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Sample records for lethally irradiated hosts

  1. Maintenance of host leukocytes in peripheral immune compartments following lethal irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution: implications for graft versus host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Elizabeth M; Tanner, Scott M; Daft, Joseph G; Stanus, Andrea L; Martin, Steven M; Lorenz, Robin G

    2013-03-01

    Bone marrow reconstitution is utilized as a tool for disease treatment and as a research technique to elucidate the function of bone marrow derived cells. Clinically successful engraftment is indicated by the development of a functioning immune repertoire. In research, reconstitution is considered successful if >85% of splenic leukocytes are of donor origins. Previous work suggests that splenic reconstitution may not be indicative of reconstitution in the mucosa. We sought to evaluate mucosal reconstitution in animals following a standard bone marrow eradication and reconstitution technique. Bone marrow was harvested from adult B6.SJL donor mice (CD45.1) and injected via either the retro-orbital or intraperitoneal route into lethally irradiated B6 (CD45.2) adult or neonatal recipients respectively. The expression of CD45 by flow cytometry was used to calculate reconstitution with respect to immune compartment and cell type. In reconstituted adult animals 93.2±1.5% of splenic leukocytes expressed the donor CD45.1 antigen thus meeting the standard definition of reconstitution, however only 58.6±13.6% of intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes and 52.4±16.0% of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes were of donor origin, confirming splenic reconstitution fails to represent peripheral immune reconstitution. T-cells in the gastrointestinal tract are the most poorly reconstituted, while B-cells appear to be almost universally replaced by donor cells. The inadequate mucosal reconstitution was not corrected by evaluating later time points or by performing the bone marrow transfer during the neonatal period. This demonstration that substantial host T-cells remain in the intestinal mucosa after a "successful" bone marrow transplantation should cause a re-evaluation of data from research bone marrow chimera experiments, as well as the mechanisms for complications after clinical bone marrow transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Animal experimental model of a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction after allogenic transplantation of bone marrow in lethally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenke, H.; Muench, S.; Haubold, S.; Weber, B.

    1977-01-01

    The graft-versus-host (GVH) disease represents a serious still unsolved problem in the human allogenic transplantation of bone marrow. An experimental model of GVH reaction after an allogenic transplantation of bone marrow in the adult mouse has been worked out as a prerequisite for further studies on the therapeutic influence of this syndrome. 3 groups have been formed out of 82 lethally X-irradiated C57 Bl mice. The non-transplanted control group died to a hundred per cent within 12 days. While out of the 2nd group treated with syngenic bone marrow 55 per cent survived from the 22nd day, 30 per cent of the third animal group, allogenicly transplanted with histoincompatible AKR donor marrow developed a chronic GVH syndrome. The following symptoms were observed: retardation, alterations of the skin, diarrhea, edemas of the legs, failing increase of leukocytes in blood and proliferation of lymphocytes in bone marrow of about 60 per cent (18 per cent in syngenically transplanted animals), in lacking proliferation of hematopoiesis. The increase of liver and especially spleen index is not characteristic in comparison with the syngenically transplanted group, since in the latter there is also an increase of the values on account of a strong hematopoetic proliferation. The model is suitable and sufficiently well characterized for the performance of further experimental studies. (author)

  3. Gluconeogenesis in lethally X-irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M.

    1983-01-01

    The in vivo incorporation of U- 14 C-alanine into blood glucose and liver glycogen was measured in rats irradiated with a single whole body lethal dose of X-rays. Changes in gluconeogenic enzyme activities were studied in the liver. Increased incorporation of 14 C-alanine into blood glucose and liver glycogen were found after irradiation. Liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glycogenic activity underwent almost parallel changes and were significantly elevated from the 6th to the 48th hour, with resultant accumulation of glycogen. Glucose-6-phosphatase activity was depressed and there was a negative correlation between it and liver glycogen concentration. Maximum fructose-1,6-diphosphatase activity was found at 48 hours. The results show that glycogen accumulation in the liver and the raised blood glucose level in X-irradiated rats are based on raised gluconeogenesis. (author)

  4. Gluconeogenesis in lethally X-irradiated rats

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    Paulikova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M. (Univerzita P.J. Safarika, Kosice (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Vseobecnej Biologie)

    1983-02-01

    The in vivo incorporation of U-/sup 14/C-alanine into blood glucose and liver glycogen was measured in rats irradiated with a single whole body lethal dose of X-rays. Changes in gluconeogenic enzyme activities were studied in the liver. Increased incorporation of /sup 14/C-alanine into blood glucose and liver glycogen were found after irradiation. Liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glycogenic activity underwent almost parallel changes and were significantly elevated from the 6th to the 48th hour, with resultant accumulation of glycogen. Glucose-6-phosphatase activity was depressed and there was a negative correlation between it and liver glycogen concentration. Maximum fructose-1,6-diphosphatase activity was found at 48 hours. The results show that glycogen accumulation in the liver and the raised blood glucose level in X-irradiated rats are based on raised gluconeogenesis.

  5. The Effects of Anthrax Lethal Toxin on Host Barrier Function

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    David M. Frucht

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathological actions of anthrax toxin require the activities of its edema factor (EF and lethal factor (LF enzyme components, which gain intracellular access via its receptor-binding component, protective antigen (PA. LF is a metalloproteinase with specificity for selected mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MKKs, but its activity is not directly lethal to many types of primary and transformed cells in vitro. Nevertheless, in vivo treatment of several animal species with the combination of LF and PA (termed lethal toxin or LT leads to morbidity and mortality, suggesting that LT-dependent toxicity is mediated by cellular interactions between host cells. Decades of research have revealed that a central hallmark of this toxicity is the disruption of key cellular barriers required to maintain homeostasis. This review will focus on the current understanding of the effects of LT on barrier function, highlighting recent progress in establishing the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects.

  6. Protection of lethally irradiated mice with allogeneic fetal liver cells: influence of irradiation dose on immunologic reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulunay, O.; Good, R.A.; Yunis, E.J.

    1975-01-01

    After lethal irradiation long-lived, immunologically vigorous C3Hf mice were produced by treatment with syngeneic fetal liver cells or syngeneic newborn or adult spleen cells. Treatment of lethally irradiated mice with syngeneic or allogeneic newborn thymus cells or allogeneic newborn or adult spleen cells regularly led to fatal secondary disease or graft-versus-host reactions. Treatment of the lethally irradiated mice with fetal liver cells regularly yielded long-lived, immunologically vigorous chimeras. The introduction of the fetal liver cells into the irradiated mice appeared to be followed by development of immunological tolerance of the donor cells. The findings suggest that T-cells at an early stage of differentiation are more susceptible to tolerance induction than are T-lymphocytes at later stages of differentiation. These investigations turned up a perplexing paradox which suggests that high doses of irradiation may injure the thymic stroma, rendering it less capable of supporting certain T-cell populations in the peripheral lymphoid tissue. Alternatively, the higher and not the lower dose of irradiation may have eliminated a host cell not readily derived from fetal liver precursors which represents an important helper cell in certain cell-mediated immune functions, e.g., graft-versus-host reactions, but which is not important in others, e.g., allograft rejections. The higher dose of lethal irradiation did not permit development or maintenance of a population of spleen cells that could initiate graft-versus-host reactions but did permit the development of a population of donor cells capable of achieving vigorous allograft rejection

  7. Thyroid and pancreatic hormones in lethally irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlersova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M.

    1985-01-01

    The concentrations of thyroxine, triiodothyronine and reverse triiodothyronine, glucagon and insulin in the serum or plasma were determined by radioimmunoassay in male rats of the Wistar strain 1, 6, 24, 48 and 72 hours after irradiation with 14.35 Gy (1500R) of X-rays. The irradiated and sham-irradiated rats were starved till examination. The concentrations of thyroxine and triiodothyronine dropped 6 hours after irradiation as compared with controls, the concentration of thyroxine also dropped after 72 hours. The level of reverse triiodothyronine in irradiated rats increased in the terminal period. The level of insulin dropped 24 hours after irradiation, at 72 hours it was higher than that in controls. The concentration of glucagon in irradiated rats increased in the terminal phase of radiation disease. The results document the diverse reaction of hormones in lethally irradiated rats and contribute to a deeper recognition of metabolic imbalance in the course of radiation disease. (author)

  8. Pluripotent stem cells with normal or reduced self renewal survive lethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brecher, G.; Neben, S.; Yee, M.; Bullis, J.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    Transfusion with 10,000 or 20,000 marrow cells resulted in 30+ days survival of 15%-50% of mice exposed to an Ld90 or LD100 or radiation. The use of congenic mice with alloenzyme markers permitted the identification of host and donor cells in the peripheral blood of transfused animals. Donor cells were present initially in all hosts. Between 55% and 92% of the animals became 100% host type by 12-24 weeks after transfusion in three separate experiments. To explore whether the temporary repopulation by donor cells was due to short-lived stem cells, the marrows of several primary hosts were transfused into secondary, lethally irradiated hosts. Some of the retransplanted primary donor and host cells persisted only temporarily. It is suggested that some of the donor stem cells in both the primary and secondary hosts had an intrinsically shortened life span

  9. Necrostatin-1 rescues mice from lethal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhentai; Epperly, Michael; Watkins, Simon C; Greenberger, Joel S; Kagan, Valerian E; Bayır, Hülya

    2016-04-01

    There is an emerging need in new medical products that can mitigate and/or treat the short- and long-term consequences of radiation exposure after a radiological or nuclear terroristic event. The direct effects of ionizing radiation are realized primarily via apoptotic death pathways in rapidly proliferating cells within the initial 1-2days after the exposure. However later in the course of the radiation disease necrotic cell death may ensue via direct and indirect pathways from increased generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Here we evaluated radiomitigative potential of necrostatin-1 after total body irradiation (TBI) and the contribution of necroptosis to cell death induced by radiation. Circulating TNFα levels were increased starting on d1 after TBI and associated with increased plasmalemma permeability in ileum of irradiated mice. Necrostatin-1 given iv. 48h after 9.5Gy TBI attenuated radiation-induced receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) serine phosphorylation in ileum and improved survival vs. vehicle. Utilizing apoptosis resistant cytochrome c(-/-) cells, we showed that radiation can induce necroptosis, which is attenuated by RNAi knock down of RIPK1 and RIPK3 or by treatment with necrostatin-1 or -1s whereas 1-methyl-L-tryptophan, an indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase inhibitor, did not exhibit radiomitigative effect. This suggests that the beneficial effect of necrostatin-1 is likely through inhibition of RIPK1-mediated necroptotic pathway. Overall, our data indicate that necroptosis, a form of programmed necrosis, may play a significant role in cell death contributing to radiation disease and mortality. This study provides a proof of principle that necrostatin-1 and perhaps other RIPK1 inhibitors are promising therapeutic agents for radiomitigation after TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Repair of potentially lethal and sublethal radiation damage in x-irradiated ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, Atsushi; Okamoto, Mieko; Tsuchiya, Takehiko.

    1985-01-01

    The ability of cells to repair cellular radiation damage during the growth of TMT-3 ascites tumor and the effect of host reaction on the repair ability were examined by using an in vitro assay of cell clonogenicity after in situ irradiation of tumor cells. In single-dose experiments, the repair of potentially lethal radiation damage (PLD) was observed in stationary phase cells (12-day tumor) of the unirradiated host, but not in exponential phase cells (3-day tumor) of the unirradiated host animals. However, if previously irradiated host animals were used, even the exponentially growing tumor cells showed repair of PLD. In two-dose experiments, the ability to repair sublethal radiation damage (SLD) in exponential phase tumor cells was less than that of stationary phase cells in the unirradiated host. In the pre-irradiated host, the extent of the repair in exponential phase cells was somewhat enhanced. These results suggest that irradiation of host animals might suppress a factor that inhibits repair, resulting in enhancement of the repair capability of tumor cells. (author)

  11. Restoring efficiency of hemopoietic cell transplantation in a mouse lethally irradiated by a total exposure to X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, Gino

    1959-10-01

    This research thesis reports the study of possibility of treatments (or restoration) of a mouse which has been submitted to a lethal dose of X rays. More particularly, the author compared the restoring efficiency of bone marrow and fetal liver injected in a mouse which had been lethally irradiated by a total exposure to X rays. He also studied the functional status of the hemopoietic graft, and the emergence of the secondary disease in mice which had been as well lethally irradiated and then restored by injection of bone marrow and fetal liver. The author then addressed the influence of the induction of immune tolerance of the host with respect to the donor on the survival of a mouse lethally irradiated and restored by homologue bone marrow [fr

  12. Transplantation of bone marrow cells into lethally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktora, L.; Hermanova, E.

    1978-01-01

    Morphological changes were studied of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and spleen of lethally irradiated mice (0.2 C/kg) after transplantation of living bone marrow cells. It was observed that functional trombopoietic megakaryocytes occur from day 15 after transplantation and that functional active megakaryocytes predominate in bone marrow and spleen from day 20. In addition, other types of cells, primarily granulocytes, were detected in some megakaryocytes. (author)

  13. Genotoxicity test of irradiated spice mixture by dominant lethal test

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    Barna, J

    1986-03-01

    Dominant lethal test (DLT) was performed in Sprague Dawley male rats prefed with 25% irradiated spice mixture which was composed of 55% non-pungent ground paprika, 14% black pepper, 9% allspice, 9% coriander, 7% marjoram, 4% cumin, 2% nutmeg. Microbial count of the spice mixture was reduced with 15 kGy from a sup(60)Co source. Control groups received spice-free or untreated spice diet or were administered to cyclophosphamide i.p., respectively. DTL parameters altered significantly in the latter group but neither untreated nor irradiated spice mixture proved to be germ cell mutagens. 24 refs.; 8 figs.

  14. Late radiation effects in animals surviving lethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, L.A.

    1974-01-01

    Animals (rats, mice, dogs) survived lethal irradiation by means of prophylactic-therapeutic treatments or previously irradiated, were studied for late radiation effects: life span, cachexia and fat growing of hypophysical type, tissue or organ hypoplasia manifested by disturbed hemopoiesis, suppressed function of adrenal gland, etc., suppressed immune reactivity of the irradiated organism, atypical biochemical changes in DNA and protein metabolism, epilation, chronic dermatitis, ulcerations, reduced reproductivity or full sterility, damage of kidneys leading to nephrosclerosis, dishormonal states, cataracts, diffuse sclerotic processes, various kinds of malignant and non-malignant tumors. In these cases hemopoiesis compensated for a definite time peripheral blood composition, but during the late period it showed features of incompleteness: shorter life survival of erythrocytes and thrombocytes manifested by a decreased binding of labelled methionine in these blood elements, anemia and relative thrombocytopenia sometimes with an increased number of polychromatic erythrocytes in peripheral blood and a decreased number of reticulocytes at the same time; lymphopenia and relative leucopenia with an increased number of hypersegmented neutrophils. Decreased reproductivity and atypical biochemical changes available in the first generation of the irradiated animals showed the probable role of mutagenic factors in the emergence of some late radiation effects. A significant part of late radiation sequences were due to neuro-endocrine desintegrations which lead to a disturbed supply of the vessels and afterwards to their sclerosis. Some of the described late radiation effects were also observed in biological controls as festures of ageing while in irradiated animals they were manifested in an earlier period. After application of optimal amounts radioprotectors (AET, cysteamine, serotonin) a more marked protective effect is demonstrated in the early reactions (time survival

  15. Late radiation effects in animals surviving lethal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrov, L A

    1974-01-01

    Animals (rats, mice, dogs) survived lethal irradiation by means of prophylactic-therapeutic treatments or previously irradiated, were studied for late radiation effects: life span, cachexia and fat growing of hypophysical type, tissue or organ hypoplasia manifested by disturbed hemopoiesis, suppressed function of adrenal gland, etc., suppressed immune reactivity of the irradiated organism, atypical biochemical changes in DNA and protein metabolism, epilation, chronic dermatitis, ulcerations, reduced reproductivity or full sterility, damage of kidneys leading to nephrosclerosis, dishormonal states, cataracts, diffuse sclerotic processes, various kinds of malignant and non-malignant tumors. In these cases hemopoiesis compensated for a definite time peripheral blood composition, but during the late period it showed features of incompleteness: shorter life survival of erythrocytes and thrombocytes manifested by a decreased binding of labelled methionine in these blood elements, anemia and relative thrombocytopenia sometimes with an increased number of polychromatic erythrocytes in peripheral blood and a decreased number of reticulocytes at the same time; lymphopenia and relative leucopenia with an increased number of hypersegmented neutrophils. Decreased reproductivity and atypical biochemical changes available in the first generation of the irradiated animals showed the probable role of mutagenic factors in the emergency of some late radiation effects. A significant part of late radiation sequences were due to neuro-endocrine disintegrations. Some of the described late radiation effects were also observed in biological controls as features of ageing. After application of radioprotectors (AET, cysteamine, serotonin) a more marked protective effect is demonstrated in the early reactions (time survival till 30th day, DNA and protein metabolism, immune reactions) of the lethally irradiated animals.

  16. Gastrointestinal decontamination in healthy and lethally irradiated monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, W.D.H.

    1980-01-01

    In periods of extreme immunosuppression, infections which are often life-threatening, frequently occur. In an attempt to prevent such infections in lethally irradiated rhesus monkeys, the animals were subjected to strict reverse isolation prior to irradiation and administrated orally with nonabsorbable antibiotics in order to eliminate their microflora. The antibiotic combination was selected on the basis of a sensitivity test and was added to the liquid food supply. To rapidly achieve a high bactericidal concentration in the intestine, the same antibiotics were additionally given orally for 5 days. The microflora was reduced rapidly; within a few days sterile cultures were obtained. Particularly after discontinuation of the administration of the additional antibiotics were colonizations found. In contrast to colonizations persisting from the first day of treatment on, the first were rather easy to suppress. (Auth.)

  17. Cell lethality after selective irradiation of the DNA replication fork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, K.G.; Warters, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    It has been suggested that nascent DNA located at the DNA replication fork may exhibit enhanced sensitivity to radiation damage. To evaluate this hypothesis, Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) were labeled with 125 I-iododeoxyuridine ( 125 IUdR) either in the presence or absence of aphidicolin. Aphidicolin (5 μg/ml) reduced cellular 125 IUdR incorporation to 3-5% of the control value. The residual 125 I incorporation appeared to be restricted to low molecular weight (sub-replicon sized) fragments of DNA which were more sensitive to micrococcal nuclease attack and less sensitive to high salt DNase I digestion than randomly labeled DNA. These findings suggest that DNA replicated in the presence of aphidicolin remains localized at the replication fork adjacent to the nuclear matrix. Based on these observations an attempt was made to compare the lethal consequences of 125 I decays at the replication fork to that of 125 I decays randomly distributed over the entire genome. Regardless of the distribution of decay events, all treatment groups exhibited identical dose-response curves (D 0 : 101 125 I decays/cell). Since differential irradiation of the replication complex did not result in enhanced cell lethality, it can be concluded that neither the nascent DNA nor the protein components (replicative enzymes, nuclear protein matrix) associated with the DNA replication site constitute key radiosensitive targets within the cellular genome. (orig.)

  18. Lethal mutation of internal irradiation brown planthopper (Nilaparvita lugens Stal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahid, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The moulting IVth of BPH nympha were irradiated internally with radiophosphorous 32-P 1 uCi/ml, 10 uCi/ml, 50 uCi/ml, 100 uCi/ml, and 500 uCi/ml concentrations respectivelly. An observation was carried out to determines heredity of hopper sterilities from the mating groups of R male x N female, R male x R female, and N male x R female. The 32-P concentration below of 50 uCi/ml seemed to be the substerile dose, however, the dominant lethal mutation has been visually shown by R male x R female F1 mating group. The hereditary lines of F1, F2, F3, and F4 of the hopper sterilities wich were indicated by the nympha hatch ability have some significant correlations (r1= -0.77, r2= -0.92, r3= -0.93 and r4= -0.85). Thus, the resesif lethal mutations visually showed by F3 and F4 from all of the 100 uCi/ml and 50 uCi/ml treated groups. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Use of lymphokine-activated killer cells to prevent bone marrow graft rejection and lethal graft-vs-host disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Kaplan, J.

    1989-01-01

    Prompted by our recent finding that lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells mediate both veto and natural suppression, we tested the ability of adoptively transferred LAK cells to block two in vivo alloreactions which complicate bone marrow transplantation: resistance to transplanted allogeneic bone marrow cells, and lethal graft-vs-host disease. Adoptive transfer of either donor type B6D2 or recipient-type B6 lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells, cells found to have strong LAK activity, abrogated or inhibited the resistance of irradiated B6 mice to both B6D2 marrow and third party-unrelated C3H marrow as measured by CFU in spleen on day 7. The ability of lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells to abrogate allogeneic resistance was eliminated by C lysis depletion of cells expressing asialo-GM1, NK1.1, and, to a variable degree, Thy-1, but not by depletion of cells expressing Lyt-2, indicating that the responsible cells had a LAK cell phenotype. Similar findings were obtained by using splenic LAK cells generated by 3 to 7 days of culture with rIL-2. Demonstration that allogeneic resistance could be blocked by a cloned LAK cell line provided direct evidence that LAK cells inhibit allogeneic resistance. In addition to inhibiting allogeneic resistance, adoptively transferred recipient-type LAK cells prevented lethal graft-vs-host disease, and permitted long term engraftment of allogeneic marrow. Irradiation prevented LAK cell inhibition of both allogeneic resistance and lethal graft-vs-host disease. These findings suggest that adoptive immunotherapy with LAK cells may prove useful in preventing graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease in human bone marrow transplant recipients

  20. Graft irradiation abrogates graft-versus-host disease in combined pancreas-spleen transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulak, J.A.; Sharp, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    A model of combined pancreas-spleen transplantation (PST) was studied in LBN F1 recipients of Lewis grafts in order to evaluate the efficacy of pretransplant graft irradiation in preventing lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Recipients of unmodified PST uniformly developed severe GVHD and died (MST = 16.7 +/- 3.8 days). Whole body donor irradiation with either 500 or 250 rad prevented lethal GVHD. Similarly, ex vivo graft irradiation with either 1000 or 500 rad also resulted in normal weight gain, graft function, and host survival for the 6-week study period. Conversely, delay of graft irradiation until 3 days after transplantation failed to prevent this complication (MST = 15.8 +/- 3.7 days). Recipients of irradiated grafts displayed glucose tolerance tests that were identical to those in the control group indicating that the doses of radiation employed in these experiments were not deleterious to islet function. Irradiated spleen grafts appeared histologically normal at 6 weeks after transplantation. Cells derived from these grafts failed to stimulate lymph node enlargement in a popliteal lymph node assay for GVHD, suggesting that these spleens may have become repopulated with host cells. These experiments confirm that PST has the potential to cause lethal GVHD and suggest that pretransplant graft irradiation may be used to prevent its occurrence

  1. A reliable method for reconstituting thymectomized, lethally irradiated guinea pigs with bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terata, N.; Tanio, Y.; Zbar, B.

    1984-01-01

    The authors developed a reliable method for reconstituting thymectomized, lethally irradiated guinea pigs. Injection of 2.5-10 x 10 7 syngeneic bone marrow cells into adult thymectomized, lethally irradiated guinea pigs produced survival of 46-100% of treated animals. Gentamycin sulfate (5 mg/kg of body weight) for 10 days was required for optimal results. Acidified drinking water (pH 2.5) appeared to be required for optimal results. Thymectomized, lethally irradiated, bone marrow reconstituted ('B') guinea pigs had impaired ability to develop delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity to mycobacterial antigens and cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity to keyhole limpet hemocyanin; proliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin were impaired. (Auth.)

  2. Comparative influence of dose rate and radiation nature, on lethality after big mammals irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destombe, C.; Le Fleche, Ph.; Grasseau, A.; Reynal, A.

    1997-01-01

    For the same dose and the 30 days lethality as biological criterion, the dose rate influence is more important than the radiation nature on the results of an big mammals total body irradiation. (authors)

  3. Diabetes susceptibility of BALB/cBOM mice treated with streptozotocin. Inhibition by lethal irradiation and restoration by splenic lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, S.G.; Blue, M.L.; Fleischer, N.; Shin, S.

    1982-01-01

    In genetically susceptible strains of mice, repeated injections of a subdiabetogenic dose of streptozotocin induces the development of progressive insulin-dependent hyperglycemia. We showed previously that host T-cell functions play an obligatory etiologic role in this experimental disease by demonstrating that the athymic nude mouse is resistant to diabetes induction unless its T-cell functions are reconstituted by thymus graft. Here we show that lethal irradiation of euthymic (+/nu) mice of BALB/cBOM background causes selective resistance of the mice to the diabetogenic effects of the multiple low doses of streptozotocin without affecting their sensitivity to a high pharmacologic dose of the toxin. We also show that reconstitution of the irradiated mice with splenic lymphocytes causes the restoration of diabetes susceptibility. Lethally irradiated mice thus represent a useful experimental model for analyzing the host functions involved in the development of this disease. These results provide an additional support for the hypothesis that the induction of diabetes in this model system is mediated by an autoimmune amplification mechanism

  4. Photoreactivable sector of lethal damage in ultraviolet-irradiated Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balgavy, P.

    1976-01-01

    The photoreactivable sector of lethal damage in Escherichia coli Bsub(s-1), Escherichia coli B/r Hcr - and Escherichia coli B/r Hcr + cells after ultraviolet irradiation at 254 nm is 0.823 +- 0.004, 0.70 +- 0.01 and 0.53 +- 0.06, respectively, at 99% confidence limits. For the low values of the photoreactivable sector in the B/r Hcr - and B/r Hcr + strains are likely to be responsible dark repair processes which eliminate lethal damage, brought about by pyrimidine dimers, preferably in comparison with lethal damage caused by photoproducts of another type. (author)

  5. Dominant lethal mutations in male mice fed γ-irradiated diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, P.S.; Aravindakshan, M.; Aiyer, A.S.; Sundaram, K.

    1975-01-01

    Three groups of Swiss male mice were fed a stock ration of an unirradiated or irradiated (2.5 Mrad) test diet for 8 wk. After the feeding period, the males were mated with groups of untreated female mice for 4 consecutive weeks. The females were autopsied at mid-term pregnancy for evaluation of dominant lethal mutations. Numbers of dead implantations, including deciduomas and dead embryos, showed no significant differences among the different groups, thus producing no evidence of any induced post-implantation lethality in mice fed on irradiated diet. Similarly, there was no indication of preimplantation lethality, since implantation rates remained comparable among different groups. Consumption of irradiated diet did not affect the fertility of mice. Total pre- and post-implantation loss, as indicated by the numbers of live implantations remained comparable among all the groups of mice. (author)

  6. Radiation-induced mouse chimeras: a cellular analysis of the major lymphoid compartments, factors affecting lethal graft versus host disease and host-tumor interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaraz, R.

    1981-01-01

    The major lymphoid compartments of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras were evaluated for the extent of cell chimerism and distribution of Thy 1 and la bearing cells. These chimeras contained lymphoid cell primarily of donor origin. The bone marrow compartment was a mixture of host and donor origin cells. The distribution of Thy 1 and la bearing cells was similar as in normal mice. The effect of adult thymectomy alone or followed by whole-body irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution on the distribution of the Thy 1 positive cells was also investigated. Thymectomy with or without WBI and bone marrow reconstitution significantly lowered the number of Thy 1 bearing cells in the blood and spleen. The number of la bearing cells did not appear to be affected by thymectomy. The role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras was studied. Mice reconstituted with allogeneic bone marrow from bled donors had a statistically lower incidence of GVHD than those reconstituted with bone marrow from unbled donors. Addition of mature peripheral lymphocytes from blood to the reconstituting bone marrow cells from bled donors reduplicated the high incidence of lethal GVHD. It was demonstrated that the bone marrow of mice not exsanguinated prior to harvesting of bone marrow contained significant numbers of peripheral contaminating cells in the harvested bone marrow. The role of suppressor cell elimination in resisting tumor growth was investigated using radiation induced mouse chimeras. Local effects of irradiation alone at the site of tumor inoculation could account for this lack of growth

  7. Dominant lethal mutations research in mice fed with irradiated black beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Z.P.

    1982-01-01

    To evaluate the potential mutagenic effects of irradiated black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) with conservation purpose, in germ cells of mice, dominant lethal assay were employed. Three groups of albino swiss male mice (S W-55) were fed with a normal ration, or unirradiated or irradiated (0,2; 0,5; 1; 5; 10; 15 e 20 KGy) test diets for eight weeks. After the feeding period the males were mated with groups of untreated females mice for four consecutive weeks. Numbers of pregnancy rates females were observed. The females were autopsied at mid-term pregnancy for evaluation of dominant lethal mutations. (author)

  8. Reproductive-phase and interphase lethal cell damage after irradiation and treatment with cytostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, G.

    1979-01-01

    After X-ray irradiation of manual cells, two lethal fractions occur due to reproductive and interphase death under low and high radiation doses. The damage kinetics on which this fact is based is compared with hypothetical tumour frequencies and leucemia induction caused in experiments. The reproductive-lethal damage can be manifested by means of colony size spectrometry, with the median colony size class differences (MCD) serving as measure for the damage found. The simultaneous effects of the cytostatics BLEOMYCIN or ICRF 159 and X-rays on reproductive lethal and interphase-lethal damage are measured by means of MCD and survival fraction, and the additive and intensifying effect' is judged with the help of suitably defined terms. This shows that the clinically used ICRF 159 has an additive effect on interphase-lethal and a sub-additive effect on reproductive-lethal cell damage. Thus, favourable results may be expected for the electivity factor in fractionated irradiation and with regard to delayed damage in healthy tissue. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 RDG [de

  9. Clinical and symptomatological study of pigs subjected to a lethal dose of integral gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaiman, M.; Guenet, J.-L.; Maas, J.; Nizza, P.

    1966-05-01

    Results are reported from a clinical and haematological study on a Corsican species of pigs wholly exposed to an approximately lethal dose of γ radiation. The aim of this work was to examine the changes in the irradiation syndrome of irradiation for pigs to make it thus possible to devise further experiments, in particular in the therapeutic field. The dose received was 285 rads (measured as the absorption in the vertical antero-posterior medial plane). Data are presented on cyto-haematological changes in the blood circulating immediately after irradiation, and followed up to death, and changes in the medullary cytology after irradiation. The clinical picture of lethal radiation injury in swine is described. (authors) [fr

  10. Mutagenicity assayed by dominant lethality testing in mice fed a combined gamma-irradiated diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupova, I.; Katsarova, Ts.; Bajrakova, A.; Baev, I.; Tencheva, S.

    1980-01-01

    Mice fed a combined gamma-irradiated diet were examined for a mutagenic effect using the dominant lethality test. Their feed contained the following irradiated ingredients: 20% maize, 10% dried plums, and 5% walnut kernels. Taking into account cycle duration in spermatogenesis and oogenesis, males were fed this special diet throughout 56 days, and females throughout 21 days. The experiments involved three animal groups: (1) fed the special diet containing irradiated ingredients; (2) fed the special diet but with the ingredients nonirradiated; and (3) fed standard vivarium diet. Matings to provide the first generation were between one parent fed the special diet and a partner fed standard diet. With an adequate number of implants examined on day 16 of gestation, embryonic death rate was not found to be increased; hence, induction of dominant lethality from consumption of irradiated diet failed to be demonstrated

  11. Hemopoiesis in bone marrow of lethally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktora, L.; Zoubkova, M.; Urbankova, J.

    1976-01-01

    A percentual representation of individual types of cells and their share of the restoration of hemopoiesis in bone marrow was observed on the 9th, 12th, 16th and 20th days following transplantation of bone marrow cells to letally irradiated mice. Myelopoiesis was ascertained which on the 20th day after transplantation became the dominant constituent and reached peak level around the 16th day after transplantation. The examination further showed that with regard to the period of irradiation and transplantation the erythropoiesis in bone marrow culminates on the 9th day after the transplantation and that normal values are quickly restored. On the 2ath day myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis come close to values in normal bone marrow

  12. Effects of feeding lactobacillus GG on lethal irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, M.Y.; Chang, T.W.; Gorbach, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Mice exposed to 1400 rads of total body irradiation experienced 80%-100% mortality in 2 wk. Bacteremia was demonstrated in all dead animals. Feeding Lactobacillus GG strain reduced Pseudomonas bacteremia and prolonged survival time in animals colonized with this organism. In animals not colonized with Pseudomonas, feeding Lactobacillus GG also produced some reduction in early deaths, and there was less Gram-negative bacteremia in these animals compared with controls

  13. Forecasting of the lethality in cases of nonuniform accidental irradiation (experimental studies at external gamma irradiation of rats)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingilizova, K.

    1983-01-01

    A model is suggested that enables the prediction of death probability for the body (L) within the whole lethality dose range (DL 0 -DL 100 ), on the basis of predetermined physical characteristics: in cases of uneven external wholebody irradiation. Some biological effects of 4 variants of uneven irradiation have been studied, i.e. ventro-dorsal (V-D), dorso-ventral (D-V), cranio-caudal (Cr-Ca) and caudo-cranial (Ca-Cr). The following basic conclusions have been drawn: 1. The study of the biological effects of uneven irradiation, when estimated by the lethality factor, points out the lower efficiency of the former, if compared to even irradiation. 2. The even irradiation lethality in the conducted experiments, according to the ALE data and the postradiation mortality dynamics, is determined basically by the damage of the bloodforming tissue and the animals die of bone marrow syndrome. 3. The uneven irradiation, estimated by the total weight factor, is of lower efficiency than the even one. 4. The radiation-induced hypoplasia of the studied organs is exponential in character. 5. An original model for predicting radiation mortality in cases of uneven irradiation has been constructed. The model gives the possibility of relating the alterations in the index of biological efficiency reduction to the wholebody irradiation factor, as well as to the two systems with highest radiosensitivity: red bone marrow and the small intestine. The model helps determining the numerical value of death probability, depending on the average body irradiation doses and the integral unevenness factors for RBM. (author)

  14. Arrest of irradiated G1, S, or G2 cells at mitosis using nocodazole promotes repair of potentially lethal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, G.; Nuesse, M.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of synchronized Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, irradiated in G1, S, and G2 phases, to repair potentially lethal damage when arrested at mitosis by using 0.4 μg/ml nocodazole, a specific inhibitor of microtubule polymerization, has been studied. Cells irradiated in these phases were found to repair potentially lethal damage at mitosis. The extent of this repair was similar to that observed for cells irradiated at the same stages in the cell cycle but allowed to repair potentially lethal damage by incubating in balanced salt solution for 6 hr after X irradiation

  15. Protective effect of zinc against lethality of the irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, J.; Inada, T.; Machida, K.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of adding 1000 ppm Zn in the drinking water 10 days before gamma irradiation (562 - 1000 rad) of mice were studied. The mice which had received zinc had a lower mortality rate and a longer survival time compared to the controls. The LD 50 of gamma radiation was 690 rad in the control group and 770 rad in the zinc group. Zinc added to the culture medium of human melanoma cells did not shown any change in radiosensitivity; thus the radioprotective effect of zinc appears to work at the whole body level. (U.K.)

  16. Peculiarities of morphofunctional state of adenohypophysis in lethally irradiated recipients after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsaeva, A.A.; Glushko, T.A.; Shatilova, L.E.; Tupchienko, G.S.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of lethal irradiation and transplantation of syngenic bone marrow on the morphofunctional state of hypophysis at various stages of the posttransplantation period has been studied for 3 months using 100 linear male mice of 1 F 1 (CBAXC 57 B) line. The experiments conducted have shown that bone marrow transplantation reduces the intensity of the negative effect of irradiation on hypophysis and facililitates normalization of its histological structure. There was a correlation between changes in the number of secretory cells in the anterior lobe of the hypophysis and the level of corticosterone in irradiated and bone-marrow-protected animals

  17. Transplantation of homologous bone marrow cells to lethally irradiated mice: changes in the spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viktora, L; Hach, P; Zoubkova, M

    1975-01-01

    Bone marrow cell suspensions were administered intravenously to lethally irradiated mice. The number of colonies in the spleen and the regeneration of hematopoietic tissue in the spleen were studied on the 9th day after irradiation and transplantation. From a comparison of the histological picture and weight of the spleens, the authors conclude that the degree of regeneration of hematopoiesis in the spleen after irradiation and transplantation is reflected in the weight of the spleen as well as in the number of hematopoietic colonies.

  18. Metabolic changes after non-lethal X-irradiation of rats. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlersova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Slavkovska, E.; Praslicka, M.

    1981-01-01

    Male rats of the Wistar strain were fasted overnight prior to exposure to single whole-body X-ray dose of 2.39 Gy (250 R). Irradiated and sham-irradiated rats were pair-fed for 5 days, in the following period they were fed ad libitum. The levels of corticosterone and immunoreactive insulin in serum, glucose in blood, glycogen in liver, heart and skeletal muscle were determined 1 and 6 h, 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 38 days after irradiation and sham-irradiation. Irradiation of rats resulted, in one hour, in a decrease and, in two days, in an increase in blood glucose level. A marked increase in liver glycogen persisted from 6 h to 21 days after irradiation. The level of glycogen in the skeletal muscle was reduced after 6 h and increased on days 3 and 14. Heart muscle glycogen declined within the first 24 h and rose at 14 days after exposure. The kinetics of changes in the heart and skeletal muscle glycogen following non-lethal irradiation was similar and indicated an overlap of changes produced by fasting with those brought about by irradiation, particularly during the first week. Corticosterone in serum was markedly increased in rats 24 and 72 h after irradiation compared to pair-fed controls. The serum insulin concentration did not change after irradiation, except for a single increase on day 21. Irradiation with non-lethal doses produced changes in the parameters of the carbohydrate metabolism studied, except for serum insulin which reflected the changes in the nutrition regimen upon pair-feeding rather than the effect of ionizing irradiation. (author)

  19. Lethal and sublethal cellular injury in multifraction irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, H.R.

    1975-01-01

    Work has been carried out on cellular injury in multifraction irradiation of mouse tissues and compared with similar work on human skin reported earlier by Dutreix et al (Eur. J. Cancer.; 9:159 (1973)). In agreement with Dutreix et al it is emphasized that the absolute amount of sublethal injury repaired per fractionation interval (Dsub(r)) is not as important to radiotherapists as the change in the amount repaired (ΔDsub(r)) when the dose-per-fraction is altered. It was found that although there is a critical divergence at low doses, the data for mouse tissues are similar to those previously given for human skin and support the conclusions: (i) That the capacity of many normal cells for accumulating and repairing sublethal radiation injury is probably not greatly different. (ii) That fixed exponents used for fraction number and time in iso-effect formulae are inaproporiate. At low doses-per-fraction, repair of sublethal injury is complete, or nearly so, and hence, additional fractionation of dose does not give appreciable additional sparing, whereas rapidly-regenerating tissues, due to the lengthening of overall time, would continue being spared by repopulation. (U.K.)

  20. Inhibitory action of chlorophyllin of autosome recessive lethals induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salceda, V.M.; Pimentel, P.A.E.; Cruces, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    The chlorophyllin is a sodium salt of the chlorophyll that has a strong protective action of the damage induced by different agents so much physical as chemical. In Drosophila there is reported this effect in somatic cells. In contrast, in germinal cells using tests with the sexual chromosomes has not been found such inhibitory action. For this reason, in this occasion we will refer to the effect of the lethality induced in autosome chromosomes, in particular to the chromosome II of this species. For such effect groups of males of the line Canton-S its were pre-treated for 24h with or without 69 mm of CCS and later on treaties with or without 40 Gy of gamma irradiation. The males were then subjected to the technical Cy L / Pm for the detection of recessive lethals. In the third generation the respective counts of the descendant of each one of them to determine the corresponding categories for each extracted chromosome were made. To be mendelian crosses it is expected for a normal chromosome a proportion 2:1 of individuals with genotype Cy L / +: +/+. The absence of individuals +/+ it is indicative of a lethal gene, until 10% of these individuals of each male's total descendant, it is considered that is carrying of a semi lethal gene. The sum of lethal and semi lethals constitutes the category detrimental. The obtained results indicated that the pre-treatment with CCS reduces in a significant way the frequency of induced lethals by 40 Gy of gamma rays. The fact that an effect inhibitor has not been observed in the test of recessive lethal bound to the sex obtained previously, it contrasts with the effect observed in the chromosome II, results of this study and with the one observed in the chromosome III in somatic cells. The above-mentioned shows a differential action of the CCS between sexual chromosomes and autosomal before the effect of the gamma radiation. At the moment we don't have an explanation to these evidences. To evaluate the action of the chlorophyllin

  1. Low survival of mice following lethal gamma-irradiation after administration of inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, M.; Pospisil, M.; Tkadlecek, L.; Viklicka, S.; Pipalova, I.; Hola, J.

    1992-01-01

    An impairment was observed of the survival of mice subjected to whole-body gamma-irradiation with a lethal dose of 10 Gy and treated with a repeated postirradiation administration of the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors (PGSIs) indomethacin or diclofenac. Morphological examination of the gastrointestinal tract and estimation of the blood loss into its lumen in animals treated with diclofenac did not show serious damage such as hemorrhages or perforation, but revealed structural injury to the intestinal mucosa indicating inflammatory processes. The lesions found are supposed to be connected with increased intestinal permeability which leads to endotoxin escape from the gut and a subsequent increased mortality rate of irradiated animals. It may be concluded that PGSIs are not suitable for the management of radiation sickness after an exposure to lethal doses of ionizing radiation. (author) 2 tabs., 4 figs., 20 refs

  2. A single dose of an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase 2, meloxicam, administered shortly after irradiation increases survival of lethally irradiated mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Dušek, L.; Hoferová, Zuzana; Weiterová, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 176, č. 2 (2011), s. 269-272 ISSN 0033-7587 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0158 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0128 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition * lethal irradiation * survival Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.684, year: 2011

  3. Changes in activities of adaptive liver enzymes in rats after non-lethal x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toropila, M.; Ahlersova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Benova, K.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of a single dose of whole-body X-irradiation of 2.39 Gy (250 R) on the activities of selected adaptive rat liver enzymes and blood serum corticosterone concentrations was followed for a period of 28 days. Rats of Wistar strain SPF breeding (VELAZ Prague) were used. Both irradiated and control animals were fed in pairs with the same amount of feed as was consumed by irradiated animals in the pilot experiment. The feed intake of irradiated animals decreased significantly until the fourth day. During the rest of the experimental period no significant differences were recorded in feed intake between the experimental and control groups. The activity of tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) in the liver of irradiated animals increased, with the exception of the initial period. Similar changes were recorded in the activity of tryptophane-2-3 dioxygenase (TO). A significant increase on the third day and a significant decrease from the seventh day after irradiation was recorded in the activity of aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Similar changes were observed with alanine aminotransferase (ALT). It is necessary to stress that the activity of this enzyme decreased also on the first day after irradiation. Until the third day there was a marked increase of serum corticosterone in the irradiated animals. The results point not only towards significant changes to the parameters observed, caused by a non-lethal irradiation dose, but also towards the importance of the nutritional regime, so-called paired feeding

  4. Evaluation of freshly irradiated wheat for dominant lethal mutations in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawan, S.C.; Aravindakshan, M.; Kumar, N.S.; Subba Rao, V.; Aiyar, A.S.; Sundaram, K.

    1977-01-01

    Three independent, serially performed experiments involving acute and chronic feeding of freshly irradiated wheat (75 krad, gamma-irradiation) were carried out in Wistar rats. In the first experiment groups of 10 males were given wheat for 1 week; irradiated wheat was consumed by the animals within 24 h of irradiation. In the other two experiments feeding of males was continued for 6 (10 males per group) and 12 (13 males per group) weeks, respectively, and the irradiated wheat was fed within 7 days of irradiation. At the end of each treatment period each male was paired with 3 females for 7 days and sequentially at weekly intervals for 5 or 8 weeks. Females were killed and examined for live and dead implantations and corpora lutea. There were no differences between groups with regard to fertility nor was there any inter-group difference as regards pre- and post-implantation losses whether the rats were fed irradiated or non-irradiated wheat. This suggested that even feeding of freshly irradiated wheat does not induce any dominant lethal mutations in rats

  5. Evaluation of freshly irradiated wheat for dominant lethal mutations in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawan, S C; Aravindakshan, M; Kumar, N S; Subba Rao, V; Aiyar, A S; Sundaram, K [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Bio-medical Group

    1977-01-01

    Three independent, serially performed experiments involving acute and chronic feeding of freshly irradiated wheat (75 krad, gamma-irradiation) were carried out in Wistar rats. In the first experiment groups of 10 males were given wheat for 1 week; irradiated wheat was consumed by the animals within 24 h of irradiation. In the other two experiments feeding of males was continued for 6 (10 males per group) and 12 (13 males per group) weeks, respectively, and the irradiated wheat was fed within 7 days of irradiation. At the end of each treatment period each male was paired with 3 females for 7 days and sequentially at weekly intervals for 5 or 8 weeks. Females were killed and examined for live and dead implantations and corpora lutea. There were no differences between groups with regard to fertility nor was there any inter-group difference as regards pre- and post-implantation losses whether the rats were fed irradiated or non-irradiated wheat. This suggested that even feeding of freshly irradiated wheat does not induce any dominant lethal mutations in rats.

  6. Transplantation of cryopreserved allogeneic bone marrow after its long-term storage to lethally irradiated dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikova, N.N.; Fedotenkov, A.G.; Sukyasyan, G.V.; Timakova, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The study of the dog bone marrow preserved at -196 deg C during 6-12 years has shown that in the body of lethally irradiated animals (8Gy), due to the antigenic difference in the tissues of the donor and the irradiated recipients, the cells of cryopreserved allogeneic bone marrow were differentiated by the lymphoid type similar to that observed in transplantation of freshly prepared myelocaryocytes. However, their proliferative activity in the period of active lymphocyte transformation was quantitatively less manifest than in freshly transplanted cells. The results of the study evidence that the bone marrow cells cryopreserved during 6-12 years retain their functional activity

  7. Megakaryocytopoiesis and the number of thrombocytes after bone marrow cell transplantation in lethally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktora, L.; Hermanova, E.; Zoubkova, M.

    1977-01-01

    Changes were studied in the number of thrombocytes in the peripheral blood and megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and spleen in lethally irradiated mice after the transplantation of bone marrow cells. It was found that the thrombocytes increased in dependence on time after transplantation with the maximal values around the 20th day. An increased megakaryocytopoiesis was observed not only in the bone marrow but also in the spleen. These ascertainments suggest the importance of the transplantation of bone marrow cells and the role of thrombocytes for the survival of the organism after irradiation. (author)

  8. Induction of dominant lethal mutations by gamma irradiation of Gallus domesticus spermatozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, J; Grom, A; Csuka, J; Kindlova, L [Poultry Research Institute, Ivanka pri Dunaji (Czechoslovakia)

    1977-01-01

    Mixed semen of Gallus domesticus cocks was gamma irradiated in vitro with exposures of 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 R at the exposure rate of 5.86 Rs/sup -1/. After the irradiation the semen was applied to experimental and control layer hens, the embryonic mortality in F/sub 1/ was observed, the total number of incubated eggs was 3344. Irradiation with 500 R had a favourable influence on embryonic vitality, the exposures 1000, 2000, and 3000 R resulted in increased embryonic mortality, for 2100 R a 50% mortality of offspring was found. Induced dominant lethality was manifest during embryonic and oviduct development. The frequency of induced dominant lethality for exposures used was 19.2, 9.9, 48.3, and 69.1%, the values of mutation rate were 0.087, 0.104, 0.659, and 1.174. The mutation rate had a linear course, the value of the lethal hit per gamete for 1 R was 1.04x10/sup -4/.

  9. Induction of dominant lethal mutations by gamma irradiation of Gallus domesticus spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, J.; Grom, A.; Csuka, J.; Kindlova, L.

    1977-01-01

    Mixed semen of Gallus domesticus cocks was gamma irradiated in vitro with exposures of 500, 1000, 2000 and 3000 R at the exposure rate of 5.86 Rs -1 . After the irradiation the semen was applied to experimental and control layer hens, the embryonic mortality in F 1 was observed, the total number of incubated eggs was 3344. Irradiation with 500 R had a favourable influence on embryonic vitality, the exposures 1000, 2000 and 3000 R resulted in increased embryonic mortality, for 2100 R a 50% mortality of offspring was found. Induced dominant lethality was manifest during embryonic and oviduct development. The frequency of induced dominant lethality for exposures used was 19.2, 9.9, 48.3, and 69.1%, the values of mutation rate were 0.087, 0.104, 0.659, and 1.174. The mutation rate had linear course, the value of the lethal hit per gamete for 1 R was 1.04x10 -4 . (author)

  10. Determination the lethal dose of ascaris lumbricoides ova by gamma irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shamma, M A; Sharabi, N

    2002-01-01

    The lethal gamma irradiation dose of ascaris lumbricoides which collected from Damascus Sewage water Plant was determined. Ascaris lumbricoides ova were treated with several gamma irradiation doses with (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4,...and 1.5 KGy). No morphological changes were observed on the eggs when directly examined microscopically after irradiation. However after two weeks of incubation at 37 degree centigrade the cell contents of the eggs which irradiated with 0.5 KGy and beyond were fragmented and scattered in the whole eggs and no larvae were observed after eight weeks of incubation. It is concluded that the dose 0.5 my be considered as the dose of choice if sewage water is to be treated by gamma rays.

  11. Determination the lethal dose of ascaris lumbricoides ova by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamma, M.; Al-Adawi, M.; Sharabi, N.

    2002-11-01

    The lethal gamma irradiation dose of ascaris lumbricoides which collected from Damascus Sewage water Plant was determined. Ascaris lumbricoides ova were treated with several gamma irradiation doses with (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4,...and 1.5 KGy). No morphological changes were observed on the eggs when directly examined microscopically after irradiation. However after two weeks of incubation at 37 degree centigrade the cell contents of the eggs which irradiated with 0.5 KGy and beyond were fragmented and scattered in the whole eggs and no larvae were observed after eight weeks of incubation. It is concluded that the dose 0.5 my be considered as the dose of choice if sewage water is to be treated by gamma rays. (author)

  12. Effects of Irradiation on Insect Host-Parasite Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahalkar, G. W.; Ramakrishnan, V. [Biology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Bombay (India)

    1968-06-15

    Effects of host irradiation on the development of its parasite were investigated. Females of Bracon brevicomis readily accepted irradiated larvae of tile wax moth (Galleria mellonella) and rice moth (Corcyra cephalonica) for oviposition. However, irradiated wax moth larvae adversely influenced the viability of eggs laid on them and also the survival of the parasite grubs feeding on their bodies. The female grubs were affected more than the males. Rice moth larvae, on the other hand, exerted no significant influence on the viability of parasite eggs, but adversely affected the survival of the grubs. The progeny of parents that had been reared on irradiated larvae also exhibited some developmental changes although grown on non-irradiated host larvae, and these changes were more pronounced when G. mellonella was used as the host insect. (author)

  13. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Zhiguo [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chao, Nelson J. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Benny J., E-mail: chen0032@mc.duke.edu [Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  14. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S.; Li, Zhiguo; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells

  15. Reactivation of Immunological Response in Lethally X-Irradiated Mice Treated with Isogeneic Bone Marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovic, V.; Slijepcevic, M.; Hrsak, I. [Institute Ruder Boskovic, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia)

    1968-08-15

    Male and female C57BL/H and CBA/H mice aged 10-12 weeks were used as recipients and donors, respectively. All recipient mice were given a lethal whole-body X-irradiation dose (850 R for C57BL and 950 R for CBA mice) followed by iv injection of 10 x 106 isogeneic eosin-negative bone-marrow cells suspended in 0.5 ml of Hank's solution. The number of eosin-positive cells was less than 10%. The state of immunological responsiveness of irradiated recipients was measured at different time intervals up to 86 days after irradiation. The immune response to bacterial antigen was measured with the titre of agglutinating antibodies in serum six days after iv antigenic stimulation with a suspension of 2 x 10{sup 7} killed Salmonella typhimurium cells. The immune response to tissue antigens was evaluated by: (a) the effectiveness of the spleen cells from isologous radiation chimeric parental mice in preventing bone marrow from F{sub 1} (C57BL x CBA) hybrid donor from therapeutically affecting lethally irradiated F j recipient mice; (b) the effectiveness of the spleen cells in inducing splenom egaly in recipient F{sub 1} hybrid mice (Simonsen test). It was found that the responsiveness to bacterial antigens reappears much earlier and increases much faster than the immunological responsiveness to tissue antigens. (author)

  16. Caffeine protects mice against whole-body lethal dose of {gamma}-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, K.C.; Hebbar, S.A.; Kale, S.P.; Kesavan, P.C. [Biosciences Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    1999-06-01

    Administration of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), a major component of coffee, to Swiss mice at doses of 80 or 100 mg/kg body weight 60 min prior to whole-body lethal dose of {gamma}-irradiation (7.5 Gy) resulted in the survival of 70 and 63% of animals, respectively, at the above doses in contrast to absolutely no survivors (LD-100/25 days) in the group exposed to radiation alone. Pre-treatment with a lower concentration of caffeine (50 mg/kg) did not confer any radioprotection. The protection exerted by caffeine (80 mg/kg), however, was reduced from 70 to 50% if administered 30 min prior to irradiation. The trend statistics reveal that a dose of 80 mg/kg administered 60 min before whole-body exposure to 7.5 Gy is optimal for maximal radioprotection. However, caffeine (80 mg/kg) administered within 3 min after irradiation offered no protection. While there is documentation in the literature that caffeine is an antioxidant and radioprotector against the toxic pathway of radiation damage in a wide range of cells and organisms, this is the first report demonstrating unequivocally its potent radioprotective action in terms of survival of lethally whole-body irradiated mice. (author)

  17. Models for pulmonary lethality and morbidity after irradiation from internal and external sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.; Filipy, R.E.; Hahn, E.F.

    1989-05-01

    This report provides a hazard-function model for estimating the risk of death from radiation pneumonitis and/or pulmonary fibrosis following a light-water nuclear power accident. A similar model is also provided for estimating the prevalence of respiratory functional morbidity among those that survive death from acute effects. Hazard-function models for lethality and for morbidity were constructed using the cumulative hazard estimator H, which is related to the risk estimator R through the equation R = 1-exp(-H). The estimator H can be calculated using information provided in the report. The method of calculation depends on the exposure scenario. In general, the total normalized dose X for lethality or for morbidity is calculated. For lethality, X = 1 corresponds to a median lethal dose (LD 50 ); for morbidity, X = 1 corresponds to a median effective dose (ED 50 ). H is related to X by the equation H = 1n(2)X/sup V/, where V depends on the type of radiation (or radiations) involved. Contributions to X can arise from each of two main modes of exposure: (1) brief exposure of the lung, at a relatively high dose rate, to mainly external gammas, followed by (2) chronic internal alpha, and/or beta, and/or gamma irradiation of the lung. Equations are provided for calculating the contributions to X from both modes of exposure. 73 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Metabolic changes after non-lethal X-irradiation of rats. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlers, I.; Ahlersova, E.; Sedlakova, A.; Praslicka, M.

    1981-01-01

    Male rats of the Wistar strain were subjected to whole-body X-irradiation with 2.39 Gy (250 R) and after irradiation they were pair-fed with the sham-irradiated control group. One, 6 and 24 h, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 38 days after exposure the animals were sacrificed and examined for serum and some tissue lipids. In the first hours an increase in lipolysis in the white adipose tissue and accumulation of non-esterified fatty acids and triacylglycerols (TG) in the liver predominated; phospholipid level increased in serum and liver and decreased in bone marrow and thymus. The later phase was characterized by hypertriacylglycerolaemia and a transient hypercholesterolaemia; accumulation of TG in bone marrow was the most important change, however. Changes in the lipid composition of the serum and tissues, except for an increase in TG level in thymus, returned to normal levels at the end of the observation period. Pair-feeding provided an equivalent nutritional situation in irradiated and sham-irradiated animals and thus eliminated the non-specific changes caused by different levels of food intake in both groups of animals, especially in the initial period. A sufficiently long observation period is necessary for estimating the kinetics of metabolic changes in rats exposed to non-lethal doses of X-irradiation. (author)

  19. Lethal graft-versus-host disease: modification with allogeneic cultured donor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauch, P.; Lipton, J.M.; Hamilton, B.; Obbagy, J.; Kudisch, M.; Nathan, D.; Hellman, S.

    1984-01-01

    The use of the bone marrow culture technique was studied as a means to prepare donor marrow for bone marrow transplantation to avoid lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Preliminary experiments demonstrated the rapid loss of theta-positive cells in such cultures, so that theta-positive cells were not detected after 6 days. Initial experiments in C3H/HeJ (H-2k, Hbbd) recipients prepared with 900 rad demonstrated improved survival when 3-day cultured C57BL/6 (H-2b, Hbbs) donor cells were used in place of hind limb marrow for transplantation. However, hemoglobin typing of recipient animals revealed only short-term donor engraftment, with competitive repopulation of recipient marrow occurring. Subsequent experiments were done in 1,200-rad prepared recipients, with long-term donor engraftment demonstrated. The majority of 1,200-rad prepared animals receiving cultured allogeneic cells died of GVHD, but animals receiving 28-day cultured cells had an improved 90-day survival and a delay in GVHD development over animals receiving hind limb marrow or marrow from shorter times in culture. In addition, animals receiving anti-theta-treated, 3-day nonadherent cells had an improved survival (44%) over animals receiving anti-theta-treated hind limb marrow (20%). These experiments demonstrate modest benefit for the use of cultured cells in bone marrow transplantation across major H-2 histocompatibility complex differences

  20. Functional and morphological recovery of the T-cell compartment in lethally irradiated and reconstituted mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraal, G.; Hilst, B. van der; Boden, D.

    1979-01-01

    The recovery of the T-cell compartment in mice after lethal irradiation and reconstitution was studied using functional and morphological parameters. T-helper cell activity, determined by the direct SRBC-plaque-forming cell (PFC) response, recovered in a similar fashion as T-memory function which was studied by adoptive transfer of carrier-primed cells. Both functions returned to control levels in 2.5 to 3 months. Using immunoperoxidase staining of frozen sections with anti-T cell serum, the morphological recovery of the T-cell dependent areas in the white pulp of the spleen could be studied and compared with the functional recovery. (author)

  1. Influence on DNA repair inhibitors on dominant lethal factors after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engl, D.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were performed in order to test the hypothesis of a correlation between ionizing radiation and DNA repair inhibition under in vivo conditions. In a biometrically planned dominant lethal test on mice, the repair inhibition on the male gametes by butazolidine, TWEEN 80 and vitamin A was studied after gamma irradiation at 20 rad/10 min. No effect was observed in the case of butazolidine and TWEEN 80, whereas the influence of a high concentration of vitamin A (1 million IE/kg) was just at the statistical significancy threshold. (G.G.)

  2. Influence of radioprotectors on total body weight evolution and on oxygen consumption in lethal dose irradiated animals. (Preliminary study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatome, M.; Martine, G.; Bargy, E.; Andrieu, L.

    Comparison of total body weight evolution and oxygen consumption in lethal dose irradiated animals, protected by various well known radioprotective substances, isolated or in mixture, with evolution and consumption of non protected animals irradiated at the same dose and with these of check animals [fr

  3. Effect of restricted access to food on metabolic changes in lethally X-irradiated rats. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toropila, M.; Ahlers, I.; Ahlersova, E.; Praslicka, M.

    1982-01-01

    Differences in the reaction of glucose in blood and in that of glycogen in liver in animals with free access to food and in those with restricted food intake to lethal irradiation by X-rays were studied. SPF bred male rats of the Wistar strain were fed by common laboratory diet and by tap water ad libitum (AL group) or food was accessible to them (in unlimited amounts) only in the period between 09.00 a. m. and 11.00 a. m. (meal-fed group, MF), all under standard laboratory conditions. After more than three weeks of adaptation to the nutrition patterns and 22 h after the last food intake, animals of both groups were irradiated with a single whole-body 14.35 Gy dose of X-rays and/or sham irradiated, respectively. Glucose concentration in blood was increased in both groups during the experiment; terminal hyperglycaemia was more expressed in the MF group. Due to the high initial glycogen concentration in the liver of MF irradiated animals the accumulation of glycogen was substantially lower and started later than in irradiated AL animals. (author)

  4. Homogeneous antibodies in lethally irradiated and autologous bone marrow reconstituted Rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, P. Van Den; Radl, J.; Loewenberg, B.; Swart, A.C.W.

