nervosa, 30 with bulimia nervosa, 38 with binge eating disorder) and 164 healthy controls were genotyped. No differences were detected between patients and controls for any of the four polymorphisms in allele frequency and genotype distribution (P > 0.05). Allele frequencies and genotypes had no significant influence on body mass index (P > 0.05) in eating disorder patients. Positive findings of former case-control studies of associations between ghrelin gene polymorphisms and eating disorders could not be replicated. Neuropeptide Y gene polymorphisms have not been investigated in eating disorders before.

  7. Fuel preparation for use in the production of medical isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policke, Timothy A.; Aase, Scott B.; Stagg, William R.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention relates generally to the field of medical isotope production by fission of uranium-235 and the fuel utilized therein (e.g., the production of suitable Low Enriched Uranium (LEU is uranium having 20 weight percent or less uranium-235) fuel for medical isotope production) and, in particular to a method for producing LEU fuel and a LEU fuel product that is suitable for use in the production of medical isotopes. In one embodiment, the LEU fuel of the present invention is designed to be utilized in an Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor (AHR) for the production of various medical isotopes including, but not limited to, molybdenum-99, cesium-137, iodine-131, strontium-89, xenon-133 and yttrium-90.

  8. 76 FR 51357 - Notice of Availability: American Assured Fuel Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice... criteria in the case of supply disruptions in the nuclear fuel market. DOE will sell LEU from the AFS.... DOE will sell LEU to U.S. persons who will in turn sell to domestic or foreign recipients only...

  9. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels. Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, A.; Sahir, A.; Tan, E.; Humbird, D.; Snowden-Swan, L. J.; Meyer, P.; Ross, J.; Sexton, D.; Yap, R.; Lukas, J.

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructurecompatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis.

  10. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, M. Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J.; Jones, Patrik R.

    2013-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C6–C18) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C8–C16) or fatty alkanes (C7–C15) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L−1 was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C8–C18). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities. PMID:23248280

  11. The public health benefits of reducing fine particulate matter through conversion to cleaner heating fuels in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirbek, Iyad; Haney, Jay; Douglas, Sharon; Ito, Kazuhiko; Caputo, Steven; Matte, Thomas

    2014-12-02

    In recent years, both New York State and City issued regulations to reduce emissions from burning heating oil. To assess the benefits of these programs in New York City, where the density of emissions and vulnerable populations vary greatly, we simulated the air quality benefits of scenarios reflecting no action, partial, and complete phase-out of high-sulfur heating fuels using the Community MultiScale Air Quality (CMAQ) model conducted at a high spatial resolution (1 km). We evaluated the premature mortality and morbidity benefits of the scenarios within 42 city neighborhoods and computed benefits by neighborhood poverty status. The complete phase-out scenario reduces annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) by an estimated 0.71 μg/m(3) city-wide (average of 1 km estimates, 10-90th percentile: 0.1-1.6 μg/m(3)), avoiding an estimated 290 premature deaths, 180 hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular disease, and 550 emergency department visits for asthma each year. The largest improvements were seen in areas of highest building and population density and the majority of benefits have occurred through the partial phase out of high-sulfur heating fuel already achieved. While emissions reductions were greatest in low-poverty neighborhoods, health benefits are estimated to be greatest in high-poverty neighborhoods due to higher baseline morbidity and mortality rates.

  12. Conversion of Biomass Derivatives to Electricity in Photo Fuel Cells using Undoped and Tungsten-doped Bismuth Vanadate Photoanodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingqing; Shi, Jingying; Ding, Chunmei; Chong, Ruifeng; Zhang, Bao; Wang, Zhiliang; Li, Ailong; Liang, Zhenxing; Liao, Shijun; Li, Can

    2015-12-07

    The photo fuel cell (PFC) is a promising technology for simultaneously converting solar energy and bioenergy into electricity. Here, we present a miniature air-breathing PFC that uses either BiVO4 or W-doped BiVO4 as the photoanode and a Pt/C catalyst as the air-breathing cathode. The PFC exhibited excellent performance under solar illumination and when fed with several types of biomaterial. We found the PFC performance could be significantly enhanced using W-doping into the BiVO4 photoanode. With glucose as the fuel and simulated sunlight (AM 1.5 G) as the light source, the open-circuit voltage increased from 0.74 to 0.92 V, the short-circuit current density rose from 0.46 to 1.62 mA cm(-2) , and the maximum power density was boosted from 0.05 to 0.38 mW cm(-2) , compared to a PFC using undoped BiVO4 as the anode.

  13. Block copolymer based composition and morphology control in nanostructured hybrid materials for energy conversion and storage: solar cells, batteries, and fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Orilall, M. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The development of energy conversion and storage devices is at the forefront of research geared towards a sustainable future. However, there are numerous issues that prevent the widespread use of these technologies including cost, performance and durability. These limitations can be directly related to the materials used. In particular, the design and fabrication of nanostructured hybrid materials is expected to provide breakthroughs for the advancement of these technologies. This tutorial review will highlight block copolymers as an emerging and powerful yet affordable tool to structure-direct such nanomaterials with precise control over structural dimensions, composition and spatial arrangement of materials in composites. After providing an introduction to materials design and current limitations, the review will highlight some of the most recent examples of block copolymer structure-directed nanomaterials for photovoltaics, batteries and fuel cells. In each case insights are provided into the various underlying fundamental chemical, thermodynamic and kinetic formation principles enabling general and relatively inexpensive wet-polymer chemistry methodologies for the efficient creation of multiscale functional materials. Examples include nanostructured ceramics, ceramic-carbon composites, ceramic-carbon-metal composites and metals with morphologies ranging from hexagonally arranged cylinders to three-dimensional bi-continuous cubic networks. The review ends with an outlook towards the synthesis of multicomponent and hierarchical multifunctional hybrid materials with different nano-architectures from self-assembly of higher order blocked macromolecules which may ultimately pave the way for the further development of energy conversion and storage devices. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Block copolymer based composition and morphology control in nanostructured hybrid materials for energy conversion and storage: solar cells, batteries, and fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orilall, M Christopher; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2011-02-01

    The development of energy conversion and storage devices is at the forefront of research geared towards a sustainable future. However, there are numerous issues that prevent the widespread use of these technologies including cost, performance and durability. These limitations can be directly related to the materials used. In particular, the design and fabrication of nanostructured hybrid materials is expected to provide breakthroughs for the advancement of these technologies. This tutorial review will highlight block copolymers as an emerging and powerful yet affordable tool to structure-direct such nanomaterials with precise control over structural dimensions, composition and spatial arrangement of materials in composites. After providing an introduction to materials design and current limitations, the review will highlight some of the most recent examples of block copolymer structure-directed nanomaterials for photovoltaics, batteries and fuel cells. In each case insights are provided into the various underlying fundamental chemical, thermodynamic and kinetic formation principles enabling general and relatively inexpensive wet-polymer chemistry methodologies for the efficient creation of multiscale functional materials. Examples include nanostructured ceramics, ceramic-carbon composites, ceramic-carbon-metal composites and metals with morphologies ranging from hexagonally arranged cylinders to three-dimensional bi-continuous cubic networks. The review ends with an outlook towards the synthesis of multicomponent and hierarchical multifunctional hybrid materials with different nano-architectures from self-assembly of higher order blocked macromolecules which may ultimately pave the way for the further development of energy conversion and storage devices.

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds for photovoltaic applications and solar energy conversion of carbon dioxide to fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Vaidyanathan; Murugesan, Sankaran

    2014-04-29

    The present invention relates to formation of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds, such as bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, via a hydrothermal synthesis process, with the resulting compound(s) having multifunctional properties such as being useful in solar energy conversion, environmental remediation, and/or energy storage, for example. In one embodiment, a hydrothermal method is disclosed that transforms nanoparticles of TiO.sub.2 to bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, optionally loaded with palladium nanoparticles. The method includes reacting titanium dioxide nanotubes with a bismuth salt in an acidic bath at a temperature sufficient and for a time sufficient to form bismuth titanate crystals, which are subsequently annealed to form bismuth titanate nanocubes. After annealing, the bismuth titanate nanocubes may be optionally loaded with nano-sized metal particles, e.g., nanosized palladium particles.

  16. Preliminary Evaluation of Alternate Designs for HFIR Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Valentine, Jennifer R [ORNL

    2014-11-01

    Engineering design studies of the feasibility of conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of an effort sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI)/Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The fuel type selected by the program for the conversion of the five high-power research reactors in the U.S. that still use HEU fuel is a new U-Mo monolithic fuel. Studies by ORNL have previously indicated that HFIR can be successfully converted using the new fuel provided (1) the reactor power can be increased from 85 MW to 100 MW and (2) the fuel can be fabricated to a specific reference design. Fabrication techniques for the new fuel are under development by the program but are still immature, especially for the complex aspects of the HFIR fuel design. In FY 2012, the program underwent a major shift in focus to emphasize developing and qualifying processes for the fabrication of reliable and affordable LEU fuel. In support of this new focus and in an effort to ensure that the HFIR fuel design is as suitable for reliable fabrication as possible, ORNL undertook the present study to propose and evaluate several alternative design features. These features include (1) eliminating the fuel zone axial contouring in the previous reference design by substituting a permanent neutron absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, (2) relocating the burnable neutron absorber from the fuel plates of the inner fuel element to the side plates of the inner fuel element (the fuel plates of the outer fuel element do not contain a burnable absorber), (3) relocating the fuel zone inside the fuel plate to be centered on the centerline of the depth of the plate, and (4) reshaping the radial contour of the relocated fuel zone to be symmetric about this centerline. The present

  17. Preliminary Evaluation of Alternate Designs for HFIR Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Cook, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant [ORNL; Valentine, Jennifer [ORNL

    2014-10-30

    Engineering design studies of the feasibility of conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of an effort sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI)/Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The fuel type selected by the program for the conversion of the five high-power research reactors in the U.S. that still use HEU fuel is a new U-Mo monolithic fuel. Studies by ORNL have previously indicated that HFIR can be successfully converted using the new fuel provided (1) the reactor power can be increased from 85 MW to 100 MW and (2) the fuel can be fabricated to a specific reference design. Fabrication techniques for the new fuel are under development by the program but are still immature, especially for the “complex” aspects of the HFIR fuel design. In FY 2012, the program underwent a major shift in focus to emphasize developing and qualifying processes for the fabrication of reliable and affordable LEU fuel. In support of this new focus and in an effort to ensure that the HFIR fuel design is as suitable for reliable fabrication as possible, ORNL undertook the present study to propose and evaluate several alternative design features. These features include (1) eliminating the fuel zone axial contouring in the previous reference design by substituting a permanent neutron absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, (2) relocating the burnable neutron absorber from the fuel plates of the inner fuel element to the side plates of the inner fuel element (the fuel plates of the outer fuel element do not contain a burnable absorber), (3) relocating the fuel zone inside the fuel plate to be centered on the centerline of the depth of the plate, and (4) reshaping the radial contour of the relocated fuel zone to be symmetric about this centerline. The

  18. Metagenomic analyses reveal the involvement of syntrophic consortia in methanol/electricity conversion in microbial fuel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaka Yamamuro

    Full Text Available Methanol is widely used in industrial processes, and as such, is discharged in large quantities in wastewater. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs have the potential to recover electric energy from organic pollutants in wastewater; however, the use of MFCs to generate electricity from methanol has not been reported. In the present study, we developed single-chamber MFCs that generated electricity from methanol at the maximum power density of 220 mW m(-2 (based on the projected area of the anode. In order to reveal how microbes generate electricity from methanol, pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA-gene amplicons and Illumina shotgun sequencing of metagenome were conducted. The pyrosequencing detected in abundance Dysgonomonas, Sporomusa, and Desulfovibrio in the electrolyte and anode and cathode biofilms, while Geobacter was detected only in the anode biofilm. Based on known physiological properties of these bacteria, it is considered that Sporomusa converts methanol into acetate, which is then utilized by Geobacter to generate electricity. This speculation is supported by results of shotgun metagenomics of the anode-biofilm microbes, which reconstructed relevant catabolic pathways in these bacteria. These results suggest that methanol is anaerobically catabolized by syntrophic bacterial consortia with electrodes as electron acceptors.

  19. High-efficiency intermediate temperature solid oxide electrolyzer cells for the conversion of carbon dioxide to fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan , Jingbo; Chen, Hao; Dogdibegovic, Emir; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Cheng, Mojie; Zhou, Xiao-Dong

    2014-04-15

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide in the intermediate temperature region was investigated by utilizing a reversible solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The current potential (i-V) curve exhibited a nonlinear characteristic at low current density. Differentiation of i-V curves revealed that the cell area specific resistance (ASR) was current-dependent and had its maximum in electrolysis mode and minimum in fuel cell mode. Impedance measurements were performed under different current densities and gas compositions, and the results were analyzed by calculating the distribution of relaxation times. The ASR variation resulted from the difference in electrochemical reactions occurring on the Ni-YSZ electrode, i.e., Ni-YSZ is a better electrode for CO oxidation than for CO2 reduction. Coke formation on Ni-YSZ played a crucial role in affecting its electrolysis performance in the intermediate temperature region. The ASR apex was associated with a decrease in cell temperature during electrolysis due to the endothermic nature of CO2 reduction reaction. It was postulated that such a decrease in temperature and rise in CO concentration led to coke formation. As a consequence, higher temperature (>700 degrees C), higher CO2 concentration (>50%), and the presence of hydrogen or steam are recommended for efficient CO2 reduction in solid oxide electrochemical cells. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  20. Metagenomic analyses reveal the involvement of syntrophic consortia in methanol/electricity conversion in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamuro, Ayaka; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Abe, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Methanol is widely used in industrial processes, and as such, is discharged in large quantities in wastewater. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have the potential to recover electric energy from organic pollutants in wastewater; however, the use of MFCs to generate electricity from methanol has not been reported. In the present study, we developed single-chamber MFCs that generated electricity from methanol at the maximum power density of 220 mW m(-2) (based on the projected area of the anode). In order to reveal how microbes generate electricity from methanol, pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA-gene amplicons and Illumina shotgun sequencing of metagenome were conducted. The pyrosequencing detected in abundance Dysgonomonas, Sporomusa, and Desulfovibrio in the electrolyte and anode and cathode biofilms, while Geobacter was detected only in the anode biofilm. Based on known physiological properties of these bacteria, it is considered that Sporomusa converts methanol into acetate, which is then utilized by Geobacter to generate electricity. This speculation is supported by results of shotgun metagenomics of the anode-biofilm microbes, which reconstructed relevant catabolic pathways in these bacteria. These results suggest that methanol is anaerobically catabolized by syntrophic bacterial consortia with electrodes as electron acceptors.

  1. Comparison of adsorbents for H2S and D4 removal for biogas conversion in a solid oxide fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigot, Léa; Ducom, Gaëlle; Benadda, Belkacem; Labouré, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Biogas contains trace compounds detrimental for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application, especially sulphur-containing compounds and volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs). It is therefore necessary to remove these impurities from the biogas for fuelling an SOFC. In this paper, dynamic lab-scale adsorption tests were performed on synthetic polluted gas to evaluate the performance of a polishing treatment to remove hydrogen sulphide (H2S - sulphur compound) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4 - VOSiC). Three kinds of adsorbents were tested: an activated carbon, a silica gel (SG) and a zeolite (Z). Z proved to be the best adsorbent for H2S removal, with an adsorbed quantity higher than [Formula: see text] at the SOFC tolerance limit. However, as concerns D4 removal, SG was the most efficient adsorbent, with an adsorbed quantity of about 184 mgD4/gSG at the SOFC tolerance limit. These results could not be explained by structural characteristics of the adsorbents, but they were partly explained by chemical interactions between the adsorbate and the adsorbent. In these experiments, internal diffusion was the controlling step, Knudsen diffusion being predominant to molecular diffusion. As Z was also a good adsorbent for D4 removal, competition phenomena were investigated with Z for the simultaneous removal of H2S and D4. It was shown that H2S retention was dramatically decreased in the presence of D4, probably due to D4 polymerization resulting in pore blocking.

  2. Electrochemical conversion of CO₂ to fuels: tuning of the reaction zone using suitable functional groups in a solid polymer electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeshala, Leela Manohar; Uppaluri, Ramagopal; Verma, Anil

    2014-09-07

    The electrochemical reduction of gaseous CO2 is studied for the first time using sterically hindered bulky quaternary ammonium ions in a solid polymer matrix at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a developed electrochemical reactor. Some new insights are found, leading to an effective reaction process. It is found that the reaction zone can be tuned to a great extent with the help of fixed functional groups attached to the solid polymer. To illustrate the concept, solid polymer electrolytes with the same backbone and different fixed functional groups are synthesized. It is found that only a change to the functional group in the membrane is needed to dramatically change the efficiency and selectivity of the reaction products. Suitable groups may increase the mass transfer of CO2 at the reaction interface and help as a co-catalyst. This work may open a new approach for the development of next generation processes for gaseous CO2 electroreduction to fuels, which is a present need.

  3. Solar energy conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Crabtree, George W.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2007-01-01

    If solar energy is to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels, we must have efficient ways to convert photons into electricity, fuel, and heat. The need for better conversion technologies is a driving force behind many recent developments in biology, materials, and especially nanoscience.

