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Sample records for lethally irradiated dogs

  1. Transplantation of cryopreserved allogeneic bone marrow after its long-term storage to lethally irradiated dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikova, N.N.; Fedotenkov, A.G.; Sukyasyan, G.V.; Timakova, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The study of the dog bone marrow preserved at -196 deg C during 6-12 years has shown that in the body of lethally irradiated animals (8Gy), due to the antigenic difference in the tissues of the donor and the irradiated recipients, the cells of cryopreserved allogeneic bone marrow were differentiated by the lymphoid type similar to that observed in transplantation of freshly prepared myelocaryocytes. However, their proliferative activity in the period of active lymphocyte transformation was quantitatively less manifest than in freshly transplanted cells. The results of the study evidence that the bone marrow cells cryopreserved during 6-12 years retain their functional activity

  2. CFU-C populations in blood and bone marrow of dogs after lethal irradiation and allogeneic transfusion with cryopreserved blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nothdurft, W.; Fliedner, T.M.; Calvo, W.; Flad, H.-D.; Huget, R.; Koerbling, M.; Krumbacher-von Loringen, K; Ross, W.M.; Schnappauf, H.-P.; Steinbach, I.

    1978-01-01

    Colony forming units in agar (CFU-C) were assayed in both bone marrow and peripheral blood of dogs during haemopoietic recovery after lethal total-body irradiation (1200 R) and allogeneic transfusion of blood mononuclear cells (MNC) from histocompatible donors. MNC had been collected from the peripheral blood by continuous-flow centrifugation leucapheris and cryopreserved at -196 deg C until transfusion. Two groups of dogs were studied. Group 1 dogs (n = 12) were given between 0.39 and 2.76 x 10 9 MNC per kg body wt. Group 2 dogs (n = 14) were transfused with a similar number of MNC, ranging from 0.51 to 1.87 x 10 9 per kg body wt., but in addition underwent immuno-suppressive therapy with methotrexate. In group 1 dogs, there was a rather good correlation between the number of CFU-C in the regenerating bone marrow and the recovery of the peripheral blood granulocyte values. The regeneration of the CPU-C population in the bone marrow of methotrexate-treated dogs showed a somewhat more heterogeneous picture than in dogs of group 1 and in dogs that, in a previous study, were transfused with autologous MNC. The minimum time interval required for the reconstitution of peripheral blood CFU-C to normal levels was 2-4 weeks but usually took from 4-14 weeks. (author)

  3. Studies on the regeneration of the CFU-C population in blood and bone marrow or lethally irradiated dogs after autologous transfusion of cryopreserved mononuclear blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nothdurft, W.; Bruch, C.; Fliedner, T.M.; Rueber, E.

    1977-01-01

    In a group of 8 lethally irradiated (1200 R) dogs, that were transfused autologously with cryopreserved mononuclear cells (MNC) derived from the peripheral blood by leucapheresis the concentration of colony-forming units in agar (CFU-C) in bone marrow and peripheral blood was estimated at regular intervals after irradiation and transfusion of MNC. The numbers of MNC transfused per kg body weight ranged from 0.32 x 10 9 to 1.63 x 10 9 with an incidence of CFU-C between 0.02 x 10 5 and 1.38 x 10 5 . In 6 dogs the CFU-C levels in the bone marrow reached the normal preirradiation values between days 15 and 20. But in 2 dogs that had received the lowest CFU-C numbers the regeneration of the bone marrow CFU-C was markedly delayed. In general the time course of the bone marrow repopulation by CFU-C for single dogs was reflected by a corresponding regeneration pattern of the blood CFU-C. The time course of the curves for the blood CFU-C levels on the other hand was of the same kind as for the granulocyte values in the peripheral blood, that reached the normal levels mainly around day 30 and thereafter. Considerable fluctuations were seen in the blood CFU-C levels of single dogs before irradiation and after mononuclear leucocyte transfusion. Despite of such limitations the blood CFU-C content appeared to be a useful indicator of haematopoietic regeneration of the bone marrow. (author)

  4. Interaction of T- and B-lymphocytes in the immune respouse of lethally irradiated dogs thymus and part of bone marrow being shielded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, R.V.; Khaitov, R.M.; Sbitneva, M.F.; Fedorovskij, L.L.; Nazhmitdinov, A.M.; Ataullakhanov, R.I.; Gvozdeva, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    It has been first shown in experiments with sublethally irradiated dogs that it is possible to simulate and study the role of the co-operative interaction of T- and B-lymphocytes in the immune response. A model has been developed for determining dynamically the number of antibody-forming cells in the spleen of dogs in the course of the chronic experiment. The proposed model may be used for assessing the role of the substances that affect the interaction of T- and B-cells in the irradiated dog organism

  5. Regeneration of blood-forming organs after autologous leukocyte transfusion in lethally irradiated dogs. II. Distribution and cellularity of the marrow in irradiated and transfused animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, W.; Fliedner, T.M.; Herbst, E.; Huegl, E.; Bruch, C.

    1976-01-01

    Dogs were given transfusions of cryopreserved autologous mononuclear blood leukocytes after 1200 roentgens (R) (midline dose) whole-body x-irradiation. Bone marrow repopulation was studied by means of histomorphological methods at days 9 and 10 after transfusion of an average of 3 x 10 9 , 7 x 10 9 , 13 x 10 9 , and 31 x 10 9 cells. The return of marrow cellularity to normal values was related to the number of cells transfused. With low cell doses (3 x 10 9 and 7 x 10 9 ), the marrow regeneration at 10 days was focal. There were groups of cells (colonies) showing either erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis, or megakaryocytopoiesis in the osteal niches of the trabecular bones. Frequently such niches were seen showing complete cellular recovery next to niches with complete aplasia. With higher cell doses, all niches showed hemopoietic regeneration, and the cellularity approached normal values. No hemopoietic regeneration was observed in those skeletal parts that do not show hemopoiesis, even under normal circumstances

  6. Gluconeogenesis in lethally X-irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M.

    1983-01-01

    The in vivo incorporation of U- 14 C-alanine into blood glucose and liver glycogen was measured in rats irradiated with a single whole body lethal dose of X-rays. Changes in gluconeogenic enzyme activities were studied in the liver. Increased incorporation of 14 C-alanine into blood glucose and liver glycogen were found after irradiation. Liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glycogenic activity underwent almost parallel changes and were significantly elevated from the 6th to the 48th hour, with resultant accumulation of glycogen. Glucose-6-phosphatase activity was depressed and there was a negative correlation between it and liver glycogen concentration. Maximum fructose-1,6-diphosphatase activity was found at 48 hours. The results show that glycogen accumulation in the liver and the raised blood glucose level in X-irradiated rats are based on raised gluconeogenesis. (author)

  7. Gluconeogenesis in lethally X-irradiated rats

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    Paulikova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M. (Univerzita P.J. Safarika, Kosice (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Vseobecnej Biologie)

    1983-02-01

    The in vivo incorporation of U-/sup 14/C-alanine into blood glucose and liver glycogen was measured in rats irradiated with a single whole body lethal dose of X-rays. Changes in gluconeogenic enzyme activities were studied in the liver. Increased incorporation of /sup 14/C-alanine into blood glucose and liver glycogen were found after irradiation. Liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glycogenic activity underwent almost parallel changes and were significantly elevated from the 6th to the 48th hour, with resultant accumulation of glycogen. Glucose-6-phosphatase activity was depressed and there was a negative correlation between it and liver glycogen concentration. Maximum fructose-1,6-diphosphatase activity was found at 48 hours. The results show that glycogen accumulation in the liver and the raised blood glucose level in X-irradiated rats are based on raised gluconeogenesis.

  8. Therapeutic use of recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) in a canine model of sublethal and lethal whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacVittie, T.J.; Monroy, R.L.; Patchen, M.L.; Souza, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) was studied for its ability to modulate haemopoiesis in normal dogs as well as to decrease therapeutically the severity and duration of neutropenia in sublethally and lethally irradiated dogs. Data indicate that in the lethally irradiated dog, effective cytokine therapy with rhG-CSF will increase survival through the induction of earlier recovery of neutrophils and platelets. (author)

  9. Late radiation effects in animals surviving lethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, L.A.

    1974-01-01

    Animals (rats, mice, dogs) survived lethal irradiation by means of prophylactic-therapeutic treatments or previously irradiated, were studied for late radiation effects: life span, cachexia and fat growing of hypophysical type, tissue or organ hypoplasia manifested by disturbed hemopoiesis, suppressed function of adrenal gland, etc., suppressed immune reactivity of the irradiated organism, atypical biochemical changes in DNA and protein metabolism, epilation, chronic dermatitis, ulcerations, reduced reproductivity or full sterility, damage of kidneys leading to nephrosclerosis, dishormonal states, cataracts, diffuse sclerotic processes, various kinds of malignant and non-malignant tumors. In these cases hemopoiesis compensated for a definite time peripheral blood composition, but during the late period it showed features of incompleteness: shorter life survival of erythrocytes and thrombocytes manifested by a decreased binding of labelled methionine in these blood elements, anemia and relative thrombocytopenia sometimes with an increased number of polychromatic erythrocytes in peripheral blood and a decreased number of reticulocytes at the same time; lymphopenia and relative leucopenia with an increased number of hypersegmented neutrophils. Decreased reproductivity and atypical biochemical changes available in the first generation of the irradiated animals showed the probable role of mutagenic factors in the emergence of some late radiation effects. A significant part of late radiation sequences were due to neuro-endocrine desintegrations which lead to a disturbed supply of the vessels and afterwards to their sclerosis. Some of the described late radiation effects were also observed in biological controls as festures of ageing while in irradiated animals they were manifested in an earlier period. After application of optimal amounts radioprotectors (AET, cysteamine, serotonin) a more marked protective effect is demonstrated in the early reactions (time survival

  10. Late radiation effects in animals surviving lethal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrov, L A

    1974-01-01

    Animals (rats, mice, dogs) survived lethal irradiation by means of prophylactic-therapeutic treatments or previously irradiated, were studied for late radiation effects: life span, cachexia and fat growing of hypophysical type, tissue or organ hypoplasia manifested by disturbed hemopoiesis, suppressed function of adrenal gland, etc., suppressed immune reactivity of the irradiated organism, atypical biochemical changes in DNA and protein metabolism, epilation, chronic dermatitis, ulcerations, reduced reproductivity or full sterility, damage of kidneys leading to nephrosclerosis, dishormonal states, cataracts, diffuse sclerotic processes, various kinds of malignant and non-malignant tumors. In these cases hemopoiesis compensated for a definite time peripheral blood composition, but during the late period it showed features of incompleteness: shorter life survival of erythrocytes and thrombocytes manifested by a decreased binding of labelled methionine in these blood elements, anemia and relative thrombocytopenia sometimes with an increased number of polychromatic erythrocytes in peripheral blood and a decreased number of reticulocytes at the same time; lymphopenia and relative leucopenia with an increased number of hypersegmented neutrophils. Decreased reproductivity and atypical biochemical changes available in the first generation of the irradiated animals showed the probable role of mutagenic factors in the emergency of some late radiation effects. A significant part of late radiation sequences were due to neuro-endocrine disintegrations. Some of the described late radiation effects were also observed in biological controls as features of ageing. After application of radioprotectors (AET, cysteamine, serotonin) a more marked protective effect is demonstrated in the early reactions (time survival till 30th day, DNA and protein metabolism, immune reactions) of the lethally irradiated animals.

  11. MKLN1 splicing defect in dogs with lethal acrodermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anina Bauer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lethal acrodermatitis (LAD is a genodermatosis with monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance in Bull Terriers and Miniature Bull Terriers. The LAD phenotype is characterized by poor growth, immune deficiency, and skin lesions, especially at the paws. Utilizing a combination of genome wide association study and haplotype analysis, we mapped the LAD locus to a critical interval of ~1.11 Mb on chromosome 14. Whole genome sequencing of an LAD affected dog revealed a splice region variant in the MKLN1 gene that was not present in 191 control genomes (chr14:5,731,405T>G or MKLN1:c.400+3A>C. This variant showed perfect association in a larger combined Bull Terrier/Miniature Bull Terrier cohort of 46 cases and 294 controls. The variant was absent from 462 genetically diverse control dogs of 62 other dog breeds. RT-PCR analysis of skin RNA from an affected and a control dog demonstrated skipping of exon 4 in the MKLN1 transcripts of the LAD affected dog, which leads to a shift in the MKLN1 reading frame. MKLN1 encodes the widely expressed intracellular protein muskelin 1, for which diverse functions in cell adhesion, morphology, spreading, and intracellular transport processes are discussed. While the pathogenesis of LAD remains unclear, our data facilitate genetic testing of Bull Terriers and Miniature Bull Terriers to prevent the unintentional production of LAD affected dogs. This study may provide a starting point to further clarify the elusive physiological role of muskelin 1 in vivo.

  12. Thyroid and pancreatic hormones in lethally irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlersova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M.

    1985-01-01

    The concentrations of thyroxine, triiodothyronine and reverse triiodothyronine, glucagon and insulin in the serum or plasma were determined by radioimmunoassay in male rats of the Wistar strain 1, 6, 24, 48 and 72 hours after irradiation with 14.35 Gy (1500R) of X-rays. The irradiated and sham-irradiated rats were starved till examination. The concentrations of thyroxine and triiodothyronine dropped 6 hours after irradiation as compared with controls, the concentration of thyroxine also dropped after 72 hours. The level of reverse triiodothyronine in irradiated rats increased in the terminal period. The level of insulin dropped 24 hours after irradiation, at 72 hours it was higher than that in controls. The concentration of glucagon in irradiated rats increased in the terminal phase of radiation disease. The results document the diverse reaction of hormones in lethally irradiated rats and contribute to a deeper recognition of metabolic imbalance in the course of radiation disease. (author)

  13. Necrostatin-1 rescues mice from lethal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhentai; Epperly, Michael; Watkins, Simon C; Greenberger, Joel S; Kagan, Valerian E; Bayır, Hülya

    2016-04-01

    There is an emerging need in new medical products that can mitigate and/or treat the short- and long-term consequences of radiation exposure after a radiological or nuclear terroristic event. The direct effects of ionizing radiation are realized primarily via apoptotic death pathways in rapidly proliferating cells within the initial 1-2days after the exposure. However later in the course of the radiation disease necrotic cell death may ensue via direct and indirect pathways from increased generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Here we evaluated radiomitigative potential of necrostatin-1 after total body irradiation (TBI) and the contribution of necroptosis to cell death induced by radiation. Circulating TNFα levels were increased starting on d1 after TBI and associated with increased plasmalemma permeability in ileum of irradiated mice. Necrostatin-1 given iv. 48h after 9.5Gy TBI attenuated radiation-induced receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) serine phosphorylation in ileum and improved survival vs. vehicle. Utilizing apoptosis resistant cytochrome c(-/-) cells, we showed that radiation can induce necroptosis, which is attenuated by RNAi knock down of RIPK1 and RIPK3 or by treatment with necrostatin-1 or -1s whereas 1-methyl-L-tryptophan, an indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase inhibitor, did not exhibit radiomitigative effect. This suggests that the beneficial effect of necrostatin-1 is likely through inhibition of RIPK1-mediated necroptotic pathway. Overall, our data indicate that necroptosis, a form of programmed necrosis, may play a significant role in cell death contributing to radiation disease and mortality. This study provides a proof of principle that necrostatin-1 and perhaps other RIPK1 inhibitors are promising therapeutic agents for radiomitigation after TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transplantation of bone marrow cells into lethally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktora, L.; Hermanova, E.