    1976-01-01

    Ten Rhesus monkeys were lethally irradiated and reconstituted with autologous bone marrow. During the restoration period, the animals were immunized with DNP-Rhesus albumin and IgA1lambda-10S human paraprotein. One or more transient homogenous immunoglobulin components appeared in sera of all experimental monkeys. In four animals, these homogeneous immunoglobulins were shown to be specific antibodies against DNP-Rhesus albumin. They gradually became as heterogeneous as those in control monkeys which were immunized but not irradiated and transplanted. The onset of the specific antibody response after immunization was slightly delayed in the experimental group. On determining the time necessary to reach normalization of the overall immunoglobulin levels and the normal heterogeneity of the immunoglobulin spectrum, it was found to be more than 1 year in most of the animals. (author)

  5. Effects of lethal dose of γ-irradiation on intestinal enzymes of the pigeons Columba livia intermedia Strickland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadhia, P.K.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of γ-irradiation with lethal dose (1000 rads) on alkaline phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase have been studied in two different regions (duodenum and ileum) of small intestine of pigeons. The enzymes were studied at different intervals like 2, 4, 6 and 8 days after irradiation. The sp. activities of enzyme increased significantly both in duodenum and ileum. However, significant increase in alkaline phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase were observed at the 2nd and the 4th days post-irradiation respectively. The increase in enzyme activities may present de novo synthesis of these enzymes after lethal dose of irradiation. The histologic picture revealed that after the 4th day of irradiation, the number of goblet cells increased and after the 6th day crypt-villus system was destroyed completely as compared to sham-irradiated pigeons. (author)

  6. Effects of lethal dose of. gamma. -irradiation on intestinal enzymes of the pigeons Columba livia intermedia Strickland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadhia, P.K. (South Gujarat Univ., Surat (India). Dept. of Biosciences); Shah, V.C. (Gujarat Univ. School of Sciences, Ahmedabad (India))

    1979-09-01

    Effect of ..gamma..-irradiation with lethal dose (1000 rads) on alkaline phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase have been studied in two different regions (duodenum and ileum) of small intestine of pigeons. The enzymes were studied at different intervals like 2, 4, 6 and 8 days after irradiation. The sp. activities of enzyme increased significantly both in duodenum and ileum. However, significant increase in alkaline phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase were observed at the 2nd and the 4th days post-irradiation respectively. The increase in enzyme activities may present de novo synthesis of these enzymes after lethal dose of irradiation. The histologic picture revealed that after the 4th day of irradiation, the number of goblet cells increased and after the 6th day crypt-villus system was destroyed completely as compared to sham-irradiated pigeons.

  7. Protective properties of plasma of burnt and irradiated rats against lethal effect of endotoxins in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budagov, R S; Chureyeva, L N

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to estimate protective properties of plasma in disease with increased endotoxemia. Burns and acute radiation sickness were used as models of suppression of physiological mechanisms of detoxication. Experiments were performed on male Wistar rats and mice, which received 3rd degree burns over 15% of the body surface, whole body gamma irradiation at 7.5 Gr or both. At 3 hours, 3, 7 and 12 days after the exposure the animals were decapitated and blood collected. The irradiated mice received 0.2 ml endotoxin intraperitoneally, 1.0 ml freshly prepared rat plasma, then the lethality of the mice in 24 hours was observed. It was found that the plasma of intact rats was capable of decreasing the lethal effects of S. typhimurium and E. coli endotoxins in vivo in mice. Deep skin burns, acute radiation sickness and the combined effects of radiation and thermal injury did not change this phenomenon. The plasma of the experimental rats retained the protective properties at various periods of time after the thermal, radiation and combined exposures. The functioning of the humoral detoxication mechanism is radioresistant, indirectly indicating the nonimmunoglobulin nature of endotoxin inactivators. 19 references.

  8. An early-biomarker algorithm predicts lethal graft-versus-host disease and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Matthew J; Özbek, Umut; Holler, Ernst; Renteria, Anne S; Major-Monfried, Hannah; Reddy, Pavan; Aziz, Mina; Hogan, William J; Ayuk, Francis; Efebera, Yvonne A; Hexner, Elizabeth O; Bunworasate, Udomsak; Qayed, Muna; Ordemann, Rainer; Wölfl, Matthias; Mielke, Stephan; Pawarode, Attaphol; Chen, Yi-Bin; Devine, Steven; Harris, Andrew C; Jagasia, Madan; Kitko, Carrie L; Litzow, Mark R; Kröger, Nicolaus; Locatelli, Franco; Morales, George; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Reshef, Ran; Rösler, Wolf; Weber, Daniela; Wudhikarn, Kitsada; Yanik, Gregory A; Levine, John E; Ferrara, James L M

    2017-02-09

    BACKGROUND. No laboratory test can predict the risk of nonrelapse mortality (NRM) or severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after hematopoietic cellular transplantation (HCT) prior to the onset of GVHD symptoms. METHODS. Patient blood samples on day 7 after HCT were obtained from a multicenter set of 1,287 patients, and 620 samples were assigned to a training set. We measured the concentrations of 4 GVHD biomarkers (ST2, REG3α, TNFR1, and IL-2Rα) and used them to model 6-month NRM using rigorous cross-validation strategies to identify the best algorithm that defined 2 distinct risk groups. We then applied the final algorithm in an independent test set ( n = 309) and validation set ( n = 358). RESULTS. A 2-biomarker model using ST2 and REG3α concentrations identified patients with a cumulative incidence of 6-month NRM of 28% in the high-risk group and 7% in the low-risk group ( P < 0.001). The algorithm performed equally well in the test set (33% vs. 7%, P < 0.001) and the multicenter validation set (26% vs. 10%, P < 0.001). Sixteen percent, 17%, and 20% of patients were at high risk in the training, test, and validation sets, respectively. GVHD-related mortality was greater in high-risk patients (18% vs. 4%, P < 0.001), as was severe gastrointestinal GVHD (17% vs. 8%, P < 0.001). The same algorithm can be successfully adapted to define 3 distinct risk groups at GVHD onset. CONCLUSION. A biomarker algorithm based on a blood sample taken 7 days after HCT can consistently identify a group of patients at high risk for lethal GVHD and NRM. FUNDING. The National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, and the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

  9. Tanacetum parthenium leaf extract mediated survival protection in lethally irradiated Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, Prashanth; Pooja, S.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Shetty, Jayaram; Peter, Alex John; Jose, Jerish M.

    2016-01-01

    Search for less-toxic radioprotectors has spurred interest in the development of natural products. In Ayurveda, the traditional medicine, Tanacetum species have been used to treat ailments since ancient times throughout the world. Effects of the administration of different concentrations of Tanacetum parthenium leaf aqueous extract (TPLA), Tanacetum parthenium leaf ethanolic extract (TPLE) were investigated in Swiss albino mice. Mice (20-25 g) were randomly divided into 8 groups of ten animals each. The control group and the radiation group were treated daily with oral administration of saline for 15 days. Each subgroups of TPLA and TPLE were treated with doses of 50, 100 and 250 mg/kg daily for 15 days. On the 15th day, all were irradiated with 10 Gy whole body irradiation. Survival was observed daily up to 30th post-irradiation day. Data were analysed using the Kaplan-Meier survival curves. The significance difference in survival between control, radiation and treatment groups were observed (P < 0.001). Current studies revealed the protective effect of Tanacetum parthenium rendering high survivability in lethally irradiated mice. (author)

  10. The entry of the prothymocyte into the thymus after lethal irradiation and bone marrow transplantation. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, A.H.; Visser, J.W.M.; Zoetelief, J.; Bekkum, D.W. van

    1988-01-01

    The time of entry of prothymocytes into the thymus after lethal irradiation and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was determined by exposing the thymus only or the whole body with the thymus shielded to a second irradiation after different intervals. The repopulation of the thymus by donor type cells was determined by a thymus repopulation assay using donor specific markers. Reirradiation of the thymus kills the prothymocytes that have entered the thymus during the interval. It was found that reirradiation of the thymus from 48 hours after BMT onwards increasingly delayed thymus regeneration. This shows that donor prothymocytes do not enter the thymus until about 2 days after BMT and that they continue to do so during at least 3 subsequent days. In the second reirradiation protocol thymus regeneration occurred earlier in the shielded thymus than in thymuses of whole body irradiated mice. Earlier thymus regeneration was not seen in mice that were reirradiated at 24 hours after BMT, but occurred only when irradiation took place at 48 hours and later. These data are consistent with those obtained in the first protocol. The results are in contradiction with results of direct homing experiments, which showed entrance of donor cells within 3 hours after BMT. A functional assay demonstrated that the early appearing cells cannot be prothymocytes. In retransplantation experiments it was shown that the bone marrow may indeed be the initial homing site of prothymocytes. 14 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 table

  11. Radioprotective effect of chitosan in sub-lethally X-ray irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Ikota, Nobuo; Arima, Hiromi; Watanabe, Yoshito; Yukawa, Masae; Ozawa, Toshihiko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kim, Hee-Sun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Corp., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Radiation Health Research Inst.; Bom, Hee-Seung; Kim, Young-Ho [Chonnam Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of). Hospital

    2003-03-01

    The radioprotective effect of chitosan was studied in mice following whole-body X-ray irradiation. C3H/He mice were exposed to 7 Gy, and their survival rates were examined. The survival rates of chitosan-diet mice were about 20% higher than those of mice on a standard diet, and the rates dropped sharply to a plateau at day 10 after X-ray irradiation. The chitosan-diet mice had an increased weight ratio of spleen to body within the experimental period. The leukocyte, thrombocyte, and erythrocyte counts as well as the hematocrit and hemoglobin levels were recovered significantly and more rapidly in the chitosan-diet mice than the standard-diet mice at day 14 after irradiation. The scavenging abilities of chitosan were evaluated by the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping method. These observations suggested that chitosan led to hematopoetic activation and leuko-cytogenesis in mice after sub-lethal dose irradiation, and that the biological response might be caused by radical trapping or scavenging. (author)

  12. Soluble factor(s) from bone marrow cells can rescue lethally irradiated mice by protecting endogenous hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Zhan, Yuxia; Burke, Kathleen A; Anderson, W French

    2005-04-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced myeloablation can be rescued via bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or administration of cytokines if given within 2 hours after radiation exposure. There is no evidence for the existence of soluble factors that can rescue an animal after a lethal dose of radiation when administered several hours postradiation. We established a system that could test the possibility for the existence of soluble factors that could be used more than 2 hours postirradiation to rescue animals. Animals with an implanted TheraCyte immunoisolation device (TID) received lethal-dose radiation and then normal bone marrow Lin- cells were loaded into the device (thereby preventing direct interaction between donor and recipient cells). Animal survival was evaluated and stem cell activity was tested with secondary bone marrow transplantation and flow cytometry analysis. Donor cell gene expression of five antiapoptotic cytokines was examined. Bone marrow Lin- cells rescued lethally irradiated animals via soluble factor(s). Bone marrow cells from the rescued animals can rescue and repopulate secondary lethally irradiated animals. Within the first 6 hours post-lethal-dose radiation, there is no significant change of gene expression of the known radioprotective factors TPO, SCF, IL-3, Flt-3 ligand, and SDF-1. Hematopoietic stem cells can be protected in lethally irradiated animals by soluble factors produced by bone marrow Lin- cells.

  13. The effects of gut commensal bacteria depletion on mice exposed to acute lethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Bing; Xu Zhiwei; Zhang Chenggang

    2007-01-01

    The prevention and management of bacterial infection are the mainstays of therapies for irradiation victims. However, worries about adverse effects arise from gut commensal flora depletion owing to the broad-spectrum antibiotics treatment. In the present study, we investigated the effects of gut bacteria depletion on the mice receiving total-body irradiation (TBI) at a single dose of 12 Gy. One group of mice was merely exposed to TBI but was free of antibiotic treatment throughout the experiment, while the other two groups of mice were additionally given broad-spectrum antibiotics, either from 2 weeks before or immediately after irradiation. The survival time of each animal in each group was recorded for analysis. Results showed that the mean survival time of mice was longest in the group without antibiotic treatment and shortest in the group treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics from 2 weeks before TBI. In conclusion, our data suggested that depletion of gut commensal bacteria with broad-spectrum antibiotics seemed deleterious for mammals receiving lethal TBI. (author)

  14. Dominant lethal mutations in insects with holokinetic chromosomes: irradiation of pink bollworm sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, G.J.; LaChance, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    Adult males of the pink bollworm, Pectinophora gosypiella (Saunders), were irradiated with 19 and 30 krad of gamma radiation and mated with virgin, untreated females. Males treated with 19 or 30 krad of gamma radiation, at 2 to 24-h or 48 to 72-h postemergence, respectively, did not show reduced mating frequency compared with the untreated male controls. However, transfer of eupyrene sperm was reduced by treating 2 to 24-h postemergent males with 30 krad. Irradiation with 19 or 30 krad did not cause complete male sterility; 12.7 and 16.8 percent, respectively, of the fertilized eggs hatched. Eggs fertilized with irradiated sperm were examined cytologically and showed a retardation of embryonic development up to the blastoderm stage. From the blastoderm stage onward, development was parallel to those eggs which were fertilized by unirradiated sperm. Of the embryos in the groups treated with 30 and 19 krad, 51.3 to 66.6 percent, respectively, developed into fully differentiated, normal-appearing, prehatch embryos. The radiation-induced dominant lethal mutations were, generally, expressed very late in embryonic development

  15. B-lymphocyte differentiation in lethally irradiated and reconstituted mice. II. Recovery of humoral immune responsiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozing, J.; Brons, N.H.C.; Benner, R.

    1977-01-01

    The recovery of humoral immune responsiveness was studied in lethally irradiated, fetal liver-reconstituted mice. By means of both membrane fluorescence and antibody formation to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as a functional assay, the rate of recovery of the compartments of B and T lymphocytes was determined in various lymphoid organs. The recovery of the immunoglobulin-positive (B) cell compartment after irradiation and reconstitution started in the spleen. This organ was also found to be the first in which the recovery of the B-cell population was completed. The interval between the recovery of the B-cell population in the spleen and that in the other organs tested was found to increase when the irradiated mice were reconstituted with spleen colony cells instead of fetal liver cells. This proved to be caused by the number and nature of the reconstituting hemopoietic stem cells. The immunoglobulin-positive (B) cells were found to appear before SRBC-reactive B cells could be demonstrated in spleen, lymph nodes, and Peyer's patches. The appearance of T lymphocytes in the various lymphoid organs required even more time. By means of cell transfer experiments, a sequential appearance of the precursors of anti-SRBC IgM-, IgG-, and IgA-plaque-forming cells could be demonstrated in spleen, bone marrow, lymph nodes, and Peyer's patches

  16. Indirect effects are involved in the production of potentially lethal damage in X irradiated escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, D.

    1985-01-01

    When living cells are exposed to low LET radiation, 60 to 70% of the resulting lethality is said to be due to indirect effects. Using the OH radical scavengers: glycerol n-butanol, t-butanol, and NO/sub 2//sup -/. The authors observed that a radiosensitive E. coli K-12 mutant (W 3110 thy/sup -/ polAl/sup -/) lacking DNA polymerase 1 displays a markedly enhanced radioresistance when exposed to X rays in the presence of these chemicals. The extent of protection afforded by these chemicals correlated with their OH radical scavenging ability over the limited range of concentrations of the chemicals studied. (Only non-toxic concentrations of the chemicals were used). The presence of 2M glycerol during irradiation of the PolAl/sup -/ cells results in a survival level higher than that seen for the unprotected parent strain (W 3110 thy polA/sup +/)

  17. Aberrations of holokinetic chromosomes and associated lethality after X-irradiation of meiotic stages in Tetranychus urticae Koch (acari, tetranychidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempelaar, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    Chromosomes of the holokinetic organization type were irradiated with X-rays in various stages of meiosis in unfertillized eggs of Tetranychus urticae Koch. Visible cytological aberrations, lethality and sterility were investigated in subsequent generations. Chromosome fragments are the most frequently occuring light-microscopically visible chromosome aberrations; bridges are not formed. Contrary to expectations, the presence of fragments appears to be positively correlated with the occurrence of lethality; loss of fragments, missegregation and the measure of damage of the broken chromosome parts are involved. In contrast with monokinetic chromosomes the earliest lethality occurs only after about 10 divisions. The ratios between different embryonic lethality types (early vs. late) differ depending on the stage irradiated: in more compact chromatin, more serious damage (i.e. more early lethality syndromes) is induced than in less compact chromatin. In the progeny of the surviving males, neither translocations nor independent fragments are found; indirect evidence indicated the occasional presence of inversions. The presumtive inversions are induced more frequently in a chromatin-compact stage (metaphase I) than in a less compact one (telophase I). (Auth.)

  18. Effect of peripheral lymphoid cells on the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease following allogeneic mouse bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaraz, R.; Ballinger, W.; Sachs, D.H.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation-induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras. The incidence of GVHD was reduced significantly in BALB/c leads to C57BL/6 radiation chimeras if bone marrow donors were exsanguinated immediately prior to marrow harvest. Chimeras resulting from the injection of bone marrow from bled donors exhibited only donor cells in spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood and normal levels of Thy 1+ and Ia+ cells were found in each of these lymphoid compartments. The addition of as few as 3 X 10(4) peripheral mononuclear cells to the marrow from exsanguinated donors uniformly led to lethal GVHD. 51 Cr-labeled cell traffic studies revealed that prior exsanguination of marrow donors led to about a 70% reduction in the number of circulating mononuclear cells contaminating the bone marrow at the time of marrow harvest. This decrease in contaminating peripheral cells was calculated to be in the appropriate range to account for the decreased GVHD seen when marrow from exsanguinated donors was used. It thus appears that peripheral cells contaminating marrow can be an important factor in causing lethal GVHD in allogeneic radiation chimeras

  19. Changes in rat liver and adipose tissue lipogenesis after single lethal X-irradiation: modification by the restricted food intake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlakova, A.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M.

    1981-01-01

    Male rats of Wistar strain were adapted during a 4-week period to the nutritional regimes of meal feeding (MF) and ad libitum (AL) and were irradiated with the single whole-body lethal X-ray dose 14.35 Gy after 22 h of fasting. Within the intervals 1, 24, 48 and 72 h after irradiation lipogenesis changes in the liver were studied by measuring 1- 14 C-acetate incorporation (74 KBq) in the total lipids, fatty acids and cholesterol, and in the white adipose tissue pieces by measuring U- 14 C-glucose incorporation (74 KBq) in the total lipids, fatty acids and glyceride glycerol. Lipogenesis increased in the liver of the irradiated rats as compared with sham irradiated rats and reached the maximal values at 72 h after irradiation in AL animals and at 48 h after irradiation in MF animals. Lipogenesis in the adipose tissue decreased in the irradiated rats as compared with the sham irradiated ones and continued to decrease with the post-irradiation period. The adaptation to the nutritional regime of meal feeding markedly modified lipogenesis in the liver and the adipose tissue of the irradiated rats. Long-term fasting (before and after irradiation) was supposed to be another modifying factor in the lipogenesis changes. Lipogenesis changes in the liver depended on the MF nutritional regime. (author)

  20. Changes in rat liver and adipose tissue lipogenesis after single lethal X-irradiation: modification by the restricted food intake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlakova, A; Ahlers, I; Praslicka, M [Univerzita P.J. Safarika, Kosice (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Vseobecnej Biologie

    1981-01-01

    Male rats of Wistar strain were adapted during a 4-week period to the nutritional regimes of meal feeding (MF) and ad libitum (AL) and were irradiated with the single whole-body lethal X-ray dose 14.35 Gy after 22 h of fasting. Within the intervals 1, 24, 48 and 72 h after irradiation lipogenesis changes in the liver were studied by measuring 1-/sup 14/C-acetate incorporation (74 KBq) in the total lipids, fatty acids and cholesterol, and in the white adipose tissue pieces by measuring U-/sup 14/C-glucose incorporation (74 KBq) in the total lipids, fatty acids and glyceride glycerol. Lipogenesis increased in the liver of the irradiated rats as compared with sham irradiated rats and reached the maximal values at 72 h after irradiation in AL animals and at 48 h after irradiation in MF animals. Lipogenesis in the adipose tissue decreased in the irradiated rats as compared with the sham irradiated ones and continued to decrease with the post-irradiation period. The adaptation to the nutritional regime of meal feeding markedly modified lipogenesis in the liver and the adipose tissue of the irradiated rats. Long-term fasting (before and after irradiation) was supposed to be another modifying factor in the lipogenesis changes. Lipogenesis changes in the liver depended on the MF nutritional regime.

  1. Studies on chromosomal aberrations and dominant lethal mutations induced by x irradiation in germ cells of male mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xianli; Wang Mingdong; Wang Bin; Sun Shuqing

    1992-01-01

    After male mice irradiated by 2 Gy X rays mated to normal virginal females superovulated with PMSG and HCG, pronuclei chromosome spreading of first-cleavage embryos were prepared and chromosomal aberrations of paternal pronuclei were observed. The results showed that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations was highest irradiated at spermatic stage among different stages of spermatogenesis. The sequence of radiosensitivity in spermatogenesis was as follows: spermatids > mature sperm > spermatocyte > spermatogonia and stem spermatogonia. The frequencies of paternal chromosomal aberrations resulted from irradiation at spermatids and mature sperms were significantly higher than that in control. The reciprocal translocations of stem spermatogonia induced by 2 Gy X rays in those male mice were also examined in the preparations of diakinesis-metaphase I. The frequency of reciprocal translocations were 0.0429 per cell and significantly higher than that in control. The proportion of unbalanced gametes, resulting in lethal embryos after fertilization, was 0.02145 to be predicted. At the same time, the dominant lethality induced by X rays in stem spermatogonia was measured, being 0.0371. The frequency of dead fetuses in irradiation group was about twice as in control. The regression analysis was found that the reciprocal translocations was markedly related to the dominant lethality

  2. The effect of embryonal thymic calf extracts on neonatally thymectomized mice and on mice lethally irradiated with gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaplicki, J.; Blonska, B.; Stec, L.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of embryonal thymic calf extracts (ETCE) on mice thymectomized at birth was investigated. ETCE was found to induce an increase in leukopenia and decrease in the level of serum gamma globulins; it also reduced survival time in mice. The effect of ETCE on lethally irradiated mice was also examined. Only long-term administration of ETCE prior to gamma irradiation at 750 rad prolonged the survival time of mice (40% permanent survival) as compared with irradiated controls; the leukocytes from mice retained mitotic capability. Neither long-term treatment with ETCE prior to irradiation at 1000 rad, nor short-term administration prior to 750 rad affected survival time. ETCE administered after irradiation of mice with 750 rad caused a rapid decrease in blood leukocytes and a significantly lowered survival time. (Auth.)

  3. Effects of sub-lethal dose of γ-irradiation on lysosomal enzymes in tissue of pigeon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.C.; Gadhia, P.K.

    1979-01-01

    Effects of total body γ-irradiation with sub-lethal dose (300 rad) on three lysosomal enzymes namely acid phosphatase, ribonuclease-II and deoxyribonuclease-II have been studied in pigeons. Liver, kidney and spleen were the tissues studied at different intervals like 1-h, 24-h, 48-h, and 72-h of irradiation. The specific activities ('crude' fraction) of acid phosphatase and ribonuclease-II increased significantly in spleen and liver at 48-h of irradiation. The activity of deoxyribonuclease-II in liver and spleen was increased only at 72-h post-irradiation. On the other hand, the total activities of three lysosomal enzymes did not show remarkable change throughout 72-h of irradiation. (author)

  4. Mutagenicity of irradiated food in the host mediated assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston-Arthur, T.; Turanitz, K.; Hruby, R.; Stehlik, G.; Brena-Valle, M.

    1975-01-01

    Groups of Swiss albino mice (SPF) fed with normal and gamma-irradiated food at doses of 0.75, 1.5 and 3.0 Mrad, were injected intraperitoneally with SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM TA 1530 for the host mediated assay test of mutagenesis. The mutation frequency was calculated in terms of the number of mutant colonies per unit number of surviving cells. The results indicate that there is a significant increase in mutation frequency induced by the 3 Mrad sterilized food. No difference was observed in the 0.75 Mrad dose when compared with the control

  5. Induction of lethal mutations in the x-chromosome of unirradiated Drosophila oocytes after fertilization by irradiated spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Zainullin, V.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In primary study on Drosophila it was found that irradiated male X-chromosomes induce recessive lethals in unirradiated female homologues (Abeleva et al., 1961, Radiobiologya. 1:123-126). The same effects were obtained in Drosophila in some recent investigations. The mechanisms of these effects is unknown. However it may be responsible for low-dose radiation effects as it induce mutations in unirradiated DNA. We assume that this effect may be a result of activation of error prone repair in response to preliminary DNA lesions in irradiated chromosome. In this research we analyse the frequencies of the recessive lethal mutations in the X-chromosome of Drosophila females mated with irradiated Basc males. We used acute irradiation with a dose rate of 10 Gy. For testing our hypothesis we use the mus209 and mei-41 mutant females. Mus209 is a PCNA gene homologue and mei-41 is a homologue of ATM gene. These genes are involved in post-replication DNA repair which may be error prone repair in Drosophila. It was obtained the tendency to decreasing the mutation rate at the mei-41[D5] background and decreasing mutation rate in mus209[B1] background in comparison with wild type strains CS (p<0.05). The obtained results demonstrate the possible role of mus209[B1] and mei-41[D5] genes in the inducing of mutations in the unirradiated X-chromosome in the presence of irradiated homologue

  6. Poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism in X-irradiated Chinese hamster cells: its relation to repair of potentially lethal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hur, E.; Elkind, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) is the substrate used by cells in poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis. X-irradiation of log-phase Chinese hamster cells caused a rapid decrease in NAD + levels which was linearly dependent on radiation dose. The activity of ADP-ribosyl transferase (ADPRT) also increased linearly with radiation dose. The decrease of NAD + was slower, and the increase in ADPRT activity was less pronounced, in a radiation sensitive line, V79-AL162/S-10. An inhibitor of ADPRT, m-aminobenzamide, largely prevented the depletion of cellular NAD + and reduced the rate at which ADPRT activity disappeared during post-irradiation incubation. Post-irradiation treatment with hypertonic buffer or with medium containing D 2 O-which inhibit repair of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage-enhanced the depletion of NAD + and prevented the reduction in ADPRT activity following irradiation. The characteristics of the effects of treatment with hypertonic buffer on NAD + metabolism were qualitatively similar to the effects that such treatment has on radiation-induced cell killing. These results suggest that poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis after irradiation plays a role in the repair of potentially lethal damage. (author)

  7. Sensitivity of Vibrio cholerae cells to lethal and mutagenic effect of UV-irradiation mediated by plasmids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiganova, I.G.; Evdokimova, N.M.; Aleshkin, G.I.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of UV-irradiation on Vibrio cholerae cells and its changes mediated by the plasmid R245 have been studied. Vibrio cholerae strains 569B and RV31 have been shown to be considerably more sensitive to lethal effect of UV-irradiation as compared with Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium cells. Highly toxigenic strain 569B and practically atoxigenic strain RV31 have the same UV-sensitivity. Lethla effect of UV-irradiation on Vibrio cholerae cells is incresed when the irradiated cells are plated on enriched media. UV-induction of mutations was not registered in plasmidless strains of Vibrio cholerae. Plasmid R245 increase UV-resistance of vibrio cells and makes them UV-mutable

  8. Therapeutic use of recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) in a canine model of sublethal and lethal whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacVittie, T.J.; Monroy, R.L.; Patchen, M.L.; Souza, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) was studied for its ability to modulate haemopoiesis in normal dogs as well as to decrease therapeutically the severity and duration of neutropenia in sublethally and lethally irradiated dogs. Data indicate that in the lethally irradiated dog, effective cytokine therapy with rhG-CSF will increase survival through the induction of earlier recovery of neutrophils and platelets. (author)

  9. Influence of vaccination with Bordetella pertussis cells on haemopoiesis in sublethally irradiated mice and their radiation lethality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiek, S.; Bitny-Szlachto, S.

    1978-01-01

    Post-irradiation lethality of CFW mice has turned out to be enhanced by vaccination with Bordetella pertussis cells 10 min., 48 hrs. prior or 48 hrs. after the exposure to X-rays. The sensitization factor was found to be 1.23, as it revealed by decrease of radiation LD 50 . Granulopoiesis and erythropoiesis proved to be stimulated by vaccination, in mice irradiated with 200 or 400 R but not in those after 600 R. Direct radiosensitivity of CFU was not altered by vaccination, but the subsequent loss of bone marrow stem cells was enhanced in vaccinated mice. On the other hand, endocolonization of spleens with bone marrow stem cells has turned out to be highly enhanced by the vaccine, resulting in confluent growth of colonies. This effect of the vaccine was not abolished by hydroxyurea given 15 min. or 1 hr. after vaccination. Enhanced post-irradiation lethality is considered to result from fall of the bone marrow stem cell pool below the level indispensable to ensure the post-irradiation recovery of the haemopoietic system. (author)

  10. Sub-lethal irradiation of human colorectal tumor cells imparts enhanced and sustained susceptibility to multiple death receptor signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Ifeadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Death receptors (DR of the TNF family function as anti-tumor immune effector molecules. Tumor cells, however, often exhibit DR-signaling resistance. Previous studies indicate that radiation can modify gene expression within tumor cells and increase tumor cell sensitivity to immune attack. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic effect of sub-lethal doses of ionizing radiation in sensitizing colorectal carcinoma cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The ability of radiation to modulate the expression of multiple death receptors (Fas/CD95, TRAILR1/DR4, TRAILR2/DR5, TNF-R1 and LTβR was examined in colorectal tumor cells. The functional significance of sub-lethal doses of radiation in enhancing tumor cell susceptibility to DR-induced apoptosis was determined by in vitro functional sensitivity assays. The longevity of these changes and the underlying molecular mechanism of irradiation in sensitizing diverse colorectal carcinoma cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis were also examined. We found that radiation increased surface expression of Fas, DR4 and DR5 but not LTβR or TNF-R1 in these cells. Increased expression of DRs was observed 2 days post-irradiation and remained elevated 7-days post irradiation. Sub-lethal tumor cell irradiation alone exhibited minimal cell death, but effectively sensitized three of three colorectal carcinoma cells to both TRAIL and Fas-induced apoptosis, but not LTβR-induced death. Furthermore, radiation-enhanced Fas and TRAIL-induced cell death lasted as long as 5-days post-irradiation. Specific analysis of intracellular sensitizers to apoptosis indicated that while radiation did reduce Bcl-X(L and c-FLIP protein expression, this reduction did not correlate with the radiation-enhanced sensitivity to Fas and/or TRAIL mediated apoptosis among the three cell types. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Irradiation of tumor cells can overcome Fas and TRAIL

  11. Irradiation of Eggs and Larvae of Bactrocera Carambolae (Drew and Hancock) Fruit Fly to Produce Irradiation Host for Its Parasitoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achmad Nasroh Kuswadi; Murni lndarwatmi; Nasution, Indah Arastuti

    2004-01-01

    Bactrocera carambolae (Drew and Hancock) fruit fly, a major pests of commercial fruits in Indonesia, is attacked by several species of parasitoids in the field, such as by Biosteres sp. that attacks on early instar larvae and Opius sp. on late instar larvae. In order to produce irradiated host in mass rearing of both species, several dosage of gamma were tested on both eggs and larvae. Egg masses of 0.5 ml were irradiated with 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy and then inoculated into artificial diet. Viability of the eggs, the larval period and the number of pupae produced were observed. About 200 third instar larvae irradiated with 0, 10, 30, 50,70 dan 90 Gy and the number and quality of the pupae developed were then observed. The results showed that the eggs irradiated with tested dosage did not reduce its viability however it reduced the survival of larvae emerged. Number of pupae produced from 0.5 ml irradiated eggs were reduced from 2740 pupae to 407, 167, 113, 53 and 44 pupae, besides the pupation delayed up to three days. Irradiation on third instars larvae did not reduce its pupation, since pupae were developed from > 85 % of irradiated larvae. However, irradiation did reduced the fly emergence from the pupae. Irradiated hosts for Biosteres sp and Opius sp can be produced by irradiating eggs however it should be evaluated since the survival rate of the larvae reduced. Irradiation of third instar larvae may produce irradiated host for Opius sp So, the use of irradiated eggs or irradiated larvae as host in the colonization of the parasitoids will insure no hosts emerged as adult. However it remain to be proved whether irradiated hosts are prefered and able to support the life of parasitoid. (author)

  12. Effects of actonomycin D and ultraviolet irradiation on multiplication of brome mosaic virus in host and non-host cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, K.; Furusawa, I.; Okuno, T.

    1981-01-01

    The modes of multiplication of brome mosaic virus (BMV) were compared in protoplasts isolated from host and non-host plants. BMV actively multiplied in the leaves and isolated mesophyll protoplasts of barley, a host of BMV. BMV multiplication in barley protoplasts was inhibited by addition of actinomycin D immediately after inoculation or by u.v. irradiation of the protoplasts before inoculation. In contrast, although BMV could not multiply in leaves of radish and turnip (non-hosts for BMV) it multiplied at a low level in protoplasts isolated from these two plant species. Moreover, u.v. irradiation, or the addition of actinomycin D, enhanced multiplication of BMV in radish and turnip protoplasts. These results suggest that (i) in the host cells replication of BMV is dependent on cellular metabolism of nucleic acid and protein, and (ii) in the non-host cells a substance(s) inhibitory to replication of BMV is synthesized. (author)

  13. The Effect of A Single Sub-Lethal Dose of Whole Body Irradiation on the Small Intestine of Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ramli, M. A.; Kubba, M. A.; Al-Bassam, L. S.; Belhaj, K.; Al-shawish, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of whole body radiation with a single sub-lethal dose at 4 Gy on rat small intestine was studied histologically and quantitatively. Irradiated animals were euthanized at 24 hours, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post- irradiation. Crypts of Leiberkuhn and peyer's patches were especially targeted by irradiation. The crypts showed severe cellular fragmentation in the germinal cellular compartments twenty Four hours after irradiation resulting in partial denudation of villi especially at their Tips. At three days, these cells resumed their proliferative activity with the appearance of unusually large numbers of mitotic figures. Cellular regeneration in the crypts and on the villous surface showed improvement with advancing time till day 28 when the villi had complete epithelial covering and the proliferative activity of the germinal cryptic cells returned to normal. The quantitative study included the measurement of about fifty villi at each time after irradiation. A significant decrease in villous length was noticed at twenty four hours post-irradiation compared to the control values. The length of villi plateaued at about this level till day twenty one when it slightly increased to reach a sub normal mean length on day 28. We concluded that whole body irradiation with a single dose at 4 Gy was enough to induce cryptic cellular necrosis with sloughing of epithelial villous columnar covering. This cellular damage was, however, sub- total since quick regenerative cellular activity was noticed three days post-irradiation. The decrease in the villous length paralleled the cryptic cellular damage whereas full recovery was not achieved despite obvious cellular regeneration.

  14. Molecular basis of the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.

    1982-01-01

    Using bacteria as a model, the molecular basis of the mutagenic and lethal effects of uv radiation is being studied. Attention is focused on the mechanism of action of uv-1 specific endonucleases in the repair of damaged DNA. The isolation and identification of similar enzymes in human cells are being conducted concurrently

  15. Evidence of heritable lethal mutations in progeny of X-irradiated CHO cells by micronucleus count in clon-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, G.; Kreczik, A.; Treichel, M.

    1996-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation reduce the growth rates of clones following irradiation of the progenitor cells. Such reductions of clone growth have been proven by means of measurements of clone size distributions. The medians of such distributions can be used to quantify the radiation damage. Prolongations of generation times and cell death as result of heritable lethal mutations have been discussed as causes for the reduction of clone growth. The cell number of a clone of hypotetraploid CHO-cells was compared to the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells in the same clone using the cytokinesis-block-micronucleus method. The dose dependent reduction of clone sizes is measured by the difference of the medians (after log transformation) of the clone size distributions. At cytochalasin-B concentrations of 1 μg/ml and after an incubation time of 16 h a yield of binucleated cells of about 50% was obtained. Median clone size differences as a measure of clonal radiation damage increased linearly with incubation times of 76, 100, 124, and 240 h following irradiation with 3, 5, 7, and 12 Gy. The frequency of binucleated clone cells with micronuclei strongly increased with decreasing clone size by a factor up to 20 following irradiation with 3, 5, and 7 Gy. The frequency of micronucleated binucleated clone cells was found to be independent of incubation time after irradiation. Radiation induced clone size reductions result from cell losses caused by intraclonal expression of micronuclei which have its origin in heritable lethal mutations. Measurements of clone size distributions can be done automatically. They can serve as predictive test for determination of median cell loss rates of surviving cell clones. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Induction of lethal and genetic damage by vacuum-ultraviolet (163 nm) irradiation of aqueous suspensions of yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, T.; Kobayashi, K.

    1976-01-01

    Yeast cells suspended in distilled water were irradiated with monochromatic 163 nm photons by immersing a specially designed discharge tube into the suspension. This was thought to be a useful means of investigating in vivo effects of radiation-induced water radicals on well cells in the complete absence of ionic species, since 163 nm photons can dissociate water only via excitation. These experiments showed that the water radicals (excluding e/sub aq/ - ) exerted both lethal and genetic (gene-conversion) effects quite potently, and the characteristic protection against these effects was observable when 2-mercaptoethanol or, in particular, p-aminobenzoic acid, a specific scavenger for OH radicals, was added to the medium prior to irradiation. Nearly complete protection from both lethal and genetic effects was observed in some cases with p-aminobenzoic acid. These results establish unequivocally that the OH radical, and not the hydrogen atom (H radical), possesses the damaging potency in the cell. Comparisons with γ-ray experiments revealed several differences between 163 nm photons and γ rays in the protective actions of radical scavengers, which may be attributable to reactive species other than OH radicals produced by the γ rays

  17. Reduced repair of potentially lethal radiation damage in glutathione synthetase-deficient human fibroblasts after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midander, J.; Revesz, L.; Deschavanne, P.J.; Debieu, D.; Malaise, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    Using a human fibroblast strain deficient in glutathione synthetase and a related proficient control strain, the role of glutathione (GSH) in repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) has been investigated in determining survival by plating cells immediately or 24 h after irradiation. After oxic or hypoxic irradiation, both cell strains repair radiation-induced damage. However, under hypoxic conditions, the proficient cells repair PLD as well as under oxic conditions while the deficient cells repair less PLD after irradiation under hypoxic than under oxic conditions. Therefore, the oxygen enhancement ratio (o.e.r.) for proficient cells is similar whether the cells are plated immediately or 24 h later (2.0 and 2.13, respectively). In contrast, the o.e.r. for deficient cells is lower when the cells are plated 24 h after irradiation than when they are plated immediately thereafter (1.16 as compared to 1.55). The results indicate that GSH is involved in PLD repair and, in particular, in the repair of damage induced by radiation delivered under hypoxic conditions. (author)

  18. Enhanced proliferation of transfused marrow and reversal of normal growth inhibition of female marrow in male hosts 2 months after sublethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brecher, G.; Mulcahy, K.; Tjio, J.H.; Raveche, E.

    1985-01-01

    It is well established that 0.5 to 1 million marrow cells suffice to rescue (though not necessarily fully restore) lethally irradiated mice, while even 40 million cells result only in minimal seeding in isogeneic, nonirradiated mice. It was originally suggested that the results imply the existence of special proliferative sites which are filled in the nonirradiated animal, but are emptied by high doses of irradiation. In 1982 the authors demonstrated the feasibility of establishing substantial numbers of donor cells in normal, non-irradiated hosts. After four daily transfusions of 50 million marrow cells, 20-40% of the host's marrow consisted of cells of donor origin. The present paper reports the marked enhancement of the proliferation of transfused marrow cells in mice exposed to sublethal doses of irradiation of 300-900 R. Two months later, when the peripheral blood counts of the irradiated animals had returned to normal, transfusion of 100 million cells resulted in donor cell percentages of 55-100% in the peripheral blood and marrow. The authors previously found that male donor cells proliferated as readily in female as in male hosts, while female donor cells proliferated to a comparable degree only in female hosts. In the present study, male animals that had been exposed to 600-900 R 2 months earlier sustained proliferation of male and female donor cells equally well

  19. Dominant lethal mutations and histological changes produced in mouse oocytes by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyglenov, A.; Baev, I.; Rupova, I.; Kusheva, R.

    1976-01-01

    Mouse female were exposed to a total dose of 500 or 1000 rad 137 Cs gamma rays delivered at 0.01 rad/min. Effects were scored at 1, 5, 7, and 10 weeks after cessation of treatment. Histologically, ovaria in the 500 rad group showed a decrease up to 11% in follicle numbers as compared to controls; with the prolongation of the time after exposure, a further fall in follicle numbers is observed. In the 1000 rad group, depopulation of ovaria was complete. With the 500 rad dose, total dominant lethality was found to be increased for any of the time intervals between radiation exposure and conception; postimplantation dominant lethality was comparatively low, with similar scores between the weeks investigated. (author)

  20. Influence Of Quinolone Lethality on Irradiated Anaerobic Growth of Escherichia Coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, I.M.; El-Kabbany, H.M.; El-Esseily, E.SH.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities were measured with wild type cells and isomerase mutants of Escherichia coli for ciprofloxacin, formation of quinolone-gyrase-DNA complexes, observed as a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) dependent drop in cell lysate viscosity, occurred during aerobic and anaerobic growth and in the presence and in the absence of chloramphenicol. Quinolone activity against Escherichia coli was examined during aerobic growth, aerobic treatment with chloramphenicol, and anaerobic growth. Nalidixic acid, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin were lethal for cultures growing aerobically, and the bacteriostatic activity of each quinolone was unaffected by anaerobic growth. However, lethal activity was distinct for each quinolone with cells treated aerobically with chloramphenicol or grown anaerobically. Nalidixic acid failed to kill cells under both conditions, norfloxacin killed cells when they were grown anaerobically but not when they were treated with chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin killed cells under both conditions but required higher concentrations than those required with cells grown aerobically, C-methoxy fluoro quinolone was equally lethal under all conditions. However, lethal chromosome fragmentation, detected as a drop in viscosity in the absence of SDS, was occurred with nalidixic acid treatment only under aerobic conditions in the absence of chloramphenicol, thus, all quinolones tested appeared to form reversible bacteriostatic complexes containing broken DNA during aerobic growth, during anaerobic growth, and when protein synthesis is blocked. The ability to fragment chromosomes rapidly kill cells under these conditions depends on quinolone structure. The radiation of sublethal dose was 3 Gy at rate of 0.6 Gy/min was shown as non-significant result

  1. The clinic and pathologic picture in the lethal dose irradiated ewes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halagan, J.; Stanikova, A.; Maracek, I.

    2004-01-01

    The history of clinical symptoms as well as pathologic histological and morphological changes after long/lasting gamma irradiation were estimated in seven clinical healthy ewes. The animals were irradiated continually seven days with totally 6.7 Gy per ewe. Clinically recognizable symptoms of the radiation sickness were observed commencing the 4 th after last dose of irradiation. Sharp increase of the body temperature, heart and respiratory frequency rate as well as apathy, anorexia, arrhythmia, dyspnoe, diarrhea, dehydration, polyuria were prevalent in clinical founding . All of the animals were death in course of seven days after last irradiated dose. The gastrointestinal radiation syndrome was typical evidence of gastrointestinal tract and the general hemorrhagic enhancing of the gamma irradiation damage effects was confirmed. (authors)

  2. A novel challenge test incorporating irradiation (60Co) of compost sub-samples to validate thermal lethality towards pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John E; Watabe, Miyuki; Stewart, Andrew; Cherie Millar, B; Rao, Juluri R

    2009-01-01

    Maturing compost heaps normally attaining temperatures ranging from 55 to 65 degrees C is generally regarded to conform to recommended biological risks and sanitation standards for composts stipulated by either EU or US-EPA. Composted products derived from animal sources are further required by EU biohazard safety regulatory legislation that such composts either attain 70 degrees C for over 3h during maturation or via treatment at 70 degrees C for 1h before being considered for dispensation on land. The setting of the upper limit of thermal lethality at 70 degrees C/1h for achieving biosecurity of the animal waste composted products (e.g. pelleted fertilizer formulations) is not properly substantiated by specific validation tests, comprising a 'wipe-out' step (usually via autoclaving) followed by inoculation of a prescribed bacterium, exposure to 70 degrees C/1h and the lethality determined. Pelleted formulations of composts are not amenable for wet methods (autoclaving) for wipe-out sterilization step as this is detrimental to the pellet and compromises sample integrity. This study describes a laboratory method involving the employment of ((60)Co) irradiation 'wipe-out' step to: (a) compost sub-samples drawn from compost formulation heaps and (b) pelleted products derived from composted animal products while determining the thermal lethality of a given time/temperature (70 degrees C/1h) treatment process and by challenging the irradiated sample (not just with one bacterium but), out with 10 potential food-poisoning organisms from the bacterial genera (Campylobacter, Escherichia, Listeria, Salmonella, Yersinia) frequently detected in pig and poultry farm wastes. This challenge test on compost sub-samples can be a useful intervention ploy for 'inspection and validation' technique for composters during the compost maturity process, whose attainment of temperatures of 55-65 degrees C is presumed sufficient for attainment of sanitation. Stringent measures are further

  3. Some biochemical characteristics of a toxic substance isolated from organs of lethally irradiated animals in the course of the intestinal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meter, J D; Sirota, N S [Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Rentgeno-Radiologicheskij Inst., Leningrad (USSR)

    1976-05-01

    A toxic substance isolated from organs of lethally irradiated (1300 rads) animals in the period when intestinal syndrome has developed is classified according to the parameters under study (namely, the molecular weight, UV-absorption curve, extinction coefficient, specific monosaccharides, the presence and percentage of KDA, etc.) as lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli, the main inhabitant of the gastroenteric tract of mice. That endotoxins (sensitivity to which is increased in this period of radiation sickness) are detected in the blood and organs of lethally irradiated animals, might indicate their participation in the pathogenesis of the intestinal syndrome.

  4. Some biochemical characteristics of a toxic substance isolated from organs of lethally irradiated animals in the course of the intestinal syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meter, J.D.; Sirota, N.S.

    1976-01-01

    A toxic substance isolated from organs of lethally irradiated (1300 rads) animals in the period when intestinal syndrome has developed is classified according to the parameters under study (namely, the molecular weight, UV-absorption curve, extinction coefficient, specific monosaccharides, the presence and percentage of KDA, etc.) as lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli, the main inhabitant of the gastroenteric tract of mice. That endotoxins (sensitivity to which is increased in this period of radiation sickness) are detected in the blood and organs of lethally irradiated animals, might indicate their participation in the pathogenesis of the intestinal syndrome

  5. Skin allografts in lethally irradiated animals repopulated with syngeneic hemopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwadron, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Total body irradiation and repopulation with syngeneic hemopoietic cells can be used to induce tolerance to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched heart and kidney grafts in rats and mice. However, this protocol does not work for MHC mismatched skin grafts in rats or mice. Furthermore, LEW rats that accept WF cardiac allografts after irradiation and repopulation reject subsequent WF skin grafts. Treatment of skin allograft donors with methotrexate prior to grafting onto irradiated and reconstituted mice resulted in doubling of the mean survival time. Analysis of which antigens provoked skin graft rejection by irradiation and reconstituted animals revealed the importance of I region antigens. Cardiac allograft acceptance by irradiated and reconstituted animals is mediated by suppressor cells found in the spleen. Adoptively tolerant LEW rats accepted WF skin grafts in 50% of grafted animals. Analysis of this phenomenon revealed that the adoptive transfer procedure itself was important in achieving skin allograft acceptance by these animals. In general, it seems that the lack of ability of irradiated and reconstituted animals to accept fully MHC disparate skin grafts results from the inability of these animals to suppress lymph node effector cells against I region antigen seen on highly immunogenic allogeneic Langerhans cells in the skin

  6. Lethal effect after whole-body irradiation on mouse with various photon radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohda, Shizuo

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of mortality on the quality of radiation was investigated in ICR mice after wholebody irradiation with 200 kV x-ray, 60 Co γ-ray, or 10 MV x-ray. With respect to the 30 day mortality, LD 50 values were estimated as 606 rad for 200 kV x-ray and as 713 rad both for 60 Co γ-ray and for 10 MV x-ray. Hence, the value of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to that for 200 kV x-ray was 0.850, while the value decreased with increasing the mortality rate. The value extrapolated to 100% mortality was estimated as 0.6. These results were valid for either 7 or 8 week mice, but the life span of 7 week mice after the irradiation was 3 days shorter than that of 8 week mice. These findings resulted in following conclusions: 1) There are no qualitative differences between 10 MV x-ray and 60 Co γ-ray irradiations. 2) The biological effects after 10 MV x-ray and 60 Co γ-ray irradiations are reduced with increased killing rate, compared with that after 200 kV x-ray irradiations. (Evans, J.)

  7. Strand breaks and lethal damage in plasmid DNA subjected to 60CO-γirradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimczak, U.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments with calf thymus DNA subjected to extracellular irradiation yield information on the role of direct and indirect effects in single-strand breakage, if this is evaluated with reference to the scavenger activity in respect of OH radicals. The role of the two processes in the occurrence of double-stand breaks and further damage leading to cell decay has so far remained largely obscure. It was the aim of the study described here to contribute to research in this field by performing in vitro experiments on biologically active DNA. For this purpose, DNA from pBR322 plasmids was irradiated in the presence of OH-radical scavengers. The number of single-strand and double-strand breaks was determined on the basis of the system's ability to eliminate OH radicals. In order to asses the influence of irradiation processes on the biological activity of DNA, investigations were carried out in E. coli for transformations caused by irradiated plasmid DNA. The results were interpreted in the light of theories about inhomogenous reaction kinetics put forward by Mark et al. (1989). It was finally discussed, which of the gamma-irradiation injuries occurring in DNA was to be held responsible for the inactivation of plasmid DNA and which enzymatic processes were additionally at work here. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Protection of melanized Cryptococcus neoformans from lethal dose gamma irradiation involves changes in melanin's chemical structure and paramagnetism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelahad Khajo

    Full Text Available Certain fungi thrive in highly radioactive environments including the defunct Chernobyl nuclear reactor. Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans, which uses L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA to produce melanin, was used here to investigate how gamma radiation under aqueous aerobic conditions affects the properties of melanin, with the aim of gaining insight into its radioprotective role. Exposure of melanized fungal cell in aqueous suspensions to doses of γ-radiation capable of killing 50 to 80% of the cells did not lead to a detectable loss of melanin integrity according to EPR spectra of melanin radicals. Moreover, upon UV-visible (Xe-lamp illumination of melanized cells, the increase in radical population was unchanged after γ-irradiation. Gamma-irradiation of frozen cell suspensions and storage of samples for several days at 77 K however, produced melanin modification noted by a reduced radical population and reduced photoresponse. More direct evidence for structural modification of melanin came from the detection of soluble products with absorbance maxima near 260 nm in supernatants collected after γ-irradiation of cells and cell-free melanin. These products, which include thiobarbituric acid (TBA-reactive aldehydes, were also generated by Fenton reagent treatment of cells and cell-free melanin. In an assay of melanin integrity based on the metal (Bi(+3 binding capacity of cells, no detectable loss in binding was detected after γ-irradiation. Our results show that melanin in C. neoformans cells is susceptible to some damage by hydroxyl radical formed in lethal radioactive aqueous environments and serves a protective role in melanized fungi that involves sacrificial breakdown.

  9. Extracellular hydrogen peroxide produced under irradiation as the most important factor in the lethality of gamma-irradiated Paramecium tetraurelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Dupouy, D.; Planel, H.

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown that the surviving fraction of γ-irradiated paramecia is correlated with the residual H 2 O 2 concentration in the extracellular medium which is strongly dependent on the bacterial concentration, that is, on the enzyme content in the culture medium. (author)

  10. Extracellular hydrogen peroxide produced under irradiation as the most important factor in the lethality of gamma-irradiated Paramecium tetraurelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Dupouy, D.; Planel, H. (Laboratoire de Biologie Medicale, 31 - Toulouse (France))

    1982-02-01

    It has been shown that the surviving fraction of ..gamma..-irradiated paramecia is correlated with the residual H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration in the extracellular medium which is strongly dependent on the bacterial concentration, that is, on the enzyme content in the culture medium.

  11. Brazilian status in blood irradiation in Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD) prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goes, E.G. de; Borges, J.C.; Ghilardi Netto, T.

    1996-01-01

    A short overview of the Brazilian reality concerning Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD) is presented. Suggestions of policies and procedures to optimise GVHD prevention are reported. A national irradiator device using cobalt teletherapy unit is proposed for irradiation of blood and cellular components

  12. Molecular basis for the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Pathways of DNA repair in bacteria and mammalian cells. Progress is reported on the following studies: genetic control of incision and excision in Escherichia coli; effects of binding proteins on the repair process in vitro; location of endonuclease - uv-irradiated DNA complexes; identification of eukaryotic repair mechanisms; nuclear complementation in HeLa cells; enzyme isolation from repair syndrome skin fibroblasts; and expression of the E. coli - SV40 hybrid DNA

  13. Heritable non-lethal damage to cultured human cells irradiated with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.T.; Walker, O.A.

    2002-01-01

    During interplanetary flights the nuclei of all of a crew member's cells could be traversed by at least one high-LET (linear energy transfer) cosmic-ray particle. In mammalian cells irradiated in vitro about 1 in 10,000 of the surviving cells traversed by heavy particles is transformed to malignancy or mutated. What, if anything, happens to the remaining >99% of surviving cells? A retrospective analysis of archived data and samples from heavy-ion irradiation experiments with cultured human cells in vitro indicated that heavy ions caused a dose- and LET-dependent reduction in growth rates of progeny of irradiated cells, based on colony-size distributions. The maximum action cross section for this effect is between 100 and 300 μm 2 , at least as large as the cell nuclear area and up to 3 times the cross section for cell killing. Thus, heritable slow growth is the most prevalent effect of high-LET radiations on cultured animal cells, which may have implications for crew health during deep space travel. (author)

  14. Host influence on irradiation bioefficacy : growth and development of Spodoptera litura (Fabricius)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    Survival and development of Spodoptera litura(F), a polyphagous pest was ascertained on a range of host plants, common and economic in the Indian context. Castor, cotton, green gram and okra constituted the preferred host group showing significantly better growth rate (GR) and growth index (GI) than the group of less preferred host plants that included groundnut, red gram, rose leaf and rose petal. Ontogenic growth profile vis-a-vis irradiation was studied with recording of GI at L3, pupa and adult levels in response to gamma dosages administered in L1 stage. Irradiation effect on the growth index was mainly due to reduction in survival, which was further pronounced owing to delay in development. On all the preferred host plants, adult-G1 was reduced by more than 50 per cent at 40 Gy gamma dose; whereas the same dose on less preferred host plants could prevent adult emergence on ground nut and red gram, and inhibited pupa formation on rose diet. The percentage mortality of larvae exhibiting delayed development was markedly more in the less preferred host group. Dose dependent reduction was observed in the larval growth rate of L3, L5 and L6 instars on all the host plants. 20 Gy exhibited almost same intensity of adverse impact in less preferred host group as was shown by 40 Gy in preferred hosts. 20 Gy dose reduced the pupal weight and conversion ratio of treated insects significantly. Age influence was evident on irradiation efficacy on all the diets. Insects treated in the later instar had less radiosusceptibility as compared to the young irradiated larvae. Irradiation had a negative correlation with survival and weight gain during the course of development that in turn bore a positive relation with the increase in radiation dosage. Food is an important governing factor in influencing the insects survival value and developmental behaviour and may modify its intrinsic sensitivity towards irradiation stress. (author). 21 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  15. Free radical scavenging and the expression of potentially lethal damage in X-irradiated repair-deficient Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, D.

    1987-01-01

    When cells are exposed to ionizing radiation, they suffer lethal damage (LD), potentially lethal damage (PLD), and sublethal damage (SLD). All three forms of damage may be caused by direct or indirect radiation action or by the interaction of indirect radiation products with direct DNA damage. In this report I examine the expression of LD and PLD caused by the indirect action of X rays in isogenic, repair-deficient Escherichia coli. The radiosensitivity of a recA mutant, deficient both in pre- and post replication recombination repair and SOS induction (inducible error-prone repair), was compared to that of a recB mutant which is recombination deficient but SOS proficient and to a previously studied DNA polymerase 1-deficient mutant (polA) which lacks the excision repair pathway. Indirect damage by water radicals (primarily OH radicals) was circumvented by the presence of 2 M glycerol during irradiation. Indirect X-ray damage by water radicals accounts for at least 85% of the PLD found in exposed repair-deficient cells. The DNA polymerase 1-deficient mutant is most sensitive to indirect damage with the order of sensitivity polA1 greater than recB greater than or equal to recA greater than wild type. For the direct effects of X rays the order of sensitivity is recA greater than recB greater than polA1 greater than wild type. The significance of the various repair pathways in mitigating PLD by direct and indirect damage is discussed

  16. Abnormal sensitivity of diploid skin fibroblasts from a family with Gardner's syndrome to the lethal effects of X-irradiation, ultraviolet light and mitomycin-C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.B.; Nove, J.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts isolated from two members of the same family with the cancer-prone disease Gardner's Syndrome (intestinal polyposis, colon cancer, bone and soft tissue tumors) showed enhanced sensitivity to the lethal effects of X-irradiation, ultraviolet light and mitomycin-C. These cells showed no liquid-holding type recovery following UV-irradiation of confluent cultures, but were normal in their capacity for UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis. UV survival was not influenced by post-irradiation incubation with caffeine. (orig.)

  17. Changes in electrographic correlates of sleep-wakefulness cycle in cats irradiated with minimal lethal doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordzadze, R.N.; Nadarishvili, K.Sh.; Tsinitia, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    The paper deals with the dynamics of changes in bioelectrical activity (BEA) of the somatosensory cortex (SC) and dorsal hippocampus (DH) in the sleep-wakefulness (SW) cycle by means of a computer and automatized frequency analysis system in the course of chronic experiences with cats before and at various stages of development of radiation sickness (RS). The dose of single whole-body irradiation equaled 8 Gr (800+-20 rad). It has been shown that changes which occur in SC substantially differ in dependence on the stages of the SW cycle. More pronounced changes after irradiation are observed in low-frequency rhythms, particularly at the stage of deep slow wave sleep (DSWS) and less pronounced - in the paradoxical sleep (PS). Rhythmics shifts taking place in DH are mainly similar during wakefulness (W), superficial slow wave sleep (SSWS) and DSWS. In PS changes in rhythmics considerably differ as compared with We SSWS and DSWS. Revealed are also other specific shifts including a reliable enhancement of absolute value (AV) and specific ponderability (SP) of thera-rhythm of hippocampus during the RS acute period in animals survived the three week observation period. All this permits to conclude that BEA quantitative studies of various brain areas in the SW permit to reveal the trends in search of diagnostic and prognostic value of such investigations in case of different extreme states and to outline on the patogenetic basis correction methods for neutral disorders in case of RS

  18. The effect of peripheral lymphoid cells on the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease following allogeneic mouse bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaraz, R.; Ballinger, W.; Sachs, D.H.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation-induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras. The incidence of GVHD was reduced significantly in BALB/c leads to C57BL/6 radiation chimeras if bone marrow donors were exsanguinated immediately prior to marrow harvest. Chimeras resulting from the injection of bone marrow from bled donors exhibited only donor cells in spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood and normal levels of Thy 1+ and Ia+ cells were found in each of these lymphoid compartments. The addition of as few as 3 X 10(4) peripheral mononuclear cells to the marrow from exsanguinated donors uniformly led to lethal GVHD. 51 Cr-labeled cell traffic studies revealed that prior exsanguination of marrow donors led to about a 70% reduction in the number of circulating mononuclear cells contaminating the bone marrow at the time of marrow harvest. This decrease in contaminating peripheral cells was calculated to be in the appropriate range to account for the decreased GVHD seen when marrow from exsanguinated donors was used. It thus appears that peripheral cells contaminating marrow can be an important factor in causing lethal GVHD in allogeneic radiation chimeras. These results raise the possibility that the fulminant GVHD seen in human marrow transplantation is in part due to the major contamination of bone marrow with peripheral blood that results from the techniques currently used for human bone marrow harvest

  19. Genetic recombination of Herpes simplex virus, the role of the host cell and UV-irradiation of the virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, U.B.; Summers, W.C.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT

    1980-01-01

    Recombination frequencies for two sets of genetic markers of Herpes simplex virus were determined in various host cells with and without ultraviolet irradiation of the virus. UV irradiation increased the recombination frequency in all the cell types studied in direct proportion to the unrepaired lethal damage. In human skin fibroblasts derived from a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) of complementation group A, a given dose of UV stimulated recombination more than that in fibroblasts from normal individuals. On the other hand, UV stimulation of HSV recombination was slightly less than normal in fibroblasts derived from a patient with a variant form XP and from an ataxia telangiectasia patient. Caffeine, an agent known to inhibit repair of UV damage, reduced recombination in most of the cell types studied but did not suppress the UV-induced increase in recombination. These findings suggest that for virus DNA with the same number of unrepaired UV-lesions, each of the tested cell types promoted HSV-recombination to an equivalent extent. (orig.) [de

  20. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. II. Synergistic lethality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busse, P.M.; Bose, S.K.; Jones, R.W.; Tolmach, L.J.