  4. Conversion of activated-sludge reactors to microbial fuel cells for wastewater treatment coupled to electricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Tomoya; Miyahara, Morio; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-11-01

    Wastewater can be treated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with the aid of microbes that oxidize organic compounds using anodes as electron acceptors. Previous studies have suggested the utility of cassette-electrode (CE) MFCs for wastewater treatment, in which rice paddy-field soil was used as the inoculum. The present study attempted to convert an activated-sludge (AS) reactor to CE-MFC and use aerobic sludge in the tank as the source of microbes. We used laboratory-scale (1 L in capacity) reactors that were initially operated in an AS mode to treat synthetic wastewater, containing starch, yeast extract, peptone, plant oil, and detergents. After the organics removal became stable, the aeration was terminated, and CEs were inserted to initiate an MFC-mode operation. It was demonstrated that the MFC-mode operation treated the wastewater at similar efficiencies to those observed in the AS-mode operation with COD-removal efficiencies of 75-80%, maximum power densities of 150-200 mW m(-2) and Coulombic efficiencies of 20-30%. These values were similar to those of CE-MFC inoculated with the soil. Anode microbial communities were analyzed by pyrotag sequencing of 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicons. Comparative analyses revealed that anode communities enriched from the aerobic sludge were largely different from those from the soil, suggesting that similar reactor performances can be supported by different community structures. The study demonstrates that it is possible to construct wastewater-treatment MFCs by inserting CEs into water-treatment tanks.

  5. Research and development of rapid hydrogenation for coal conversion to synthetic motor fuels (riser cracking of coal). Final report, April 1, 1976-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, D. A.; Beeson, J. L.; Oberle, R. D.

    1981-02-01

    The objective of the program described was to develop a noncatalytic process for the hydropyrolysis of lignite and coal to produce high-octane blending gasoline constituents, methane, ethane, and carbon oxides. The process would operate in a balanced plant mode, using spent char to generate process hydrogen by steam-oxygen gasification. The technical program included the construction and operating of a bench-scale unit (5-10 lb/hr), the design, construction, and operation of a process development unit (PDU) (100 lb/hr), and a final technical and economic assessment of the process, called Riser Cracking of Coal. In the bench-scale unit program, 143 runs were made investigating the effects of pressure, temperature, heating rate, residence time, and particle size, processing North Dakota lignite in hydrogen. Some runs were made in which the hydrogen was preheated to pyrolysis temperatures prior to contact with the coal, and, also, in which steam was substituted for half of the hydrogen. Attempts to operate the bench-scale unit at 1200 psig and 1475/sup 0/F were not successful. Depth of carbon conversion was found to be influenced by hydrogen pressure, hydrogen-to-coal ratio, and the severity of the thermal treatment. The composition of hydrocarbon liquids produced was found to change with severity. At low severity, the liquids contained sizable fractions of phenols and cresols. At high severity, the fraction of phenols and cresols was much reduced, with an attendant increase in BTX. In operating the PDU, it was necessary to use more oxygen than was planned to achieve pyrolysis temperatures because of heat losses, and portions of hydrocarbon products were lost through combustion with a large increase in carbon oxide yields. Economic studies, however, showed that selling prices for gasoline blending stock, fuel oil, and fuel gas are competitive in current markets, so that the process is held to warrant further development.

  6. Energy landscape of LeuT from molecular simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Gur, Mert; Zomot, Elia; Cheng, Mary Hongying; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial sodium-coupled leucine transporter (LeuT) has been broadly used as a structural model for understanding the structure-dynamics-function of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters as well as other solute carriers that share the same fold (LeuT fold), as the first member of the family crystallographically resolved in multiple states: outward-facing open, outward-facing occluded, and inward-facing open. Yet, a complete picture of the energy landscape of (sub)states visited along th...

  7. Energy landscape of LeuT from molecular simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Gur, Mert; Zomot, Elia; Cheng, Mary Hongying; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial sodium-coupled leucine transporter (LeuT) has been broadly used as a structural model for understanding the structure-dynamics-function of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters as well as other solute carriers that share the same fold (LeuT fold), as the first member of the family crystallographically resolved in multiple states: outward-facing open, outward-facing occluded, and inward-facing open. Yet, a complete picture of the energy landscape of (sub)states visited along th...

  8. Thermoelectric power plant conversion from fuel oil to coal with integration of a CO{sub 2} capture plant. Part 1; Conversion de una central termoelectrica de combustoleo a carbon con integracion de una planta de captura de CO{sub 2}. Parte 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huante Perez, Liborio; Rodriguez Martinez, J. Hugo; Arriola Medellin, Alejandro M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    The major features in the design of power plant conversion from fuel oil to coal, considering the new technical characteristics of fuel and his transportation to plant, equipment required to comply with Mexican environmental standards and additional requirements of auxiliaries are described. In addition, changes needed on power plant design were considered according to integrates CO{sub 2} capture plant alternatives. [Spanish] En este articulo se describen las caracteristicas principales en el diseno de la conversion de Centrales de combustoleo a carbon, considerando el nuevo combustible y su transporte hasta la central, los equipos requeridos para cumplir con las normas ambientales y los requerimientos adicionales de los servicios auxiliares. Adicionalmente, se lleva a cabo el analisis de los cambios requeridos en el diseno de la conversion considerando diferentes opciones para la integracion de una planta de captura de CO{sub 2}, la cual debera entregar este subproducto para su compresion y envio a su destino final para su almacenamiento.

  9. Bio-energy Alliance High-Tonnage Bio-energy Crop Production and Conversion into Conventional Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capareda, Sergio [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Biological & Agricultural Engineering; El-Halwagi, Mahmoud [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Hall, Kenneth R. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Holtzapple, Mark [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Searcy, Royce [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Biological & Agricultural Engineering; Thompson, Wayne H. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences; Baltensperger, David [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences; Myatt, Robert [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences; Blumenthal, Jurg [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences

    2012-11-30

    Maintaining a predictable and sustainable supply of feedstock for bioenergy conversion is a major goal to facilitate the efficient transition to cellulosic biofuels. Our work provides insight into the complex interactions among agronomic, edaphic, and climatic factors that affect the sustainability of bioenergy crop yields. Our results provide science-based agronomic response measures that document how to better manage bioenergy sorghum production from planting to harvest. We show that harvest aids provide no significant benefit as a means to decrease harvest moisture or improve bioenergy yields. Our efforts to identify optimal seeding rates under varied edaphic and climatological conditions reinforce previous findings that sorghum is a resilient plant that can efficiently adapt to changing population pressures by decreasing or increasing the numbers of additional shoots or tillers – where optimal seeding rates for high biomass photoperiod sensitive sorghum is 60,000 to 70,000 seeds per acre and 100,000 to 120,000 seeds per acre for sweet varieties. Our varietal adaptability trials revealed that high biomass photoperiod sensitive energy sorghum consistently outperforms conventional photoperiod insensitive sweet sorghum and high biomass forage sorghum as the preferred bioenergy sorghum type, with combined theoretical yields of both cellulosic and fermentable water-soluble sugars producing an average yield of 1,035 gallons of EtOH per acre. Our nitrogen trials reveal that sweet sorghums produce ample amounts of water-soluble sugars with minimal increases in nitrogen inputs, and that excess nitrogen can affect minor increases in biomass yields and cellulosic sugars but decrease bioenergy quality by decreasing water-soluble sugar concentrations and increasing ash content, specifically when plant tissue nitrogen concentrations exceed 0.6 %, dry weight basis. Finally, through our growth and re-growth trials, we show that single-cut high biomass sorghum bioenergy yields

  10. Comparative study of regulated and unregulated air pollutant emissions before and after conversion of automobiles from gasoline power to liquefied petroleum gas/gasoline dual-fuel retrofits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Chien, Shu-Mei; Cheng, Man-Ting; Peng, Chiung-Yu

    2007-12-15

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is increasingly being examined as an alternative to gasoline use in automobiles as interest grows in reducing air pollutant emissions. In this study, emissions of regulated (CO, THC, NO(x)) and unregulated air pollutants, including CO2, particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and BTEX (acronym for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), were measured before and after conversion of nine gasoline-powered automobiles to LPG/ gasoline dual-fuel retrofits. The tests were conducted on a standard chassis dynamometer in accordance with the United States Environmental Protection Agency FTP-75 test procedure, with the exception that all tests were conducted under hot-start driving conditions. The influences of LPG on air pollutant emission levels and carcinogenic potency were investigated and compared with gasoline. The results showed average emission factors of 0.14 g/km, 0.33 mg/km, 0.09 g/km, 0.44 g/km, and 197 g/km for CO, THC, NO(x), PM, and CO2, respectively, for LPG/ gasoline dual-fuel retrofits. Paired-sample t-test results indicated that the emissions of CO (p = 0.03), THC (p = 0.04), and CO2 (p = 4.6 x 10(-8)) were significantly reduced with the retrofit in comparison with gasoline-powered automobiles. The reduction percentages were 71%, 89%, and 14% for CO, THC, and CO2, respectively. The average total PAH emission factor for LPG was 217 microg/km, which is significantly lower than gasoline (863 microg/km; p = 0.05). The PAH corresponding carcinogenicities (BaP(eq)) were calculated via toxic equivalencies based on benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Paired-sample t-test results fortotal BaP(eq) emissions showed no significant difference between gasoline (30.0 microg/km) and LPG (24.8 microg/km) at a confidence level of 95%. The discrepancy between PAH and BaP(eq) emissions resulted from the higher emission percentages of high molecular weight PAHs for LPG, which might be from lubricant oil. The average emission factors of

  11. Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project. Fiscal Year 2014 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Matthew K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); MacFarlan, Paul J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pool, Karl N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Slonecker, Bruce D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Frances N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Steen, Franciska H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with using PNNL facilities and processes to receive irradiated low enriched uranium–molybdenum (LEU-Mo) fuel plate samples and perform analysis in support of the M3 Reactor Conversion Program. This work is in support of the M3 Reactor Conversion Fuel Development Pillar that is managed by Idaho National Laboratory. The primary research scope was to determine the thermo-physical properties as a function of temperature and burnup. Work conducted in Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 complemented measurements performed in FY 2013 on four additional irradiated LEU-Mo fuel plate samples. Specifically, the work in FY 2014 investigated the influence of different processing methods on thermal property behavior, the absence of aluminum alloy cladding on thermal property behavior for additional model validation, and the influence of higher operating surface heat flux / more aggressive irradiation conditions on thermal property behavior. The model developed in FY 2013 and refined in FY 2014 to extract thermal properties of the U-Mo alloy from the measurements conducted on an integral fuel plate sample (i.e., U-Mo alloy with a thin Zr coating and clad in AA6061) continues to perform very well. Measurements conducted in FY 2014 on samples irradiated under similar conditions compare well to measurements performed in FY 2013. In general, there is no gross influence of fabrication method on thermal property behavior, although the difference in LEU-Mo foil microstructure does have a noticeable influence on recrystallization of grains during irradiation. Samples irradiated under more aggressive irradiation conditions, e.g., higher surface heat flux, revealed lower thermal conductivity when compared to samples irradiated at moderate surface heat fluxes, with the exception of one sample. This report documents thermal

  12. Contribution to Conversion of CO2 to fuel by electro-photo-catalytic reduction in hydro-genocarbonated aqueous solution tion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezzal, Ghania; Benammar, Souad; Hamouni, Samia; Meziane, Dalila; Naama, Sabrina; Abdessemed, Djamel

    2015-04-01

    Referring to the last World Conference COPENHAGEN (2010), endorsed by the United Nations,to '' RISKS OF CLIMATE CHANGES ', states had not reached an agreement to work fairly, in an international program, to limit Carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere, to put off it, to the next (in 2015), the right decisions, despite the recommendations of the 'IPCC'. Based on the natural reaction of photosynthesis, which converts carbon dioxide in the presence of water and sun, to '' OSA'' ', it is natural that scientists believe to implement an artificial conversion of CO2 in a renewable energy faster. Our contribution focuses on the same goals, by a different line. In this perspective, nano-materials, catalysts, pervaporation membranes, pervaporation unit, and a photo-reactor prototype, have been made. A summary of the preliminary results presented: For example, are given the concentrations of the various species present in a aqueous solution of sodium hydrogen carbonate, 0.5M, saturated with CO2, at standard temperature and pressure: (CO2) = 1M; (H2CO3) = 0,038M; (HCO3-) = 0,336M; (CO3 --) = 0,34M; pH = 7.33, an overall concentration = 1,714M, more than three times that of the initial solution. It is in such conditions that the conversion of carbon dioxide by the hydrogen produced in situ by electrolysis, in fuel, must be done in the presence of catalyst, under UV radiation. For electrodes, a nano-porous layer was formed on their surface to receive the suitable catalyst. These lats prepared, are made of porous supports (montmorillonite, aluminum and silicon oxides) into which are inserted the metal precursor, by impregnation interactive, in Iron, cobalt, nickel salt solutions, cobalt, nickel. Their performance has been identified by the reduction of para- nitrophenol, to para-aminophenol in aqueous medium in the presence of sodium borohydride. This is the catalyst 'Cobalt supported by SiO2'' that gave the best conversion, 99.5% instead of 99.7%, for a platinum catalyst

  13. Antidepressant Specificity of Serotonin Transporter Suggested by Three LeuT-SSRI Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Zhen, J; Karpowich, N; Law, C; Reith, M; Wang, D

    2009-01-01

    Sertraline and fluoxetine are selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) that are widely prescribed to treat depression. They exert their effects by inhibiting the presynaptic plasma membrane serotonin transporter (SERT). All SSRIs possess halogen atoms at specific positions, which are key determinants for the drugs' specificity for SERT. For the SERT protein, however, the structural basis of its specificity for SSRIs is poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial SERT homolog, in complex with sertraline, R-fluoxetine or S-fluoxetine. The SSRI halogens all bind to exactly the same pocket within LeuT. Mutation at this halogen-binding pocket (HBP) in SERT markedly reduces the transporter's affinity for SSRIs but not for tricyclic antidepressants. Conversely, when the only nonconserved HBP residue in both norepinephrine and dopamine transporters is mutated into that found in SERT, their affinities for all the three SSRIs increase uniformly. Thus, the specificity of SERT for SSRIs is dependent largely on interaction of the drug halogens with the protein's HBP.

  14. Antidepressant specificity of serotonin transporter suggested by three LeuT-SSRI structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng; Zhen, Juan; Karpowich, Nathan K; Law, Christopher J; Reith, Maarten E A; Wang, Da-Neng

    2009-06-01

    Sertraline and fluoxetine are selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) that are widely prescribed to treat depression. They exert their effects by inhibiting the presynaptic plasma membrane serotonin transporter (SERT). All SSRIs possess halogen atoms at specific positions, which are key determinants for the drugs' specificity for SERT. For the SERT protein, however, the structural basis of its specificity for SSRIs is poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial SERT homolog, in complex with sertraline, R-fluoxetine or S-fluoxetine. The SSRI halogens all bind to exactly the same pocket within LeuT. Mutation at this halogen-binding pocket (HBP) in SERT markedly reduces the transporter's affinity for SSRIs but not for tricyclic antidepressants. Conversely, when the only nonconserved HBP residue in both norepinephrine and dopamine transporters is mutated into that found in SERT, their affinities for all the three SSRIs increase uniformly. Thus, the specificity of SERT for SSRIs is dependent largely on interaction of the drug halogens with the protein's HBP.

  15. Design, Synthesis, and Mechanistic Evaluation of Iron-Based Catalysis for Synthesis Gas Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enrique Iglesia; Akio Ishikawa; Manual Ojeda; Nan Yao

    2007-09-30

    A detailed study of the catalyst composition, preparation and activation protocol of Fe-based catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) have been carried out in this project. We have studied the effects of different promoters on the catalytic performance of Fe-based catalysts. Specifically, we have focused on how their sequence of addition dramatically influences the performance of these materials in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The resulting procedures have been optimized to improve further upon the already unprecedented rates and C{sub 5+} selectivities of the Fe-based catalysts that we have developed as part of this project. Selectivity to C{sub 5+} hydrocarbon was close to 90 % (CO{sub 2}-free basis) and CO conversion rate was about 6.7 mol h{sup -1} g-at Fe{sup -1} at 2.14 MPa, 508 K and with substoichiometric synthesis gas; these rates were larger than any reported previously for Fe-based FTS catalysts at these conditions. We also tested the stability of Fe-based catalysts during FTS reaction (10 days); as a result, the high hydrocarbon formation rates were maintained during 10 days, though the gradual deactivation was observed. Our investigation has also focused on the evaluation of Fe-based catalysts with hydrogen-poor synthesis gas streams (H{sub 2}/CO=1). We have observed that the Fe-based catalysts prepared in this project display also a high hydrocarbon synthesis rate with substoichiometric synthesis gas (H{sub 2}/CO=1) stream, which is a less desirable reactant mixture than stoichiometric synthesis gas (H{sub 2}/CO=2). We have improved the catalyst preparation protocols and achieved the highest FTS reaction rates and selectivities so far reported at the low temperatures required for selectivity and stability. Also, we have characterized the catalyst structural change and active phases formed, and their catalytic behavior during the activation process to evaluate their influences on FTS reaction. The efforts of this project led to (i

  16. The Environment Shapes the Inner Vestibule of LeuT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmat Sohail

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human neurotransmitter transporters are found in the nervous system terminating synaptic signals by rapid removal of neurotransmitter molecules from the synaptic cleft. The homologous transporter LeuT, found in Aquifex aeolicus, was crystallized in different conformations. Here, we investigated the inward-open state of LeuT. We compared LeuT in membranes and micelles using molecular dynamics simulations and lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET. Simulations of micelle-solubilized LeuT revealed a stable and widely open inward-facing conformation. However, this conformation was unstable in a membrane environment. The helix dipole and the charged amino acid of the first transmembrane helix (TM1A partitioned out of the hydrophobic membrane core. Free energy calculations showed that movement of TM1A by 0.30 nm was driven by a free energy difference of ~15 kJ/mol. Distance measurements by LRET showed TM1A movements, consistent with the simulations, confirming a substantially different inward-open conformation in lipid bilayer from that inferred from the crystal structure.