    1978-01-01

    Morphological changes were studied of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and spleen of lethally irradiated mice (0.2 C/kg) after transplantation of living bone marrow cells. It was observed that functional trombopoietic megakaryocytes occur from day 15 after transplantation and that functional active megakaryocytes predominate in bone marrow and spleen from day 20. In addition, other types of cells, primarily granulocytes, were detected in some megakaryocytes. (author)

  15. Genotoxicity test of irradiated spice mixture by dominant lethal test

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    Barna, J

    1986-03-01

    Dominant lethal test (DLT) was performed in Sprague Dawley male rats prefed with 25% irradiated spice mixture which was composed of 55% non-pungent ground paprika, 14% black pepper, 9% allspice, 9% coriander, 7% marjoram, 4% cumin, 2% nutmeg. Microbial count of the spice mixture was reduced with 15 kGy from a sup(60)Co source. Control groups received spice-free or untreated spice diet or were administered to cyclophosphamide i.p., respectively. DTL parameters altered significantly in the latter group but neither untreated nor irradiated spice mixture proved to be germ cell mutagens. 24 refs.; 8 figs.

  16. Gastrointestinal decontamination in healthy and lethally irradiated monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, W.D.H.

    1980-01-01

    In periods of extreme immunosuppression, infections which are often life-threatening, frequently occur. In an attempt to prevent such infections in lethally irradiated rhesus monkeys, the animals were subjected to strict reverse isolation prior to irradiation and administrated orally with nonabsorbable antibiotics in order to eliminate their microflora. The antibiotic combination was selected on the basis of a sensitivity test and was added to the liquid food supply. To rapidly achieve a high bactericidal concentration in the intestine, the same antibiotics were additionally given orally for 5 days. The microflora was reduced rapidly; within a few days sterile cultures were obtained. Particularly after discontinuation of the administration of the additional antibiotics were colonizations found. In contrast to colonizations persisting from the first day of treatment on, the first were rather easy to suppress. (Auth.)

  17. Cell lethality after selective irradiation of the DNA replication fork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, K.G.; Warters, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    It has been suggested that nascent DNA located at the DNA replication fork may exhibit enhanced sensitivity to radiation damage. To evaluate this hypothesis, Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) were labeled with 125 I-iododeoxyuridine ( 125 IUdR) either in the presence or absence of aphidicolin. Aphidicolin (5 μg/ml) reduced cellular 125 IUdR incorporation to 3-5% of the control value. The residual 125 I incorporation appeared to be restricted to low molecular weight (sub-replicon sized) fragments of DNA which were more sensitive to micrococcal nuclease attack and less sensitive to high salt DNase I digestion than randomly labeled DNA. These findings suggest that DNA replicated in the presence of aphidicolin remains localized at the replication fork adjacent to the nuclear matrix. Based on these observations an attempt was made to compare the lethal consequences of 125 I decays at the replication fork to that of 125 I decays randomly distributed over the entire genome. Regardless of the distribution of decay events, all treatment groups exhibited identical dose-response curves (D 0 : 101 125 I decays/cell). Since differential irradiation of the replication complex did not result in enhanced cell lethality, it can be concluded that neither the nascent DNA nor the protein components (replicative enzymes, nuclear protein matrix) associated with the DNA replication site constitute key radiosensitive targets within the cellular genome. (orig.)

  18. Lethal mutation of internal irradiation brown planthopper (Nilaparvita lugens Stal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahid, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The moulting IVth of BPH nympha were irradiated internally with radiophosphorous 32-P 1 uCi/ml, 10 uCi/ml, 50 uCi/ml, 100 uCi/ml, and 500 uCi/ml concentrations respectivelly. An observation was carried out to determines heredity of hopper sterilities from the mating groups of R male x N female, R male x R female, and N male x R female. The 32-P concentration below of 50 uCi/ml seemed to be the substerile dose, however, the dominant lethal mutation has been visually shown by R male x R female F1 mating group. The hereditary lines of F1, F2, F3, and F4 of the hopper sterilities wich were indicated by the nympha hatch ability have some significant correlations (r1= -0.77, r2= -0.92, r3= -0.93 and r4= -0.85). Thus, the resesif lethal mutations visually showed by F3 and F4 from all of the 100 uCi/ml and 50 uCi/ml treated groups. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Neoplasms in young dogs after irradiation during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, S.A.; Williams, J.S.; Angleton, G.M.; Saunders, W.J.; Miller, G.K.; Lee, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    To study the lifetime effects of irradiation during development, 1680 beagle dogs were given single, whole body exposures to 60Co gamma radiation at one of 6 pre- or postnatal ages. Four groups of 120 dogs each (480 or 29%) received 0.16 or 0.83 Gy at early prenatal times, 8 or 28 days postcoitus (dpc). Four groups of 120 dogs each (29%) received 0.16 or 0.83 Gy in the perinatal period at 55 dpc or 2 days postpartum (dpp). Groups of 120 and 240 dogs (21%) received 0.83 Gy at later postnatal times, 70 or 365 dpp, respectively. A group of 360 dogs (21%) were sham-irradiated. The youngest dogs are now 12 years old. Through 4 years of age, 20 dogs had neoplasms diagnosed. Five malignancies and one benign tumor were seen in the first two years, including the only fatal malignancies which occurred in 4 perinatally irradiated dogs. Up to two years of age, the other non-fatal malignancy and benign tumor were found in dogs irradiated at 365 dpp and 55 dpc. The remaining 14 neoplasms, 12 benign and 2 non-fatal malignant, were diagnosed between two and four years of age. Respective numbers of these benign and non-fatal malignant tumors found in control, perinatally irradiated, and all other irradiated dogs were 2 and 0; 5 and 1; and 5 and 1. Eight of the benign lesions were minute papillomas of the eyelids which were more frequent in the perinatally irradiated dogs. Overall, 71% (5 of 7) of the malignancies seen in the first four years of life occurred in the 29% of the dogs irradiated in the perinatal period. Sixty-seven percent (8 of 12) of all neoplasms, excluding eyelid papillomas, also occurred in perinatally irradiated dogs. These data suggest an increased risk for neoplasia after perinatal irradiation

  20. Alterations in immune responses in prenatally irradiated dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nold, J.B.; Benjamin, S.A.; Miller, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    Immunologic responses were studied in beagle dogs following prenatal (35 days gestation) irradiation to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing immune system. Each dog received 1.5 Gy 60 Co gamma irradiation or sham irradiation. Prenatally irradiated dogs exhibited a significant reduction in primary humoral antibody responses to inoculated sheep red blood cells, a T-dependent antigen, and a concurrent decrease in T-helper lymphocyte subpopulations in the peripheral blood at 3 to 4 months of age. Similarly, irradiated fetuses have been shown to have defects in epitheliostromal development of the thymus. It is suggested that the postnatal immunologic deficits may relate to the prenatal thymic injury

  1. Titanium implants in irradiated dog mandibles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The use of osseointegrated titanium implants has been a great benefit to selected cancer patients who otherwise would not be able to wear conventional and/or maxillofacial prostheses. Cognizant of the risk of osteoradionecrosis, we used an animal model to seek experimental evidence for successful osseointegration in bone irradiated to tumoricidal levels. Five healthy male beagle dogs received 60 gray to a previously edentulated and healed area of the right hemimandible. The left hemimandible was kept as a nonirradiated control. After 9 months, titanium implants were placed and allowed an additional 5 1/2 months to osseointegrate. At that time, block specimens were obtained, radiographed, photographed, and analyzed histologically. Although statistical significance cannot be attached to the results, osseointegration was achieved in half of the irradiated specimens

  2. A reliable method for reconstituting thymectomized, lethally irradiated guinea pigs with bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terata, N.; Tanio, Y.; Zbar, B.

    1984-01-01

    The authors developed a reliable method for reconstituting thymectomized, lethally irradiated guinea pigs. Injection of 2.5-10 x 10 7 syngeneic bone marrow cells into adult thymectomized, lethally irradiated guinea pigs produced survival of 46-100% of treated animals. Gentamycin sulfate (5 mg/kg of body weight) for 10 days was required for optimal results. Acidified drinking water (pH 2.5) appeared to be required for optimal results. Thymectomized, lethally irradiated, bone marrow reconstituted ('B') guinea pigs had impaired ability to develop delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity to mycobacterial antigens and cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity to keyhole limpet hemocyanin; proliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin were impaired. (Auth.)

  3. Role of vegetative nervous system in regulation of excretory function of irradiated dog stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostesha, N.Ya.

    1989-01-01

    Dogs and rats were exposed to γ/neutron- and X-radiation. The anterior part of dog's stomach was exposed to 10 Gy and 13 Gy respectively; rats were subjected to whole-body irradiation with absolutely lethal doses. Prior to irradiation, various parts of the vegetative nervous system of both types of animals were switched off pharmocologically. In addition to clinical investigation of radiation sickness the excretory function of the stomach was studied by the excretion of intravenously injected neutral red. The switching-off of the parasympathetic nervous system prior to irradiation stabilized the excretory processes in the stomach, increased the resistance of animals, and, vice wersa, the switching-off of the sympathetic nervous system destabilized the excetory processes and decreased the resistance of the organism

  4. Comparative influence of dose rate and radiation nature, on lethality after big mammals irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destombe, C.; Le Fleche, Ph.; Grasseau, A.; Reynal, A.

    1997-01-01

    For the same dose and the 30 days lethality as biological criterion, the dose rate influence is more important than the radiation nature on the results of an big mammals total body irradiation. (authors)

  5. Presence of virus neutralizing antibodies in cerebral spinal fluid correlates with non-lethal rabies in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement W Gnanadurai

    Full Text Available Rabies is traditionally considered a uniformly fatal disease after onset of clinical manifestations. However, increasing evidence indicates that non-lethal infection as well as recovery from flaccid paralysis and encephalitis occurs in laboratory animals as well as humans.Non-lethal rabies infection in dogs experimentally infected with wild type dog rabies virus (RABV, wt DRV-Mexico correlates with the presence of high level of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF and mild immune cell accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS. By contrast, dogs that succumbed to rabies showed only little or no VNA in the serum or in the CSF and severe inflammation in the CNS. Dogs vaccinated with a rabies vaccine showed no clinical signs of rabies and survived challenge with a lethal dose of wild-type DRV. VNA was detected in the serum, but not in the CSF of immunized dogs. Thus the presence of VNA is critical for inhibiting virus spread within the CNS and eventually clearing the virus from the CNS.Non-lethal infection with wt RABV correlates with the presence of VNA in the CNS. Therefore production of VNA within the CNS or invasion of VNA from the periphery into the CNS via compromised blood-brain barrier is important for clearing the virus infection from CNS, thereby preventing an otherwise lethal rabies virus infection.

  6. Inactivated recombinant plant virus protects dogs from a lethal challenge with canine parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeveld, J P; Brennan, F R; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, J L; Jones, T D; Boshuizen, R S; Vela, C; Casal, J I; Kamstrup, S; Dalsgaard, K; Meloen, R H; Bendig, M M; Hamilton, W D

    2001-06-14

    A vaccine based upon a recombinant plant virus (CPMV-PARVO1), displaying a peptide derived from the VP2 capsid protein of canine parvovirus (CPV), has previously been described. To date, studies with the vaccine have utilized viable plant chimaeric particles (CVPs). In this study, CPMV-PARVO1 was inactivated by UV treatment to remove the possibility of replication of the recombinant plant virus in a plant host after manufacture of the vaccine. We show that the inactivated CVP is able to protect dogs from a lethal challenge with CPV following parenteral immunization with the vaccine. Dogs immunized with the inactivated CPMV-PARVO1 in adjuvant displayed no clinical signs of disease and shedding of CPV in faeces was limited following CPV challenge. All immunized dogs elicited high titres of peptide-specific antibody, which neutralized CPV in vitro. Levels of protection, virus shedding and VP2-specific antibody were comparable to those seen in dogs immunized with the same VP2- peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Since plant virus-derived vaccines have the potential for cost-effective manufacture and are not known to replicate in mammalian cells, they represent a viable alternative to current replicating vaccine vectors for development of both human and veterinary vaccines.

  7. Radiation carcinogenesis in dogs irradiated during prenatal and postnatal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, S.A.; Saunders, W.J.; Angleton, G.M.; Lee, A.C. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (Unites States). Coll. of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences)

    1991-12-01

    To evaluate the lifetime hazards of ionizing radiation exposure, 1680 beagles recieved whole-body, 60-cobalt gamma exposures or sham-exposures during development. Eight groups of 120 dogs each recieved mean doses of 16 or 83 cGy at 8 (preimplantation), 28 (embryonic), or 55 (late fetal) days postcoitus (dpc), or 2 (neonatal) days postpartum (dpp). One group of 120 dogs received 83 cGy at 70 dpp (juvenile), and one group of 240 dogs received 83 cGy at 365 dpp (young adult). Sham-irradiations were delivered to 360 controls. Sexes were equally represented. Young dogs, up to 4 years of age, had an increase in benign and malignant neoplasms after irradiation in the perinatal period at 55 dpc or 2 dpp. Among these, 4 fatal cancers were observed. No malignancies occurred in comparably-aged controls. The increase in both fatal neoplasms and all neoplasms in the perinatally-exposed groups were statistically significant. Over the full lifetime, dogs irradiated in the perinatal period also had the strongest evidence for an increased risk for fatal malignancies of all types. Though not as strong, there was a trend for increased risk for fatal cancer in dogs irradiated at all other ages. The risk of fatal malignancy after irradiation was greater in females than in males. Dogs exposed at 55 dpc had a significant increase in lymphoid neoplasia and dogs exposed at 8 and 55 dpc had increased risk for hemangiosarcoma. There was no evidence for an increased risk for mammary carcinoma in irradiated females. Dogs exposed as juveniles at 70 dpp had a significant increase in all benign and malignant thyroid neoplasms, including fatal thyroid carcinoma. (author) 40 refs.

  8. Radiation carcinogenesis in dogs irradiated during prenatal and postnatal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, S.A.; Saunders, W.J.; Angleton, G.M.; Lee, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the lifetime hazards of ionizing radiation exposure, 1680 beagles recieved whole-body, 60-cobalt gamma exposures or sham-exposures during development. Eight groups of 120 dogs each recieved mean doses of 16 or 83 cGy at 8 (preimplantation), 28 (embryonic), or 55 (late fetal) days postcoitus (dpc), or 2 (neonatal) days postpartum (dpp). One group of 120 dogs received 83 cGy at 70 dpp (juvenile), and one group of 240 dogs received 83 cGy at 365 dpp (young adult). Sham-irradiations were delivered to 360 controls. Sexes were equally represented. Young dogs, up to 4 years of age, had an increase in benign and malignant neoplasms after irradiation in the perinatal period at 55 dpc or 2 dpp. Among these, 4 fatal cancers were observed. No malignancies occurred in comparably-aged controls. The increase in both fatal neoplasms and all neoplasms in the perinatally-exposed groups were statistically significant. Over the full lifetime, dogs irradiated in the perinatal period also had the strongest evidence for an increased risk for fatal malignancies of all types. Though not as strong, there was a trend for increased risk for fatal cancer in dogs irradiated at all other ages. The risk of fatal malignancy after irradiation was greater in females than in males. Dogs exposed at 55 dpc had a significant increase in lymphoid neoplasia and dogs exposed at 8 and 55 dpc had increased risk for hemangiosarcoma. There was no evidence for an increased risk for mammary carcinoma in irradiated females. Dogs exposed as juveniles at 70 dpp had a significant increase in all benign and malignant thyroid neoplasms, including fatal thyroid carcinoma. (author) 40 refs

  9. Failure patterns following cobalt irradiation in dogs with nasal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrall, D.E.; Heidner, G.L.; Novotney, C.A.; McEntee, M.C.; Page, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    The pattern of tumor recurrence was assessed in 24 dogs receiving cobalt radiation therapy for nasal carcinoma. Dogs were evaluated using nasal cavity computed tomography prior to treatment, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment, and at 6-month intervals thereafter if still alive. Dogs were treated with various combinations of total dose, and fraction size. Total doses were normalized to equivalent doses given in 3.0 Gy fractions. The extent of tumor regression or duration of tumor control were not dependent on absolute total dose, normalized total dose, or tumor type. The median duration of local control in all dogs was 312 days. Marked tumor regression was observed in 11 of the 24 dogs. Median duration of local control was significantly longer in dogs with marked tumor regression in comparison to dogs without tumor regression; 389 vs. 161 days respectively. When tumor recurrence was documented in dogs having tumor regression, the location of the recurrence was in the nasal cavity. No tumor recurred in a sinus or periorbital region, and only one geographic miss was detected. Tumor recurrence in the irradiated volume, including dogs with and without marked regression, was documented in 13 of the 24 dogs. The high local failure rate, coupled with the recurrence pattern in these dogs, suggests there may be an opportunity for improvement in local control through use of shrinking field techniques

  10. Photoreactivable sector of lethal damage in ultraviolet-irradiated Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balgavy, P.