    1977-01-01

    Postirradiation treatment of HeLa S3 cells with 1 mM caffeine results in a marked diminution of the surviving fraction as scored by colony formation. The decrease is dose dependent; the effect of a 24-hour postirradiation treatment of a nonsynchronous population with caffeine is to change the terminal slope of the survival curve and its intercept. D 0 is reduced from 130 to 60 rad; the extrapolation number is increased about twofold. The amount of postirradiation killing is maximal if cells are exposed to caffeine at a concentration of at least 1 mM for 8 hours; less than 10% of unirradiated cells are killed under these conditions. Dose-response curves were also obtained for synchronous cells at various phases of the cell cycle. Similar results were obtained at all cell ages, but the magnitude of the effect is age dependent. This age dependence was further explored in experiments in which mitotically collected cells were exposed to 300 or 500 rad doses at 2-hour intervals throughout the cell cycle. Treatment with caffeine for 24 hours after irradiation enchances the killing of cells late in the cycle more than cells in G1. The sensitivities of two other cell lines, CHO and EMT6, also were examined; both are substantially less sensitive to caffeine. The smaller cell-cycle dependence of CHO cells is qualitatively the same as that of HeLa cells

  1. Relationship of DNA repair and chromosome aberrations to potentially lethal damage repair in X-irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Nagasawa, H.; Little, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    By the alkaline elution technique, the repair of x-ray-induced DNA single strand breaks and DNA-protein cross-links was investigated in stationary phase, contact-inhibited mouse cells. During the first hour of repair, approximately 90% of x-ray induced single strand breaks were rejoined whereas most of the remaining breaks were rejoined more slowly during the next 5 h. The number of residual non-rejoined single strand breaks was approximately proportional to the x-ray dose at early repair times. DNA-protein cross-links were removed at a slower rate - T 1/2 approximately 10 to 12 h. Cells were subcultured at low density at various times after irradiation and scored for colony survival, and chromosome aberrations in the first mitosis after sub-culture. Both cell lethality and the frequency of chromosome aberrations decreased during the first several hours of repair, reaching a minimum level by 6 h; this decrease correlated temporally with the repair of the slowly rejoining DNA strand breaks. The possible relationship of DNA repair to changes in survival and chromosome aberrations is discussed

  2. Inhibitory action of chlorophyllin of autosome recessive lethals induced by irradiation; Accion inhibidora de la clorofilina de letales recesivos autosonicos inducidos por irradiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salceda, V M; Pimentel, P A.E.; Cruces, M P [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The chlorolin is a sodium salt of the chlorophyll that has a strong protective action of the damage induced by different agents so much physical as chemical. In Drosophila there is reported this effect in somatic cells. In contrast, in germinal cells using tests with the sexual chromosomes has not been found such inhibitory action. For this reason, in this occasion we will refer to the effect of the lethality induced in autosome chromosomes, in particular to the chromosome II of this species. For such effect groups of males of the line Canton-S its were pre-treated for 24h with or without 69 mm of CCS and later on treaties with or without 40 Gy of gamma irradiation. The males were then subjected to the technical Cy L / Pm for the detection of recessive lethals. In the third generation the respective counts of the descendant of each one of them to determine the corresponding categories for each extracted chromosome were made. To be mendelian crosses it is expected for a normal chromosome a proportion 2:1 of individuals with genotype Cy L / +: +/+. The absence of individuals +/+ it is indicative of a lethal gene, until 10% of these individuals of each male's total descendant, it is considered that is carrying of a semi lethal gene. The sum of lethal and semi lethals constitutes the category detrimental. The obtained results indicated that the pre-treatment with CCS reduces in a significant way the frequency of induced lethals by 40 Gy of gamma rays. The fact that an effect inhibitor has not been observed in the test of recessive lethal bound to the sex obtained previously, it contrasts with the effect observed in the chromosome II, results of this study and with the one observed in the chromosome III in somatic cells. The above-mentioned shows a differential action of the CCS between sexual chromosomes and autosomal before the effect of the gamma radiation. At the moment we don't have an explanation to these evidences. To evaluate the action of the chlorophyllin on

  3. Inhibitory action of chlorophyllin of autosome recessive lethals induced by irradiation; Accion inhibidora de la clorofilina de letales recesivos autosonicos inducidos por irradiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salceda, V.M.; Pimentel, P.A.E.; Cruces, M.P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: vmss@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The chlorolin is a sodium salt of the chlorophyll that has a strong protective action of the damage induced by different agents so much physical as chemical. In Drosophila there is reported this effect in somatic cells. In contrast, in germinal cells using tests with the sexual chromosomes has not been found such inhibitory action. For this reason, in this occasion we will refer to the effect of the lethality induced in autosome chromosomes, in particular to the chromosome II of this species. For such effect groups of males of the line Canton-S its were pre-treated for 24h with or without 69 mm of CCS and later on treaties with or without 40 Gy of gamma irradiation. The males were then subjected to the technical Cy L / Pm for the detection of recessive lethals. In the third generation the respective counts of the descendant of each one of them to determine the corresponding categories for each extracted chromosome were made. To be mendelian crosses it is expected for a normal chromosome a proportion 2:1 of individuals with genotype Cy L / +: +/+. The absence of individuals +/+ it is indicative of a lethal gene, until 10% of these individuals of each male's total descendant, it is considered that is carrying of a semi lethal gene. The sum of lethal and semi lethals constitutes the category detrimental. The obtained results indicated that the pre-treatment with CCS reduces in a significant way the frequency of induced lethals by 40 Gy of gamma rays. The fact that an effect inhibitor has not been observed in the test of recessive lethal bound to the sex obtained previously, it contrasts with the effect observed in the chromosome II, results of this study and with the one observed in the chromosome III in somatic cells. The above-mentioned shows a differential action of the CCS between sexual chromosomes and autosomal before the effect of the gamma radiation. At the moment we don't have an explanation to these evidences. To evaluate the action of the

  4. Relationship between chromosomal aberration of germ cells and dominant lethal mutation in male mice after low dosage of X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingdong, Wang; Baochen, Yang; Yuke, Jin [Bethune (N.) Medical Univ., Changchun, JL (China). Dept. of Gentics

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between chromosomal aberration adn dominant mutation in spermatocytes of late pachytene phase in male mice after a single X-irridiation was reported. It was found that the frequency of aberrant cells was correlative to the rate of fetal death, the latter was being about 2.5 times as high as the former. The frequency of dominant lethal mutation induced by X-irradiation is 2.1995x10{sup -3} gamete {center dot} 10 mGy.

  5. Coliphage 186 replication is delayed when the host cell is UV irradiated before infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, I.; Woods, W.H.; Egan, B.

    1981-01-01

    In contrast to results with injections by lambda and P2, the latent period for infection by coliphage 186 is extended when the host cell is UV irradiated before infection. We find that 186 replication is significantly delayed in such a cell, even though the phage itself has not been irradiated. In contrast, replication of the closely related phage P2 under the same conditions is not affected

  6. The production of IL-1, IL-3, CSA by bone marrow nuclears during bone marrow haemopoiesis after lethal irradiation and syngenic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dygaj, A.M.; Buznik, D.V.; Bogdashin, I.V.; Agafonov, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    The production of haemopoietic factors (IL-1, IL-3, CSA) by adherent and unadherent cells of lethally irradiate CBA mice bone marrow and after syngenic myelokaryocyte transplantation was studied. Radioresistant myelokaryocytes capable to produce haemopoetic factors IL-1, CSA as early as 24 hr after irradiation were found in adherent cell fraction. The synthesis of humoral factors (IL-3, CSA) by unadherent bone marrow elements was realised in a late of experiment (3-6 days) that was connected with forming of functionally valuable cell forms from transplanted or viable stem cells

  7. MASM, a Matrine Derivative, Offers Radioprotection by Modulating Lethal Total-Body Irradiation-Induced Multiple Signaling Pathways in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Matrine is an alkaloid extracted from Sophora flavescens Ait and has many biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antitumor, anti-fibrosis, and immunosuppressive properties. In our previous studies, the matrine derivative MASM was synthesized and exhibited potent inhibitory activity against liver fibrosis. In this study, we mainly investigated its protection against lethal total-body irradiation (TBI in rats. Administration of MASM reduced the radiation sickness characteristics and increased the 30-day survival of rats before or after lethal TBI. Ultrastructural observation illustrated that pretreatment of rats with MASM significantly attenuated the TBI-induced morphological changes in the different organs of irradiated rats. Gene expression profiles revealed that pretreatment with MASM had a dramatic effect on gene expression changes caused by TBI. Pretreatment with MASM prevented differential expression of 53% (765 genes of 1445 differentially expressed genes induced by TBI. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 21 pathways, such as metabolic pathways, pathways in cancer, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways. Our data indicated that pretreatment of rats with MASM modulated these pathways induced by TBI, suggesting that the pretreatment with MASM might provide the protective effects on lethal TBI mainly or partially through the modulation of these pathways, such as multiple MAPK pathways. Therefore, MASM has the potential to be used as an effective therapeutic or radioprotective agent to minimize irradiation damages and in combination with radiotherapy to improve the efficacy of cancer therapy.

  8. Stem and stromal cell reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice following transplantation of hematopoietic tissue from donors of various ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, C.M.; Doran, G.A.; Crouse, D.A.; Sharp, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    If the limited life span of hematopoietic tissues in vitro is due to a finite proliferative capacity of individual stem cells, one might expect tissues of young donors to possess a greater proliferative capacity and to contain a larger population of primitive stem cells than those of older donors. To test this hypothesis, we used 12- and 8-day spleen colony formation (CFU-s) to assay more and less primitive stem cell subpopulations of three murine hematopoietic tissues: fetal liver (FL) and weanling (WBM) and adult (ABM) bone marrow. Subsequently, the same assays and a stromal cell assay were performed on the bone marrow from groups of lethally irradiated mice reconstituted with these tissues. Comparison of the CFU-s content of the donor tissues revealed that FL contained a significantly greater proportion of primitive stem cells as evidenced by a (Day 12):(Day 8) CFU-s ratio of 3.0 +/- 1.0 as compared to 0.9 +/- 0.1 for WBM and ABM. In addition, at 21 weeks post-transplantation the CFU-s/femur values of the FL reconstituted group were significantly greater than those of the ABM and WBM reconstituted groups. These results suggest that fetal hematopoietic tissue contains a greater proportion of primitive stem cells and has a greater proliferative potential than hematopoietic tissue from older donors. No differences were seen in stromal cell reconstitution of the three experimental groups. In all cases, assayable fibroblast colony forming cells (CFU-f) remained at 20-40% of control values, even at 21 weeks postreconstitution

  9. Inhibition of potential lethal damage repair and related gene expression after carbon-ion beam irradiation to human lung cancer grown in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashiro, Tomoyasu; Fujisawa, Takehiko; Koyama-Saegusa, Kumiko; Imai, Takashi; Miyamoto, Tadaaki

    2007-01-01

    Using cultured and nude mouse tumor cells (IA) derived from a human lung cancer, we previously demonstrated their radiosensitivity by focusing attention on the dynamics of tumor clonogens and the early and rapid survival recovery (potential lethal damage repair: PLD repair) occurring after X-ray irradiation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating gene expression in association with PLD repair after carbon-ion beam or X-ray irradiation to cancer cells. In this study we tried to detect the mechanism of DNA damage and repair of the clonogens after X-ray or carbon-ion beam irradiation. At first, colony assay method was performed after irradiation of 12 Gy of X-ray or 5 Gy of carbon-ion beam to compare the time dependent cell survival of the IA cells after each irradiation pass. Second, to search the genes causing PLD repair after irradiation of X-ray or carbon-ion beam, we evaluated gene expressions by using semi-quantitative RT-PCR with the selected 34 genes reportedly related to DNA repair. The intervals from the irradiation were 0, 6, 12 and 24 hr for colony assay method, and 0, 3, 18 hr for RT-PCR method. From the result of survival assays, significant PLD repair was not observed in carbon-ion beam as compared to X-ray irradiation. The results of RT-PCR were as follows. The gene showing significantly higher expressions after X-ray irradiation than after carbon-ion beam irradiation was PCNA. The genes showing significantly lower expressions after X-ray irradiation rather than after carbon-ion beam irradiation were RAD50, BRCA1, MRE11A, XRCC3, CHEK1, MLH1, CCNB1, CCNB2 and LIG4. We conclude that PCNA could be a likely candidate gene for PLD repair. (author)

  10. Hematopoietic differentiative properties of murine spleen implanted in the omenta of irradiated and nonirradiated hosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, J E; Tjio, J H; Smith, W W; Brecher, G [California Univ., San Francisco (USA); National Inst. of Arthritis, Metabolism, and Digestive Diseases, Bethesda, Md. (USA); National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, Md. (USA). Lab. of Viral Oncology)

    1975-01-01

    Whole body irradiation of the recipients of syngeneic splenic implants into the omentum greatly enhances hematopoiesis and permits survival of and repopulation by stem cells of donor origin. Donor hematopoietic stem cells do not survive in spleen implants of the nonirradiated host.Irradiated hosts were therefore used in the bulk of the experiments. Differentiation in the implants of splenic fragments is predominantly erythrocytic at 10 days and shifts to predominantly granulocytic differentiation at 21 days. Suspensions of spleen cells injected into the omentum are predominantly granulocytopoietic at 10 days. The differentiation in fragments of spleen depleted of stem cells by irradiation, seeded with bone marrow cells and implanted into the omentum results in mixed erythrocytic and granulocytic hematopoiesis, with granulocytic predominance. Lymphocytic cells appeared late in the implants of irradiated recipients even at a time of prolific lymphocytopoiesis in the hosts' own spleens. The cause of the delay in the implants is not clear. The data are consistent with the concept that differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells is influenced by the stromal cells of the parent organ. The erythrocytic inductive capacity of the stromal cells may belost by mechanical disruption or modified by irradiation or a prolonged period of implantation.

  11. Role of marrow architecture and stromal cells in the recovery process of aplastic marrow of lethally irradiated rats parabiosed with healthy litter mates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.; Kagawa, K.; Awai, M.; Irino, S.

    1986-01-01

    Bone marrow aplasia was induced in rats by whole body lethal irradiation (1,000 rads by x-ray), and rats died of irradiation injury within 7 days. Correlative studies at light (LM), transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated swelling of endothelial and reticular cells and hemorrhage due to detachment of sinus endothelial cells on days 1 and 2. With time, structural recovery occurred without hemopoietic recovery. Reticular cells developed small intracytoplasmic lipid droplets on days 3 and 4. This resulted in fatty aplastic marrow within 7 days. On the other hand, in the marrow of irradiated rats parabiosed with healthy mates by aortic anastomosis, hemopoiesis was initiated by adhesion of nucleated blood cells to fine cytoplasmic pseudopods of fat-stored cells on days 1 and 2 after parabiosis. On days 3 to 5, reticular cells with large lipid droplets and fine pseudopods increased, then hemopoietic foci became clear and extensive. On day 8 after parabiosis, the aplastic bone marrow recovered completely both its structure and hemopoietic activity. Thus, hemopoietic recovery in lethally irradiated marrow begins with recovery of vascular endothelial cells, re-establishment of sinusoidal structure, and morphological and functional recoveries of reticular cells from fat-storage cells by releasing intracytoplasmic lipid droplets. Marrow stromal cells, namely reticular, fat-storage and fibroblastoid cells, share a common cellular origin, and regain their structure and function when fat-storage cells and fibroid cells are placed in contact with hemopoietic precursor cells

  12. Lethal Effect of Gamma Irradiation on the Potato Tuber Moth, Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) and its Effect on Certain Physicochemical Properties of Potato Tubers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, G.M.; Rizk, S. A.; Abdalla, R.S.; Sobeiha, A.M.K.; Dahroug, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of 4-day-old eggs of Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) to a dose level of 800 Gy of gamma radiation caused complete mortality and prevent egg hatching after 4 days from exposure to radiation. This dose level was considered as the lethal dose for the egg stage. The dose levels of 700 and 2800 Gy were considered lethal for the full grown larvae after periods of 9 and 1 days elapsed respectively from exposure to gamma radiation .The percent larval mortality increased with the increase of both the dose level applied and the time elapsed after exposure to gamma radiation. Irradiation of full grown pupae at the dose level 1900 Gy resulted in a complete reduction of adult emergence, reached 100 % . It could be concluded that gamma irradiation with a dose level 2800 Gy caused complete mortality to different stages of Phthorimaea operculella. Moreover, the physical and chemical properties of irradiated potato tubers did not significantly differ as compared to unirradiated tubers .This obtained, fatal irradiation dose did not exceed the safe limits recommended by the international organization FAO/WHO.

  13. Effects of sub-lethal dose of gamma-irradiation on levels of acid phosphatase in cerebellum of pigeons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.C.; Gadhia, P.K.

    1980-01-01

    The changes in the activities of acid phosphatase in the sham-irradiated and γ-irradiated cerebellum of pigeons have been studied both biochemically as well as histochemically after 400 rads. The specific activity of acid phosphatase decreased significantly after 48h and 72h of irradiation. The histochemical observations following total body irradiation confirmed the results obtained by quantitative biochemical studies. (author)

  14. The effect of a single lethal X-irradiation exposure on the activity of lipoprotein lipase in the tissues of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlakova, A.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M.

    1979-01-01

    Wistar male rats, both fed and fasting for 16 h prior to irradiation, were exposed to a single lethal X-ray dose of 387 mC/kg (1500R). The activity of lipoprotein lipase in white adipose (epididymal) tissue and heart muscle and the concentration of serum triglycerides were determined at 1, 6, 24, 48, and 72 h after irradiation. In the early time periods, at 1 and 6 h after exposure, the activity of lipoprotein lipase decreased in adipose tissue and increased in heart muscle of the irradiated fed rats; in fasting rats it decreased in heart muscle at 1 h after exposure. The concentration of serum triglycerides increased at 1 h and decreased at 6 h after exposure in fed rats. In these rats, alterations in serum triglycerides correlated with changes in lipoprotein lipase activity in adipose tissue. Alterations observed at the later time periods were more dependent on the time interval between irradiation and the analysis. Lipoprotein lipase activity increased with time after irradiation up to the maximal values at 72 h. Fasting prior to and after irradiation substantially modified the response of animals to radiation. (author)

  15. Complexity of the Microglial Activation Pathways that Drive Innate Host Responses During Lethal Alphavirus Encephalitis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilufer Esen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Microglia express multiple TLRs (Toll-like receptors and provide important host defence against viruses that invade the CNS (central nervous system. Although prior studies show these cells become activated during experimental alphavirus encephalitis in mice to generate cytokines and chemokines that influence virus replication, tissue inflammation and neuronal survival, the specific PRRs (pattern recognition receptors and signalling intermediates controlling microglial activation in this setting remain unknown. To investigate these questions directly in vivo, mice ablated of specific TLR signalling molecules were challenged with NSV (neuroadapted Sindbis virus and CNS viral titres, inflammatory responses and clinical outcomes followed over time. To approach this problem specifically in microglia, the effects of NSV on primary cells derived from the brains of wild-type and mutant animals were characterized in vitro. From the standpoint of the virus, microglial activation required viral uncoating and an intact viral genome; inactivated virus particles did not elicit measurable microglial responses. At the level of the target cell, NSV triggered multiple PRRs in microglia to produce a broad range of inflammatory mediators via non-overlapping signalling pathways. In vivo, disease survival was surprisingly independent of TLR-driven responses, but still required production of type-I IFN (interferon to control CNS virus replication. Interestingly, the ER (endoplasmic reticulum protein UNC93b1 facilitated host survival independent of its known effects on endosomal TLR signalling. Taken together, these data show that alphaviruses activate microglia via multiple PRRs, highlighting the complexity of the signalling networks by which CNS host responses are elicited by these infections.

  16. Clinical and symptomatological study of pigs subjected to a lethal dose of integral gamma irradiation; Etude clinique et symptomatologique chez le porc soumis a une irradiation gamma totale a dose letale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaiman, M; Guenet, J -L; Maas, J; Nizza, P

    1966-05-01

    Results are reported from a clinical and haematological study on a Corsican species of pigs wholly exposed to an approximately lethal dose of {gamma} radiation. The aim of this work was to examine the changes in the irradiation syndrome of irradiation for pigs to make it thus possible to devise further experiments, in particular in the therapeutic field. The dose received was 285 rads (measured as the absorption in the vertical antero-posterior medial plane). Data are presented on cyto-haematological changes in the blood circulating immediately after irradiation, and followed up to death, and changes in the medullary cytology after irradiation. The clinical picture of lethal radiation injury in swine is described. (authors) [French] Les auteurs rapportent les resultats d'une etude clinique et hematologique chez des porcs de race corse irradies in toto a dose sensiblement letale. Le but de cette etude etait de connaitre l'evolution du syndrome aigu d'irradiation chez le porc et de permettre ainsi le developpement d'experimentations ulterieures, en particulier dans le domaine therapeutique. La dose delivree etait de 285 rad (en dose absorbee au niveau du plan median vertical anteroposterieur. L'etude a porte essentiellement: 1. Sur les modifications cyclo-hematologiques du sang circulant immediatement apres l'irradiation, pour les differentes lignees cellulaires; l'evolution de ces modifications a ete notee jusqu'a la mort; 2. Sur les modifications de la cytologie medullaire apres irradiation (evolution du myelogramme et essai d'evaluation de la cellularite de la moelle osseuse);: 3. Sur les signes cliniques, d'ailleurs tres discrets, observes chez les porcs apres irradiation. (auteurs)

  17. Clinical and symptomatological study of pigs subjected to a lethal dose of integral gamma irradiation; Etude clinique et symptomatologique chez le porc soumis a une irradiation gamma totale a dose letale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaiman, M.; Guenet, J.-L.; Maas, J.; Nizza, P

    1966-05-01

    Results are reported from a clinical and haematological study on a Corsican species of pigs wholly exposed to an approximately lethal dose of {gamma} radiation. The aim of this work was to examine the changes in the irradiation syndrome of irradiation for pigs to make it thus possible to devise further experiments, in particular in the therapeutic field. The dose received was 285 rads (measured as the absorption in the vertical antero-posterior medial plane). Data are presented on cyto-haematological changes in the blood circulating immediately after irradiation, and followed up to death, and changes in the medullary cytology after irradiation. The clinical picture of lethal radiation injury in swine is described. (authors) [French] Les auteurs rapportent les resultats d'une etude clinique et hematologique chez des porcs de race corse irradies in toto a dose sensiblement letale. Le but de cette etude etait de connaitre l'evolution du syndrome aigu d'irradiation chez le porc et de permettre ainsi le developpement d'experimentations ulterieures, en particulier dans le domaine therapeutique. La dose delivree etait de 285 rad (en dose absorbee au niveau du plan median vertical anteroposterieur. L'etude a porte essentiellement: 1. Sur les modifications cyclo-hematologiques du sang circulant immediatement apres l'irradiation, pour les differentes lignees cellulaires; l'evolution de ces modifications a ete notee jusqu'a la mort; 2. Sur les modifications de la cytologie medullaire apres irradiation (evolution du myelogramme et essai d'evaluation de la cellularite de la moelle osseuse);: 3. Sur les signes cliniques, d'ailleurs tres discrets, observes chez les porcs apres irradiation. (auteurs)

  18. The lethal interaction of x ray and penicillin induced lesions following x-irradiation of Escherichia coli B/r in the presence of hypoxic cell sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, N.E.; Obioha, F.I.

    1982-01-01

    When Escherichia coli B/r were x-irradiated under anoxia in the presence of different electron-affinic sensitizers and then incubated in broth containing penicillin (at a concentration that did not kill unirradiated cells) additional killing of the bacteria occurred provided the sensitizers were of relatively high lipophilicity. The overall effect was to increase the efficiency of these sensitizers. It is concluded that sensitizer-dependent latent radiation lesions(s) are produced in membrane components of the cell envelope that interact with damage caused by penicillin in the peptidoglycan layer and this causes the additional lethality

  19. Enhancement of the far-UV lethality in yeast Candida guilliermondii by near-UV post-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraikin, G.Y.; Pospelov, M.E.; Rubin, L.B.

    1980-01-01

    In experiments with the non-photoreactivable yeast Candida guilliermondii, radiations at 313, 334 and 365 nm, having no effect on untreated cell populations, produced an 'enhancing' effect on the lethality of 254 nm-pretreated cells. Wavelengths in the visible region of the spectrum did not exhibit a similar effect. (author)

  20. Metastasis and growth of friend tumor cells in irradiated syngeneic hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matioli, G.

    1974-01-01

    Friend tumor cells (FTC) have been studied by growing them in lethally irradiated syngeneic mice. After establishing the FTC dilution factor (delta), extinction factor (Q), and the optimal time for colony counts, the FTC kinetic was analyzed by the recovery curve method. It was found that FTC growth is different from that experienced by normal or leukemic Friend stem cells when tested by the same in vivo assay. The most interesting differences were the high metastatic activity, the lack of differentiation, the deterministic growth, and the independence from the spleen microenvironment experienced by the FTC, in contrast with the normal and leukemic stem cells. In addition, the estimate of the critical size the FTC colony has to reach before releasing the first metastatic cells is presented. (U.S.)

  1. Restoring efficiency of hemopoietic cell transplantation in a mouse lethally irradiated by a total exposure to X rays; L'efficacite restauratrice de la greffe de cellules hemopoietiques chez la souris letalement irradiee par une exposition totale aux rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Gino

    1959-10-15

    This research thesis reports the study of possibility of treatments (or restoration) of a mouse which has been submitted to a lethal dose of X rays. More particularly, the author compared the restoring efficiency of bone marrow and fetal liver injected in a mouse which had been lethally irradiated by a total exposure to X rays. He also studied the functional status of the hemopoietic graft, and the emergence of the secondary disease in mice which had been as well lethally irradiated and then restored by injection of bone marrow and fetal liver. The author then addressed the influence of the induction of immune tolerance of the host with respect to the donor on the survival of a mouse lethally irradiated and restored by homologue bone marrow [French] Des resultats des recherches que nous avons conduites permettent, dans les limites de nos conditions experimentales, d'eclaircir certains aspects du probleme de la restauration des animaux irradies par la greffe de cellules hemopoietiques. On peut admettre que la moelle osseuse de 30 jours est 2 fois plus efficace que le foie foetal de 16 jours, pour ce qui concerne la survie 30 jours; ceci aussi bien en cas de restauration isologue que homologue. En outre, le foie foetal de 16 jours permet une survie d'environ 50 pc plus elevee que les foies foetaux de 13 ou 19 jours; ceci en cas de restauration isologue. On a aussi montre que les degres de capacite restauratrice des differents tissus hemopoietiques dependent du nombre de cellules souches, progenitrices des granulocytes polynucleaires. Nous avons mis en evidence, en cas de restauration par la moelle osseuse homologue, que la presence d'un greffon hemopoietique fonctionnel est necessaire et suffisante pour l'apparition de la maladie secondaire et que celle-ci est une cause suffisante et non necessaire de la mortalite tardive. La constatation experimentale que la viabilite du greffon est une cause suffisante et non necessaire de la mortalite tardive en est la preuve

  2. A Study on Recovery from Potentially Lethal Damage induced by γ-Irradiation in Plateau-phase Vero Cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Il Han; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il; Cha, Chang Yong

    1988-01-01

    Recovery from potentially lethal damage (PLDR) after irradiation was studied in plateau-phase culture of Vero cells in vitro. Unfed plateau-phase cells were irradiated with dose of 1 to 9 Gy using Cs-137 irradiator. Cells then were incubated again and left in situ for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 24 hours and then were trypsinized, explanted, and subcultured in fresh RPMI-1640 media containing 0.33% agar. Cell survival was measured by colony forming ability. An adequate number of heavily irradiated Vero cells were added as feeder cells to make the total cell number constant in every culture dish. As the postirradiation in situ incubation time increased, surviving fraction increased saturation level at 2 to 4 hours after in situ incubation. As the radiation dose increased, the rate of PLDR also increased. In analysis of cell survival curve fitted to the linear-quadratic model, the linear inactivation coefficient (a) decreased largely and reached nearly to zero but the quadratic inactivation coefficient (b) increased minimally by increment of postirradiation in situ incubation time. So PLDR mainly affected the damage expressed as a. In the multitarget model, significant change was not obtained in D0 but in Dq. Therefore, shoulder region in cell survival curve was mainly affected by PLDR and terminal slope was not influenced at all. And dose-modifying factor by PLDR was relatively higher in shoulder region, that is, in low dose area below 3 Gy

  3. Anti-asialo GM1 antiserum treatment of lethally irradiated recipients before bone marrow transplantation: Evidence that recipient natural killer depletion enhances survival, engraftment, and hematopoietic recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiberghien, P.; Longo, D.L.; Wine, J.W.; Alvord, W.G.; Reynolds, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are reported to have an important role in the resistance of lethally irradiated recipients to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Therefore, we investigated the effects of recipient NK depletion on survival, chimerism, and hematopoietic reconstitution after lethal irradiation and the transplantation of limiting amounts of T-cell-deficient bone marrow (BM). When administered before BMT, anti-asialo GM1 (ASGM1) antiserum treatment, effective in depleting in vivo NK activity, was associated with a marked increase in survival in 3 of 3 allogeneic combinations (BALB/c into C3H/HeN, C57B1/6, or C3B6F1). This enhanced survival was independent of the susceptibility of each recipient strain to accept BALB/c BM. Moreover, recipient anti-ASGM1 treatment was also effective in increasing survival in recipients of syngeneic BM, suggesting that NK cells can adversely affect engraftment independent of genetically controlled polymorphic cell surface determinants. Analysis of chimerism in surviving animals 2 months post-BMT showed that recipient NK depletion significantly increased the level of donor engraftment when high doses of BM were transplanted. These studies also demonstrated that anti-ASGM1 pretreatment mainly resulted in an increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis in the second and third week after irradiation. Anti-ASGM1 treatment also dramatically accelerated the rate of appearance of donor-derived cells with a higher level of donor-cell engraftment apparent at a time when the differences in survival between NK-depleted and control BMT recipients became significant. Peripheral cell counts were also affected by NK depletion, with significantly enhanced platelet and red blood cell recovery and a moderate increase in granulocyte recovery

  4. Anti-asialo GM1 antiserum treatment of lethally irradiated recipients before bone marrow transplantation: Evidence that recipient natural killer depletion enhances survival, engraftment, and hematopoietic recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiberghien, P.; Longo, D.L.; Wine, J.W.; Alvord, W.G.; Reynolds, C.W. (Program Resources, Inc., Frederick, MD (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are reported to have an important role in the resistance of lethally irradiated recipients to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Therefore, we investigated the effects of recipient NK depletion on survival, chimerism, and hematopoietic reconstitution after lethal irradiation and the transplantation of limiting amounts of T-cell-deficient bone marrow (BM). When administered before BMT, anti-asialo GM1 (ASGM1) antiserum treatment, effective in depleting in vivo NK activity, was associated with a marked increase in survival in 3 of 3 allogeneic combinations (BALB/c into C3H/HeN, C57B1/6, or C3B6F1). This enhanced survival was independent of the susceptibility of each recipient strain to accept BALB/c BM. Moreover, recipient anti-ASGM1 treatment was also effective in increasing survival in recipients of syngeneic BM, suggesting that NK cells can adversely affect engraftment independent of genetically controlled polymorphic cell surface determinants. Analysis of chimerism in surviving animals 2 months post-BMT showed that recipient NK depletion significantly increased the level of donor engraftment when high doses of BM were transplanted. These studies also demonstrated that anti-ASGM1 pretreatment mainly resulted in an increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis in the second and third week after irradiation. Anti-ASGM1 treatment also dramatically accelerated the rate of appearance of donor-derived cells with a higher level of donor-cell engraftment apparent at a time when the differences in survival between NK-depleted and control BMT recipients became significant. Peripheral cell counts were also affected by NK depletion, with significantly enhanced platelet and red blood cell recovery and a moderate increase in granulocyte recovery.

  5. Separate effects of irradiation and of graft-versus-host reaction on rat mucosal mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, A.G.; Munro, G.H.; Huntley, J.F.; Miller, H.R.P.; Ferguson, A.

    1989-01-01

    T cell mediated immune responses in the gut can produce enteropathy and malabsorption. The authors investigated the relevance of mucosal mast cells (MMC) to the mechanisms of this enteropathy by using graft-versus-host reaction (GvHR) in the rat as a model of mucosal delayed type hypersensitivity. x-irradiation, with or without GvHR, led to the virtual disappearance of jejunal MMC, undetectable jejunal rat mast cell protease (RMCPII) and very low levels of RMCPII in serum (all p<0.01 when compared with unirradiated controls). These experiments show that there is a modest expansion in jejunal MMC in unirradiated rats with semiallogeneic GvHR, whereas irradiation, alone or associated with GvHR, profoundly depletes MMC for at least two weeks. The enteropathy of GvHR can evolve in the virtual absence of MMC. (author)

  6. Contribution to the study of non-lethal whole-body gamma irradiation effects on the unitary activities of the dorsal hippocampus in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassant, M.-H.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of non-lethal whole-body gamma irradiation on the spontaneous activity of the dorsal hippocampus pyramidal cells were studied in rabbits. First of all the unitary activity of the CA 1 and CA 4 pyramidal cells was recorded extracellularly in the reference animal. The results were analyzed by a statistical method. By classifying the various cell functioning modes observed, and measuring the frequency with which they appear as a function of the state of vigilance, an attempt was made to characterize precisely the spontaneous activity of the hippocampal neurons. Recording were then made under identical experimental conditions on animals totally irradiated to mean absorbed doses of 250 and 450 rads (delivered at a constant rate of 14 rads/mn). The electroencephalographic activity of the hippocampus shows many anomalies (slow waves, wave-points, theta rythm deformation) as a function of which several pathological states were distinguished and used to classify the data, then processed by the methods already used for the reference data. The results obtained prove that the statistical characteristics of the unitary activity are changed by irradiation [fr

  7. Prevention of lethal murine graft versus host disease by treatment of donor cells with L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charley, M.; Thiele, D.L.; Bennett, M.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    Graft vs. host disease (GVHD) remains one of the main problems associated with bone marrow transplantation. The current studies were undertaken to determine whether treatment of the donor inoculum with the anticytotoxic cell compound L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester (Leu-Leu-OMe) would alter the development of GVHD in a murine model. Irradiated recipient mice transplanted with a mixture of control bone marrow and spleen cells from naive semiallogeneic donors died rapidly from GVHD, whereas the recipients of cells incubated with 250 microM Leu-Leu-OMe all survived. In addition, Leu-Leu-OMe treatment of cells obtained from donors immunized against host alloantigens resulted in significantly prolonged survival. Phenotypic characterization of spleen cells from the various groups of mice that had received Leu-Leu-OMe-treated cells and survived consistently revealed the donor phenotype. Treatment of marrow cells with 250 microM Leu-Leu-OMe appeared to have no adverse effects on stem cell function. Erythropoiesis was undiminished, as assayed by splenic 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine- 125 I uptake. Moreover, granulocytic and megakaryocytic regeneration were histologically equivalent in the spleens of recipients of control or Leu-Leu-OMe-treated cells. Treatment of the donor inoculum with Leu-Leu-OMe thus prevents GVHD in this murine strain combination with no apparent stem cell toxicity

  8. Effect of Pseudomonas contamination or antibiotic decontamination of the GI tract on acute radiation lethality after neutron or gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of antibiotic decontamination of Pseudomonas contamination of the GI tract prior to whole-body neutron or gamma irradiation was studied. It was observed that for fission neutron doses greater than 5.5 Gy, cyclotron-produced neutron doses greater than 6.7 Gy, and 137Cs gamma-ray doses greater than 14.4 Gy, the median survival time of untreated rats was relatively constant at 4.2 to 4.5 days, indicating death was due to intestinal injury. Within the dose range of 3.5 to 5.5 Gy of fission neutrons, 4.9 to 6.7 Gy of cyclotron-produced neutrons, and 9.6 to 14.4 Gy of gamma rays, median survival time of these animals was inversely related to dose and varied from 12 to 4.6 days. This change in survival time with dose reflects a transition in the mechanisms of acute radiation death from pure hematopoietic, to a combination of intestinal and hematopoietic, to pure intestinal death. Decontamination of the GI tract with antibiotics prior to irradiation increased median survival time 1 to 5 days in this transitional dose range. Contamination of the intestinal flora with Pseudomonas aeruginosa prior to irradiation reduced median survival time 1 to 5 days in the same radiation dose range. Pseudomonas-contaminated animals irradiated within this transitional dose range had maximum concentrations of total bacteria and Pseudomonas in their livers at the time of death. However, liver bacteria concentration was usually higher in gamma-irradiated animals, due to a smaller contribution of hematopoietic injury in neutron-irradiated animals. The effects of both decontamination of the GI tract and Pseudomonas contamination of the GI tract were negligible in the range of doses in which median survival time was dose independent, i.e., in the pure intestinal death dose range

  9. Lethality in repair-proficient Escherichia coli after 365nm ultraviolet light irradiation is dependent on fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Reciprocity (total applied fluence produces the same response, regardless of the fluence rate) for the lethal effects caused by 365 and 254 nm ultraviolet light (UV) was studied for repair-proficient and -deficient Escherichia coli strains. In the repair-proficient strain, E. coli WP2 uvr A + recA + , reciprocity after 365 nm UV was only observed at fluence rates of about 750 Wm -2 and above. Below this rate, the cells became increasingly sensitive as the fluence rate was decreased. Similar lack of reciprocity was obtained whether the cells were exposed at 0 or 25 0 C. The double repair-defective mutant, E. coli WP100 uvr A recA, showed complete reciprocity after 365 nm UV over the same range of fluence rates measured for the repair-proficient strain. For 254 nm UV, complete reciprocity occurred in both strains over a range of fluence rates differing by an order of magnitude. (author)

  10. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. VII. Evidence that caffeine enhances expression of potentially lethal radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetham, K.L.; Tolmach, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    HeLa cells irradiated with 2 Gy of 220-kV X rays suffer a 60-70% loss of colony-forming ability which is increased to 90% by postirradiation treatment with 10 mM caffeine for 6 hr. The detailed postirradiation patterns of cell death and sister-cell fusion in such cultures and in cultures in which the colony-forming ability was brought to about the same level by treatment with a larger (4 Gy) X-ray dose alone or by longer (48 hr) treatment with 10 mM caffeine alone were recorded by time-lapse cinemicrography. Because the patterns of cell death and fusion differ radically in irradiated and in caffeine-treated cultures, the response of the additional cells killed by the combined treatment can be identified as X-ray induced rather than caffeine induced. The appearance of cultures after several days of incubation confirms the similarity of the post-treatment patterns of proliferation in cultures suffering enhanced killing to those occurring in cultures treated with larger doses of X rays alone. It is concluded that x rays do not sensitize cells to caffeine, but rather that caffeine enhanced the expression of potentially lethal radiation-induced damage

  11. Effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to lethal whole-body. gamma. irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoue, M.; Uchida, K.; Yokokura, T.; Takahashi, T.; Mutai, M.

    1981-11-01

    The effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to 2-kR whole-body ..gamma.. irradiation was studied using germfree, monoassociated, and conventionalized ICR mice. The germfree mice were monoassociated with 1 of 11 bacterial strains, which were isolated from the fresh feces of conventional mice, 2 weeks prior to irradiation. All mice died within 3 weeks after irradiation. Monoassociation with Fusobacterium sp., Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas sp. significantly reduced the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. In contrast, monoassociation with Clostridium sp., Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, or Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly prolonged the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. This suggests that the latter organisms may perform some activity to protect the mice from radiation injury. In this histopathological autopsy examination, the main lesions were hypocellularity in hematopoietic organs and hemorrhage in various organs. Neither karyorrhexis nor desquamation of intestinal mucosal cells was observed in any mice. From these observations, it is suggested that the death of these mice was related to hematopoietic damage. Bacterial invasion into various organs was observed in conventionalized and Pseudomonas-, E. coli-, or S. faecalis-monoassociated mice but not in Clostridium-, B. pseudolongum-, L. acidophilus-, or Fusobacterium-monoassociated mice.

  12. Effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to lethal whole-body γ irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoue, M.; Uchida, K.; Yokokura, T.; Takahashi, T.; Mutai, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to 2-kR whole-body γ irradiation was studied using germfree, monoassociated, and conventionalized ICR mice. The germfree mice were monoassociated with 1 of 11 bacterial strains, which were isolated from the fresh feces of conventional mice, 2 weeks prior to irradiation. All mice died within 3 weeks after irradiation. Monoassociation with Fusobacterium sp., Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas sp. significantly reduced the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. In contrast, monoassociation with Clostridium sp., Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, or Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly prolonged the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. This suggests that the latter organisms may perform some activity to protect the mice from radiation injury. In this histopathological autopsy examination, the main lesions were hypocellularity in hematopoietic organs and hemorrhage in various organs. Neither karyorrhexis nor desquamation of intestinal mucosal cells was observed in any mice. From these observations, it is suggested that the death of these mice was related to hematopoietic damage. Bacterial invasion into various organs was observed in conventionalized and Pseudomonas-, E. coli-, or S. faecalis-monoassociated mice but not in Clostridium-, B. pseudolongum-, L. acidophilus-, or Fusobacterium-monoassociated mice

  13. Mutagenesis and lethality following S phase irradiation of xeroderma pigmentosum and normal human diploid fibroblasts with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Little, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of u.v. light exposure in the DNA synthetic phase of the cell cycle were determined in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XP-A), hereditary adenomatosis of the colon and rectum (ACR), and a normal, foreskin derived cell strain (AG1522). For AG1522, an increased sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of u.v. light was observed as compared to previous findings for confluent, non-proliferating cultures. XP-A fibroblasts were markedly hypersensitive and ACR fibroblasts exhibited an intermediate response. The mutagenic response of ACR fibroblasts, however, was similar to normal fibroblasts. A threshold of 1.5-2 J/m 2 was observed for u.v. induced mutagenesis in normal and ACR fibroblasts. XP fibroblasts, on the other hand, were strikingly hypermutable and demonstrated little or no threshold. When S phase mutagenesis was considered as a function of survival level rather than u.v. light dose, XP fibroblasts remained significantly hypermutable as compared with normal fibroblasts at all survival levels. Previous mutagenesis results with confluent, non-proliferating cultures of XP and normal fibroblasts were reanalyzed as a function of cytotoxicity; XP hypermutability at all survival levels was also observed. (author)

  14. Interaction of co-insult treatments wth cadmium chloride and gamma irradiation on lethality and blood indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were (1) to gain insight into sensitivities of vital organs systems after treatments with cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 ), gamma ( 60 Co) radiation, and combined CdCl 2 -gamma radiation; (2) to determine physiological and cellular/molecular changes after these same treatments; and (3) to develop a summary of biochemical/hematological indicators for each insult individually, as well as for the co-insult treatment. Three lethality studies, Acute CdCl 2 , Chronic CdCl 2 , and Acute Radiation, wwere used to determine sublethal doses for the fourth study (Co-insult), which utilized various combinations of CdCl 2 and gamma radiation and from which the hematological and biochemical data were derived. Radiation groups exhibited statistically significant decreases in the total number of leukocytes, lymphocytes, and polyneutrophils. Significant increases were seen in serum iron, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase, and triglycerides. Cadmium groups had increased total numbers of leukocytes, polyneutrophils, and serum glutamic oxaloacetate transminase (SGOT). Decreases were seen in lymphocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, total red blood cell counts, and total protein. When co-insult treatments were used, significant decreases were seen in the total number of leukocytes, polyneutrophils, lymphocytes, hemoglobin, total red blood cells, and serum iron

  15. A giant planet undergoing extreme-ultraviolet irradiation by its hot massive-star host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudi, B Scott; Stassun, Keivan G; Collins, Karen A; Beatty, Thomas G; Zhou, George; Latham, David W; Bieryla, Allyson; Eastman, Jason D; Siverd, Robert J; Crepp, Justin R; Gonzales, Erica J; Stevens, Daniel J; Buchhave, Lars A; Pepper, Joshua; Johnson, Marshall C; Colon, Knicole D; Jensen, Eric L N; Rodriguez, Joseph E; Bozza, Valerio; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; D'Ago, Giuseppe; Dumont, Mary T; Ellis, Tyler; Gaillard, Clement; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Kasper, David H; Fukui, Akihiko; Gregorio, Joao; Ito, Ayaka; Kielkopf, John F; Manner, Mark; Matt, Kyle; Narita, Norio; Oberst, Thomas E; Reed, Phillip A; Scarpetta, Gaetano; Stephens, Denice C; Yeigh, Rex R; Zambelli, Roberto; Fulton, B J; Howard, Andrew W; James, David J; Penny, Matthew; Bayliss, Daniel; Curtis, Ivan A; DePoy, D L; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; Gould, Andrew; Joner, Michael D; Kuhn, Rudolf B; Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Lund, Michael B; Marshall, Jennifer L; McLeod, Kim K; Pogge, Richard W; Relles, Howard; Stockdale, Christopher; Tan, T G; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia

    2017-06-22

    The amount of ultraviolet irradiation and ablation experienced by a planet depends strongly on the temperature of its host star. Of the thousands of extrasolar planets now known, only six have been found that transit hot, A-type stars (with temperatures of 7,300-10,000 kelvin), and no planets are known to transit the even hotter B-type stars. For example, WASP-33 is an A-type star with a temperature of about 7,430 kelvin, which hosts the hottest known transiting planet, WASP-33b (ref. 1); the planet is itself as hot as a red dwarf star of type M (ref. 2). WASP-33b displays a large heat differential between its dayside and nightside, and is highly inflated-traits that have been linked to high insolation. However, even at the temperature of its dayside, its atmosphere probably resembles the molecule-dominated atmospheres of other planets and, given the level of ultraviolet irradiation it experiences, its atmosphere is unlikely to be substantially ablated over the lifetime of its star. Here we report observations of the bright star HD 195689 (also known as KELT-9), which reveal a close-in (orbital period of about 1.48 days) transiting giant planet, KELT-9b. At approximately 10,170 kelvin, the host star is at the dividing line between stars of type A and B, and we measure the dayside temperature of KELT-9b to be about 4,600 kelvin. This is as hot as stars of stellar type K4 (ref. 5). The molecules in K stars are entirely dissociated, and so the primary sources of opacity in the dayside atmosphere of KELT-9b are probably atomic metals. Furthermore, KELT-9b receives 700 times more extreme-ultraviolet radiation (that is, with wavelengths shorter than 91.2 nanometres) than WASP-33b, leading to a predicted range of mass-loss rates that could leave the planet largely stripped of its envelope during the main-sequence lifetime of the host star.

  16. Studies on the regeneration of the CFU-C population in blood and bone marrow or lethally irradiated dogs after autologous transfusion of cryopreserved mononuclear blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nothdurft, W.; Bruch, C.; Fliedner, T.M.; Rueber, E.

    1977-01-01

    In a group of 8 lethally irradiated (1200 R) dogs, that were transfused autologously with cryopreserved mononuclear cells (MNC) derived from the peripheral blood by leucapheresis the concentration of colony-forming units in agar (CFU-C) in bone marrow and peripheral blood was estimated at regular intervals after irradiation and transfusion of MNC. The numbers of MNC transfused per kg body weight ranged from 0.32 x 10 9 to 1.63 x 10 9 with an incidence of CFU-C between 0.02 x 10 5 and 1.38 x 10 5 . In 6 dogs the CFU-C levels in the bone marrow reached the normal preirradiation values between days 15 and 20. But in 2 dogs that had received the lowest CFU-C numbers the regeneration of the bone marrow CFU-C was markedly delayed. In general the time course of the bone marrow repopulation by CFU-C for single dogs was reflected by a corresponding regeneration pattern of the blood CFU-C. The time course of the curves for the blood CFU-C levels on the other hand was of the same kind as for the granulocyte values in the peripheral blood, that reached the normal levels mainly around day 30 and thereafter. Considerable fluctuations were seen in the blood CFU-C levels of single dogs before irradiation and after mononuclear leucocyte transfusion. Despite of such limitations the blood CFU-C content appeared to be a useful indicator of haematopoietic regeneration of the bone marrow. (author)

  17. Carbon translocation from symbiont to host depends on irradiance and food availability in the tropical coral Stylophora pistillata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, P.; Grover, R.; Maguer, J. F.; Hoogenboom, M.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.

    2014-03-01

    Reef-building corals live in symbiosis with dinoflagellates that translocate a large proportion of their photosynthetically fixed carbon compounds to their coral host for its own metabolism. The carbon budget and translocation rate, however, vary depending on environmental conditions, coral host species, and symbiont clade. To quantify variability in carbon translocation in response to environmental conditions, this study assessed the effect of two different irradiance levels (120 and 250 μmol photons m-2 s-1) and feeding regimes (fed with Artemia salina nauplii and unfed) on the carbon budget of the tropical coral Stylophora pistillata. For this purpose, H13CO3 --enriched seawater was used to trace the conversion of photosynthetic carbon into symbiont and coral biomass and excrete particulate organic carbon. Results showed that carbon translocation (ca. 78 %) and utilization were similar under both irradiance levels for unfed colonies. In contrast, carbon utilization by fed colonies was dependent on the growth irradiance. Under low irradiance, heterotrophy was accompanied by lower carbon translocation (71 %), higher host and symbiont biomass, and higher calcification rates. Under high irradiance, heterotrophy was accompanied by higher rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and carbon translocation (90 %) as well as higher host biomass. Hence, levels of resource sharing within coral-dinoflagellate symbioses depend critically on environmental conditions.

  18. Brazilian situation of blood component irradiation practice for the prevention of transfusion associated Graft-versus-Host disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goes, E.G.; Borges, J.C.; Covas, D.T.; Motta, I.

    1998-01-01

    Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is a usually complication of transfusion of blood component containing T lymphocytes what recently has also involved immunocompetent patient. Gamma irradiation of cellular blood components has been the mainstay against TA-GVHD, nevertheless there is little information in the literature about current transfusion medicine practices regarding gamma irradiation of blood products. This work presents an overview of the Brazilian reality and suggests policies to optimize TA-GVHD prevention. (Author)

  19. Brazilian situation of blood component irradiation practice for the prevention of transfusion associated Graft-versus-Host disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goes, E.G.; Borges, J.C. [EE/COPPE-UFRJ (Brazil); Covas, D.T. [Faculdade deMedicina-USP-RP (Brazil); Motta, I. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer- Rio deJaneiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is a usually complication of transfusion of blood component containing T lymphocytes what recently has also involved immunocompetent patient. Gamma irradiation of cellular blood components has been the mainstay against TA-GVHD, nevertheless there is little information in the literature about current transfusion medicine practices regarding gamma irradiation of blood products. This work presents an overview of the Brazilian reality and suggests policies to optimize TA-GVHD prevention. (Author)

  20. Fixation of potentially lethal radiation damage by post-irradiation exposure of Chinese hamster cells to 0.5 M or 1.5 M NaCl solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Dewey, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of 0.05 M and 1.5 M NaCl treatments on CHO cells during and after irradiation has been examined. Treatment with either hypotonic or hypertonic salt solutions during and after irradiation resulted in the fixation of radiation damage which would otherwise not be expressed. The half time for fixation was 4 to 5 min, and the increased expression of the potentially lethal damage by anisotonic solutions was mainly characterized by large decreases in the shoulder of the survival curve, as well as by decreases in Dsub(o). Fixation of radiation damage at 37 0 C occurred to a much greater extent for the hypertonic treatment than for the hypotonic treatment and was greater at 37 0 C than at 20 0 C. Although both the hypotonic and hypertonic treatments during and after irradiation reduced or eliminated the repair of sublethal and potentially lethal damage, treatment during irradiation only, radiosensitized the cells when the treatment was hypotonic, and radioprotected the cells when the treatment was hypertonic. These observations are discussed in relation to salt treatments and different temperatures altering competition between repair and fixation of potentially lethal lesions, the number of which depends on the particular salt treatment at the time of irradiation. (author)

  1. Lethal response of HeLa cells to x irradiation in the latter part of the generation cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, T.D.; Tolmach, L.J.

    1976-01-01

    The age-response for the killing of HeLa S3 cells by x rays during the latter part of the generation cycle has been examined in detail. As synchronous cells move from the G1/S boundary through S phase, the relatively high sensitivity of late G1 cells gradually decreases; minimum sensitivity is reached in mid-S and maintained during the remainder of that phase. The response of cells as they progress from S to the point in G2 at which they are temporarily arrested by radiation (or by inhibitors of protein synthesis) was measured in populations free of both S phase cells and late G2 cells that had passed the arrest point: cells retain their high resistance from early G2 up to the arrest point. The response of G2 cells that have passed the arrest point before being irradiated was examined by exposing randomly growing cultures to x rays and collecting cells periodically thereafter, as they entered mitosis. Survival values very close to those of sensitive mitotic cells were found in the 2 h period after irradiation during which unarrested cells continued to reach mitosis. Values typical of late S/early G2 were found only after cells that had been arrested began arriving at mitosis. Thus, HeLa S3 cells undergo an abrupt increase in sensitivity at or near the arrest point. The sensitivity to a second irradiation of cells arrested in G2 by a conditioning x-ray dose increases rapidly in the early part of the arrest period

  2. Protective properties of the plasma of burnt and irradiated rats with respect to the lethal effect of endotoxins in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, R.S.; Chureeva, L.N.

    1984-01-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of endotoxins s. typhimurium and E. coli to preliminarily irradiated rats resulted in death of 80% of animals during 24 hours. At combined injection of endoxins with heterologic plasma of intact rats death decreased to 12 and 19% respectively. Deep burn of skin, acute radiation sickness and combined radiation-thermal injury did not eliminate the given phenomenon of humoral detoxication; at different periods after thermal, radiation and combined effects plasma of test rats produced protective effect practically the same as at the control

  3. Human umbilical-cord-blood mononucleated cells enhance the survival of lethally irradiated mice. Dosage and the window of time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, Olga A.; Ende, Norman; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the window of time and dose of human umbilical-cord-blood (HUCB) mononucleated cells necessary for successful treatment of radiation injury in mice. Female A/J mice (27-30 weeks old) were exposed to an absorbed dose of 9-10 Gy of 137 Cs γ-rays delivered acutely to the whole body. They were treated either with 1 × 10 8 or 2 × 10 8 HUCB mononucleated cells at 24-52 h after the irradiation. The antibiotic Levaquin was applied 4 h postirradiation. The increased dose of cord-blood cells resulted in enhanced survival. The enhancement of survival in animals that received 2 × 10 8 HUCB mononucleated cells relative to irradiated but untreated animals was highly significant (P < 0.01). Compared with earlier studies, the increased dose of HUCB mononucleated cells, coupled with early use of an antibiotic, extended the window of time for effective treatment of severe radiation injury from 4 to 24-52 h after exposure. (author)

  4. Radiation and host factors in human thyroid tumors following thymus irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, R.E.; Pasternack, B.S.; Woodard, E.D.; Hempelmann, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    Thyroid tumor data from the 1971 survey of the Rochester, New York thymus irradiated population are further analyzed to study radiobiological and host factors. The analyses were based on the approx. 2650 irradiated subjects and 4800 sibling controls who had 5 or more years of follow-up. Twenty-four thyroid cancers and 52 thyroid adenomas were found in the irradiated group, and O thyroid cancers and 6 adenomas among the controls. The overall risk estimates were 3.8 thyroid cancers/10 6 persons/yr/rad and 4.5 thyroid adenomas/10 6 persons/yr/rad. The dose-response data (thyroid dose range of 5 to > 1000 rad) for thyroid cancer indicate both a linear and a dose-squared component, but no dose-squared component is evident for thyroid adenomas. At lower total doses (< 400 rad) there was a suggestion that dose fractionation diminished the thyroid cancer response, but a similar fractionation effect was not found for thyroid adenomas. The temporal pattern of tumors suggested an extended plateau of excess tumor production, rather than a wavelike temporal pattern. There was no evidence for an inverse relationship between thyroid radiation dose and thyroid cancer latency. Female and Jewish subjects had a higher risk of radiation-induced thyroid cancer than did their respective counterparts. The additive and multiplicative models of radiation effects were compared with respect to sex differences; neither model provided a superior fit to the data. The tentative nature of the conclusions is stressed because of the relatively small number of thyroid cancers. (author)

  5. On the lack of host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated phage T5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, T.; Harm, W.

    1976-01-01

    Previously reported experiments have shown that host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated phage T1 in excision-repair proficient Escherichia coli cells is inhibited by superinfection with phage T5. Theoretical considerations have led to predictions concerning the dependence of repair inhibition on the multiplicity of superinfecting T5 phage and on the UV fluence to which they were exposed. These predictions have been supported by experimental results described in this paper. The fluence dependence permitted calculation of the relative UV sensitivity of the gene function responsible for repair inhibition; it was found to be about 2.3% that of the plaque-forming ability of phage T5. The T5-inhibitable step in excision repair occurs early in the infective cycle of T1. Furthermore, experiments involving the presence of 400 μg/ml chloramphenicol showed that HCR inhibition of T1 is caused by a protein produced after the FST segment of T5 (i.e. the first 8% of the T5 genome) has entered the host cell. A previously described minor T1 recovery process, occuring in both excision-repair-proficient and -deficient host-cells, is inhibited by T5 infection due to a different substance, which is most likely associated with the 'second-step-transfer' region of T5 DNA (involving the remainder of the genome). Superinfection with T4v 1 phage resulted in HCR inhibition of T1, resembling that observed after T5 superinfection. The discussion of these results suggests that inhibition of the bacterial excision repair system by T5 or T4 infection occurs at the level of UV-endonucleolytic incision, and that lack of HCR both in T-even phages and in T5 can be explained in the same manner

  6. Lethality and the depression on DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, K. (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation suppresses the semiconservative DNA replication in mammalian cells. The rate of DNA synthesis is initially depressed and later recovers after low doses of UV radiation in human cells. Such a response is more sensitive to UV radiation in cells derived from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) than that in normal human cells. The relative rate of DNA synthesis is not always correlated with cell survival because, unlike cell survival, the dose-response curve of the relative rate of DNA synthesis shows the biphasic nature of the sensitivity. In the experiments reported herein, the total amount (not the rate) of DNA synthesized during a long interval of incubation which covers the period of inhibition and recovery (but not longer than one generation time) after irradiation with various doses of UV radiation was examined in normal human and XP cells, and was found to be well correlated with cell survival in all the cells tested.

  7. Protection of Escherichia coli cells against the lethal effects of ultraviolet and X-irradiation by prior X-irradiation. A genetic and physiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K C; Martignoni, K D [Stanford Univ., Calif. (USA). Dept. of Radiology

    1976-12-01

    When log phase cells of wild-type E.coli K-12 were maintained in growth medium after X-irradiation, they became progressively more resistant to a subsequent exposure to UV or X-radiation. The time to achieve maximum resistance was about 60 min. The uvrB, uvrD, polA and certain exrA strains (W3110 background) also demonstrated this X-ray-induced resistance to subsequent UV or X-irradiation but recA, recB, lex (AB1157 or W3110 backgrounds) and other exrA strains (AB1157 background) did not. The resistance induced in wild-type, uvrB and uvrD cells was characterized by the production or enhancement of a shoulder on the survival curves obtained for the second irradiation, while the resistance induced in the W3110 exrA strains was expressed only as a change in slope. The induction of resistance in the W3110 exrA strain was not inhibited by the presence of chloramphenical, but that in the wild-type cells appeared to be. The production or enhancement of a shoulder on the survival curves of the rec/sup +/ lex/sup +/ exr/sup +/ cells is consistent with the concept of the radiation induction of repair enzymes. Alternative explanations, however, are discussed.

  8. CFU-C populations in blood and bone marrow of dogs after lethal irradiation and allogeneic transfusion with cryopreserved blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nothdurft, W.; Fliedner, T.M.; Calvo, W.; Flad, H.-D.; Huget, R.; Koerbling, M.; Krumbacher-von Loringen, K; Ross, W.M.; Schnappauf, H.-P.; Steinbach, I.

    1978-01-01

    Colony forming units in agar (CFU-C) were assayed in both bone marrow and peripheral blood of dogs during haemopoietic recovery after lethal total-body irradiation (1200 R) and allogeneic transfusion of blood mononuclear cells (MNC) from histocompatible donors. MNC had been collected from the peripheral blood by continuous-flow centrifugation leucapheris and cryopreserved at -196 deg C until transfusion. Two groups of dogs were studied. Group 1 dogs (n = 12) were given between 0.39 and 2.76 x 10 9 MNC per kg body wt. Group 2 dogs (n = 14) were transfused with a similar number of MNC, ranging from 0.51 to 1.87 x 10 9 per kg body wt., but in addition underwent immuno-suppressive therapy with methotrexate. In group 1 dogs, there was a rather good correlation between the number of CFU-C in the regenerating bone marrow and the recovery of the peripheral blood granulocyte values. The regeneration of the CPU-C population in the bone marrow of methotrexate-treated dogs showed a somewhat more heterogeneous picture than in dogs of group 1 and in dogs that, in a previous study, were transfused with autologous MNC. The minimum time interval required for the reconstitution of peripheral blood CFU-C to normal levels was 2-4 weeks but usually took from 4-14 weeks. (author)

  9. Effect of a non lethal whole-body gamma irradiation on the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalographic activities of the adult rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, L.