  17. The Environment Shapes the Inner Vestibule of LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Azmat; Jayaraman, Kumaresan; Venkatesan, Santhoshkannan; Gotfryd, Kamil; Daerr, Markus; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J; Wanner, Klaus T; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H; Sandtner, Walter; Stockner, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Human neurotransmitter transporters are found in the nervous system terminating synaptic signals by rapid removal of neurotransmitter molecules from the synaptic cleft. The homologous transporter LeuT, found in Aquifex aeolicus, was crystallized in different conformations. Here, we investigated the inward-open state of LeuT. We compared LeuT in membranes and micelles using molecular dynamics simulations and lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET). Simulations of micelle-solubilized LeuT revealed a stable and widely open inward-facing conformation. However, this conformation was unstable in a membrane environment. The helix dipole and the charged amino acid of the first transmembrane helix (TM1A) partitioned out of the hydrophobic membrane core. Free energy calculations showed that movement of TM1A by 0.30 nm was driven by a free energy difference of ~15 kJ/mol. Distance measurements by LRET showed TM1A movements, consistent with the simulations, confirming a substantially different inward-open conformation in lipid bilayer from that inferred from the crystal structure.

  18. Auger Spectroscopy Analysis of Spalled LEU-10Mo Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schulze, Roland K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-03

    Presentation includes slides on Surface Science used to probe LEU-10Mo Spall; Auger highlights graphitic-like inclusions and Mo-deficient oxide on base metal; Higher C concentration detected within spall area Images Courtesy; Depth profiling reveals thick oxide; Mo concentration nears nominal only at depths ~400 nm; and lastly Key Findings.

  19. GREEN-FC. Decentralized biogas conversion on modular plants for the utilization of biogenic energy sources by means of fuel cells; GREEN-FC. Dezentrale Biogaskonversion ueber modulare Anlagen zur Nutzung biogener Energietraeger durch Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birth, Torsten [Fraunhofer-Einrichtung fuer Fabrikbetrieb und -Automatisierung (IFF), Magdeburg (Germany); Heineken, Wolfram; He, Ling

    2013-10-01

    About 60% of the world's annual demand (500 bm{sup 3}) of hydrogen is provided by the reforming of fossil fuels. Regarding the limitation of fossil resources, the production of H{sub 2} from biogas becomes increasingly important. The GREEN-FC prototype for biogas conversion to hydrogen for fuel cells includes five modules: gas supply, gas purification, gas reforming, gas utilization and post-combustion. Operation parameters of the entire system have been optimized in order to maximize the H{sub 2} yield while limiting the CO content to avoid poisoning the HT-PEMFC. A replacement of modules is possible such that alternative reactors for biogas conversion and the further use of this concept can be studied. (orig.)

  20. Highly cost-effective and sulfur/coking resistant VOx-grafted TiO2 nanoparticles as an efficient anode catalyst for direct conversion of dry sour methane in solid oxide fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, A.; Yan, N.; Vincent, A.; Singh, A.; Hill, J.M.; Chuang, K. T.; Luo, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we show that grafted metal oxide can be a highly cost-effective and active anode for solid oxide fuel cells for sour methane conversion. The developed electro-catalyst was composed of vanadium oxide grafted TiO2 nanoparticles (VOx/TiO2) infiltrated into a porous La0.4Sr0.5Ba0.1TiO3+δ e

  1. Fuel distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tison, R.R.; Baker, N.R.; Blazek, C.F.

    1979-07-01

    Distribution of fuel is considered from a supply point to the secondary conversion sites and ultimate end users. All distribution is intracity with the maximum distance between the supply point and end-use site generally considered to be 15 mi. The fuels discussed are: coal or coal-like solids, methanol, No. 2 fuel oil, No. 6 fuel oil, high-Btu gas, medium-Btu gas, and low-Btu gas. Although the fuel state, i.e., gas, liquid, etc., can have a major impact on the distribution system, the source of these fuels (e.g., naturally-occurring or coal-derived) does not. Single-source, single-termination point and single-source, multi-termination point systems for liquid, gaseous, and solid fuel distribution are considered. Transport modes and the fuels associated with each mode are: by truck - coal, methanol, No. 2 fuel oil, and No. 6 fuel oil; and by pipeline - coal, methane, No. 2 fuel oil, No. 6 oil, high-Btu gas, medium-Btu gas, and low-Btu gas. Data provided for each distribution system include component makeup and initial costs.

  2. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leu3 protein activates expression of GDH1, a key gene in nitrogen assimilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Y.; Cooper, T. G.; Kohlhaw, G B

    1995-01-01

    The Leu3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be a transcriptional regulator of genes encoding enzymes of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Leu3 binds to upstream activating sequences (UASLEU) found in the promoters of LEU1, LEU2, LEU4, ILV2, and ILV5. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that activation by Leu3 requires the presence of alpha-isopropylmalate. In at least one case (LEU2), Leu3 actually represses basal-level transcription when alpha-isopro...

  3. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sahir, A. H. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Humbird, David [DWH Process Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Pimphan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Jeff [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sexton, Danielle [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Yap, Raymond [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Lukas, John [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis. Both the in situ and ex situ conceptual designs, using the underlying assumptions, project MFSPs of approximately $3.5/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE). The performance assumptions for the ex situ process were more aggressive with higher distillate (diesel-range) products. This was based on an assumption that more favorable reaction chemistry (such as coupling) can be made possible in a separate reactor where, unlike in an in situ upgrading reactor, one does not have to deal with catalyst mixing with biomass char and ash, which pose challenges to catalyst performance and maintenance. Natural gas was used for hydrogen production, but only when off gases from the process was not sufficient to meet the needs; natural gas consumption is insignificant in both the in situ and ex situ base cases. Heat produced from the burning of char, coke, and off-gases allows for the production of surplus electricity which is sold to the grid allowing a reduction of approximately 5¢/GGE in the MFSP.

  4. Solar fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, J.R.

    1978-11-17

    The paper is concerned with (1) the thermodynamic and kinetic limits for the photochemical conversion and storage of solar energy as it is received on the earth's surface, and (2) the evaluation of a number of possible photochemical reactions with particular emphasis on the production of solar hydrogen from water. Procedures for generating hydrogen fuel are considered. Topics examined include the general requirements for a fuel-generation reaction, the photochemical reaction, limits on the conversion of light energy to chemical energy, an estimate of chemical storage efficiency, and the water decomposition reaction.

  5. Cloning, sequencing and application of the LEU2 gene from the sour dough yeast Candida milleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turakainen, Hilkka; Korhola, Matti

    2005-07-30

    We have cloned by complementation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and sequenced a LEU2 gene from the sour dough yeast Candida milleri CBS 8195 and studied its chromosomal location. The LEU2 coding sequence was 1092 nt long encoding a putative beta-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase protein of 363 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence in the coding region had 71.6% identity to S. cerevisiae LEU2 sequence. On the protein level, the identity of C. milleri Leu2p to S. cerevisiae Leu2p was 84.1%. The CmLEU2 DNA probe hybridized to one to three chromosomal bands and two or three BamHI restriction fragments in C. milleri but did not give any signal to chromosomes or restriction fragments of C. albicans, S. cerevisiae, S. exiguus or Torulaspora delbrueckii. Using CmLEU2 probe for DNA hybridization makes it easy to quickly identify C. milleri among other sour dough yeasts.

  6. Supplemental Reactor Physics Calculations and Analysis of ELF Mk 1A Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Michael A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    These calculations supplement previous the reactor physics work evaluating the Enhanced Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel (ELF) Mk 1A element. This includes various additional comparisons between the current Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and LEU along with further characterization of the performance of the ELF fuel. The excess reactivity to be held down at BOC for ELF Mk 1A fuel is estimated to be approximately $2.75 greater than with HEU for a typical cycle. This is a combined effect of the absence of burnable poison in the ELF fuel and the reduced neck shim worth in LEU fuel compared to HEU. Burnable poison rods were conceptualized for use in the small B positions containing Gd2O3 absorber. These were shown to provide $2.37 of negative reactivity at BOC and to burn out in less than half of a cycle. The worth of OSCCs is approximately the same between HEU and ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. This was evaluated by rotating all banks simultaneously. The safety rod worth is relatively unchanged between HEU and ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. However, this should be reevaluated with different loadings. Neutron flux, both total and fast (>1 MeV), is either the same or reduced upon changing from HEU to ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. This is consistent with the well-established trend of lower neutron fluxes for a given power in LEU than HEU.The IPT loop void reactivity is approximately the same or less positive with ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuel than HEU in the representative loading evaluated.

  7. Ion-driver fast ignition: Reducing heavy-ion fusion driver energy and cost, simplifying chamber design, target fab, tritium fueling and power conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, G.; Callahan-Miller, D.; Perkins, J.; Caporaso, G.; Tabak, M.; Moir, R.; Meier, W.; Bangerter, Roger; Lee, Ed

    1998-04-01

    Ion fast ignition, like laser fast ignition, can potentially reduce driver energy for high target gain by an order of magnitude, while reducing fuel capsule implosion velocity, convergence ratio, and required precisions in target fabrication and illumination symmetry, all of which should further improve and simplify IFE power plants. From fast-ignition target requirements, we determine requirements for ion beam acceleration, pulse-compression, and final focus for advanced accelerators that must be developed for much shorter pulses and higher voltage gradients than today's accelerators, to deliver the petawatt peak powers and small focal spots ({approx}100 {micro}m) required. Although such peak powers and small focal spots are available today with lasers, development of such advanced accelerators is motivated by the greater likely efficiency of deep ion penetration and deposition into pre-compressed 1000x liquid density DT cores. Ion ignitor beam parameters for acceleration, pulse compression, and final focus are estimated for two examples based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator; (1) a small target with {rho}r {approx} 2 g/cm{sup 2} for a small demo/pilot plant producing {approx}40 MJ of fusion yield per target, and (2) a large target with {rho}r {approx} 10 g/cm{sup 2} producing {approx}1 GJ yield for multi-unit electricity/hydrogen plants, allowing internal T-breeding with low T/D ratios, >75 % of the total fusion yield captured for plasma direct conversion, and simple liquid-protected chambers with gravity clearing. Key enabling development needs for ion fast ignition are found to be (1) ''Close-coupled'' target designs for single-ended illumination of both compressor and ignitor beams; (2) Development of high gradient (>25 MV/m) linacs with high charge-state (q {approx} 26) ion sources for short ({approx}5 ns) accelerator output pulses; (3) Small mm-scale laser-driven plasma lens of {approx}10 MG fields to provide steep focusing angles

  8. Advanced bioreactor concepts for gaseous substrates: Conversion of synthesis gas to liquid fuels and removal of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} from coal combustion gases. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, E.N.; Selvaraj, P.T.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of the proposed research program was the development and demonstration of a new generation of gaseous substrate-based bioreactors for the production of liquid fuels from coal synthesis gas and the removal of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} species from coal combustion flue gas. This study addressed the further investigation of optimal bacterial strains, growth media and kinetics for the biocatalytic conversion of coal synthesis gas to liquid fuel such as ethanol and the reduction of gaseous flue gas constituents. The primary emphasis was on the development of advanced bioreactor systems coupled with innovative biocatalytic systems that will provide increased productivity under controlled conditions. It was hoped that this would result in bioprocessing options that have both technical and economic feasibility, thus, ensuring early industrial use. Predictive mathematical models were formulated to accommodate hydrodynamics, mass transport, and conversion kinetics, and provide the data base for design and scale-up. The program was separated into four tasks: (1) Optimization of Biocatalytic Kinetics; (2) Development of Well-mixed and Columnar Reactors; (3) Development of Predictive Mathematical Models; and (4) Industrial Demonstration. Research activities addressing both synthesis gas conversion and flue gas removal were conducted in parallel by BRI and ORNL respectively.

  9. Qualification of pebble fuel for HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik (LRST)

    2016-05-15

    The German HTGR fuel development program for the HTR-Modul concept has resulted in a reference design based on LEU UO2 TRISO coated particle fuel in a spherical fuel element. The coated particles consist of minute uranium particle kernels coated with layers of carbon and silicon carbide. Analyses on quality of as-manufactured fuel, its behavior under HTR-Modul relevant operating and accident conditions have demonstrated excellent performance. Coated particles can withstand high internal gas pressure without releasing their fission products to the environment. International efforts are on-going for further improvement of coated particle fuel to meet the needs of future generation-IV HTR concepts.

  10. A novel monolithic LEU foil target based on a PVD manufacturing process for (99)Mo production via fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmer, Tobias; Petry, Winfried

    2016-12-01

    (99)Mo is the most widely used radioactive isotope in nuclear medicine. Its main production route is the fission of uranium. A major challenge for a reliable supply is the conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). A promising candidate to realize this conversion is the cylindrical LEU irradiation target. The target consists of a uranium foil encapsulated between two coaxial aluminum cladding cylinders. This target allows a separate processing of the irradiated uranium foil and the cladding when recovering the (99)Mo. Thereby, both the costs and the volume of highly radioactive liquid waste are significantly reduced compared to conventional targets. The presented manufacturing process is based on the direct coating of the uranium on the inside of the outer cladding cylinder. This process was realized by a cylindrical magnetron enhanced physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. The method features a highly automated process, a good quality of the resulting uranium foils and a high material utilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Uranium Conversion & Enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The isotopes of uranium that are found in nature, and hence in ‘fresh’ Yellowcake’, are not in relative proportions that are suitable for power or weapons applications. The goal of conversion then is to transform the U3O8 yellowcake into UF6. Conversion and enrichment of uranium is usually required to obtain material with enough 235U to be usable as fuel in a reactor or weapon. The cost, size, and complexity of practical conversion and enrichment facilities aid in nonproliferation by design.

  12. Global Threat Reduction Initiative Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project: Sample Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, Amanda J.; Pereira, Mario M.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2013-01-01

    This sample management plan provides guidelines for sectioning, preparation, acceptance criteria, analytical path, and end-of-life disposal for the fuel element segments utilized in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project. The Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project is tasked with analysis of irradiated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel element samples to support the GTRI conversion program. Sample analysis may include optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fuel-surface interface analysis, gas pycnometry (density) measurements, laser flash analysis (LFA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis with mass spectroscopy (TG /DTA-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrophotometry (ICP), alpha spectroscopy, and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (TIMS). The project will utilize existing Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) operating, technical, and administrative procedures for sample receipt, processing, and analyses. Test instructions (TIs), which are documents used to provide specific details regarding the implementation of an existing RPL approved technical or operational procedure, will also be used to communicate to staff project specific parameters requested by the Principal Investigator (PI). TIs will be developed, reviewed, and issued in accordance with the latest revision of the RPL-PLN-700, RPL Operations Plan. Additionally, the PI must approve all project test instructions and red-line changes to test instructions.

  13. Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation from radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. [Conversion factors are given for dose rates to 21 organs from 240 different radionuclides for 3 different modes of exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1979-02-01

    Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation have been calculated for 240 radionuclides of potential importance in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Dose-rate conversion factors for immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and exposure to a contaminated ground surface are estimated for tissue-equivalent material at the body surface of an exposed individual. For each exposure mode, photon dose-rate conversion factors are also estimated for 22 body organs. The calculations assume that the contaminated air, water, and ground surface are infinite in extent and that the radionuclide concentration is uniform. Dose-rate conversion factors for immersion in contaminated air and water are based on the requirement that all energy emitted in the decay of a radionuclide is absorbed in the infinite medium. Dose-rate conversion factors for ground-surface exposure are calculated for a height of 1 m using the point-kernel integration method and known specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons in air. The computer code DOSFACTER written to perform the calculations is described and documented.