    1976-01-01

    The photoreactivable sector of lethal damage in Escherichia coli Bsub(s-1), Escherichia coli B/r Hcr - and Escherichia coli B/r Hcr + cells after ultraviolet irradiation at 254 nm is 0.823 +- 0.004, 0.70 +- 0.01 and 0.53 +- 0.06, respectively, at 99% confidence limits. For the low values of the photoreactivable sector in the B/r Hcr - and B/r Hcr + strains are likely to be responsible dark repair processes which eliminate lethal damage, brought about by pyrimidine dimers, preferably in comparison with lethal damage caused by photoproducts of another type. (author)

  11. Dominant lethal mutations in male mice fed γ-irradiated diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, P.S.; Aravindakshan, M.; Aiyer, A.S.; Sundaram, K.

    1975-01-01

    Three groups of Swiss male mice were fed a stock ration of an unirradiated or irradiated (2.5 Mrad) test diet for 8 wk. After the feeding period, the males were mated with groups of untreated female mice for 4 consecutive weeks. The females were autopsied at mid-term pregnancy for evaluation of dominant lethal mutations. Numbers of dead implantations, including deciduomas and dead embryos, showed no significant differences among the different groups, thus producing no evidence of any induced post-implantation lethality in mice fed on irradiated diet. Similarly, there was no indication of preimplantation lethality, since implantation rates remained comparable among different groups. Consumption of irradiated diet did not affect the fertility of mice. Total pre- and post-implantation loss, as indicated by the numbers of live implantations remained comparable among all the groups of mice. (author)

  12. Dominant lethal mutations research in mice fed with irradiated black beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Z.P.

    1982-01-01

    To evaluate the potential mutagenic effects of irradiated black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) with conservation purpose, in germ cells of mice, dominant lethal assay were employed. Three groups of albino swiss male mice (S W-55) were fed with a normal ration, or unirradiated or irradiated (0,2; 0,5; 1; 5; 10; 15 e 20 KGy) test diets for eight weeks. After the feeding period the males were mated with groups of untreated females mice for four consecutive weeks. Numbers of pregnancy rates females were observed. The females were autopsied at mid-term pregnancy for evaluation of dominant lethal mutations. (author)

  13. Reproductive-phase and interphase lethal cell damage after irradiation and treatment with cytostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, G.

    1979-01-01

    After X-ray irradiation of manual cells, two lethal fractions occur due to reproductive and interphase death under low and high radiation doses. The damage kinetics on which this fact is based is compared with hypothetical tumour frequencies and leucemia induction caused in experiments. The reproductive-lethal damage can be manifested by means of colony size spectrometry, with the median colony size class differences (MCD) serving as measure for the damage found. The simultaneous effects of the cytostatics BLEOMYCIN or ICRF 159 and X-rays on reproductive lethal and interphase-lethal damage are measured by means of MCD and survival fraction, and the additive and intensifying effect' is judged with the help of suitably defined terms. This shows that the clinically used ICRF 159 has an additive effect on interphase-lethal and a sub-additive effect on reproductive-lethal cell damage. Thus, favourable results may be expected for the electivity factor in fractionated irradiation and with regard to delayed damage in healthy tissue. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 RDG [de

  14. Clinical and symptomatological study of pigs subjected to a lethal dose of integral gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaiman, M.; Guenet, J.-L.; Maas, J.; Nizza, P.

    1966-05-01

    Results are reported from a clinical and haematological study on a Corsican species of pigs wholly exposed to an approximately lethal dose of γ radiation. The aim of this work was to examine the changes in the irradiation syndrome of irradiation for pigs to make it thus possible to devise further experiments, in particular in the therapeutic field. The dose received was 285 rads (measured as the absorption in the vertical antero-posterior medial plane). Data are presented on cyto-haematological changes in the blood circulating immediately after irradiation, and followed up to death, and changes in the medullary cytology after irradiation. The clinical picture of lethal radiation injury in swine is described. (authors) [fr

  15. Mutagenicity assayed by dominant lethality testing in mice fed a combined gamma-irradiated diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupova, I.; Katsarova, Ts.; Bajrakova, A.; Baev, I.; Tencheva, S.

    1980-01-01

    Mice fed a combined gamma-irradiated diet were examined for a mutagenic effect using the dominant lethality test. Their feed contained the following irradiated ingredients: 20% maize, 10% dried plums, and 5% walnut kernels. Taking into account cycle duration in spermatogenesis and oogenesis, males were fed this special diet throughout 56 days, and females throughout 21 days. The experiments involved three animal groups: (1) fed the special diet containing irradiated ingredients; (2) fed the special diet but with the ingredients nonirradiated; and (3) fed standard vivarium diet. Matings to provide the first generation were between one parent fed the special diet and a partner fed standard diet. With an adequate number of implants examined on day 16 of gestation, embryonic death rate was not found to be increased; hence, induction of dominant lethality from consumption of irradiated diet failed to be demonstrated

  16. Protection of lethally irradiated mice with allogeneic fetal liver cells: influence of irradiation dose on immunologic reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulunay, O.; Good, R.A.; Yunis, E.J.

    1975-01-01

    After lethal irradiation long-lived, immunologically vigorous C3Hf mice were produced by treatment with syngeneic fetal liver cells or syngeneic newborn or adult spleen cells. Treatment of lethally irradiated mice with syngeneic or allogeneic newborn thymus cells or allogeneic newborn or adult spleen cells regularly led to fatal secondary disease or graft-versus-host reactions. Treatment of the lethally irradiated mice with fetal liver cells regularly yielded long-lived, immunologically vigorous chimeras. The introduction of the fetal liver cells into the irradiated mice appeared to be followed by development of immunological tolerance of the donor cells. The findings suggest that T-cells at an early stage of differentiation are more susceptible to tolerance induction than are T-lymphocytes at later stages of differentiation. These investigations turned up a perplexing paradox which suggests that high doses of irradiation may injure the thymic stroma, rendering it less capable of supporting certain T-cell populations in the peripheral lymphoid tissue. Alternatively, the higher and not the lower dose of irradiation may have eliminated a host cell not readily derived from fetal liver precursors which represents an important helper cell in certain cell-mediated immune functions, e.g., graft-versus-host reactions, but which is not important in others, e.g., allograft rejections. The higher dose of lethal irradiation did not permit development or maintenance of a population of spleen cells that could initiate graft-versus-host reactions but did permit the development of a population of donor cells capable of achieving vigorous allograft rejection

  17. Hemopoiesis in bone marrow of lethally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktora, L.; Zoubkova, M.; Urbankova, J.

    1976-01-01

    A percentual representation of individual types of cells and their share of the restoration of hemopoiesis in bone marrow was observed on the 9th, 12th, 16th and 20th days following transplantation of bone marrow cells to letally irradiated mice. Myelopoiesis was ascertained which on the 20th day after transplantation became the dominant constituent and reached peak level around the 16th day after transplantation. The examination further showed that with regard to the period of irradiation and transplantation the erythropoiesis in bone marrow culminates on the 9th day after the transplantation and that normal values are quickly restored. On the 2ath day myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis come close to values in normal bone marrow

  18. Effects of feeding lactobacillus GG on lethal irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, M.Y.; Chang, T.W.; Gorbach, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Mice exposed to 1400 rads of total body irradiation experienced 80%-100% mortality in 2 wk. Bacteremia was demonstrated in all dead animals. Feeding Lactobacillus GG strain reduced Pseudomonas bacteremia and prolonged survival time in animals colonized with this organism. In animals not colonized with Pseudomonas, feeding Lactobacillus GG also produced some reduction in early deaths, and there was less Gram-negative bacteremia in these animals compared with controls

  19. Forecasting of the lethality in cases of nonuniform accidental irradiation (experimental studies at external gamma irradiation of rats)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingilizova, K.

    1983-01-01

    A model is suggested that enables the prediction of death probability for the body (L) within the whole lethality dose range (DL 0 -DL 100 ), on the basis of predetermined physical characteristics: in cases of uneven external wholebody irradiation. Some biological effects of 4 variants of uneven irradiation have been studied, i.e. ventro-dorsal (V-D), dorso-ventral (D-V), cranio-caudal (Cr-Ca) and caudo-cranial (Ca-Cr). The following basic conclusions have been drawn: 1. The study of the biological effects of uneven irradiation, when estimated by the lethality factor, points out the lower efficiency of the former, if compared to even irradiation. 2. The even irradiation lethality in the conducted experiments, according to the ALE data and the postradiation mortality dynamics, is determined basically by the damage of the bloodforming tissue and the animals die of bone marrow syndrome. 3. The uneven irradiation, estimated by the total weight factor, is of lower efficiency than the even one. 4. The radiation-induced hypoplasia of the studied organs is exponential in character. 5. An original model for predicting radiation mortality in cases of uneven irradiation has been constructed. The model gives the possibility of relating the alterations in the index of biological efficiency reduction to the wholebody irradiation factor, as well as to the two systems with highest radiosensitivity: red bone marrow and the small intestine. The model helps determining the numerical value of death probability, depending on the average body irradiation doses and the integral unevenness factors for RBM. (author)

  20. Arrest of irradiated G1, S, or G2 cells at mitosis using nocodazole promotes repair of potentially lethal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, G.; Nuesse, M.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of synchronized Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, irradiated in G1, S, and G2 phases, to repair potentially lethal damage when arrested at mitosis by using 0.4 μg/ml nocodazole, a specific inhibitor of microtubule polymerization, has been studied. Cells irradiated in these phases were found to repair potentially lethal damage at mitosis. The extent of this repair was similar to that observed for cells irradiated at the same stages in the cell cycle but allowed to repair potentially lethal damage by incubating in balanced salt solution for 6 hr after X irradiation

  1. Protective effect of zinc against lethality of the irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, J.; Inada, T.; Machida, K.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of adding 1000 ppm Zn in the drinking water 10 days before gamma irradiation (562 - 1000 rad) of mice were studied. The mice which had received zinc had a lower mortality rate and a longer survival time compared to the controls. The LD 50 of gamma radiation was 690 rad in the control group and 770 rad in the zinc group. Zinc added to the culture medium of human melanoma cells did not shown any change in radiosensitivity; thus the radioprotective effect of zinc appears to work at the whole body level. (U.K.)

  2. Peculiarities of morphofunctional state of adenohypophysis in lethally irradiated recipients after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsaeva, A.A.; Glushko, T.A.; Shatilova, L.E.; Tupchienko, G.S.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of lethal irradiation and transplantation of syngenic bone marrow on the morphofunctional state of hypophysis at various stages of the posttransplantation period has been studied for 3 months using 100 linear male mice of 1 F 1 (CBAXC 57 B) line. The experiments conducted have shown that bone marrow transplantation reduces the intensity of the negative effect of irradiation on hypophysis and facililitates normalization of its histological structure. There was a correlation between changes in the number of secretory cells in the anterior lobe of the hypophysis and the level of corticosterone in irradiated and bone-marrow-protected animals

  3. Transplantation of homologous bone marrow cells to lethally irradiated mice: changes in the spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viktora, L; Hach, P; Zoubkova, M

    1975-01-01

    Bone marrow cell suspensions were administered intravenously to lethally irradiated mice. The number of colonies in the spleen and the regeneration of hematopoietic tissue in the spleen were studied on the 9th day after irradiation and transplantation. From a comparison of the histological picture and weight of the spleens, the authors conclude that the degree of regeneration of hematopoiesis in the spleen after irradiation and transplantation is reflected in the weight of the spleen as well as in the number of hematopoietic colonies.

  4. Metabolic changes after non-lethal X-irradiation of rats. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlersova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Slavkovska, E.; Praslicka, M.

    1981-01-01

    Male rats of the Wistar strain were fasted overnight prior to exposure to single whole-body X-ray dose of 2.39 Gy (250 R). Irradiated and sham-irradiated rats were pair-fed for 5 days, in the following period they were fed ad libitum. The levels of corticosterone and immunoreactive insulin in serum, glucose in blood, glycogen in liver, heart and skeletal muscle were determined 1 and 6 h, 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 38 days after irradiation and sham-irradiation. Irradiation of rats resulted, in one hour, in a decrease and, in two days, in an increase in blood glucose level. A marked increase in liver glycogen persisted from 6 h to 21 days after irradiation. The level of glycogen in the skeletal muscle was reduced after 6 h and increased on days 3 and 14. Heart muscle glycogen declined within the first 24 h and rose at 14 days after exposure. The kinetics of changes in the heart and skeletal muscle glycogen following non-lethal irradiation was similar and indicated an overlap of changes produced by fasting with those brought about by irradiation, particularly during the first week. Corticosterone in serum was markedly increased in rats 24 and 72 h after irradiation compared to pair-fed controls. The serum insulin concentration did not change after irradiation, except for a single increase on day 21. Irradiation with non-lethal doses produced changes in the parameters of the carbohydrate metabolism studied, except for serum insulin which reflected the changes in the nutrition regimen upon pair-feeding rather than the effect of ionizing irradiation. (author)

  5. Kidney allograft survival in dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, R.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Lum, C.T.; Lewis, W.I.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is immunosuppressive and, in rodents, can induce a state where transplantation of allogenic bone marrow results in chimerism and permanent acceptance of organ allografts from the donor strain. Twelve splenectomized dogs were treated with TLI (150 rads per fraction, total dose 1950 to 3000 rads) before bilateral nephrectomy and renal allotransplantation. Eight dogs received bone marrow from the kidney donor. In 13 untreated control dogs renal allografts functioned for a mean +- (SE) of 4.7 +- 0.3 days. In the four TLI treated dogs who did not receive bone marrow the renal allografts functioned for 15 to 76 days (two dogs died with functioning grafts). In the eight TLI treated dogs who received donor bone marrow, two died immediately after transplantation, two rejected at 3 and 13 days, one died at 13 days with a functioning graft, and two have had the grafts function for longer than 500 days. Chimerism was not detected in the one dog tested. The response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to stimulation with phytohemaglutinin and in mixed lymphocyte culture was suppressed for at least one month after TLI. The results confirm the immunosuppressive effect of TLI. The absence of kidney rejection in two recipients of donor bone marrow show the potential of this approach to induce long-term immunologic unresponsiveness as to an organ allograft, but the outcome is unpredictable and further experiments are needed to define the optimal conditions for administration of TLI and bone marrow to the recipients

  6. Lethal and sublethal cellular injury in multifraction irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, H.R.

    1975-01-01

    Work has been carried out on cellular injury in multifraction irradiation of mouse tissues and compared with similar work on human skin reported earlier by Dutreix et al (Eur. J. Cancer.; 9:159 (1973)). In agreement with Dutreix et al it is emphasized that the absolute amount of sublethal injury repaired per fractionation interval (Dsub(r)) is not as important to radiotherapists as the change in the amount repaired (ΔDsub(r)) when the dose-per-fraction is altered. It was found that although there is a critical divergence at low doses, the data for mouse tissues are similar to those previously given for human skin and support the conclusions: (i) That the capacity of many normal cells for accumulating and repairing sublethal radiation injury is probably not greatly different. (ii) That fixed exponents used for fraction number and time in iso-effect formulae are inaproporiate. At low doses-per-fraction, repair of sublethal injury is complete, or nearly so, and hence, additional fractionation of dose does not give appreciable additional sparing, whereas rapidly-regenerating tissues, due to the lengthening of overall time, would continue being spared by repopulation. (U.K.)