    1969-01-01

    The whole of the experimental methods described (animal preparation, achievement of a precise physiological technique, dosimetry, biological information processing) allowed us to follow the changes for 15 days in the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalogram activities of rabbits submitted to a non-lethal 400 rads whole-body gamma-irradiation. Behavioural troubles, changes in the arousal state and the spontaneous electrical activity of the neo-cortex and hippocampus were noticed constantly together with an enhanced cortical excitability, and the appearance of elements of the paroxystic series sometimes in contrast with a general decrease in amplitude. After a visual stimulus the general morphology of evoked activities at the level of the primary visual areas and hippocampus was unchanged, but enhanced latencies and delays, less systematic modifications in amplitudes seemed to show out a direct effect of radiations on the nervous system and sensorial activities; these troubles seemed to occur independently from the basic electrical activity. As a whole, the changes observed were usually transitory and varied with each individual. Finally an assumption is made to explain the mechanism of arousal troubles and the general evolution of spontaneous electrical activity in the brain. (author) [fr

  10. Test of mutagenicity of an irradiated standard diet for laboratory animals in the host-mediated assay with salmonella typhimurium TA 1530

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenzner, R.; Renner, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    Feed irradiated at a dose of 3 Mrad was tested for mutagenic activity in the host-mediated assay with the mouse as host and Salmonella typhimurium TA 1530 as indicator organism. In the in vivo and in the in vitro comparative test the irradiated feed showed no mutagenic effect. (orig.) [de

  11. Early dominance of irradiated host cells in the responder profiles of thymocytes from P → F1 radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korngold, R.; Bennink, J.R.; Doherty, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    The number of cells in the thymus of radiation (1000 rad) chimeras increases approximately 10-fold between 7 and 14 days after reconstitution with bone marrow. At least 50% of the cells in thymus on day 14 are of host origin and respond to virus presented in the context of both H-2/sup k/ and H-2/sup b/ when primed in irradiated, virus-infected (b x k)F 1 recipients. Strong CTL responses can be generated from thymocytes of donor origin on day 21. All evidence of a significant host thymocyte component has disappeared by day 28. The responsiveness of 14-day thymocytes is not abrogated by pretreatment of the mice used to make the chimeras with anti-thymocyte serum or by using doses of irradiation as high as 1200 rads to eliminate host components

  12. Lethal Epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, Roger W

    2016-09-01

    Epistaxis or nosebleed refers to bleeding from the nostrils, nasal cavity, or nasopharynx. Occasional cases may present with torrential lethal hemorrhage. Three cases are reported to demonstrate particular features: Case 1: A 51-year-old woman with lethal epistaxis with no obvious bleeding source; Case 2: A 77-year-old man with treated nasopharyngeal carcinoma who died from epistaxis arising from a markedly neovascularized tumor bed; Case 3: A 2-year-old boy with hemophilia B who died from epistaxis with airway obstruction in addition to gastrointestinal bleeding. Epistaxis may be associated with trauma, tumors, vascular malformations, bleeding diatheses, infections, pregnancy, endometriosis, and a variety of different drugs. Careful dissection of the nasal cavity is required to locate the site of hemorrhage and to identify any predisposing conditions. This may be guided by postmortem computerized tomographic angiography (PCTA). Despite careful dissection, however, a source of bleeding may never be identified. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. V. Identity of the sector of cells that expresses potentially lethal damage in G1 and G2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetham, K.L.; Tolmach, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    When HeLa S3 cells are irradiated in early G 1 with 4 Gy of 220-kV x rays and are then incubated in growth medium containing up to 5 mM caffeine, survival is reduced (as reported previously), reaching a concentration-dependent plateau. Cell killing presumably occurs as a result of the fixation of a portion of the potentially lethal damage the cells contain. These cells respond to continued treatment with caffeine at concentrations greater than 2 mM during S, but less so than during G 1 . When they reach G 2 arrest, however, extensive cell killing again occurs (reported previously), presumably also the result of potentially lethal damage fixation. G 1 -irradiated cultures that are treated with caffeine either continuously at a concentration in the range 1 to 5 mM, or at 10 mM for 8 hr and subsequently with the low concentration, achieve the same survival level in G 2 , provided that the potentially lethal damage is not repaired during G 1 and S. Repair seems to be completely inhibited in the presence of 3 to 4 mM caffeine. The results indicate that fixation of potentially lethal damage occurs in the same sector of cells in G 1 and G 2 , suggesting that the same cellular lesion gives rise to cell killing in the two phases

  14. Analysis of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations in genetically different strains of Drosophila melanogaster ms and w irradiated in the five-kilometer zone of the Chernobyl meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, M.M.; Kim, A.I.; Magomedova, M.A.; Fatkulbayanova, N.L.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of induced and spontaneous recessive sex-linked lethal mutations (RSLLM) in Drosophila melanogaster strains w and ms was estimated after their chronic irradiation in the five-kilometer zone of the Chernobyl' meltdown. The mutagenic effect of relatively low radiation doses was analyzed. In an experiment conducted in 1990, a significant increase in the RSLLM frequency was recorded, while, in 1991, no significant difference between the experiment and control was found

  15. Effect of serum from rats with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus on the formation of hemopoietic colonies in the spleen of lethally irradiated mice after bone marrow cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, N.A.; Likhovetskaya, Z.M.; Kurbanova, G.N.; Prigozhina, T.A.; L'vovich, A.I.

    1982-01-01

    Colony formation capability of serum from animals with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus was studied in lethally irradiated mice. Male-rats of Wistar line and hybrid mice (CBA x C57 BL) were used in the experiments. The serum from rats with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus was injected simultaneously with bone marrow transplantation into lethally irradiated mice. The number of macrocolonies in the spleen was counted on the 9th day. It was ascertained that the serum from rats with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus caused an increase of the number of macroscopically visible colonies in the spleen of lethally irradiated mice. The determination of hemopoetic types of colonies showed that the effect of the serum from those animals caused an increase of the number of granulocytic-type colonies. The initiation of colony stimulating and leukopoetic activity in the blood of animals after the destruction of mammillary body nuclei and posterior hypothalamic nucleus attested, according to the authors point of view, that humoral mediators (humoral mediator) could participated in the mechanism of hypothalamus effect on leulopoiesis

  16. Regeneration of blood-forming organs after autologous leukocyte transfusion in lethally irradiated dogs. II. Distribution and cellularity of the marrow in irradiated and transfused animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, W.; Fliedner, T.M.; Herbst, E.; Huegl, E.; Bruch, C.

    1976-01-01

    Dogs were given transfusions of cryopreserved autologous mononuclear blood leukocytes after 1200 roentgens (R) (midline dose) whole-body x-irradiation. Bone marrow repopulation was studied by means of histomorphological methods at days 9 and 10 after transfusion of an average of 3 x 10 9 , 7 x 10 9 , 13 x 10 9 , and 31 x 10 9 cells. The return of marrow cellularity to normal values was related to the number of cells transfused. With low cell doses (3 x 10 9 and 7 x 10 9 ), the marrow regeneration at 10 days was focal. There were groups of cells (colonies) showing either erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis, or megakaryocytopoiesis in the osteal niches of the trabecular bones. Frequently such niches were seen showing complete cellular recovery next to niches with complete aplasia. With higher cell doses, all niches showed hemopoietic regeneration, and the cellularity approached normal values. No hemopoietic regeneration was observed in those skeletal parts that do not show hemopoiesis, even under normal circumstances

  17. Molecular mechanisms of induced mutagenesis. Replication in vivo of bacteriophage phiX174 single-stranded, ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA in intact and irradiated host cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillet-Fauquet, P; Defais, M; Radman, M [Brussels Univ. (Belgium)

    1977-11-25

    Genetic analysis has revealed that radiation and many chemical mutagens induce in bacteria an error-prone DNA repair process which is responsible for their mutagenic effect. The biochemical mechanism of this inducible error-prone repair has been studied by analysis of the first round of DNA synthesis on ultraviolet light-irradiated phiX174 DNA in both intact and ultraviolet light-irradiated host cells. Intracellular phiX174 DNA was extracted, subjected to isopycnic CsCl density-gradient analysis, hydroxylapatite chromatography and digestion by single-strand-specific endonuclease S/sub 1/. Ultraviolet light-induced photolesions in viral DNA cause a permanent blockage of DNA synthesis in intact Escherichia coli cells. However, when host cells were irradiated and incubated to induce fully the error-prone repair system, a significant fraction of irradiated phiX174 DNA molecules can be fully replicated. Thus, inducible error-prone repair in E.coli is manifested by an increased capacity for DNA synthesis on damaged phiX174 DNA. Chloramphenicol (100 ..mu.. g/ml), which is an inhibitor of the inducible error-prone DNA repair, is also an inhibitor of this particular inducible DNA synthesis.

  18. Effect of host irradiation on bio-infectivity and proliferation capacity of Steinernema glaseri as entomopathogenic nematodes on a serious tropical pest, Spodoptera litura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, R K; Barik, T K [Dept. of Zoology, Univ. of Delhi, Delhi (India)

    2007-07-15

    Bioefficacy of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs). Steinernema glaseri on irradiated lepidopteran pest, Spodoptera litura (Fabr.) was studied to understand the impact of host irradiation on behaviour of EPNs in order to establish these nematodes as potential biocontrol agents by using nuclear techniques. Initially, radiation impact was ascertained on growth and reproductive behaviour of host, S. litura when treated in different stages, viz. 5th instar larva (L5), 6th instar larva (L6) and pre-pupa, to select the range of gamma sterilizing doses for these insect stages. ED{sub 50} and ED{sub 90} gamma doses resulting into 50% and 90% check, respectively, in pupa formation, adult emergence and egg viability of host with respect to control, were determined. Then, based on these results, the efficacy of the selected doses, (40-70Gy), was evaluated on the metamorphosis, degree of malformation and reproductive behaviour of S. litura before studying the EPNs' bio-infectivity on irradiated host. 70 Gy was determined as an overall sterilizing dose for L5, L6 and pre-pupa stages. The data indicated that radiosusceptibility decreased with age. Host irradiation of L5 and L6 stages did not influence significantly the parasitization by infective juveniles (IJs) of EPNs. Irradiation decrease the pre-pupal parasitization by EPNs, but in case pre-pupa escaped as being target for parasitization, impact of host irradiation was not apparent on the parasitization of the ensuing pupal stage, although total parasitization by EPNs in pre-pupal and pupal stages (subsequent to pre-pupal irradiation and pre-pupal exposure to IJs) was decreased due to radiation. The impact of host irradiation with 40 Gy was not significant on the bio-infective behaviour of EPNs except harvest of IJs from host stage-pupa. Host irradiation dose of 70 Gy reduced the IJs harvest per mg host weight by 9-11.7% on L5 and by 9-19.8% on L6 in comparison to control. The effect of host radiation on harvest of IJs was

  19. Effect of host irradiation on bio-infectivity and proliferation capacity of Steinernema glaseri as entomopathogenic nematodes on a serious tropical pest, Spodoptera litura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, R.K.; Barik, T.K.

    2007-01-01

    Bioefficacy of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs). Steinernema glaseri on irradiated lepidopteran pest, Spodoptera litura (Fabr.) was studied to understand the impact of host irradiation on behaviour of EPNs in order to establish these nematodes as potential biocontrol agents by using nuclear techniques. Initially, radiation impact was ascertained on growth and reproductive behaviour of host, S. litura when treated in different stages, viz. 5th instar larva (L5), 6th instar larva (L6) and pre-pupa, to select the range of gamma sterilizing doses for these insect stages. ED 50 and ED 90 gamma doses resulting into 50% and 90% check, respectively, in pupa formation, adult emergence and egg viability of host with respect to control, were determined. Then, based on these results, the efficacy of the selected doses, (40-70Gy), was evaluated on the metamorphosis, degree of malformation and reproductive behaviour of S. litura before studying the EPNs' bio-infectivity on irradiated host. 70 Gy was determined as an overall sterilizing dose for L5, L6 and pre-pupa stages. The data indicated that radiosusceptibility decreased with age. Host irradiation of L5 and L6 stages did not influence significantly the parasitization by infective juveniles (IJs) of EPNs. Irradiation decrease the pre-pupal parasitization by EPNs, but in case pre-pupa escaped as being target for parasitization, impact of host irradiation was not apparent on the parasitization of the ensuing pupal stage, although total parasitization by EPNs in pre-pupal and pupal stages (subsequent to pre-pupal irradiation and pre-pupal exposure to IJs) was decreased due to radiation. The impact of host irradiation with 40 Gy was not significant on the bio-infective behaviour of EPNs except harvest of IJs from host stage-pupa. Host irradiation dose of 70 Gy reduced the IJs harvest per mg host weight by 9-11.7% on L5 and by 9-19.8% on L6 in comparison to control. The effect of host radiation on harvest of IJs was more severe

  20. DNA polymerase I is crucial for the repair of potentially lethal damage caused by the indirect effects of X irradiation in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, D.

    1985-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in DNA polymerase I was measured in the presence of OH radical scavengers. The extreme X-ray sensitivity of the mutant could be abolished by OH radical scavengers if a sufficiently high level of radioprotector was present. There was a direct correlation between the OH radical scavenging activity of the chemicals tested (NO 2 - , n-butanol, glycerol, t-amyl alcohol, and t-butanol) and their protective ability. The author interprets the data as showing that the indirect actions of X rays (primarily OH radicals) result in major damage to the bacterial DNA which in large part consists of potentially lethal lesions. This potentially lethal damage is repaired through an enzymatic pathway requiring DNA polymerase I. I. In the mutant lacking DNA polymerase I, these potentially lethal lesions are expressed as cell lethality

  1. Influence of host irradiation on the bio-infectivity of Steinernema glaseri as entomopathogenic nematodes and their perpetuating parasitisation potential on a serious tropical lepidopteran pest, Spodoptera litura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, R K [Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Barik, T K; Chauhan, S [Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi (India)

    2005-07-01

    Biological and parabiological control measures of the lepidopteran pest, Spodoptera litura need to be eco-compatible in view of increasing environmental hazards by the chemical pesticides and development of insecticide-resistance in this pest. Among bio-control agents, the entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) appear to be promising due to their great ability for host searching and killing, high reproductive rate, and safety to the non target organisms. The EPNs need to be transported within host-insects (in vivo) into the field so that they have their proper viability as part of augmentative releases. To avoid the risk of released host insects, if unparasitized, building up of the pest population in the field, radiation-sterilisation of the host is considered desirable. Therefore, an attempt was made to ascertain the bioinfectivity of EPNs, Steinernema glaseri vis-a-vis irradiated hosts, Spodoptera litura and assess parasitisation behaviour of the infective juveniles (IJs) derived from irradiated hosts, in order to establish this biocontrol strategy using nuclear techniques. Radiation impact was ascertained on behaviour and reproduction of S. litura in order to select the range of gamma doses for sterilising the various insect stages. Radio-sensitivity decreased with age in this 'radio-resistant' pest, S. litura. Two doses were selected (40 Gy, 70 Gy), for bio-evaluation of EPNs on treated host stages. 70 Gy was determined as an overall sterilising dose for late larval and prepupal stages. Influence of host-irradiation was ascertained on EPNs bioefficacy towards hosts reared on two different diets, castor (natural food) and a semi-synthetic diet (used in mass-rearing). Host-irradiation did not influence significantly the parasitisation behaviour of EPNs on host insects reared on castor, whereas irradiation slightly affected the bio-infective response of EPNs and their proliferation rate in hosts fed on the semi-synthetic diet. Further, the parasitisation behaviour of

  2. Characteristics of histocompatibility barriers in congenis strains of mice. III. Passive enhancement of skin allografts in x-irradiated hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, J.L.; Kaliss, N.; Hildemann, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    Passive immunological enhancement of skin allografts was investigated in three donor-host combinations of congenic mice disparate at non-H-2 loci. Serum against the graft donor was derived from mice that had received donor strain lymphoid cells as neonates, and thereby were rendered specifically tolerant of a skin allograft. We refer to this serum as ''allograft-tolerant'' serum. Each strain combination was chosen to provide only two non-H-2 histoincompatibilities present in the donor and absent in the host. The differences are categorized as immunogenetically strong, moderate, or weak, on the basis of skin allograft survival times. With passively administered allograft-tolerant serum, significantly prolonged graft survivals were noted for the weakest combination only. Combined treatment with sublethal x-irradiation and allograft-tolerant serum significantly prolonged graft survival in both the moderate and weak combinations, with the largest effect present in the weakest disparity. A hyperimmune alloantiserum (produced in adults) directed against the graft donor prolonged allograft survival in the strongest disparity when given in combination with irradiation. In this combination, graft survival time was increased in hosts exposed to x-ray alone, but joint treatment with x-ray and the alloantiserum gave the largest increment. In contrast, combined treatment with the serum and an antithymocyte alloantiserum did not affect graft survival times. Treatment with both radiation and antithymocyte serum did not prolong graft survival beyond that in mice given only x-radiation. Immunological enhancement with central inhibition is assumed as the mechanism underlying prolonged graft survival, and it is suggested that a population of thymus-derived killer cells, sensitive to x-irradiation, is required for normal graft rejection. (U.S.)

  3. Repair of potentially lethal damage following irradiation with x rays or cyclotron neutrons: response of the EMT-6/UW tumor system treated under various growth conditions in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasey, J.S.; Nelson, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    Postirradiation potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair was examined in the EMT-6/UW tumor system under a variety of in vitro and in vivo growth conditions. Following x irradiation, surviving fraction increased in fed and unfed plateau cultures if subculture and plating were delayed; in exponentially growing cultures if they were covered with depleted medium for the first 6 h postirradiation; and in tumors in vivo if excision for preparation of a cell suspension was delayed. Following irradiation with 21.5 meV (d + → Be) neutrons, PLD repair was measurable only in unfed plateau cultures when subculture was delayed and in exponentially growing cells exposed to depleted culture medium immediately after irradiation. In x-irradiated EMT-6/UW cells, the greatest repair capacity and the highest surviving fraction ratios were measured in unfed plateau cultures; the least repair was observed in exponentially growing cells exposed to depleted medium. Thus post-neutron repair was not limited to situations where the amount of repair of photon PLD is large. The demonstration of PLD repair in tumors irradiated in vivo with X rays and the absence of such repair after neutrons could have important implications in radiotherapy if this is a general phenomenon

  4. Effect of a non lethal whole-body gamma irradiation on the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalographic activities of the adult rabbit; Effets d'une irradiation gamma globale non letale sur les activites electroencephalograpiques spontanees et evoquees du lapin adulte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Court, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The whole of the experimental methods described (animal preparation, achievement of a precise physiological technique, dosimetry, biological information processing) allowed us to follow the changes for 15 days in the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalogram activities of rabbits submitted to a non-lethal 400 rads whole-body gamma-irradiation. Behavioural troubles, changes in the arousal state and the spontaneous electrical activity of the neo-cortex and hippocampus were noticed constantly together with an enhanced cortical excitability, and the appearance of elements of the paroxystic series sometimes in contrast with a general decrease in amplitude. After a visual stimulus the general morphology of evoked activities at the level of the primary visual areas and hippocampus was unchanged, but enhanced latencies and delays, less systematic modifications in amplitudes seemed to show out a direct effect of radiations on the nervous system and sensorial activities; these troubles seemed to occur independently from the basic electrical activity. As a whole, the changes observed were usually transitory and varied with each individual. Finally an assumption is made to explain the mechanism of arousal troubles and the general evolution of spontaneous electrical activity in the brain. (author) [French] 'L'ensemble des methodes experimentales decrites (preparation des animaux, mise au point d'une technique physiologique precise, dosimetrie, traitement de l'information biologique) a permis de suivre, pendant 15 jours, chez le lapin soumis a une irradiation gamma globale non letale de 400 rads, les modifications des activites electroencephaliques spontanees et evoquees. De facon constante, on note des troubles du comportement, des modifications de la vigilance et de l'activite electrique spontanee du neo-cortex et de l'hippocampe, ainsi qu'une augmentation de l'excitabilite corticale, l'apparition d'elements de la serie paroxystique contrastant parfois avec une diminution

  5. Allosuppressor and allohelper T cells in acute and chronic graft-vs-host disease. I. Alloreactive suppressor cells rather than killer T cells appear to be the decisive effector cells in lethal graft-vs.-host disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolink, A. G.; Radaszkiewicz, T.; Pals, S. T.; van der Meer, W. G.; Gleichmann, E.

    1982-01-01

    Splenic T cells from B10 donors were injected into irradiated (B10 x DBA/2)F1 mice. Either 5 or 6 d later, activated donor T cells were recovered from the spleens of these primary F1 (1 degree F1) recipients and transferred to groups of nonirradiated syngeneic F1 (2 degrees F1) recipients. Whereas

  6. Both caffeine-induced lethality and the negative liquid holding effect, in UV- or γ-irradiated wild-type Schizosaccharomyces pombe, are consequences of interference with a recombinational repair process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    UV-or γ-irradiated G2 phase cells of rad + Schizosac charonmyces pombe show increased inactivation if incubated postirradiation, in liquid growth medium containing caffeine, before being plated on normal agar medium. The following however, do not show such caffeine-induced lethality: G1 phase rad + cells; ascospores of a rad + strain; either G2 or G1 phase cells of the recombination-deficient rad1 strain; unirradiated rad + cells. Of the above, only the G2 phase rad + cells possess, at the time of radiation exposure, the capability for recombination. Similarly, the negative liquid holding effect is manifested only in G2 phase rad + cells. Both the negative liquid holding effect and caffeine-induced lethality therefore are seen only in cells which fulfill all of the following conditions: (a) they must be genetically recombination-proficient; (b) they must possess at the time of irradiation the necessary two DNA copies with which to perform recombinational repair (for a haploid cell, this means they must be in G2 phase); (c) their DNA must be damaged, such as by UV or γ-ray exposure, thus requiring that recombinational repair capability be exercised in order to maintain viability; and (d) they must be incubated under conditions that fail to support the normal progress of recombinational repair. (orig./AJ) [de

  7. Usefulness of blood irradiation before transfusion to avoid transfusion associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Koki

    1997-01-01

    We summarize the pathology of the transfusion associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD) and examine the usefulness of the blood irradiation before transfusion as more widely used prophylaxis. The symptom of TA-GVHD was as follows: after (asymptomatic phase) for 1 to 2 weeks after blood transfusion, pyrexia and erythema appeared. Furthermore, hepatic disorder, diarrhea and bloody stool occurred. In no longer time, pancytopenia by aplastic crisis of the bone marrow appeard, and severe granulocytopenia occurred. Finally, by the complication with severe infectious disease such as septicemia, almost all the patients died with in 3 to 4 weeks after blood transfusion. TA-GVHD was found in some patients without immune deficiency syndrome. The cause of the frequent occurrence of the disease in Japan was shown by the probability of the one-way matching analysis. As the countermeasure of TA-GVHD, we examined the effectiveness of the blood irradiation before transfusion under the consideration of the safety and the emergency. After the responder cells were beforehand irradiated with various doses of radiation (X-ray or g-ray), the proliferative response was investigated through the uptake of 3 H-thymidine, and we obtained 15-50 Gy as the optimum dose of the radiation. We discuss the establishment of the countermeasure for the TA-GVHD and the formation of the nationwide support system for TV-GVHD (K.H.). 33 refs

  8. Engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow without graft-versus-host disease in mongrel dogs using total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottlieb, M.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Grumet, F.C.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1980-01-01

    We achieved long-term engraftment of unmatched bone marrow (BM) in dogs without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) using a regimen of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) which could be applied clinically. Twelve normal adult mongrel dogs were given TLI in 18 fractions of 100 rad each (total dose, 1800 rad) over 4 weeks to mantle and abdominal fields in continuity. Nine of the 12 were transfused with one or two random donor whole blood transfusions during the irradiation regimen to determine the risk of sensitization after the onset of immunosuppression. A mean (+- SD) of 0.71 +- 0.54 x 10 9 BM cells/kg of recipient body weight from unrelated sex-mismatched donors was infused within 24 h of the 18th irradiation fraction. Engraftment was assessed by demonstration of donor-type sex chromosomes in spontaneous metaphase spreads of recipient marrow aspirates, and by the appearance of donor-type red blood cells antigens (DEA) in the recipients' blood. Three untransfused and nine transfused recipients were shown to be stable mixed BM chimeras during a followup period of 2 to 11 months after transplantation. Blood transfusion during TLI did not result in graft rejection. We observed no clinical signs of acute or chronic GVHD. TLI has minimal toxicity when compared with conditioning regimens currently used in BM transplantation for aplastic anemia. Potential advantages of the TLI regimen include the opportunity to use unmatched marrow donors and protection from GVHD

  9. Fetal hypothalamic transplants into brain irradiated rats: Graft morphometry and host behavioral responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlman, S.H.; Rubin, P.; White, H.C.; Wiegand, S.J.; Gash, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that neural implants can ameliorate or prevent some of the long-term changes associated with CNS irradiation. Using a rat model, the initial study focused on establishing motor, regulatory, and morphological changes associated with brain radiation treatments. Secondly, fetal hypothalamic tissue grafts were placed into the third ventricle of rats which had been previously irradiated. Adult male Long Evans rats received one of three radiation doses (15, 22.5, ampersand 30 Gy) or no radiation. Three days after irradiation, 7 animals in each dose group received an embryonic day 17 hypothalamic graft into the third ventricle while the remaining 8-9 animals in each group received injections of vehicle solution (sham). Few changes were observed in the 15 and 22.5 Gy animals, however rats in the 30 Gy treatment group showed stereotypic and ambulatory behavioral hyperactivity 32 weeks after irradiation. Regulatory changes in the high dose group included decreased growth rate and decreased urine osmolalities, but these measures were extremely variable among animals. Morphological results demonstrated that 30 Gy irradiated animals showed extensive necrosis primarily in the fimbria, which extended into the internal capsule, optic nerve, hippocampus, and thalamus. Hemorrhages were found in the hippocampus, thalamus, and fimbria. Defects in the blood-brain barrier also were evident by entry of intravascularly injected horseradish peroxidase into the parenchyma of the brain. Animals in the 30 Gy grafted group showed fewer behavioral changes and less brain damage than their sham grafted counterparts. Specifically, activity measures were comparable to normal levels, and a dilute urine was not found in the 30 Gy implanted rats. Morphological changes support these behavioral results since only two 30 Gy implanted rats showed necrosis

  10. Donor hematopoiesis in mice following total lymphoid irradiation requires host T-regulatory cells for durable engraftment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Antonia M. S.; Poyser, Jessica; Küpper, Natascha J.; Burnett, Cassandra; Ko, Rose M.; Kohrt, Holbrook E.K.; Florek, Mareike; Zhang, Pei; Negrin, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is a unique regimen that prepares recipients for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation by targeting lymph nodes, while sparing large areas of the bone marrow. TLI is reported to increase the frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells (Treg) relative to conventional T cells. In this study, barriers to hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment following this nonmyeloablative conditioning were evaluated. TLI/ATG resulted in profound lymphoablation but endogenous host HSC remained. Initial donor HSC engraftment occurred only in radiation exposed marrow sites, but gradually distributed to bone marrow outside the radiation field. Sustained donor engraftment required host lymphoid cells insofar as lymphocyte deficient Rag2γc−/− recipients had unstable engraftment compared with wild-type. TLI/ATG treated wild-type recipients had increased proportions of Treg that were associated with increased HSC frequency and proliferation. In contrast, Rag2γc−/− recipients who lacked Treg did not. Adoptive transfer of Treg into Rag2γc−/− recipients resulted in increased cell cycling of endogenous HSC. Thus, we hypothesize that Treg influence donor engraftment post-TLI/ATG by increasing HSC cell cycling, thereby promoting the exit of host HSC from the marrow niche. Our study highlights the unique dynamics of donor hematopoiesis following TLI/ATG, and the effect of Treg on HSC activity. PMID:24591203

  11. Inclusion polymerization of vinyl chloride monomer in deoxycholic acid host via γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirachanchai, S.; Kumkrong, A.; Ishida, Hatsuo

    2000-01-01

    Inclusion polymerization of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) was studied in the system of 3α, 12α -dihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid (deoxycholic acid, DCA). DCA-VCM inclusion compound system was originally prepared by guest intercalation technique in DCA guest free crystal. The inclusion polymerization of DCA-VCM by γ-irradiation at total dose 2 Mrad, gives a syndiotactic rich polyvinyl chloride (PVC) as can be confirmed by FT-IR and FT-NMR. (author)

  12. Inclusion polymerization of vinyl chloride monomer in deoxycholic acid host via {gamma}-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chirachanchai, S.; Kumkrong, A. [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Ishida, Hatsuo [Department of Macromolecular Science, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2000-03-01

    Inclusion polymerization of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) was studied in the system of 3{alpha}, 12{alpha} -dihydroxy-5{beta}-cholan-24-oic acid (deoxycholic acid, DCA). DCA-VCM inclusion compound system was originally prepared by guest intercalation technique in DCA guest free crystal. The inclusion polymerization of DCA-VCM by {gamma}-irradiation at total dose 2 Mrad, gives a syndiotactic rich polyvinyl chloride (PVC) as can be confirmed by FT-IR and FT-NMR. (author)

  13. Experiences in therapy for lethal midline granuloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosaka, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Takeru

    1982-01-01

    Four cases of the lethal midline granuloma or malignant granuloma of the nose were treated by irradiation and chemotherapy, which are generally prescribed for malignant lymphomas. Clinical, histological and laboratory examination indicated that they were the lethal midline granuloma and clearly differentiated from Wegener's granulomatosis or malignant lymphoma. All of the cases exhibited primary remission. The four cases were observed up to 38, 22, 14, and 10 months since the beginning of the therapy, showing no local or general recurrence. (author)

  14. Gamma irradiation on canola seeds affects herbivore-plant and host-parasitoid interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akandeh, M.; Kocheili, F.; Rasekh, A.; Soufbaf, M.

    2017-01-01

    As an agricultural modernization, gamma irradiation is an important method for enhancing crop yield and quality. Nevertheless, its use can alter other plant traits such as nutrition and resistance to different biotic/abiotic stresses that consequently affect plant-insect interactions. A tritrophic system was utilized based on two canola mutant lines produced through gamma irradiation (RGS 8-1 and Talaye 8-3). Plutella xylostella (L.), as a worldwide pest of Brassicaceae and Cotesia vestalis (Holiday) as a key biocontrol agent of P. xylostella were examined for the potential indirect effects of canola seed irradiation on the experimental insects' performance when acting on the respective mutant lines. This study showed that physical mutation did not affect plant nitrogen and herbivore-damaged total phenolics; however, phenolic compounds showed greater concentration in damaged leaves than undamaged leaves of both mutant and control plants. The relative growth rate and pupal weight of P. xylostella reared on RGS 8-1 were significantly higher than those reared on the control RGS. There was no significant difference by performance parameters of the parasitoid, C. vestalis, including total pre-oviposition period, adult longevity, adult fresh body weight of males and females, pupal weight, forewing area, and total longevity of both sexes on tested canola cultivars in comparison with their mutant lines. Life table parameters of C. vestalis on mutant lines of both cultivars, RGS and Talaye, were not significantly different from their control treatments. Comprehensive studies should be conducted to find out the mechanisms under which gamma rays affect plant-insect interactions. (author)

  15. Gamma irradiation on canola seeds affects herbivore-plant and host-parasitoid interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akandeh, M.; Kocheili, F.; Rasekh, A. [Dept. of Entomology, Shahid Chamran Univ of Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soufbaf, M., E-mail: msoufbaf@nrcam.org [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    As an agricultural modernization, gamma irradiation is an important method for enhancing crop yield and quality. Nevertheless, its use can alter other plant traits such as nutrition and resistance to different biotic/abiotic stresses that consequently affect plant-insect interactions. A tritrophic system was utilized based on two canola mutant lines produced through gamma irradiation (RGS 8-1 and Talaye 8-3). Plutella xylostella (L.), as a worldwide pest of Brassicaceae and Cotesia vestalis (Holiday) as a key biocontrol agent of P. xylostella were examined for the potential indirect effects of canola seed irradiation on the experimental insects' performance when acting on the respective mutant lines. This study showed that physical mutation did not affect plant nitrogen and herbivore-damaged total phenolics; however, phenolic compounds showed greater concentration in damaged leaves than undamaged leaves of both mutant and control plants. The relative growth rate and pupal weight of P. xylostella reared on RGS 8-1 were significantly higher than those reared on the control RGS. There was no significant difference by performance parameters of the parasitoid, C. vestalis, including total pre-oviposition period, adult longevity, adult fresh body weight of males and females, pupal weight, forewing area, and total longevity of both sexes on tested canola cultivars in comparison with their mutant lines. Life table parameters of C. vestalis on mutant lines of both cultivars, RGS and Talaye, were not significantly different from their control treatments. Comprehensive studies should be conducted to find out the mechanisms under which gamma rays affect plant-insect interactions. (author)

  16. Host-cell reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated SV 40 DNA in five complementation groups of xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahams, P.J.; Eb, A.J. van der

    1976-01-01

    Host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated double-stranded SV40 DNA was studied in BSC-1 monkey cells, normal human cells, heterozygous Xeroderma pigmentosum xp cells, representative cell strains of the five complemention groups of XP and in XP 'variant' cells. The following percentages of survival of the plaque-forming ability of double-stranded SV40 DNA were found in XP cells compared with the value found in normal monkey and human cells: groupA, 13%; group B, 30%; group C, 18%; group D, 14%; group E, 59%; and in the heterozygous XP cells almost 100%. The survival in XP 'variant' cells was 66%. The survival of single-stranded SV40 DNA in BSC-1 cells was much lower than that of double-stranded SV40 DNA in XP cells of complementation group A, which possibly indicates that some repair of UV damage occurs even in XP cells of group A

  17. INFRARED ECLIPSES OF THE STRONGLY IRRADIATED PLANET WASP-33b, AND OSCILLATIONS OF ITS HOST STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deming, Drake; Fraine, Jonathan D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Sada, Pedro V. [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Universidad de Monterrey, Monterrey (Mexico); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Knutson, Heather A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Harrington, Joseph; Blecic, Jasmina; Nymeyer, Sarah [Planetary Sciences Group, Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Smith, Alexis M. S. [Astrophysics Group, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Jackson, Brian, E-mail: ddeming@astro.umd.edu [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    We observe two secondary eclipses of the strongly irradiated transiting planet WASP-33b, in the K{sub s} band at 2.15 {mu}m, and one secondary eclipse each at 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m using Warm Spitzer. This planet orbits an A5V {delta}-Scuti star that is known to exhibit low-amplitude non-radial p-mode oscillations at about 0.1% semi-amplitude. We detect stellar oscillations in all of our infrared eclipse data, and also in one night of observations at J band (1.25 {mu}m) out of eclipse. The oscillation amplitude, in all infrared bands except K{sub s} , is about the same as in the optical. However, the stellar oscillations in K{sub s} band (2.15 {mu}m) have about twice the amplitude (0.2%) as seen in the optical, possibly because the Brackett-{gamma} line falls in this bandpass. As regards the exoplanetary eclipse, we use our best-fit values for the eclipse depth, as well as the 0.9 {mu}m eclipse observed by Smith et al., to explore possible states of the exoplanetary atmosphere, based on the method of Madhusudhan and Seager. On this basis we find two possible states for the atmospheric structure of WASP-33b. One possibility is a non-inverted temperature structure in spite of the strong irradiance, but this model requires an enhanced carbon abundance (C/O > 1). The alternative model has solar composition, but an inverted temperature structure. Spectroscopy of the planet at secondary eclipse, using a spectral resolution that can resolve the water vapor band structure, should be able to break the degeneracy between these very different possible states of the exoplanetary atmosphere. However, both of those model atmospheres absorb nearly all of the stellar irradiance with minimal longitudinal re-distribution of energy, strengthening the hypothesis of Cowan and Agol that the most strongly irradiated planets circulate energy poorly. Our measurement of the central phase of the eclipse yields ecos {omega} = 0.0003 {+-} 0.00013, which we regard as being consistent with a

  18. Plasmids which make their host bacteria mutable as well as resistant to ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Toshihiko; Ando, Takao

    1980-01-01

    Some of the naturally occurring Iα, I zeta, M, N, O and T group plasmids increase both the mutability and UV resistance of their host bacteria, while group H and S plasmids only increase mutability. This suggests that these two plasmid-mediated repair functions are separable. The two functions have no direct relation to their restriction-modification systems and nitrofuran resistant functions. In addition, the close linking between the restriction-modification genes and these repair function genes was suggested in group N plasmids. (author)

  19. The treatment of peripheral nerve injuries using irradiated allografts and temporary host immunosuppression (in a rat model)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterling, K.J.; Trumble, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    Irradiation of allografts prior to transplantation and host immunosuppression with cyclosporin-A were studied separately and in combination as means of lessening the rejection of transplanted peripheral nerve tissue. Lewis and Brown Norway rats were used in the animal model, as they differ at both major and minor histocompatibility loci. Sciatic nerve grafts (2.5 cm) were used and the animals were followed for 16 weeks after nerve grafting. The outcome was studied by functional measurements (sensory testing, gait analysis, joint flexion contracture, and muscle weight), as well as by measurements of biochemical and histologic parameters (hydroxyproline concentration and axon counts, respectively). Sensory testing was not reliable because of crossover innervation by the saphenous nerve. Evaluation by standard gait-testing techniques was found to be unsatisfactory. However, the allografted animals receiving cyclosporin-A had significantly smaller flexion contractures, compared to the allografted animals without immunosuppression (17 degrees +/- 12 degrees vs. 44 degrees +/- 13 degrees and 51 degrees +/- 13 degrees, p less than 0.005). Allografted animals receiving short-term cyclosporin-A had contractures that were not significantly different from those seen in isografted control animals (17 degrees +/- 12 degrees vs. 22 degrees +/- 15 degrees, NS). Muscle hydroxyproline concentration analysis revealed a lower hydroxyproline concentration among the allografted groups that received irradiated allografts, compared to groups receiving nonirradiated allogeneic grafts. The studies of muscle hydroxyproline concentration and muscle weight both showed substantial reinnervation, even in allografted animals without pretreatment of the grafts or immunosuppression of the recipient animal

  20. The treatment of peripheral nerve injuries using irradiated allografts and temporary host immunosuppression (in a rat model)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterling, K.J.; Trumble, T.E. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Irradiation of allografts prior to transplantation and host immunosuppression with cyclosporin-A were studied separately and in combination as means of lessening the rejection of transplanted peripheral nerve tissue. Lewis and Brown Norway rats were used in the animal model, as they differ at both major and minor histocompatibility loci. Sciatic nerve grafts (2.5 cm) were used and the animals were followed for 16 weeks after nerve grafting. The outcome was studied by functional measurements (sensory testing, gait analysis, joint flexion contracture, and muscle weight), as well as by measurements of biochemical and histologic parameters (hydroxyproline concentration and axon counts, respectively). Sensory testing was not reliable because of crossover innervation by the saphenous nerve. Evaluation by standard gait-testing techniques was found to be unsatisfactory. However, the allografted animals receiving cyclosporin-A had significantly smaller flexion contractures, compared to the allografted animals without immunosuppression (17 degrees +/- 12 degrees vs. 44 degrees +/- 13 degrees and 51 degrees +/- 13 degrees, p less than 0.005). Allografted animals receiving short-term cyclosporin-A had contractures that were not significantly different from those seen in isografted control animals (17 degrees +/- 12 degrees vs. 22 degrees +/- 15 degrees, NS). Muscle hydroxyproline concentration analysis revealed a lower hydroxyproline concentration among the allografted groups that received irradiated allografts, compared to groups receiving nonirradiated allogeneic grafts. The studies of muscle hydroxyproline concentration and muscle weight both showed substantial reinnervation, even in allografted animals without pretreatment of the grafts or immunosuppression of the recipient animal.

  1. Severe acute radiation syndrome. Treatment of a lethally 60Co-source irradiated accident victim in China with HLA-mismatched peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Mei; Dong Zheng; Qiao Jianhui

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of a 32-year-old man exposed to a total body dose of 14.5 Gy γ-radiation in a lethal 60 Co-source irradiation accident in 2008 in China. Frequent nausea, vomiting and marked neutropenia and lymphopenia were observed from 30 min to 45 h after exposure. HLA-mismatched peripheral blood stem cell transplantation combined with infusion of mesenchymal stem cells was used at Day 7. Rapid hematopoietic recovery, stable donor engraftment and healing of radioactive skin ulceration were achieved during Days 18-36. The patient finally developed intestinal obstruction and died of multi-organ failure on Day 62, although intestinal obstruction was successfully released by emergency bowel resection. (author)

  2. The effect of postirradiation holding at 22 degrees C on the repair of sublethal, potentially lethal and potentially neoplastic transforming damage in gamma-irradiated HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redpath, J.L.; Antoniono, R.J.; Mendonca, M.S.; Sun, C.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of postirradiation holding at 22 degrees C on cell growth, progression of cells through the cell cycle, and the repair of sublethal, potentially lethal and potentially neoplastic transforming damage in γ-irradiated HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells has been examined. Cell growth and cell cycle progression were essentially stopped at this reduced temperature. Cell survival was dramatically reduced by holding confluent cultures for 6 h at 22 degrees C, as opposed to 37 degrees C, after 7.5 Gy γ radiation delivered at a rate of 2 Gy/min. Return of the cells to 37 degrees C for 6 h after holding at 22 degrees C did not result in increased survival. A similar effect was obtained when the cells were held at 22 degrees C between split-dose irradiation of log-phase cultures where no increase in survival was observed over a split-dose interval of 4 h. In this case a partial increase in survival was observed upon returning the cells to 37 degrees C for 3 h after holding at 22 degrees C for the first 3 h of the split-dose interval. Neoplastic transformation frequency was not enhanced by holding confluent cultures for 6 h at 22 degrees C after 7.5 Gy γ radiation. This is consistent with previous observations that misrepair of potentially neoplastic transforming damage already occurs at 37 degrees C. The overall results are interpreted in terms of the reduced temperature favoring misrepair, rather than inhibition of repair, of sublethal, potentially lethal and potentially transforming radiation damage. 24 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Early changes in GABA and dlutamine levels and aminotransferase activity in rat brain after total-body γ-irradiation with absolutely lethal doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanov, V.A.; Karpovich, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The contents of gaama-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (GL) as well as GABA-aspartate- and alanine aminotransferase activities were measured in rat cerebellum, cerebral cortex and truncus cerebri 1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 hr following total-body γ-irradiation ( 60 Co) with a dose of 30 Gy. All the indices under study changed in a similar way in the cortex and truncus cerebri while in the cerebellum, GABA level increased and GABA-α-ketoglutarate aminotransfearse activity decreased 60 min after irradiation. The levels of GABA and GL in the cortex and truncus cerebri decreased immediately and increased 24 hr after irradiation. Activity of aminotransferases changed in a phase manner: changes in aspartate- and alanine aminotransferase activity were more pronounced than those of GABA-α-ketoglutarate aminotransferase activity and correlated with the glutamate level changes

  4. Interaction of T- and B-lymphocytes in the immune respouse of lethally irradiated dogs thymus and part of bone marrow being shielded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, R.V.; Khaitov, R.M.; Sbitneva, M.F.; Fedorovskij, L.L.; Nazhmitdinov, A.M.; Ataullakhanov, R.I.; Gvozdeva, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    It has been first shown in experiments with sublethally irradiated dogs that it is possible to simulate and study the role of the co-operative interaction of T- and B-lymphocytes in the immune response. A model has been developed for determining dynamically the number of antibody-forming cells in the spleen of dogs in the course of the chronic experiment. The proposed model may be used for assessing the role of the substances that affect the interaction of T- and B-cells in the irradiated dog organism

  5. A quick method for testing recessive lethal damage with a diploid strain of Aspergillus nidulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morpurgo, G.; Puppo, S.; Gualandi, G.; Conti, L.

    1978-01-01

    A simple method capable of detecting recessive lethal damage in a diploid strain of Aspergillus nidulans is described. The method scores the recessive lethals on the 1st, the 3rd and the 5th chromosomes, which represent about 40% of the total map of A. nidulans. Two examples of induced lethals, with ultraviolet irradiation and methyl methanesulfonate are shown. The frequency of lethals may reach 36% of the total population with UV irradiation. (Auth.)

  6. Protection to glycolysis by a combination of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan and 2-aminoethylisothiuronium bromide hydrobromide in lethally irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, S.K.; Srinivasan, M.N.; Chuttani, K.; George, S.

    1992-01-01

    Rate of glycolysis in vivo at different time intervals following 8 Gy[LDsub(100(30)] whole body gamma radiation (WBGR) was evaluated by estimating liver glycogen, blood sugar, serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and lactic acid concentration in adult male Sprague Dawley rats. Within 1 hr of radiation exposure, a significant fall in liver glycogen was observed in rats fed food and water ad libitum. The glycogen content increased after 24 hr and had returned to control level on 7th day after radiation exposure. Blood sugar, serum LDH and blood lactate levels increased significantly as compared to non irradiated controls. Pretreatment with 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP;100 mg/kg) + 2-aminoethylisothiuronium bromide hydrobromide (AET;20 mg/kg)ip 30 min before 8 Gy WBGR, modified these values and restored them to normal level on 7th day post-irradiation. (author). 24 refs

  7. Induction and repair of lethal and oncogenic lesions and their relationship to cytogenetic changes in UV-irradiated mouse 10T1/2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, G.L.; Nagasawa, H.; Little, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    While bacterial system is valuable for the pragmatic purpose of screening potential environmental carcinogens, the fundamental difference between prokaryotes and mammalian cells warrant caution against the use of bacterial mutagenic mechanisms to explain the oncogenic process in mammalian cells. The 10 T1/2 cells exposed to UV light in the plateau phase and subcultured immediately to low density to assay for clonogenic survival were extremely resistant to the cytotoxic effect of UV light. Purely physical considerations such as the increased thickness of plateau phase cells and the increased cytoplasmic shielding of UV light from the nuclei were insufficient to account for this unusual resistance. The effect of caffeine on the repair processes in UV-irradiated mammalian cells appears to be exerted during the first DNA synthetic phase after the UV exposure. The daughter DNA synthesized on a UV-irradiated template is of reduced molecular weight. 10 T1/2 cells were exposed in the log phase of growth to UV light, and then they were cultured for the next 48 hours in the complete growth medium containing the specific concentration of caffeine. Parallel experiments were performed, in which cells were exposed for 48 hours to caffeine only with no prior exposure to UV light. It was found that caffeine did not potentiate the transformation by UV light. Caffeine alone induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), whereas the caffeine given after UV light had no effect. The class of UV-induced lesions which induce SCE also leads to malignant transformation. (Yamashita, S.)

  8. Caracterização da dose letal mínima por irradiação gama para Penicillium citrinum Characterization of minimum lethal dosis of gama irradiation to Penicillium citrinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Norberg

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available O uso das radiações ionizantes na destruição de microrganismos responsáveis pela deterioração de alimentos ou causadores de infecções ou toxinfecções alimentares, constituiu-se aplicação da energia nuclear, para fins verdadeiramente pacíficos. Penicillium citrinum é um fungo produtor de micotoxinas, responsáveis por intoxicações em humanos e animais que se utilizam de alimentos contaminados. Há escassez de informações sobre a resistência do P. citrinum à irradiação gama; assim esta pesquisa objetivou determinar a dose letal por irradiação gama para esse microrganismo. Foram irradiadas 76 suspensões, contendo aproximadamente 100.000 esporos por mililitro, com doses entre 0,2 e 2,2 KGy (KiloGray, sendo os sobreviventes re-irradiados com doses até 3,0 KGy. O fungo foi totalmente destruído com dose de 2,2 KGy. P. citrinum descendentes dos sobreviventes de 2,0 KGy, quando re-irradiados também foram totalmente destruídos com dose de 2,2 KGy. Observou-se um aumento da resistência às doses mais baixas em relação ao fungo não irradiadoThe use of nuclear power through radiation for the destruction of microrganisms which cause food decay, and toxicosis, is specifically for peaceful purposes. Penicillium citrinum is a fungus which produce mycotoxins responsible for intoxication in humans and animals as a result of eating contaminated food. There is little informations on the resistance of P. citrinum to radiation. The objective of this research is to determine the lethal dose of gama radiation for these microrganisms. Seventy six suspensions containing approximately 100,000 spores/ml received a dose of radiation between 0.2 and 2.2 KGy (KiloGray, being one sample still alive re-irradiated with doses up to 3.0 KGy. The fungus were totally destroyed with a 2.2 KGy. Seventy six suspensions containing approximately 100,000 spores/ml received a dose of radiation between 0.2 and 2.2 KGy, being one sample still alive re-irradiated

  9. Ultraviolet irradiation modulates MHC-alloreactive cytotoxic T-cell precursors involved in the onset of graft-versus-host disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prooijen, H.C. Van; Aarts-Riemens, M.I.; Weelden, H. Van; Grijzenhout, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation of cellular blood components has been proposed as a new technology to prevent HLA sensitization in recipients. Earlier studies have shown that a dose of 2 J/cm 2 abrogates the ability of lymphocytes to serve as stimulators in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC). In this study the authors evaluate the effect of UV energy on T-lymphocytes for the prevention of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GvHD). The response of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors against host alloantigens was almost undetectable at a dose of 0.5 J/cm 2 . T-cell proliferation in MLC or in response to phytohaemagglutinin was inhibited by more than 95% at doses of 1 J/cm 2 or higher. The data suggest that UV irradiation can be used to prevent both HLA sensitization and TA-GvHD in recipients. (Author)

  10. Increase of acceptability period of Musca domestic l., 1758 (diptera: muscidae) pupae, irradiated by gamma radiation as host of the pupal parasitoid Spalangia endius, Walker, 1839 (hymenoptera: pteromalidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itepan, Natanael M., E-mail: nmitepan@ifsp.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Sao Paulo (IFSP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Itepan, Sara E.D.Z., E-mail: sarazenitepan@ig.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras; Arthur, Valter, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This experiment was carried out in Biological Control of Domestic Fly 'Eduardo Hiroshi Mizumoto' Laboratory at Entomology and Acarology Department (LEA/ESALQ/USP) and in Food Irradiation and Radioentomology Laboratory (LIARE/CENA/USP). The gamma radiation source used was a Co-60 irradiator model Gammabeam-650 of the Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. whose activity in the beginning of the experiments was 9.8x10{sup 13} Bq. (2,644 Ci). The lots of pupae of Musca domestic L., 1758 and the parasitoid Spalangia endius Walker, 1839 had been kept in acclimatized room with 25 ± 2 deg C of temperature and 70 ± 5% of relative humidity. This experiment was designed to investigate if the non-viabilization M. domestic pupae, using gamma radiation, could build up the acceptability period as host of the pupal parasitoid S. endius. At these age intervals, the dose to prevent adult emergence was 25, 220, 360 and 520 Gy respectively. The 1, 2, 3 and 4 days old pupae were irradiated (dose rate: 1,510 Gy/hr) and exposed to the parasitoid S. endius at a proportion of one female parasitoid to five housefly pupae, during different periods after the irradiation. The results allow us to conclude that irradiation increase the acceptability period of the housefly pupae by the parasitoid. The best age to irradiate the housefly pupae was one day. (author)

  11. Increase of acceptability period of Musca domestic l., 1758 (diptera: muscidae) pupae, irradiated by gamma radiation as host of the pupal parasitoid Spalangia endius, Walker, 1839 (hymenoptera: pteromalidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itepan, Natanael M.; Itepan, Sara E.D.Z.

    2013-01-01

    This experiment was carried out in Biological Control of Domestic Fly 'Eduardo Hiroshi Mizumoto' Laboratory at Entomology and Acarology Department (LEA/ESALQ/USP) and in Food Irradiation and Radioentomology Laboratory (LIARE/CENA/USP). The gamma radiation source used was a Co-60 irradiator model Gammabeam-650 of the Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. whose activity in the beginning of the experiments was 9.8x10 13 Bq. (2,644 Ci). The lots of pupae of Musca domestic L., 1758 and the parasitoid Spalangia endius Walker, 1839 had been kept in acclimatized room with 25 ± 2 deg C of temperature and 70 ± 5% of relative humidity. This experiment was designed to investigate if the non-viabilization M. domestic pupae, using gamma radiation, could build up the acceptability period as host of the pupal parasitoid S. endius. At these age intervals, the dose to prevent adult emergence was 25, 220, 360 and 520 Gy respectively. The 1, 2, 3 and 4 days old pupae were irradiated (dose rate: 1,510 Gy/hr) and exposed to the parasitoid S. endius at a proportion of one female parasitoid to five housefly pupae, during different periods after the irradiation. The results allow us to conclude that irradiation increase the acceptability period of the housefly pupae by the parasitoid. The best age to irradiate the housefly pupae was one day. (author)

  12. Effects of Thy-1+ cell depletion on the capacity of donor lymphoid cells to induce tolerance across an entire MHC disparity in sublethally irradiated adult hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, G.E.; Watts, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    Thy-1+ cell depletion with anti-Thy-1.2 mAb and complement markedly reduced the capacity of C57BL/6J, H-2b bone marrow to establish mixed lymphoid chimerism and induce tolerance to C57BL/6J skin grafts across an entire MHC disparity in BALB/c, H-2d hosts conditioned with sublethal, fractionated 7.5 Gy total-body irradiation. In this model tolerance can be transferred to secondary irradiated BALB/c hosts only by cells of C57BL/6J donor, not host, genotype isolated from the spleens of tolerant hosts. Thy-1+ cell depletion abolished the capacity of C57BL/6J donor cells from tolerant BALB/c host spleens to transfer tolerance. The capacity of semiallogeneic BALB/c x C57BL/6J F1, H-2d/b donor BM and spleen cells to induce chimerism and tolerance to C57BL/6J skin grafts in BALB/c parental hosts was also reduced by Thy-1+ cell depletion. Thus the requirement for donor Thy-1+ cells cannot be explained simply on the basis of alloaggression. It is unlikely that the requisite Thy-1+ cells are nonspecific suppressor cells: Thy-1+ cell depletion had no effect on the slight but significant prolongation of third-party C3H/HeJ, H-2k skin grafts in irradiated BALB/c hosts injected with allogeneic C57BL/6J or semiallogeneic BALB/c x C57BL/6J F1 BM compared to irradiated controls injected with medium only. Furthermore, injections of semiallogeneic F1 spleen cells had no significant effect on the survival of the third-party grafts, although these cells were fully capable of inducing tolerance, and their capacity to induce tolerance was significantly reduced by Thy-1+ cell depletion. The requirement for a specific population of lymphoid cells, i.e. Thy-1+, remains unexplained but suggests that donor cells might play a role in the induction or maintenance of tolerance in this model other than merely providing a circulating source of donor antigens

  13. Prevention of lethal graft-versus-host disease in mice by monoclonal antibodies directed against T cells or their subsets.I.Evidence for the induction of a state of tolerance based on suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knulst, A.C.; Tibbe, G.J.M.; Noort, W.A.; Bril-Bazuin, C.; Benner, R.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    1994-01-01

    Lethal GVHD in the fully allogeneic BALB/c (donor)-(C57BL x CBA)F1 (recipient) mouse strain combination could be prevented by a single dose of IgG2b monoclonal antibodies (moAb) directed to T cells. The influence of the time of administration of this moAb after GVHD induction and the effect of

  14. Treatment of whole blood with riboflavin plus ultraviolet light, an alternative to gamma irradiation in the prevention of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Loren D; Nevola, Martha; Tavares, Jennifer; Reddy, Heather L; Goodrich, Ray P; Marschner, Susanne

    2013-02-01

    Exposure of blood products to gamma irradiation is currently the standard of care in the prevention of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD). Regulatory, technical, and clinical challenges associated with the use of gamma irradiators are driving efforts to develop alternatives. Pathogen reduction methods were initially developed to reduce the risk of microbial transmission by blood components. Through modifications of nucleic acids, these technologies interfere with the replication of both pathogens and white blood cells (WBCs). To date, systems for pathogen and WBC inactivation of products containing red blood cells are less well established than those for platelets and plasma. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo function of WBCs present in whole blood after exposure to riboflavin plus ultraviolet light (Rb-UV) was examined and compared to responses of WBCs obtained from untreated or gamma-irradiated blood by measuring proliferation, cytokine production, activation, and antigen presentation and xenogeneic (X-)GVHD responses in an in vivo mouse model. In vitro studies demonstrated that treatment of whole blood with Rb-UV was as effective as gamma irradiation in preventing WBC proliferation, but was more effective in preventing antigen presentation, cytokine production, and T-cell activation. Consistent with in vitro findings, treatment with Rb-UV was as effective as gamma irradiation in preventing X-GVHD, a mouse model for TA-GVHD. The ability to effectively inactivate WBCs in fresh whole blood using Rb-UV, prior to separation into components, provides the transfusion medicine community with a potential alternative to gamma irradiation. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. Prevention of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease by irradiation: technical aspect of a new ferrous sulphate dosimetric system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Sacchini Del Lama

    Full Text Available Irradiation of whole blood and blood components before transfusion is currently the only accepted method to prevent Transfusion-Associated Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (TA-GVHD. However, choosing the appropriate technique to determine the dosimetric parameters associated with blood irradiation remains an issue. We propose a dosimetric system based on the standard Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG dosimeter and an appropriate phantom. The modified dosimeter was previously calibrated using a (60Co teletherapy unit and its validation was accomplished with a (137Cs blood irradiator. An ionization chamber, standard FXG, radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs were used as reference dosimeters to determine the dose response and dose rate of the (60Co unit. The dose distributions in a blood irradiator were determined with the modified FXG, the radiochromic film, and measurements by TLD dosimeters. A linear response for absorbed doses up to 54 Gy was obtained with our system. Additionally, the dose rate uncertainties carried out with gel dosimetry were lower than 5% and differences lower than 4% were noted when the absorbed dose responses were compared with ionization chamber, film and TLDs.

  16. Prevention of Transfusion-Associated Graft-versus-Host Disease by Irradiation: Technical Aspect of a New Ferrous Sulphate Dosimetric System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Lama, Lucas Sacchini; de Góes, Evamberto Garcia; Petchevist, Paulo César Dias; Moretto, Edson Lara; Borges, José Carlos; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; de Almeida, Adelaide

    2013-01-01

    Irradiation of whole blood and blood components before transfusion is currently the only accepted method to prevent Transfusion-Associated Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (TA-GVHD). However, choosing the appropriate technique to determine the dosimetric parameters associated with blood irradiation remains an issue. We propose a dosimetric system based on the standard Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) dosimeter and an appropriate phantom. The modified dosimeter was previously calibrated using a 60Co teletherapy unit and its validation was accomplished with a 137Cs blood irradiator. An ionization chamber, standard FXG, radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used as reference dosimeters to determine the dose response and dose rate of the 60Co unit. The dose distributions in a blood irradiator were determined with the modified FXG, the radiochromic film, and measurements by TLD dosimeters. A linear response for absorbed doses up to 54 Gy was obtained with our system. Additionally, the dose rate uncertainties carried out with gel dosimetry were lower than 5% and differences lower than 4% were noted when the absorbed dose responses were compared with ionization chamber, film and TLDs. PMID:23762345

  17. Effects of extracellular and intracellular pH on repair of potentially lethal damage, chromosome aberrations and DNA double-strand breaks in irradiated plateau-phase A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanth, V.R.; Bayne, M.T.; Varnes, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    Plateau-phage A549 cells exhibit a high capacity for repair of potentially lethal radiation damage (PLD). Previously it was found that PLD repair could be partially inhibited by increasing the extracellular pH (pH e ) of the spent medium from its normal value of 6.7-6.8 to 7.6 during postirradiation holding. This study shows that PLD repair is also inhibited by reducing the pH e of the spent medium to 6.0. The effects of altering pH e on rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) as measured by neutral filter elution and on mitotic delay and chromosome aberrations seen after releasing cells from the plateau phase were investigated. Neither increasing nor decreasing the pH e of the spent medium had an effect on radiation-induced mitotic delay. Rejoining of DSBs was significantly inhibited by holding at pH e 6.0 but not affected by holding at pH e 7.6. At 2 h after irradiation about 51% of unrejoined breaks remained at pH e 6.0, compared to about 15% at pH e 6.7 or 7.6. However, holding at pH e 7.6 appeared to cause a marginal change in the kinetics of rejoining of DSBs. Repair of lesions leading to dicentric and acentric chromosome aberrations did not occur when cells were held at pH e 6.0, since less than 10% of these aberrations disappeared from cells held for 24 h before subculture. In contrast, holding plateau-phase cells at pH e 7.6 vs 6.7 caused a small but significant reduction in the disappearance of dicentrics but had no effect on the rate or extent of the disappearance of acentrics. These data have led us to hypothesize that inhibition of PLD repair by holding at pH e 6.0 is related both to inhibition of pH-dependent DNA repair enzymes and to induction of changes in DNA which lead to misrepair when the cells are released from plateau phase. Inhibition of PLD repair by holding at pH e 7.6 is related primarily to changes in DNA structure which promote misrepair. 43 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and chemically-treated herpes simplex virus-1 by xeroderma pigmentosum, xp heterozygotes and normal skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selsky, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    The host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylamino-fluorene-treated herpes simplex virus type 1 strain MP was studied in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum human skin fibroblasts. Virus treated with either agent demonstrated lower survival in XP cells from complementation groups A, B, C and D than in normal fibroblasts. The relative reactivation ability of XP cells from the different genetic complementation groups was found to be the same for both irradiated and chemically treated virus. In addition, the inactivation kinetics for virus treated with either agent in the XP variant were comparable to that seen in normal skin fibroblasts. The addition of 2 or 4 mmoles caffeine to the post-infection assay medium had no effect on the inactivation kinetics of virus treated by either agent in the XP variant or in XP cells from the different genetic complementation groups. Treatment of the virus with nitrogen mustard resulted in equivalent survival in normal and XP genetic complementation group D cells. No apparent defect was observed in the ability of XP heterozygous skin fibroblasts to repair virus damaged with up to 100 μg N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene per ml. These findings indicate that the repair of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus is accomplished by the same pathway or different pathways sharing a common intermediate step and that the excision defect of XP cells plays little if any role in the reactivation of nitrogen mustard treated virus. (Auth.)