  14. The Environment Shapes the Inner Vestibule of LeuT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohail, Azmat; Jayaraman, Kumaresan; Venkatesan, Santhoshkannan;

    2016-01-01

    Human neurotransmitter transporters are found in the nervous system terminating synaptic signals by rapid removal of neurotransmitter molecules from the synaptic cleft. The homologous transporter LeuT, found in Aquifex aeolicus, was crystallized in different conformations. Here, we investigated...... in a membrane environment. The helix dipole and the charged amino acid of the first transmembrane helix (TM1A) partitioned out of the hydrophobic membrane core. Free energy calculations showed that movement of TM1A by 0.30 nm was driven by a free energy difference of ~15 kJ/mol. Distance measurements by LRET...

  15. The tetrapeptide Z-Leu-Aib-Pro-Val-OBg monohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Schiemann, Norbert; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2003-08-01

    The intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern of Z-Leu-Aib-Pro-Val-OBg monohydrate [(N-benzhydrylamino)carbonylmethyl N-benzyloxycarbonyl-alpha-aminoisobutyrylprolylvalinate monohydrate], C(43)H(55)N(5)O(8).H(2)O, is unusual for a tetrapeptide because, in addition to a 1-->4 hydrogen bond, a second hydrogen bond of the type 1-->5 is formed. This folding reflects the intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern that this amino acid sequence adopts in the naturally occurring peptaibol alamethicin.

  16. Influence of the flux axial form on the conversion rate and duration of cycle between recharging for ThPu and U{sub nat} fuels in CANDU reactors; Influence de la forme axiale du flux sur le taux de conversion et la duree du cycle entre rechargements pour du combustible ThPu et U{sub nat} dans les reacteurs CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambon, Richard [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier / CNRS-IN2P3, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France)

    2007-01-15

    To face the increasing world power demand the world nuclear sector must be continuously updated and developed as well. Thus reactors of new types are introduced and advanced fuel cycles are proposed. The technological and economic feasibility and the transition of the present power park to a renewed park require thorough studies and scenarios, which are highly dependent on the reactor performances. The conversion rate and cycle span between recharging are important parameters in the scenarios studies. In this frame, we have studied the utilisation of thorium in the CANDU type reactors and particularly the influence of axial form of the flux, i.e. of the recharging mode, on the conversion rate and duration of the cycle between recharging. The results show that up to a first approximation the axial form of the flux resulting from the neutron transport calculations for assessing the conversion rate is not necessary to be taken into account. However the time span between recharging differs up to several percents if the axial form of the flux is taken into consideration in transport calculations. Thus if the burnup or the recharging frequency are parameters which influence significantly the deployment scenarios of a nuclear park an approach more refined than a simple transport evolution in a typical cell/assembly is recommended. Finally, the results of this study are not more general than for the assumed conditions but they give a thorough calculation method valid for any recharging/fuel combination in a CANDU type reactor.

  17. Conformational dynamics of ligand-dependent alternating access in LeuT

    OpenAIRE

    Kazmier, Kelli; Sharma, Shruti; Quick, Matthias; Islam, Shahidul M.; Roux, Benoit; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.

    2014-01-01

    The leucine transporter (LeuT) from Aquifex aeolicus is a bacterial homolog of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) that catalyze reuptake of neurotransmitters at the synapse. Crystal structures of wild type (WT) and mutants of LeuT have been interpreted as conformational states in the coupled transport cycle. However, the mechanistic identities inferred from these structures have not been validated and the ligand-dependent conformational equilibrium of LeuT has not been defined. Here, we...

  18. National level POLYSYS data for Hellwinckel et al. (2015): Simulated impact of the renewable fuels standard on US Conservation Reserve Program enrollment and conversion

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is the data of national level land conversions, prices, assumptions, etc., in the POLYSYS runs to estimate the land use change impacts from a growing biofuels...

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of Na{sup +} and leucine transport by LeuT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Rong, E-mail: rong.chen@anu.edu.au; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-08-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to gain insight into the binding of Na{sup +} and leucine substrate to the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, focusing on the crystal structures of LeuT in the outward-open and inward-open states. For both conformations of LeuT, a third Na{sup +} binding site involving Glu290 in addition to the two sites identified from the crystal structures is observed. Once the negative charge from Glu290 in the inward-open LeuT is removed, the ion bound to the third site is ejected from LeuT rapidly, suggesting that the protonation state of Glu290 regulates Na{sup +} binding and release. In Cl{sup −}-dependent transporters where Glu290 is replaced by a neutral serine, a Cl{sup −} ion would be required to replace the role of Glu290. Thus, the simulations provide insights into understanding Na{sup +} and substrate transport as well as Cl{sup −}-independence of LeuT. - Highlights: • Ion binding site involving Glu290 is identified in the outward- and inward-open LeuT. • Sodium is released from inward-open LeuT once the side chain of Glu290 is protonated. • Protonation state of Glu290 regulates sodium binding and transport in LeuT.

  20. Temperature feedback of TRIGA MARK-II fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usang, M. D.; Minhat, M. S.; Rabir, M. H.; M. Rawi M., Z.

    2016-01-01

    We study the amount of temperature feedback on reactivity for the three types of TRIGA fuel i.. ST8, ST12 and LEU fuel, are used in the TRIGA MARK II reactor in Malaysia Nuclear Agency. We employ WIMSD-5B for the calculation of kin f for a single TRIGA fuel surrounded by water. Typical calculations of TRIGA fuel reactivity are usually limited to ST8 fuel, but in this paper our investigation extends to ST12 and LEU fuel. We look at the kin f of our model at various fuel temperatures and calculate the amount reactivity removed. In one instance, the water temperature is kept at room temperature of 300K to simulate sudden reactivity increase from startup. In another instance, we simulate the sudden temperature increase during normal operation where the water temperature is approximately 320K while observing the kin f at various fuel temperatures. For accidents, two cases are simulated. The first case is for water temperature at 370K and the other is without any water. We observe that the higher Uranium content fuel such as the ST12 and LEU have much smaller contribution to the reactivity in comparison to the often studied ST8 fuel. In fact the negative reactivity coefficient for LEU fuel at high temperature in water is only slightly larger to the negative reactivity coefficient for ST8 fuel in void. The performance of ST8 fuel in terms of negative reactivity coefficient is cut almost by half when it is in void. These results are essential in the safety evaluation of the reactor and should be carefully considered when choices of fuel for core reconfiguration are made.

  1. Temperature feedback of TRIGA MARK-II fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usang, M. D., E-mail: mark-dennis@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Minhat, M. S.; Rabir, M. H.; Rawi, M. Z. M. [Malaysia Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    We study the amount of temperature feedback on reactivity for the three types of TRIGA fuel i.. ST8, ST12 and LEU fuel, are used in the TRIGA MARK II reactor in Malaysia Nuclear Agency. We employ WIMSD-5B for the calculation of kin f for a single TRIGA fuel surrounded by water. Typical calculations of TRIGA fuel reactivity are usually limited to ST8 fuel, but in this paper our investigation extends to ST12 and LEU fuel. We look at the kin f of our model at various fuel temperatures and calculate the amount reactivity removed. In one instance, the water temperature is kept at room temperature of 300K to simulate sudden reactivity increase from startup. In another instance, we simulate the sudden temperature increase during normal operation where the water temperature is approximately 320K while observing the kin f at various fuel temperatures. For accidents, two cases are simulated. The first case is for water temperature at 370K and the other is without any water. We observe that the higher Uranium content fuel such as the ST12 and LEU have much smaller contribution to the reactivity in comparison to the often studied ST8 fuel. In fact the negative reactivity coefficient for LEU fuel at high temperature in water is only slightly larger to the negative reactivity coefficient for ST8 fuel in void. The performance of ST8 fuel in terms of negative reactivity coefficient is cut almost by half when it is in void. These results are essential in the safety evaluation of the reactor and should be carefully considered when choices of fuel for core reconfiguration are made.

  2. Uranium conversion; Conversion de l`uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This booklet is a presentation of the activities of the Comurhex company, created in 1971 and which became a 100% Cogema`s daughter company in 1992. The Comurhex company is in charge of the conversion of natural uranium into gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). The two steps of the conversion operation are performed in the Malvesi and Pierrelatte (France) industrial sites and represent 31% (14000 t/year) of the uranium conversion capacity of western countries. The refining and UF{sub 4} production (Malvesi) and the UF{sub 6} fabrication (Pierrelatte) processes are described. Comurhex is also one of the few companies in the world which produces UF{sub 6} from the uranium of spent fuels. (J.S.)

  3. Conversational Dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Helmut; Poth, Annette

    Details of conversational behavior can often not be interpreted until the social interaction, including the rights and obligations of the participants, their intent, the topic, etc., has been defined. This paper presents a model of conversation in which the conversational image a person presents in a given conversational situation is a function of…

  4. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  5. Coal conversion processes and analysis methodologies for synthetic fuels production. [technology assessment and economic analysis of reactor design for coal gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Information to identify viable coal gasification and utilization technologies is presented. Analysis capabilities required to support design and implementation of coal based synthetic fuels complexes are identified. The potential market in the Southeast United States for coal based synthetic fuels is investigated. A requirements analysis to identify the types of modeling and analysis capabilities required to conduct and monitor coal gasification project designs is discussed. Models and methodologies to satisfy these requirements are identified and evaluated, and recommendations are developed. Requirements for development of technology and data needed to improve gasification feasibility and economies are examined.

  6. Design of peptides with alpha,beta-dehydro residues: pseudo-tripeptide N-benzyloxycarbonyl-DeltaLeu-L-Ala-L-Leu-OCH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Jyoti; Dey, Sharmistha; Kumar, Pravindra; Singh, Tej P

    2002-04-01

    The title peptide N-benzyloxycarbonyl-DeltaLeu-L-Ala-L-Leu-OCH(3) [methyl N-(benzyloxycarbonyl)-alpha,beta-dehydroleucyl-L-alanyl-L-leucinate], C(24)H(35)N(3)O(6), was synthesized in the solution phase. The peptide adopts a type II' beta-turn conformation which is stabilized by an intramolecular 4 --> 1 N-H* * *O hydrogen bond. The crystal packing is stabilized by two intermolecular N-H* * *O hydrogen bonds.

  7. Utilization of biomass in the U.S. for the production of ethanol fuel as a gasoline replacement. I - Terrestrial resource potential. II - Energy requirements, with emphasis on lignocellulosic conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferchak, J. D.; Pye, E. K.

    The paper assesses the biomass resource represented by starch derived from feed corn, surplus and distressed grain, and high-yield sugar crops planted on set-aside land in the U.S. It is determined that the quantity of ethanol produced may be sufficient to replace between 5 to 27% of present gasoline requirements. Utilization of novel cellulose conversion technology may in addition provide fermentable sugars from municipal, agricultural and forest wastes, and ultimately from highly productive silvicultural operations. The potential additional yield of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass appears to be well in excess of liquid fuel requirements of an enhanced-efficiency transport sector at present mileage demands. No conflict with food production would be entailed. A net-energy assessment is made for lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks' conversion to ethanol and an almost 10:1 energy yield/energy cost ratio determined. It is also found that novel cellulose pretreatment and enzymatic conversion methods still under development may significantly improve even that figure, and that both chemical-feedstocks and energy-yielding byproducts such as carbon dioxide, biogas and lignin make ethanol production potentially energy self-sufficient. A final high-efficiency production approach incorporates site-optimized, nonpolluting energy sources such as solar and geothermal.

  8. Biogas to syngas: flexible on-cell micro-reformer and NiSn bimetallic nanoparticle implanted solid oxide fuel cells for efficient energy conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, B.; Li, M.; Sun, Y.-F.; Zhang, Y.-Q.; Yan, N.; Chen, J.; Li, J.; Etsell, T.; Sarkar, P.; Luo, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) deliver an energy-efficient and eco-friendly pathway to convert biogas into syngas and electricity. However, many problems still need to be solved before their commercialization. Some of the disadvantages of biogas SOFC technology include coking and sulfur poisoning th

  9. Biogas to syngas: flexible on-cell micro-reformer and NiSn bimetallic nanoparticle implanted solid oxide fuel cells for efficient energy conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, B.; Li, M.; Sun, Y.-F.; Zhang, Y.-Q.; Yan, N.; Chen, J.; Li, J.; Etsell, T.; Sarkar, P.; Luo, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) deliver an energy-efficient and eco-friendly pathway to convert biogas into syngas and electricity. However, many problems still need to be solved before their commercialization. Some of the disadvantages of biogas SOFC technology include coking and sulfur poisoning

  10. Light water reactor fuel element suitable for thorium employment in a discrete seed and blanket configuration with the aim to attain conversion ratios above the range of one

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrovat, M.F.; Grosse, K.H.; Seemann, R. [ALD Vacuum Technologies GmbH, Hanau (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The thorium resources in the world are relatively large. According to the IAEA-NEA-publication ''Red Book'' they amount to 4.5 10E6 metric tons and are about 4 times greater than the resources of Uranium. The fuel element described in this paper could be used in light water reactor (LWR) preferably in pressurized water reactor (PWR). The seed (feed) rods contain uranium 235 as fissionable material and the blanket (breed) rods contain thorium and uranium. The thorium in the blanket rods is converted to fissionable U-233 by irradiation with thermal neutrons. The U-233 produced is a valuable fissionable material and is characterized by high revalues, where t is defined as the number of fission neutrons per absorption in fissile materials. By optimized configuration and loading of the seed- and blanket rods the thorium is converted to U-233 and the U-238 is converted to fissionable Plutonium isotopes. Consequently more fissionable material is generated than is used. The fuel cycle is also flexible. Thus U-235, Pu-239 or weapons-grade Plutonium can be used.Based on knowledge obtained in the development of fuel elements for material test reactors (MTR), high temperature reactors (HTR) and light water reactors (LWR), a new design of fuel element suitable for thorium employment in PWR is described.

  11. LeuO is a global regulator of gene expression in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillon, Shane C.; Espinosa, Elena; Hokamp, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We report the first investigation of the binding of the Salmonella enterica LeuO LysR‐type transcription regulator to its genomic targets in vivo. Chromatin‐immunoprecipitation‐on‐chip identified 178 LeuO binding sites on the chromosome of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344. These site...

  12. Factor XIII Va134Leu and the risk of venous thromboembolism in factor V Leiden carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, RF; Middeldorp, S; Meinardi, [No Value; van Pampus, ECM; Reitsma, PH

    2000-01-01

    A mutation in factor XIII (Val34Leu) was reported to protect against Venous thromboembolism. We evaluated the effect of Val34Leu on thrombotic risk in 352 factor V Leiden carriers who were first-degree relatives of 132 thrombotic propositi carrying factor V Leiden. The total observation period was

  13. Factor XIII Va134Leu and the risk of venous thromboembolism in factor V Leiden carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, RF; Middeldorp, S; Meinardi, [No Value; van Pampus, ECM; Reitsma, PH

    2000-01-01

    A mutation in factor XIII (Val34Leu) was reported to protect against Venous thromboembolism. We evaluated the effect of Val34Leu on thrombotic risk in 352 factor V Leiden carriers who were first-degree relatives of 132 thrombotic propositi carrying factor V Leiden. The total observation period was 2

  14. Conformational dynamics of ligand-dependent alternating access in LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmier, Kelli; Sharma, Shruti; Quick, Matthias; Islam, Shahidul M; Roux, Benoît; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; McHaourab, Hassane S

    2014-05-01

    The leucine transporter (LeuT) from Aquifex aeolicus is a bacterial homolog of neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) that catalyze reuptake of neurotransmitters at the synapse. Crystal structures of wild-type and mutants of LeuT have been interpreted as conformational states in the coupled transport cycle. However, the mechanistic identities inferred from these structures have not been validated, and the ligand-dependent conformational equilibrium of LeuT has not been defined. Here, we used distance measurements between spin-label pairs to elucidate Na(+)- and leucine-dependent conformational changes on the intracellular and extracellular sides of the transporter. The results identify structural motifs that underlie the isomerization of LeuT between outward-facing, inward-facing and occluded states. The conformational changes reported here present a dynamic picture of the alternating-access mechanism of LeuT and NSSs that is different from the inferences reached from currently available structural models.

  15. Studies of mixed HEU-LEU-MTR cores using 3D models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenggi, P.; Lehmann, E.; Hammer, J.; Christen, R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-08-01

    Several different core loadings were assembled at the SAPHIR research reactor in Switzerland combining the available types of MTR-type fuel elements, consisting mainly of both HEU and LEU fuel. Bearing in mind the well known problems which can occur in such configurations (especially power peaking), investigations have been carried out for each new loading with a 2D neutron transport code (BOXER). The axial effects were approximated by a global buckling value and therefore the radial effects could be studied in considerably detail. Some of the results were reported at earlier RERTR meetings and were compared to those obtained by other methods and with experimental values. For the explicit study of the third dimension of the core, another code (SILWER), which has been developed in PSI for LWR power plant cores, has been selected. With the help of an adapted model for the MTR-core of SAPHIR, several important questions have been addressed. Among other aspects, the estimation of the axial contribution to the hot channel factors, the influence of the control rod position and of the Xe-poisoning on the power distribution were studied. Special attention was given to a core position where a new element was assumed placed near a empty, water filled position. The comparison of elements of low and high enrichments at this position was made in terms of the induced power peaks, with explicit consideration of axial effects. The program SILWER has proven to be applicable to MTR-cores for the investigation of axial effects. For routine use as for the support of reactor operation, this 3D code is a good supplement to the standard 2D model.