  7. Inhibitory action of chlorophyllin of autosome recessive lethals induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salceda, V.M.; Pimentel, P.A.E.; Cruces, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    The chlorophyllin is a sodium salt of the chlorophyll that has a strong protective action of the damage induced by different agents so much physical as chemical. In Drosophila there is reported this effect in somatic cells. In contrast, in germinal cells using tests with the sexual chromosomes has not been found such inhibitory action. For this reason, in this occasion we will refer to the effect of the lethality induced in autosome chromosomes, in particular to the chromosome II of this species. For such effect groups of males of the line Canton-S its were pre-treated for 24h with or without 69 mm of CCS and later on treaties with or without 40 Gy of gamma irradiation. The males were then subjected to the technical Cy L / Pm for the detection of recessive lethals. In the third generation the respective counts of the descendant of each one of them to determine the corresponding categories for each extracted chromosome were made. To be mendelian crosses it is expected for a normal chromosome a proportion 2:1 of individuals with genotype Cy L / +: +/+. The absence of individuals +/+ it is indicative of a lethal gene, until 10% of these individuals of each male's total descendant, it is considered that is carrying of a semi lethal gene. The sum of lethal and semi lethals constitutes the category detrimental. The obtained results indicated that the pre-treatment with CCS reduces in a significant way the frequency of induced lethals by 40 Gy of gamma rays. The fact that an effect inhibitor has not been observed in the test of recessive lethal bound to the sex obtained previously, it contrasts with the effect observed in the chromosome II, results of this study and with the one observed in the chromosome III in somatic cells. The above-mentioned shows a differential action of the CCS between sexual chromosomes and autosomal before the effect of the gamma radiation. At the moment we don't have an explanation to these evidences. To evaluate the action of the chlorophyllin

  8. Low survival of mice following lethal gamma-irradiation after administration of inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, M.; Pospisil, M.; Tkadlecek, L.; Viklicka, S.; Pipalova, I.; Hola, J.

    1992-01-01

    An impairment was observed of the survival of mice subjected to whole-body gamma-irradiation with a lethal dose of 10 Gy and treated with a repeated postirradiation administration of the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors (PGSIs) indomethacin or diclofenac. Morphological examination of the gastrointestinal tract and estimation of the blood loss into its lumen in animals treated with diclofenac did not show serious damage such as hemorrhages or perforation, but revealed structural injury to the intestinal mucosa indicating inflammatory processes. The lesions found are supposed to be connected with increased intestinal permeability which leads to endotoxin escape from the gut and a subsequent increased mortality rate of irradiated animals. It may be concluded that PGSIs are not suitable for the management of radiation sickness after an exposure to lethal doses of ionizing radiation. (author) 2 tabs., 4 figs., 20 refs

  9. A single dose of an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase 2, meloxicam, administered shortly after irradiation increases survival of lethally irradiated mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Dušek, L.; Hoferová, Zuzana; Weiterová, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 176, č. 2 (2011), s. 269-272 ISSN 0033-7587 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0158 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0128 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition * lethal irradiation * survival Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.684, year: 2011

  10. Changes in activities of adaptive liver enzymes in rats after non-lethal x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toropila, M.; Ahlersova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Benova, K.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of a single dose of whole-body X-irradiation of 2.39 Gy (250 R) on the activities of selected adaptive rat liver enzymes and blood serum corticosterone concentrations was followed for a period of 28 days. Rats of Wistar strain SPF breeding (VELAZ Prague) were used. Both irradiated and control animals were fed in pairs with the same amount of feed as was consumed by irradiated animals in the pilot experiment. The feed intake of irradiated animals decreased significantly until the fourth day. During the rest of the experimental period no significant differences were recorded in feed intake between the experimental and control groups. The activity of tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) in the liver of irradiated animals increased, with the exception of the initial period. Similar changes were recorded in the activity of tryptophane-2-3 dioxygenase (TO). A significant increase on the third day and a significant decrease from the seventh day after irradiation was recorded in the activity of aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Similar changes were observed with alanine aminotransferase (ALT). It is necessary to stress that the activity of this enzyme decreased also on the first day after irradiation. Until the third day there was a marked increase of serum corticosterone in the irradiated animals. The results point not only towards significant changes to the parameters observed, caused by a non-lethal irradiation dose, but also towards the importance of the nutritional regime, so-called paired feeding

  11. Evaluation of freshly irradiated wheat for dominant lethal mutations in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawan, S.C.; Aravindakshan, M.; Kumar, N.S.; Subba Rao, V.; Aiyar, A.S.; Sundaram, K.

    1977-01-01

    Three independent, serially performed experiments involving acute and chronic feeding of freshly irradiated wheat (75 krad, gamma-irradiation) were carried out in Wistar rats. In the first experiment groups of 10 males were given wheat for 1 week; irradiated wheat was consumed by the animals within 24 h of irradiation. In the other two experiments feeding of males was continued for 6 (10 males per group) and 12 (13 males per group) weeks, respectively, and the irradiated wheat was fed within 7 days of irradiation. At the end of each treatment period each male was paired with 3 females for 7 days and sequentially at weekly intervals for 5 or 8 weeks. Females were killed and examined for live and dead implantations and corpora lutea. There were no differences between groups with regard to fertility nor was there any inter-group difference as regards pre- and post-implantation losses whether the rats were fed irradiated or non-irradiated wheat. This suggested that even feeding of freshly irradiated wheat does not induce any dominant lethal mutations in rats

  12. Evaluation of freshly irradiated wheat for dominant lethal mutations in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawan, S C; Aravindakshan, M; Kumar, N S; Subba Rao, V; Aiyar, A S; Sundaram, K [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Bio-medical Group

    1977-01-01

    Three independent, serially performed experiments involving acute and chronic feeding of freshly irradiated wheat (75 krad, gamma-irradiation) were carried out in Wistar rats. In the first experiment groups of 10 males were given wheat for 1 week; irradiated wheat was consumed by the animals within 24 h of irradiation. In the other two experiments feeding of males was continued for 6 (10 males per group) and 12 (13 males per group) weeks, respectively, and the irradiated wheat was fed within 7 days of irradiation. At the end of each treatment period each male was paired with 3 females for 7 days and sequentially at weekly intervals for 5 or 8 weeks. Females were killed and examined for live and dead implantations and corpora lutea. There were no differences between groups with regard to fertility nor was there any inter-group difference as regards pre- and post-implantation losses whether the rats were fed irradiated or non-irradiated wheat. This suggested that even feeding of freshly irradiated wheat does not induce any dominant lethal mutations in rats.

  13. Megakaryocytopoiesis and the number of thrombocytes after bone marrow cell transplantation in lethally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktora, L.; Hermanova, E.; Zoubkova, M.

    1977-01-01

    Changes were studied in the number of thrombocytes in the peripheral blood and megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and spleen in lethally irradiated mice after the transplantation of bone marrow cells. It was found that the thrombocytes increased in dependence on time after transplantation with the maximal values around the 20th day. An increased megakaryocytopoiesis was observed not only in the bone marrow but also in the spleen. These ascertainments suggest the importance of the transplantation of bone marrow cells and the role of thrombocytes for the survival of the organism after irradiation. (author)

  14. Induction of dominant lethal mutations by gamma irradiation of Gallus domesticus spermatozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, J; Grom, A; Csuka, J; Kindlova, L [Poultry Research Institute, Ivanka pri Dunaji (Czechoslovakia)

    1977-01-01

    Mixed semen of Gallus domesticus cocks was gamma irradiated in vitro with exposures of 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 R at the exposure rate of 5.86 Rs/sup -1/. After the irradiation the semen was applied to experimental and control layer hens, the embryonic mortality in F/sub 1/ was observed, the total number of incubated eggs was 3344. Irradiation with 500 R had a favourable influence on embryonic vitality, the exposures 1000, 2000, and 3000 R resulted in increased embryonic mortality, for 2100 R a 50% mortality of offspring was found. Induced dominant lethality was manifest during embryonic and oviduct development. The frequency of induced dominant lethality for exposures used was 19.2, 9.9, 48.3, and 69.1%, the values of mutation rate were 0.087, 0.104, 0.659, and 1.174. The mutation rate had a linear course, the value of the lethal hit per gamete for 1 R was 1.04x10/sup -4/.

  15. Induction of dominant lethal mutations by gamma irradiation of Gallus domesticus spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, J.; Grom, A.; Csuka, J.; Kindlova, L.

    1977-01-01

    Mixed semen of Gallus domesticus cocks was gamma irradiated in vitro with exposures of 500, 1000, 2000 and 3000 R at the exposure rate of 5.86 Rs -1 . After the irradiation the semen was applied to experimental and control layer hens, the embryonic mortality in F 1 was observed, the total number of incubated eggs was 3344. Irradiation with 500 R had a favourable influence on embryonic vitality, the exposures 1000, 2000 and 3000 R resulted in increased embryonic mortality, for 2100 R a 50% mortality of offspring was found. Induced dominant lethality was manifest during embryonic and oviduct development. The frequency of induced dominant lethality for exposures used was 19.2, 9.9, 48.3, and 69.1%, the values of mutation rate were 0.087, 0.104, 0.659, and 1.174. The mutation rate had linear course, the value of the lethal hit per gamete for 1 R was 1.04x10 -4 . (author)

  16. Determination the lethal dose of ascaris lumbricoides ova by gamma irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shamma, M A; Sharabi, N

    2002-01-01

    The lethal gamma irradiation dose of ascaris lumbricoides which collected from Damascus Sewage water Plant was determined. Ascaris lumbricoides ova were treated with several gamma irradiation doses with (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4,...and 1.5 KGy). No morphological changes were observed on the eggs when directly examined microscopically after irradiation. However after two weeks of incubation at 37 degree centigrade the cell contents of the eggs which irradiated with 0.5 KGy and beyond were fragmented and scattered in the whole eggs and no larvae were observed after eight weeks of incubation. It is concluded that the dose 0.5 my be considered as the dose of choice if sewage water is to be treated by gamma rays.

  17. Determination the lethal dose of ascaris lumbricoides ova by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamma, M.; Al-Adawi, M.; Sharabi, N.

    2002-11-01

    The lethal gamma irradiation dose of ascaris lumbricoides which collected from Damascus Sewage water Plant was determined. Ascaris lumbricoides ova were treated with several gamma irradiation doses with (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4,...and 1.5 KGy). No morphological changes were observed on the eggs when directly examined microscopically after irradiation. However after two weeks of incubation at 37 degree centigrade the cell contents of the eggs which irradiated with 0.5 KGy and beyond were fragmented and scattered in the whole eggs and no larvae were observed after eight weeks of incubation. It is concluded that the dose 0.5 my be considered as the dose of choice if sewage water is to be treated by gamma rays. (author)

  18. Experimental studies of the reimplantation of irradiated lung in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, T; Fujimura, S; Sohara, Y; Kawakami, M; Okaniwa, G [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis and Cancer

    1978-02-01

    In order to treat the patients with lung cancer who have impaired cardiopulmonary function, a new method is designed, which includes the following steps; 1) pneumonectomy, 2) resection of tumor-bearing lobe, 3) /sup 60/Co irradiation to the remaining lobe, and 4) orthotopic reimplantation of the irradiated lung. The purpose of present study is to clarify the feasibility to use this method clinically. Using adult mongreal dogs, left lung was excised, irradiated and reimplanted. Radiation was carried out from 2,000 rad to 4,000 rad. Viability and function of reimplanted lungs were evaluated by their survival time, serial chest x-ray films, sup(99m)Tc-MAA perfusion scanning, unilateral pulmonary artery occlusion test and histologic examinations. Of 17 animals, 12 survived postoperative period and following results were obtained; 1) no dogs developed pulmonary edema, 2) only one dog was considered to die from acute radiation pneumonitis, 3) serial perfusion scanning showed a gradual decrease in flow distribution to the transplanted lung, 4) the right pulmonary occlusion test done in the dog irradiated with 2,000 rad revealed well reserved pulmonary function 2 months after the operation, and 5) histologically, most irradiated lungs revealed so-called ''late reaction'' of lung fibrosis, but there was the case with nearly normal findings after 6 months from the operation. Although many reports concerning to the radiation pneumonitis are published, there have not been any such reports as the present study. From our experiment, it may be indicated that there is a feasibility to use this new method clinically.

  19. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Zhiguo [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chao, Nelson J. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Benny J., E-mail: chen0032@mc.duke.edu [Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  20. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S.; Li, Zhiguo; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells

  1. Recombinant rabies virus expressing the H protein of canine distemper virus protects dogs from the lethal distemper challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Xue; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Yang, Yong; Sun, Na; Tan, Bin; Li, Zhen-Guang; Cheng, Shi-Peng; Fu, Zhen F; Wen, Yong-Jun

    2014-12-05

    The rabies virus (RV) vector LBNSE expressing foreign antigens have shown considerable promise as vaccines against viral and bacteria diseases, which is effective and safe. We produced a new RV-based vaccine vehicle expressing 1.824 kb hemagglutinin (H) gene of the canine distemper virus (CDV) by reverse genetics technology. The recombinant virus LBNSE-CDV-H retained growth properties similar to those of vector LBNSE both in BSR and mNA cell culture. The H gene of CDV was expressed and detected by immunostaining. To compare the immunogenicity of LBNSE-CDV-H, dogs were immunized with each of these recombinant viruses by intramuscular (i.m.). The dogs were bled at third weeks after the immunization for the measurement of virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) and then challenged with virulent virus (ZJ 7) at fourth weeks. The parent virus (LBNSE) without expression of any foreign molecules was included for comparison. Dogs inoculated with LBNSE-CDV-H showed no any signs of disease and exhibited seroconversion against both RV and CDV H protein. The LBNSE-CDV-H did not cause disease in dogs and conferred protection from challenge with a lethal wild type CDV strain, demonstrating its potential value for wildlife conservation efforts. Together, these studies suggest that recombinant RV expressing H protein from CDV stimulated high levels of adaptive immune responses (VNA), and protected all dogs challenge infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reactivation of Immunological Response in Lethally X-Irradiated Mice Treated with Isogeneic Bone Marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovic, V.; Slijepcevic, M.; Hrsak, I. [Institute Ruder Boskovic, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Croatia)

    1968-08-15

    Male and female C57BL/H and CBA/H mice aged 10-12 weeks were used as recipients and donors, respectively. All recipient mice were given a lethal whole-body X-irradiation dose (850 R for C57BL and 950 R for CBA mice) followed by iv injection of 10 x 106 isogeneic eosin-negative bone-marrow cells suspended in 0.5 ml of Hank's solution. The number of eosin-positive cells was less than 10%. The state of immunological responsiveness of irradiated recipients was measured at different time intervals up to 86 days after irradiation. The immune response to bacterial antigen was measured with the titre of agglutinating antibodies in serum six days after iv antigenic stimulation with a suspension of 2 x 10{sup 7} killed Salmonella typhimurium cells. The immune response to tissue antigens was evaluated by: (a) the effectiveness of the spleen cells from isologous radiation chimeric parental mice in preventing bone marrow from F{sub 1} (C57BL x CBA) hybrid donor from therapeutically affecting lethally irradiated F j recipient mice; (b) the effectiveness of the spleen cells in inducing splenom egaly in recipient F{sub 1} hybrid mice (Simonsen test). It was found that the responsiveness to bacterial antigens reappears much earlier and increases much faster than the immunological responsiveness to tissue antigens. (author)

  3. Caffeine protects mice against whole-body lethal dose of {gamma}-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, K.C.; Hebbar, S.A.; Kale, S.P.; Kesavan, P.C. [Biosciences Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    1999-06-01

    Administration of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), a major component of coffee, to Swiss mice at doses of 80 or 100 mg/kg body weight 60 min prior to whole-body lethal dose of {gamma}-irradiation (7.5 Gy) resulted in the survival of 70 and 63% of animals, respectively, at the above doses in contrast to absolutely no survivors (LD-100/25 days) in the group exposed to radiation alone. Pre-treatment with a lower concentration of caffeine (50 mg/kg) did not confer any radioprotection. The protection exerted by caffeine (80 mg/kg), however, was reduced from 70 to 50% if administered 30 min prior to irradiation. The trend statistics reveal that a dose of 80 mg/kg administered 60 min before whole-body exposure to 7.5 Gy is optimal for maximal radioprotection. However, caffeine (80 mg/kg) administered within 3 min after irradiation offered no protection. While there is documentation in the literature that caffeine is an antioxidant and radioprotector against the toxic pathway of radiation damage in a wide range of cells and organisms, this is the first report demonstrating unequivocally its potent radioprotective action in terms of survival of lethally whole-body irradiated mice. (author)

  4. Gastrointestinal decontamination of dogs treated with total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Heidt, P.J.; Zurcher, C.