  19. Host-cell reactivation of uv-irradiated and chemically treated Herpes simplex virus type 1 strain MP in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selsky, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    The host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated herpes simplex virus type 1 strain mp was studied in normal human skin fibroblasts and xeroderma pigmentosum skin fibroblasts from XP genetic complementation groups A-D and in an XP variant. The increasing relative order for the host-cell reactivation of both types of damaged virus in the different complementation groups is A = D < B < C; XP variant = normal controls. XP complementation group D cells, which manifest the most severe inhibition of her ability for both UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus, can reactivate nitrogen mustard treated HSV-1 mp to the same extent as normal cells. Together, these results indicate that (1) Excision repair of UV and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene DNA damaged viruses share a common rate limiting enzymatic step and (2) The repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells plays little or no role in the recovery of nitrogen mustard treated virus. The results of studies on the effect of caffeine on the survival of both UV- and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus in normal and XP cells imply that the reactivation of HSV-1 mp is mediated by an excision repair process with little if any recovery contributed by post-replication repair mechanisms. The host-cell reactivation of N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated HSV-1 mp was also correlated with the defective UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in two skin fibroblast strains established from a skin biopsy obtained from each of two juvenile females who had been clinically diagnosed as xeroderma pigmentosum. These findings are discussed in relation to the further characterization of the xeroderma pigmentosum phenotype and their possible utilization for the selection and isolation of new mammalian cell DNA repair mutants

  20. Association of immunity and tolerance of host H-2 determinants in irradiated F1 hybrid mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells from one parental strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprent, J.; von Boehmer, H.; Nabholz, M.

    1975-01-01

    Semiallogeneic radiation chimeras were prepared by injecting heavily irradiated F 1 hybrid mice with bone marrow cells from one parental strain; the bone marrow cells were treated with anti-theta serum and complement to remove T cells and injected in large numbers (2 x 10 7 cells). The mice survived in excellent health until sacrifice 6 mo later. Thoracic duct cannulation at this stage showed that the mice possessed normal numbers of recirculating lymphocytes. Close to 100 percent of thoracic duct lymphocytes and lymph node cells were shown to be of donor strain origin. The capacity of lymphocytes from the chimeras to respond to host-type determinants was tested in mixed leukocyte culture and in an assay for cell-mediated lympholysis (CML). Mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR) were measured both in vitro and in vivo; tumor cells and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated blast cells were used as target cells for measuring CML. While responding normally to third party determinants, cells from the chimeras gave a definite, though reduced MLR when exposed to host-type determinants. However, this proliferative response to host-type determinants, unlike that to third party determinants, was not associated with differentiation into cytotoxic lymphocytes

  1. Effect of UV irradiation (253.7 nm) on free Legionella and Legionella associated with its amoebae hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero-Aragó, Sílvia; Sommer, Regina; Araujo, Rosa M

    2014-12-15

    Water systems are the primary reservoir for Legionella spp., where the bacteria live in association with other microorganisms, such as free-living amoebae. A wide range of disinfection treatments have been studied to control and prevent Legionella colonization but few of them were performed considering its relation with protozoa. In this study, the effectiveness of UV irradiation (253.7 nm) using low-pressure lamps was investigated as a disinfection method for Legionella and amoebae under controlled laboratory conditions. UV treatments were applied to 5 strains of Legionella spp., 4 strains of free-living amoeba of the genera Acanthamoeba and Vermamoeba, treating separately trophozoites and cysts, and to two different co-cultures of Legionella pneumophila with the Acanthamoeba strains. No significant differences in the UV inactivation behavior were observed among Legionella strains tested which were 3 logs reduced for fluences around 45 J/m(2). UV irradiation was less effective against free-living amoebae; which in some cases required up to 990 J/m(2) to obtain the same population reduction. UV treatment was more effective against trophozoites compared to cysts; moreover, inactivation patterns were clearly different between the genus Acanthamoeba and Vermamoeba. For the first time data about Vermamoeba vermiformis UV inactivation has been reported in a study. Finally, the results showed that the association of L. pneumophila with free-living amoebae decreases the effectiveness of UV irradiation against the bacteria in a range of 1.5-2 fold. That fact demonstrates that the relations established between different microorganisms in the water systems can modify the effectiveness of the UV treatments applied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 1. modification of the proliferative capacity of transplanted bone marrow colony forming units by changes in the host environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beran, M.; Tribukait, B.

    1974-01-01

    Regulation of the proliferation of transplanted colony forming units (CFUs) was investigated in lethally irradiated mice, pretreated by methods known to accelerate hemopoietic recovery after sublethal irradiation. Prospective recipients were exposed to either hypoxia, vinblastine or priming irradiation and at different intervals thereafter lethally irradiated and transplanted with bone marrow. Repopulation of CFUs was determined by counting the number of splenic colonies in primary recipients or by retransplantation. Regeneration of grafted CFUs was greatly accelerated and their self-renewal capacity increased in mice grafted within 2 days after hypoxia. Also the number of splenic colonies formed by grafted syngeneic CFUs as well as by C57B1 parent CFUs growing in BC3F1 hosts was significantly increased. The effect was not dependent on the seeding efficiency of CFUs and apparently resulted from hypoxia induced changes in the hosts' physiological environment. Proliferative capacity of grafted CFUs increased remarkably in hosts receiving vinblastine 2 or 4 days prior to irradiation. Priming irradiation given 6 days before main irradiation accelerated, given 2 days before impaired regeneration of CFUs. The increased rate of regeneration was not related to the cellularity of hemopoietic organs at the time of transplantation. The growth of CFUs in diffusion chambers implanted into posthypoxic mice was only slightly improved which does indicate that the accelerated regeneration of CFUs in posthypoxic mice is mainly due to the changes in the hemopoietic microenvironment. A short conditioning of transplanted CFUs by host factor(s) was sufficient to improve regeneration. The results might suggest that the speed of hemopoietic regeneration depends on the number of CFUs being induced to proliferate shortly after irradiation, rather than on the absolute numbers of CFUs available to the organism. (author)

  3. Use of irradiation to produce vaccines and use of radioisotopes to study the pathophysiology and immunology of host-parasite relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, P.H.; Abbott, E.M.; Parkins, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the use of nuclear techniques to investigate various aspects of the control and study of parasitic diseases in domestic animals. The development of an irradiated vaccine against bovine lungworm disease has been very successful and many millions of calves have been vaccinated. The development of irradiated vaccines against other parasitic diseases has, for various reasons, been less successful. A major application of nuclear techniques in parasitology has been in the investigation of the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal helminth infections and particularly the aetiology of the anaemia and hypoalbuminaemia associated with such infections. These techniques have also been used to investigate the influence of nutrition on host-parasite relationships. Studies are described of the influence of protein nutrition on the establishment, pathophysiology and immunity of Haemonchus contortus infection of sheep. The results showed that the protein content of the diet per se did not influence the establishment of single primary infections. However, lambs given a low protein diet showed more severe clinical and pathophysiological changes, despite similar levels of gastric blood loss. Lambs given a high protein diet and subjected to repeated infections were more likely to develop resistance to reinfection than animals on a low protein diet. Dietary protein did not, however, appear to influence the ability of older, mature animals to respond to vaccination against H. contortus using gamma-irradiated larvae. These findings indicate the importance of nutrition on the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal nematode infections and could have considerable significance in field situations where suboptimal nutrition commonly occurs. There has also been extensive use of nuclear techniques to study the immunology of parasitic infections. Two examples are described, one using radiolabelled trypanosomes to measure immune clearance in vivo and the other using the in vivo

  4. Use of irradiation to produce vaccines and use of radioisotopes to study the pathophysiology and immunology of host-parasite relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, P.H.; Abbott, E.M.; Parkins, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    A review is presented of the use of nuclear techniques to investigate various aspects of the control and study of parasitic diseases in domestic animals. The development of an irradiated vaccine against bovine lungworm disease has been very successful and many millions of calves have been vaccinated. The development of irradiated vaccines against other parasitic diseases has, for various reasons, been less successful. A major application of nuclear techniques in parasitology has been in the investigation of the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal helminth infections and particularly the aetiology of the anaemia and hypoalbuminaemia associated with such infections. These techniques have also been used to investigate the influence of nutrition on host-parasite relationships. Studies are described of the influence of protein nutrition on the establishment, pathophysiology and immunity of Haemonchus contortus infection of sheep. The results showed that the protein content of the diet per se did not influence the establishment of single primary infections. However, lambs given a low protein diet showed more severe clinical and pathophysiological changes, despite similar levels of gastric blood loss. Lambs given a high protein diet and subjected to repeated infections were more likely to develop resistance to reinfection than animals on a low protein diet. Dietary protein did not, however, appear to influence the ability of older, mature animals to respond to vaccination against H. contortus using gamma-irradiated larvae. These findings indicate the importance of nutrition on the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal nematode infections and could have considerable significance in field situations where subtropical nutrition commonly occurs. There has also been extensive use of nuclear techniques to study the immunology of parasitic infections. Two examples are described, one using radiolabelled trypanosomes to measure immune clearance in vivo and the other using the in vivo

  5. Avoidance of graft versus host reactions in cured W-anemic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, D.E.

    1976-01-01

    Graft-versus-host reactions of parental cells in F 1 hybrids were studied with two unrelated inbred strains of mice that differed at the mouse major histocompatibility locus. W-anemic F 1 recipients were compared with lethally irradiated normal F 1 recipients. Both sets of recipients were populated by marrow and spleen cell grafts from parental and F 1 donors. Most W-anemic F 1 recipients were cured by parental and F 1 cell grafts (except B6 spleen). Even after 13 to 18 months, they showed little or no effect from GVH reactions. Lethally irradiated normal F 1 recipients tolerated parental marrow grafts almost as well, but gave dramatically different results with parental spleen grafts. Seventy-nine of 80 irradiated F 1 recipients of parental spleen grafts died within 1 month. Unlike lethally irradiated recipients, W-anemic recipients have substantial numbers of their own cells along with the donor cells in their lymphoid tissues. These F 1 lymphocytes may interact with parental lymphocytes in vivo to restrain reactions against F 1 allogeneic antigens

  6. Radiobiological speculations on therapeutic total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    Unexpected total body irradiation (TBI) of human beings, involved in nuclear warfare or in accidents in nuclear reactors can be lethal. In the 1950s, bone marrow transplantation was discovered as a potentially life saving procedure after TBI in the dose range of 5.0 to 12.0 Gy. Since that time, deliberate or therapeutic TBI has been used to condition patients with a lethal bone marrow disorder for bone marrow replacement. The therapeutic ratio of TBI followed by bone marrow transplantation is small. Many potentially lethal complications can occur, such as acute TBI side effects, late TBI side effects or immunological complications of bone marrow transplantation such as graft versus host disease or graft rejection. The benefits of TBI and bone marrow transplantation are that they offer a chance for cure of previously lethal bone marrow disorders. The optimal parameters for TBI remain to be defined. The review discusses the current clinical and experimental animal data, as they relate to the future definition of less toxic TBI procedures with a better therapeutic ratio. Different TBI procedures are required for patients with malignant vs. non-malignant disorders or for patients with histoincompatible vs. histocompatible bone marrow donors.77 references

  7. Ontogeny of B lymphocyte function. IV. Kinetics of maturation of B lymphocytes from fetal and neonatal mice when transferred into adult irradiated hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherr, D.; Szewczuk, M.R.; Siskind, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    Lethally irradiated mice reconstituted with adult T cells and neonatal or fetal B cells produce an anti-DNP response of restricted heterogeneity of affinity when compared with the response of mice reconstituted with T and B cells from adult donors. The capacity to reconstitute adult mice to give a heterogeneous response matures between 7 and 10 days after birth. The maturation of B cells from day-15 fetal or neonatal donors to produce a heterogeneous response was followed in the adult, cell transfer recipient by immunizing them at different times after cell transfer. It was found that B cells both from day-15 fetal mice and from neonatal mice acquire the capacity to produce a heterogeneous response within 3 days in the adult, cell transfer recipient. Thus, the B cell population matures more rapidly in the cell transfer recipient than in the intact donor. The kinetics of maturation in the adult recipient is the same for B cells from day-15 fetal and neonatal donors. The data imply that all information required to produce a fully heterogeneous response is already present in the day-15 fetus. In addition, the data strongly support the hypothesis that a factor in the adult mouse acts to induce this step in the maturation of the B lymphocyte population. Thus, the data seem to be inconsistent with the view that the timing of the occurrence of this differentiation event is precoded in an internal cell clock in the B lymphocyte line. Clearly, B cells from day-15 fetal mice are already capable of differentiating in response to the inducing factor which is present in the adult animal

  8. Histopathological effects of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The histopathological effects of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of glyphosate on African catfish Clarias gariepinus were investigated. C. gariepinus juveniles were assessed in a static renewal bioassay for 96 hours (acute toxicity) and 28 days (chronic toxicity) using varying concentrations (0.0 mg/l 20.0 mg/l, 30.0 mg/l, ...

  9. Effect of a non lethal whole-body gamma irradiation on the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalographic activities of the adult rabbit; Effets d'une irradiation gamma globale non letale sur les activites electroencephalograpiques spontanees et evoquees du lapin adulte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Court, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The whole of the experimental methods described (animal preparation, achievement of a precise physiological technique, dosimetry, biological information processing) allowed us to follow the changes for 15 days in the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalogram activities of rabbits submitted to a non-lethal 400 rads whole-body gamma-irradiation. Behavioural troubles, changes in the arousal state and the spontaneous electrical activity of the neo-cortex and hippocampus were noticed constantly together with an enhanced cortical excitability, and the appearance of elements of the paroxystic series sometimes in contrast with a general decrease in amplitude. After a visual stimulus the general morphology of evoked activities at the level of the primary visual areas and hippocampus was unchanged, but enhanced latencies and delays, less systematic modifications in amplitudes seemed to show out a direct effect of radiations on the nervous system and sensorial activities; these troubles seemed to occur independently from the basic electrical activity. As a whole, the changes observed were usually transitory and varied with each individual. Finally an assumption is made to explain the mechanism of arousal troubles and the general evolution of spontaneous electrical activity in the brain. (author) [French] 'L'ensemble des methodes experimentales decrites (preparation des animaux, mise au point d'une technique physiologique precise, dosimetrie, traitement de l'information biologique) a permis de suivre, pendant 15 jours, chez le lapin soumis a une irradiation gamma globale non letale de 400 rads, les modifications des activites electroencephaliques spontanees et evoquees. De facon constante, on note des troubles du comportement, des modifications de la vigilance et de l'activite electrique spontanee du neo-cortex et de l'hippocampe, ainsi qu'une augmentation de l'excitabilite corticale, l'apparition d'elements de la serie

  10. Suicide Lethality: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBastiani, Summer; De Santis, Joseph P

    2018-02-01

    Suicide is a significant health problem internationally. Those who complete suicide may have different behaviors and risk factors than those who attempt a non-fatal suicide. The purpose of this article is to analyze the concept of suicide lethality and propose a clear definition of the concept through the identification of antecedents, attributes, and consequences. A literature search for articles published in the English language between 1970 and 2016 was conducted using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Pubmed, Psychlit, Ovid, PsycINFO, and Proquest. The bibliographies of all included studies were also reviewed to identify additional relevant citations. A concept analysis was conducted on the literature findings using six stages of Walker and Avant's method. The concept analysis differentiated between suicide, lethality, suicidal behavior, and suicide lethality. Presence of a suicide plan or a written suicide note was not found to be associated with the majority of completed suicides included in the definition of suicide lethality. There are a few scales that measure the lethality of a suicide attempt, but none that attempt to measure the concept of suicide lethality as described in this analysis. Clarifying the concept of suicide lethality encourages awareness of the possibility of different suicidal behaviors associated with different suicide outcomes and will inform the development of future nursing interventions. A clearer definition of the concept of suicide lethality will guide clinical practice, research, and policy development aimed at suicide prevention.

  11. DNA repair in human fibroblasts, as reflected by host-cell reactivation of a transfected UV-irradiated luciferase gene, is not related to donor age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, Thomas J.; O'Brien, Katherine; Brooks, Philip J.; Tarone, Robert E.; Robbins, Jay H.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of donor age on the ability of mammalian cells to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage has been studied using several approaches, most recently via assays that measure the host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated reporter gene-containing plasmid vectors following their transfection into cells. Plasmid HCR assays indirectly quantify a cell line's ability to perform nucleotide excision repair (NER) by measuring the enzyme activity of the repaired reporter gene, e.g., chloramphenical acetyltransferase (cat) or luciferase (luc), and are useful in studies investigating whether increasing age may be a risk factor for the deficient repair of potentially cancer-causing, sunlight-induced, DNA lesions in skin cells. In our study, we quantified the DNA repair ability of cultured, nontransformed, human skin fibroblast lines through their HCR of a transfected UV-C-irradiated plasmid containing luc. HCR was measured at various times after transfection in five lines from normal donors of ages 21-96 years, and from one donor who had xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The normal lines displayed increasing HCR at successive post-transfection time points and showed no significant correlation between HCR and donor age. The XP-A line, known to be markedly deficient in NER of UV-induced DNA damage, showed minimal evidence of HCR compared to the normal lines. To further assess potential variation in HCR with donor age, fibroblast lines from five old donors, ages 84-94 years, were compared with lines from five young donors, ages 17-26 years. While significant differences in HCR were found between some lines, no significant difference was found between the young and old age groups (P=0.44). Our study provides no indication that the higher incidence of skin cancer observed with increasing age is due to an age-related decrease in the ability to repair UV-induced DNA damage

  12. Enhanced mutagenesis of UV-irradiated simian virus 40 occurs in mitomycin C-treated host cells only at a low multiplicity of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarasin, A.; Benoit, A.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of monkey kidney cells with mitomycin C (MMC) 24 h prior to infection with UV-irradiated simian virus 40 (SV40) enhanced both virus survival and virus mutagenesis. The use of SV40 as a biological probe has been taken as an easy method to analyse SOS response of mammalian cells to the stress caused by DNA damage or inhibition of DNA replication. The mutation assay we used was based on the reversion from a temperature-sensitive phenotype (tsA58 mutant) to a wild-type phenotype. The optimal conditions for producing enhanced survival and mutagenesis in the virus progeny were determined with regard to the multiplicity of infection (MOI). Results showed that the level of enhanced mutagenesis observed for UV-irradiated virus grown in MMC-treated cells was an inverse function of the MOI, while enhanced survival was observed at nearly the same level regardless of the MOI. For the unirradiated virus, almost no increase in the mutation of virus progeny issued from MMC-treated cells was observed, while a small amount of enhanced virus survival was obtained. These results show that enhanced virus mutagenesis and enhanced virus survival can be dissociated under some experimental conditions. Enhanced virus mutagenesis, analogous to the error-prone replication of phages in SOS-induced bacteria, was observed, at least for SV40, only when DNA of both virus and host cells was damaged and when infection occurred with a small number of viral particles. We therefore hypothesize that an error-prone replication mode of UV-damaged templates is observed in induced monkey kidney cells

  13. DNA repair in human fibroblasts, as reflected by host-cell reactivation of a transfected UV-irradiated luciferase gene, is not related to donor age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, Thomas J.; O' Brien, Katherine; Brooks, Philip J.; Tarone, Robert E.; Robbins, Jay H

    2004-10-04

    The effect of donor age on the ability of mammalian cells to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage has been studied using several approaches, most recently via assays that measure the host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated reporter gene-containing plasmid vectors following their transfection into cells. Plasmid HCR assays indirectly quantify a cell line's ability to perform nucleotide excision repair (NER) by measuring the enzyme activity of the repaired reporter gene, e.g., chloramphenical acetyltransferase (cat) or luciferase (luc), and are useful in studies investigating whether increasing age may be a risk factor for the deficient repair of potentially cancer-causing, sunlight-induced, DNA lesions in skin cells. In our study, we quantified the DNA repair ability of cultured, nontransformed, human skin fibroblast lines through their HCR of a transfected UV-C-irradiated plasmid containing luc. HCR was measured at various times after transfection in five lines from normal donors of ages 21-96 years, and from one donor who had xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The normal lines displayed increasing HCR at successive post-transfection time points and showed no significant correlation between HCR and donor age. The XP-A line, known to be markedly deficient in NER of UV-induced DNA damage, showed minimal evidence of HCR compared to the normal lines. To further assess potential variation in HCR with donor age, fibroblast lines from five old donors, ages 84-94 years, were compared with lines from five young donors, ages 17-26 years. While significant differences in HCR were found between some lines, no significant difference was found between the young and old age groups (P=0.44). Our study provides no indication that the higher incidence of skin cancer observed with increasing age is due to an age-related decrease in the ability to repair UV-induced DNA damage.

  14. Sterilization and lethal gamma radiation doses on adults and eggs of Sitotroga Cerealella (OLIVIER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiendl, F.M.; Bovi, O.A.; Arthur, V.

    1975-04-01

    The influence of lethal doses of radiation from a cobalt 60 gamma source on eggs, adults and fertitility of Sitotroga Cerealella (Olivier) is described. Eggs irradiated with a dose of 14 Krad still showed viability of 16.1%. On longevity doses up to 70 Krad were usually non lethal but some variation could be observed related to the larval diet. Females fertilized by males irradiated with a dose of 70 Krad produced 36% fertile eggs. When the females were irradiated with the same dose, their fertility dropped to 2.2% and when both sexes were irradiated with a 60 Krad dose, the fertility was 28.8%

  15. The effect of total body irradiation dose and chronic graft-versus-host disease on leukaemic relapse after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frassoni, F; Bacigalupo, A [Ospedale San Martino (Italy). Centro Trapianti Midollo Osseo; Scarpati, D [Univ. di Genova (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia; and others

    1989-10-01

    One-hundred and five patients undergoing allo-geneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) (n=61) and chronic myeloid leukaemia (n=44) were analysed for risk factors associated with relapse. All patients received marrow from an HLA identical sibling after preparation with cyclophosphamide 120 mg/kg and total body irradiation (TBI) 330 cGy on each of the three days prior to transplantation. A multivariate Cox analysis indicated that a lower TBI dose (less than 990 cGy) was the most significant factor associated with relapse and the second most important factor associated with recurrence of leukaemia was the absence of chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGvHD). Actuarial relapse incidence was 62%, 28% and 18% for patients with no, limited or extensive chronic GvHD respectively. However, chronic GvHD had no significant impact on survival. Combined stratification for TBI dose and cGvHD showed that the dose effect of TBI on relapse was evident both in patients with and without cGvHD. Chronic GvHD influenced the risk of relapse only in patients receiving less than 990 cGy. These results suggest that a higher dose of TBI, within this schedule, produced long-term disease-free survival in the majority of AMLs and CMLs. Minor radiobiological side effects were experienced, but a small reduction of the dose may significantly increase the risk of relapse. (author).

  16. Incidence and Pattern of Graft-versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Transplantation after Nonmyeloablative Conditioning with Total Lymphoid Irradiation and Antithymocyte Globulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Veltri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmyeloablative (NMA conditioning with total lymphoid irradiation and antithymocyte globulin (TLI/ATG has been shown to protect against acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. We report here our institutional experience with allogeneic transplantation following NMA conditioning with TLI/ATG (. GVHD prophylaxis consisted of a combination of a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil. Median patient age was 59 years. The median followup of surviving patients is 545 days. One patient experienced primary graft rejection. The median time to neutrophil engraftment was 18 days and platelet engraftment was 9.5 days. The cumulative incidence (CI of grade II–IV acute GVHD at day +100 was 28.6% and 38.1% at day +180. The CI for grade III-IV acute GVHD was 28.6% at day +180. CI of chronic GVHD was 45.2% at 1 year. The CI of disease relapse was 9.5% at 1 year. The rate of nonrelapse mortality (NRM was 0% at day +100 and only 9.5% at 1 year. The overall and progression free survival at 1 year was 81% and 80.4%, respectively. Our limited, retrospective data show encouraging relapse and NRM rates with TLI/ATG-based NMA conditioning, but with higher than previously reported rates of acute and chronic GVHD, underscoring the need for novel strategies designed to effectively prevent GVHD.

  17. The effect of total body irradiation dose and chronic graft-versus-host disease on leukaemic relapse after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frassoni, F.; Bacigalupo, A.; Scarpati, D.

    1989-01-01

    One-hundred and five patients undergoing allo-geneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) (n=61) and chronic myeloid leukaemia (n=44) were analysed for risk factors associated with relapse. All patients received marrow from an HLA identical sibling after preparation with cyclophosphamide 120 mg/kg and total body irradiation (TBI) 330 cGy on each of the three days prior to transplantation. A multivariate Cox analysis indicated that a lower TBI dose (less than 990 cGy) was the most significant factor associated with relapse and the second most important factor associated with recurrence of leukaemia was the absence of chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGvHD). Actuarial relapse incidence was 62%, 28% and 18% for patients with no, limited or extensive chronic GvHD respectively. However, chronic GvHD had no significant impact on survival. Combined stratification for TBI dose and cGvHD showed that the dose effect of TBI on relapse was evident both in patients with and without cGvHD. Chronic GvHD influenced the risk of relapse only in patients receiving less than 990 cGy. These results suggest that a higher dose of TBI, within this schedule, produced long-term disease-free survival in the majority of AMLs and CMLs. Minor radiobiological side effects were experienced, but a small reduction of the dose may significantly increase the risk of relapse. (author)

  18. Frequencies of aneuploidy and dominant lethal mutations in young female mice induced by low dose γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Suyan; Zhang Chaoyang; Dai Lianlian; Gao Changwen

    1991-01-01

    Relationship between aneuploidy, dominant lethal mutations and doses in young feral mice induced by low dose γ-rays was examined. The results suggest that the frequencies of aneuploidy of embryos increased at 0.15 Gy, but increases at over 0.50 Gy after irradiation in groups. The frequencies of aneuploidy and dominant lethal mutations increased with increasing doses and fitted linear relationship. This dose-response relationship of trisomic was not significant. The frequency of dominant lethal mutations induced by 60 Co γ irradiation is 5.59%. The effect of dominant lethal mutation is higher than that of the aneuploidy

  19. Preliminary studies on factors controlling the rate of regrowth of heavily x-irradiated rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenforde, T.S.; Curtis, S.B.; Woodruff, H.K.; Parks, D.L.; Daniels, S.J.; Crabtree, K.E.; Schilling, W.A.; DeGuzman, R.J.

    1977-12-01

    Following large single doses of x rays, rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumors exhibit a volume response which characteristically has a swelling phase, a regression phase, a rapid ''initial'' regrowth phase and a slow ''late'' regrowth phase. The preliminary experiments reported here were designed to examine three mechanisms that may underlie the reduction in growth rate occurring in the late regrowth phase; heritable non-lethal cellular damage, host immunity, delayed post-irradiation tissue and vascular damage. Based on retransplantation experiments and studies with immunosuppressed rats, neither heritable non-lethal damage nor host immune factors appear to influence the regrowth rate of tumors receiving radiation doses well below the cure level. After an x-ray dose approaching the cure level, regrowing tumors were observed to have a greatly reduced growth rate, possibly reflecting the presence of heritable non-lethal damage and/or an increased antigenicity of the heavily irradiated tumor cells. Morphometric analysis of histological sections did not reveal statistically significant abnormalities at the cellular level during the late regrowth phase, except for an increase in the percentage of necrotic tissue relative to non-irradiated tumors. The morphological resolution of small blood vessels was not adequate to evaluate delayed vascular damage in regrowing irradiated tumors

  20. Differentiation of strains of yellow fever virus in γ-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgeorge, R.; Bradish, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The mouse sensitized by optimal, sub-lethal γ-irradiation has been used for the differentiation of strains of yellow fever virus and for the resolution of their immunogenicity and pathogenicity as distinct characteristics. For different strains of yellow fever virus, the patterns of antibody-synthesis, regulatory immunity (pre-challenge) and protective immunity (post-challenge) are differentially sensitive to γ-irradiation. These critical differentiations of strains of yellow fever virus in γ-irradiated mice have been compared with those shown in normal athymic and immature mice in order to elucidate the range of quantifiable in vivo characteristics and the course of the virus-host interaction. This is discussed as a basis for the comparisons of the responses of model and principal hosts to vaccines and pathogens. (author)

  1. Abrogation of bone marrow allograft resistance in mice by increased total body irradiation correlates with eradication of host clonable T cells and alloreactive cytotoxic precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, E.; Lapidot, T.; Gozes, D.; Singer, T.S.; Reisner, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Host-vs-graft activity presents a major obstacle for transplantation of T cell-depleted bone marrow in HLA-mismatched patients. In a primate model, conditioned exactly like leukemia patients, it was shown that residual host clonable T cells, as well as alloreactive cytotoxic precursors, were present in peripheral blood and spleen after completion of cytoreduction. We have now extended this study in a mouse model for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. C 3 H/HeJ mice were treated by 9 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), and 24 hr later their spleen cells were cultured in the presence of T cell growth factor and phytohemagglutinin according to the limit dilution procedure. After 7 days of culture the average frequency of clonable cells was 2.5 X 10(-3) compared with 37 X 10(-3) in the spleens of normal mice. The T cell derivation of the growing cells was ascertained by complement-mediated cytotoxicity with anti-Thy-1 as well as with anti-Lyt-2 and anti-Ly-3T4. In parallel, we found that the initial engraftment rate of bone marrow allograft in mice given 9 Gy TBI was lower than that found in recipients of syngeneic marrow. The initial engraftment rate was measured by the number of colony-forming units in the spleen and by splenic uptake of 125 IUdR. A slight increase in TBI from 9 Gy to 11 Gy markedly reduced the difference in the number of spleen colony-forming units or the IUdR uptake between recipients of allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow. This increase in TBI also coincided with eradication of detectable clonable T cells. Moreover, in mice transplanted with T cell-depleted bone marrow after 9 Gy TBI, we also demonstrate that cytotoxicity against donor-type target cells is present in the spleen 10 to 14 days posttransplantation, whereas in mice treated by 11 Gy TBI such alloreactivity could not be detected

  2. Mechanism of donor to host tolerance in rat bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutschka, P.; Schwerdtfeger, R.; Slavin, R.; Santos, G.

    1977-01-01

    Lewis rats were conditioned with cyclophosphamide and grafted with AgB incompatible bone marrow. They were examined 250 days after transplantation and demonstrated to be healthy complete chimeras. Marrow cells from these chimeras were infused into lethally irradiated ACI, Lewis and BN recipients. Graft-versus-host disease occurred only in the BN rats. Other chimeric rats were given no treatment, busulfan, CY, or total body irradiation prior to the infusion of normal ACI BM. GvHD occurred only in animals given CY or TBI. Normal Lewis rats were conditioned with TBI and given ACI BM. In addition, they received whole blood, irradiated blood, or serum from chimeric rats. GvHD developed in all animals except those given unirradiated chimeric blood. These studies suggest that suppressor cell populations, sensitive to immunosuppression, are likely the fundamental mechanism of recovery from GvHD

  3. The Gottingen minipig is a model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome: G-colony stimulating factor stimulates hematopoiesis and enhances survival from lethal total-body γ-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D; Holt, Rebecca K; Whitnall, Mark H

    2013-08-01

    We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroni, Maria, E-mail: maria.moroni@usuhs.edu [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ngudiankama, Barbara F. [Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Christensen, Christine [Division of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Olsen, Cara H. [Biostatistics Consulting Center, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Owens, Rossitsa [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Lombardini, Eric D. [Veterinary Medicine Department, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok (Thailand); Holt, Rebecca K. [Veterinary Science Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Whitnall, Mark H. [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  5. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes

  6. Potentially lethal damage and its repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    Two forms termed fast-and slow-potentially lethal lethal damage (PLD) are introduced and discussed. The effect on the survival of x-irradiated Chinese hamster cells (V79) of two different post-treatments is examined in plateau- and in log-phases of growth. The postirradiation treatments used : a) incubation in hypertonic solution, and b) incubation in conditioned medium obtained from plateau-phase. Similar reduction in survival was caused by postirradiation treatment with hypertonic phosphate buffered saline, and similar increased in survival was effected by treatment in conditioned medium in plateau- and in log-phases cells. However, repair of PLD sensitive to hypertonic treatment was faster (half time, 5-10 min)(f-PLD repair) and independent from the repair of PLD (half time, 1-2 hour)(s-PLD repair) observed in conditioned medium. The results indicate the induction of two forms of PLD by radiation. Induction of both PLD was found to decrease with increasing LET of the radiation used. Identification of the molecular processes underlying repair and fixation of PLD is a task of particular interest, since it may allow replacement of a phenomenological definition with a molecular definition. Evidence is reviewed indicating the DNA double strand breaks (directly or indirectly induced) may be the DNA lesions underlying PLD. (author)

  7. Theories of Lethal Mutagenesis: From Error Catastrophe to Lethal Defection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero, Héctor; Montero, Francisco; Nuño, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses get extinct in a process called lethal mutagenesis when subjected to an increase in their mutation rate, for instance, by the action of mutagenic drugs. Several approaches have been proposed to understand this phenomenon. The extinction of RNA viruses by increased mutational pressure was inspired by the concept of the error threshold. The now classic quasispecies model predicts the existence of a limit to the mutation rate beyond which the genetic information of the wild type could not be efficiently transmitted to the next generation. This limit was called the error threshold, and for mutation rates larger than this threshold, the quasispecies was said to enter into error catastrophe. This transition has been assumed to foster the extinction of the whole population. Alternative explanations of lethal mutagenesis have been proposed recently. In the first place, a distinction is made between the error threshold and the extinction threshold, the mutation rate beyond which a population gets extinct. Extinction is explained from the effect the mutation rate has, throughout the mutational load, on the reproductive ability of the whole population. Secondly, lethal defection takes also into account the effect of interactions within mutant spectra, which have been shown to be determinant for the understanding the extinction of RNA virus due to an augmented mutational pressure. Nonetheless, some relevant issues concerning lethal mutagenesis are not completely understood yet, as so survival of the flattest, i.e. the development of resistance to lethal mutagenesis by evolving towards mutationally more robust regions of sequence space, or sublethal mutagenesis, i.e., the increase of the mutation rate below the extinction threshold which may boost the adaptability of RNA virus, increasing their ability to develop resistance to drugs (including mutagens). A better design of antiviral therapies will still require an improvement of our knowledge about lethal

  8. Hematologic syndrome in man modeled from mammalian lethality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.D.

    1981-01-01

    Data on acute radiation lethality due to failure of the hematologic system in rats, mice, dogs, swine, monkeys and man are analyzed. Based on the available data, the mortality incidences for 1-100% levels can be computed directly if one has only an estimate of the dose lethal to 50% of the population (LD 50 ) for the mammalian strain and radiation environment of interest. The sole restriction is that the dose profile to the marrow be moderately uniform. If an LD 50 for any exposure situation has been measured, then one can readily scale to any desired situation through implicit-biological and empirical-physical relationships. The LD 50 for man, exposed to an isotropic cloud of photons, and knowledge of the bone-marrow dose profiles readily permit evaluation of the model for other levels of human mortality from different irradiating particles, partial body irradiation and spatially dependent and/or mixed radiation environments. (author)

  9. Ultraviolet-B lethal damage on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degiorgi, C.F.; Fernandez, R.O.; Pizarro, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has shown an increased sensitivity compared with that of Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae, when they were exposed to 0.4 kJ/m2 of ultraviolet-B radiation. The rapid decay in cell viability observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa after the irradiation was influenced by factors such as culture media and the presence of pyocyanine during the irradiation. The radioinduced lethal damage could be prevented by photoreactivating treatment, indicating that pyrimidine dimer formation was the mechanism causing bacterial death. The results indicate that several environmental conditions may act as protective agents against ultraviolet-B-induced damage

  10. Non-Lethal Weapons Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets Frequently Asked Questions Non-Lethal Weapons FAQs Active Denial System FAQs Human Electro -Muscular Incapacitation FAQs Related Links Business Opportunities Contact JNLWD Congressional Engagement , Wednesday, Sept 20, 2017. The Active Denial System, blunt-impact munitions, dazzling lasers, LRAD 100X

  11. Mutagenesis of lambda phage by tif-expression or host-irradiation functions is largely independent of damage in the phage DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Wright, A.; Bridges, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    The survival and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated phage lambda, as well as bacterial mutagenesis, are enhanced in tif mutants of Escherichia coli when these strains are grown at 43 0 C (Castellazzi et al., 1972). This was interpreted on the basis of a hypothesis (the SOS hypothesis) according to which the UV-inducible phenomena connected with reactivation and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated bacteriophages (Weigle, 1953; Radman, 1975) are constitutively expressed in tif-bacteria at high temperature (Witkin, 1974). In unpublished experiments with phage T3 we found that the survival of UV-irradiated phage is also better at 43 0 C than at 32 0 C in tif + cells and this made us reexamine the significance and nature of tif expression and examine its effects on both unirradiated and UV-irradiated phage lambda. Our results indicate that tif-induced mutagenesis and possibly reactivation of UV-irradiated phage lambda should be reinterpreted. (orig./AJ)

  12. Contribution to the study of the radioprotective effect of serotonin on brain spontaneous and evoked electrical activities in the adult rabbit following whole-body lethal $gamma$-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatome, M; Court, L

    1973-11-01

    Thesis. Submitted to Paris Univ., (France). A 1 to 12 mg/kg serotonin- creatine-sulfate intravenous injection seems to act only slightly on the chronic implanted rabbit CNS except for an increase in latencies and delays of the fast components of evoked potentials and a generalized decrease in the total energy of the signal occurring 20 to 60 min after the injection. The CNS is given a real protection by a 10 mg/kg serotonin injec, tion 20 min before a 650 R whole-body exposure, the spontaneous or induced electrical activity being slightly disturbed. In the hours following irradiation the total energy increase is less important than in the unprotected animal, and there is no clear variation towards the low frequencies. Serotonin could act on the brain structures and the total energy of the signal through its depressing effect. Its radioprotective effect could act, at least partly, through the CNS. (auth)

  13. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerens, H [Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France); Saint-Lebe, L

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment.

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerens, H.; Saint-Lebe, L.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment [fr

  15. Modification of the repair of potentially lethal damage in plateau-phase Chinese hamster cells by 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Hiraoka, Wakako; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Matsuda, Akira; Ueda, Tohru; Sato, Fumiaki.

    1988-09-01

    The ability of 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, to inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage was demonstrated in Chinese hamster V79 cells after X irradiation in plateau-phase cultures. This ability of the drug was completely diminished when deoxycytidine was added at the same time, though this was slightly affected by the addition of adenosine, suggesting that this drug was phosphorylated by deoxycytidine kinase to serve as an inhibitor of the repair of potentially lethal damage. Compared with hydroxyurea, another ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, this drug appeared to contain its own activity which suppressed the repair of potentially lethal damage. A combined study of post-irradiation treatment with hypertonic salt solution and with this drug on the fixation of potentially lethal damage revealed that this drug inhibited the repair of hypertonic-insensitive potentially lethal damage.

  16. Modification of the repair of potentially lethal damage in plateau-phase Chinese hamster cells by 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Hiraoka, Wakako; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Matsuda, Akira; Ueda, Tohru; Sato, Fumiaki.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, to inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage was demonstrated in Chinese hamster V79 cells after X irradiation in plateau-phase cultures. This ability of the drug was completely diminished when deoxycytidine was added at the same time, though this was slightly affected by the addition of adenosine, suggesting that this drug was phosphorylated by deoxycytidine kinase to serve as an inhibitor of the repair of potentially lethal damage. Compared with hydroxyurea, another ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, this drug appeared to contain its own activity which suppressed the repair of potentially lethal damage. A combined study of post-irradiation treatment with hypertonic salt solution and with this drug on the fixation of potentially lethal damage revealed that this drug inhibited the repair of hypertonic-insensitive potentially lethal damage. (author)

  17. Lethal mechanisms in gastric volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omond, Kimberley J; Byard, Roger W

    2017-01-01

    A 55-year-old wheelchair-bound woman with severe cerebral palsy was found at autopsy to have marked distention of the stomach due to a volvulus. The stomach was viable, and filled with air and fluid and had pushed the left dome of the diaphragm upwards causing marked compression of the left lung with a mediastinal shift to the right (including the heart). There was no evidence of gastric perforation, ischaemic necrosis or peritonitis. Removal of the organ block revealed marked kyphoscoliosis. Histology confirmed the viability of the stomach and biochemistry showed no dehydration. Death in cases of acute gastric volvulus usually occurs because of compromise of the gastric blood supply resulting in ischaemic necrosis with distention from swallowed air and fluid resulting in perforation with lethal peritonitis. Hypovolaemic shock may also occur. However, the current case demonstrates an alternative lethal mechanism, that of respiratory compromise due to marked thoracic organ compression.

  18. National food irradiation programme of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimaki, M.

    1982-01-01

    The present state of studies on feasibility and wholesomeness of irradiated food is presented. Irradiation projects were realized of potatoes, onions, wheat, Vienna sausages, fish-paste products, and mandarine oranges. Mutagenecity tests with Salmonella or E. coli, chromosome aberration tests, dominant lethal tests, fibroblasts and micronucleus tests, and toxicity tests performed in amimals fed with irradiated food showed no positive results

  19. Rifaximin diminishes neutropenia following potentially lethal whole-body radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahraus, Christopher D; Schemera, Bettina; Rynders, Patricia; Ramos, Melissa; Powell, Charles; Faircloth, John; Brawner, William R

    2010-07-01

    Terrorist attacks involving radiological or nuclear weapons are a substantial geopolitical concern, given that large populations could be exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation. Because of this, evaluating potential countermeasures against radiation-induced mortality is critical. Gut microflora are the most common source of systemic infection following exposure to lethal doses of whole-body radiation, suggesting that prophylactic antibiotic therapy may reduce mortality after radiation exposure. The chemical stability, easy administration and favorable tolerability profile of the non-systemic antibiotic, rifaximin, make it an ideal potential candidate for use as a countermeasure. This study evaluated the use of rifaximin as a countermeasure against low-to-intermediate-dose whole-body radiation in rodents. Female Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were irradiated with 550 cGy to the whole body and were evaluated for 30 d. Animals received methylcellulose, neomycin (179 mg/kg/d) or variably dosed rifaximin (150-2000 mg/kg/d) one hour after irradiation and daily throughout the study period. Clinical assessments (e.g. body weight) were made daily. On postirradiation day 30, blood samples were collected and a complete blood cell count was performed. Animals receiving high doses of rifaximin (i.e. 1000 or 2000 mg/kg/d) had a greater increase in weight from the day of irradiation to postirradiation day 30 compared with animals that received placebo or neomycin. For animals with an increase in average body weight from irradiation day within 80-110% of the group average, methylcellulose rendered an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of 211, neomycin rendered an ANC of 334, rifaximin 300 mg/kg/d rendered an ANC of 582 and rifaximin 1000 mg/kg/d rendered an ANC of 854 (P = 0.05 for group comparison). Exposure to rifaximin after near-lethal whole-body radiation resulted in diminished levels of neutropenia.

  20. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isildar, M.; Bakale, G.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of ionizing radiation on histidine-deficient auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium were studied to improve the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The auxotrophs were divided into two groups - one which is sensitive to base-pair substitutions and another sensitive to frameshifts. These groups were composed of parent-daughter pairs in which the chemical mutagenicity enhancing plasmid, pKM101, is absent in the parent strain and present in the daughter. Co-60 #betta#-radiation and 250 kV x-rays were used to irradiate the bacteria. Irradiation of the frameshift - sensitive strains which carry the pKm101 plasmid doubled the absolute number of induced revertants whereas irradiation of the base-pair substitution sensitive strain which also carries the pKm101 plasmid produced nearly no change in the number of induced revertants. A nearly negligible effect on the mutation rate was observed for all parent strains

  1. Delayed erythropoiesis in irradiated rats grafted with syngeneic marrow: effects of cytotoxic drugs and iron-deficiency anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodday, P.; Bennett, M.; Vitalle, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Erythropoiesis in spleens of lethally irradiated Lewis rats grafted with 4-35 x 10 6 syngeneic marrow cells was inhibited or delayed during the test period of 5 days; this was in marked contrast to observations in irradiated mice. The mechanism of this inhibition was the subject of this study. Pretreatment of recipients 9 days prior to irradiation with the cytotoxic drugs cyclophosphamide (CY), busulfan (BUS), or dimethylmyleran (DMM), or the induction of iron deficiency with anemia in recipients reversed this delayed erythropoiesis. However, neither iron-deficiency anemia nor pretreatment with BUS or DMM affected the ability of irradiated recipients to reject 20 to 50 x 10 6 allogeneic marrow cells. The administration of commercial preparations of erythropoietin to hosts stimulated erythropoiesis moderately. However, proliferation of syngeneic marrow cells was not enhanced when infused into lethally irradiated spontaneous hypertensive (SH) inbred-strain rats which have high levels of endogenous erythropoietin. Finally, plasma from irradiated rats treated with phenylhydrazine to produce severe anemia was rich in erythropoietin but failed to stimulate erythropoiesis in the cell transfer system. Two hypotheses are considered

  2. Chemical and radiation induced late dominant lethal effects in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favor, J.; Crenshaw, J.W. Jr.; Soares, E.R.

    1978-01-01

    Although theoretically expected, experimental data to date have not shown dominant lethal expression to occur throughout the developmental period. Specifically, late post-implantation effects have not been demonstrated. The authors routinely use an experimental technique in which parental females mated to mutagenically treated males are allowed to give birth and wean their litter, and their uterine horns are then inspected for uterine scars indicative of live and dead embryos. In a number of experiments in which males were mutagenically treated with either chemicals or X-irradiation, a discrepancy was observed between the number of live embryos as determined by the scar technique and the number of live observed at birth, suggesting the possibility of embryonic losses at a late stage in development. Initial analyses showed that mutagenic treatment increased the percentage of these late losses. These differences were statistically significant in 2 of 3 analyses. Factors affecting statistical significance and an understanding of dominant lethal mutations are discussed. (Auth.)

  3. Abrogation of genetically controlled resistance of mice to Treponema pallidum by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.R.; Monjan, A.A.; Hardy, P.H. Jr.; Cole, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    On intradermal infection, transient primary lesions, characteristic of those seen in naturally acquired human syphilis, can be produced regularly in some strains of mice but not others, indicating a genetic basis for host susceptibility. However strains of mice which normally fail to develop lesions, do so after exposure to ionising radiation. Here the importance of an intact immune system in the outcome of local infection is illustrated by the use of radiation-induced immunosuppression. The mice were exposed to lethal doses of total body irradiation from a 137 Ce source (137 rad per min), 850-1,050 rad depending on mouse strain. (UK)

  4. Transplantation of germ cells from glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-overexpressing mice to host testes depleted of endogenous spermatogenesis by fractionated irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, L. B.; Meng, X.; den Ouden, K.; van Pelt, A. M. M.; Izadyar, F.; Santoro, M.; Sariola, H.; de rooij, D. G.

    2002-01-01

    With a novel method of eliminating spermatogenesis in host animals, male germ cells isolated from mice with targeted overexpression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) were transplanted to evaluate their ability to reproduce the phenotype previously found in the transgenic animals.

  5. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  6. Modification of radiation-induced sex-linked recessive lethal mutation frequency by tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, C.; Roy, R.M.; Sproule, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of supplementing culture medium with α-tocopherol acetate on the yield of sex-linked recessive lethal mutants induced by X-irradiation in mature sperm of Drosophila. Although tocopherol treatment of males had no impact on the yield of mutations, a drastic reduction in mutation frequency was observed when irradiated males were mated to females raised and subsequently maintained on tocopherol-enriched diet. (orig./MG)

  7. EPR spectroscopy on irradiated nickel tetracyanide in NaCl host lattice: mechanism for the simultaneous formation of reduced and oxidized species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga de Araujo, M.; Pinhal, Nelson Moreira; Vugman, Ney Vernon

    2002-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidized and reduced Ni 2+ complexes produced by X-ray irradiation on single crystals of NaCl doped with [Ni(CN) 4 ] 2- is studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance at room temperature. The interdependent generation of these two complexes is attributed to migration of the charge compensating vacancy from the reduced to the oxidized complex in a reversible reaction. At higher X-ray doses, there is a predominant formation of the reduced complex

  8. Blood irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandy, Mammen

    1998-01-01

    Viable lymphocytes are present in blood and cellular blood components used for transfusion. If the patient who receives a blood transfusion is immunocompetent these lymphocytes are destroyed immediately. However if the patient is immunodefficient or immunosuppressed the transfused lymphocytes survive, recognize the recipient as foreign and react producing a devastating and most often fatal syndrome of transfusion graft versus host disease [T-GVHD]. Even immunocompetent individuals can develop T-GVHD if the donor is a first degree relative since like the Trojan horse the transfused lymphocytes escape detection by the recipient's immune system, multiply and attack recipient tissues. T-GVHD can be prevented by irradiating the blood and different centers use doses ranging from 1.5 to 4.5 Gy. All transfusions where the donor is a first degree relative and transfusions to neonates, immunosuppressed patients and bone marrow transplant recipients need to be irradiated. Commercial irradiators specifically designed for irradiation of blood and cellular blood components are available: however they are expensive. India needs to have blood irradiation facilities available in all large tertiary institutions where immunosuppressed patients are treated. The Atomic Energy Commission of India needs to develop a blood irradiator which meets international standards for use in tertiary medical institutions in the country. (author)

  9. Pedigree analyses of yeast cells recovering from DNA damage allow assignment of lethal events to individual post-treatment generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, F.; Karwan, A.; Wintersberger, U.

    1990-01-01

    Haploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were treated with different DNA damaging agents at various doses. A study of the progeny of individual such cells allowed the assignment of lethal events to distinct post treatment generations. By microscopically inspecting those cells which were not able to form visible colonies the authors could discriminate between cells dying from immediately effective lethal hits and those generating microcolonies probably as a consequence of lethal mutation(s). The experimentally obtained numbers of lethal events were mathematically transformed into mean probabilities of lethal fixations at taking place in cells of certain post treatment generations. Such analyses give detailed insight into the kinetics of lethality as a consequence of different kinds of DNA damage. For example, X-irradiated cells lost viability mainly by lethal hits, only at a higher dose also lethal mutations fixed in the cells that were in direct contact with the mutagen, but not in later generations, occurred. Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-treated cells were hit by 00-fixations in a dose dependent manner. The distribution of all sorts of lethal fixations taken together, which occurred in the EMS-damaged cell families, was not random. For comparison analyses of cells treated with methyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and nitrous acid are also reported

  10. Allogeneic radiation chimeras respond to TNP-modified donor and host targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattime, E.C.; Gershon, H.E.; Stutman, O.

    1980-01-01

    Tolerance to major histocompatibility antigens as well as the ability to mount a cytotoxic response to hapten-modified cells of bone marrow donor and host origin was studied in allogeneic radiation chimeras. Lethally irradiated (C57BL/6 x DBA/2)F1 hosts reconstituted with anti-Thy 1.2 + C-treated bone marrow from (C57BL/6 x CBA)F1 mice showed tolerance to the MHC antigens of the three parental strains as measured by MLC and CML assay. The chimeras responded normally to unrelated allogeneic cells. Chimeric animals generated a cytotoxic response to hapten-modified cells of both donor (CBA) and host (DBA/2) haplotypes, as well as to C57BL/6, demonstrating that tolerance to the hapten-presenting host haplotype is sufficient to allow a cytotoxic antihapten response, and that processing through a semiallogeneic host environment does not affect the ability to generate a response to hapten in conjunction with self-determinants. Chimeras failed to mount a cytotoxic response to hapten presented on nontolerated allogeneic spleen cells

  11. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Periasamy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection.

  12. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C.; Sellati, Timothy J.; Harton, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection. PMID:27015566

  13. Blood irradiation: Rationale and technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    Upon request by the local American Red Cross, the Savannah Regional Center for Cancer Care irradiates whole blood or blood components to prevent post-transfusion graft-versus-host reaction in patients who have severely depressed immune systems. The rationale for blood irradiation, the total absorbed dose, the type of patients who require irradiated blood, and the regulations that apply to irradiated blood are presented. A method of irradiating blood using a linear accelerator is described

  14. Effect of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of tobacco (Nicotiana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lethal and sub-lethal bioassays on Clarias gariepinus were conducted to evaluate the toxicity of tobacco (Nicotiana tobaccum) leaf dust on weight gain and haematological indices of Clarias gariepinus (mean weight 10.5±0.70g) in glass aquaria with aeration system. The concentrations used during the lethal exposure are: ...

  15. Booster irradiation to the spleen following total body irradiation. A new immunosuppressive approach for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapidot, T.; Singer, T.S.; Salomon, O.; Terenzi, A.; Schwartz, E.; Reisner, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Graft rejection presents a major obstacle for transplantation of T cell-depleted bone marrow in HLA-mismatched patients. In a primate model, after conditioning exactly as for leukemia patients, it was shown that over 99% of the residual host clonable T cells are concentrated in the spleen on day 5 after completion of cytoreduction. We have now corroborated these findings in a mouse model. After 9-Gy total body irradiation (TBI), the total number of Thy-1.2+ cells in the spleen reaches a peak between days 3 and 4 after TBI. The T cell population is composed of both L3T4 (helper) and Lyt-2 (suppressor) T cells, the former being the major subpopulation. Specific booster irradiation to the spleen (5 Gy twice) on days 2 and 4 after TBI greatly enhances production of donor-type chimera after transplantation of T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow. Similar enhancement can be achieved by splenectomy on day 3 or 4 after TBI but not if splenectomy is performed 1 day before TBI or 1 day after TBI, strengthening the hypothesis that, after lethal TBI in mice, the remaining host T cells migrate from the periphery to the spleen. These results suggest that a delayed booster irradiation to the spleen may be beneficial as an additional immunosuppressive agent in the conditioning of leukemia patients, in order to reduce the incidence of bone marrow allograft rejection

  16. Potentiation of radiation lethality by Topotecan, a Topoisomerase I inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamond, J.P.; Kinsella, T.J.; Boothman, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Topotecan is a water soluble Topoisomerase I (Topo I) inhibitor that has demonstrated antineoplastic activity in phase I/II trials of solid tumors (such as non-small cell lung, small cell lung, ovarian, esophageal and head and neck primaries) and leukemias. We sought to determine (1) if Topotecan potentiated the lethal effects of ionizing radiation, and (2) the characteristics of the synergistic effect. Materials and Methods: Human radioresistant melanoma (U1-Mel) and glioma (D54) cells were grown in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DME) with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) until confluence-arrest. Cells were x-irradiated (0-700 cGy) and exposed to various Topotecan concentrations (2-100μM), either before (for 4 hours), during, or after (for 4 hours) irradiation. Appropriate controls were also performed. Survival was determined via colony forming assays. Survival curves were normalized to correct for drug cytotoxicities and variations in initial viable cells plated. In another set of experiments, U1-Mel cells were exposed to 10 μM Topotecan either before, during or after 400 cGy, as described above. A modification of the SDS and KCl assay was used to quantify Topo I-DNA complexes via glass fiber filter binding. All experiments were performed at least 7 times in duplicate. Results: Potentiation of radiation lethality was seen in the U1-Mel and D54 cell lines. The synergistic effects were (1) dependent on drug concentration, with lethality enhancement and minimal drug lethality alone in the 2-10 μM range (2) dependent on timing, with synergy present only when the drug was present at the time of, or shortly after irradiation, and (3) irreversible, with inhibition of potential lethal damage repair (PLDR). The dose enhancement ratios (DER) for 4 μM Topotecan in the U1-Mel cells was 1.7 - 2.4, depending on the survival endpoints that were used. The DER for 2 μM Topotecan in D54 cells was 3.0 - 4.0. The U1-Mel cells that were exposed to Topotecan

  17. A linear-quadratic model of cell survival considering both sublethal and potentially lethal radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutz, H.P.; Coucke, P.A.; Mirimanoff, R.O.

    1991-01-01

    The authors assessed the dose-dependence of repair of potentially lethal damage in Chinese hamster ovary cells x-irradiated in vitro. The recovery ratio (RR) by which survival (SF) of the irradiated cells was enhanced increased exponentially with a linear and a quadratic component namely ζ and ψ: RR=exp(ζD+ψD 2 ). Survival of irradiated cells can thus be expressed by a combined linear-quadratic model considering 4 variables, namely α and β for the capacity of the cells to accumulate sublethal damage, and ζ and ψ for their capacity to repair potentially lethal damage: SF=exp((ζ-α)D+ (ψ-β)D 2 ). author. 26 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  18. Experimental evaluation of the relationship between lethal or non-lethal virulence and transmission success in malaria parasite infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithiuthai S

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary theory suggests that the selection pressure on parasites to maximize their transmission determines their optimal host exploitation strategies and thus their virulence. Establishing the adaptive basis to parasite life history traits has important consequences for predicting parasite responses to public health interventions. In this study we examine the extent to which malaria parasites conform to the predicted adaptive trade-off between transmission and virulence, as defined by mortality. The majority of natural infections, however, result in sub-lethal virulent effects (e.g. anaemia and are often composed of many strains. Both sub-lethal effects and pathogen population structure have been theoretically shown to have important consequences for virulence evolution. Thus, we additionally examine the relationship between anaemia and transmission in single and mixed clone infections. Results Whereas there was a trade-off between transmission success and virulence as defined by host mortality, contradictory clone-specific patterns occurred when defining virulence by anaemia. A negative relationship between anaemia and transmission success was found for one of the parasite clones, whereas there was no relationship for the other. Notably the two parasite clones also differed in a transmission phenotype (gametocyte sex ratio that has previously been shown to respond adaptively to a changing blood environment. In addition, as predicted by evolutionary theory, mixed infections resulted in increased anaemia. The increased anaemia was, however, not correlated with any discernable parasite trait (e.g. parasite density or with increased transmission. Conclusions We found some evidence supporting the hypothesis that there is an adaptive basis correlating virulence (as defined by host mortality and transmission success in malaria parasites. This confirms the validity of applying evolutionary virulence theory to biomedical

  19. Factors influencing circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, R C; Bozigian, H P; Davies, M H; Merrick, B A; Park, K S; McMillan, D A

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of changes in lighting schedules and food consumption on circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels in male mice. Under a normal lighting schedule (light: 06.00-18.00 h), male mice exhibited a circadian rhythm in acetaminophen lethality (peak: 18.00 h; nadir: 06.00, 10.00 h) and an inverse rhythm in hepatic glutathione concentrations (peak: 06.00, 10.00 h; nadir: 18.00 h). Under a reversed lighting schedule (light: 18.00-06.00 h) the glutathione rhythm was reversed and the rhythm in acetaminophen lethality was altered showing greater sensitivity to the drug. Under continuous light, there was a shift in the acetaminophen lethality and the hepatic glutathione rhythms. Under continuous dark, both rhythms were abolished. Under a normal lighting regimen, hepatic glutathione levels were closely correlated with food consumption; i.e., both were increased during the dark phase and decreased during the light phase. Fasting the mice for 12 h abolished the rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels; moreover, the lethality was increased and the hepatic glutathione levels were decreased. These experiments show that both lighting schedules and feeding can alter the circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels in male mice.