  16. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  17. Molecular mechanism of substrate specificity in the bacterial neutral amino acid transporter LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, Sergei Y

    2008-12-01

    The recently published X-ray structure of LeuT, a Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporter, has provided fresh impetus to efforts directed at understanding the molecular principles governing specific neurotransmitter transport. The combination of the LeuT crystal structure with the results of molecular simulations enables the functional data on specific binding and transport to be related to molecular structure. All-atom FEP and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of LeuT embedded in an explicit membrane were performed alongside a decomposition analysis to dissect the molecular determinants of the substrate specificity of LeuT. It was found that the ligand must be in a zwitterionic (ZW) form to bind tightly to the transporter. The theoretical results on the absolute binding-free energies for leucine, alanine, and glycine show that alanine can be a potent substrate for LeuT, although leucine is preferred, which is consistent with the recent experimental data (Singh et al., Nature 2007;448:952-956). Furthermore, LeuT displays robust specificity for leucine over glycine. Interestingly, the ability of LeuT to discriminate between substrates relies on the dynamics of residues that form its binding pocket (e.g., F253 and Q250) and the charged side chains (R30-D404) from a second coordination shell. The water-mediated R30-D404 salt bridge is thought to be part of the extracellular (EC) gate of LeuT. The introduction of a polar ligand such as glycine to the water-depleted binding pocket of LeuT gives rise to structural rearrangements of the R30-D404-Q250 hydrogen-bonding network and leads to increased hydration of the binding pocket. Conformational changes associated with the broken hydrogen bond between Q250 and R30 are shown to be important for tight and selective ligand binding to LeuT.

  18. Distinguishing Isomeric Peptides: The Unimolecular Reactivity and Structures of (LeuPro)M(+) and (ProLeu)M(+) (M = Alkali Metal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jami-Alahmadi, Yasaman; Linford, Bryan D; Fridgen, Travis D

    2016-12-29

    The unimolecular chemistries and structures of gas-phase (ProLeu)M(+) and (LeuPro)M(+) complexes when M = Li, Na, Rb, and Cs have been explored using a combination of SORI-CID, IRMPD spectroscopy, and computational methods. CID of both (LeuPro)M(+) and (ProLeu)M(+) showed identical fragmentation pathways and could not be differentiated. Two of the fragmentation routes of both peptides produced ions at the same nominal mass as (Pro)M(+) and (Leu)M(+), respectively. For the litiated peptides, experiments revealed identical IRMPD spectra for each of the m/z 122 and 138 ions coming from both peptides. Comparison with computed IR spectra identified them as the (Pro)Li(+) and (Leu)Li(+), and it is concluded that both zwitterionic and canonical forms of (Pro)Li(+) exist in the ion population from CID of both (ProLeu)Li(+) and (LeuPro)Li(+). The two isomeric peptide complexes could be distinguished using IRMPD spectroscopy in both the fingerprint and the CH/NH/OH regions. The computed IR spectra for the lowest energy structures of each charge solvated complexes are consistent with the IRMPD spectra in both regions for all metal cation complexes. Through comparison between the experimental spectra, it was determined that in lithiated and sodiated ProLeu, metal cation is bound to both carbonyl oxygens and the amine nitrogen. In contrast, the larger metal cations are bound to the two carbonyls, while the amine nitrogen is hydrogen bonded to the amide hydrogen. In the lithiated and sodiated LeuPro complexes, the metal cation is bound to the amide carbonyl and the amine nitrogen while the amine nitrogen is hydrogen bonded to the carboxylic acid carbonyl. However, there is no hydrogen bond in the rubidiated and cesiated complexes; the metal cation is bound to both carbonyl oxygens and the amine nitrogen. Details of the position of the carboxylic acid C═O stretch were especially informative in the spectroscopic confirmation of the lowest energy computed structures.

  19. Conversion disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000954.htm Conversion disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Conversion disorder is a mental condition in which a person ...

  20. Fuel processors for fuel cell APU applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicher, T.; Lenz, B.; Gschnell, F.; Groos, U.; Federici, F.; Caprile, L.; Parodi, L.

    The conversion of liquid hydrocarbons to a hydrogen rich product gas is a central process step in fuel processors for auxiliary power units (APUs) for vehicles of all kinds. The selection of the reforming process depends on the fuel and the type of the fuel cell. For vehicle power trains, liquid hydrocarbons like gasoline, kerosene, and diesel are utilized and, therefore, they will also be the fuel for the respective APU systems. The fuel cells commonly envisioned for mobile APU applications are molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC), solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), and proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Since high-temperature fuel cells, e.g. MCFCs or SOFCs, can be supplied with a feed gas that contains carbon monoxide (CO) their fuel processor does not require reactors for CO reduction and removal. For PEMFCs on the other hand, CO concentrations in the feed gas must not exceed 50 ppm, better 20 ppm, which requires additional reactors downstream of the reforming reactor. This paper gives an overview of the current state of the fuel processor development for APU applications and APU system developments. Furthermore, it will present the latest developments at Fraunhofer ISE regarding fuel processors for high-temperature fuel cell APU systems on board of ships and aircrafts.

  1. Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

    2006-02-01

    A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

  2. Liquid Fuel from Heat-Loving Microorganisms: H2-Dependent Conversion of CO2 to Liquid Electrofuels by Extremely Thermophilic Archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: NC State is working with the University of Georgia to create Electrofuels from primitive organisms called extremophiles that evolved before photosynthetic organisms and live in extreme, hot water environments with temperatures ranging from 167-212 degrees Fahrenheit The team is genetically engineering these microorganisms so they can use hydrogen to turn carbon dioxide directly into alcohol-based fuels. High temperatures are required to distill the biofuels from the water where the organisms live, but the heat-tolerant organisms will continue to thrive even as the biofuels are being distilled—making the fuel-production process more efficient. The microorganisms don’t require light, so they can be grown anywhere—inside a dark reactor or even in an underground facility.

  3. PLASTIC WASTE CONVERSION TO LIQUID FUELS OVER MODIFIED-RESIDUAL CATALYTIC CRACKING CATALYSTS: MODELING AND OPTIMIZATION USING HYBRID ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK – GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The plastic waste utilization can be addressed toward different valuable products. A promising technology for the utilization is by converting it to fuels. Simultaneous modeling and optimization representing effect of reactor temperature, catalyst calcinations temperature, and plastic/catalyst weight ratio toward performance of liquid fuel production was studied over modified catalyst waste. The optimization was performed to find optimal operating conditions (reactor temperature, catalyst calcination temperature, and plastic/catalyst weight ratio that maximize the liquid fuel product. A Hybrid Artificial Neural Network-Genetic Algorithm (ANN-GA method was used for the modeling and optimization, respectively. The variable interaction between the reactor temperature, catalyst calcination temperature, as well as plastic/catalyst ratio is presented in surface plots. From the GC-MS characterization, the liquid fuels product was mainly composed of C4 to C13 hydrocarbons.KONVERSI LIMBAH PLASTIK MENJADI BAHAN BAKAR CAIR DENGAN METODE PERENGKAHAN KATALITIK MENGGUNAKAN KATALIS BEKAS YANG TERMODIFIKASI: PEMODELAN DAN OPTIMASI MENGGUNAKAN GABUNGAN METODE ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK DAN GENETIC ALGORITHM. Pemanfaatan limbah plastik dapat dilakukan untuk menghasilkan produk yang lebih bernilai tinggi. Salah satu teknologi yang menjanjikan adalah dengan mengkonversikannya menjadi bahan bakar. Permodelan, simulasi dan optimisasi simultan yang menggambarkan efek dari suhu reaktor, suhu kalsinasi katalis, dan rasio berat plastik/katalis terhadap kinerja produksi bahan bakar cair telah dipelajari menggunakan katalis bekas termodifikasi Optimisasi ini ditujukan untuk mencari kondisi operasi optimum (suhu reaktor, suhu kalsinasi katalis, dan rasio berat plastik/katalis yang memaksimalkan produk bahan bakar cair. Metode Hybrid Artificial Neural Network-Genetic Algorithm (ANN-GA telah digunakan untuk permodelan dan optimisasi simultan tersebut. Inetraksi antar variabel

  4. An intensified π-hole in beryllium-doped boron nitride meshes: its determinant role in CO2 conversion into hydrocarbon fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Sun, Chenghua

    2016-02-28

    DFT investigations on beryllium-doped boron nitride meshes or sheets (BNs) predict the existence of a very reactive kind of novel material capable of spontaneously reducing the first hydrogenation step in the CO2 conversion mechanism. This impressive behaviour appears as a result of the very deep π-hole generated by the beryllium moieties, and also determines its selectivity towards the production of CH4.

  5. Use of silicide fuel in the Ford Nuclear Reactor - to lengthen fuel element lifetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Burn, R.R.; Lee, J.C. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Phoenix Memorial Lab.

    1995-12-31

    Based on economic considerations, it has been proposed to increase the lifetime of LEU fuel elements in the Ford Nuclear Reactor by raising the {sup 235}U plate loading from 9.3 grams in aluminide (UAl{sub x}) fuel to 12.5 grams in silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel. For a representative core configuration, preliminary neutronic depletion and steady state thermal hydraulic calculations have been performed to investigate core characteristics during the transition from an all-aluminide to an all-silicide core. This paper discusses motivations for this fuel element upgrade, results from the calculations, and conclusions.

  6. Cellulosic Biomass Sugars to Advantage Jet Fuel: Catalytic Conversion of Corn Stover to Energy Dense, Low Freeze Point Paraffins and Naphthenes: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elander, Rick [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-08-04

    NREL will provide scientific and engineering support to Virent Energy Systems in three technical areas: Process Development/Biomass Deconstruction; Catalyst Fundamentals; and Technoeconomic Analysis. The overarching objective of this project is to develop the first fully integrated process that can convert a lignocellulosic feedstock (e.g., corn stover) efficiently and cost effectively to a mix of hydrocarbons ideally suited for blending into jet fuel. The proposed project will investigate the integration of Virent Energy System’s novel aqueous phase reforming (APR) catalytic conversion technology (BioForming®) with deconstruction technologies being investigated by NREL at the 1-500L scale. Corn stover was chosen as a representative large volume, sustainable feedstock.

  7. Double-shelled plasmonic Ag-TiO{sub 2} hollow spheres toward visible light-active photocatalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} into solar fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Shichao; Wang, Meng; Li, Ping; Tu, Wenguang [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, School of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Eco-Materials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC), Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhou, Yong [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, School of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Eco-Materials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC), Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics (MOE), Institute of Acoustics, Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Nano Technology, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zou, Zhigang [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, School of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Eco-Materials and Renewable Energy Research Center (ERERC), Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Nano Technology, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Double-shelled hollow hybrid spheres consisting of plasmonic Ag and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through a simple reaction process. The analysis reveals that Ag nanoparticles were dispersed uniformly in the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle shell. The plasmonic Ag-TiO{sub 2} hollow sphere proves to greatly enhance the photocatalytic activity toward reduction of CO{sub 2} into renewable hydrocarbon fuel (CH{sub 4}) in the presence of water vapor under visible-light irradiation. The possible formation mechanism of the hollow sphere and related plasmon-enhanced photocatalytic performance were also briefly discussed.

  8. An analysis of the thermochemical conversion process for the synthesis of BtL fuels; Analyse von thermochemischen Konversionsverfahren zur Herstellung von BtL-Kraftstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiermann, Dagmar

    2011-07-01

    Synthetic biofuels via BtL-processes are compatible to current cars and can contribute to a sustainable mobility. Based on process analysis, this thesis investigates several procedural, economical and ecological parameters like efficiency, costs and the potential of CO{sub 2}-reduction of different BtL-pathways by a transparent procedure. Especially effects of different process options are analysed. Three gasification concepts (Choren, FZK and Guessing) are combined with two synthesis concepts (Fischer-Tropsch and MtSynfuels). Variations of plant capacity (100 MW{sub th}, 500 MW{sub th}, 2 GW{sub th}), operational modes (once through, recycle, self-sufficient), feedstocks (straw, waste wood, wood from short rotation trees) and utilities (conventional vs. green electricity) were made, resulting in 15 scenarios for production of BtL-fuels. Flowsheeting models of these scenarios were made using the process simulation tool Chemcad. Mass and energy balances were done to analyse yields and efficiencies. Calculations of investment costs showed, that a 500 MW{sub th} BtL-greenfield plant would currently cost more than one billion Euros. Fuel production costs of all 500 MW{sub th} scenarios vary from 1,19 Euro per liter to 3,60 Euro per liter, VAT and petroleum tax excluded. Depending on the set frame conditions, production costs can vary extremely, e.g. from 1,12 Euro per liter to 3,57 Euro per liter just for one scenario. According to the WTW-report potentials of CO{sub 2}-reduction of the scenarios were determined. Up to 96,7 % are possible when using waste wood and green electricity for the process and selling by-products as fuels. CO{sub 2} abatement costs vary from 263 to 1.095 Euro/t CO{sub 2}, depending on the specific scenario. A key role for efficiencies, costs and the potential of CO{sub 2}-reduction plays the suited frame conditions, e.G. the assumption that by-products like naphtha and raw-gasoline are also sold as fuels. Dependencies and interactions of

  9. Analysis of costs and scarce fuel savings associated with nine Eastern and North Central center city conversions to a district energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A.A.; Santini, D.J.; Marder, S.M.; Bernow, S.S.

    1979-02-01

    This study considers the major urbanized areas of nine US cities to arrive at rough estimates of costs required to retrofit them with district energy systems (DES). Only those costs associated with heating and hot water are addressed here. Demand estimates and energy-supply analyses are made, and component capital costs are estimated to arrive at annualized system costs. Finally, a comparison of alternative energy-delivery options is made, and estimates of scarce-fuel savings are derived. 49 references, 20 figures, 14 tables.

  10. TamA interacts with LeuB, the homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leu3p, to regulate gdhA expression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polotnianka, R; Monahan, B J; Hynes, M J; Davis, M A

    2004-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that expression of the gdhA gene, encoding NADP-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH), in Aspergillus nidulans is regulated by the major nitrogen regulatory protein AreA and its co-activator TamA. We show here that loss of TamA function has a more severe effect on the levels of gdhA expression than loss of AreA function. Using TamA as the bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen, we have identified a second protein that interacts with TamA. Sequencing analysis and functional studies have shown that this protein, designated LeuB, is a transcriptional activator with similar function to the homologous Leu3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Inactivation of leuB revealed that this gene is involved in the regulation of gdhA, and an areA; leuB double mutant was shown to have similar NADP-GDH levels to a tamA single mutant. The requirement for TamA function to promote gdhA expression is likely to be due to its dual interaction with AreA and LeuB.

  11. Moderator configuration options for a low-enriched uranium fueled Kilowatt-class Space Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Jeffrey C., E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines (CSM), Golden, CO (United States); Mencarini, Leonardo de Holanda; Guimaraes, Lamartine N. F., E-mail: guimaraes@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: mencarini@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA), and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) are studying the feasibility of a space nuclear reactor with a power of 1-5 kW{sub e} and fueled with Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU). This type of nuclear reactor would be attractive to signatory countries of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) or commercial interests. A LEU-fueled space reactor would avoid the security concerns inherent with Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. As an initial step, the HEU-fueled Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) designed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory serves as a basis for a similar reactor fueled with LEU fuel. Using the computational code MCNP6 to predict the reactor neutronics performance, the size of the resulting reactor fueled with 19.75 wt% enriched uranium-10 wt% molybdenum alloy fuel is adjusted to match the excess reactivity of KRUSTY. Then, zirconium hydride moderator is added to the core to reduce the size of the reactor. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between homogeneous and heterogeneous moderator systems, in terms of the core diameter required to meet a specific multiplication factor (k{sub eff} = 1.035). This comparison illustrates the impact of moderator configuration on the size and performance of a LEU-fueled kilowatt-class space nuclear reactor. (author)

  12. How LeuT shapes our understanding of the mechanisms of sodium-coupled neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penmatsa, Aravind; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters are ion-coupled symporters that drive the uptake of neurotransmitters from neural synapses. In the past decade, the structure of a bacterial amino acid transporter, leucine transporter (LeuT), has given valuable insights into the understanding of architecture and mechanism of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters. Different conformations of LeuT, including a substrate-free state, inward-open state, and competitive and non-competitive inhibitor-bound states, have revealed a mechanistic framework for the transport and transport inhibition of neurotransmitters. The current review integrates our understanding of the mechanistic and pharmacological properties of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters obtained through structural snapshots of LeuT.

  13. Advanced bioreactor systems for gaseous substrates: Conversion of synthesis gas to liquid fuels and removal of SO{sub X} and NO{sub X} from coal combustion gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvaraj, P.T.; Kaufman, E.N.

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this research program is the development and demonstration of a new generation of gaseous substrate based bioreactors for the production of liquid fuels from coal synthesis gas and the removal of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} species from combustion flue gas. This R&D program is a joint effort between the staff of the Bioprocessing Research and Development Center (BRDC) of ORNL and the staff of Bioengineering Resources, Inc. (BRI) under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology report entitled {open_quotes}Biotechnology for the 21st Century{close_quotes} and the recent Energy Policy Act of 1992 emphasizes research, development, and demonstration of the conversion of coal to gaseous and liquid fuels and the control of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in effluent streams. This R&D program presents an innovative approach to the use of bioprocessing concepts that will have utility in both of these identified areas.