    1981-01-01

    Procedures for total and selective gastrointestinal decontamination of dogs are described. The selective procedure removed only Gram negative aerobic bacteria, yeast and fungi. Dogs receiving total decontamination were less susceptible to the GI syndrome following total body irradiation (TBI) than

  5. Models for pulmonary lethality and morbidity after irradiation from internal and external sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.; Filipy, R.E.; Hahn, E.F.

    1989-05-01

    This report provides a hazard-function model for estimating the risk of death from radiation pneumonitis and/or pulmonary fibrosis following a light-water nuclear power accident. A similar model is also provided for estimating the prevalence of respiratory functional morbidity among those that survive death from acute effects. Hazard-function models for lethality and for morbidity were constructed using the cumulative hazard estimator H, which is related to the risk estimator R through the equation R = 1-exp(-H). The estimator H can be calculated using information provided in the report. The method of calculation depends on the exposure scenario. In general, the total normalized dose X for lethality or for morbidity is calculated. For lethality, X = 1 corresponds to a median lethal dose (LD 50 ); for morbidity, X = 1 corresponds to a median effective dose (ED 50 ). H is related to X by the equation H = 1n(2)X/sup V/, where V depends on the type of radiation (or radiations) involved. Contributions to X can arise from each of two main modes of exposure: (1) brief exposure of the lung, at a relatively high dose rate, to mainly external gammas, followed by (2) chronic internal alpha, and/or beta, and/or gamma irradiation of the lung. Equations are provided for calculating the contributions to X from both modes of exposure. 73 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Restoring efficiency of hemopoietic cell transplantation in a mouse lethally irradiated by a total exposure to X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, Gino

    1959-10-01

    This research thesis reports the study of possibility of treatments (or restoration) of a mouse which has been submitted to a lethal dose of X rays. More particularly, the author compared the restoring efficiency of bone marrow and fetal liver injected in a mouse which had been lethally irradiated by a total exposure to X rays. He also studied the functional status of the hemopoietic graft, and the emergence of the secondary disease in mice which had been as well lethally irradiated and then restored by injection of bone marrow and fetal liver. The author then addressed the influence of the induction of immune tolerance of the host with respect to the donor on the survival of a mouse lethally irradiated and restored by homologue bone marrow [fr

  7. Metabolic changes after non-lethal X-irradiation of rats. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlers, I.; Ahlersova, E.; Sedlakova, A.; Praslicka, M.

    1981-01-01

    Male rats of the Wistar strain were subjected to whole-body X-irradiation with 2.39 Gy (250 R) and after irradiation they were pair-fed with the sham-irradiated control group. One, 6 and 24 h, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 38 days after exposure the animals were sacrificed and examined for serum and some tissue lipids. In the first hours an increase in lipolysis in the white adipose tissue and accumulation of non-esterified fatty acids and triacylglycerols (TG) in the liver predominated; phospholipid level increased in serum and liver and decreased in bone marrow and thymus. The later phase was characterized by hypertriacylglycerolaemia and a transient hypercholesterolaemia; accumulation of TG in bone marrow was the most important change, however. Changes in the lipid composition of the serum and tissues, except for an increase in TG level in thymus, returned to normal levels at the end of the observation period. Pair-feeding provided an equivalent nutritional situation in irradiated and sham-irradiated animals and thus eliminated the non-specific changes caused by different levels of food intake in both groups of animals, especially in the initial period. A sufficiently long observation period is necessary for estimating the kinetics of metabolic changes in rats exposed to non-lethal doses of X-irradiation. (author)

  8. Functional and morphological recovery of the T-cell compartment in lethally irradiated and reconstituted mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraal, G.; Hilst, B. van der; Boden, D.

    1979-01-01

    The recovery of the T-cell compartment in mice after lethal irradiation and reconstitution was studied using functional and morphological parameters. T-helper cell activity, determined by the direct SRBC-plaque-forming cell (PFC) response, recovered in a similar fashion as T-memory function which was studied by adoptive transfer of carrier-primed cells. Both functions returned to control levels in 2.5 to 3 months. Using immunoperoxidase staining of frozen sections with anti-T cell serum, the morphological recovery of the T-cell dependent areas in the white pulp of the spleen could be studied and compared with the functional recovery. (author)

  9. Influence on DNA repair inhibitors on dominant lethal factors after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engl, D.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were performed in order to test the hypothesis of a correlation between ionizing radiation and DNA repair inhibition under in vivo conditions. In a biometrically planned dominant lethal test on mice, the repair inhibition on the male gametes by butazolidine, TWEEN 80 and vitamin A was studied after gamma irradiation at 20 rad/10 min. No effect was observed in the case of butazolidine and TWEEN 80, whereas the influence of a high concentration of vitamin A (1 million IE/kg) was just at the statistical significancy threshold. (G.G.)

  10. Influence of radioprotectors on total body weight evolution and on oxygen consumption in lethal dose irradiated animals. (Preliminary study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatome, M.; Martine, G.; Bargy, E.; Andrieu, L.

    Comparison of total body weight evolution and oxygen consumption in lethal dose irradiated animals, protected by various well known radioprotective substances, isolated or in mixture, with evolution and consumption of non protected animals irradiated at the same dose and with these of check animals [fr

  11. Effect of restricted access to food on metabolic changes in lethally X-irradiated rats. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toropila, M.; Ahlers, I.; Ahlersova, E.; Praslicka, M.

    1982-01-01

    Differences in the reaction of glucose in blood and in that of glycogen in liver in animals with free access to food and in those with restricted food intake to lethal irradiation by X-rays were studied. SPF bred male rats of the Wistar strain were fed by common laboratory diet and by tap water ad libitum (AL group) or food was accessible to them (in unlimited amounts) only in the period between 09.00 a. m. and 11.00 a. m. (meal-fed group, MF), all under standard laboratory conditions. After more than three weeks of adaptation to the nutrition patterns and 22 h after the last food intake, animals of both groups were irradiated with a single whole-body 14.35 Gy dose of X-rays and/or sham irradiated, respectively. Glucose concentration in blood was increased in both groups during the experiment; terminal hyperglycaemia was more expressed in the MF group. Due to the high initial glycogen concentration in the liver of MF irradiated animals the accumulation of glycogen was substantially lower and started later than in irradiated AL animals. (author)

  12. Homogeneous antibodies in lethally irradiated and autologous bone marrow reconstituted Rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, P. Van Den; Radl, J.; Loewenberg, B.; Swart, A.C.W.

    1976-01-01

    Ten Rhesus monkeys were lethally irradiated and reconstituted with autologous bone marrow. During the restoration period, the animals were immunized with DNP-Rhesus albumin and IgA1lambda-10S human paraprotein. One or more transient homogenous immunoglobulin components appeared in sera of all experimental monkeys. In four animals, these homogeneous immunoglobulins were shown to be specific antibodies against DNP-Rhesus albumin. They gradually became as heterogeneous as those in control monkeys which were immunized but not irradiated and transplanted. The onset of the specific antibody response after immunization was slightly delayed in the experimental group. On determining the time necessary to reach normalization of the overall immunoglobulin levels and the normal heterogeneity of the immunoglobulin spectrum, it was found to be more than 1 year in most of the animals. (author)

  13. Effects of lethal dose of γ-irradiation on intestinal enzymes of the pigeons Columba livia intermedia Strickland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadhia, P.K.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of γ-irradiation with lethal dose (1000 rads) on alkaline phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase have been studied in two different regions (duodenum and ileum) of small intestine of pigeons. The enzymes were studied at different intervals like 2, 4, 6 and 8 days after irradiation. The sp. activities of enzyme increased significantly both in duodenum and ileum. However, significant increase in alkaline phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase were observed at the 2nd and the 4th days post-irradiation respectively. The increase in enzyme activities may present de novo synthesis of these enzymes after lethal dose of irradiation. The histologic picture revealed that after the 4th day of irradiation, the number of goblet cells increased and after the 6th day crypt-villus system was destroyed completely as compared to sham-irradiated pigeons. (author)

  14. Effects of lethal dose of. gamma. -irradiation on intestinal enzymes of the pigeons Columba livia intermedia Strickland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadhia, P.K. (South Gujarat Univ., Surat (India). Dept. of Biosciences); Shah, V.C. (Gujarat Univ. School of Sciences, Ahmedabad (India))

    1979-09-01

    Effect of ..gamma..-irradiation with lethal dose (1000 rads) on alkaline phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase have been studied in two different regions (duodenum and ileum) of small intestine of pigeons. The enzymes were studied at different intervals like 2, 4, 6 and 8 days after irradiation. The sp. activities of enzyme increased significantly both in duodenum and ileum. However, significant increase in alkaline phosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase were observed at the 2nd and the 4th days post-irradiation respectively. The increase in enzyme activities may present de novo synthesis of these enzymes after lethal dose of irradiation. The histologic picture revealed that after the 4th day of irradiation, the number of goblet cells increased and after the 6th day crypt-villus system was destroyed completely as compared to sham-irradiated pigeons.

  15. Protective properties of plasma of burnt and irradiated rats against lethal effect of endotoxins in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budagov, R S; Chureyeva, L N

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to estimate protective properties of plasma in disease with increased endotoxemia. Burns and acute radiation sickness were used as models of suppression of physiological mechanisms of detoxication. Experiments were performed on male Wistar rats and mice, which received 3rd degree burns over 15% of the body surface, whole body gamma irradiation at 7.5 Gr or both. At 3 hours, 3, 7 and 12 days after the exposure the animals were decapitated and blood collected. The irradiated mice received 0.2 ml endotoxin intraperitoneally, 1.0 ml freshly prepared rat plasma, then the lethality of the mice in 24 hours was observed. It was found that the plasma of intact rats was capable of decreasing the lethal effects of S. typhimurium and E. coli endotoxins in vivo in mice. Deep skin burns, acute radiation sickness and the combined effects of radiation and thermal injury did not change this phenomenon. The plasma of the experimental rats retained the protective properties at various periods of time after the thermal, radiation and combined exposures. The functioning of the humoral detoxication mechanism is radioresistant, indirectly indicating the nonimmunoglobulin nature of endotoxin inactivators. 19 references.

  16. Repair of potentially lethal and sublethal radiation damage in x-irradiated ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, Atsushi; Okamoto, Mieko; Tsuchiya, Takehiko.

    1985-01-01

    The ability of cells to repair cellular radiation damage during the growth of TMT-3 ascites tumor and the effect of host reaction on the repair ability were examined by using an in vitro assay of cell clonogenicity after in situ irradiation of tumor cells. In single-dose experiments, the repair of potentially lethal radiation damage (PLD) was observed in stationary phase cells (12-day tumor) of the unirradiated host, but not in exponential phase cells (3-day tumor) of the unirradiated host animals. However, if previously irradiated host animals were used, even the exponentially growing tumor cells showed repair of PLD. In two-dose experiments, the ability to repair sublethal radiation damage (SLD) in exponential phase tumor cells was less than that of stationary phase cells in the unirradiated host. In the pre-irradiated host, the extent of the repair in exponential phase cells was somewhat enhanced. These results suggest that irradiation of host animals might suppress a factor that inhibits repair, resulting in enhancement of the repair capability of tumor cells. (author)

  17. Tanacetum parthenium leaf extract mediated survival protection in lethally irradiated Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, Prashanth; Pooja, S.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Shetty, Jayaram; Peter, Alex John; Jose, Jerish M.

    2016-01-01

    Search for less-toxic radioprotectors has spurred interest in the development of natural products. In Ayurveda, the traditional medicine, Tanacetum species have been used to treat ailments since ancient times throughout the world. Effects of the administration of different concentrations of Tanacetum parthenium leaf aqueous extract (TPLA), Tanacetum parthenium leaf ethanolic extract (TPLE) were investigated in Swiss albino mice. Mice (20-25 g) were randomly divided into 8 groups of ten animals each. The control group and the radiation group were treated daily with oral administration of saline for 15 days. Each subgroups of TPLA and TPLE were treated with doses of 50, 100 and 250 mg/kg daily for 15 days. On the 15th day, all were irradiated with 10 Gy whole body irradiation. Survival was observed daily up to 30th post-irradiation day. Data were analysed using the Kaplan-Meier survival curves. The significance difference in survival between control, radiation and treatment groups were observed (P < 0.001). Current studies revealed the protective effect of Tanacetum parthenium rendering high survivability in lethally irradiated mice. (author)

  18. The entry of the prothymocyte into the thymus after lethal irradiation and bone marrow transplantation. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, A.H.; Visser, J.W.M.; Zoetelief, J.; Bekkum, D.W. van

    1988-01-01

    The time of entry of prothymocytes into the thymus after lethal irradiation and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was determined by exposing the thymus only or the whole body with the thymus shielded to a second irradiation after different intervals. The repopulation of the thymus by donor type cells was determined by a thymus repopulation assay using donor specific markers. Reirradiation of the thymus kills the prothymocytes that have entered the thymus during the interval. It was found that reirradiation of the thymus from 48 hours after BMT onwards increasingly delayed thymus regeneration. This shows that donor prothymocytes do not enter the thymus until about 2 days after BMT and that they continue to do so during at least 3 subsequent days. In the second reirradiation protocol thymus regeneration occurred earlier in the shielded thymus than in thymuses of whole body irradiated mice. Earlier thymus regeneration was not seen in mice that were reirradiated at 24 hours after BMT, but occurred only when irradiation took place at 48 hours and later. These data are consistent with those obtained in the first protocol. The results are in contradiction with results of direct homing experiments, which showed entrance of donor cells within 3 hours after BMT. A functional assay demonstrated that the early appearing cells cannot be prothymocytes. In retransplantation experiments it was shown that the bone marrow may indeed be the initial homing site of prothymocytes. 14 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 table

  19. Radioprotective effect of chitosan in sub-lethally X-ray irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Ikota, Nobuo; Arima, Hiromi; Watanabe, Yoshito; Yukawa, Masae; Ozawa, Toshihiko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kim, Hee-Sun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Corp., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Radiation Health Research Inst.; Bom, Hee-Seung; Kim, Young-Ho [Chonnam Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of). Hospital

    2003-03-01

    The radioprotective effect of chitosan was studied in mice following whole-body X-ray irradiation. C3H/He mice were exposed to 7 Gy, and their survival rates were examined. The survival rates of chitosan-diet mice were about 20% higher than those of mice on a standard diet, and the rates dropped sharply to a plateau at day 10 after X-ray irradiation. The chitosan-diet mice had an increased weight ratio of spleen to body within the experimental period. The leukocyte, thrombocyte, and erythrocyte counts as well as the hematocrit and hemoglobin levels were recovered significantly and more rapidly in the chitosan-diet mice than the standard-diet mice at day 14 after irradiation. The scavenging abilities of chitosan were evaluated by the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping method. These observations suggested that chitosan led to hematopoetic activation and leuko-cytogenesis in mice after sub-lethal dose irradiation, and that the biological response might be caused by radical trapping or scavenging. (author)

  20. Soluble factor(s) from bone marrow cells can rescue lethally irradiated mice by protecting endogenous hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Zhan, Yuxia; Burke, Kathleen A; Anderson, W French

    2005-04-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced myeloablation can be rescued via bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or administration of cytokines if given within 2 hours after radiation exposure. There is no evidence for the existence of soluble factors that can rescue an animal after a lethal dose of radiation when administered several hours postradiation. We established a system that could test the possibility for the existence of soluble factors that could be used more than 2 hours postirradiation to rescue animals. Animals with an implanted TheraCyte immunoisolation device (TID) received lethal-dose radiation and then normal bone marrow Lin- cells were loaded into the device (thereby preventing direct interaction between donor and recipient cells). Animal survival was evaluated and stem cell activity was tested with secondary bone marrow transplantation and flow cytometry analysis. Donor cell gene expression of five antiapoptotic cytokines was examined. Bone marrow Lin- cells rescued lethally irradiated animals via soluble factor(s). Bone marrow cells from the rescued animals can rescue and repopulate secondary lethally irradiated animals. Within the first 6 hours post-lethal-dose radiation, there is no significant change of gene expression of the known radioprotective factors TPO, SCF, IL-3, Flt-3 ligand, and SDF-1. Hematopoietic stem cells can be protected in lethally irradiated animals by soluble factors produced by bone marrow Lin- cells.