  20. Repopulation of the Stem-Cell Compartment in Haemopoietic and Lymphatic Tissues of Mice after X-Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, O. [Medical Biological Laboratory of the National Defense Organization TNO, Rijswijk Z.H. (Netherlands)

    1968-08-15

    Repopulation in haemopoietic tissues of mice was studied at various times after irradiation with a sub-lethal X-ray dose of 460 R and after exposure to a lethal X-ray dose of 800 R followed by transplantation of 4 x 10{sup 6} syngeneic bone-marrow cells. The number of stem cells was determined with the exogenous and endogenous spleen colony technique in the bone-marrow of the femur and in the spleen. Repopulation in lymphatic tissues was investigated at various times after sub-lethal irradiation with 460 R, sub-lethal irradiation with 460 R followed by allogeneic skin transplantation, lethal irradiation with 800 R followed by transplantation of 2 x 10{sup 6} syngeneic bone-marrow cells, and irradiation with 800 R followed by transplantation of 2 x 10{sup 6} and 5 x 10{sup 6} syngeneic bone-marrow and lymph node cells, respectively. The number of stem cells was estimated in the spleen and in lymph nodes with a technique based on a graft-versus- host reaction. The results showed that a rapid repopulation occurred in haemopoietic tissues under all circumstances. In the spleen an overshoot was found during a period beginning shortly after the 7th day and lasting for some weeks. In lymphatic tissues repopulation by stem cells was slow. During the first one or two weeks some decrease was even observed. This was followed by a slow repopulation that around 100 days after irradiation reached a level slightly below that found in control animals. Small differences of repopulation in the various organs and under different circumstances are discussed. It was postulated that immuno-competent lymphatic stem cells (antigen-sensitive cells or PC{sub 1} cells) do not proliferate or do so only to a limited extent. This compartment must be replenished by repopulation of differentiating stem cells from the bone marrow. It seems probable that stem-cell depletion or antigeneic stimulation has only a marginal effect upon repopulation. (author)

  1. Effect of sublethal gamma radiation on host defenses in experimental scrub typhus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.J.; Rees, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of sublethal gamma radiation on inbred mice chronically infected with scrub typhus rickettsiae was examined. Inbred mice which were inoculated with the Gilliam or Karp strain of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi by the subcutaneous route harbored the infection for at least 1 year. Irradiation of these animals at 12 or 52 weeks postinoculation with normally sublethal levels induced a significantly higher percentage of rickettsemic mice (recrudescence) than was seen in the unirradiated, similarly infected control animals. In addition, sublethal irradiation at 12 weeks induced a quantitative increase in total rickettsiae. Homologous antibody titers to the rickettsiae were examined for 5 weeks after irradiation to determine the role of the humoral response in radiation-induced recrudescence. Unirradiated, infected mice showed consistent titers of about 320 throughout the 5-week observation period, and the titer was not affected by exposure of up to 500 rads of gamma radiation. Drug dose-dependent radioprotection and modification of recrudescence was noted in infected, irradiated mice treated with the antiradiation compound S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioic acid. The results of this investigation supported the conclusion that the recrudescence of a chronic rickettsial infection in the appropriate host after immunological impairment due to gamma radiation can result in an acute, possibly lethal rickettsemia

  2. Immunization of mice with gamma-irradiated intramuscularly injected schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickle, Q.D.; Taylor, M.G.; Doenhoff, M.J.; Nelson, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    The parameters involved in the induction of resistance against Schistosoma mansoni by injection of irradiated, artificially transformed schistosomula were studied in mice. Single intramuscular injections of 500 schistosomula exposed to radiation doses in the range 2.3 to 160 krad. resulted in significant protection ( in the range 20 to 50% as assessed by reduced worm burdens) against a challenge infection administered at intervals from 3 to 24 weeks post-vaccination. However, schistosomular irradiated with 20 krad. consistently resulted in better protection than those exposed to either higher or lower radiation doses despite the persistence of stunted adults from the infections irradiated with 2.3 krad. Vaccination with 40 krad. schistosomula resulted in significant protection in terms of reduced worm and tissue egg burdens and increased survival following lethal challenge. Varying the number of irradiated schistosomula, the frequency and route of their administration, the site of challenge and the strain of host all failed to enhance the level of resistance. However, percutaneously applied, irradiated cercariae were found to be more effective in stimulating resistance (60%) than intramuscularly injected, irradiated schistosomula (40%). (author)

  3. Transporting Patients with Lethal Contagious Infections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swartz, Colleen

    2002-01-01

    .... The AIT is a unique military medical team capable of worldwide air evacuation and management of a limited number of patients who are potentially exposed to known and unknown lethal communicable...

  4. Hygiene assessment of irradiated potato mutagenic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uralova, M.; Grunt, J.; Patzeltova, N.

    1977-01-01

    Albino rat males were fed on gamma-irradiated potatoes for one month and mated with two intact female rats each. The dominant lethal mutation method was then used for the study of possible mutagenic activity of the irradiated potatoes. No statistically significant differences were observed and no mutagenic activity was found. Thus, the test showed that potatoes irradiated with a dose of 10 krad of gamma radiation does not present genetic hazards for albino rats. (L.O.)

  5. Studies of blood irradiator application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenhong; Lu Yangqiao

    2004-01-01

    Transfusion is an important means for medical treatment, but it has many syndromes such as transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, it's occurrence rate of 5% and above 90% death-rate. Now many experts think the only proven method is using blood irradiator to prevent this disease. It can make lymphocyte of blood product inactive, so that it can not attack human body. Therefore, using irradiation blood is a trend, and blood irradiator may play an important role in medical field. This article summarized study of blood irradiator application, including the meaning of blood irradiation, selection of the dose for blood irradiation and so on

  6. Lethal Nipah virus infection induces rapid overexpression of CXCL10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Mathieu

    Full Text Available Nipah virus (NiV is a recently emerged zoonotic Paramyxovirus that causes regular outbreaks in East Asia with mortality rate exceeding 75%. Major cellular targets of NiV infection are endothelial cells and neurons. To better understand virus-host interaction, we analyzed the transcriptome profile of NiV infection in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We further assessed some of the obtained results by in vitro and in vivo methods in a hamster model and in brain samples from NiV-infected patients. We found that NiV infection strongly induces genes involved in interferon response in endothelial cells. Among the top ten upregulated genes, we identified the chemokine CXCL10 (interferon-induced protein 10, IP-10, an important chemoattractant involved in the generation of inflammatory immune response and neurotoxicity. In NiV-infected hamsters, which develop pathology similar to what is seen in humans, expression of CXCL10 mRNA was induced in different organs with kinetics that followed NiV replication. Finally, we showed intense staining for CXCL10 in the brain of patients who succumbed to lethal NiV infection during the outbreak in Malaysia, confirming induction of this chemokine in fatal human infections. This study sheds new light on NiV pathogenesis, indicating the role of CXCL10 during the course of infection and suggests that this chemokine may serve as a potential new marker for lethal NiV encephalitis.

  7. Chronic graft-versus-host disease in the rat radiation chimera. III. Immunology and immunopathology in rapidly induced models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beschorner, W.E.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Although chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) frequently develops in the long-term rat radiation chimera, we present three additional models in which a histologically similar disease is rapidly induced. These include adoptive transfer of spleen and bone marrow from rats with spontaneous chronic GVHD into lethally irradiated rats of the primary host strain; sublethal irradiation of stable chimeras followed by a booster transplant; and transfer of spleen cells of chimeras recovering from acute GVHD into second-party (primary recipient strain) or third-party hosts. Some immunopathologic and immune abnormalities associated with spontaneous chronic GVHD were not observed in one or more of the induced models. Thus, IgM deposition in the skin, antinuclear antibodies, and vasculitis appear to be paraphenomena. On the other hand, lymphoid hypocellularity of the thymic medulla, immaturity of splenic follicles, and nonspecific suppressor cells were consistently present in the long term chimeras, and in all models. These abnormalities therefore may be pathogenetically important, or closely related to the development of chronic GVHD

  8. Lethality Index 2008-2014: Less shootings, same lethality, more opacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Silva Forné

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the use of lethal force by Mexican federal security forces during shootings with presumed members of organized crime from 2008-2014. The authors use official data and press reports on deaths and wounded in shootings to construct indicators such as the number of dead civilians over the number of dead officials from the federal security forces and the number of dead civilians over the number of wounded civilians. In a context where certain factors that contribute to an excessive use of force become more common, the results of the study show a growing use of lethal force. This raises questions over the possible excessive use of lethal force as a normal or systematic practice. The study also shows a growing context of opacity in the information available to evaluate the use of lethal force and the general lack of a legal framework to regulate the use of lethal force in Mexico.

  9. The effects of radiation dose-rate and quality on the induction of dominant lethals in mouse spermatids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, A.G.; Beechey, G.V.

    1981-01-01

    Hybrid male mice were given 3 Gy (300 rad) doses of X- or γ-irradiation at dose-rates of either 0.6 or 0.002 Gy/min for each radiation. Germ-cells treated as spermatids were tested for dominant lethality. Effects on spermatogonia were evaluated by studying testis-weight, sperm-count and sperm abnormalities. The rate of induction of dominant lethal mutations was 2.1 times as high after acute X-irradiation as after protracted γ-irradiation. Most of this difference resulted from the change in radiation quality, since the relative effectiveness of X- versus γ-irradiation was 1.9 at low and 1.6 at high dose rates. For each radiation, however, fewer dominant lethals were induced at low dose-rates than at high (low/high ratios of 0.8 and 0.9 respectively) although differences did not reach a significant level. There were no statistically significant effects of dose rate on testis-weight of sperm-count in the X-ray series, but there were significantly less severe effects on both with protraction of the γ-irradiation. Evidence for effects of radiation quality on these characters was conflicting. Frequencies of abnormal spermatozoa were markedly increased 7 weeks after irradiation but there were no consistent effects of radiation intensity or quality. (orig.)

  10. Host defenses in experimental scrub typhus: effect of sublethal gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of sublethal gamma radiation on inbred mice chronically infected with scrub typhus rickettsiae was examined. Inbred mice which have been inoculated with Gilliam or Karp strain of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi by the subcutaneous route harbored the infection for at least one year. Irradiation of these animals at 12 or 52 weeks post inoculation at normally sublethal levels induced a significantly higher percentage of rickettsemic mice (recrudescence) than in the unirradiated similarly infected control animals. In addition, sublethal irradiation at 12 weeks also induced a quantitative increase in total rickettsiae. Homologous antibody titers to the rickettsiae were examined for five weeks following irradiation to determine the role of the humoral response in radiation induced recrudescence. Modification of recrudescence was investigated using radioprotective drugs. The expected results of this investigation supported the conclusion that the recrudescence of a chronic rickettsial infection in the appropriate host following immunological impairment due to battlefield or clinical exposure to gamma radiation can result in an acute, possibly lethal rickettsemia

  11. Role of Natural Killer Cells in Innate Protection against Lethal Ebola Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Warfield, Kelly L.; Perkins, Jeremy G.; Swenson, Dana L.; Deal, Emily M.; Bosio, Catharine M.; Aman, M. Javad; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Young, Howard A.; Bavari, Sina

    2004-01-01

    Ebola virus is a highly lethal human pathogen and is rapidly driving many wild primate populations toward extinction. Several lines of evidence suggest that innate, nonspecific host factors are potentially critical for survival after Ebola virus infection. Here, we show that nonreplicating Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), containing the glycoprotein (GP) and matrix protein virus protein (VP)40, administered 1–3 d before Ebola virus infection rapidly induced protective immunity. VLP injectio...

  12. Mutagenic effects of irradiated glucose in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, M.B.; Rao, K.P.; Nandan, S.D.; Rao, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    The mutagenic effects of irradiated glucose were studied using the sex-linked recessive lethal test in Drosophila melanogaster. Oregon K males of D. melanogaster reared on a medium containing 20 or 40% glucose irradiated with a dose of 0.02, 0.10, 0.20, 2 or 5 Mrad #betta#-rays were scored for the induction of sex-linked recessive lethals. The results showed no significant increase in the frequency of X-lethals in Drosophila at any of the dose levels. (author)

  13. The effect of 60Co γ-rays irradiation on seeds and branches of Euonymus fortunei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao Yan; Inner Mongolia Agriculture Univ., Huhhot; Zhang Guosheng; Lu Renqiang; Pan Qinghua

    2006-01-01

    Seeds and plant branches of Euonymus fortunei were irradiated with 60 Co γ-ray. The results showed that after irradiation, seed germination rate, emergence rate and surviving rate were restrained, and it was negatively correlated with irradiation dose increasing significantly. The first euphylis period was delayed compared with control. Seedling height decreased with the increase of irradiation dose. Semi-lethal dose of Euonymus fortunei seeds was 128.56 Gy. Branch irradiation could cause significantly number and length reduced, and it is correlated with irradiation dose increasing. The semi-lethal dose for Euonymus fortunei branches was 95.54 Gy. (authors)

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Amish lethal microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 in 500 newborns in the Old Order Amish population of Pennsylvania. It has not been found outside this population. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic ... gene cause Amish lethal microcephaly . The SLC25A19 gene provides instructions for ...

  15. The evolution of lethal intergroup violence

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Raymond C.

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings and analyses in evolutionary biology, archaeology, and ethnology provide a favorable conjuncture for examining the evolution of lethal intergroup violence among hominids during the 2.9-million-year Paleolithic time span. Here, I seek to identify and investigate the main turning points in this evolutionary trajectory and to delineate the periodization that follows from this inquiry.

  16. The evolution of lethal intergroup violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Raymond C

    2005-10-25

    Recent findings and analyses in evolutionary biology, archaeology, and ethnology provide a favorable conjuncture for examining the evolution of lethal intergroup violence among hominids during the 2.9-million-year Paleolithic time span. Here, I seek to identify and investigate the main turning points in this evolutionary trajectory and to delineate the periodization that follows from this inquiry.

  17. A new lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingston, H.M.; Freeman, J.S.; Hall, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    A neonate is described with a lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia associated with prenatal fractures and craniofacial abnormalities including microcephaly, exophthalmos, hypoplastic nose and mid-face, small jaw and nodular hyperplasia of the gums. Parental consanguinity suggests that an autosomal recessive mutation is the likely aetiology. (orig.)

  18. Therapy of infections in mice irradiated in mixed neutron/photon fields and inflicted with wound trauma: a review of current work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledney, G D; Madonna, G S; Elliott, T B; Moore, M M; Jackson, W E

    1991-10-01

    When host antimicrobial defenses are severely compromised by radiation or trauma in conjunction with radiation, death from sepsis results. To evaluate therapies for sepsis in radiation casualties, we developed models of acquired and induced bacterial infections in irradiated and irradiated-wounded mice. Animals were exposed to either a mixed radiation field of equal proportions of neutrons and gamma rays (n/gamma = 1) from a TRIGA reactor or pure gamma rays from 60[Co sources. Skin wounds (15% of total body surface area) were inflicted under methoxyflurane anesthesia 1 h after irradiation. In all mice, wounding after irradiation decreased resistance to infection. Treatments with the immunomodulator synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) before or after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation increased survival. Therapy with S-TDCM for mice irradiated with either a mixed field or gamma rays increased resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced infections. Combined therapy with S-TDCM and ceftriaxone for K. pneumoniae infections in mice exposed to a mixed radiation field or to gamma rays was more effective than single-agent therapy. In all irradiated-wounded mice, single therapy of acquired infections with an antibiotic or S-TDCM did not increase survival. Survival of irradiated-wounded mice after topical application of gentamicin sulfate cream suggested that bacteria colonizing the wound disseminated systemically in untreated irradiated mice, resulting in death from sepsis. In lethal models of acquired infections in irradiated-wounded mice, significant increases in survival were achieved when systemic treatments with S-TDCM or gentamicin were combined with topical treatments of gentamicin cream. Therapies for sepsis in all mice exposed to a mixed field were less effective than in mice exposed to gamma rays. Nonetheless, the data show a principle by which successful therapy may be provided to individuals receiving tissue trauma in conjunction with

  19. Caffeine and D sub 2 O medium interact in affecting the expression of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, H. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Radiation Biology Center); Elkind, M.M. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Radiological Health Sciences)

    1991-10-01

    Earlier work has been extended to compare the killing of long-phase V79 Chinese hamster cells by ionizing radiation when they are treated immediately after irradiation with medium containing either caffeine or 90% D{sub 2}O. The object was to determine if the enhanced killing due to post-treatment with caffeine, or D{sub 2}O, resulted from action on the same sector of potentially lethal damage as appeared to be the case for hypertonic shock and D{sub 2}O medium. The treatments by themselves were not toxic to unirradiated cells. We found that the enhanced expression of potentially lethal damage by post-treatment with caffeine or D{sub 2}O medium is similar. For example, the kinetic of the repair of the potentially lethal damage expressible by either post-treatment was similar, and an additive enhancement of potentially lethal damage occurred when the two treatments were administered sequentially. These findings suggest that caffeine and D{sub 2}O medium affect the same sector of potentially lethal damage. When the two treatments were combined, however, they competed with each other. Thus, although caffeine and D{sub 2}O medium act on the same sector of potentially lethal damage they do so differently, suggesting that more than one pathway of the expression of radiation damage can result in the same phenotypic effect. (author).

  20. Caffeine and D2O medium interact in affecting the expression of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1991-01-01

    Earlier work has been extended to compare the killing of long-phase V79 Chinese hamster cells by ionizing radiation when they are treated immediately after irradiation with medium containing either caffeine or 90% D 2 O. The object was to determine if the enhanced killing due to post-treatment with caffeine, or D 2 O, resulted from action on the same sector of potentially lethal damage as appeared to be the case for hypertonic shock and D 2 O medium. The treatments by themselves were not toxic to unirradiated cells. We found that the enhanced expression of potentially lethal damage by post-treatment with caffeine or D 2 O medium is similar. For example, the kinetic of the repair of the potentially lethal damage expressible by either post-treatment was similar, and an additive enhancement of potentially lethal damage occurred when the two treatments were administered sequentially. These findings suggest that caffeine and D 2 O medium affect the same sector of potentially lethal damage. When the two treatments were combined, however, they competed with each other. Thus, although caffeine and D 2 O medium act on the same sector of potentially lethal damage they do so differently, suggesting that more than one pathway of the expression of radiation damage can result in the same phenotypic effect. (author)

  1. The role of cell progression in potentiation of radiation lethality by hyperthermia and by chemical means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djordjevic, B.; Lange, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    Aerobic stationary dense cultures of HeLa cells show very little potentiation of radiation lethality when irradiated cells are incubated with procaine HCl for two hours at 37 0 C, but if cells are diluted in fresh medium after irradiation and incubated for two hours with procaine, a high degree of radiopotentiation is obtained. This effect is not cell density dependent, since the addition of heavily irradiated cells to achieve comparable densities did not diminish lethality in the diluted culture. Procaine radiopotentiation at 37 0 C could be prevented by simultaneous administration with procaine of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Since cycloheximide inhibits cell cycle progression (with block points in G1 and G2) progression is strongly implicated in the phenomenon of radiopotentiation. Cell progression may be also involved in hyperthermic radiopotentiation: adding cycloheximide during heating of irradiated cells at 41 0 C for two hours increased survival. This effect of cycloheximide is even more pronounced in cells also treated with procaine during heating, thus diminishing the interaction of heat and procaine in radiopotentiation. Data pertaining to cell progression in synchronous cultures of HeLa cells under various treatment conditions are presented and discussed

  2. Repair in schizosaccharomyces pombe as measured by recovery from caffeine enhancement of radiation-induced lethality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Werner, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    Inhibition of DNA repair by caffeine is manifested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe wild-type cells as an enhancement of UV- or γ-irradiation-induced lethality. The progress of DNA repair processes involving one or more caffeine-sensitive steps may be conveniently followed by measuring the concomitant decrease of this lethal enhancement effect. By measuring, during post-irradiation incubation, the ability of cells to overcome susceptibility to repair inhibition by caffeine, we have determined the time course and requirements for repair in S. pombe. Recovery began immediately and took 150-200 min after γ-irradiation and more than 500 min after UV-irradiation, for exposures which gave about 10% survival in the absence of caffeine. An incubation medium capable of supporting growth was required for caffeine-sensitive repair; no recovery occurred under liquid holding conditions. Survival curves after various recovery times indicated that a logarithmic phase cell population was homogeneous with respect to caffeine-sensitive repair of both UV- and γ-ray-induced damage. Recovery from caffeine inhibition was compared for cells of different physiological states (logarithmic and stationary phase); although the importance of the physiological state was not the same for the two types of radiation, recovery was found to occur more rapidly in the more radiation-resistant state, in each case. (orig.) [de

  3. Reduction of fatal graft-versus-host disease by 3H--thymidine suicide of donor cells cultured with host cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheever, M.A.; Einstein, A.B. Jr.; Kempf, R.A.; Fefer, A.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the tritiated thymidine ( 3 H-TdR) suicide technique on the ability of donor cells to induce fatal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was studied. C57BL/6 (H-2/sup b/) spleen cells were stimulated in vitro with irradiated BALB/c (H-2/sup d/) Moloney lymphoma cells in mixed culture and 3 H-TdR of high-specific activity added to eliminate proliferating cells. The ability of such cells to induce fatal GVHD was assayed by injecting them i.v. into adult BALB/c mice immunosuppressed with cyclophosphamide (180 mg/kg). These cells induced fatal GVHD in fewer mice (52 percent) than did C57BL/6 cells cultured with BALB/c lymphoma cells but without 3 H-TdR (87 percent) and C57BL/6 cells cultured with irradiated C57BL/6 cells with (95 percent) or without 3 H-TdR (86 percent). Thus, the 3 H-TdR suicide technique greatly diminished the ability of cells to induce lethal GVHD

  4. Quantitative aspects of repair of potentially lethal damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, G.; Pohlit, W.

    1979-01-01

    Stationary cultures of Ehrlich ascites tumour cells were irradiated with X-rays and then immediately or after a time interval tsub(rep) plated to measure the survival. The increase in survival observed after delayed plating was interpreted as repair of potentially lethal damage. A cybernetic model was used to analyse these data. Three states of damage were assumed for the cells. In state A the cells could grow to macrocolonies, in state B the cells suffered potentially lethal damage and could grow to macrocolonies only if they were allowed to repair the damage and in state C the cells were lethally damaged. A method of deriving the values of the parameters of the model from the experimental data was given. The dependence of the reaction rate constant of the repair potentially lethal damage on the dose D was used to derive a possible mechanism for the production of the shoulder in the dose effect curve. Finally this model was compared with other models of radiation action in living cells. (author)

  5. Interaction of radiation, Dihydroxyanthraquinone, and Adriamycin on the induction of acute lethality in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimler, B.F.; Cox, G.G.; Reddy, E.K.

    1984-01-01

    The acute lethality induced by combinations of radiation, Dihydroxyanthraquinone (DHAQ), and Adriamycin (ADR) was investigated in mice. Whole-body irradiation produced acute lethality, with an LD-50/30 of approximately 6.5 Gy. ADR and DHAQ produced LD-50/30's of 14 and 4 mg/kg, respectively. When 10 mg/kg doses were fractionated into 5 x 2 mg/kg daily doses, both drugs were equally or more efficient at producing mortality, 90% by day 30. When 4 Gy radiation was combined with 5 mg/kg ADR or 5 mg/kg DHAQ, a response no greater than that produced by drug alone was obtained. However, when 5 mg/kg ADR was administered concomitantly with 5 mg/kg DHAQ, there was a less-than-additive induction of lethality, resulting in only 21% mortality by day 20. ADR and DHAQ (at doses of 5 mg/kg) were combined but with a 1 day interval between drugs, the protective effect was lost and animals died earlier than after either agent alone. At present, no definite explanation is available for this unusual protective effect of ADR against acute lethality induced by DHAQ

  6. Comparative study of different sexis mutability: recessive sex-linked and dominant lethals in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatti, K.V.; Dzhaparidze, L.A.; Mamon, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    The frequency of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations (RSLLM) and those realizing in embryogenesis of dominant lethals, which form in oo- and spermatogenesis of Drosophila and fly productivity under the effect of X-rays and N-nitroso-N methylourea (NMU), is studied. In the case of effect of both mutagens RSLLM form in spermatocytes with higher frequency as compared with oocytes. Dominant lethal mutations (DLM) during irradiation are also often registered in spermatocytes. NMU induces DLM in mitotic male cells with a very high frequency but is not effective during the effect on oocytes. When both mutagens affect males and X-rays affect females, the decrease of productivity is mainly conditioned by DLM. As NMU does not induce DLM in females realizing in embryogenesis but reduces productivity, a later lethal realization connected with their different nature is supposed. Differences in mole and female mutability found in the course of X-ray and NMU effect are discussed in connection with peculiarities of their mitotic cells and the nature of effect of mutagens applied [ru

  7. Survival of irradiated mice treated with WR-151327, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate, or ofloxacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledney, G. D.; Elliott, T. B.; Landauer, M. R.; Vigneulle, R. M.; Henderson, P. L.; Harding, R. A.; Tom, S. P.

    1994-10-01

    Spaceflight personnel need treatment options that would enhance survival from radiation and would not disrupt task performance. Doses of prophylactic or therapeutic agents known to induce significant short-term (30-day) survival with minimal behavioral (locomotor) changes were used for 180-day survival studies. In protection studies, groups of mice were treated with the phosphorothioate WR-151327 (200 mg/kg, 25% of the LD10) or the immunomodulator, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM; 8 mg/kg), before lethal irradiation with reactor-generated fission neutrons and γ-rays (n/γ = 1) or 60Co γ-rays. In therapy studies, groups of mice received either S-TDCM, the antimicrobial ofloxacin, or S-TDCM plus ofloxacin after irradiation. For WR-151327 treated-mice, survival at 180 days for n/γ = 1 and γ-irradiated mice was 90% and 92%, respectively; for S-TDCM (protection), 57% and 78%, respectively; for S-TDCM (therapy), 20% and 25%, respectively; for ofloxacin, 38% and 5%, respectively; for S-TDCM combined with ofloxacin, 30% and 30%, respectively; and for saline, 8% and 5%, respectively. Ofloxacin or combined ofloxacin and S-TDCM increased survival from the gram-negative bacterial sepsis that predominated in n/γ = 1) irradiated mice. The efficacies of the treatments depended on radiation quality, treatment agent and its mode of use, and microflora of the host.

  8. Lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Yim, Chung Ik; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1986-01-01

    We have detailed our experiences on 6 cases of neonatal lethal short-limbed dwarfism and reviewed the articles. They include, achondrogenesis, thanatophoric dysplasia, asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfect a congenita, and hypophosphatasia lethals. Five babies were born alive but died soon after birth and one was a stillbirth. The main cause of failure to thrive was respiratory insufficiency. Each case was having quite characteristic radiologic findings, even if the general appearances were similar to the achondroplasts clinically. Precise diagnosis is very important for genetic counselling of the parents and alarm to them the possibility of bone dysplasias to the next offsprings. For this purpose, the radiologists play major role for the correct diagnosis. We stress that when the baby is born with short-limbed dwarfism, whole body radiogram should be taken including lateral view and postmortem radiogram is also very precious.

  9. Lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Yim, Chung Ik; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    We have detailed our experiences on 6 cases of neonatal lethal short-limbed dwarfism and reviewed the articles. They include, achondrogenesis, thanatophoric dysplasia, asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfect a congenita, and hypophosphatasia lethals. Five babies were born alive but died soon after birth and one was a stillbirth. The main cause of failure to thrive was respiratory insufficiency. Each case was having quite characteristic radiologic findings, even if the general appearances were similar to the achondroplasts clinically. Precise diagnosis is very important for genetic counselling of the parents and alarm to them the possibility of bone dysplasias to the next offsprings. For this purpose, the radiologists play major role for the correct diagnosis. We stress that when the baby is born with short-limbed dwarfism, whole body radiogram should be taken including lateral view and postmortem radiogram is also very precious.

  10. Mining of lethal recessive genetic variation in Danish cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    in fertility. The primary objective of this PhD projekt was to identify recessive lethal gentic variants in the main Danish dairy cattle breed. Holstein-Friesian utilzing next generation sequencing (NGS) data. This study shows a potential for the use of the NGS-based reverse genetic approach in identifying...... lethal or semi-lethal recessive gentic variation...

  11. Midgut microbiota and host immunocompetence underlie Bacillus thuringiensis killing mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Caccia, Silvia; Di Lelio, Ilaria; La Storia, Antonietta; Marinelli, Adriana; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Banyuls, Núria; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Casartelli, Morena; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan; Gigliotti, Silvia; Ercolini, Danilo; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis and its toxins are widely used for insect control. Notwithstanding the remarkable importance of this insect pathogen, its killing mechanism has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we show that the microbiota resident in the host midgut triggers a lethal septicemia. The infection process is enhanced by reducing the host immune response and its control on replication of midgut bacteria invading the body cavity through toxin-induced epithelial lesions. The experimental approa...

  12. Myxoma virus M130R is a novel virulence factor required for lethal myxomatosis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, John W; Werden, Steven J; Wang, Fuan; McKillop, William M; Jimenez, June; Villeneuve, Danielle; McFadden, Grant; Dekaban, Gregory A

    2009-09-01

    Myxoma virus (MV) is a highly lethal, rabbit-specific poxvirus that induces a disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits. In an effort to understand the function of predicted immunomodulatory genes we have deleted various viral genes from MV and tested the ability of these knockout viruses to induce lethal myxomatosis. MV encodes a unique 15 kD cytoplasmic protein (M130R) that is expressed late (12h post infection) during infection. M130R is a non-essential gene for MV replication in rabbit, monkey or human cell lines. Construction of a targeted gene knockout virus (vMyx130KO) and infection of susceptible rabbits demonstrate that the M130R knockout virus is attenuated and that loss of M130R expression allows the rabbit host immune system to effectively respond to and control the lethal effects of MV. M130R expression is a bona fide poxviral virulence factor necessary for full and lethal development of myxomatosis.

  13. Lethal midline granuloma syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle; Oliveira, Ana Luiza Vianna Sobral de Magalhaes; Marchon Junior, Joao Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The rare lethal midline granuloma syndrome is difficult to diagnose because of the wide array of related diseases and lack of knowledge by the majority of physicians. In the present report, the authors describe the case of a patient with this disease, caused by squamous cell carcinoma, drawing attention to differential diagnoses and to clinical and radiological findings that may be useful to define the diagnosis. (author)

  14. Lethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocene

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-P?rez, Ana; Pablos, Adri?n; Mart?nez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M.; G?mez-Olivencia, Asier; Berm?dez de Castro, Jos? Mar?a; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force ...

  15. Lethal midline granuloma syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle [Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (HUCFF-UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Ana Luiza Vianna Sobral de Magalhaes [Resident of Medical Practice, Hospital Federal da Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marchon Junior, Joao Luiz [Unit of Computed Tomography, Hospital Federal da Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    The rare lethal midline granuloma syndrome is difficult to diagnose because of the wide array of related diseases and lack of knowledge by the majority of physicians. In the present report, the authors describe the case of a patient with this disease, caused by squamous cell carcinoma, drawing attention to differential diagnoses and to clinical and radiological findings that may be useful to define the diagnosis. (author)

  16. Derangement of cellular plasma membranes due to non-lethal radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.; Kubasova, T.; Somosy, Z.; Horvath, L.

    1983-01-01

    Earlier observations in the laboratory on fibroblasts and various blood cells of animal and human origins pointed to alteration of concanavalin A binding sites of plasma membranes as well as to concomitant morphological changes and scanning electron microscopic appearance of cell surfaces following sub-lethal doses of X-, fission neutron and beta irradiations. The effects appeared early and existed temporarily; their intensities and the restitution of membrane function depended on radiation doses, types and conditions of cells. In the present paper further aspects of structural and functional derangements of plasma membranes are introduced which were provoked by X- and tritium beta irradiation in the dose range up to 2.5 Gy and in the concentration range from 3.7 kBq/mL, respectively. The state of membrane structure was followed by bindings of various ligands of different receptor requirements, concanavalin A, cationized ferritin and polio virus. In the case of X-irradiation the binding conditions suggest the shift of overall negative surface charges to less negative ones. It was also found that radiation-induced phenomena appear on the cell surface unevenly. Long- and short-term treatments of cells with 3 H-thymidine and 3 H-water also perturb the plasma membrane; beta irradiation affects it directly. Membrane structure and function are suggested to offer good biological models to study correlation of energy deposition and biological effects, both restricted to domains of nanometre range. The data give evidence for radiation-induced membrane alterations in the sub-lethal or non-lethal ranges which might have consequences in the development of stochastic and non-stochastic effects. (author)

  17. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohemi Sala

    Full Text Available Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  18. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  19. Study on proliferative responses to host Ia antigens in allogeneic bone marrow chimera in mice: sequential analysis of the reactivity and characterization of the cells involved in the responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, K.; Ogasawara, K.; Ogasawara, M.; Yasumizu, R.; Noguchi, M.; Geng, L.; Fujita, M.; Good, R.A.; Onoe, K.

    1987-01-01

    Irradiation bone marrow chimeras were established by reconstitution of lethally irradiated AKR mice with C57BL/10 marrow cells to permit serial analysis of the developing reactivities of lymphocytes from such chimeras, [B10----AKR], against donor, host, or third party antigens. We found that substantial proliferative responses to Ia antigens of the recipient strain and also to third party antigens were generated by the thymocytes obtained from the irradiation chimeras at an early stage after bone marrow reconstitution. The majority of the responding thymocytes had surfaces lacking demonstrable peanut agglutinin receptors and were donor type Thy-1+, Ly-2-, and L3T4+ in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. In anti-host responses, however, Ly-2+ thymocytes seemed to be at least partially involved. This capacity of thymus cells to mount a response to antigens of the recipient strain declined shortly thereafter, whereas the capacity to mount MLR against third party antigens persisted. The spleen cells of [B10----AKR] chimeras at the same time developed a more durable capability to exhibit anti-host reactivities and a permanent capability of reacting to third party allo-antigens. The stimulator antigens were Ia molecules on the stimulator cells in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. The responding splenocytes were of donor origin and most of them had Thy-1+, Ly-1+2-, and L3T4+ phenotype

  20. Feeding Studies of Irradiated Foods with Insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaharanu, Srisan

    1978-06-15

    Insects are of value to man in many scientific studies. Microsomal detoxication systems exist in both insects and mammals. In the preliminary investigations it was found that irradiated cocoa beans and white and red kidney beans (Phaseolus spp.) did not significantly change the percentage of egg-hatch in the insects tested. In more detailed investigations food samples that are susceptible to insect spoilage and are representatives of widely consumed human foods were fed to various insect species. The development, sex distortion and reproductivity of the insects were investigated. Cytogenetic aberrations as related to dominant lethality were studied in insects with reasonably clear chromosomal patterns. The meiosis stage was examined, using the squash technique and Aceto-orcein staining. Black beans, Phaseolus spp., irradiated with up to 200 krad of gamma rays did not apparently change the percentage of survival and the sex ratio of the bean weevil, Zabrotes subfasciatus. Dominant lethality in the German cockroach, Blatella germanica, fed on irradiated black beans did not apparently occur when considering the results of cytological investigation and the number of offspring obtained. Dried sardine samples irradiated with up to 400 krad of gamma rays neither apparently affected the survival nor caused sex distortion in the cheese skipper, Piophila casei. This irradiated product apparently did not induce dominant lethality in the German cockroach as tested. Coffee processed from coffee beans that had been irradiated with up to 100 krad of gamma rays did not apparently cause adverse effects on the experimental insects. (author)

  1. Feeding studies of irradiated foods with insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaharanu, S.

    1978-01-01

    Insects are of value to man in many scientific studies. Microsomal detoxication systems exist in both insects and mammals. In the preliminary investigations it was found that irradiated cocoa beans and white and red kidney beans (Phaseolus spp.) did not significantly change the percentage of egg-hatch in the insects tested. In more detailed investigations food samples that are susceptible to insect spoilage and are representatives of widely consumed human foods were fed to various insect species. The development, sex distortion and reproductivity of the insects were investigated. Cytogenetic aberrations as related to dominant lethality were studied in insects with reasonably clear chromosomal patterns. The meiosis stage was examined, using the squash technique and Aceto-orcein staining. Black beans, Phaseolus spp., irradiated with up to 200 krad of gamma rays did not apparently change the percentage of survival and the sex ratio of the bean weevil, Zabrotes subfasciatus. Dominant lethality in the German cockroach, Blatella germanica, fed on irradiated black beans did not apparently occur when considering the results of cytological investigation and the number of offspring obtained. Dried sardine samples irradiated with up to 400 krad of gamma rays neither apparently affected the survival nor caused sex distortion in the cheese skipper, Piophila casei. This irradiated product apparently did not induce dominant lethality in the German cockroach as tested. Coffee processed from coffee beans that had been irradiated with up to 100 krad of gamma rays did not apparently cause adverse effects on the experimental insects. (author)

  2. Effect of selective T cell depletion of host and/or donor bone marrow on lymphopoietic repopulation, tolerance, and graft-vs-host disease in mixed allogeneic chimeras (B10 + B10.D2----B10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ildstad, S.T.; Wren, S.M.; Bluestone, J.A.; Barbieri, S.A.; Stephany, D.; Sachs, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with a mixture of T cell-depleted syngeneic plus T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow (B10 + B10.D2----B10) leads to the induction of mixed lymphopoietic chimerism, excellent survivals, specific in vivo transplantation tolerance to subsequent donor strain skin grafts, and specific in vitro unresponsiveness to allogeneic donor lymphoid elements as assessed by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) proliferative and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) cytotoxicity assays. When B10 recipient mice received mixed marrow inocula in which the syngeneic component had not been T cell depleted, whether or not the allogeneic donor marrow was treated, they repopulated exclusively with host-type cells, promptly rejected donor-type skin allografts, and were reactive in vitro to the allogeneic donor by CML and MLR assays. In contrast, T cell depletion of the syngeneic component of the mixed marrow inocula resulted in specific acceptance of allogeneic donor strain skin grafts. Such animals were specifically unreactive to allogeneic donor lymphoid elements in vitro by CML and MLR, but were reactive to third party. When both the syngeneic and allogeneic marrow were T cell depleted, variable percentages of host- and donor-type lymphoid elements were detected in the mixed reconstituted host. When only the syngeneic bone marrow was T cell depleted, animals repopulated exclusively with donor-type cells. Although these animals had detectable in vitro anti-host (B10) reactivity by CML and MLR and reconstituted as fully allogeneic chimeras, they exhibited excellent survival and had no in vivo evidence for graft-vs-host disease. Experiments in which untreated donor spleen cells were added to the inocula in this last group suggest that the presence of T cell-depleted syngeneic bone marrow cells diminishes graft-vs-host disease and the mortality from it

  3. Estimation of the contribution of ionization and excitation to the lethal effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petin, V.G.; Komarov, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A simple theoretical model is proposed for estimating the differential contribution of ionization and excitation to the lethal effect of ionizing radiation. Numerical results were obtained on the basis of published experimental data on the ability of bacterial cells Escherichia coli to undergo photoreactivation of radiation-induced damage. It was shown that inactivation by excitation may be highly significant for UV-hypersensitive cells capable of photoreactivation; inactivation by excitation increased with the energy of ionizing radiation and the volume of irradiated suspensions. The data are in qualitative agreement with the assumption of a possible contribution of the UV-component of Cerenkov radiation to the formation of excitations responsible for the lethal effect and the phenomenon of photoreactivation after ionizing radiation. Some predictions from the model are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Scopolamine methylbromide mitigates radiation induced damage and lethality in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Nitisha; Joshi, Jayadev; Ghosh, Subhajit; Dimri, Manali; Prem Kumar, Indracanti; Sehgal, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    In view of the strategic importance radiation countermeasures hold, the present study was undertaken to screen a collection of small molecule clinical compounds for possible radioprotective action using zebrafish as a model system. Preliminary screening in developing zebrafish embryos (24 hour post fertilization, (hpf)) using damage manifestations and survival as end point identified scopolamine methylbromide (SMB), a muscarinic receptor antagonist, as a potential radiomitigator. It was found to be optimal (60% survival advantage after 6 th post irradiation day) at a dose of 80 μM when added 3 h post 20 Gy exposure. Mechanistic studies suggested that SMB though exhibited no significant antioxidant potential, but was found to limit radiation induced apoptosis (pre G1 population) quantified through flow cytometry (6 and 5% reduction after 8 or 24 h after treatments) and annexin V staining (8% reduction). Further, quantitative analysis, using caspase 3 assay, revealed a 2.46 fold increase in apoptosis in irradiated group and treatment of irradiated zebrafish embryos with SMB led to a significant reduction in global apoptosis (1.7 fold; p<0.05) when compared to irradiated group. In silico studies based on structural and functional similarity with known radioprotectors suggested similarities with atropine, a known anti-inflammatory agent with muscarinic antagonism and radioprotective potential. In view of this SMB was tested, in silico, for possible anti-inflammatory action. Molecular docking studies revealed that SMB interacts (B.E-8.0 Kcal/mole) with cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2). In lieu of this, anti-inflammation activity was assessed through ChIN (chemically induced inflammation) method in 3 dpf (days post fertilization) embryos and SMB was found to significantly inhibit inflammation at all doses studied from 20-200 μM at 3 and 6 hpi (hours post inflammation). Overall the result suggests that scopolamine methylbromide mitigates radiation induced injury and lethality in

  5. Dominant lethal effect of gamma radiation of 60Co in Biomphalaria glabrata (SAY, 1818)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallarico, Lenita de Freitas

    2003-01-01

    Germ cell mutations are used in ecotoxicological studies as biomarkers of population effects and indicators of ecological changes. Biomphalaria glabrata, a freshwater mollusk, is a good experimental model for biomonitoring studies due to its biological characteristics and the ecological importance of this invertebrate group. The dominant lethal test was established in B. glabrata for the detection of germ cell mutations. Results with chemical mutagens showed that this system is efficient, specific and sensitive in the evaluation of germ cell mutations induced by reference mutagens. In this work, the dominant lethal effects of gamma radiation of 60 Co were studied. A preliminary experiment was done to establish the dose range and to estimate the chronology of spermatogenesis in B. glabrata. This estimate is possible because of the uniformity in response to ionizing radiation between germ cells at homologous stages of spermatogenesis in widely different species. In general, pre-meiotic germ cells are less sensitive to the induction of lethal dominant mutations than post-meiotic cells. This effect can be attributed to: young gametogenic cells - mitotically active - have greater repair ability from sub-lethal DNA damage and there is a selective elimination of the damaged cells. In our system: induction of lethal dominant mutations causes an increase in the frequency of malformations and, cytotoxic effect is displayed as a reduction in the crossing rates. Total duration of spermatogenesis was estimated in approximately 36 days, with the following distribution of stages: 1 to 13 days - spermatogonia, 14 to 20 days - spermatocytes, 21 to 36 days - spermatids and spermatozoa. Based on this chronology, irradiated wild-type snails with 2,5; 10 and 20Gy and crossed with non-irradiated albino snails after 7, 17, 23, 30 and 36 days. The frequencies of malformations in the heterozygous wild-type offspring of the nonirradiated albino snails were used as indicator of germ cell

  6. Seed irradiation with continuously increasing doses of thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlik, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Pittermann, P.

    1977-01-01

    In the 'Raman' pea cv. the biological activity of thermal neutrons was investigated after irradiation of a 780 mm column of seeds for 3000 and 4167 seconds with a flux of 5.607 x 10 9 n.cm -2 per second. For different fractions of the seed column the average density of the neutron flux was calculated. It was proved that for the described method of seed irradiation it was sufficient to determine only the dose approaching the lethal dose. If a sufficiently high column of seeds is used part of the column of seeds will be irradiated with the optimum range of doses. The advantages of the suggested method of irradiation are not only smaller time and technological requirements resulting from the need for the determination of only the critical lethal dose of radiation by means of inhibition tests performed with seedlings, but also a simpler irradiation procedure. The suggested method of irradiation is at least nine times cheaper. (author)

  7. Evaluation of lethal effect of microwave exposure on protoscolices of hydatid cyst in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Eslamirad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the lethal effect of microwave radiation on protoscolices of hydatid cyst. Methods: The protoscolices were divided in two separate groups. The first group received continuous irradiation while the second group received repetitive irradiation. According to the exposure time, the first and the second groups were divided into 8 subgroups. Non-treated protoscolices were considered as the control in each experiment. The protoscolex mortality rate was calculated, and changes in temperature difference in protoscolex suspension before and after the irradiation and the mortality rate with the increase of exposure time were recorded. Results: The results showed that microwave was able to increase the mortality rate of protoscolices in hydatid cyst. The mortality rate from 20% in 20 s of continuous exposure was increased to 100% in 50 s. Also, the differences between the mortality rates in subgroups of the first and the second groups and the control were significant (P < 0.001. Although the effect of temperature change in repetitive irradiation was not significant, non-thermal repetitive irradiation effects were obviously stronger than the thermal continuous irradiation effects. Conclusions: It seems that, microwaves especially in the repetitive mode, may be used as a supplementary measure for both treatment and prevention of hydatidosis.

  8. Oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity of Escherichia coli and mitigation in lethality by superoxide dismutase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Taeko; Yamaguchi, Hikoyuki; Yano, Keiji

    1978-01-01

    Oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity of Escherichia coli W3623 his - was confirmed. Regarding cellular superoxide dismutase (SOD), cells grown oxically gained higher activity than those anoxically, however, the reinforced enzyme level could not compensate the oxygen effect, i.e., the enhanced lethal effect of oxic γ-irradiation. Rather, the enhancement of oxygen effect was found in cells grown oxically compared with those anoxically. Oxygen enhanced lethality was mitigated to the extent by the amount of added SOD into the cell suspension to be irradiated. The results supported a proposal that superoxide anion, O 2 - , is involved in the oxygen effect, with the most likely site of the damage in the outer structure of cell but not in the cell matrix. Reverse oxygen effect could be found with lambda phage DNA in transfecting ability. Added SOD protected phage DNA somewhat in oxic irradiation. While considerable protections were found in anoxic one with the added SOD even autoclaved but their function was still unknown. (auth.)

  9. Wholesomeness study of irradiated salted and dried mackerel in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anukarahanonta, T.; Temcharoen, P.; Nagara, B.N.; Chudhabuddhi, C.; Bhamarapravati, N.

    1981-01-01

    A long-term multigeneration study was performed of the wholesomeness of irradiated salted and dried mackerel fed to the rats of Wistar strain and revealed no significant evidence that would impose a hazard attributable to irradiation with respect to the longevity, carcinogenecity, teratogenicity, dominant lethal, reproductive function and biophysiological function. Some abnormalities that were noted could be explained on the basis of differences in food quality due to the addition of fish protein and minerals rather than the irradiation effect

  10. Irradiation effects on the variability of yield characteristics of soybeans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasztor, K.; Egri, K.; Toeroek, Z.; Bornemiszane, P.P.

    1983-01-01

    The seeds of soybean varieties 'Merit' and 'S-1346' were irradiated by fast neutrons with doses between 4 and 174 Gy. The doses in the range of 57-174 Gy proved to be lethal. After low dose irradiation, shorter breeding time and the stimulation of plant growth could be observed. The effects of irradiation on the oil and protein contents of soybeans were contradictory. (V.N.)

  11. Immune reactivity after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassmann, W.; Wottge, H.U.; von Kolzynski, M.; Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.

    1986-01-01

    Immune reactivity after total-body irradiation was investigated in rats using skin graft rejection as the indicator system. After sublethal irradiation with 10.5 Gy (approximately 50% lethality/6 weeks) the rejection of major histocompatibility complex allogeneic skin grafts was delayed significantly compared with nonirradiated control animals (28 versus 6.5 days). In contrast, skin grafts were rejected after 7.5 days in sublethally irradiated animals and 7 days in lethally irradiated animals if additional skin donor type alloantigens--namely, irradiated bone marrow cells--were given i.v. either simultaneously or with a delay of not more than 24 hr after the above conditioning regimen. These reactions were alloantigen-specific. They were observed in six different strain combinations with varying donors and recipients. Starting on day 2 after irradiation, i.v. injection of bone marrow gradually lost its effectivity and skin grafts were no longer rejected with uniform rapidity; skin donor marrow given on days 4 or 8 did not accelerate skin graft rejection at all. These data show that for approximately 1-2 days after high-dose total-body irradiation rats are still capable of starting a vigorous immune reaction against i.v.-injected alloantigens. The phenomenon of impaired rejection of skin grafted immediately after high-dose irradiation appears to result from the poor accessibility of skin graft alloantigens during the early postirradiation phase when vascularization of the grafted skin is insufficient

  12. Hyperthermic radiosensitization of synchronous Chinese hamster cells: relationship between lethality and chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, W.C.; Sapareto, S.A.; Betten, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    Synchronous Chinese hamster cells in vitro were obtained by mitotic selection. The cells were heated at 45.5 0 C for 4 min in mitosis, 11 min in G 1 , or 7 min in S sphase and then x-irradiated immediately thereafter. Colony survival from heat alone was 0.30 to 0.45, and the frequency of chromosomal aberrations induced by heat was 0.00, 0.14, or 0.97 for heat treatments during M, G 1 , or S, respectively. As shown previously, lethality from hyperthermia alone is due to chromosomal aberrations only when the cells are heated during S phase. The log survival (D 0 /sup approximately/ = 80 rad) and aberration frequency curves for cells irradiated during mitosis were linear, and the only effect of hyperthermia was to shift the curves in accord with the effect from heat alone. Thus, hyperthermia did not radiosensitize the mitotic cells. The cells irradiated in G 1 were more resistant (D 0 /sup approximately/ = 100 rad) than those irradiated in mitosis, and the survival and aberration frequency curves both had shoulders. The primary effect of hyperthermia was to greatly reduce the shoulders of the curves and to increase the slopes by about 23%. The cells irradiated in S were the most resistant (D 0 /sup approximately/ = 140 rad), and the survival and aberration frequency curves both had large shoulders. For both end points of lethality and chromosomal aberrations, heat selectively radiosensitized S-phase cells relative to G 1 cells by removing most of the shoulder and increasing the slope by about 45%. For cells treated in G 1 or S, the increase in radiosensitization following hyperthermia can be accounted for by an increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations

  13. Lethal effects of selected novel pesticides on immature stages of Trichogramma pretiosum (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Ashraf; Ruberson, John R

    2017-12-01

    Trichogramma pretiosum Riley is an important egg parasitoid and biological control agent of caterpillar pests. We studied the acute toxicity of 20 pesticides (14 insecticides/miticides, three fungicides and three herbicides) exposed to recommended field rates. Egg, larval, and pupal stages of the parasitoid in their hosts were dipped in formulated solutions of the pesticides and evaluated 10 days later for percentage of host eggs with holes, number of parasitoids emerged per egg with holes, and stage-specific mortality of immature as well as adult wasps within the host eggs. Seven insecticides (buprofezin, chlorantraniliprole, spirotetramat, flonicamid, flubendiamide) and miticides (spiromesifen, cyflumetofen), one herbicide (nicosulfuron), and three fungicides (myclobutanil, pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin + tebuconazole) caused no significant mortality to immature stages or pre-emergent adult parasitoids relative to controls. By contrast, seven insecticides/miticides (abamectin, acetamiprid, dinotefuran, fipronil, novaluron, spinetoram, tolfenpyrad) adversely affected immature and pre-emergent adult T. pretiosum, with tolfenpyrad being particularly lethal. Two herbicides had moderate (glufosinate ammonium) to severe (s-metolachlor) acute lethal effects on the immature parasitoids. This study corroborates earlier findings with adult T. pretiosum. Over half of the pesticides - and all the fungicides - tested in the current study would appear to be compatible with the use of T. pretiosum in integrated pest management programs, with respect to acute parasitoid mortality. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) and other lethal arthrogryposes in Finland--an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkasjärvi, Niklas; Ritvanen, Annukka; Herva, Riitta; Peltonen, Leena; Kestilä, Marjo; Ignatius, Jaakko

    2006-09-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by multiple contractures with an estimated frequency of 1 in 3,000 births. With improving diagnostic methods, increasing numbers of fetuses with arthrogryposis are found. The pathogenetic mechanisms are relatively well known but the epidemiology and genetics of the prenatally lethal forms of arthrogryposis are less well known. In this study we collected all cases of a multiple contractures diagnosed in Finland during 1987-2002 including live born infants, stillbirths, and terminated pregnancies. Ninety-two cases of 214 suffered intrauterine demise (68 selective pregnancy terminations and 24 stillbirths) and 58 died in infancy. In 141 out of these cases the diagnosis could be included within lethal arthrogryposes, with a prevalence of 1 in 6,985 (1.43/10,000) births. Of these, 59 had spinal cord pathology at autopsy and thus were of neurogenic origin. Thirty-nine cases had lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) clinically characterized by total immobility of the fetus at all ultrasound examinations (12 weeks or later), multiple joint contractures in both upper and lower limbs, hydrops, and fetal death before the 32nd week of pregnancy. LCCS is noted as a unique Finnish disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 25,250 (0.40/10,000) births and is a major cause of lethal arthrogryposis in Finland.

  15. Suicide Intent and Accurate Expectations of Lethality: Predictors of Medical Lethality of Suicide Attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory K.; Henriques, Gregg R.; Sosdjan, Daniella; Beck, Aaron T.

    2004-01-01

    The degree of intent to commit suicide and the severity of self-injury were examined in individuals (N = 180) who had recently attempted suicide. Although a minimal association was found between the degree of suicide intent and the degree of lethality of the attempt, the accuracy of expectations about the likelihood of dying was found to moderate…

  16. Enhanced sensitivity to the lethal and mutagenic effects of photosensitizing action of chlorpromazine in ethylenediaminetetraacetate-treated Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, S.; Todo, T.

    1982-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) treatment of Escherichia coli H/r30 (Arg - ) enhanced cell sensitivity to the lethal and mutagenic effects of the photosensitizing action of chlorpromazine (CPZ). The most obvious effect of EDTA on the fluence-survival curve was an elimination of the shoulder. In the absence of EDTA, CPZ plus near-UV radiation did not induce the reversion from arginine-auxotroph to autotroph of E. coli H/r30. However, when EDTA (5 mM)-treated cells were subjected to CPZ plus near-UV radiation, the induced reversion frequency increased with time of irradiation. It is concluded that the enhanced penetration of CPZ into E. coli cells by EDTA facilitates the drug binding to DNA within the cells upon near-UV irradiation and that this is the cause for the enhanced photosensitized lethal and mutagenic effects of CPZ. (author)

  17. Lethal doses of ionizing radiation versus endogenous level of superoxide dismutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipecka, K; Domanski, T; Dniaszewska, K; Grabowska, B; Pietrowicz, D; Lindner, P; Cisowska, B; Gorski, H [Military Medical Academy, Lodz (Poland). Inst. of Occupational Medicine

    1982-06-22

    The stability of superoxide dismutase (SOD) as well as its activity distribution in a human population were investigated. The SOD activity level of the erythrocytes proved to be an index for the endogenous SOD activity in the whole body. In a rat population, having similar SOD frequency distribution as a human population, the mortality due to acute irradiation depended on the SOD level; after a single acute dose approximating the lethal dose (LD/sub 50/30/) the survival depended distinctly on the endogenous SOD activity level.

  18. Lethal domestic violence in eastern North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, M G; Spence, P R; Spence, R L

    2000-01-01

    Strategies for preventing domestic violence can be tailored to a particular geographic or socioeconomic area if the patterns of domestic violence in the area are known. National statistics, although widely available, may not be applicable to a specific region. We reviewed homicide deaths in Eastern North Carolina between 1978 and 1999 to identify patterns in this rural area. Approximately 20% of the homicide deaths in eastern North Carolina are caused by intimate partners. Women accounted for 53% of the victims in 1976, similar to national figures but not rising to 72% as seen nationally in 1998. Latinos are an increasing presence in the area, but had only one recorded episode of lethal violence against an intimate partner. Gunshots accounted for most of the deaths (59% in men, 72% in women). Knowledge of such patterns can assist in selecting prevention strategies for this particular area. Over the last 25 years increasing attention has been devoted to domestic violence (DV), initially defined as abuse committed against a spouse, former spouse, fiancée, boy- or girlfriend, or cohabitant. As time has passed, the definition has been broadened to include other family members--elders, children, and siblings. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now uses the term "intimate partner violence" for intentional emotional or physical abuse inflicted by a spouse, ex-spouse, a present or former boy- or girlfriend, or date. For the purposes of this paper, we consider DV interchangeable with intimate partner violence. There has been a national concern that abusive events are under-reported. The National Crime Victimization Survey, an anonymous household survey, indicated nearly 1 million incidents of non-lethal intimate partner violence per year between 1992 and 1996. The number decreased from 1.1 million in 1993 to 840,000 in 1996. Attempts to validate such data for a given geographic area often require subjects to violate anonymity--this may account for lower

  19. Genetic effects of feeding irradiated wheat to mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayalaxmi

    1976-01-01

    The effects of feeding irradiated wheat in mice on bone marrow and testis chromosomes, germ cell numbers and dominant lethal mutations were investigated. Feeding of freshly irradiated wheat resulted in significantly increased incidence of polyploid cells in bone marrow, aneuploid cells in testis, reduction in number of spermatogonia of types A, B and resting primary spermatocytes as well as a higher mutagenic index. Such a response was not observed when mice were fed stored irradiated wheat. Also there was no difference between the mice fed un-irradiated wheat and stored irradiated wheat. (author)

  20. Biochemical aspects of the immunomodular action in irradiated survival mice with 60C gama irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Agudo, N.L. del M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The radioprotective action of Calmetti-Guerin bacillus (BCG), Corynebacterium parvum, Escherichia coli Lipopolysccharides (LPS) and peptone proteose was evaluated. A single injection of the macrophage activiting agents prior to 60 Co whole-body irradiation increased the survival rate of mice in the lethal dose range. (L.M.J.) [pt

  1. Demonstration and suppression of a radioresistant host-versus-graft reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierfelder, S.; Roessler, R. v.; Ruppelt, W.

    1975-01-01

    The possibilities of suppressing and measuring a radioresistant host-versus-graft reaction are described. According to the authors, the host-versus-graft immune reaction may outlast whole-body irradiation at high doses. (BSC/AK) [de

  2. A Recombinant Adenovirus Expressing Ovine Interferon Tau Prevents Influenza Virus-Induced Lethality in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, V; Pascual, E; Avia, M; Rangel, G; de Molina, A; Alejo, A; Sevilla, N

    2016-01-06

    Ovine interferon tau (IFN-τ) is a unique type I interferon with low toxicity and a broad host range in vivo. We report the generation of a nonreplicative recombinant adenovirus expressing biologically active IFN-τ. Using the B6.A2G-Mx1 mouse model, we showed that single-dose intranasal administration of recombinant Ad5-IFN-τ can effectively prevent lethality and disease induced by highly virulent hv-PR8 influenza virus by activating the interferon response and preventing viral replication. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soothill, R.

    1987-01-01

    The issue of food irradiation has become important in Australia and overseas. This article discusses the results of the Australian Consumers' Association's (ACA) Inquiry into food irradiation, commissioned by the Federal Government. Issues discussed include: what is food irradiation; why irradiate food; how much food is consumer rights; and national regulations

  4. Changes in some blood lipid fractions in whole-body irradiated rats as influenced by some radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousri, R.M.; Roushdy, H.; Gawish, M.A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of sublethal and lethal total body gamma irradiation on some serum lipid fractions in male rats was investigated. The protective efficacy of estradiol and/or α-tocopherol was also studied. The results of this study demonstrate that the lethally irradiated rats showed significant alteration in serum triglycerides, cholesterol, total lipids and phospholipids level. Estradiol exerted a benefical effect on lipid fractions after one and two days post lethal α-irradiation (8 Gy). No consistent radioprotective effect of tocopherol could be detected on the levels of serum lipid fractions. This finding was also observed when both radioprotectors were used. (orig.) [de

  5. Enhanced lethal effect of combined ACNU with x-ray on cultured HeLaS3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Haruyuki; Miyamoto, Tadaaki

    1983-01-01

    The combined effects of ACNU and X-irradiation on cultured HeLaS 3 cells were investigated. Pretreatment with either ACNU or X-ray induced a substantial reduction in shoulder width the D 0 value of the dose-response curve for the other agent, given later was unchanged. ACNU did not inhibit the recovery of sublethal damage (SLD) induced by X-ray when this treatment preceded the spilit-dose experiment. Our results indicate that some cell damage induced by each agent is transmissible to the progeny of the surviving cells and that the interaction of ACNU and X-irradiation was lethal to the cells. (author)

  6. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review of food irradiation and lists plants for food irradiation in the world. Possible applications for irradiation are discussed, and changes induced in food from radiation, nutritional as well as organoleptic, are reviewed. Possible toxicological risks with irradiated food and risks from alternative methods for treatment are also brought up. Ways to analyze weather food has been irradiated or not are presented. 8 refs

  7. Estimation of mutation rates induced by large doses of gamma, proton and neutron irradiation of the X-chromosome of the nematode Panagrellus redivivus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denich, K.T.R.; Samoiloff, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation-resistant free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus was used to study mutation rates in oocytes, following gamma, proton and neutron irradiation in the dose range 45-225 grays. γ-Radiation produced approximately 0.001 lethal X-chromosomes per gray over the range tested. Proton or neutron irradiation produced approximately 0.003 lethal X-chromosomes per gray at lower doses, with the mutation rate dropping to 0.001 lethal X-chromosome per gray at the higher doses. These results suggest a dose-dependent mutation-repair system. Cell lethality was also examined. γ-Radiation produced the greatest amount of cell lethality at all doses, while neutron irradiation had no cell lethal effect at any of the doses examined. (orig.)

  8. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T. (ROB, DCT, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (US))

    1991-05-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the {alpha} and {beta} terms reflect lethal damage created {ital during} the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD.

  9. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T.

    1991-01-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the α and β terms reflect lethal damage created during the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with ''unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD

  10. Computed tomography of lethal medline granuloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Suk; Kim, Tae Ho; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duk Sik

    1991-01-01

    In order to clarify the CT findings of lethal midline granuloma (LMG) diagnosed clinically or histopathologically, the authors retrospectively analyzed 12 patients who were seen at Kyungpook National University Hospital from February 1985 to August 1989. CT showed nasal mucosal thickening and / or soft tissue mass (9 case), spreading of the lesions along the facial subcutaneous fat plane (8 cases), invasion into the paranasal sinuses (5 cases), bone destruction (5 cases), nasopharyngeal mass lesion (2 cases), and extension of the lesion into the infratemporal fossa (1 case). In spite of the fact that CT does not make definitive diagnosis of LMG, it permits evaluation of the extent of the lesion, detection of the combined lesion, differential diagnosis, and close monitoring of its evolution under treatment

  11. Ants defend aphids against lethal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Charlotte; Agrawal, Anurag A.; Hajek, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    Social insects defend their own colonies and some species also protect their mutualist partners. In mutualisms with aphids, ants typically feed on honeydew produced by aphids and, in turn guard and shelter aphid colonies from insect natural enemies. Here we report that Formica podzolica ants tending milkweed aphids, Aphis asclepiadis, protect aphid colonies from lethal fungal infections caused by an obligate aphid pathogen, Pandora neoaphidis. In field experiments, bodies of fungal-killed aphids were quickly removed from ant-tended aphid colonies. Ant workers were also able to detect infective conidia on the cuticle of living aphids and responded by either removing or grooming these aphids. Our results extend the long-standing view of ants as mutualists and protectors of aphids by demonstrating focused sanitizing and quarantining behaviour that may lead to reduced disease transmission in aphid colonies. PMID:19923138

  12. Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael

    1997-12-01

    Antibacterial agents are increasingly being used for the prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases. As these agents can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Light-activated antimicrobial agents release singlet oxygen and free radicals which can kill adjacent bacteria and a wide range of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria has been shown to be susceptible to such agents. In the oral cavity these organisms are present as biofilms (dental plaques) which are less susceptible to traditional antimicrobial agents than bacterial suspensions. The results of these studies have shown that biofilm-grown oral bacteria are also susceptible to lethal photosensitization although the light energy doses required are grater than those needed to kill the organisms when they are grown as aqueous suspensions.