  14. Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumesic, James A [Verona, WI; Ruiz, Juan Carlos Serrano [Madison, WI; West, Ryan M [Madison, WI

    2012-04-03

    Described is a method to make liquid chemicals, such as functional intermediates, solvents, and liquid fuels from biomass-derived cellulose. The method is cascading; the product stream from an upstream reaction can be used as the feedstock in the next downstream reaction. The method includes the steps of deconstructing cellulose to yield a product mixture comprising levulinic acid and formic acid, converting the levulinic acid to .gamma.-valerolactone, and converting the .gamma.-valerolactone to pentanoic acid. Alternatively, the .gamma.-valerolactone can be converted to a mixture of n-butenes. The pentanoic acid so formed can be further reacted to yield a host of valuable products. For example, the pentanoic acid can be decarboxylated yield 1-butene or ketonized to yield 5-nonanone. The 5-nonanone can be hydrodeoxygenated to yield nonane, or 5-nonanone can be reduced to yield 5-nonanol. The 5-nonanol can be dehydrated to yield nonene, which can be dimerized to yield a mixture of C.sub.9 and C.sub.18 olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of alkanes. Alternatively, the nonene may be isomerized to yield a mixture of branched olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of branched alkanes. The mixture of n-butenes formed from .gamma.-valerolactone can also be subjected to isomerization and oligomerization to yield olefins in the gasoline, jet and Diesel fuel ranges.

  15. Advanced bioreactor systems for gaseous substrates: Conversion of synthesis gas to liquid fuels and removal of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} from coal combustion gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvaraj, P.T.; Kaufman, E.N.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the proposed research program is the development and demonstration of a new generation of gaseous substrate-based bioreactors for the production of liquid fuels from coal synthesis gas and the removal of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} species from combustion flue gas. Coal is thermochemically converted to synthesis gas consisting of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Conventional catalytic upgrading of coal synthesis gas into alcohols or other oxychemicals is subject to several processing problems such as interference of the other constituents in the synthesis gases, strict CO/H{sub 2} ratios required to maintain a particular product distribution and yield, and high processing cost due to the operation at high temperatures and pressures. Recently isolated and identified bacterial strains capable of utilizing CO as a carbon source and coverting CO and H{sub 2} into mixed alcohols offer the potential of performing synthesis gas conversion using biocatalysts. Biocatalytic conversion, though slower than the conventional process, has several advantages such as decreased interference of the other constituents in the synthesis gases, no requirement for strict CO/H{sub 2} ratios, and decreased capital and oeprating costs as the biocatalytic reactions occur at ambient temperatures and pressures.

  16. Alternative Fuels (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-19

    feedstock for HRJ, plant cost for F-T) Courtesy AFRL, Dr. Tim Edwards Unclassified • Agricultural crop oils (canola, jatropha, soy, palm , etc...Fuels Focus  Various conversion processes  Upgraded to meet fuel specs Diverse energy sources Petroleum Crude Oil Petroleum based Single Fuel in the...University of North Dakota EERC – UOP – General Electric (GE) – Swedish Biofuels AB • Cellulosic and algal feedstocks that are non- competitive with

  17. Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-12-11

    A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

  18. Development of potent antagonists for formyl peptide receptor 1 based on Boc-Phe-D-Leu-Phe-D-Leu-Phe-OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ryo; Kitajima, Toshiki; Mizuguchi, Hikaru; Fujimoto, Miki; Yamaguchi, Aya; Koga, Shuichiro; Koga, Yuya; Osada, Satoshi; Kodama, Hiroaki

    2014-08-01

    While stimulation of formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) on the surface of human neutrophils induces several immune responses, under conditions of continuous activation of the receptor by agonists such as formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-OH (fMLP), neutrophil-dependent tissue damage ensues. Thus, FPR antagonists could be anticipated as drugs for FPR-related disease. In this study, Boc-Phe-D-Leu-Phe-D-Leu-Phe-OH (Boc-FlFlF), one of several FPR subtype selective antagonists, was chosen and the positions at the Phe residues were optimized. We found that substitution with unnatural amino acids resulted in an improvement of two orders of magnitude. The most potent antagonist indicated FPR subtype selectivity at 1 μM. In addition to finding a potent antagonist, the structure-activity trends observed in this study should be valuable in designing a new type of FPR subtype selective antagonist. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Design Description of a Planned Breadboard Development of a Stirling Power Conversion System (SPCS) for the European Space Agency (ESA) Powered by a Simulated Nuclear Fuel Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, Claire; Vrublevskis, John; Bate, Alan; Summers, David; Edwards, Robin; Bradshaw, Tom; Crook, Martin; Gilley, Geoff; Rawlings, Thomas; Bailey, Paul; Dadd, Mike; Stone, Richard; Jamotton, Pierre; De Cock, Ellen; Linder, Martin; Dowell, Allan; Shaughnessy, Bryan

    2014-08-01

    The design of a breadboard power converter system for use with radioisotopic heat sources will be described. This design is based on the Stirling cycle, taking advantage of long-life technologies developed for past European space cooler systems. Electrical output is a conditioned DC bus of approximately 100 We. The design consists of a Stirling Converter Subsystem, Fuel Module Subsystem, Power Conditioning Electronics and Support Structure. The critical functions of a future Stirling radioisotope power generation system have been identified as safety, long-life, efficiency, mass and scalability. The breadboard (supported by 2 independent models) has been designed to investigate these areas fully and to raise their technology readiness levels (TRLs). Testing of the breadboard is currently planned to start in 2014.

  20. Regulation of Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) by the LysR-type regulator LeuO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Elena; Casadesús, Josep

    2014-03-01

    LeuO is a quiescent LysR-type regulator belonging to the H-NS regulon. Activation of leuO transcription represses expression of pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and inhibits invasion of epithelial cells. Loss of HilE suppresses LeuO-mediated downregulation of SPI-1. Activation of leuO transcription reduces the level of HilD protein, and loss of HilE restores the wild type HilD level. Hence, LeuO-mediated downregulation of SPI-1 may involve inhibition of HilD activity by HilE, a view consistent with the fact that HilE is a HilD inhibitor. In vivo analyses using β-galactosidase fusions indicate that LeuO activates hilE transcription. In vitro analyses by slot blotting, electrophoretic mobility shift analysis and DNase I footprinting show that LeuO binds the hilE promoter region. Although residual SPI-1 repression by LeuO is observed in the absence of HilE, the LeuO-HilE-HilD 'pathway' appears to be the major mechanism. Because both leuO and SPI-1 are repressed by H-NS, activation of leuO transcription may provide a backup mechanism for SPI-1 repression under conditions that impair H-NS-mediated silencing.

  1. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1992-03-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes, and (5) application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Topics include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced rechargeable batteries, improvements in battery and fuel-cell materials, and the establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Chemical Applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing waste streams from synfuel plants and coal gasifiers. Other research projects seek to identify and characterize the constituents of liquid fuel-system streams and to devise energy-efficient means for their separation. Materials Applications research includes the evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as the development of novel preparation techniques. For example, the use of advanced techniques, such as sputtering and laser ablation, are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  2. Conversational Narcissism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangelisti, Anita L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines narcissistic communication and the ways it is exhibited in everyday conversation. Identifies the following behavioral referents: boasting, refocusing the topic of conversation on the self, exaggerating hand and body movements, using a loud tone of voice, and "glazing over" when others speak. Suggests that conversational…

  3. Contentious Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidema, Leah A.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of joining a conversation through reading and writing is not new; in his 1941 book "The Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action," Kenneth Burke suggests that the acts of reading and writing are like entering a parlor where others are already conversing. The author explores the place of professional debate within NCTE and…

  4. Microbial Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Merry [American Society for Microbiology (ASM), Washington, DC (United States); Wall, Judy D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium March 10-12, 2006, in San Francisco, California, to discuss the production of energy fuels by microbial conversions. The status of research into various microbial energy technologies, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches, research needs in the field, and education and training issues were examined, with the goal of identifying routes for producing biofuels that would both decrease the need for fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, the choices for providing energy are limited. Policy makers and the research community must begin to pursue a broader array of potential energy technologies. A diverse energy portfolio that includes an assortment of microbial energy choices will allow communities and consumers to select the best energy solution for their own particular needs. Funding agencies and governments alike need to prepare for future energy needs by investing both in the microbial energy technologies that work today and in the untested technologies that will serve the world’s needs tomorrow. More mature bioprocesses, such as ethanol production from starchy materials and methane from waste digestors, will find applications in the short term. However, innovative techniques for liquid fuel or biohydrogen production are among the longer term possibilities that should also be vigorously explored, starting now. Microorganisms can help meet human energy needs in any of a number of ways. In their most obvious role in energy conversion, microorganisms can generate fuels, including ethanol, hydrogen, methane, lipids, and butanol, which can be burned to produce energy. Alternatively, bacteria can be put to use in microbial fuel cells, where they carry out the direct conversion of biomass into electricity. Microorganisms may also be used some day to make oil and natural gas technologies more efficient by sequestering carbon or by assisting in the recovery of oil and

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of Na(+) and leucine transport by LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-08-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to gain insight into the binding of Na(+) and leucine substrate to the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, focusing on the crystal structures of LeuT in the outward-open and inward-open states. For both conformations of LeuT, a third Na(+) binding site involving Glu290 in addition to the two sites identified from the crystal structures is observed. Once the negative charge from Glu290 in the inward-open LeuT is removed, the ion bound to the third site is ejected from LeuT rapidly, suggesting that the protonation state of Glu290 regulates Na(+) binding and release. In Cl(-)-dependent transporters where Glu290 is replaced by a neutral serine, a Cl(-) ion would be required to replace the role of Glu290. Thus, the simulations provide insights into understanding Na(+) and substrate transport as well as Cl(-)-independence of LeuT.

  6. Boiler conversions for biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinni, J. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Boiler conversions from grate- and oil-fired boilers to bubbling fluidized bed combustion have been most common in pulp and paper industry. Water treatment sludge combustion, need for additional capacity and tightened emission limits have been the driving forces for the conversion. To accomplish a boiler conversion for biofuel, the lower part of the boiler is replaced with a fluidized bed bottom and new fuel, ash and air systems are added. The Imatran Voima Rauhalahti pulverized-peat-fired boiler was converted to bubbling fluidized bed firing in 1993. In the conversion the boiler capacity was increased by 10 % to 295 MWth and NO{sub x} emissions dropped. In the Kymmene Kuusankoski boiler, the reason for conversion was the combustion of high chlorine content biosludge. The emissions have been under general European limits. During the next years, the emission limits will tighten and the boilers will be designed for most complete combustion and compounds, which can be removed from flue gases, will be taken care of after the boiler. (orig.) 3 refs.

  7. The effects of catalysts on the conversion of organic matter and bio-fuel production in the microwave pyrolysis of sludge at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Huang, Xiaofei; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Lin; Sun, Shichang; Zhang, Peixin; Zhang, Xianghua; Zhao, Xuxin

    2017-08-01

    Adding catalyst could improve the yields and qualities of bio-gas and bio-oil, and realize the oriented production. Results showed that the catalytic gas-production capacities of CaO were higher than those of Fe2O3, and the bio-gas yield at 800°C reached a maximum of 35.1%. Because the polar cracking active sites of CaO reduced the activation energy of the pyrolysis reaction and resulted in high catalytic cracking efficiencies. In addition, the quality of bio-oil produced by CaO was superior to that by Fe2O3, although the bio-oil yield of CaO was relatively weak. The light bio-fuel oriented catalytic pyrolysis could be realized when adding different catalysts. At 800°C, CaO was 45% higher than Fe2O3 in aspect of H2 production while Fe2O3 was 103% higher than CaO in aspect of CH4 production. Therefore, CaO was more suitable for H2 production and Fe2O3 was more suitable for CH4 production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Energetic conversion of European semi-natural grassland silages through the integrated generation of solid fuel and biogas from biomass: energy yields and the fate of organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensgen, Frank; Bühle, Lutz; Donnison, Iain; Heinsoo, Katrin; Wachendorf, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Twelve European habitat types were investigated to determine the influence of the IFBB technique (integrated generation of biogas and solid fuel from biomass) on the fate of organic compounds and energy yields of semi-natural grassland biomass. Concentration of organic compounds in silage and IFBB press cake (PC), mass flows within that system and methane yields of IFBB press fluids (PF) were determined. The gross energy yield of the IFBB technique was calculated in comparison to hay combustion (HC) and whole crop digestion (WCD). The IFBB treatment increased fibre and organic matter (OM) concentrations and lowered non-fibre carbohydrates and crude protein concentrations. The PF was highly digestible irrespective of habitat types, showing mean methane yields between 312.1 and 405.0 LN CH4 kg(-1) VS. Gross energy yields for the IFBB system (9.75-30.19MWh ha(-1)) were in the range of HC, outperformed WCD and were influenced by the habitat type. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Catalytic Conversion of Bio-Oil to Oxygen-Containing Fuels by Acid-Catalyzed Reaction with Olefins and Alcohols over Silica Sulfuric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwen Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Crude bio-oil from pine chip fast pyrolysis was upgraded with olefins (1-octene, cyclohexene, 1,7-octadiene, and 2,4,4-trimethylpentene plus 1-butanol (iso-butanol, t-butanol and ethanol at 120 °C using a silica sulfuric acid (SSA catalyst that possesses a good catalytic activity and stability. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR analysis showed that upgrading sharply increased ester content and decreased the amounts of levoglucosan, phenols, polyhydric alcohols and carboxylic acids. Upgrading lowered acidity (pH value rose from 2.5 to >3.5, removed the unpleasant odor and increased hydrocarbon solubility. Water content dramatically decreased from 37.2% to about 7.0% and the heating value increased from 12.6 MJ·kg−1 to about 31.9 MJ·kg−1. This work has proved that bio-oil upgrading with a primary olefin plus 1-butanol is a feasible route where all the original heating value of the bio-oil plus the added olefin and alcohol are present in the resulting fuel.

  10. Analysis of the Temperature Effect on the Infinite Multiplication Factor for HEU-UAl4 and LEU-UO2 Lattices of GHARR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Alhassan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to analyze the temperature effect on the infinite multiplication factor for light water moderated High Enriched Uranium (HEU-UAl4 and Low Enriched Uranium (LEU-UO2 lattices of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1. To quantify the contribution of each component of the infinite multiplication factor with respect to temperature within the 20 to 140ºC range, cell calculations were performed for the two MNSR typical lattices: the 90.2% enriched HEU-UAl4 and 12.6% enriched LEU- UO2 proposed fuel of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1 using SCUBA, a locally developed FORTRAN 95 code for the calculations and analysis of temperature coefficients of GHARR-1. It was observed that at the beginning of life of the core, the temperature coefficient of the resonance escape probability and that of the thermal utilization factor, contributed significantly to the negative temperature coefficient of the infinite multiplication factor obtained for both fuels.

  11. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of recycle uranium to UF/sub 6/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roddy, J.W.; Blanco, R.E.; Finney, B.C.; Hill, G.S.; Moore, R.E.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1977-04-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of various radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the amount of radioactive materials released from a model recycle uranium conversion and uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released radioactive materials on the environment. This study is designed to assist the US NRC in defining the term ''as low as reasonably achievable'' as it applies to these nuclear facilities. The base case model plant is representative of a licensable UF/sub 6/ production plant and has an annual capacity of 1500 metric tons of uranium. Additional radwaste treatment systems are added to the base case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The cost for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitments is calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. The methodology used in estimating the costs is presented. (34 tables, 11 figs.)

  12. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leu3 protein activates expression of GDH1, a key gene in nitrogen assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y; Cooper, T G; Kohlhaw, G B

    1995-01-01

    The Leu3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be a transcriptional regulator of genes encoding enzymes of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Leu3 binds to upstream activating sequences (UASLEU) found in the promoters of LEU1, LEU2, LEU4, ILV2, and ILV5. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that activation by Leu3 requires the presence of alpha-isopropylmalate. In at least one case (LEU2), Leu3 actually represses basal-level transcription when alpha-isopropylmalate is absent. Following identification of a UASLEU-homologous sequence in the promoter of GDH1, the gene encoding NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, we demonstrate that Leu3 specifically interacts with this UASLEU element. We then show that Leu3 is required for full activation of the GDH1 gene. First, the expression of a GDH1-lacZ fusion gene is three- to sixfold lower in a strain lacking the LEU3 gene than in an isogenic LEU3+ strain. Expression is restored to near-normal levels when the leu3 deletion cells are transformed with a LEU3-bearing plasmid. Second, a significant decrease in GDH1-lacZ expression is also seen when the UASLEU of the GDH1-lacZ construct is made nonfunctional by mutation. Third, the steady-state level of GDH1 mRNA decreases about threefold in leu3 null cells. The decrease in GDH1 expression in leu3 null cells is reflected in a diminished specific activity of NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. We also demonstrate that the level of GDH1-lacZ expression correlates with the cells' ability to generate alpha-isopropylmalate and is lowest in cells unable to produce alpha-isopropylmalate. We conclude that GDH1, which plays an important role in the assimilation of ammonia in yeast cells, is, in part, activated by a Leu3-alpha-isopropylmalate complex. This conclusion suggests that Leu3 participates in transcriptional regulation beyond the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways.