  1. Affecting mortality of whole-body gamma-irradiated Beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dostal, M.; Kuna, P.; Neruda, O.; Petyrek, P.; Simsa, J.; Vavrova, J.; Skopec, F.

    1982-01-01

    The efficacy is compared of radioprotection and the complex treatment of acute radiation syndrome in laboratory dogs. One group of dogs was administered an injection of radioprotectives, the other was a control group. The treated group was administered vitamins and antibiotics in injections after the irradiation. It was found that complex treatment between days 1 and 28 after irradiation is relatively effective. In the treated dogs radioprotection does not significantly influence survival or even reduces survival. (M.D.)

  2. Remote effects in treated dogs survived acute radiation sickness. Hemodynamics at various times after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostesha, N.Ya.; Lopukhova, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Dogs were exposed to X-radiation at a dose of 15 Gy; part of them received a complex treatment. The morphological of internal organs of control dogs were made before death (on days 4 to 15 after irradiation). The treated dogs were killed 0.5-2 years following irradiation. Hemodynamics normalization was noted in 1.5-2 years in the liver, brain cortex, adrenals, insular tissue of the pancreas, and lymph nodes

  3. Autologous bone marrow transplantation following chemotherapy and irradiation in dogs with spontaneous lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowles, C.A.; Bull, M.; McCormick, K.; Kadin, M.; Lucas, D.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty dogs with spontaneous lymphomas were administered two to six cycles of chemotherapy and were randomized into 3 groups to receive 800 rads of total body irradiation and autologous bone marrow transplantation. Of 10 dogs irradiated after chemotherapy-induced remission and infused with remission marrow (group 1), 8 (80%) had successful grafts and experienced remissions lasting 62 to 1024 days. Of 9 dogs irradiated during remission and infused with remission marrow mixed with autologous tumor cells (group 2), 6 (66%) had remission lasting 15 to 45 days. Eleven dogs with progressive tumor growth (relapse) following chemotherapy were irradiated and infused with remission marrow (group 3). Tumor remission lasting 39 to 350 days was observed in 5 dogs (45%) in this group, and 6 dogs died in less than 30 days. Dogs in groups 1 to 3 had median survival times of 216, 60, and 45 days, respectively. The prolonged survival times for dogs in group 1 compared to dogs in groups 2 and 3 suggest that protocols involving irradiation and autologous marrow grafting in this model would be most effective when these protocols are applied to animals having a minimum tumor burden at the time of irradiation and when the grafting is done with tumor-free autologous marrow

  4. The effects of gut commensal bacteria depletion on mice exposed to acute lethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Bing; Xu Zhiwei; Zhang Chenggang

    2007-01-01

    The prevention and management of bacterial infection are the mainstays of therapies for irradiation victims. However, worries about adverse effects arise from gut commensal flora depletion owing to the broad-spectrum antibiotics treatment. In the present study, we investigated the effects of gut bacteria depletion on the mice receiving total-body irradiation (TBI) at a single dose of 12 Gy. One group of mice was merely exposed to TBI but was free of antibiotic treatment throughout the experiment, while the other two groups of mice were additionally given broad-spectrum antibiotics, either from 2 weeks before or immediately after irradiation. The survival time of each animal in each group was recorded for analysis. Results showed that the mean survival time of mice was longest in the group without antibiotic treatment and shortest in the group treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics from 2 weeks before TBI. In conclusion, our data suggested that depletion of gut commensal bacteria with broad-spectrum antibiotics seemed deleterious for mammals receiving lethal TBI. (author)

  5. Dominant lethal mutations in insects with holokinetic chromosomes: irradiation of pink bollworm sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, G.J.; LaChance, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    Adult males of the pink bollworm, Pectinophora gosypiella (Saunders), were irradiated with 19 and 30 krad of gamma radiation and mated with virgin, untreated females. Males treated with 19 or 30 krad of gamma radiation, at 2 to 24-h or 48 to 72-h postemergence, respectively, did not show reduced mating frequency compared with the untreated male controls. However, transfer of eupyrene sperm was reduced by treating 2 to 24-h postemergent males with 30 krad. Irradiation with 19 or 30 krad did not cause complete male sterility; 12.7 and 16.8 percent, respectively, of the fertilized eggs hatched. Eggs fertilized with irradiated sperm were examined cytologically and showed a retardation of embryonic development up to the blastoderm stage. From the blastoderm stage onward, development was parallel to those eggs which were fertilized by unirradiated sperm. Of the embryos in the groups treated with 30 and 19 krad, 51.3 to 66.6 percent, respectively, developed into fully differentiated, normal-appearing, prehatch embryos. The radiation-induced dominant lethal mutations were, generally, expressed very late in embryonic development

  6. B-lymphocyte differentiation in lethally irradiated and reconstituted mice. II. Recovery of humoral immune responsiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozing, J.; Brons, N.H.C.; Benner, R.

    1977-01-01

    The recovery of humoral immune responsiveness was studied in lethally irradiated, fetal liver-reconstituted mice. By means of both membrane fluorescence and antibody formation to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as a functional assay, the rate of recovery of the compartments of B and T lymphocytes was determined in various lymphoid organs. The recovery of the immunoglobulin-positive (B) cell compartment after irradiation and reconstitution started in the spleen. This organ was also found to be the first in which the recovery of the B-cell population was completed. The interval between the recovery of the B-cell population in the spleen and that in the other organs tested was found to increase when the irradiated mice were reconstituted with spleen colony cells instead of fetal liver cells. This proved to be caused by the number and nature of the reconstituting hemopoietic stem cells. The immunoglobulin-positive (B) cells were found to appear before SRBC-reactive B cells could be demonstrated in spleen, lymph nodes, and Peyer's patches. The appearance of T lymphocytes in the various lymphoid organs required even more time. By means of cell transfer experiments, a sequential appearance of the precursors of anti-SRBC IgM-, IgG-, and IgA-plaque-forming cells could be demonstrated in spleen, bone marrow, lymph nodes, and Peyer's patches

  7. Indirect effects are involved in the production of potentially lethal damage in X irradiated escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, D.

    1985-01-01

    When living cells are exposed to low LET radiation, 60 to 70% of the resulting lethality is said to be due to indirect effects. Using the OH radical scavengers: glycerol n-butanol, t-butanol, and NO/sub 2//sup -/. The authors observed that a radiosensitive E. coli K-12 mutant (W 3110 thy/sup -/ polAl/sup -/) lacking DNA polymerase 1 displays a markedly enhanced radioresistance when exposed to X rays in the presence of these chemicals. The extent of protection afforded by these chemicals correlated with their OH radical scavenging ability over the limited range of concentrations of the chemicals studied. (Only non-toxic concentrations of the chemicals were used). The presence of 2M glycerol during irradiation of the PolAl/sup -/ cells results in a survival level higher than that seen for the unprotected parent strain (W 3110 thy polA/sup +/)

  8. Pluripotent stem cells with normal or reduced self renewal survive lethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brecher, G.; Neben, S.; Yee, M.; Bullis, J.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    Transfusion with 10,000 or 20,000 marrow cells resulted in 30+ days survival of 15%-50% of mice exposed to an Ld90 or LD100 or radiation. The use of congenic mice with alloenzyme markers permitted the identification of host and donor cells in the peripheral blood of transfused animals. Donor cells were present initially in all hosts. Between 55% and 92% of the animals became 100% host type by 12-24 weeks after transfusion in three separate experiments. To explore whether the temporary repopulation by donor cells was due to short-lived stem cells, the marrows of several primary hosts were transfused into secondary, lethally irradiated hosts. Some of the retransplanted primary donor and host cells persisted only temporarily. It is suggested that some of the donor stem cells in both the primary and secondary hosts had an intrinsically shortened life span

  9. Neonatal irradiation nephropathy in the growing dog. I. Renal morphological and functional adaptations following neonatal, sublethal, whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, W.L.; Phemister, R.D.; Jaenke, R.S.

    1979-01-01

    Sixty beagles were used to study the effects of exposure to 330 R 60 Co γ radiation (bilateral, whole-body) at 2 days of age on renal functional and morphological development in the growing dog. A significant deficit in grams kidney per kilogram body weight was found in irradiated dogs at 50 days of age (P < 0.05), but not at 125 or 200 days of age. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) per kilogram body weight and GFR per gram kidney were not significantly different between irradiated and nonirradiated dogs at 50, 125, or 200 days of age, but blood urea nitrogen (BUN) was significantly elevated in irradiated dogs throughout this period (P < 0.05). The fractional distribution of intracortical renal blood flow, as determined by radiolabeled microspheres, to the outermost cortex was found to be reduced in irradiated animals at all ages evaluated (P < 0.05). The fractional blood flow to the outermost renal cortex was negatively correlated with BUN in both irradiated (P < 0.05) and nonirradiated (P < 0.05) animals. Based on prior demonstrations of reductions in nephron numbers following similar irradiation, these data indicate increases in mean single nephron GFR and nephronal hypertrophy in the kidneys of the neonatally irradiated dog. The renal functional and morphological adaptations are sufficient to maintain adequate renal function in growing, neonatally irradiated dogs. The BUN elevations in irradiated dogs are believed to be related to changes in intracortical renal blood flow, rather than indicating renal insufficiency. The possible importance of the functional and morphological adaptations to the subsequent development of chronic renal failure in neonatally irradiated animals is discussed

  10. An improved approach to identify irradiated dog feed by electron paramagnetic resonance study and thermoluminescence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanyal, Bhaskar, E-mail: bhaskar_sanyal@rediffmail.co [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400 085 (India); Chawla, S.P.; Sharma, Arun [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400 085 (India)

    2011-05-15

    In the present study, probably for the first time, a detailed analysis of the radiation induced radical species and thermoluminescence measurements of irradiated dog feed are reported. The EPR spectrum of non-irradiated ready-to-eat dog feed was characterized by singlet g=2.0047{+-}0.0003. Irradiated samples exhibited a complex EPR spectrum. During high power (50.0 mW) EPR spectroscopy, a visible change in the shape of the EPR spectrum was observed and characterized by EPR spectrum simulation technique. An axially symmetric anisotropic signal with g{sub ||}=2.0028 and g{sub perpendicular}=1.9976 was identified. However, a negligible change in the matrix of irradiated edible dog chew was observed using EPR spectroscopy. Therefore, thermoluminescence study of the isolated minerals from dog chew was carried out. The composition of the poly-minerals was studied using SEM and EDX analysis and a complete verdict on identification of irradiation is proposed.

  11. An improved approach to identify irradiated dog feed by electron paramagnetic resonance study and thermoluminescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, Bhaskar; Chawla, S.P.; Sharma, Arun

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, probably for the first time, a detailed analysis of the radiation induced radical species and thermoluminescence measurements of irradiated dog feed are reported. The EPR spectrum of non-irradiated ready-to-eat dog feed was characterized by singlet g=2.0047±0.0003. Irradiated samples exhibited a complex EPR spectrum. During high power (50.0 mW) EPR spectroscopy, a visible change in the shape of the EPR spectrum was observed and characterized by EPR spectrum simulation technique. An axially symmetric anisotropic signal with g || =2.0028 and g perpendicular =1.9976 was identified. However, a negligible change in the matrix of irradiated edible dog chew was observed using EPR spectroscopy. Therefore, thermoluminescence study of the isolated minerals from dog chew was carried out. The composition of the poly-minerals was studied using SEM and EDX analysis and a complete verdict on identification of irradiation is proposed.

  12. Aberrations of holokinetic chromosomes and associated lethality after X-irradiation of meiotic stages in Tetranychus urticae Koch (acari, tetranychidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempelaar, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    Chromosomes of the holokinetic organization type were irradiated with X-rays in various stages of meiosis in unfertillized eggs of Tetranychus urticae Koch. Visible cytological aberrations, lethality and sterility were investigated in subsequent generations. Chromosome fragments are the most frequently occuring light-microscopically visible chromosome aberrations; bridges are not formed. Contrary to expectations, the presence of fragments appears to be positively correlated with the occurrence of lethality; loss of fragments, missegregation and the measure of damage of the broken chromosome parts are involved. In contrast with monokinetic chromosomes the earliest lethality occurs only after about 10 divisions. The ratios between different embryonic lethality types (early vs. late) differ depending on the stage irradiated: in more compact chromatin, more serious damage (i.e. more early lethality syndromes) is induced than in less compact chromatin. In the progeny of the surviving males, neither translocations nor independent fragments are found; indirect evidence indicated the occasional presence of inversions. The presumtive inversions are induced more frequently in a chromatin-compact stage (metaphase I) than in a less compact one (telophase I). (Auth.)

  13. Early radiation changes of normal dog brain following internal and external brain irradiation: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, H.; Maruyama, Y.; Markesbery, W.; Goldstein, S.; Wang, P.; Tibbs, P.; Young, B.; Feola, J.; Beach, L.

    1984-01-01

    To examine radiation-induced changes in the normal brain, internal or external radiation was given to normal dog brain. Seven medium-sized dogs were used in this study. Two dogs were controls and an ice-pick (plastic implant applicator) was placed in the right frontal lobe for about 5 hours but no irradiation. Two dogs underwent Cs-137 brain implantation for 4 and 5 hours, respectively using an ice-pick technique. Two dogs were given internal neutron irradiation using the same technique of intracerebral ice-pick brachytherapy. One dog received an external photon irradiation using 6-Mev Linear Accelerator. Postmortem microscopic examination was made to study the early cerebral changes to irradiation in three dogs: one control with no irradiation; one received intracerebral Cesium implantation; and one external photon irradiation. Vascular change was the most prominent microscopic finding. There were hemorrhage, endothelial proliferation and fibrinoid changes of small vessel wall. Most of the changes were localized in the white matter and the cortex remained intact. Details (CT, NMR and histological studies) are discussed

  14. Changes in rat liver and adipose tissue lipogenesis after single lethal X-irradiation: modification by the restricted food intake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlakova, A.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M.