  13. Tityus serrulatus venom--A lethal cocktail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Cordeiro, Francielle Almeida; Longhim, Heloisa Tavoni; Cremonez, Caroline Marroni; Oliveira, Guilherme Honda; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2015-12-15

    Tityus serrulatus (Ts) is the main scorpion species of medical importance in Brazil. Ts venom is composed of several compounds such as mucus, inorganic salts, lipids, amines, nucleotides, enzymes, kallikrein inhibitor, natriuretic peptide, proteins with high molecular mass, peptides, free amino acids and neurotoxins. Neurotoxins are considered the most responsible for the envenoming syndrome due to their pharmacological action on ion channels such as voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and potassium (Kv) channels. The major goal of this review is to present important advances in Ts envenoming research, correlating both the crude Ts venom and isolated toxins with alterations observed in all human systems. The most remarkable event lies in the Ts induced massive releasing of neurotransmitters influencing, directly or indirectly, the entire body. Ts venom proved to extremely affect nervous and muscular systems, to modulate the immune system, to induce cardiac disorders, to cause pulmonary edema, to decrease urinary flow and to alter endocrine, exocrine, reproductive, integumentary, skeletal and digestive functions. Therefore, Ts venom possesses toxins affecting all anatomic systems, making it a lethal cocktail. However, its low lethality may be due to the low venom mass injected, to the different venom compositions, the body characteristics and health conditions of the victim and the local of Ts sting. Furthermore, we also described the different treatments employed during envenoming cases. In particular, throughout the review, an effort will be made to provide information from an extensive documented studies concerning Ts venom in vitro, in animals and in humans (a total of 151 references). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chloroquine Improves Survival and Hematopoietic Recovery After Lethal Low-Dose-Rate Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim Yiting; Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M.; Kastan, Michael B.; Matsui, William; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 μg per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection

  15. Total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, D.E.; Ferguson, R.M.; Simmons, R.L.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation by itself can produce sufficient immunosuppression to prolong the survival of a variety of organ allografts in experimental animals. The degree of prolongation is dose-dependent and is limited by the toxicity that occurs with higher doses. Total lymphoid irradiation is more effective before transplantation than after, but when used after transplantation can be combined with pharmacologic immunosuppression to achieve a positive effect. In some animal models, total lymphoid irradiation induces an environment in which fully allogeneic bone marrow will engraft and induce permanent chimerism in the recipients who are then tolerant to organ allografts from the donor strain. If total lymphoid irradiation is ever to have clinical applicability on a large scale, it would seem that it would have to be under circumstances in which tolerance can be induced. However, in some animal models graft-versus-host disease occurs following bone marrow transplantation, and methods to obviate its occurrence probably will be needed if this approach is to be applied clinically. In recent years, patient and graft survival rates in renal allograft recipients treated with conventional immunosuppression have improved considerably, and thus the impetus to utilize total lymphoid irradiation for its immunosuppressive effect alone is less compelling. The future of total lymphoid irradiation probably lies in devising protocols in which maintenance immunosuppression can be eliminated, or nearly eliminated, altogether. Such protocols are effective in rodents. Whether they can be applied to clinical transplantation remains to be seen

  16. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenewald, T

    1985-01-01

    Food irradiation has become a matter of topical interest also in the Federal Republic of Germany following applications for exemptions concerning irradiation tests of spices. After risks to human health by irradiation doses up to a level sufficient for product pasteurization were excluded, irradiation now offers a method suitable primarily for the disinfestation of fruit and decontamination of frozen and dried food. Codex Alimentarius standards which refer also to supervision and dosimetry have been established; they should be adopted as national law. However, in the majority of cases where individual countries including EC member-countries so far permitted food irradiation, these standards were not yet used. Approved irradiation technique for industrial use is available. Several industrial food irradiation plants, partly working also on a contractual basis, are already in operation in various countries. Consumer response still is largely unknown; since irradiated food is labelled, consumption of irradiated food will be decided upon by consumers.

  17. Differential effect of procaine on irradiated mammalian cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djordjevic, B.

    1979-01-01

    HeLa and V-79 Chinese hamster cells temporarily stored in ampoules were treated with the local anesthetic procaine. Postirradiation treatment increased lethality in HeLa cells depending on drug concentration, duration of treatment, and cell density, as measured by colony-forming ability upon plating. If present during irradiation only, procaine protected from irradiation. In V-79 cells, procaine potentiated radiation lethality only in freshly trypsinized cells. Procaine effect was thus cell type specific and most likely involved the cell membrane

  18. Hemostimulating efficiency of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs under modified irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhvoronkov, L.P.; Sklobovskaya, I.Eh.

    1988-01-01

    Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) were found to have hemostimulating effect in mice after irradiation. This effect was rather definite under irradiation conditions modified by dose fractioning or radioprotective chemicals. NSAID application during fractionated irradiation with midlethal integral dose leads to almost complete recovery of bone marrow hemopoiesis by the 9th day of radiation illness. NSAID usage combined with chemical radioprotectors provides effective hemopoiesis stimulation leading to survival increase in animals, irradiated with absolutely lethal doses. (author)

  19. Chronic exposure of corals to fine sediments: lethal and sub-lethal impacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florita Flores

    Full Text Available Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora. The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l(-1 TSS (25 mg cm(-2 day(-1 for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l(-1 TSS (83 mg cm(-2 day(-1 for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue.

  20. Chronic Exposure of Corals to Fine Sediments: Lethal and Sub-Lethal Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Smith, Luke D.; Cooper, Timothy F.; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l−1 TSS (25 mg cm−2 day−1) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l−1 TSS (83 mg cm−2 day−1) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue. PMID:22662225

  1. Effect of host lex, recA, recF, and uvrD genotypes on the ultraviolet light-protecting and related properties of plasmid R46 in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waleh, N.S.; Stocker, B.A.D.

    1979-01-01

    The ability of plasmid R46 to reduce the lethal but enhance the mutagenic effect of ultraviolet (uv) irradiation was tested in sets of Escherichia coli K-12 derivatives, wild type or with different mutations affecting DNA repair capacity, but otherwise isogenic. uv protection and enhancement of uv mutagenic effect were obtained in uvrA6, uvrB5, uvrD3, and recF143 hosts, but not in a recA56 strain. The plasmid gave some uv protection in two lexA1 and two lexA101 strains and in one lexA102 host, but produced no such effect in another lexA102 host. The plasmid restored uv mutagenic effect in a lexB30 strain, the yield of induced mutants per survivor of irradiation (10 J/m 2 ) being about the same for the lexB30(R46) and lex + (R46) strains; by contrast the plasmid, though it reduced the uv sensitivity of the lexB30 strain, did not make it as uv-resistant as the lex + R - strain

  2. The influence of continuous γ-irradiation at decreasing dose-rate on the survival rote and induction of gene mutations in cultured Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feoktistova, T.P.; Elisova, E.V.; Stavrakova, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    Continuous γ-irradiation at decreasing dose-rate was shown to be less effective than acute exposure with regard to the lethal effect and frequency of mutations of resistance to 6-thioguanine in cultured Chinese hamster cells. The cell population subjected to continuons irradiation was d more radioresistant than the intact one. Lethal and genetic effects of continuous irradiation at decreasing dose-rate were mainly determined by the contribution of the radiation dose received during the first 24 h of exposure

  3. Preoperative irradiation of hypernephroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbar, D.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1969, preoperative irradiation of hypernephiroid carcinoma has been a routine measure at the Steglitz medical clinic: It consists in the application of a focal dose of 30 Gy, fractionated into doses of 2.5 Gy, as Betatron pendulum irradiation (42 MeV photons) covering the para-aortic lymph nodes. After a treatment-free interval of 3 weeks, radical nephrectomy is carried through. Of 178 patients, 47 were in tumor stage I, 15 in stage II, 83 in stage III and 33 in stage IV. In 99 patients the treatment dated back longer than 5 years; the survival rate was 52%. 67% of the patients had survived longer than 3 years. Operation lethality was 3%. The preoperative irradiation pursues the following aims: 1. Devitalization of potentially proliferating cells in the tumor periphery, and thus prevention of displaced tumor cells growing on and postoperative local recidivations; 2. Shrinking of the tumor, facilitating the surgical intervention. In a third of the cases a measurable alteration of the tumor was confirmed by X-ray. The low operation lethality of 3% is attributed to this. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Effects of β-arabinofuranosyladenine on the growth and repair of potentially lethal damage in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, G.

    1980-01-01

    β-D-Arabinofuranosyladenine (β-araA) inhibit the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells by selective inhibition of DNA polymerases. RNA and protein synthesis are not significantly affected. Addition of β-araA to the cells after irradiation resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in survival, presumably due to the inhibition of the repair of potentially lethal damage. Since β-araA selectively inhibits DNA polymerases it is suggested that repair of potentially lethal damage involves steps at the DNA level which require some polymerization. These repair steps take place in the DNA with a velocity comparable to that of the repair of potentially lethal damage. The inhibition of the repair of potentially lethal damage by β-araA was modified by the addition of deoxyadenosine; this supports the finding that β-araA acts competitively against dATP at the molecular level. The inhibition of the repair of potentially lethal damage by β-araA, which is partly reversible, resulted in a concentration-dependent modification of the survival curve. At low concentrations of β-araA a dose-modifying decrease in survival was observed. At higher concentrations (more than 12 μM) the decrease in survival resulted in a decrease of the shoulder width of the survival curve. Eventually an exponential curve was obtained. We suggest therefore that the shoulder of the survival curve results from some repair or potentially lethal damage. Preliminary information has been obtained on the time course of this repair

  5. Incidence of interstitial pneumonia after hyperfractionated total body irradiation before autologous bone marrow/stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, F.; Schraube, P.; Wenz, F.; Flentje, M.; Kalle, K. von; Haas, R.; Hunstein, W.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Interstitial pneumonia (IP) is a severe complication after allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with incidence rates between 10 % and 40 % in different series. It is a polyetiologic disease that occurs depending on age, graft vs. host disease (GvHD), CMV-status, total body irradiation (TBI) and immunosuppressive therapy after BMT. The effects of fractionation and dose rate are not entirely clear. This study evaluates the incidence of lethal IP after hyperfractionated TBI for autologous BMT or stem cell transplantation. Materials and Methods Between 1982 and 1992, 182 patients (60 % male, 40 % female) were treated with hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) before autologous bone marrow transplantation. Main indications were leukemias and lymphomas (53 % AML, 21 % ALL, 22 % NHL, 4 % others) Median age was 30 ys (15 - 55 ys). A total dose of 14.4 Gy was applied using lung blocks (12 fractions of 1.2 Gy in 4 days, dose rate 7-18 cGy/min, lung dose 9 - 9.5 Gy). TBI was followed by cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg). 72 % were treated with bone marrow transplantation, 28 % were treated with stem cell transplantation. Interstitial pneumonia was diagnosed clinically, radiologically and by autopsy. Results 4 patients died most likely of interstitial pneumonia. For another 12 patients interstitial pneumonia was not the most likely cause of death but could not be excluded. Thus, the incidence of lethal IP was at least 2.2 % but certainly below 8.8 %. Conclusion Lethal interstitial pneumonia is a rare complication after total body irradiation before autologous bone marrow transplantation in this large, homogeously treated series. In the autologous setting, total doses of 14.4 Gy can be applied with a low risk for developing interstitial pneumonia if hyperfractionation and lung blocks are used. This falls in line with data from series with identical twins or t-cell depleted marrow and smaller, less homogeneous autologous transplant studies. Thus

  6. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomotaro; Aoki, Shohei

    1976-01-01

    Definition and significance of food irradiation were described. The details of its development and present state were also described. The effect of the irradiation on Irish potatoes, onions, wiener sausages, kamaboko (boiled fish-paste), and mandarin oranges was evaluated; and healthiness of food irradiation was discussed. Studies of the irradiation equipment for Irish potatoes in a large-sized container, and the silo-typed irradiation equipment for rice and wheat were mentioned. Shihoro RI center in Hokkaido which was put to practical use for the irradiation of Irish potatoes was introduced. The state of permission of food irradiation in foreign countries in 1975 was introduced. As a view of the food irradiation in the future, its utilization for the prevention of epidemics due to imported foods was mentioned. (Serizawa, K.)

  7. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of five pesticides used in rice farming on the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, Andreu; Sabater, Consuelo; Castillo, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of five pesticides typically used in rice farming (trichlorfon, dimethoate, carbendazim, tebuconazole and prochloraz) was evaluated on different lethal and sub-lethal endpoints of the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The evaluated endpoints included: avoidance behaviour after an exposure

  8. Relationships between host viremia and vector susceptibility for arboviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Cynthia C; Rutledge, C Roxanne; Tabachnick, Walter J

    2006-05-01

    Using a threshold model where a minimum level of host viremia is necessary to infect vectors affects our assessment of the relative importance of different host species in the transmission and spread of these pathogens. Other models may be more accurate descriptions of the relationship between host viremia and vector infection. Under the threshold model, the intensity and duration of the viremia above the threshold level is critical in determining the potential numbers of infected mosquitoes. A probabilistic model relating host viremia to the probability distribution of virions in the mosquito bloodmeal shows that the threshold model will underestimate the significance of hosts with low viremias. A probabilistic model that includes avian mortality shows that the maximum number of mosquitoes is infected by feeding on hosts whose viremia peaks just below the lethal level. The relationship between host viremia and vector infection is complex, and there is little experimental information to determine the most accurate model for different arthropod-vector-host systems. Until there is more information, the ability to distinguish the relative importance of different hosts in infecting vectors will remain problematic. Relying on assumptions with little support may result in erroneous conclusions about the importance of different hosts.

  9. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  10. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The article explains what radiation does to food to preserve it. Food irradiation is of economic importance to Canada because Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is the leading world supplier of industrial irradiators. Progress is being made towards changing regulations which have restricted the irradiation of food in the United States and Canada. Examples are given of applications in other countries. Opposition to food irradiation by antinuclear groups is addressed

  11. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of food irradiation are outlined. The interaction of irradiation with matter is then discussed with special reference to the major constituents of foods. The application of chemical analysis in the evaluation of the wholesomeness of irradiated foods is summarized [af

  12. Lethal endomyocarditis caused by chronic "Krokodil" intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Antonella; Trotta, Silvia; Colucci, Anna Pia; Aventaggiato, Lucia; Marzullo, Andrea; Solarino, Biagio

    2018-03-19

    "Krokodil" is a home-made opioid drug obtained by synthesizing desomorphine from codeine and combining it with other low-cost additives. Initially introduced in the former Soviet countries, it was then imported to Western Europe as a heroin substitute. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an Italian case of lethal krokodil abuse, that occurred in a 39-year-old man, who died suddenly after transportation to the Emergency Department (ED) for hyperthermia associated with sweating, dyspnoea and tachycardia. Post-mortem examination revealed extensive necrotic ulcerative lesions on the forearms, and autopsy showed a hypertrophic heart with ample endocardial vegetation on the aortic valve and patency of the foramen ovale. Histopathological examination of the heart showed ulcero-vegetative lesions of the aortic valve with an abscess on the annulus and extension to the periaortic adipose tissue, as well as diffuse myocardial interstitial inflammatory neutrophilic infiltrates. Toxicological analysis demonstrated a desomorphine metabolite in urine. On the basis of all these findings the cause of death was ruled to be congestive heart failure caused by endocarditis and myocarditis, correlated with chronic abuse of krokodil.

  13. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Human cooperation by lethal group competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egas, Martijn; Kats, Ralph; van der Sar, Xander; Reuben, Ernesto; Sabelis, Maurice W

    2013-01-01

    Why humans are prone to cooperate puzzles biologists, psychologists and economists alike. Between-group conflict has been hypothesized to drive within-group cooperation. However, such conflicts did not have lasting effects in laboratory experiments, because they were about luxury goods, not needed for survival ("looting"). Here, we find within-group cooperation to last when between-group conflict is implemented as "all-out war" (eliminating the weakest groups). Human subjects invested in helping group members to avoid having the lowest collective pay-off, whereas they failed to cooperate in control treatments with random group elimination or with no subdivision in groups. When the game was repeated, experience was found to promote helping. Thus, not within-group interactions alone, not random group elimination, but pay-off-dependent group elimination was found to drive within-group cooperation in our experiment. We suggest that some forms of human cooperation are maintained by multi-level selection: reciprocity within groups and lethal competition among groups acting together.

  15. Treatment of mice with sepsis following irradiation and trauma with antibiotics and synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madonna, G.S.; Ledney, G.D.; Moore, M.M.; Elliott, T.B.; Brook, I.

    1991-01-01

    Compromise of antimicrobial defenses by irradiation can result in sepsis and death. Additional trauma can further predispose patients to infection and thus increase mortality. We recently showed that injection of synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) significantly augments resistance to infection and increases survival of mice compromised either by whole-body irradiation with gamma radiation or equal mixtures of fission neutron and gamma radiation. In this study, C3H/HeN mice were given a lethal dose of gamma radiation (8.0 Gy) and an open wound (15% total body surface area [TBSA]) 1 hr later while anesthetized. Irradiated/wounded mice became more severely leukopenic and thrombocytopenic than mice exposed to radiation alone, and died from natural wound infection and sepsis within 7 days. S-TDCM given 1 hr postirradiation increased survival of mice exposed to radiation alone. However, this treatment did not increase survival of the irradiated/wounded mice. Systemic antibiotic therapy with gentamicin or ofloxacin for 10 days significantly increased survival time compared with untreated irradiated/wounded mice (p less than 0.01). Combination therapy with topical gentamicin cream and systemic oxacillin increased survival from 0% to 100%. Treatment with S-TDCM combined with the suboptimal treatment of topical and systemic gentamicin increased survival compared with antibiotic treatment alone. These studies demonstrate that post-trauma therapy with S-TDCM and antibiotics augments resistance to infection in immunocompromised mice. The data suggest that therapies which combine stimulation of nonspecific host defense mechanisms with antibiotics may increase survival of irradiated patients inflicted with accidental or surgical trauma

  16. Treatment of mice with sepsis following irradiation and trauma with antibiotics and synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madonna, G.S.; Ledney, G.D.; Moore, M.M.; Elliott, T.B.; Brook, I. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Compromise of antimicrobial defenses by irradiation can result in sepsis and death. Additional trauma can further predispose patients to infection and thus increase mortality. We recently showed that injection of synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) significantly augments resistance to infection and increases survival of mice compromised either by whole-body irradiation with gamma radiation or equal mixtures of fission neutron and gamma radiation. In this study, C3H/HeN mice were given a lethal dose of gamma radiation (8.0 Gy) and an open wound (15% total body surface area (TBSA)) 1 hr later while anesthetized. Irradiated/wounded mice became more severely leukopenic and thrombocytopenic than mice exposed to radiation alone, and died from natural wound infection and sepsis within 7 days. S-TDCM given 1 hr postirradiation increased survival of mice exposed to radiation alone. However, this treatment did not increase survival of the irradiated/wounded mice. Systemic antibiotic therapy with gentamicin or ofloxacin for 10 days significantly increased survival time compared with untreated irradiated/wounded mice (p less than 0.01). Combination therapy with topical gentamicin cream and systemic oxacillin increased survival from 0% to 100%. Treatment with S-TDCM combined with the suboptimal treatment of topical and systemic gentamicin increased survival compared with antibiotic treatment alone. These studies demonstrate that post-trauma therapy with S-TDCM and antibiotics augments resistance to infection in immunocompromised mice. The data suggest that therapies which combine stimulation of nonspecific host defense mechanisms with antibiotics may increase survival of irradiated patients inflicted with accidental or surgical trauma.

  17. Hyperthermia radiosensitization in human glioma cells comparison of recovery of polymerase activity, survival, and potentially lethal damage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Feeley, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    DNA polymerase inactivation is compared to thermal radiosensitization and inhibition of damage recovery in human glioma cells. Two human glioma cell lines (U87MG and U373MG) were exposed to hyperthermia and irradiation. Hyperthermia was given at 43 degrees C and 45 degrees C and DNA polymerase α + δ + ε and β activities were measured. Hyperthermia was given at various times before irradiation and the degree of radiosensitization and polymerase activity was assessed at various times after heating. In addition the ability of cells to undergo repair of potentially lethal radiation damage was assessed for cells irradiated at various times after heating. Polymerase α + δ + ε and polymerase β both recovered after heating but polymerase β was faster and was complete in U373MG but not in the U87MG cell lines after 48 h incubation after heating (45 degrees C, 60 min). Incubation, between hyperthermia and irradiation resulted in a loss of radiosensitization and a loss of inhibition of repair of potentially lethal damage. These changes correlated well with recovery of polymerase β but not with polymerase α + δ + ε. The correlation of polymerase β activity and thermoradiosensitization and its recovery indicate that polymerase β may be one of the mechanisms involved in thermoradiosensitization. 35 refs., 7 figs

  18. Dose uniformity estimations in the blood irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    Use of irradiated blood in transfusions is recognized as the most effective way of preventing Graft Versus Host Disease (GVHD). This paper shows the study carried out in the dose rate variation for various source arrangements for optimising the source-sample chamber geometry, during the development of the Blood Irradiator, Bl-2000

  19. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklin, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Queensland Government has given its support the establishment of a food irradiation plant in Queensland. The decision to press ahead with a food irradiation plant is astonishing given that there are two independent inquiries being carried out into food irradiation - a Parliamentary Committee inquiry and an inquiry by the Australian Consumers Association, both of which have still to table their Reports. It is fair to assume from the Queensland Government's response to date, therefore, that the Government will proceed with its food irradiation proposals regardless of the outcomes of the various federal inquiries. The reasons for the Australian Democrats' opposition to food irradiation which are also those of concerned citizens are outlined

  20. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1989-01-01

    The ranges of doses used for food irradiation and their effect on the processed foods are outlined. The wholesomeness of irradiated foods is discussed. The present food irradiation technology development in the world is described. A review of the irradiated foods permitted for public consumption, the purposes of food irradiaton, the doses used and a review of the commercial-scale food irradiators are tabulated. The history and the present state of food processing in Czechoslovakia are described. (author). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  1. Irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrington, Hugh

    1988-06-01

    This special edition of 'Food Manufacture' presents papers on the following aspects of the use of irradiation in the food industry:- 1) an outline view of current technology and its potential. 2) Safety and wholesomeness of irradiated and non-irradiated foods. 3) A review of the known effects of irradiation on packaging. 4) The problems of regulating the use of irradiation and consumer protection against abuse. 5) The detection problem - current procedures. 6) Description of the Gammaster BV plant in Holland. 7) World outline review. 8) Current and future commercial activities in Europe. (U.K.)

  2. Development of non-lethal methods for investigation of actinide uptake by wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, M.; Child, D.; Davis, E.; Harrison, J.; Hotchkis, M.; Payne, T.; Thiruvoth, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Org. (Australia); Wood, M. [University of Salford (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    There is growing interest in the use of non-lethal methods in radioecology and an International Union of Radioecology Task Group has been established to facilitate international cooperation in this field (http://iur-uir.org/en/task-groups/id-19-non-lethal-methods-in-radioecology). In this paper, we evaluate the use of lethally-, and non-lethally obtained samples (various body tissues, excreta and blood withdrawals as well as parasites and found bones) as indicators of contamination. Samples of mammals and reptiles were collected from the semi-arid former weapons test site at Maralinga, Australia and analysed for thorium, plutonium, and uranium isotopes by accelerator mass spectrometry and alpha-spectrometry. Most samples were of low mass and presented analytical challenges as a result. The plutonium concentrations in blood withdrawn from the marginal ear veins of Oryctolagus cuniculus (European rabbit) were successfully analysed using small samples (0.2 -7.9 ml, below the ∼10 ml threshold for safe extraction of blood from these rabbits). The results demonstrate that small-volume blood samples can serve as indicators of the presence of plutonium absorbed within other tissues (e.g., muscle, bone). However, the magnitude of the blood plutonium masses were poorly correlated with those in muscle and bone due to the presence of a small number of outliers (without the outliers, correlations improved to r = +0.66 and r = +0.51 for muscle and bone respectively). The activity concentrations in parasitic ticks were relatively high compared with those of their hosts Pseudomys hermannsburgensis (sandy inland mouse) and Ctenophorus cristatus (crested dragon lizard). Successful measurement of tick samples indicates a potential for use of parasites as general indicators of contamination within host organisms. The concentrations of actinides in found bones of Macropus rufus (red kangaroo) and O. cuniculus demonstrated potential for their use as indicators of the areal extent of

  3. X-ray lethality in diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cember, H.; Thorson, T.M. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Rats were made diabetic with streptozotocin and were irradiated with X-rays at various exposure levels in order to determine the LD-50/30 day dose. Non-diabetic control rats were exposed in a similar manner. The LD-50 exposures for the diabetic rats and the control rats were 436 R, and 617 R respectively. In view of the high prevalence of diabetes among the adult population, this finding may have important implications for diabetic workers who may be exposed accidentally to high levels of ionizing radiation

  4. Biological and physiological studies on the effect of some botanical oils and gamma irradiation on the Greasy Cut Worm Agrotis Ipsilon (HUF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EL- Wahed Ali, A G.A. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2008-07-01

    The greasy cut worm, Agrotis ipsilon ( Lepidoptera-Noctuidae ) is a serious pest for the seedlings of most crops such as cotton, maize, beans, broccoli, cabbage, carrot, chinese broccoli, chinese cabbage, Chinese spinach, corn, eggplant, flowering white cabbage, green beans, head cabbage, lettuce, mustard cabbage, potato, spinach, sugarcane, sweet potato, tomato, turnip, as well as many other plants. An extensive listing of hosts of the greasy cutworm may be found in (Rings et al. 1975). The extensive and continuous use of synthetic pesticides in control of agricultural pests have created many problems, one of them is the incapability of toxic agents in controlling the target pests at the recommended doses. Therefore, it was of great interest to investigate some alternative methods as substitutes for insecticides in the control of this pest. Among these methods, is the irradiation, plant extracts and oils. Irradiation techniques seem to offer solutions that are desirable in many aspects, contributing that this treatment should eventually prove to be cheaper, safer and more reliable than chemical control. Irradiation shortens life span of insects (Baxter and Blair, 1969), possibly by accelerating senescence (Aly et al., 1996). Irradiation may also cause protein denaturation, which may impair enzyme activity (Ljubenov and Andreev, 1974) and (Tribe and Webb, 1979 a, b, c). According to (Kinipling, 1955), insect exposure to ionizing radiation causes sterilization through induction of dominates lethal mutation in the genetic structure of organisms. This technique to be successful control device for suppressing and combating many lepidopteraus insect pests, including Agrotis ipsilon has been studied.

  5. Biological and physiological studies on the effect of some botanical oils and gamma irradiation on the Greasy Cut Worm Agrotis Ipsilon (HUF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL- Wahed Ali, A.G.A.

    2008-01-01

    The greasy cut worm, Agrotis ipsilon ( Lepidoptera-Noctuidae ) is a serious pest for the seedlings of most crops such as cotton, maize, beans, broccoli, cabbage, carrot, chinese broccoli, chinese cabbage, Chinese spinach, corn, eggplant, flowering white cabbage, green beans, head cabbage, lettuce, mustard cabbage, potato, spinach, sugarcane, sweet potato, tomato, turnip, as well as many other plants. An extensive listing of hosts of the greasy cutworm may be found in (Rings et al. 1975). The extensive and continuous use of synthetic pesticides in control of agricultural pests have created many problems, one of them is the incapability of toxic agents in controlling the target pests at the recommended doses. Therefore, it was of great interest to investigate some alternative methods as substitutes for insecticides in the control of this pest. Among these methods, is the irradiation, plant extracts and oils. Irradiation techniques seem to offer solutions that are desirable in many aspects, contributing that this treatment should eventually prove to be cheaper, safer and more reliable than chemical control. Irradiation shortens life span of insects (Baxter and Blair, 1969), possibly by accelerating senescence (Aly et al., 1996). Irradiation may also cause protein denaturation, which may impair enzyme activity (Ljubenov and Andreev, 1974) and (Tribe and Webb, 1979 a, b, c). According to (Kinipling, 1955), insect exposure to ionizing radiation causes sterilization through induction of dominates lethal mutation in the genetic structure of organisms. This technique to be successful control device for suppressing and combating many lepidopteraus insect pests, including Agrotis ipsilon has been studied

  6. Action of sulfured radioprotectors on spontaneous cerebral electric activity of implanted chronic non irradiated adult rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatome, M.

    In a previous study, the radioprotective action of serotonin on central nervous system of lethal dose irradiated rabbit had been determined. In the present study, the possibilities of sulfured radioprotectors were considered in order to see if these products have by themselves an action on central nervous system of non irradiated animals [fr

  7. Repair of potentially lethal radiation damage: comparison of neutron and x-ray RBE and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Kraljevic, U.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments with Chinese hamster cells have shown that neutron irradiation does not result in repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD), i.e., that which can be influenced by changes in environmental conditions following irradiation. Since PLD is presumed to be repaired in tumors but not in normal tissues, this absence of differential sparing of tumor cells relative to normal tissues--a feature characteristic of irradiation with x rays--represents an advantage of neutrons in addition to their reduced oxygen effect. At a given dose, the difference in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) between tumors and normal tissues corresponds to a 5 percent increase in tumor dose with no concomitant increase in dose to normal tissues, which could be significant in cancer therapy

  8. Protective effect of Asparagus racemosus root extract against lethal total - body electron beam radiation induced damage in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharmila, K.P.; Bhandary, B. Satheesh Kumar; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Bhat, Vadish S.; Shetty, Jayaram; Peter, Alex John; Jose, Jerish M.; Fernandes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the protective effect of Asparagus Racemosus Root ethanolic extract (ARE) in Swiss albino mice against acute lethal total - body Electron beam irradiation. Swiss Albino mice were used for the assessment of radiation induced sickness and 30 day survival analysis. Survival studies were determined using the Kaplan-Meier survival curves. The maximum survival was observed in the experimental mice pretreated with 200 mg/kg.b.wt. of ARE which also reduced the radiation sickness characteristics. This dose was considered as an optimal dose for radioprotection. Treatment of mice with ARE before irradiation delayed the onset of mortality as compared with the untreated irradiated controls. Present findings demonstrate the potential of ARE in mitigating radiation-induced mortality, which may be attributed to its free radical scavenging and increased antioxidant potential

  9. Lethal and mutagenic effects of radiation and chemicals on cultured fish cells derived the erythrophoroma of goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitani, H. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Zoology)

    1983-01-01

    GEM 199 cells derived from an eryhtrophoroma of goldfish (Carassius auratus), which had a high plating efficiency, were used to investigate the lethal and mutational effects of radiations (UV and ..gamma..-rays) and chemicals (4NQO and MNNG). The cells were more resistant to rays than mammalian cells and CAF-MM1 cells derived from the normal fin tissue of goldfish. They were also more resistant to UV-irradiation than CAF-MM1 cells. Photoreactivation after UV-irradiation was present in GEM 199 cells for both survival and mutation. The initial shoulder of the survival curve of UV-irradiated cells was reduced greatly by caffeine, suggesting a high activity of the post-replication repair. The spontaneous mutation frequency to ouabain resistance was 1-5x10/sup -6/ clones per viable cell. MNNG was effective in inducing ouabain-resistant mutation, while 4NQO and ..gamma..-rays did not induce mutation.

  10. The involvement of IL-17A in the murine response to sub-lethal inhalational infection with Francisella tularensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Markel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is an intercellular bacterium often causing fatal disease when inhaled. Previous reports have underlined the role of cell-mediated immunity and IFNgamma in the host response to Francisella tularensis infection.Here we provide evidence for the involvement of IL-17A in host defense to inhalational tularemia, using a mouse model of intranasal infection with the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS. We demonstrate the kinetics of IL-17A production in lavage fluids of infected lungs and identify the IL-17A-producing lymphocytes as pulmonary gammadelta and Th17 cells. The peak of IL-17A production appears early during sub-lethal infection, it precedes the peak of immune activation and the nadir of the disease, and then subsides subsequently. Exogenous airway administration of IL-17A or of IL-23 had a limited yet consistent effect of delaying the onset of death from a lethal dose of LVS, implying that IL-17A may be involved in restraining the infection. The protective role for IL-17A was directly demonstrated by in vivo neutralization of IL-17A. Administration of anti IL-17A antibodies concomitantly to a sub-lethal airway infection with 0.1xLD(50 resulted in a fatal disease.In summary, these data characterize the involvement and underline the protective key role of the IL-17A axis in the lungs from inhalational tularemia.

  11. Preliminary report on the sensitivity of tea plant to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Lijuan

    1985-01-01

    The seeds of different varieties of tea have been irradiated. In most cases the rate of emergence of seedings was delayed and the rate of emergence of seedlings was decreased with increasing the radiation doses. The more suitable doses for tea seeds were 5 Krads, and the lethal dose is over 7 Krads. Except for the variety Fudingdabai, the survival rate of cuttings was decreased and its growth rate was reduced with increasing the radiation doses. The applicable dose and the lethal dose for cuttings were 0.5-1 Krads and 2 Krads respectively. Irradiation with low dose (below 4 Krads) give a good effect in the germination of pollen. The semilethal dose for pollen is 12 Krads, and the lethal dose is more than 20 Krads

  12. Genotoxicity test of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Noriho

    2004-01-01

    Safety tests of radiation irradiated foods started as early as from 1967 in Japan and genotoxicity tests in the Hatano Res. Inst., from 1977. The latter is unique in the world and is reviewed in this paper. Tests included those for the initial injury of DNA, mutagenicity, chromosomal aberration and transformation with use of bacteria, cultured mammalian cells and animals (for chromosomal aberration, micronucleus formation and dominant lethality). Foods tested hitherto were onion, rice, wheat and flour, Vienna sausage, fish sausage (kamaboko), mandarian orange, potato, black pepper and red capsicum, of which extract or powder was subjected to the test. Irradiation doses and its purposes were 0.15-6 kGy γ-ray ( 60 Co) or electron beam by the accelerator (only for the orange), and suppression of germination, pesticide action or sterilization, respectively. Genotoxicity of all foods under tested conditions is shown negative. (N.I.)

  13. A new type of lethal short-limbed dwarfism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nairn, E.R.; Chapman, S.

    1989-01-01

    Details are presented of a most unusual osteo-chondrodysplasia which presents with lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism, defective ossification and nodular calcification with cartilage. The features resemble one case previously described in the literature. (orig.)

  14. Back to the future: revisiting HIV-1 lethal mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapp, Michael J.; Patterson, Steven E.; Mansky, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of eliminating HIV-1 infectivity by elevating the viral mutation rate was first proposed over a decade ago, even though the general concept had been conceived earlier for RNA viruses. Lethal mutagenesis was originally viewed as a novel chemotherapeutic approach for treating HIV-1 infection in which use of a viral mutagen would over multiple rounds of replication lead to the lethal accumulation of mutations, rendering the virus population non infectious – known as the slow mutation accumulation model. There have been limitations in obtaining good efficacy data with drug leads, leaving some doubt into clinical translation. More recent studies of the APOBEC3 proteins as well as new progress in the use of nucleoside analogs for inducing lethal mutagenesis have helped to refocus attention on rapid induction of HIV-1 lethal mutagenesis in a single or limited number of replication cycles leading to a rapid mutation accumulation model. PMID:23195922

  15. New type of lethal short-limbed dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nairn, E.R.; Chapman, S.

    1989-05-01

    Details are presented of a most unusual osteo-chondrodysplasia which presents with lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism, defective ossification and nodular calcification with cartilage. The features resemble one case previously described in the literature.

  16. Quantitative determination of the contribution of indirect and direct radiation action to the production of lethal lesions in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlit, W.; Drenkard, S.

    1985-01-01

    For quantitative models of radiation action in living cells it is necessary to know what fraction of the absorbed dose affects the target molecule by direct radiation action and what fraction by indirect radiation action. Mammalian cells were irradiated in suspension, saturated with N 2 O or CO 2 . With these gases the production of OH-radicals is changed by a factor of two in aqueous solutions and a corresponding change in cell survival would be expected, if only indirect radiation action is involved in the production of lethal lesions in the living cell. No difference could be detected, however, and it is concluded that indirect radiation action does not contribute to radiation lethality in mammalian cells. (author)

  17. Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease presenting as hydrops fetalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenHamida, Emira; Ayadi, Imene; Ouertani, Ines; Chammem, Maroua; Bezzine, Ahlem; BenTmime, Riadh; Attia, Leila; Mrad, Ridha; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease is very rare and is considered a variant of type 2 Gaucher disease that occurs in the neonatal period. The most distinct features of perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease are non-immune hydrops fetalis. Less common signs of the disease are hepatosplenomegaly, ichthyosis and arthrogryposis. We report a case of Gaucher's disease (type 2) diagnosed in a newborn who presented with Hydrops Fetalis.

  18. Conflict Without Casualties: Non-Lethal Weapons in Irregular Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    the body,” and the Geneva Protocol of 1925, bans the use of chemical and biological weapons .11 On 8 April 1975, President Ford issued Executive...E Funding – PE 63851M) (accessed 15 December 2006). The American Journal of Bioethics . “Medical Ethics and Non-Lethal Weapons .” Bioethics.net...CASUALTIES: NON-LETHAL WEAPONS IN IRREGULAR WARFARE by Richard L. Scott September 2007 Thesis Advisor: Robert McNab Second Reader

  19. Non-Lethal Weapons: Opportunities for R&D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    during the Vietnam War. US; emulsifying agents are used in food processing, drilling fluids, cosmetics , pharmaceuticals, heavy- duty cleaners, textile...conducted in a professional manner, with no threat to public safety or the environment. 11 References [1] Fenton , G., (2001). NLW Technology Taxonomy...W.A., Mason, R.L., Collins, K.R., (2000). Non-Lethal Applicants of Slippery Substances. NDIA Non-Lethal Defense IV. [24] Fenton , G., (2000). Overview

  20. Lethal synergy involving bicyclomycin: an approach for reviving old antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Muhammad; Li, Liping; Zhao, Xilin; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Drlica, Karl

    2014-12-01

    One way to address the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance is to revive old compounds that may have intrinsic lethal activity that is obscured by protective factors. Bicyclomycin is an old inhibitor of the Rho transcription terminator that by itself shows little rapid lethal activity. However, bicyclomycin participates in bacteriostatic synergy, which raises the possibility that conditions for lethal synergy may exist, perhaps through a suppression of protective factors. Bicyclomycin was combined with bacteriostatic inhibitors of gene expression, and bactericidal activity was measured with several cultured Gram-negative pathogens. When used alone, bicyclomycin failed to rapidly kill growing cultures of Escherichia coli; however, the additional presence of bacteriostatic concentrations of tetracycline, chloramphenicol or rifampicin led to rapid killing. Four other pathogen species, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and Shigella dysenteriae, also exhibited enhanced killing when bicyclomycin was combined with tetracycline or rifampicin. This lethal synergy was achieved at low concentrations (slightly above the MIC) for all agents tested in combinations. Follow-up work with E. coli indicated that lethal synergy arose from a blockage of transcription elongation. Moreover, lethal synergy was reduced when bicyclomycin was added 60 min before tetracycline, suggesting that bicyclomycin induces a protective factor. The action of bicyclomycin illustrates the potential present in a largely abandoned antibacterial agent; it exhibits lethal synergy when coadministered with known, bacteriostatic inhibitors of gene expression. The identification of protective factors, which are currently uncharacterized, may reveal new ways to promote the lethal action of some old antibiotics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved

  1. Sonographic features of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome at 14 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Chan, Gavin Shueng Wai; Lee, Chin Peng; Tang, Mary Hoi Yin

    2005-06-01

    Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome is a rare inherited disorder. Previous reports suggest that the diagnosis may be based on prenatal sonographic demonstration of severe limb flexion, absence of fetal motion, and a large cystic hygroma in the second and third trimesters. We present the sonographic features and postmortem features of a fetus with lethal multiple pterygium syndrome at 13 weeks of gestation, which shows that the condition can possibly be diagnosed in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  2. Physiological alterations in UV-irradiated cells: liquid holding recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragao, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    The biochemical and physiological alterations that occur in ultraviolet irradiated cells, during liquid holding have been studied. Incubation in buffer acts not to interfer directly with the mechanic repairs but by promoting metabolic alterations that would block some irreversible and lethal physiological responses. (L.M.J.) [pt

  3. Glucorticoids/insulin ratio in irradiated animal blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizina, T.Yu.

    1990-01-01

    Similar changes in blood levels of immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and glucocorticoids (GC) were observed in rats, mice and dogs after X-irradiation with lethal doses. The use of the blood GC/IRI ratio indices in estimating the functional status of the exposed organism is discussed

  4. Foodstuff irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Report written on behalf of the Danish Food Institute summarizes national and international rules and developments within food irradiation technology, chemical changes in irradiated foodstuffs, microbiological and health-related aspects of irradiation and finally technological prospects of this conservation form. Food irradiatin has not been hitherto applied in Denmark. Radiation sources and secondary radiation doses in processed food are characterized. Chemical changes due to irradiation are compared to those due to p.ex. food heating. Toxicological and microbiological tests and their results give no unequivocal answer to the problem whether a foodstuff has been irradiated. The most likely application fields in Denmark are for low radiation dosis inhibition of germination, riping delay and insecticide. Medium dosis (1-10 kGy) can reduce bacteria number while high dosis (10-50 kGy) will enable total elimination of microorganisms and viruses. Food irradiation can be acceptable as technological possibility with reservation, that further studies follow. (EG)

  5. Associations between tumor types in irradiated BALB/c female mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storer, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Associations between pairs of 12 different tumor types were estimated for a population of over 3800 irradiated BALB/c female mice. The associations were adjusted for age and radiation dose. Of the 66 pairs of tumor types, 21 showed significant positive or negative associations. Of these, 8 were considered to be spurious, principally because one or both of the tumors was rapidly lethal, leading to an apparent negative association. Six of the remaining 13 significant associations involed tumors of endocrine organs or tumors known to be endocrine related. Six others involved associations between lung, vascular tissue, or reticular tissue tumors, and tumors of endocrine organs. The remaining and highly negative association was between reticulum cell sarcomas and other lymphomas and leukemias. It was concluded that in irradiated female mice of this strain, at least, tumors are not independent and that alterations in host factors (principally endocrine) lead to animals developing both tumors (positive associations) or to one tumor but not the other (negative associations)

  6. Hemibody irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schen, B.C.; Mella, O.; Dahl, O.

    1992-01-01

    In a large number of cancer patients, extensive skeletal metastases or myelomatosis induce vast suffering, such as intolerable pain and local complications of neoplastic bone destruction. Analgetic drugs frequently do not yield sufficient palliation. Irradiation of local fields often has to be repeated, because of tumour growth outside previously irradiated volumes. Wide field irradiation of the lower or upper half of the body causes significant relief of pain in most patients. Adequate pretreatment handling of patients, method of irradiation, and follow-up are of importance to reduce side effects, and are described as they are carried out at the Department of Oncology, Haukeland Hospital, Norway. 16 refs., 2 figs

  7. Recommendations for the use of irradiated components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The disease 'graft-versus-host' associated with the transfusion (EIVH TA) is an adverse reaction rare but fatal, linked to the proliferation of T cells that are found in cellular components and reacting against the receptor's tissues). Gamma irradiation of cellular components is used as a prevention method because it deactivates the lymphocytes T by reducing its survival and by restraining its proliferation without producing alterations in others cells function. Recommendations for the use of gamma irradiation along with clinical indications for pediatric patients, patients with acquired immunosuppression and immunocompetent patients are given in this study. A brief description of operative aspects of irradiation procedures such as components to be irradiated, irradiation method, irradiation dose and viability of irradiated components is given [es

  8. Pretreatment with ascorbic acid prevents lethal gastrointestinal syndrome in mice receiving a massive amount of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kinoshita, Manabu; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Hiroi, Sadayuki; Sugasawa, Hidekazu; Majima, Takashi; Seki, Shuhji; Matsushita, Yoshitaro; Saitoh, Daizoh

    2010-01-01

    While bone marrow or stem cell transplantation can rescue bone marrow aplasia in patients accidentally exposed to a lethal radiation dose, radiation-induced irreversible gastrointestinal damage (GI syndrome) is fatal. We investigated the effects of ascorbic acid on radiation-induced GI syndrome in mice. Ascorbic acid (150 mg/kg/day) was orally administered to mice for 3 days, and then the mice underwent whole body irradiation (WBI). Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) 24 h after irradiation rescued mice receiving a WBI dose of less than 12 Gy. No mice receiving 14 Gy-WBI survived, because of radiation-induced GI syndrome, even if they received BMT. However, pretreatment with ascorbic acid significantly suppressed radiation-induced DNA damage in the crypt cells and prevented denudation of intestinal mucosa; therefore, ascorbic acid in combination with BMT rescued mice after 14 Gy-WBI. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that irradiation up-regulated expressions of apoptosis-related genes in the small intestine, including those related to the caspase-9-mediated intrinsic pathway as well as the caspase-8-mediated extrinsic pathway, and down-regulated expressions of these genes in ascorbic acid-pretreated mice. Thus, pretreatment with ascorbic acid may effectively prevent radiation-induced GI syndrome. (author)

  9. Evidence for a decreased susceptibility to acute radiation lethality in young lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, P B [Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lower Hutt (New Zealand). Inst. of Nuclear Sciences; Pfeffer, A T [Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Upper Hutt (New Zealand). Wallaceville Animal Research Centre

    1980-08-01

    The survival of 2- to 4-day old Romney-lambs was studied following bilateral /sup 60/Co irradiation at about 3.5 R/min (the exposure rate in air at the mid-line of the animal). Probit analysis of the data yielded an LDsub(50/60) of 900 R with 95% confidence limits of 700-1150 R. Mature sheep irradiated under similar conditions are known to have an LDsub(50/60) in the region of 250-350 R. These data indicate that very young lambs were less susceptible to radiation-induced hemopoietic failure than adults. Dorset Horn lambs and Romneys born by caesarian section also exhibited low susceptibility when irradiated at 2-4 days of age. There are few data available on LD/sub 50/ values for very young, large mammals (as opposed to rodents). Consideration must be given to the possibility that large mammals may be less sensitive to radiation-induced lethality shortly after birth than they are at maturity. Further work on the radiation response as a function of age after birth seems warranted and suggestions for some of the parameters which require investigation are made.

  10. Blue light induced reactive oxygen species from flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide on lethality of HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Yeh; Chang, Chih-Jui; Chen, Liang-Yü

    2017-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a safe and non-invasive treatment for cancers and microbial infections. Various photosensitizers and light sources have been developed for clinical cancer therapies. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are the cofactor of enzymes and are used as photosensitizers in this study. Targeting hypoxia and light-triggering reactive oxygen species (ROS) are experimental strategies for poisoning tumor cells in vitro. HeLa cells are committed to apoptosis when treated with FMN or FAD and exposed to visible blue light (the maximum emitted wavelength of blue light is 462nm). Under blue light irradiation at 3.744J/cm 2 (=0.52mW/cm 2 irradiated for 2h), the minimal lethal dose is 3.125μM and the median lethal doses (LD 50 ) for FMN and FAD are 6.5μM and 7.2μM, respectively. Individual exposure to visible blue light irradiation or riboflavin photosensitizers does not produce cytotoxicity and no side effects are observed in this study. The western blotting results also show that an intrinsic apoptosis pathway is activated by the ROS during photolysis of riboflavin analogues. Blue light triggers the cytotoxicity of riboflavins on HeLa cells in vitro. Based on these results, this is a feasible and efficient of PDT with an intrinsic photosensitizer for cancer research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lethal effects of solar radiation in proficient and deficient bacteria in repair systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa Neto, A. de.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the lethal action of solar radiation on strains of E.coli K12, proficient or deficient in repair systems, as well as the wild type strain gene products are involved in repair of damage induced by solar radiation. The inactivation of the various bacterial strains (normalized to a dose equivalent to radiation at a wavelength 254 nm) suggests that the more energetic wavelengths of the solar spectrum (290-320 nm) could be responsible for the primary damage that occurs in the DNA. The reduction in the shoulder of the survival curve in wild type strains in indicative of induction of sub-lethal damage in this region of the curve. Analysing solar inactivation curves of the bacterial strains (normalised by spore dosimetry) together with those of the same strains irradiated with UV at 254 nm, it was evident that 254 nm is not the ideal wavelength for comparison. This analysis also indicated that in addition to damage to DNA, other factors are involved in the solar radiation inactivation of wild type strains. (author)

  12. Effect of sulfhydryls on potentiation of radiation-induced cell lethality by substituted anthraquinones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimler, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of various substituted anthraquinones (SAQ's) and Adriamycin (ADR) were investigated in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells. These drugs cause a potentiation of radiation-induced cell lethality, albeit by different mechanisms. One possibility is that these components operate through the production of free radicals which then produce DNA strand breaks and crosslinks. If so, then one should be able to change the degree of cell kill by modifying sulfhydryl (SH) levels such that free radical processes are altered. Diamide, buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine, and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) were used to reduce intracellular SH levels. Cysteamine and dithiotheitol were used to increase SH levels. In general, altered SH levels did not affect SAQ-induced cytotoxicity at low drug concentrations. When drug-tested cells were also irradiated, survival levels were generally those predicted from assuming purely additive interactions. On the other hand, survival after treatment with high concentrations of ADR and one other SAQ were decreased by concomitant treatment with NEM. Since altered SH levels do not produce changes in the potentiation of radiation-induced cell lethality by SAQs, it is concluded that free radicals are not involved in this potentiation. A free radical-mediated process may be involved in the cytotoxicity induced by ADR and other SAQs; however, it is not a simple process

  13. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercader, J.P.; Emily Leong

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Akira

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews researches, commentaries, and conference and public records of food irradiation, published mainly during the period 1987-1989, focusing on the current conditions of food irradiation that may pose not only scientific or technologic problems but also political issues or consumerism. Approximately 50 kinds of food, although not enough to fill economic benefit, are now permitted for food irradiation in the world. Consumerism is pointed out as the major factor that precludes the feasibility of food irradiation in the world. In the United States, irradiation is feasible only for spices. Food irradiation has already been feasible in France, Hollands, Belgium, and the Soviet Union; has under consideration in the Great Britain, and has been rejected in the West Germany. Although the feasibility of food irradiation is projected to increase gradually in the future, commercial success or failure depends on the final selection of consumers. In this respect, the role of education and public information are stressed. Meat radicidation and recent progress in the method for detecting irradiated food are referred to. (N.K.) 128 refs

  15. Irradiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Akira

    1977-01-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures. (Kanao, N.)

  16. Irradiation proctitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, A [Osaka Kita Tsishin Hospital (Japan)

    1977-06-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures.

  17. Influence of gamma radiation on the levels of polyphenols and lethality of ethanol extracts of Anacardium occidentale Linn., against Biomphalaria glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.H.F.; Silva, E.B.; Melo, A.M.M.A.; Lima, C.S.A; Amorim, E.L.C.; Peixoto Sobrinho, T.J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Plant materials rich in phenolic compounds, such as Anacardium occidentale Linn., Have been used as alternatives to synthetic pesticides in Biomphalaria glabrata control programs, intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni. Studies show that ionizing radiation can influence the content of phenolic compounds and thus their biological actions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of gamma radiation of 60 Co in polyphenol composition of hydroalcoholic extracts of bark and leaves of A. occidentale and evaluate the toxicity of these extracts to embryos and adults of B. glabrata. To achieve this goal this, the extracts were irradiated at 10 kGy, the controls being maintained from 0 kGy and positive (CaCO 3 ) and negative (H 2 O). We quantified the total phenols by the Folin-Ciocalteau and tannins by precipitation of casein. Extracts were used at a concentration of 100 mg/L. The results showed that the radiation caused the changes to the leaves, the percentage of polyphenols and tannins, and the percentage of lethality in embryos and adults Biomphalaria glabrata, these percentages being: 13 ± 5 (0 kGy) and 27 ± 2.5 (10 kGy), and 36.67 ± 5.77 (0 kGy), and 56.67 ± 5.77 (10 kGy), respectively. Gamma radiation caused significant changes in the levels of polyphenols in the extracts of leaves of Anacardium ocidentale Linn., translated by the increased toxicity of this extract against embryos and adults of Biomphalaria glabrata. This indicates that gamma radiation can be used as an agent potentiating the toxicity of plant extracts on the alternate use of these materials as molluscicides. (author)

  18. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kikuchi, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Food irradiation can have a number of beneficial effects, including prevention of sprouting; control of insects, parasites, pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, moulds and yeasts; and sterilization, which enables commodities to be stored for long periods. It is most unlikely that all these potential applications will prove commercially acceptable; the extend to which such acceptance is eventually achieved will be determined by practical and economic considerations. A review of the available scientific literature indicates that food irradiation is a thoroughly tested food technology. Safety studies have so far shown no deleterious effects. Irradiation will help to ensure a safer and more plentiful food supply by extending shelf-life and by inactivating pests and pathogens. As long as requirement for good manufacturing practice are implemented, food irradiation is safe and effective. Possible risks of food irradiation are not basically different from those resulting from misuse of other processing methods, such as canning, freezing and pasteurization. (author)

  19. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  20. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  1. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  2. Characterization of Toxoplasma DegP, a rhoptry serine protease crucial for lethal infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle Lentini

    Full Text Available During the infection process, Apicomplexa discharge their secretory organelles called micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules to sustain host cell invasion, intracellular replication and to modulate host cell pathways and immune responses. Herein, we describe the Toxoplasma gondii Deg-like serine protein (TgDegP, a rhoptry protein homologous to High temperature requirement A (HtrA or Deg-like family of serine proteases. TgDegP undergoes processing in both types I and II strains as most of the rhoptries proteins. We show that genetic disruption of the degP gene does not impact the parasite lytic cycle in vitro but affects virulence in mice. While in a type I strain DegPI appears dispensable for the establishment of an infection, removal of DegPII in a type II strain dramatically impairs the virulence. Finally, we show that KO-DegPII parasites kill immunodeficient mice as efficiently as the wild-type strain indicating that the protease might be involved in the complex crosstalk that the parasite engaged with the host immune response. Thus, this study unravels a novel rhoptry protein in T. gondii important for the establishment of lethal infection.

  3. Role of natural killer cells in innate protection against lethal ebola virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfield, Kelly L; Perkins, Jeremy G; Swenson, Dana L; Deal, Emily M; Bosio, Catharine M; Aman, M Javad; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Young, Howard A; Bavari, Sina

    2004-07-19

    Ebola virus is a highly lethal human pathogen and is rapidly driving many wild primate populations toward extinction. Several lines of evidence suggest that innate, nonspecific host factors are potentially critical for survival after Ebola virus infection. Here, we show that nonreplicating Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), containing the glycoprotein (GP) and matrix protein virus protein (VP)40, administered 1-3 d before Ebola virus infection rapidly induced protective immunity. VLP injection enhanced the numbers of natural killer (NK) cells in lymphoid tissues. In contrast to live Ebola virus, VLP treatment of NK cells enhanced cytokine secretion and cytolytic activity against NK-sensitive targets. Unlike wild-type mice, treatment of NK-deficient or -depleted mice with VLPs had no protective effect against Ebola virus infection and NK cells treated with VLPs protected against Ebola virus infection when adoptively transferred to naive mice. The mechanism of NK cell-mediated protection clearly depended on perforin, but not interferon-gamma secretion. Particles containing only VP40 were sufficient to induce NK cell responses and provide protection from infection in the absence of the viral GP. These findings revealed a decisive role for NK cells during lethal Ebola virus infection. This work should open new doors for better understanding of Ebola virus pathogenesis and direct the development of immunotherapeutics, which target the innate immune system, for treatment of Ebola virus infection.

  4. In Vitro Repair of UV-Irradiated Micrococcus luteus Bacteriophage N1 Transfecting DNA 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Inga; George, Jeanne; Grossman, Lawrence

    1974-01-01

    Calcium-treated UV-sensitive, host cell reactivation− strains of Micrococcus luteus are infected with UV-irradiated N1 DNA. In strains lacking UV endonuclease, in vitro treatment of the irradiated DNA results in transfection enhancement. PMID:4823319

  5. Lethal Effect on Bacterium of Decay of Incorporated Radioactive Atoms (3H, 14C, 32P)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelgot, Sonia

    1968-01-01

    The biological effect of decay of 3 H, 14 C and 32 P incorporated into a bacterium depends on the nature of the organic molecule labelled, on the position of the isotope within it and on the isotope itself. In sum, results obtained to date show that: The decay of 3 H atoms incorporated into certain macromolecules of a bacterium causes sterilization through ionization by the ß - particle emitted; transmutation is of negligible importance. This self-irradiation is comparable in effect with X-rays and is affected in a similar manner by the same factors: temperature, presence of a radioprotector, radiosensitivity of the strain. Decay of 14 C or 32 P atoms incorporated into bacterial DNA is lethal because of the transmutation effect; ionizations produced by emitted ß - particles may be disregarded. Survival curves for 32 P transmutations depend on the experimental conditions. Some of the results obtained with 32 P are similar to those obtained with X-rays, e.g. effects of temperature, radical capture and oxygen, while others are similar to those of u.v. light, e.g., effect of growth conditions. Comparative tests made with 32 P indicate that the recoil energy of transmutation is not the phenomenon responsible for the lethal effect observed. Comparison of the results obtained after X-irradiation or decay of 3 H or 32 P incorporated into the DNA of bacteria of the same strain of E. coli shows that the efficiency of a 32 P transmutation is about four times greater than that of an ionization produced at random within the same DNA. (author) [fr

  6. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkum, Kelsey L; Stemler, Kristina M; White, Lynn S; Loza, Andrew J; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-12-22

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy.

  7. Empirical complexities in the genetic foundations of lethal mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James J; Joyce, Paul; Gladstone, Eric; Molineux, Ian J

    2013-10-01

    From population genetics theory, elevating the mutation rate of a large population should progressively reduce average fitness. If the fitness decline is large enough, the population will go extinct in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. Lethal mutagenesis has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach to viral treatment, and several in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. Yet only one empirical study has tested the genetic models underlying lethal mutagenesis, and the theory failed on even a qualitative level. Here we provide a new level of analysis of lethal mutagenesis by developing and evaluating models specifically tailored to empirical systems that may be used to test the theory. We first quantify a bias in the estimation of a critical parameter and consider whether that bias underlies the previously observed lack of concordance between theory and experiment. We then consider a seemingly ideal protocol that avoids this bias-mutagenesis of virions-but find that it is hampered by other problems. Finally, results that reveal difficulties in the mere interpretation of mutations assayed from double-strand genomes are derived. Our analyses expose unanticipated complexities in testing the theory. Nevertheless, the previous failure of the theory to predict experimental outcomes appears to reside in evolutionary mechanisms neglected by the theory (e.g., beneficial mutations) rather than from a mismatch between the empirical setup and model assumptions. This interpretation raises the specter that naive attempts at lethal mutagenesis may augment adaptation rather than retard it.

  8. A multivariate model of stakeholder preference for lethal cat management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Dara M; Jacobson, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n=1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI=0.94, RMSEA=0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (pstakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management.

  9. Todralazine protects zebra fish from lethal doses of ionizing radiation: role of hematopoietic stem cell expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimri, Manali; Joshi, Jaidev; Indracanti, Prem Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Radiation induced cell killing and hematopoietic stem cell depletion leads to compromised immune functions and opportunistic infections which significantly affect the recovery and survival upon irradiation. Any agent which can expand residual hematopoietic stem cells in irradiated organism can render protection from the effects of lethal doses of ionizing radiation. Johns Hopkins Clinical compound library (JHCCL) was screened for protection against lethal doses of ionizing radiation using developing zebra fish as a model organism. Modulation of radiation induced reactive oxygen species by the small molecules were done by DCFDA staining and for visual identification and quantification of apoptosis acridine orange assay, flow cytometry were employed respectively. Hematopoietic stem cell expansion potential was assessed by quantifying runx1 expression, a marker for definitive stem cells, were done by RT-PCR and by the kinetics of recovery from chemically induced anaemia. Todralazine hydrochloride from JHCCL exhibited promising results with potential anti radiation effects. A dose of 5μM was found to be the most effective and has rendered significant organ and whole body protection (100% survival advantage over a period of 6 days) against 20 Gy. However todralazine did not modulated radiation induced free radicals (monitored within 2 h of irradiation) and apoptosis in zebra fish embryos analysed at 8 and 24h post irradiation. Flow cytometric quantification of pre G1 population suggested the same. Chemoinformatics approaches were further carried out to elucidate possible targets which are contributing to its radioprotection potential. Structural similarity search suggested several targets and possible hematopoietic stem cell expanding potential. Treatment of zebra fish embryos with todralazine has lead to significant proliferation of hematopoietic stem cell as indicated by increase in expression of runx1. HSC expanding potential of todralazine was further supported by

  10. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetherington, M.