  13. The use of LeuT as a receptor model for antidepressant development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Rustanti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs merupakan golongan antidepresan yang cukup selektif terhadap serotonin re-uptake transporter (SERT. Sertraline dan fluoxetine merupakan golongan SSRI yang mempunyai afinitas kuat terhadap SERT serta mampu menghambat neurotransmitter recycling. Akan tetapi, kedua obat tersebut juga mempunyai afinitas terhadap norepinephrine and dopamine transporter (NAT dan DAT yang menyebabkan terjadinya efek samping. Oleh karena itu, penelitian mengenai interaksi antara SSRI dan SERT sangat penting untuk mengetahui faktor penentu interaksi obat-reseptor. Penggunaan Leucine Transporter (LeuT, model SERT yang berasal dari bakteri Aquifexaeolicus, bisa menjelaskan interaksi SSRI-SERT. Akan tetapi, karena perbedaan spesiesasal reseptor, obat yang efektif pada LeuT belum tentu efektif pada SERT. Penggunaan LeuT bisa menjelaskan interaksi SSRIs-SERT secara molekuler. Halogen binding pocket (HBP merupakan faktor penentu dalam interaksi SSRI-SERT. LeuT memiliki~25% sekuen yang sama dengan SERT pada manusia. Konservasi pada sekuen ini ditemukan pada sisi aktif reseptordimana HPB berada. LeuT sebagai reseptor model mampu menggambarkan interaksi antara obat dan reseptor. Hasil penemuan tersebut sangat bermanfaat untuk pengembangan obat antidepresan yang lebih selektif. (Health Science Indones 2010; 1: 51 - 57 Kata kunci: LeuT, antidepresan, serotonin re-uptake transporter Abstract Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs have been considered to be promising drugs in psychiatric practice because of their selectivity to serotonin re-uptake transporter (SERT. Sertraline and fluoxetine are considered to be effective SSRIs as their ability in binding SERT and inhibit neurotransmitter recycling. However, they also bind norepinephrine and dopamine transporter (NAT and DAT that cause undesirable effects. Thus, the study of drug-receptor interaction between SSRIs and SERT is important to gauge the active site of the drugs. By

  14. Characteristics of American coals in relation to their conversion into clean-energy fuels. Final report. [1150 samples of US coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spackman, W.; Davis, A.; Walker, P.L.; Lovell, H.L.; Vastola, F.J.; Given, P.H.; Suhr, N.H.; Jenkins, R.G.

    1982-06-01

    To further characterize the Nation's coals, the Penn State Coal Sample Bank and Data Base were expanded to include a total of 1150 coal samples. The Sample Bank includes full-seam channel samples as well as samples of lithotypes, seam benches, and sub-seam sections. To the extent feasible and appropriate basic compositional data were generated for each sample and validated and computerized. These data include: proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, sulfur forms analysis, calorific value, maceral analysis, vitrinite reflectance analysis, ash fusion analysis, free-swelling index determination, Gray-King coke type determination, Hardgrove grindability determination, Vicker's microhardness determination, major and minor element analysis, trace element analysis, and mineral species analysis. During the contract period more than 5000 samples were prepared and distributed. A theoretical and experimental study of the pyrolysis of coal has been completed. The reactivity of chars, produced from all ranks of American coals, has been studied with regard to reactivity to air, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/ and steam. Another area research has concerned the catalytic effect of minerals and various cations on the gasification processes. Combustion of chars, low volatile fuels, coal-oil-water-air emulsions and other subjects of research are reported here. The products of this research can be found in 23 DOE Technical Research Reports and 49 published papers. As another mechanism of technology transfer, the results have been conveyed via more than 70 papers presented at a variety of scientific meetings. References to all of these are contained in this report.

  15. Conversion Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recent significant stress or emotional trauma Being female — women are much more likely to develop conversion disorder Having a mental health condition, such as mood or anxiety disorders, dissociative disorder or certain personality disorders Having ...

  16. Conversation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffrin, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the current state of research in conversation analysis, referring primarily to six different perspectives that have developed from the philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and linguistics disciplines. These include pragmatics; speech act theory; interactional sociolinguistics; ethnomethodology; ethnography of communication; and…

  17. Conversation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffrin, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the current state of research in conversation analysis, referring primarily to six different perspectives that have developed from the philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and linguistics disciplines. These include pragmatics; speech act theory; interactional sociolinguistics; ethnomethodology; ethnography of communication; and…

  18. Strategic conversation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Asher

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Models of conversation that rely on a strong notion of cooperation don’t apply to strategic conversation — that is, to conversation where the agents’ motives don’t align, such as courtroom cross examination and political debate. We provide a game-theoretic framework that provides an analysis of both cooperative and strategic conversation. Our analysis features a new notion of safety that applies to implicatures: an implicature is safe when it can be reliably treated as a matter of public record. We explore the safety of implicatures within cooperative and non cooperative settings. We then provide a symbolic model enabling us (i to prove a correspondence result between a characterisation of conversation in terms of an alignment of players’ preferences and one where Gricean principles of cooperative conversation like Sincerity hold, and (ii to show when an implicature is safe and when it is not. http://dx.doi.org/10.3765/sp.6.2 BibTeX info

  19. The CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism and risk of urinary system cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Lin, Chang-sheng; Zhang, Ai-min; Song, Hua; Fan, Chang-chun

    2014-05-01

    The cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) gene plays a key role in the metabolism of various carcinogens. The CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism leads to leucine to valine substitution at codon 432. A lot of studies have shown that the CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism was associated with urinary system cancers, especially prostate cancer. However, the results were still inconclusive. In this meta-analysis, by searching online databases and references of related reviews, we identified 17 eligible studies to assess the relationship between CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism and urinary system cancers, including 7,783 cancer cases and 7,238 controls. By pooling all eligible studies, we found that the CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism was not associated with overall urinary system cancers. However, in subgroup analyses, we found that the variant 432Val allele significantly increased the risk of prostate cancer (Val vs. Leu, odds ratio (OR) = 1.064, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.981-1.154; Pheterogeneity = 0.002), while no association was found for bladder cancer (Val vs. Leu, OR = 0.942, 95% CI 0.853-1.041; Pheterogeneity = 0.504). No evidence of publication bias was found (Begg's test, P = 0.053; Egger's test, P = 0.073). In conclusion, based on 17 eligible studies, we found that the CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, while no association of bladder cancer was observed.

  20. In vitro evaluation of the potential of thiomers for the nasal administration of Leu-enkephalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernkop-Schnürch, A; Obermair, K; Greimel, A; Palmberger, T F

    2006-06-01

    It was the aim of this study to evaluate the potential of thiolated polycarbophil for the nasal administration of Leucine-enkephalin (Leu-enkephalin). The enzymatic degradation of Leu-enkephalin on freshly excised bovine nasal mucosa was analysed qualitatively via thin layer chromatography and quantitatively via high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The potential of thiolated polycarbophil gels to provide a sustained release for the therapeutic peptide was investigated via diffusion studies. Permeation studies were performed in Ussing-type diffusion chambers with freshly excised bovine nasal mucosa. Results demonstrated that Leu-enkephalin is mainly degraded by the cleavage of tyrosine from the N-terminus of the peptide. Within one hour more than 63.5 +/- 2% of this therapeutic peptide are degraded on the nasal mucosa. In the presence of 0.25% thiolated polycarbophil, this degradation process, however, could be significantly lowered. Diffusion studies demonstrated that Leu-enkephalin being incorporated in a 0.5% thiolated polycarbophil gel is sustained released out of it. The appearent permeability coefficient (P(app)) for Leu-enkephalin on the nasal mucosa was determined to be 1.9 +/- 1.2 x 10(-7) cm/sec. Furthermore, in the presence of 0.5% thiolated polycarbophil and 1% glutathione, which is used as permeation mediator for the thiomer, the uptake of Leu-enkephalin from the nasal mucosa was even 82-fold improved. According to these results thiolated polycarbophil might be a promising excipient for nasal administration of Leu-enkephalin.

  1. CO2催化转化为高附加值燃料:现状、挑战及其未来方向%Catalytic conversion of CO2 to value added fuels:Current status, challenges, and future directions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjie Wu; Xiao-Dong Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of CO2 into liquid fuels especially coupling with the intermittent renewable electricity offers a promising means of storing electricity in chemical form, which reduc‐es the dependence on fossil fuels and mitigates the negative impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on the planet. Although converting CO2 to fuels is not in itself a new concept, the field has not sub‐stantially advanced in the last 30 years primarily because of the challenge of discovery of structural electrocatalysts and the development of membrane architectures for efficient collection of reactants and separation of products. This overview summarizes recent advances in catalytic conversion of CO2 and presents the challenges and future directions in producing value‐added fuels.

  2. Methanol conversion to DME as a blue fuel:The beneficial use of ultrasonic irradiation for the preparation of CuO/H-MOR nanocatalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sameh M.K.Abuo l-Fotouh

    2014-01-01

    Methanol conversion to DME was investigated over CuO/H-MOR nanocatalyst prepaer d by precipitation and/or by precipitation flowe d by ultrasonic irradai tion methods. BET, XRD, SEM, NH3-TPD and H2-TPR techniques were used to characterize nanocatalysts.The effective ultar os nication factors encountered durni g carrying out the dehydration of methanol on Cuo/H-MOR zeolite catalysts to produce dimethylether are studied in the present work.These factors include:the type of ultrasonication media, the ultrasonci ation time, and the fixed weight of the solid catalyst per the volume of the ultrasonication liquid media (Wcatalyst/Vliquid ratio).XRD showed that structure of H-MOR is not damaged even after it is loaded with CuO nanoparticles or with ultrasonication.H2-TPR profiles indicated that reducibility of sonicated CuO/H-MOR nanocatalyst is higher than non-sonicated catalyst.It is found that employing ultrasound energ y for 60 min has the highest influence on the surface properties of nanocatalyst and its catalytic performance ( activity and stability) of CuO/H-MOR catalyst.Surface morphology ( SEM) of the sno icated CuO/H-MORc atalysts have clarified that methanol by itself used sa an ultrasonication medium gives teh best er sults concerning the homogeneity of ap rticle sizes com pared to the non-sonicated catalyst, where al rgea gglomerates and non-homgo enoe us clusters pa peared.Watre used as a sonicatio n medium showde many large agglomerates in addition to some smaller particles resulted in low catalytic activity.The different alcohols and ( Wcatalyst/Vliquid ) ratio were examined to give precise correlation with the catalytic activity of the sonicated CuO/H-MOR zeolite catalyst.These findings certified that ultrasonication has a deep effect on the surface morphology and hence on the catalytic behavior of the dehydration of methanol to DME.NH3-TPD shows that ultrasound irradiation has enhanced the acidity of CuOH/-MOR catalyst and hence it's catalytic performance

  3. Liquid Fuels from Lignins: Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chum, H. L.; Johnson, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    This task was initiated to assess the conversion of lignins into liquid fuels, primarily of lignins relevant to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes. The task was composed of a literature review of this area and an experimental part to obtain pertinent data on the conversion of lignins germane to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes.

  4. Properties of an Inward-Facing State of LeuT: Conformational Stability and Substrate Release

    OpenAIRE

    Grouleff, Julie; Søndergaard, Siri; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The leucine transporter (LeuT) is a bacterial homolog of the human monoamine transporters, which are important pharmaceutical targets. There are no high-resolution structures of the human transporters available; however, LeuT has been crystallized in several different conformational states. Recently, an inward-facing conformation of LeuT was solved revealing an unexpectedly large movement of transmembrane helix 1a (TM1a). We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of the mutated and wil...

  5. Association of the CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism with the risk of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lingling; Dillehay, Kelsey; Chen, Weimin; Shen, Deliang; Dong, Zhongyun; Li, Wenjie

    2012-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) is a key P450 enzyme involved in the metabolism of exogenous and endogenous substrates in endocrine-mediated tumors such as prostate cancer. The potential significance of nonsynonymous SNP Leu432Val (rs1056836) as a risk factor in prostate cancer has been extensively studied. The objective of this meta-analysis was to quantitatively summarize the association between CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism and prostate cancer. All eligible studies were searched and acquired from the PubMed and ISI databases. Statistical analysis was performed by using the software STATA 11.0. Ten case-controlled studies from nine eligible publications were identified, which includes 6,668 subjects with 3,221 cases and 3,447 controls. Overall, no significant association was found between the CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism and prostate cancer susceptibility for Val/Val vs Leu/Leu (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.79-1.44; P = 0.67), Leu/Val vs Leu/Leu (OR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.94-1.17; P = 0.42), Leu/Val + Val/Val vs Leu/Leu (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.91-1.26; P = 0.40) and Val/Val vs Leu/Val + Leu/Leu (OR = 1.11; 95% CI: 0.86-1.44; P = 0.43). However, a higher risk was found among Asians in all genetic models (Val/Val vs Leu/Leu :OR = 2.48, 95% CI: 1.14-5.39, P = 0.02; Leu/Val vs Leu/Leu: OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.03-1.89, P = 0.03; Leu/Val + Val/Val vs Leu/Leu: OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.14-2.01, P = 0.004; Val/Val vs Leu/Val + Leu/Leu: OR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.35-4.56, P = 0.004). We were not able to detect any association in the subgroup analysis by source of controls and genotyping method in all genetic models. In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides evidence that CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism is not associated with prostate cancer risk overall with the exception in Asians.

  6. DIissolution of low enriched uranium from the experimental breeder reactor-II fuel stored at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Almond, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-28

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is actively engaged in the development of electrochemical processing technology for the treatment of fast reactor fuels using irradiated fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as the primary test material. The research and development (R&D) activities generate a low enriched uranium (LEU) metal product from the electrorefining of the EBR-II fuel and the subsequent consolidation and removal of chloride salts by the cathode processor. The LEU metal ingots from past R&D activities are currently stored at INL awaiting disposition. One potential disposition pathway is the shipment of the ingots to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for dissolution in H-Canyon. Carbon steel cans containing the LEU metal would be loaded into reusable charging bundles in the H-Canyon Crane Maintenance Area and charged to the 6.4D or 6.1D dissolver. The LEU dissolution would be accomplished as the final charge in a dissolver batch (following the dissolution of multiple charges of spent nuclear fuel (SNF)). The solution would then be purified and the 235U enrichment downblended to allow use of the U in commercial reactor fuel. To support this potential disposition path, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a dissolution flowsheet for the LEU using samples of the material received from INL.

  7. Conversational Telugu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinstein, Judith; And Others

    The purpose of this text is to develop elementary conversational skills in Telugu. The language materials consist of four types of language learning activities. The first, and most predominant, is the unit microwave cycle. These cycles divide the learning process into two basic phases, the first of which involves mimicry, memorization, and…

  8. Conversion Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fisher, Robert S; Stonnington, Cynthia M; Barry, John J

    2006-01-01

    ... to proceed after establishing a diagnosis of conversion disorder. Case Presentation "Ms. A," a 53-year-old left-handed woman, was admitted to our epilepsy monitoring unit for evaluation of a 4-month history of tremors, head bobbing, and episodic loss of awareness. The onset of these symptoms was 1 week after she had visited an emergency department...

  9. Energetics, structures, vibrational frequencies, vibrational absorption, vibrational circular dichroism and Raman intensities of Leu-enkephalin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2003-01-01

    , vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) intensities and Raman scattering intensities are reported for the conformers of LeuE which are expected to be populated at room temperature. The species of LeuE-present in non-polar solvents is the neutral non-ionic species with the NH2 and CO2H groups, in contrast......, similar to the characteristic features in electronic circular dichroism spectra with respect to those in the UV-vis electronic absorption spectra. Finally, we have also attempted to stabilize the zwitterionic species by treating the aqueous environment by using a continuum solvent approach, the Onsager...

  10. Energy Conversion & Storage Program, 1993 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1994-06-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in: production of new synthetic fuels; development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion; characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species; and the study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis.