    1981-01-01

    Male rats of Wistar strain were adapted during a 4-week period to the nutritional regimes of meal feeding (MF) and ad libitum (AL) and were irradiated with the single whole-body lethal X-ray dose 14.35 Gy after 22 h of fasting. Within the intervals 1, 24, 48 and 72 h after irradiation lipogenesis changes in the liver were studied by measuring 1- 14 C-acetate incorporation (74 KBq) in the total lipids, fatty acids and cholesterol, and in the white adipose tissue pieces by measuring U- 14 C-glucose incorporation (74 KBq) in the total lipids, fatty acids and glyceride glycerol. Lipogenesis increased in the liver of the irradiated rats as compared with sham irradiated rats and reached the maximal values at 72 h after irradiation in AL animals and at 48 h after irradiation in MF animals. Lipogenesis in the adipose tissue decreased in the irradiated rats as compared with the sham irradiated ones and continued to decrease with the post-irradiation period. The adaptation to the nutritional regime of meal feeding markedly modified lipogenesis in the liver and the adipose tissue of the irradiated rats. Long-term fasting (before and after irradiation) was supposed to be another modifying factor in the lipogenesis changes. Lipogenesis changes in the liver depended on the MF nutritional regime. (author)

  15. Changes in rat liver and adipose tissue lipogenesis after single lethal X-irradiation: modification by the restricted food intake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlakova, A; Ahlers, I; Praslicka, M [Univerzita P.J. Safarika, Kosice (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Vseobecnej Biologie

    1981-01-01

    Male rats of Wistar strain were adapted during a 4-week period to the nutritional regimes of meal feeding (MF) and ad libitum (AL) and were irradiated with the single whole-body lethal X-ray dose 14.35 Gy after 22 h of fasting. Within the intervals 1, 24, 48 and 72 h after irradiation lipogenesis changes in the liver were studied by measuring 1-/sup 14/C-acetate incorporation (74 KBq) in the total lipids, fatty acids and cholesterol, and in the white adipose tissue pieces by measuring U-/sup 14/C-glucose incorporation (74 KBq) in the total lipids, fatty acids and glyceride glycerol. Lipogenesis increased in the liver of the irradiated rats as compared with sham irradiated rats and reached the maximal values at 72 h after irradiation in AL animals and at 48 h after irradiation in MF animals. Lipogenesis in the adipose tissue decreased in the irradiated rats as compared with the sham irradiated ones and continued to decrease with the post-irradiation period. The adaptation to the nutritional regime of meal feeding markedly modified lipogenesis in the liver and the adipose tissue of the irradiated rats. Long-term fasting (before and after irradiation) was supposed to be another modifying factor in the lipogenesis changes. Lipogenesis changes in the liver depended on the MF nutritional regime.

  16. Pathological study on treated and untreated dogs dead after γ-irradiation with 6 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dewen; Guan Mingchen; Liu Xuetong

    1986-01-01

    Forty dogs γ-irradiated with 6 Gy were divided into three groups: control (8 cases), treated with antibiotics alone (8 cases) and with combined measures (24 cases). The death of dogs in these groups occurred between 8th-12th, 11th-14th and 12th-169th days after irradiation respectively. In the third group, regeneration of hematopoietic cells in sternal bone marrow was first observed in dog dead on 17.5th day after irradiation, and regeneration of lymphoid tissues in spleen on 14th day. The degree of recovery in both of these organs was worse than in dogs irradiated with 3.25 Gy. The complications were varied; for instance, in addition to infection and hemorrhage, there were intussusception, gastric dilation, necrosis and hemorrhage of pancrease, jaundice, cerebral edema, hemorrhage and hernia, cachexia during recovery and so on. The causes of death in these experimental animals were also varied

  17. Pathological study on treated and untreated dogs dead after. gamma. -irradiation with 6 Gy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewen, Wang; Mingchen, Guan; Xuetong, Liu

    1986-10-01

    Forty dogs ..gamma..-irradiated with 6 Gy were divided into three groups: control (8 cases), treated with antibiotics alone (8 cases) and with combined measures (24 cases). The death of dogs in these groups occurred between 8th-12th, 11th-14th and 12th-169th days after irradiation respectively. In the third group, regeneration of hematopoietic cells in sternal bone marrow was first observed in dog dead on 17.5th day after irradiation, and regeneration of lymphoid tissues in spleen on 14th day. The degree of recovery in both of these organs was worse than in dogs irradiated with 3.25 Gy. The complications were varied; for instance, in addition to infection and hemorrhage, there were intussusception, gastric dilation, necrosis and hemorrhage of pancrease, jaundice, cerebral edema, hemorrhage and hernia, cachexia during recovery and so on. The causes of death in these experimental animals were also varied.

  18. Studies on chromosomal aberrations and dominant lethal mutations induced by x irradiation in germ cells of male mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xianli; Wang Mingdong; Wang Bin; Sun Shuqing

    1992-01-01

    After male mice irradiated by 2 Gy X rays mated to normal virginal females superovulated with PMSG and HCG, pronuclei chromosome spreading of first-cleavage embryos were prepared and chromosomal aberrations of paternal pronuclei were observed. The results showed that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations was highest irradiated at spermatic stage among different stages of spermatogenesis. The sequence of radiosensitivity in spermatogenesis was as follows: spermatids > mature sperm > spermatocyte > spermatogonia and stem spermatogonia. The frequencies of paternal chromosomal aberrations resulted from irradiation at spermatids and mature sperms were significantly higher than that in control. The reciprocal translocations of stem spermatogonia induced by 2 Gy X rays in those male mice were also examined in the preparations of diakinesis-metaphase I. The frequency of reciprocal translocations were 0.0429 per cell and significantly higher than that in control. The proportion of unbalanced gametes, resulting in lethal embryos after fertilization, was 0.02145 to be predicted. At the same time, the dominant lethality induced by X rays in stem spermatogonia was measured, being 0.0371. The frequency of dead fetuses in irradiation group was about twice as in control. The regression analysis was found that the reciprocal translocations was markedly related to the dominant lethality

  19. Lethal distemper in badgers (Meles meles) following epidemic in dogs and wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sabatino, Daria; Di Francesco, Gabriella; Zaccaria, Guendalina; Malatesta, Daniela; Brugnola, Luca; Marcacci, Maurilia; Portanti, Ottavio; De Massis, Fabrizio; Savini, Giovanni; Teodori, Liana; Ruggieri, Enzo; Mangone, Iolanda; Badagliacca, Pietro; Lorusso, Alessio

    2016-12-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) represents an important conservation threat to many wild carnivores. A large distemper epidemic sustained by an Arctic-lineage strain occurred in Italy in 2013, mainly in the Abruzzi region, causing overt disease in domestic and shepherd dogs, Apennine wolves (Canis lupus) and other wild carnivores. Two badgers were collected by the end of September 2015 in a rural area of the Abruzzi region and were demonstrated to be CDV-positive by real time RT-PCR and IHC in several tissues. The genome of CDV isolates from badgers showed Y549H substitution in the mature H protein. By employing all publicly available Arctic-lineage H protein encoding gene sequences, six amino acid changes in recent Italian strains with respect to Italian strains of dogs from 2000 to 2008, were observed. A CDV strain belonging to the European-wildlife lineage was also identified in a fox found dead in the same region in 2016, proving co-circulation of an additional CDV lineage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of embryonal thymic calf extracts on neonatally thymectomized mice and on mice lethally irradiated with gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaplicki, J.; Blonska, B.; Stec, L.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of embryonal thymic calf extracts (ETCE) on mice thymectomized at birth was investigated. ETCE was found to induce an increase in leukopenia and decrease in the level of serum gamma globulins; it also reduced survival time in mice. The effect of ETCE on lethally irradiated mice was also examined. Only long-term administration of ETCE prior to gamma irradiation at 750 rad prolonged the survival time of mice (40% permanent survival) as compared with irradiated controls; the leukocytes from mice retained mitotic capability. Neither long-term treatment with ETCE prior to irradiation at 1000 rad, nor short-term administration prior to 750 rad affected survival time. ETCE administered after irradiation of mice with 750 rad caused a rapid decrease in blood leukocytes and a significantly lowered survival time. (Auth.)

  1. Effects of sub-lethal dose of γ-irradiation on lysosomal enzymes in tissue of pigeon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.C.; Gadhia, P.K.

    1979-01-01

    Effects of total body γ-irradiation with sub-lethal dose (300 rad) on three lysosomal enzymes namely acid phosphatase, ribonuclease-II and deoxyribonuclease-II have been studied in pigeons. Liver, kidney and spleen were the tissues studied at different intervals like 1-h, 24-h, 48-h, and 72-h of irradiation. The specific activities ('crude' fraction) of acid phosphatase and ribonuclease-II increased significantly in spleen and liver at 48-h of irradiation. The activity of deoxyribonuclease-II in liver and spleen was increased only at 72-h post-irradiation. On the other hand, the total activities of three lysosomal enzymes did not show remarkable change throughout 72-h of irradiation. (author)

  2. Induction of lethal mutations in the x-chromosome of unirradiated Drosophila oocytes after fertilization by irradiated spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Zainullin, V.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In primary study on Drosophila it was found that irradiated male X-chromosomes induce recessive lethals in unirradiated female homologues (Abeleva et al., 1961, Radiobiologya. 1:123-126). The same effects were obtained in Drosophila in some recent investigations. The mechanisms of these effects is unknown. However it may be responsible for low-dose radiation effects as it induce mutations in unirradiated DNA. We assume that this effect may be a result of activation of error prone repair in response to preliminary DNA lesions in irradiated chromosome. In this research we analyse the frequencies of the recessive lethal mutations in the X-chromosome of Drosophila females mated with irradiated Basc males. We used acute irradiation with a dose rate of 10 Gy. For testing our hypothesis we use the mus209 and mei-41 mutant females. Mus209 is a PCNA gene homologue and mei-41 is a homologue of ATM gene. These genes are involved in post-replication DNA repair which may be error prone repair in Drosophila. It was obtained the tendency to decreasing the mutation rate at the mei-41[D5] background and decreasing mutation rate in mus209[B1] background in comparison with wild type strains CS (p<0.05). The obtained results demonstrate the possible role of mus209[B1] and mei-41[D5] genes in the inducing of mutations in the unirradiated X-chromosome in the presence of irradiated homologue

  3. Poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism in X-irradiated Chinese hamster cells: its relation to repair of potentially lethal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hur, E.; Elkind, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) is the substrate used by cells in poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis. X-irradiation of log-phase Chinese hamster cells caused a rapid decrease in NAD + levels which was linearly dependent on radiation dose. The activity of ADP-ribosyl transferase (ADPRT) also increased linearly with radiation dose. The decrease of NAD + was slower, and the increase in ADPRT activity was less pronounced, in a radiation sensitive line, V79-AL162/S-10. An inhibitor of ADPRT, m-aminobenzamide, largely prevented the depletion of cellular NAD + and reduced the rate at which ADPRT activity disappeared during post-irradiation incubation. Post-irradiation treatment with hypertonic buffer or with medium containing D 2 O-which inhibit repair of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage-enhanced the depletion of NAD + and prevented the reduction in ADPRT activity following irradiation. The characteristics of the effects of treatment with hypertonic buffer on NAD + metabolism were qualitatively similar to the effects that such treatment has on radiation-induced cell killing. These results suggest that poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis after irradiation plays a role in the repair of potentially lethal damage. (author)

  4. Sensitivity of Vibrio cholerae cells to lethal and mutagenic effect of UV-irradiation mediated by plasmids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiganova, I.G.; Evdokimova, N.M.; Aleshkin, G.I.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of UV-irradiation on Vibrio cholerae cells and its changes mediated by the plasmid R245 have been studied. Vibrio cholerae strains 569B and RV31 have been shown to be considerably more sensitive to lethal effect of UV-irradiation as compared with Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium cells. Highly toxigenic strain 569B and practically atoxigenic strain RV31 have the same UV-sensitivity. Lethla effect of UV-irradiation on Vibrio cholerae cells is incresed when the irradiated cells are plated on enriched media. UV-induction of mutations was not registered in plasmidless strains of Vibrio cholerae. Plasmid R245 increase UV-resistance of vibrio cells and makes them UV-mutable

  5. Response of the adrenal medulla to exogenous insulin in head X-irradiated dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, K; Mieno, M; Shimizu, T [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1976-12-01

    The observed results on the secretory response of the adrenal medulla to exogenous insulin in dogs whose heads had been irradiated with 200 rad X-irradiation at a rate of 60.6 rad/min are reported. Approximately 20 h after irradiation 2 i.u. insulin/kg body weight was administered to both irradiated and control (non-irradiated) dogs. The secretion of both adrenaline and noradrenaline in five control dogs which received insulin had increased markedly 30 min after the injection and it was sustained over the first 120 min. Five irradiated dogs also responded to the injection of insulin by secreting appreciable amounts of both adrenaline and noradrenaline, but the responsiveness was considerably lower; adrenaline and noradrenaline secretion 30 and 60 min after the injection was 59 and 33% less than that caused by insulin in control animals respectively, and these differences were significant (P < 0.01). Since insulin induces hypoglycaemia and thereby leads to an increase in the adrenal medullary secretion through the central mechanism, the present results observed 1 day after X-irradiation of the head indicate that the susceptibility of the adrenomedullary activating mechanism in the central nervous system may be diminished considerably after X-irradiation, even at doses as low as 200 rad.

  6. Response of the adrenal medulla to exogenous insulin in head X-irradiated dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, K.; Mieno, M.; Shimizu, T.

    1976-01-01

    The observed results on the secretory response of the adrenal medulla to exogenous insulin in dogs whose heads had been irradiated with 200 rad X-irradiation at a rate of 60.6 rad/min are reported. Approximately 20 h after irradiation 2 i.u. insulin/kg body weight was administered to both irradiated and control (non-irradiated) dogs. The secretion of both adrenaline and noradrenaline in five control dogs which received insulin had increased markedly 30 min after the injection and it was sustained over the first 120 min. Five irradiated dogs also responded to the injection of insulin by secreting appreciable amounts of both adrenaline and noradrenaline, but the responsiveness was considerably lower; adrenaline and noradrenaline secretion 30 and 60 min after the injection was 59 and 33% less than that caused by insulin in control animals respectively, and these differences were significant (P < 0.01). Since insulin induces hypoglycaemia and thereby leads to an increase in the adrenal medullary secretion through the central mechanism, the present results observed 1 day after X-irradiation of the head indicate that the susceptibility of the adrenomedullary activating mechanism in the central nervous system may be diminished considerably after X-irradiation, even at doses as low as 200 rad. (U.K.)

  7. In vitro radiation response studies on bone marrow fibroblasts (CFU-F) obtained from normal and chronically irradiated dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.K.; Stitzel, K.A.; Greenberg, B.; Woo, L.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation resistance of bone marrow fibroblasts as measured by their proliferative potential was evaluated in chronically irradiated dogs. Bone marrows were obtained from eight dogs that had been chronically irradiated beginning at 21 days of gestation or after birth and eight age-matched controls. Of these irradiated dogs, four were either preleukemic or exhibited frank acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. The other four were clinically normal but demonstrated abnormalities in their marrow that could be attributed to radiation effects and/or other pathologic changes. Fibroblasts from six of the irradiated dogs were significantly more radioresistant than those of their controls. Five of these six dogs subsequently succumbed to hematopathologic disease, while the two irradiated dogs with normal fibroblasts remained clinically normal, suggesting that this observed radioresistance may be linked to the disease process. (author)

  8. Influence of vaccination with Bordetella pertussis cells on haemopoiesis in sublethally irradiated mice and their radiation lethality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiek, S.; Bitny-Szlachto, S.