    1989-01-01

    This popular-level article emphasizes that the ultimate health effects of irradiated food products are unknown. They may include vitamin loss, contamination of food by botulism bacteria, mutations in bacteria, increased production of aflatoxins, changes in food, carcinogenesis from unknown causes, presence of miscellaneous harmful chemicals, and the lack of a way of for a consumer to detect irradiated food. It is claimed that the nuclear industry is applying pressure on the Canadian government to relax labeling requirements on packages of irradiated food in order to find a market for its otherwise unnecessary products

  11. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecher, O.

    1979-01-01

    Limitations of existing preserving methods and possibilities of improved food preservation by application of nuclear energy are explained. The latest state-of-the-art in irradiation technology in individual countries is described and corresponding recommendations of FAO, WHO and IAEA specialists are presented. The Sulzer irradiation equipment for potato sprout blocking is described, the same equipment being suitable also for the treatment of onions, garlic, rice, maize and other cereals. Systems with a higher power degree are needed for fodder preserving irradiation. (author)

  12. Influence of whole-body irradiation on calcium and phosphate homeostasis in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pento, J.T.; Kenny, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    Previous irradiation studies have revealed marked alterations in calcium metabolism. Moreover, the maintenance of calcium homeostasis with parathyroid hormone or calcium salts has been reported to reduce radiation lethality. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the influence of irradiation on calcium homeostasis in the rat. Nine hundred rad of whole-body irradiation produced a significant depression of both plasma calcium and phosphate at 4 days postirradiation. This effect of irradiation was observed to be dose-dependent over a range of 600 to 1200 rad, and possibly related to irradiation-induced anorexia. The physiological significance of these observations is discussed

  13. Effects of lethal and non-lethal malaria on the mononuclear phagocyte system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Tosta

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects ofone non-lethal species ofmalarialparasite, Plasmodium yoelii, and one lethal species, P. berghei, on the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS of BALB/c mice were studied. P. yoelii caused a greater and more sustained expansion and activation of the MPS, and the two major populations of spleen phagocytic cells-red pulp and marginal zone macrophages - exhibited a greater increase in numbers in this infection. During the course of P. berghei mataria, the spleen was progressively occupied by haematopoietic tissue and, at the terminal stage of infection, an extensive depletion of lymphocytes and macrophages was apparent. The possibility was suggested that the outcome of mataria may be inftuenced by the particular way the parasite interacts with the MPS.Estudou-se o efeito da infecção causada por espécie letal (Plasmodium berghei e não- letal (P. yoelii de plasmódio sobre o sistema de fagócitos mononucleares de camundongo BALB/c. O P. yoelii causou maior e mais prolongada expansão e ativação do sistema de macrófagos. As duas mais importantes populações de fagócitos esplênicos - macrófagos de polpa vermelha e da zona marginal - exibiam maior aumento do número de células nesta infecção. Durante a evolução da malária por P. berghei, o baço foi progressivamente ocupado por tecido hematopoiético e, na fase terminal da infecção, observou-se significativa depleção dos linfócitos e macrófagos esplênicos. Os dados apresentados indicam que a evolução da malária depende do tipo de interação entre o plasmódio e o sistema de fagócitos mononucleares.

  14. Measurement of oxygen enhancement ratio for sub-lethal region using saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nairy, Rajesha K.; Anjaria, K.B.; Bhat, Nagesh N.; Chaurasia, Rajesh K.; Balakrishnan, Sreedevi; Yerol, Narayana

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen is one of the best known modifiers of radiation sensitivity and the biological effects is greater in the presence of oxygen, and significant modifying effect will be observed only for low LET radiations. The reduced oxygen availability is sensed which trigger homeostatic responses, which impact on virtually all areas of biology and medicine. Failure to achieve complete response following radiotherapy of large tumors is attributed to the presence of radio-resistant hypoxic cells, therefore clarifying the mechanism of the oxygen effect is important. In the present study, a mutant type diploid yeast strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7 was used to study Oxygen Enhancement Ratio (OER) using 60 Co gamma radiation. Cells were washed thrice by centrifugation (2000 g for 5 min) and re-suspended to a cell concentration of 1x108 cells mL-1 in a sterile polypropylene vial for irradiation (sub-lethal dose range, 0-100 Gy). Hypoxic conditions were achieved by incubating the cells in airtight vials at 30℃ for 30 min prior to irradiation. The gene conversion and back mutation analysis were carried out according to the standard protocol. Gene conversion is the radio-sensitive biological endpoint, that can be studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7 yeast cells at trp locus in tryptophan (Trp- medium) deficient medium. The dose response relation at euoxic and hypoxic condition in sub-lethal doses are found to be linear and is represented by Y (Euoxic) = (6.54±0.102) D with R2=0.999 and for hypoxic condition Y(Hypoxic) = (3.346±0.033) D with R2=0.996. The OER can be calculated by dividing the euoxic slope with hypoxic slope, and is 1.95. Back mutation, which is a result of reversion of Isoleucine auxotrophs to prototrophs gives very good information at sub-lethal doses. The dose response relation between back mutated cells and radiation doses at Euoxic and hypoxic condition can be represented as Y(Euoxic) = (2.85±0.126) D with R2= 0.976 and for hypoxic condition Y

  15. The LDsub(50/30) and the survival time in whole-body gamma-irradiated conventional and germfree Minnesota miniature piglets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, L.; Travnicek, J.; Talafantova, M.; Zahradnickova, M.

    1980-01-01

    The median lethal exposure causing the death in 30 days after single whole-body gamma-irradiation (the LD 50/30) was found to be 2731 MBq (73.8 mC/kg) for conventional piglets, but 3226 MBq (87.2 mC/kg) for germ-free piglets both irradiated 14 days after birth. After lethal exposures, the survival time in germ-free piglets was prolonged for 7 days in comparison with conventional piglets. (author)

  16. Analysis of time of death of prenatally lethal Steeloid mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinchik, E.M.; Cummings, C.C.; Bangham, J.W.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Phipps, E.L.; Stelzner, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Deletion mutations have been extremely useful in initiating the functional and molecular dissections of regions of the mouse genome. For the d-se and c regions, for example, it was observed that radiation mutations carrying lethal factors separable, by complementation analysis, from the primary d, se, or c mutation itself, could often be associated at both the genetic and molecular levels with multilocus chromosomal deletions. Since many of the Oak Ridge Sld mutations arose in radiation mutagenesis experiments, a substantial number may carry chromosomal deletions that involve the Sl locus in chromosome 10. Because of the great value of deletion mutations for the genetic and molecular analysis of chromosomal regions and complex genetic loci, they have initiated a series of experiments designed to test whether radiation-induced Sld mutations carry other lethal factors, in addition to the lethality caused by severe alleles of the Sl locus itself, as one prescreen for identifying Sld's that are caused by deletions

  17. Lethal, potentially lethal, and nonlethal damage induction by heavy ions in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, P.; Wood, J.C.; Walker, J.T.; Weiss, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    In the fields of high-LET radiotherapy and space radiation safety it is important to know the relative probabilities with which a cell whose nucleus is struck by a heavy ion will be damaged or killed. Experiments were performed in which synchronous cultured human T-1 cells (presumptive HeLa) were irradiated with natural alpha particles of energy approximately 3.5 MeV at various times after mitotic selection up to the middle of S phase. Nuclear-area histograms were determined as a function of time after mitosis under conditions identical to those used for irradiation. The efficiency with which one particle passing through the nucleus killed a cell was found to be 0.14-0.20. This value was extrapolated to experimental cell survival data obtained when asynchronous cultured human cells were irradiated with He, Li, B, C, N, O, Ne, Ar ions of energy 6.58 or 5.5 MeV/amu, and the cell killing efficiency was found to be in the broad range of 0.5-1.0 under single-hit conditions. Similarly irradiated cells were examined for colony-size distribution by an image analysis technique, and it was found that the loss of large colonies was dose and LET-dependent in a systematic way. Dose-response data suggest two predominant subpopulations, resistant and sensitive cells, and it appears that the sensitive population is affected by single-hit kinetics. The single-hit coefficient for the induction of inherited slow growth varied with LET in a similar way to that for survival. The action cross section for this form of heritable damage appears to be comparable to the geometric cross section of the cell nucleus

  18. Food irradiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetinkaya, N.

    1999-01-01

    Trade in food and agricultural products is important to all countries, the economies of many developing countries would be significantly improved if they were able to export more food and agricultural products. Unfortunately, many products can not be traded because they are infested with, or hosts to, harmful pests, contaminated with microorganisms, or spoil quickly. Foods contaminated with microorganisms cause economic losses, widespread illness and death. Several technologies and products have been developed to resolve problems in trading food and to improve food safety, but none can provide all the solutions. Irradiation is an effective technology to resolve technical problems in trade of many food and agricultural products, either as a stand- alone technology or in combination with others. As a disinfestation treatment it allows different levels of quarantine security to be targeted and it is one of few methods to control internal pests. The ability of irradiation virtually to eliminate key pathogenic organisms from meat, poultry, and spices is an important public health advantage. In addition to controlling pests and eliminating harmful bacteria, irradiation also extends the storage life of many foods. In the laboratories of Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, many research projects were completed on the effects of gamma irradiation to the storage life of chicken meat, anchovy, Turkish fermented sausage, dried and fresh fruits and vegetables and also research projects were conducted on the effects of gamma irradiation on microorganisms (Salmonella, Campylo-bacteria, E.coli and S.aureus in white and red meat) and parasites (food-borne, trichostrongylus spp. and Nematodes spp.)

  19. Determining lethal dose of gamma radiation on different stages of Tribolium Cosmonauts H b s t

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolfagharieh, H.R.; Majd, F.; Torshyzie, M.; Babaie, M.

    1992-10-01

    Pest infestation causes great losses to stored grain through out the world. This is specially true in developing countries where the technology is less advanced, and climatic conditions are extremely favourable for the development of pests. Irradiation is on approved method of direct control for stored-product insect in wheat and wheat flour in many countries, and in dictation are that it will soon be approved for all grain, grain products and other dry food commodities. Radiation doses required to kill or sterilized the most important storage pests in all stages are known. However irradiation is very effective in preventing insect development and in producing sterility. A detailed analysis of the radiosensitivity of stored-product insects shows the different groups of pests have very different sensitivities and quarantine doses can be tailored to kill or sterilize the species of quarantine concern. The effect of irradiation on insects are many, and varied, depending primarily on the species, stage, age and physical factors. The aim is to survey the effect of gamma radiation on stored pest, which can categorized under following classes: 1-The effect of gamma radiation on different stages grow of tribolium castaneum (H B S T); 2-Determination of lethal doses.; 3-The study of gamma radiation on products. In summary these information indicated that fairly low dosages of gamma radiation could be used on commodities such as bulk grain in which some infestation by insect stages of irradiation would be required on products such package foods where hundred percent mortality must be obtain. (author)

  20. Kupffer cell complement receptor clearance function and host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loegering, D J

    1986-01-01

    Kupffer cells are well known to be important for normal host defense function. The development of methods to evaluate the in vivo function of specific receptors on Kupffer cells has made it possible to assess the role of these receptors in host defense. The rationale for studying complement receptors is based on the proposed important role of these receptors in host defense and on the observation that the hereditary deficiency of a complement receptor is associated with recurrent severe bacterial infections. The studies reviewed here demonstrate that forms of injury that are associated with depressed host defense including thermal injury, hemorrhagic shock, trauma, and surgery also cause a decrease in complement receptor clearance function. This decrease in Kupffer cell receptor clearance function was shown not to be the result of depressed hepatic blood flow or depletion of complement components. Complement receptor function was also depressed following the phagocytosis of particulates that are known to depress Kupffer cell host defense function. Endotoxemia and bacteremia also were associated with a depression of complement receptor function. Complement receptor function was experimentally depressed in uninjured animals by the phagocytosis of IgG-coated erythrocytes. There was a close association between the depression of complement receptor clearance function and increased susceptibility to the lethal effects of endotoxin and bacterial infection. These studies support the hypotheses that complement receptors on Kupffer cells are important for normal host defense and that depression of the function of these receptors impairs host defense.

  1. An inhibitor of potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair reduces the frequency of γ-ray mutations in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoiyama, A.; Kada, T.; Kuroda, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Cordycepin (3'-deoxyadenosine, 3 - dA) is an RNA antimetabolite and a radiosensitizer in cultured mammalian cells. In the present paper, the effects of 3'-dA on γ-ray-induced lethality and 6-thioguanine (6TG)-resistant mutations in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells were examined. 3'-dA had the effect of sensitizing the lethality induced by γ-rays. The potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair produced by post-incubation cells in Hanks' solution after γ-irradiation was almost completely suppressed by 5x10 -5 M 3'-dA. When cells were irradiated with 10 Gy γ-rays and incubated with 3'-dA for 5 h, the frequency of 6TG-resistant mutations induced by γ-rays decreased to 1/6 of that of the irradiated cells incubated without 3'-dA. The decrease in the frequency of γ-ray-induced mutations was dependent on the length of incubation time with 3'-dA. It is suggested that the inhibition of PLD repair by 3'-dA may be that of error-prone repair. (author). 26 refs.; 5 figs

  2. Early events of lethal action by tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raulston, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The immediate activities of the aminoglycoside antibiotic, tobramycin, were investigated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The influence of carbon growth substate and the antibiotic exposure environment in the magnitude of activity were examined. Lethality by 8 μg/ml tobramycin occurred rapidly (1 to 3 minutes). The release of specific cellular components into the supernatant was associated with lethality. This material was initially detected as an increase in UV-absorbance. Magnesium in the reaction mixture provided protection against lethality and leakage, but did not reverse lethal damage after a 3 minute tobramycin treatment. Also, uptake of 3 H-tobramycin was reduced in the presence of magnesium. Cells grown with glucose as a carbon source were more susceptible than organic acid grown cells as was the rapidity and amount of cell damage. Analyses of the leakage material revealed a 2-fold increase of protein in the supernatant after a 1-3 minute treatment which paralleled lethality. A prominent 29 kDa protein was observed by SDS-PAGE in the released material, which has been identified as the periplasmic enzyme, β-lactamase. The immediate activities of tobramycin did not involve (i) release of overall cell protein, (ii) massive loss of total pool amino acids, (iii) cell lysis, (iv) inhibition of proline uptake, (v) release of lipopolysaccharide, or (vi) leakage of ATP. Electron microscopy showed no apparent damage after a 3 minute exposure. 40% inhibition of protein synthesis had occurred by 3 minutes of exposure, while release of UV-absorbing material and lethality were detectable after only 1 minute. Resistant cystic fibrosis isolates of P. aeruginosa did not leak under the same experimental conditions, but one of two susceptible strains examined did show increased UV-absorbance following treatment

  3. Impact of acute alcohol consumption on lethality of suicide methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C Hyung Keun; Yoo, Seong Ho; Lee, Jaewon; Cho, Sung Joon; Shin, Min-Sup; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Se Hyun; Ham, Keunsoo; Ahn, Yong Min

    2017-05-01

    The influence of acute alcohol consumption on the factors related to suicide remains understudied. Thus, the present study investigated the relationship between blood alcohol content (BAC) and the lethality of suicide methods. Autopsy data on 315 South Korean suicide completers with a positive BAC were collected from a nationwide pool between May 2015 and November 2015, and the methods were dichotomised as suicide methods of low lethality (SMLL; drug/chemical overdose and sharp objects, n=67) and suicide methods of high lethality (SMHL; everything else, n=243). BAC at the time of autopsy and various suicide-related factors of these two groups were compared with logistic regression analyses. Compared to suicide completers with a BAC in the lowest range of 0.011-0.049%, suicide completers with a BAC in the range of 0.150-0.199% were more likely to use SMHL (odds ratio [OR]: 3.644, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.221-10.874). Additionally, the adoption of SMHL was significantly associated with the absence of a psychiatric illness (OR: 0.433, 95% CI: 0.222-0.843) and a younger age; the OR for high BAC among subjects in their 40s was 0.266 (95% CI: 0.083-0.856); in their 50s, 0.183 (95% CI: 0.055-0.615); and in their 60s, 0.057 (95% CI: 0.015-0.216). The relationship between BAC and suicide method lethality was represented by a bell-shaped pattern in which suicide methods of high lethality were more likely to be used by suicide completers with mid-range BAC levels. The increased impulsivity and impairments in particular executive functions, including planning and organization, associated with acute alcohol use may influence the selection of a particular suicide method based on its lethality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    Food treatment by means of ionizing energy, or irradiation, is an innovative method for its preservation. In order to treat important volumes of food, it is necessary to have industrial irradiation installations. The effect of radiations on food is analyzed in the present special work and a calculus scheme for an Irradiation Plant is proposed, discussing different aspects related to its project and design: ionizing radiation sources, adequate civil work, security and auxiliary systems to the installations, dosimetric methods and financing evaluation methods of the project. Finally, the conceptual design and calculus of an irradiation industrial plant of tubercles is made, based on the actual needs of a specific agricultural zone of our country. (Author) [es

  5. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Food preservation by irradiation is one part of Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace program that is enjoying renewed interest. Classified as a food additive by the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1958 instead of a processing technique, irradiation lost public acceptance. Experiments have not been done to prove that there are no health hazards from gamma radiation, but there are new pressures to get Food and Drug Administration approval for testing in order to make commercial use of some radioactive wastes. Irradiation causes chemical reactions and nutritional changes, including the destruction of several vitamins, as well as the production of radiolytic products not normally found in food that could have adverse effects. The author concludes that, lacking epidemiological evidence, willing buyers should be able to purchase irradiated food as long as it is properly labeled

  6. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallman, Guy J.

    2012-01-01

    The history of the development of generic phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is discussed beginning with its initial proposal in 1986. Generic PI treatments in use today are 150 Gy for all hosts of Tephritidae, 250 Gy for all arthropods on mango and papaya shipped from Australia to New Zealand, 300 Gy for all arthropods on mango shipped from Australia to Malaysia, 350 Gy for all arthropods on lychee shipped from Australia to New Zealand and 400 Gy for all hosts of insects other than pupae and adult Lepidoptera shipped to the United States. Efforts to develop additional generic PI treatments and reduce the dose for the 400 Gy treatment are ongoing with a broad based 5-year, 12-nation cooperative research project coordinated by the joint Food and Agricultural Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency Program on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Key groups identified for further development of generic PI treatments are Lepidoptera (eggs and larvae), mealybugs and scale insects. A dose of 250 Gy may suffice for these three groups plus others, such as thrips, weevils and whiteflies. - Highlights: ► The history of phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is given. ► Generic PI treatments in use today are discussed. ► Suggestions for future research are presented. ► A dose of 250 Gy for most insects may suffice.

  7. Lethals induced by γ-radiation in drosophila somatic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Exposure of 3-hour drosophila male embryos to γ-radiation during the topographic segregation of the germ anlage nuclei caused recessive sex-linked lethals in somatic cells only. The selectivity of the screening was determined by the ratio of mutation frequencies induced in embryos and adult males. Analysis of lethal mutations shows that a minimal rate of the divergence between germinal and somatic patterns of the cell development is observed in the embryogenesis, the 3d instar larva and prepupa, and maximal in the 1st and 2nd larva and pupa

  8. Effective lethal mutagenesis of influenza virus by three nucleoside analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Matthew D; Lauring, Adam S

    2015-04-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum antiviral strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and low mutational tolerance of many RNA viruses. This approach uses mutagenic drugs to increase viral mutation rates and burden viral populations with mutations that reduce the number of infectious progeny. We investigated the effectiveness of lethal mutagenesis as a strategy against influenza virus using three nucleoside analogs, ribavirin, 5-azacytidine, and 5-fluorouracil. All three drugs were active against a panel of seasonal H3N2 and laboratory-adapted H1N1 strains. We found that each drug increased the frequency of mutations in influenza virus populations and decreased the virus' specific infectivity, indicating a mutagenic mode of action. We were able to drive viral populations to extinction by passaging influenza virus in the presence of each drug, indicating that complete lethal mutagenesis of influenza virus populations can be achieved when a sufficient mutational burden is applied. Population-wide resistance to these mutagenic agents did not arise after serial passage of influenza virus populations in sublethal concentrations of drug. Sequencing of these drug-passaged viral populations revealed genome-wide accumulation of mutations at low frequency. The replicative capacity of drug-passaged populations was reduced at higher multiplicities of infection, suggesting the presence of defective interfering particles and a possible barrier to the evolution of resistance. Together, our data suggest that lethal mutagenesis may be a particularly effective therapeutic approach with a high genetic barrier to resistance for influenza virus. Influenza virus is an RNA virus that causes significant morbidity and mortality during annual epidemics. Novel therapies for RNA viruses are needed due to the ease with which these viruses evolve resistance to existing therapeutics. Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and the low

  9. Dosimetry of blood irradiator - 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhatre, Sachin G.V.; Shinde, S.H.; Bhat, R.M.; Rao, Suresh; Sharma, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Blood transfusion to an immunodeficient or immunosuppressed patient has a high risk involved due to occurrence of Transfusion Graft Versus Host Disease (T-GVHD). In order to eliminate this problem, blood is routinely exposed to ionizing radiation (gamma) prior to transfusion. Doses ranging from 15 Gy to 50 Gy can prevent T-GVHD. Aim of the present work was to perform dosimetry of 60 Co Blood Irradiator-2000 developed by Board of Radiation and isotope Technology (BRIT), India; using FBX dosimetric system. Dose-rate measured by FBX dosimeter was intercompared with Fricke dosimeter, which is a Reference Standard dosimeter. Experiments included measurement of dose-rate at the centre of irradiation volume, dose mapping in the central vertical plane within the irradiation volume and measurement of average dose received by blood sample using blood bags filled with FBX dosimeter by simulating actual irradiation conditions. During irradiation, the sample chamber is retracted into a cylindrical source cage, so that the sample is irradiated from all sides uniformly. Blood irradiator-2000 has sample rotation facility for increasing the dose uniformity during irradiation. The performance of this was investigated by measuring the central vertical plane dose profile in stationary state as well in rotation using the sample rotation facility (60 rpm). FBX being an aqueous dosimetric system fills container of irregular shape being irradiated hence can be used to integrate the dose over the volume. Dose-rate measured by FBX dosimeter was intercompared with Fricke dosimeter, which was in good agreement. Average dose-rate at the centre of irradiation volume and within the blood bag was measured by FBX and Fricke dosimeters. It was observed that dose profiles measured by FBX and Fricke dosimeters agreed within ± 2%. Dose uniformity within the irradiation volume was found to reduce from 21% to 17% when the sample rotation facility was used. Thus, it is suggested by the

  10. Fruit irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Food spoilage is a common problem when marketing agricultural products. Promising results have already been obtained on a number of food irradiating applications. A process is described in this paper where irradiation of sub-tropical fruits, especially mangoes and papayas, combined with conventional heat treatment results in effective insect and fungal control, delays ripening and greatly improves the quality of fruit at both export and internal markets

  11. Studies on a possible using of penicillin and specific globulin for treatment of Siberia ulcer infection in irradiated animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'nikov, V.A.; Mal'tsev, V.N.

    1975-01-01

    The efficiency of anti-anthracic globulin and penicillin for treating infectious anthrax was compared in experiments on 160 guinea pigs and 400 white mice irradiated with sub-lethal doses of cobalt-60 gamma rays. It was found that penicillin retained its effectiveness in the irradiated animals whereas anti-anthracic globulin lost much of its therapeutic efficiency. (auth.)

  12. Tissue irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in-vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood-carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170

  13. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and The World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19 MeV, 1 kW) and industrial unit Electronika (10 MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permissions for irradiation for; spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. (author)

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Processing of food with low levels of radiation has the potential to contribute to reducing both spoilage of food during storage - a particular problem in developing countries - and the high incidence of food-borne disease currently seen in all countries. Approval has been granted for the treatment of more than 30 products with radiation in over 30 countries but, in general, governments have been slow to authorize the use of this new technique. One reason for this slowness is a lack of understanding of what food irradiation entails. This book aims to increase understanding by providing information on the process of food irradiation in simple, non-technical language. It describes the effects that irradiation has on food, and the plant and equipment that are necessary to carry it out safely. The legislation and control mechanisms required to ensure the safety of food irradiation facilities are also discussed. Education is seen as the key to gaining the confidence of the consumers in the safety of irradiated food, and to promoting understanding of the benefits that irradiation can provide. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab [de

  15. Comparison of six different models describing survival of mammalian cells after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sontag, W.

    1990-01-01

    Six different cell-survival models have been compared. All models are based on the similar assumption that irradiated cells are able to exist in one of three states. S A is the state of a totally repaired cell, in state S C the cell contains lethal lesions and in state S b the cell contains potentially lethal lesions i.e. those which either can be repaired or converted into lethal lesions. The differences between the six models lie in the different mathematical relationships between the three states. To test the six models, six different sets of experimental data were used which describe cell survival at different repair times after irradiation with sparsely ionizing irradiation. In order to compare the models, a goodness-of-fit function was used. The differences between the six models were tested by use of the nonparametric Mann-Whitney two sample test. Based on the 95% confidence limit, this required separation into three groups. (orig.)

  16. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin disrupts TCR signaling in CD1d-restricted NKT cells leading to functional anergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Joshi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous CD1d-binding glycolipid (alpha-Galactosylceramide, alpha-GC stimulates TCR signaling and activation of type-1 natural killer-like T (NKT cells. Activated NKT cells play a central role in the regulation of adaptive and protective immune responses against pathogens and tumors. In the present study, we tested the effect of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LT on NKT cells both in vivo and in vitro. LT is a binary toxin known to suppress host immune responses during anthrax disease and intoxicates cells by protective antigen (PA-mediated intracellular delivery of lethal factor (LF, a potent metalloprotease. We observed that NKT cells expressed anthrax toxin receptors (CMG-2 and TEM-8 and bound more PA than other immune cell types. A sub-lethal dose of LT administered in vivo in C57BL/6 mice decreased expression of the activation receptor NKG2D by NKT cells but not by NK cells. The in vivo administration of LT led to decreased TCR-induced cytokine secretion but did not affect TCR expression. Further analysis revealed LT-dependent inhibition of TCR-stimulated MAP kinase signaling in NKT cells attributable to LT cleavage of the MAP kinase kinase MEK-2. We propose that Bacillus anthracis-derived LT causes a novel form of functional anergy in NKT cells and therefore has potential for contributing to immune evasion by the pathogen.

  17. Effects of nutritional status on gastric secretion and composition in X-irradiated rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, D.W.; Vakil, U.K.; Sreenivasan, A.

    1974-01-01

    Whole body x-irradiation of the rat with a sub-lethal (400 r) or lethal (800 r) dose causes a marked depression in secretion and composition of gastric juice with a maximum drop of the 8th day. Similarly, pepsin and gastricsin activities also decline progressively, being lowest on the 8th day post-irradiation. Radiation exposure of the rat also results in a sudden rise in serum and tissue histamine levels which occurs on the 1st day, and returns to normal on the 3rd day post-irradiation. The nutritional status of the animal appears to influence recovery from radiation injury. Rats fed adequate diets with respect to protein and vitamin A prior to irradiation (400 r) recover earlier from radiation injury than deficient animals. The above biochemical changes are associated with gross and severe degeneration of stomach cells in the x-irradiated rat. (author)

  18. Occurrence and elimination of sites sensitive to UV-endonuclease in UV-irradiated E. coli cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleibl, K; Sedliakova, M [Slovenska Akademia Vied, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Vyskumny Ustav Onkologicky

    1979-01-01

    The occurrence and elimination of sites sensitive to the endonucleolytic action of crude extract from M. luteus (Es sites) were studied in both the parental and daughter DNA of E. coli B/r Hcr/sup +/ irradiated either with lethal fluence only (LF) or with inducing and lethal fluence (IF+LF); after the lethal fluence protein synthesis could either take place or it was inhibited by chlorampehnicol (CAP). The data obtained showed that in the wild type UV-irradiated cells Es sites could be eliminated from their DNA molecules either through pyrimidine dimer excision or through the modification of dimers on replication. It appears that DNA repair takes place most efficiently in cells irradiated with IF+LF and postincubated with CAP; in these conditions cells are supplied with inducible proteins, and enough time for DNA repair is provided before the division of irradiated cells is resumed.

  19. Total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    An outline review notes recent work on total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) as a means of preparing patients for grafts and particularly for bone-marrow transplantation. T.L.I. has proved immunosuppressive in rats, mice, dogs, monkeys and baboons; when given before bone-marrow transplantation, engraftment took place without, or with delayed rejection or graft-versus-host disease. Work with mice has indicated that the thymus needs to be included within the irradiation field, since screening of the thymus reduced skin-graft survival from 50 to 18 days, though irradiation of the thymus alone has proved ineffective. A more lasting tolerance has been observed when T.L.I. is followed by an injection of donor bone marrow. 50% of mice treated in this way accepted allogenic skin grafts for more than 100 days, the animals proving to be stable chimeras with 50% of their peripheral blood lymphocytes being of donor origin. Experiments of a similar nature with dogs and baboons were not so successful. (U.K.)

  20. RBE of Cf-252 neutrons as determined by its lethal, mutagenic, and cytogenetic effects on human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadayuki

    1989-01-01

    To assess the biological effects of neutrons, a man-made spontaneously fissioning isotope, Cf-252, is useful as an experimental model to obtain basic biological data on mixed radiation of gamma-rays and neutrons. The paper describes the lethal effect of Cf-252 radiation on human skin fibroblasts, its lethal and mutagenic effect on HeLa MR cells, and the micronuclei inducing effect on human peripheral lymphocytes. Dose-survival responses of three fibroblast cell strains exposed to Cf-252 radiation are measured. Individual difference is larger than the experimental fluctuation. D 10 values of each strain are obtained from the linear model and linear-quadratic model. Though the dose rate of X-ray is higher than that of Cf-252 radiations, the mean value of RBE(n+γ) is simply obtained as 1.86+0.31 (RBE:relative biological effectiveness). RBE(n) of Cf-252 neutrons to high-dose-rate X-rays is 2.29. After X-ray irradiation, the survival curve of HeLa MR cells gives an extrapolation number of 3.6. It is 1.3 after Cf-252 irradiation. At 50% survival, RBE(n+γ) and RBE(n) are 2.05 and 2.6, respectively. At 10% survival they are 2.05 and 2.6. The mutation frequencies after X-ray irradiation showed a significant non-linear increase with dose. Those after Cf-252 irradiation increase linearly with dose. (N.K.)

  1. Induction of dominant lethal mutations by alkylating agnets in germ-cells of the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murota, Tetsuo; Murakami, Akio.

    1977-01-01

    The comparison of the intensity of activity was made by measuring radiation equivalent chemical (REC) dose in the experiment of the induction of dominant lethal mutation, using the germ cells of pupae five days before the moths will be hatched. The alkylating agents employed in the experiment are methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), diethyl sulfate (DSC) and mitomycine-C (MC). X-ray irradiation was employed in order to indicate the capability of inducing mutation of the alkylating agents with the radiation equivalent chemical dose (REC dose). The dose-hatchability curves for the alkylating agents showed sigmoidal fashion as observed in X-ray, regardless of germ cells. The REC value at LD (50) was estimated by comparing the relative mutagenic capability of these chemicals. In sperm, EMS and DES with concentration of 1.0 x 10 -7 M/g showed the same lethality as about 2.3 kR and 0.6 kR of X-ray. However, no significant reduction of embryonic lethality after the treatment of pupae with MC (up to 2.1 x 10 -7 M/g) and MMS (up to 1.0 x 10 -6 M/g) was observed. As the results, the order of mutagenic effectiveness was as follows: EMS>DES>MMS approximately equal to MC. When oocytes in the mid-pupae were treated with MMS, EMS and MC with concentration of 1.0 x 10 -7 M/g, MMS and EMS showed the same effects as 12.8 kR and 0.6 kR. Surprisingly, MC showed the same lethality as 232.3 kR. This extremely high sensitivity of oocytes to MC may be ascribed to the inhibiting effect of the drug on the meiotic division. (Iwakiri, K.)

  2. Perforated appendicitis presenting as a thigh abscess: A lethal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typical cases of acute appendicitis have excellent treatment outcomes, if managed appropriately.1 We discuss an unusual case of perforated retrocaecal appendicitis that presented as a right thigh abscess without prominent abdominal symptoms, which highlights the lethal nature of advanced appendicitis even when ...

  3. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed

  4. The "Lethal Chamber": Further Evidence of the Euthanasia Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elks, Martin A.

    1993-01-01

    Historical discussions of the euthanasia or "lethal chamber" option in relation to people with mental retardation are presented. The paper concludes that eugenic beliefs in the primacy of heredity over environment and the positive role of natural selection may have condoned the poor conditions characteristic of large, segregated institutions and…

  5. Papaya Lethal Yellowing Virus (PLYV) Infects Vasconcellea cauliflora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, P.P.R.; Resende, de R.O.; Souza, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Papaya lethal yellowing virus (PLYV) é um dos três vírus descritos infectando mamoeiros (Carica papaya L.) no Brasil. Vasconcellea cauliflora (Jacq.) A. DC., antes denominada de Carica cauliflora (Jacq.), é uma reconhecida fonte de resistência natural ao Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), causador da

  6. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  7. Fighting Lethal Yellowing Disease for Coconut Farmers (CIFSRF ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Copra is the dried kernel of the coconut, which is used to extract coconut oil. Coconut is the main income source for the coastal region's poor farmers. Over the past 10 years, Côte d'Ivoire lethal yellowing disease has destroyed more than 350 hectares of coconut and caused losses of 12,000 tons of copra per year.

  8. Why the United States Must Adopt Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    intelligence , Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems, energy production, energy storage, three-dimensional printing , bandwidth improvements, computer...views on the morality of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics technology. Eastern culture sees artificial intelligence as an economic savior...capable of improving their society. In contrast, Western culture regards artificial intelligence with paranoia, anxiety, and skepticism. As Eastern

  9. Comparison of UV action spectra for lethality and mutation in Salmonella typhimurium using a broad band source and monochromatic radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calkins, John; Selby, Christopher; Enoch, H.G.

    1987-01-01

    The UV-B region (280-320 nm) is thought to be primarily responsible for the mutagenic, lethal, and carcinogenic effects of solar radiation. We have conducted UV-B action spectroscopy for mutagenesis and survival of Ames' Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 (uvrB, pKM101) using both monochromatic radiation from a dye laser and broader bandwidth radiation emitted from FS-20 sunlamps. A series of optical filters having different transmission cut-offs together with the sunlamp source provided bandwidths having successively less short wavelength components from which a ''broad band'' action spectrum was deduced. The two sets of action spectra differed both qualitatively and quantitatively: in comparison to the monochromatic action spectra, the ''broad band'' spectra showed up to a 200-fold reduced efficiency for both mutation induction and lethality by UV-B wavelengths. These results suggest a large protective effect of the background UV-A and/or visible radiations which were present during the broad spectrum irradiations and which are also present in solar radiation. Additional experiments show that to the extent tested this protective effect is not due to photo-reactivation or irradiance (dose rate) effects. (author)

  10. Fulminant transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease in a premature infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, R.S.; Dixon, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    A fatal case of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease developed in a premature infant after receiving several blood products, including nonirradiated white blood cells. Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease can be prevented. Irradiation of blood products is the least controversial and most effective method. Treatment was unsuccessful in most reported cases of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. Therefore irradiation of blood products before transfusing to patients susceptible to transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease is strongly recommended

  11. Antiviral T cell competence and restriction specificity of mixed allogeneic (P1 + P2----P1) irradiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueedi, E.S.; Sykes, M.; Ildstad, S.T.; Chester, C.H.; Althage, A.; Hengartner, H.; Sachs, D.H.; Zinkernagel, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Mixed irradiation bone marrow chimeras were prepared by reconstituting lethally irradiated C57BL/10 (B10) or B10.D2 mice with T cell-depleted bone marrow cells of B10 plus B10.D2 origin. These chimeras were healthy and survived well under conventional housing conditions and after experimental laboratory infections. Of a total of 17 chimeras tested, 2 died spontaneously or from the injected virus. Twelve of fifteen chimeras mounted a measurable cytotoxic T cell response to virus. Despite approximately equal percentages of B10 and B10.D2 lymphocytes in chimeras, cytotoxic T cell responses to vaccinia virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus were mediated variably by either syngeneic or allogeneic donor lymphocytes; thus the H-2 type of effector T cells frequently did not correspond to the 50:50 distribution of spleen or peripheral blood lymphocytes. Cytotoxic responses were restricted exclusively to recipient H-2 type. All mixed chimeras examined were able to mount a good IgG response to vesicular stomatitis virus. These results confirm previous data suggesting that such mixed chimeras are healthy and immunocompetent and demonstrate strict recipient-determined restriction specificity of effector T cells; they also suggest that if T help is necessary for induction of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells, it does not require host-restricted interactions between helper T cells and precursor cytotoxic T cells

  12. Irradiation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toshimitsu.

    1989-01-01

    In an irradiation device for irradiating radiation rays such as electron beams to pharmaceuticals, etc., since the distribution of scanned electron rays was not monitored, the electron beam intensity could be determined only indirectly and irradiation reliability was not satisfactory. In view of the above, a plurality of monitor wires emitting secondary electrons are disposed in the scanning direction near a beam take-out window of a scanning duct, signals from the monitor wires are inputted into a display device such as a cathode ray tube, as well as signals from the monitor wires at the central portion are inputted into counting rate meters to measure the radiation dose as well. Since secondary electrons are emitted when electron beams pass through the monitor wires and the intensity thereof is in proportion with the intensity of incident electron beams, the distribution of the radiation dose can be monitored by measuring the intensity of the emitted secondary electrons. Further, uneven irradiation, etc. can also be monitored to make the radiation of irradiation rays reliable. (N.H.)

  13. Inhibition of host cell protein synthesis by UV-inactivated poliovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helentjaris, T.; Ehrenfeld, E.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of poliovirus that was irradiated with UV light at energies up to 2,160 ergs/mm 2 to subsequently inhibit host cell protein synthesis was measured. The inactivation of the host cell shutoff function followed one-hit kinetics. Increasing irradiation did not affect the rate of inhibition until the multiplicity of infection after irradiation was reduced to approximately 1 PFU/cell. At higher functional multiplicities, the rate was unchanged, but an increasing lag before the onset of inhibition was observed with increasing irradiation. The energy levels required to inactivate virus-induced inhibition of host cell protein synthesis suggest that damage to virus RNA rather than to virus capsid proteins is responsible for the loss of function. When the inactivation of host cell shutoff was compared with the inactivation of other viral functions by UV irradiation, it correlated exactly with the loss of infectivity but not with other viral functions measured. Guanidine treatment, which prevents detectable viral RNA and protein synthesis, completely inhibited host cell shutoff by low multiplicities of unirradiated virus infection but not higher multiplicities. When a high multiplicity of virus was first reduced to a low titer by irradiation, host cell shutoff was still evident in the presence of guanidine. The results demonstrate that the complete inhibition of host cell protein synthesis can be accomplished by one infectious viral genome per cell

  14. Influence of temperature and pressure on the lethality of ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raso, J.; Pagan, R.; Condon, S.; Sala, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    A specially designed resistometer was constructed, and the lethal effect on Yersinia enterocolitica of ultrasonic waves (UW) at different static pressures (manosonication [MS]) and of combined heat-UW under pressure treatments (manothermosonication [MTS]) was investigated. During MS treatments at 30 degrees C and 200 kPa, the increase in the amplitude of UW of 20 kHz from 21 to 150 micrometers exponentially decreased decimal reduction time values (D(MS)) from 4 to 0.37 min. When pressure was increased from 0 to 600 kPa at a constant amplitude (150 micrometers) and temperature (30 degrees C), D(MS) values decreased from 1.52 to 0.20 min. The magnitude of this decrease in D(MS) declined progressively as pressure was increased. The influence of pressure on D(MS) values was greater with increased amplitude of UW. Pressure alone of as much as 600 kPa did not influence the heat resistance of Y. enterocolitica (D60 = 0.094; zeta = 5.65). At temperatures of as much as 58 degrees C, the lethality of UW under pressure was greater than that of heat treatment alone at the same temperature. At higher temperatures, this difference disappeared. Heat and UW under pressure seemed to act independently. The lethality of MTS treatments appeared to result from the added effects of UW under pressure and the lethal effect of heat. The individual contributions of heat and of UW under pressure to the total lethal effect of MTS depended on temperature. The inactivating effect of UW was not due to titanium particles eroded from the sonication horn. The addition to the MS media of cysteamine did not increase the resistance of Y. enterocolitica to MS treatment. MS treatment caused cell disruption

  15. Annotating novel genes by integrating synthetic lethals and genomic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faty Mahamadou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large scale screening for synthetic lethality serves as a common tool in yeast genetics to systematically search for genes that play a role in specific biological processes. Often the amounts of data resulting from a single large scale screen far exceed the capacities of experimental characterization of every identified target. Thus, there is need for computational tools that select promising candidate genes in order to reduce the number of follow-up experiments to a manageable size. Results We analyze synthetic lethality data for arp1 and jnm1, two spindle migration genes, in order to identify novel members in this process. To this end, we use an unsupervised statistical method that integrates additional information from biological data sources, such as gene expression, phenotypic profiling, RNA degradation and sequence similarity. Different from existing methods that require large amounts of synthetic lethal data, our method merely relies on synthetic lethality information from two single screens. Using a Multivariate Gaussian Mixture Model, we determine the best subset of features that assign the target genes to two groups. The approach identifies a small group of genes as candidates involved in spindle migration. Experimental testing confirms the majority of our candidates and we present she1 (YBL031W as a novel gene involved in spindle migration. We applied the statistical methodology also to TOR2 signaling as another example. Conclusion We demonstrate the general use of Multivariate Gaussian Mixture Modeling for selecting candidate genes for experimental characterization from synthetic lethality data sets. For the given example, integration of different data sources contributes to the identification of genetic interaction partners of arp1 and jnm1 that play a role in the same biological process.

  16. [Molecular basis of the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Studies on the molecular mechanisms by which Escherichia Coli and Micrococcus luteus repair pyrimidine dimers induced in their DNA by ultraviolet light are reported. The studies involve the isolation and enzymatic activity of the ucr system. The specific roles of ucr A and ucr B proteins are sought. In addition the expression of the ucr genes in mammalian cells is addressed. 35 refs. (DT)

  17. Molecular basis for the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation. Research accomplishments (1968 to present)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.

    1978-01-01

    Earlier work on the chemical basis of mutagenesis led to certain chemical generalities sufficient to explain how certain mutagens such as uv light and hydroxylamine functioned in information transfer systems (replicative, transcriptive and translational). When such modifications were applied to biologically active DNA in a controlled manner biological expression was non-stoichiometric because much of the damage was removed from the DNA by repair systems. Our efforts were then directed to these systems which led to: (1) the isolation, purification and characterization of endonucleases responsible for the first and controlling step in DNA repair - referred to as incision in both M. luteus and E. coli. The biological role of these enzymes was inferred in appropriate mutants; (2) the isolation, purification and characterization of exonucleases responsible for the removal or excision of damaged nucleotides in M. luteus and human placental trophoblasts; (3) the repair of uv damaged biologically active transforming and transfecting DNAs by purified endonucleases, exonucleases, DNA polymerase I and polynucleotide ligase from M. luteus and E. coli; (4) the characterization of the dual gene control for incision phenomenon in M. luteus and E. coli; and (5) isolation, purification and characterization of repair enzymes from human placenta

  18. Modifying effect of caffeine on lethality and mutability of Chlamydomonas reinhardii cells following UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podstavkova, S.; Vlcek, D.; Miadokova, E.

    1983-01-01

    The modifying effect of caffeine was studied using two standard and two UV-sensitive strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardii Dang. Cell survival and mutation frequency was microscopically evaluated on media without caffeine and on media with 1.5 mM of caffeine. The obtained results were indicative of the stimulating effect of caffeine upon survival in all strains. (author)

  19. Relative effect of radiation dose rate on hemopoietic and nonhemopoietic lethality of total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, L.J.; McNeill, J.; Karolis, C.; Thames, H.D. Jr.; Travis, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine the influence of dose rate on the toxicity of total-body irrdiation (TBI) with and without syngeneic bone-marrow rescue in mice. The results showed a much greater dose-rate dependence for death from nonhemopoietic toxicity than from bone-marrow ablation, with the ratio of LD 50 's increasing from 1.73 at 25 cGy/min to 2.80 at 1 cGy/min. At the higher dose rates, dose-limiting nonhemopoietic toxicity resulted from late organ injury, affecting the lungs, kidneys, and liver. At 1 cGy/min the major dose-limiting nonhemopoietic toxicity was acute gastrointestinal injury. The implications of these results in the context of TBI in preparation for bone-marrow transplantation are discussed. 15 refs., 4 figs

  20. Long-term feeding studies in mice fed a diet containing irradiated fish. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petten, L.E. van; Calkins, J.E.; McConnell, R.F.; Gottschalk, H.M.; Elias, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    A wholesomeness feeding study was carried out in mice fed equal amounts of cod or redfish, comprising 45% of the diet. Three groups of animals received either irradiated [1.75 kGy (175 krad)] fish, non-irradiated fish or stock ration. A 90-day subchronic study, a multigeneration reproduction, a dominant lethality and a teratology study were carried out together with an 80-week oncogenic study on the F 1 generation. No adverse effects were noted on growth, reproduction and litter behaviour, in relation to dominant lethality, teratogenicity or oncogenicity. (Auth.)

  1. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beishon, J.

    1991-01-01

    Food irradiation has been the subject of concern and controversy for many years. The advantages of food irradiation include the reduction or elimination of dangerous bacterial organisms, the control of pests and insects which destroy certain foods, the extension of the shelf-life of many products, for example fruit, and its ability to treat products such as seafood which may be eaten raw. It can also replace existing methods of treatment which are believed to have hazardous side-effects. However, after examining the evidence produced by the proponents of food irradiation, the author questions whether it has any major contribution to make to the problems of foodborne diseases or world food shortages. More acceptable solutions, he suggests, may be found in educating food handlers to ensure that hygienic conditions prevail in the production, storage and serving of food. (author)

  2. Vinca irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymery, R.

    1976-10-01

    The development programme of the VINCA radiosterilisation centre involves plans for an irradiator capable of working in several ways. Discontinuous operation. The irradiator is loaded for a certain period then runs automatically until the moment of unloading. This method is suitable as long as the treatment capacity is relatively small. Continuous operation with permanent batch loading and unloading carried out either manually or automatically (by means of equipment to be installed later). Otherwise the design of the apparatus is highly conventional. The source is a vertical panel submersible in a pool. The conveyor is of the 'bucket' type, with 4 tiers to each bucket. The batches pass successively through all possible irradiation positions. Transfert into and out of the cell take place through a maze, which also provides access to the cell when the sources are in storage at the bottom of the pool [fr

  3. Irradiance gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, G.J.; Heckbert, P.S.; Technische Hogeschool Delft

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques

  4. Interrelation between irradiation and parasitism by trichogramma evanescens Westw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, M S Abd-Alla

    1986-12-31

    The present work deals with the effect of gamma radiation treatments on the relationship between the egg parasitoid, T. evanescens and its host, C. cephalonica.The obtained results could be summarized as follows: I- Effect of gamma radiation on the egg mortality percent of c.cephalonica. II- Effect of irradiated host on the biology of the parasitoid , T.evanescens. III-Direct effect of gamma irradiation on the different developmental stages of T. evanescens. 24 tabs., 8 figs., 42 refs.

  5. The effect of recovery from potentially lethal damage on the determination of repair and repopulation in a murine tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Fowler, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Repair and repopulation following X irradiation of clamped-off murine anaplastic MT tumours was investigated using the established method of (Dsub(n)-D 1 )/(n-1). Repair was complete in 4 h, similar in extent to that reported in other tumours, and within the range of that reported for normal tissues. Subsequent repopulation commenced after 4 days and was equivalent to 1.8 Gy/day recovered dose, corresponding to a clonogenic cell number doubling time of 1.8 days. However, estimates of repair and repopulation may have been in error because the chronically hypoxic cells in this tumour alone have the ability to recover from potentially lethal damage (PLD) and so are more radioresistant than cells rendered acutely hypoxic by clamping. Because of this, even clamping off tumours at irradiation does not render all cell populations equally radioresistant, and so reoxygenation between fractions could result in an underestimate of repair and repopulation. Further, the differing sensitivity between acutely and chronically hypoxic cells renders the apparent OER a function of dose (i.e., oxygen not truly dose-modifying to chronically hypoxic cells). Consequently it is incorrect to assume a constant OER in order to compare repair in tumours irradiated under hypoxic conditions with that in normal tissues irradiated under aerobic conditions. (author)

  6. Amelioration of radiation damage to haemopoiesis by Ivastimul, given after irradiation to mice protected by peroral cystamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, A.; Rotkovska, D.; Bartonickova, A.; Kautska, J.

    1992-01-01

    Combined radioprotection by preirradiation peroral cystamine and postirradiation Ivastimul administration was examined in sublethally and lethally whole-body gamma-irradiated mice. Enhancement of haemopoietic recovery and increased survival of irradiated mice was demonstrated for a single dose of Ivastimul administered after irradiation. The ameliorative influence of combined radioprotection may be explained by haemopoietic stem cell protection by cystamine and haemopoietic stimulation mediated by Ivastimul. (author) 2 tabs., 3 figs., 20 refs

  7. Repair of membrane damage in X-irradiated E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, N.E.; Ratnajothi, N.H.; Hewamanna, R.; Obioha, F.I.

    1984-01-01

    When E. coli B/r or E. coli K12 AB1157 were X-irradiated in the presence of oxygen and incubated immediately after irradiation in broth containing penicillin in concentration that on its own was not lethal to unirradiated bacteria, substantial additional killing was caused. When treatment with penicillin was delayed for increasing times after irradiation the additional killing became progressively less. These results were interpreted as demonstrating the repair or removal of oxygen-dependent radiation-induced lesions in the bacterial membranes. Removal of these lesions was inhibited by incubation of the irradiated bacteria at low temperature before treatment with penicillin or by exposing the cells to a non-lethal concentration of toluene before irradiation. These observations suggest that an enzymatic repair process may be involved in the removal of the membrane lesions. The fatty acid mutant E. coli K 1060 proved exceptional in that some additional killing by penicillin was detectable after anaerobic as well as aerobic irradiation. This points to the importance of membrane composition in the development of those radiation lesions that are brought to light by penicillin treatment. (author)

  8. Cdc42 promotes host defenses against fatal infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Keunwook; Boyd, Kelli L; Parekh, Diptiben V

    2013-01-01

    attempted to specifically delete it in these cells by crossing the Cdc42(fl/fl) mouse with a FSP-1 cre mouse, which is thought to mediate recombination exclusively in fibroblasts. Surprisingly, the FSP-1cre;Cdc42(fl/fl) mice died at 3 weeks of age due to overwhelming suppurative upper airway infections...... showed that in addition to fibroblasts, the FSP-1 cre deleted Cdc42 very efficiently in all leukocytes. Thus, by using this non-specific cre mouse we inadvertently demonstrated the importance of Cdc42 in host protection from lethal infections and suggest a critical role for this small GTPase in innate...

  9. ion irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swift heavy ions interact predominantly through inelastic scattering while traversing any polymer medium and produce excited/ionized atoms. Here samples of the polycarbonate Makrofol of approximate thickness 20 m, spin coated on GaAs substrate were irradiated with 50 MeV Li ion (+3 charge state). Build-in ...

  10. Proton Irradiation Impacts Age Driven Modulations of Cancer Progression Influenced by Immune System Transcriptome Modifications from Splenic Tissue

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Age plays a crucial role in the interplay between tumor and host; with further perturbations induced by irradiation. Proton irradiation on tumors induces biological...

  11. Humanitarian Algorithms : A Codified Key Safety Switch Protocol for Lethal Autonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Nyagudi, Nyagudi Musandu

    2014-01-01

    With the deployment of lethal autonomous weapons, there is the requirement that any such platform complies with the precepts of International Humanitarian Law. Humanitarian Algorithms[9: p. 9] ensure that lethal autonomous weapon systems perform military/security operations, within the confines of International Humanitarian Law. Unlike other existing techniques of regulating lethal autonomy this scheme advocates for an approach that enables Machine Learning. Lethal autonomous weapons must be ...

  12. Fish irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, J.; Tengumnuay, C.; Juangbhanich, C.

    1970-01-01

    Chub-mackerel was chosen for the study because they are the most common fish in Thailand. Preliminary investigations were conducted to determine the maximum radiation dose of gamma-rays by organoleptic tests. The samples were subjected to radiation at various doses up to 4 Mrad. Many experiments were conducted using other kinds of fish. The results showed that 1 Mrad would be the maximum acceptable dose for fish. Later, the influence of the radiation dose from 0.1-1 Mrad was studied in order to find the optimum acceptable dose for preservation of fish without off-flavour. For this purpose, the Hedonic scale was used. It was found that 0.2 and 0.5 Mrad gave the best result on Chub mackerel. The determinations of optimum dose, organoleptic, microbiological and trimethylamine content changes were done. The results showed that Chub mackerel irradiated at 0.2, 0.5 and 1 Mrad stored at 3 0 C for 71 days were still acceptable, on the contrary the untreated samples were found unacceptable at 14 days. The trimethylamine increment was significantly higher in the untreated samples. At 15 days storage, trimethylamine in the non-irradiated Chub-mackerel was about 10 times higher than the irradiated ones. At 51 and 79 days storage, about 13 times higher in the control samples than the irradiated samples except 0.1 Mrad. Only 2 times higher was found for the 0.1 Mrad. The microbiological results showed that the irradiation above 0.2 Mrad gave favorable extension of shelf-life of fish

  13. Chapter 2: Irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2018-04-01

    The chapter 2 presents the subjects: 1) gamma irradiators which includes: Category-I gamma irradiators (self-contained); Category-II gamma irradiators (panoramic and dry storage); Category-III gamma irradiators (self-contained in water); Category-IV gamma irradiators (panoramic and wet storage); source rack for Category-IV gamma irradiators; product transport system for Category-IV gamma irradiators; radiation shield for gamma irradiators; 2) accelerators which includes: Category-I Accelerators (shielded irradiator); Category-II Accelerators (irradiator inside a shielded room); Irradiation application examples.

  14. Highly predictive support vector machine (SVM) models for anthrax toxin lethal factor (LF) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Amin, Elizabeth Ambrose

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a highly lethal, acute infectious disease caused by the rod-shaped, Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The anthrax toxin lethal factor (LF), a zinc metalloprotease secreted by the bacilli, plays a key role in anthrax pathogenesis and is chiefly responsible for anthrax-related toxemia and host death, partly via inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) enzymes and consequent disruption of key cellular signaling pathways. Antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones are capable of clearing the bacilli but have no effect on LF-mediated toxemia; LF itself therefore remains the preferred target for toxin inactivation. However, currently no LF inhibitor is available on the market as a therapeutic, partly due to the insufficiency of existing LF inhibitor scaffolds in terms of efficacy, selectivity, and toxicity. In the current work, we present novel support vector machine (SVM) models with high prediction accuracy that are designed to rapidly identify potential novel, structurally diverse LF inhibitor chemical matter from compound libraries. These SVM models were trained and validated using 508 compounds with published LF biological activity data and 847 inactive compounds deposited in the Pub Chem BioAssay database. One model, M1, demonstrated particularly favorable selectivity toward highly active compounds by correctly predicting 39 (95.12%) out of 41 nanomolar-level LF inhibitors, 46 (93.88%) out of 49 inactives, and 844 (99.65%) out of 847 Pub Chem inactives in external, unbiased test sets. These models are expected to facilitate the prediction of LF inhibitory activity for existing molecules, as well as identification of novel potential LF inhibitors from large datasets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gamma irradiation induced variabilities in Canavalia virosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    Dry seeds of Canavalia virosa were treated with seven different doses viz., 4,8,12,16,24,32 and 36 Krad of gamma irradiation. Percent germination increased in 4 and 8 Krad treatment, while, a gradual decrease was observed from 12 to 32 Krad treatments. Seedling measurements taken at the end of 15 days showed increase in 4 and 8 Krad over control, while 12 to 32 Krad treatments showed gradual decrease, plants treated with 4 Krad showed maximum survival percentage at maturity, while a gradual decrease was observed in 12 to 32 Krad treated plants. The treatment of 36 Krad was lethal. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Pacman dysplasia: a lethal skeletal dysplasia with variable radiographic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.F. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of the King' s Daughters, Norfolk (United States); Proud, V.K. [Dept. of Genetics, Children' s Hospital of the King' s Daughters, Norfolk (United States); Werner, A.L. [Dept. of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of the King' s Daughters, Norfolk (United States); Field, F.M.; Wilcox, W.F.; Lachman, R.S.; Rimoin, D.L. [International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Background: Punctate or stippled cartilaginous calcifications are associated with many conditions, including chromosomal, infectious, endocrine, and teratogenic etiologies. Some of these conditions are clinically mild, while others are lethal. Accurate diagnosis can prove instrumental in clinical management and in genetic counseling. Objective: To describe the diagnostic radiographic features seen in Pacman dysplasia, a distinct autosomal recessive, lethal skeletal dysplasia. Materials and methods: We present the fourth reported case of Pacman dysplasia and compare the findings seen in our patient with the three previously described patients. Results: Invariable and variable radiographic findings were seen in all four cases of histologically proven Pacman dysplasia. Conclusion: Pacman dysplasia presents both constant and variable diagnostic radiographic features. (orig.)

  17. Neonatal lethal dwarfism with distinct skeletal malformations - a separate entity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosendahl, K.; Maurseth, K.; Olsen, Oe.E. [Dept. of Paediatric Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Halvorsen, O.J. [Dept. of Pathology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Gjelland, K. [Dept. of Gynaecology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Engebretsen, L. [Dept. of Genetics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)

    2001-09-01

    We describe a case of neonatal lethal dwarfism characterised by short trunk, short, stick-like tubular bones, deficient ossification of the axial skeleton and broad, sclerotic horizontal ribs. Two similar cases have previously been reported as examples of the Neu-Laxova syndrome. However, the radiological findings of the Neu-Laxova syndrome, as reported in 16 out of 40 documented cases, show a heterogeneous pattern of minor features, which differ distinctively from those found in the previous two cases and by us. A literature research did not reveal similar cases, and we therefore suggest that our case, together with the two previous cases, may represent a new distinctive form of neonatal lethal dwarfism. (orig.)

  18. Neonatal lethal dwarfism with distinct skeletal malformations - a separate entity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosendahl, K.; Maurseth, K.; Olsen, Oe.E.; Halvorsen, O.J.; Gjelland, K.; Engebretsen, L.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a case of neonatal lethal dwarfism characterised by short trunk, short, stick-like tubular bones, deficient ossification of the axial skeleton and broad, sclerotic horizontal ribs. Two similar cases have previously been reported as examples of the Neu-Laxova syndrome. However, the radiological findings of the Neu-Laxova syndrome, as reported in 16 out of 40 documented cases, show a heterogeneous pattern of minor features, which differ distinctively from those found in the previous two cases and by us. A literature research did not reveal similar cases, and we therefore suggest that our case, together with the two previous cases, may represent a new distinctive form of neonatal lethal dwarfism. (orig.)

  19. An improved brine shrimp larvae lethality microwell test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Jun; Han, Jinyuan; Gu, Xiaojie

    2012-01-01

    This article described an improved brine shrimp larvae lethality microwell test method. A simply designed connecting vessel with alternative photoperiod was used to culture and collect high yield of active Artemia parthenogenetica nauplii for brine shrimp larvae lethality microwell test. Using this method, pure A. parthenogenetica nauplii suspension was easily cultured and harvested with high density about 100-150 larvae per milliliter and the natural mortality was reduced to near zero by elimination of unnecessary artificial disturbance. And its sensitivity was validated by determination of LC(50)-24 h of different reference toxicants including five antitumor agents, two pesticides, three organic pollutants, and four heavy metals salts, most of which exhibited LC(50)-24 h between 0.07 and 58.43 mg/L except for bleomycin and mitomycin C with LC(50)-24 h over 300 mg/L.

  20. Dominant lethals following administration of tritium (THO) to rat males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagova, A.; Baev, I.; Bajrakova, A.

    1976-01-01

    Adult rat males were given a single intraperitoneal tritium (THO) injection at 0,01 or 0,001 mCi/g body weight (1/100 or 1/1000 of LDsub(50/30), respectively). Twelve days after treatment each male was mated to 3-5 intact females, and the latter were replaced by fresh ones every 12 following days over a 120-day period. Mated females were killed to score conceptions, corpora lutea, and live and dead embryos. Estimations were made of F 1 prenatal death rate (according to Bateman, 1958) and the frequency of induction of dominant lethal mutations (according to Roehrborn, 1970). The results observed indicated paternal exposure to tritium (THO) to produce dominant lethals both in pre- and post-meiotic germ cells in the rat. The extent of the genetic damage studied was found to depend on the amount of activity administered as well as on the time interval between treatment and conception. (author)