  11. Substitutions of Ser83Leu in GyrA and Ser80Leu in ParC Associated with Quinolone Resistance in Acinetobacter pittii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dan-xia; Hu, Yun-jian; Zhou, Hong-wei; Zhang, Rong; Chen, Gong-xiang

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the prevalence and the mechanism of quinolone-resistant Acinetobacter pittii, 634 Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolates were collected throughout Zhejiang Province. Identification of isolates was conducted by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), blaOXA-51-like gene, and partial RNA polymerase β-subunit (rpoB) amplification. Twenty-seven isolates of A. pittii were identified. Among the 634 isolates, A. baumannii, A. pittii, Acinetobacter nosocomialis, and A. calcoaceticus counted for 87.22%, 4.26%, 8.20%, and 0.32%, respectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility of nalidixic acid, ofloxacin, enoxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin for 27 A. pittii were determined by the agar dilution method. Detection of quinolone-resistant determining regions of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE was performed for the A. pittii isolates. In addition, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants (qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qnrC, qnrD, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA, oqxA, and oqxB) were investigated. All the 27 isolates demonstrated a higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to old quinolones than the new fluoroquinolones. No mutation in gyrA, gyrB, parC, or parE was detected in 20 ciprofloxacin-susceptible isolates. Seven ciprofloxacin-resistant A. pittii were identified with a Ser83Leu mutation in GyrA. Among them, six isolates with simultaneous Ser83Leu amino acid substitution in GyrA and Ser80Leu in ParC displayed higher MIC values against ciprofloxacin. Additionally, three were identified with a Met370Ile substitution in ParE, and two were detected with a Tyr317His mutation in ParE, which were reported for the first time. No PMQR determinants were identified in the 27 A. pittii isolates. In conclusion, mutations in chromosome play a major role in quinolone resistance in A. pittii, while resistance mechanisms mediated by plasmid have

  12. Conversion Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacov Rofé

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder remains a mystery that has only become more complicated with the decline of the scientific status of psychoanalysis (e.g., Piper, Lillevik, & Kritzer, 2008; Rofé, 2008 and recent neurological findings suggest that this behavior is controlled by biological mechanisms (van Beilen, Vogt, & Leenders, 2010. Moreover, existing theories have difficulty explaining the efficacy of various interventions, such as psychoanalysis, behavior therapy, drug therapy and religious therapy. This article reviews research and clinical evidence pertaining to both the development and treatment of conversion disorder and shows that this seemingly incompatible evidence can be integrated within a new theory, the Rational-Choice Theory of Neurosis (RCTN; Rofé, 2010. Despite the striking differences, RCTN continues Freud's framework of thinking as it employs a new concept of repression and replaces the unconscious with self-deception. Moreover, it incorporates Freud's idea, implicitly expressed in his theory, that neurotic disorders are, in fact, rational behaviors.

  13. Process analysis of electricity generation for vehicle powertrains with methanol as energy carrier and fuel-cells as energy conversion units; Verfahrensanalyse der Stromerzeugung fuer Fahrzeugantriebe mit Methanol als Energietraeger und Brennstoffzellen als Energieumwandlungssystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzer, R.; Hoehlein, B.

    1997-10-01

    Hydrogen-powered low-temperature fuel cells (PEFC) are the energy conversion units in vehicles with methanol as energy carrier and a powertrain consisting of the following main units: Methanol reformer (H{sub 2}-production) including catalytic converter, gas treatment, PEFC with peripheral units, electric motor with electric controllers and gearbox. The process engineering analysis is based on a simulation model (PRO/II, SIMSCI) and describes the energy and water management as a function of different assumptions as well as operating and ambient conditions for net electricity generation in a PEFC-powered powertrain. In particular, it presents an approach for balancing both water recovery (PEFC) and the use of water for the methanol reforming process as well as for the humidification of the PEFC. The overall balances present an optimized energy management including the peripheral air compression for the PEFC and the special emission options as compared with conventional powertrains (internal combustion engines). (orig.) [Deutsch] Wasserstoffbetriebene Niedertemperatur-Brennstoffzellen (PEFC) sind Energieumwandlungseinheiten in einem Fahrzeugantrieb mit Methanol als Energietraeger bestehend aus: Methanol-Reformer mit Katalyt-Konverter zur H{sub 2}-Erzeugung, Gasnachbehandlung, PEFC mit peripheren Einheiten, Elektromotor und Getriebe. Die vorgestellte Prozessanalyse basiert auf einem Simulationsmodell (PRO/II, SIMSCI) und beschreibt das Energie- und Wassermanagement als Funktion verschiedener Annahmen, Betriebszustaende und Umgebungsbedingungen fuer die Netto-Stromerzeugung in einem Antrieb mit PEFC. Insbesondere wird die Situation der Wassererzeugung (PEFC) einerseits und der Wassernutzung fuer den Reformer und die PEFC-Befeuchtung andererseits dargestellt. Die Gesamtbilanz zeigt das Energiemanagement einschliesslich der Luftkompression fuer die Kathodenluft der PEFC wie auch die besonderen Emissionsvorteile im Vergleich zu konventionellen Antrieben mit

  14. Conversational sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  15. Involvement of the leucine response transcription factor LeuO in regulation of the genes for sulfa drug efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2009-07-01

    LeuO, a LysR family transcription factor, exists in a wide variety of bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae and is involved in the regulation of as yet unidentified genes affecting the stress response and pathogenesis expression. Using genomic screening by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) in vitro, a total of 106 DNA sequences were isolated from 12 different regions of the Escherichia coli genome. All of the SELEX fragments formed complexes in vitro with purified LeuO. After Northern blot analysis of the putative target genes located downstream of the respective LeuO-binding sequence, a total of nine genes were found to be activated by LeuO, while three genes were repressed by LeuO. The LeuO target gene collection included several multidrug resistance genes. A phenotype microarray assay was conducted to identify the gene(s) responsible for drug resistance and the drug species that are under the control of the LeuO target gene(s). The results described herein indicate that the yjcRQP operon, one of the LeuO targets, is involved in sensitivity control against sulfa drugs. We propose to rename the yjcRQP genes the sdsRQP genes (sulfa drug sensitivity determinant).

  16. What are batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Martin; Brodd, Ralph J

    2004-10-01

    Electrochemical energy conversion devices are pervasive in our daily lives. Batteries, fuel cells and supercapacitors belong to the same family of energy conversion devices. They are all based on the fundamentals of electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics. All three are needed to service the wide energy requirements of various devices and systems. Neither batteries, fuel cells nor electrochemical capacitors, by themselves, can serve all applications.

  17. Gas generation during waste treatment of acidic solutions from the dissolution of irradiated LEU targets for 99Mo production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakel, Allen J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Conner, Cliff [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program is to limit the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors by substituting low-enriched uranium (LEU) wherever possible. The work reported here documents our work to develop the calcining technologies and processes that will be needed for 99Mo production using LEU foil targets and the Modified Cintichem Process. The primary concern with the conversion to LEU from HEU targets is that it would result in a five- to six-fold increase in the total uranium. This increase results in more liquid waste from the process. We have been working to minimize the increase in liquid waste and to minimize the impact of any change in liquid waste. Direct calcination of uranium-rich nitric acid solutions generates NO2 gas and UO3 solid. We have proposed two processes for treating the liquid waste from a Modified Cintichem Process with a LEU foil. One is an optimized direct calcination process that is similar to the process currently in use. The other is a uranyl oxalate precipitation process. The specific goal of the work reported here was to characterize and compare the chemical reactions that occur during these two processes. In particular, the amounts and compositions of the gaseous and solid products were of interest. A series of experiments was carried out to show the effects of temperature and the redox potential of the reaction atmosphere. The primary products of the direct calcination process were mixtures of U3O8 and UO3 solids and NO2 gas. The primary products of the oxalate precipitation process were mixtures of U3O8 and UO2 solid and CO2 gas. Higher temperature and a reducing atmosphere tended to favor quadrivalent over hexavalent uranium in the solid product. These data will help producers to decide between the two processes. In addition, the data can be used to design

  18. Multiple states of the Tyr318Leu mutant of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase revealed by single molecule kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, J.; Palfey, B.A.; Dertouzos, J.

    2004-01-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) from Escherichia coli is a monomeric membrane-associated flavoprotein that catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate. By using confocal fluorescence spectroscopy on the highly fluorescent Tyr318Leu DHOD mutant, we studied the catalytic turnover of si...

  19. The Leu7Pro polymorphism of the neuropeptide Y gene regulates free fatty acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Karhapää, Pauli; Vauhkonen, Ilkka; Kekäläinen, Päivi; Kareinen, Anu; Viitanen, Laura; Pesonen, Ullamari; Kallio, Jaana; Uusitupa, Matti; Laakso, Markku

    2003-05-01

    The Leu7Pro polymorphism in the signal peptide of the preproneuropeptide Y (NPY) has been associated with dyslipidemias and free fatty acid (FFA) levels during exercise. The association of this polymorphism with insulin sensitivity has not been studied. In this study, the Leu7Pro polymorphism was determined in 2 groups of nondiabetic middle-aged subjects (n = 266 and n = 295). Insulin sensitivity was measured with the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (n = 266) or with an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT, n = 295). First-phase insulin secretion was determined as insulin area under the curve (AUC) during the first 10 minutes of the IVGTT. FFAs were measured both in the fasting state and during the hyperinsulinemic clamp. The Leu7Pro polymorphism of the NPY gene was not associated with the rates of whole body glucose uptake, insulin sensitivity index, insulin secretion during the IVGTT, or insulin AUC during the oral glucose tolerance test. However, the Pro7 allele was associated with low FFA levels both in the fasting state (P =.043) and during the hyperinsulinemic clamp (P =.003). In conclusion, the Leu7Pro polymorphism of the NPY gene associates with alterations in FFA metabolism but does not have an impact on insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, or glucose metabolism. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nutrient intake, weight, and Leu7Pro polymorphism in prepro-neuropeptide Y in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvonen, Matti K; Ruottinen, Soile; Koulu, Markku; Pesonen, Ullamari; Niinikoski, Harri; Rask-Nissilä, Leena; Simell, Olli; Rönnemaa, Tapani

    2006-11-01

    The important role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the regulation of food intake and energy balance has been firmly documented in rodents, but human data are sparse. The recently identified functional Leu7Pro polymorphism in the signal peptide region of the prepro-NPY is a useful tool for the investigation of the role of NPY in men. Pro7 substitution has been associated with the following: plasma NPY concentration, the risk factors of cardiovascular disease, birth weight of children, serum triglyceride concentration, and the function of vascular endothelium. The objective of this study was to analyze the connection between Leu7Pro polymorphism and relative weight, nutrient intakes, and serum lipids in early childhood. We closely followed 647 healthy Finnish children participating in the Special Turku Risk Factor Intervention Project through their first 9 yr of life. Leu7Pro polymorphism showed no relation to intakes of energy, macronutrients, or the relative weight in either gender. However, Pro7 substitution was associated with serum triglyceride concentration in boys at the ages of 5, 7, and 9 yr. The functional Leu7Pro polymorphism is not likely to be involved in the regulation of adiposity or major nutrient preferences in childhood. In boys, the Pro7 variant may have impact on serum triglyceride concentration.

  1. Insights into transport mechanism from LeuT engineered to transport tryptophan

    OpenAIRE

    Piscitelli, Chayne L; Gouaux, Eric

    2011-01-01

    LeuT is a model protein for studying the structure and mechanism of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter family. This study reveals how the ability of a ligand to promote the structural transition to the occluded state modulates transport specificity.

  2. Insights into transport mechanism from LeuT engineered to transport tryptophan

    OpenAIRE

    Piscitelli, Chayne L; Gouaux, Eric

    2011-01-01

    LeuT is a model protein for studying the structure and mechanism of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter family. This study reveals how the ability of a ligand to promote the structural transition to the occluded state modulates transport specificity.

  3. Mechanistic aspects of sodium-binding sites in LeuT-like fold symporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Camilo; Ziegler, Christine

    2013-05-01

    Secondary active transporters are of paramount biological impact in all living cells, facilitating the movement of many different substrates across the membrane against a concentration gradient. The uphill transport of one substrate is coupled to the downhill transport of another and driven by the electrochemical gradient. In the last decade, an increasing number of atomic structures of secondary transporters have been reported, confirming a very fundamental mechanistic concept known as the alternating-access cycle. The wealth of structures of transporters sharing the so-called LeuT-like fold that is characterized by two five-transmembrane-helix repeats sharing a 2-fold inverted pseudo symmetry has raised big hopes to finally describe alternating access on a molecular level. Although comparing the individual transporter states of different LeuT-like fold transporters revealed striking similarities, the coupling process, which represents the heart of secondary transport, is far from being understood. Here, we review the structural, functional, and biophysical validation of sodium-binding sites in four different LeuT-like fold transporters. The conservation of sodium sites is discussed in light of their role as key elements connecting symmetry-related structural domains, which are involved in substrate translocation. Moreover, we highlight their crucial roles in conformational changes of LeuT-like fold transporters and their implication on a unifying mechanism in secondary transport.

  4. Hemoglobin Moabit: alpha 86 (F7) Leu leads to Arg: a new unstable abnormal hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, A; Pribilla, W; Marti, H R; Winterhalter, K H

    1979-01-01

    A new alpha chain abnormal hemoglobin variant was found in a Turkish patient with a mild Heinz body hemolytic anemia and splenomegaly. The substitution alpha 86 Leu leads to Arg, which is next to the heme binding proximal histidine, is responsible for a marked instability of the molecule. The oxygen affinity of the erythrocytes was found to be slightly decreased.

  5. Lignin biomass conversion into chemicals and fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melián Rodríguez, Mayra

    % of the weight and 40% of the energy content of lignocellulosic biomass. While designated applications for cellulose already exist in form of the current pulp and paper production as well as its prospective hydrolysis and fermentation into biofuels (mainly bioethanol), sustainable ways to valorize the lignin...... fraction of wood are yet to be established, due to its poor solubility and complex heterogeneous structure. This constitutes a major drawback in the economic viability of a biorefinery, where complete valorization of lignocellulosic biomass is necessary. For this reason, and due to its potential...... as a valuable feedstock for the production of organic chemicals, lignin valorization has become an important issue to solve. For a better understanding and analysis of the catalytic performance of lignin, it is common to use lignin model compounds, which contain the most significant linkages present in lignin...

  6. Towards Plasmonic Solar to Fuel Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Dayton Thomas

    The need to renewably store and utilize energy from chemical bonds has grown with recent economic and environmental concerns. Plasmonically-enabled devices have shown promise in various photosynthetic processes due to their scalable, cost-effective, and robust performance. Utilizing charge carriers derived from localized surface plasmons, these devices can drive various photoelectrochemical (PEC) reactions, however at limited efficiencies due to incomplete solar absorption. To improve broadband solar absorption in wide bandgap semiconductors, the plasmon resonance of different metal nanostructures in the visible are synthesized using anodic and sol-gel templating methods. Preliminary results suggest that gold nanoparticles and helical metal nanowires are well suited for photosensitization of titania for visible light absorption. Characterization by UV-Visible spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, and photoelectrochemical measurements indicate that these templated methods can be utilized as the basis for synthesizing a variety of photoelectrochemical devices as well as unique plasmonic materials for applications including energy storage, sensing, and catalysis.

  7. Evidence that intramolecular interactions are involved in masking the activation domain of transcriptional activator Leu3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Hu, Y; Zheng, F; Zhou, K; Kohlhaw, G B

    1997-08-01

    The Leu3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulates the expression of genes involved in branched chain amino acid biosynthesis and in ammonia assimilation. It is modulated by alpha-isopropylmalate, an intermediate in leucine biosynthesis. In the presence of alpha-isopropylmalate, Leu3p is a transcriptional activator. In the absence of the signal molecule, the activation domain is masked, and Leu3p acts as a repressor. The recent discovery that Leu3p retains its regulatory properties when expressed in mammalian cells (Guo, H., and Kohlhaw, G. B. (1996) FEBS Lett. 390, 191-195) suggests that masking and unmasking of the activation domain occur without the participation of auxiliary proteins. Here we present experimental support for this notion and address the mechanism of masking. We show that modulation of Leu3p is exceedingly sensitive to mutations in the activation domain. An activation domain double mutant (D872N/D874N; designated Leu3-dd) was constructed that has the characteristics of a permanently masked activator. Using separately expressed segments containing either the DNA binding domain-middle region or the activation domain of wild type Leu3p (or Leu3-dd) in a modified yeast two-hybrid system, we provide direct evidence for alpha-isopropylmalate-dependent interaction between these segments. Finally, we use the phenotype of Leu3-dd-containing cells (slow growth in the absence of added leucine) to select for suppressor mutations that map to the middle region of Leu3-dd. The properties of nine such suppressors further support the idea that masking is an intramolecular process and suggest a means for mapping the surface involved in masking.

  8. Neurotransmitter/sodium symporter orthologue LeuT has a single high-affinity substrate site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, Chayne L; Krishnamurthy, Harini; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-12-23

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) couple the uptake of neurotransmitter with one or more sodium ions, removing neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft. NSSs are essential to the function of chemical synapses, are associated with multiple neurological diseases and disorders, and are the targets of therapeutic and illicit drugs. LeuT, a prokaryotic orthologue of the NSS family, is a model transporter for understanding the relationships between molecular mechanism and atomic structure in a broad range of sodium-dependent and sodium-independent secondary transporters. At present there is a controversy over whether there are one or two high-affinity substrate binding sites in LeuT. The first-reported crystal structure of LeuT, together with subsequent functional and structural studies, provided direct evidence for a single, high-affinity, centrally located substrate-binding site, defined as the S1 site. Recent binding, flux and molecular simulation studies, however, have been interpreted in terms of a model where there are two high-affinity binding sites: the central, S1, site and a second, the S2 site, located within the extracellular vestibule. Furthermore, it was proposed that the S1 and S2 sites are allosterically coupled such