    1978-01-01

    Post-irradiation lethality of CFW mice has turned out to be enhanced by vaccination with Bordetella pertussis cells 10 min., 48 hrs. prior or 48 hrs. after the exposure to X-rays. The sensitization factor was found to be 1.23, as it revealed by decrease of radiation LD 50 . Granulopoiesis and erythropoiesis proved to be stimulated by vaccination, in mice irradiated with 200 or 400 R but not in those after 600 R. Direct radiosensitivity of CFU was not altered by vaccination, but the subsequent loss of bone marrow stem cells was enhanced in vaccinated mice. On the other hand, endocolonization of spleens with bone marrow stem cells has turned out to be highly enhanced by the vaccine, resulting in confluent growth of colonies. This effect of the vaccine was not abolished by hydroxyurea given 15 min. or 1 hr. after vaccination. Enhanced post-irradiation lethality is considered to result from fall of the bone marrow stem cell pool below the level indispensable to ensure the post-irradiation recovery of the haemopoietic system. (author)

  9. The biological effects of high dose total body irradiation in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Qingliang; Liu Xiaolan; Hao Jing; Xiong Guolin; Dong Bo; Zhao Zhenhu; Xia Zhengbiao; Qiu Liling; Mao Bingzhi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the biological effects of Beagle dogs irradiated by γ-rays at different doses. Methods: All Beagle dogs were divided into six groups and were subjected respectively to total-body irradiation (TBI) with a single dose of 6.5, 5.5, 5.0, 4.5, 3, 5 and 2.5 Gy γ-rays delivered by 60 Co sources at 7.224 x 10 -2 C/kg per minute. The general condition, blood cell counts and bone marrow cell CFC assays were observed. Results: Vomiting occurred at 0.5 to 2 hours after TBI in all groups. In 6.5 Gy group 3/5 dogs had blood-watery stool and 1/5 in 5.5 Gy group had watery stool. Diarrhea occurred in all other animals. Only one dog in 2.5 Gy group survived, all of others died. in order of decreasing irradiation dosage, the average survival time was 5.0, 8.0, 9.3, 9.5, 10.5 and 14.1 days, respectively. Conclusions: According to the clinical symptoms, leukocyte count and survival time of the dogs, the irradiation dose which will induce very severe hematopoietic radiation syndrome in Beagle dogs is 4.5 to 5.0 Gy

  10. Sub-lethal irradiation of human colorectal tumor cells imparts enhanced and sustained susceptibility to multiple death receptor signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Ifeadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Death receptors (DR of the TNF family function as anti-tumor immune effector molecules. Tumor cells, however, often exhibit DR-signaling resistance. Previous studies indicate that radiation can modify gene expression within tumor cells and increase tumor cell sensitivity to immune attack. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic effect of sub-lethal doses of ionizing radiation in sensitizing colorectal carcinoma cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The ability of radiation to modulate the expression of multiple death receptors (Fas/CD95, TRAILR1/DR4, TRAILR2/DR5, TNF-R1 and LTβR was examined in colorectal tumor cells. The functional significance of sub-lethal doses of radiation in enhancing tumor cell susceptibility to DR-induced apoptosis was determined by in vitro functional sensitivity assays. The longevity of these changes and the underlying molecular mechanism of irradiation in sensitizing diverse colorectal carcinoma cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis were also examined. We found that radiation increased surface expression of Fas, DR4 and DR5 but not LTβR or TNF-R1 in these cells. Increased expression of DRs was observed 2 days post-irradiation and remained elevated 7-days post irradiation. Sub-lethal tumor cell irradiation alone exhibited minimal cell death, but effectively sensitized three of three colorectal carcinoma cells to both TRAIL and Fas-induced apoptosis, but not LTβR-induced death. Furthermore, radiation-enhanced Fas and TRAIL-induced cell death lasted as long as 5-days post-irradiation. Specific analysis of intracellular sensitizers to apoptosis indicated that while radiation did reduce Bcl-X(L and c-FLIP protein expression, this reduction did not correlate with the radiation-enhanced sensitivity to Fas and/or TRAIL mediated apoptosis among the three cell types. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Irradiation of tumor cells can overcome Fas and TRAIL

  11. Diabetes susceptibility of BALB/cBOM mice treated with streptozotocin. Inhibition by lethal irradiation and restoration by splenic lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, S.G.; Blue, M.L.; Fleischer, N.; Shin, S.

    1982-01-01

    In genetically susceptible strains of mice, repeated injections of a subdiabetogenic dose of streptozotocin induces the development of progressive insulin-dependent hyperglycemia. We showed previously that host T-cell functions play an obligatory etiologic role in this experimental disease by demonstrating that the athymic nude mouse is resistant to diabetes induction unless its T-cell functions are reconstituted by thymus graft. Here we show that lethal irradiation of euthymic (+/nu) mice of BALB/cBOM background causes selective resistance of the mice to the diabetogenic effects of the multiple low doses of streptozotocin without affecting their sensitivity to a high pharmacologic dose of the toxin. We also show that reconstitution of the irradiated mice with splenic lymphocytes causes the restoration of diabetes susceptibility. Lethally irradiated mice thus represent a useful experimental model for analyzing the host functions involved in the development of this disease. These results provide an additional support for the hypothesis that the induction of diabetes in this model system is mediated by an autoimmune amplification mechanism

  12. The effects of dose rate in total body irradiation of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, H.J.; Bodenberger, U.; Holler, E.; Thierfelder, S.; Eckstein, R.

    1986-01-01

    In summary the studies in dogs show that the dose rate or exposure time has a great impact on survival of acute radiation syndromes. In contrast the inactivation of colony forming hemopoietic precursors is less influenced by the dose rate. The potential of hemopoietic recovery is determined by the survival of hemopoietic precursor cells. Therefore in patients with a suspected whole body exposure of more than 1.50 Gy, bacterial and fungal decontamination and reverse isolation in a sterile environment has to be started immediately. Human patients treated with about 10 Gy of TBI frequently developed nausea, elevated temperatures and swelling of the parotic glands at the first and second day. The extent of these changes varies from patient to patient. The temperature is rarely elevated above 38.5 0 C. The swelling of parotics and the nausea subside within 48 hours. The presence of such systemic symptoms may suggest the exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. The disappearance of immature red cells, i.e. reticulocytes, and bandforms of granulocytes within the first 5 days supports this suggestion. HLA typing of the victim and his family should be performed as soon as possible after the accident. An HLA-identical sibling would be a suitable bone marrow donor. Unlike therapeutic TBI accidental exposures bring about uncertainties in the calculation of dose, dose distribution and dose rate. Early after irradiation biological changes are extremely variable. Both biological and physical data have to be considered, when microbiological decontamination, reverse isolation and transplantation of bone marrow are to be decided upon. Obviously these intensive therapeutic efforts are limited to a small number of victims. (orig.)

  13. Development of fibrosis in dogs as a late consequence of whole-body X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, W.; Fliedner, T.M.; Steinbach, I.; Alcober, V.; Nothdurft, W.; Fache, I.

    1978-01-01

    Dogs wre whole-body irradiated with a single mid-line dose of 1200 R at 300 kV. This high dose will kill non-treated animals within a few days. To save these animals, leukocytes were previously collected during a four-hour leukapheresis using a continuous-flow centrifuge and were stored under liquid nitrogen. Shortly after the whole-body irradiation each dog received its own cryopreserved cells thawed immediately beforehand. The dogs received between 0.32x10 9 and 1.63x10 9 mononuclear blood cells per kilogram of body weight. The number of colony-forming cells contained in the transfusate ranged between 0.19x10 5 and 1.38x10 5 per kilogram of body weight. This blood stem transfusion, together with general supportive therapy, enabled the dogs to overcome the acute radiation syndrome and to recover. The dogs were subsequently sacrificed in two groups after observation for about 260 days or 700-898 days respectively. Pathological findings are described. A particular situation existed in the marrow, whre non-irradiated stem cells had colonized bone cavities containing irradiated stroma. Progressive fibrosis developed in the endosteal areas of the bone cavities in most of the animals. (author)

  14. The Effect of A Single Sub-Lethal Dose of Whole Body Irradiation on the Small Intestine of Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ramli, M. A.; Kubba, M. A.; Al-Bassam, L. S.; Belhaj, K.; Al-shawish, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of whole body radiation with a single sub-lethal dose at 4 Gy on rat small intestine was studied histologically and quantitatively. Irradiated animals were euthanized at 24 hours, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post- irradiation. Crypts of Leiberkuhn and peyer's patches were especially targeted by irradiation. The crypts showed severe cellular fragmentation in the germinal cellular compartments twenty Four hours after irradiation resulting in partial denudation of villi especially at their Tips. At three days, these cells resumed their proliferative activity with the appearance of unusually large numbers of mitotic figures. Cellular regeneration in the crypts and on the villous surface showed improvement with advancing time till day 28 when the villi had complete epithelial covering and the proliferative activity of the germinal cryptic cells returned to normal. The quantitative study included the measurement of about fifty villi at each time after irradiation. A significant decrease in villous length was noticed at twenty four hours post-irradiation compared to the control values. The length of villi plateaued at about this level till day twenty one when it slightly increased to reach a sub normal mean length on day 28. We concluded that whole body irradiation with a single dose at 4 Gy was enough to induce cryptic cellular necrosis with sloughing of epithelial villous columnar covering. This cellular damage was, however, sub- total since quick regenerative cellular activity was noticed three days post-irradiation. The decrease in the villous length paralleled the cryptic cellular damage whereas full recovery was not achieved despite obvious cellular regeneration.

  15. Immunoglobulin levels in dogs after total-body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Halliwell, R.E.; Johnson, P.M.; Fey, T.A.; McDonough, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of total-body irradiation (TBI) and autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation on serum immunoglobulin subclasses was determined in a dog model. Only IgG1 levels decreased after low-dose (+/- 4.5 Gy) TBI, but levels of all immunoglobulin classes fell after high-dose TBI (8.5 GyX1 or 2X6.0 Gy). After autologous bone marrow transplantation IgM levels were the first and IgE levels were the last to return to normal. After successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation prolonged low IgM and IgE levels were found but IgA levels increased rapidly to over 150% of pretreatment values. A comparison of dogs with or without clinical signs or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), revealed no differences in IgM levels. Dogs with GVHD had higher IgA but lower IgE levels. Dogs that rejected their allogeneic bone marrow cells showed significant early rises in IgE and IgA levels in comparison with dogs with GVHD. These results differ from the observations made on Ig levels in human bone marrow transplant patients. No significant differences in phytohemagglutinin stimulation tests were found between dogs with or without GVHD or dogs receiving an autologous transplant for the first four months after TBI and transplantation. An early primary or secondary involvement of humoral immunity in GVHD and graft rejection in dogs is postulated

  16. Molecular basis of the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.

    1982-01-01

    Using bacteria as a model, the molecular basis of the mutagenic and lethal effects of uv radiation is being studied. Attention is focused on the mechanism of action of uv-1 specific endonucleases in the repair of damaged DNA. The isolation and identification of similar enzymes in human cells are being conducted concurrently

  17. Evidence of heritable lethal mutations in progeny of X-irradiated CHO cells by micronucleus count in clon-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, G.; Kreczik, A.; Treichel, M.

    1996-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation reduce the growth rates of clones following irradiation of the progenitor cells. Such reductions of clone growth have been proven by means of measurements of clone size distributions. The medians of such distributions can be used to quantify the radiation damage. Prolongations of generation times and cell death as result of heritable lethal mutations have been discussed as causes for the reduction of clone growth. The cell number of a clone of hypotetraploid CHO-cells was compared to the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells in the same clone using the cytokinesis-block-micronucleus method. The dose dependent reduction of clone sizes is measured by the difference of the medians (after log transformation) of the clone size distributions. At cytochalasin-B concentrations of 1 μg/ml and after an incubation time of 16 h a yield of binucleated cells of about 50% was obtained. Median clone size differences as a measure of clonal radiation damage increased linearly with incubation times of 76, 100, 124, and 240 h following irradiation with 3, 5, 7, and 12 Gy. The frequency of binucleated clone cells with micronuclei strongly increased with decreasing clone size by a factor up to 20 following irradiation with 3, 5, and 7 Gy. The frequency of micronucleated binucleated clone cells was found to be independent of incubation time after irradiation. Radiation induced clone size reductions result from cell losses caused by intraclonal expression of micronuclei which have its origin in heritable lethal mutations. Measurements of clone size distributions can be done automatically. They can serve as predictive test for determination of median cell loss rates of surviving cell clones. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Induction of lethal and genetic damage by vacuum-ultraviolet (163 nm) irradiation of aqueous suspensions of yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, T.; Kobayashi, K.

    1976-01-01

    Yeast cells suspended in distilled water were irradiated with monochromatic 163 nm photons by immersing a specially designed discharge tube into the suspension. This was thought to be a useful means of investigating in vivo effects of radiation-induced water radicals on well cells in the complete absence of ionic species, since 163 nm photons can dissociate water only via excitation. These experiments showed that the water radicals (excluding e/sub aq/ - ) exerted both lethal and genetic (gene-conversion) effects quite potently, and the characteristic protection against these effects was observable when 2-mercaptoethanol or, in particular, p-aminobenzoic acid, a specific scavenger for OH radicals, was added to the medium prior to irradiation. Nearly complete protection from both lethal and genetic effects was observed in some cases with p-aminobenzoic acid. These results establish unequivocally that the OH radical, and not the hydrogen atom (H radical), possesses the damaging potency in the cell. Comparisons with γ-ray experiments revealed several differences between 163 nm photons and γ rays in the protective actions of radical scavengers, which may be attributable to reactive species other than OH radicals produced by the γ rays

  19. Reduced repair of potentially lethal radiation damage in glutathione synthetase-deficient human fibroblasts after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midander, J.; Revesz, L.; Deschavanne, P.J.; Debieu, D.; Malaise, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    Using a human fibroblast strain deficient in glutathione synthetase and a related proficient control strain, the role of glutathione (GSH) in repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) has been investigated in determining survival by plating cells immediately or 24 h after irradiation. After oxic or hypoxic irradiation, both cell strains repair radiation-induced damage. However, under hypoxic conditions, the proficient cells repair PLD as well as under oxic conditions while the deficient cells repair less PLD after irradiation under hypoxic than under oxic conditions. Therefore, the oxygen enhancement ratio (o.e.r.) for proficient cells is similar whether the cells are plated immediately or 24 h later (2.0 and 2.13, respectively). In contrast, the o.e.r. for deficient cells is lower when the cells are plated 24 h after irradiation than when they are plated immediately thereafter (1.16 as compared to 1.55). The results indicate that GSH is involved in PLD repair and, in particular, in the repair of damage induced by radiation delivered under hypoxic conditions. (author)

  20. Total lymphoid irradiation assessed for possible enhancement of immunosuppression in hyperimmunized dogs receiving renal allografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko (Yamato Seiwa Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan)); Rapaport, F.T.

    1992-12-01

    With performed antibodies to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) appearing in an increasing number of patients today, hyperimmunization constitutes a major problem in clinical transplantation. In adult beagle dogs hyperimmunized with skin allografts and buffy coat injection, we performed renal allograft transplantation to assess the efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) employed as a preoperative measure in combination with cyclosporine (CyA) and methyl-prednisolone (MPL) in effecting immunosuppression. The mean survival period were 6.5 days in dogs withheld preliminary treatment, 9.0 days in the dogs receiving CyA and MPL, 26.7 days in those administered one-stage TLI, and 68 days (terminated by euthanasia) of the dogs given two-stage TLI. TLI administered two stages is considered an effective method of enhancing immunosuppression sufficiently to enable the attenuation of adverse reaction to renal allograft in hyperimmunized recipients. (author).

  1. Total lymphoid irradiation assessed for possible enhancement of immunosuppression in hyperimmunized dogs receiving renal allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Rapaport, F.T.

    1992-01-01

    With performed antibodies to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) appearing in an increasing number of patients today, hyperimmunization constitutes a major problem in clinical transplantation. In adult beagle dogs hyperimmunized with skin allografts and buffy coat injection, we performed renal allograft transplantation to assess the efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) employed as a preoperative measure in combination with cyclosporine (CyA) and methyl-prednisolone (MPL) in effecting immunosuppression. The mean survival period were 6.5 days in dogs withheld preliminary treatment, 9.0 days in the dogs receiving CyA and MPL, 26.7 days in those administered one-stage TLI, and 68 days (terminated by euthanasia) of the dogs given two-stage TLI. TLI administered two stages is considered an effective method of enhancing immunosuppression sufficiently to enable the attenuation of adverse reaction to renal allograft in hyperimmunized recipients. (author)

  2. Dominant lethal mutations and histological changes produced in mouse oocytes by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyglenov, A.; Baev, I.; Rupova, I.; Kusheva, R.

    1976-01-01

    Mouse female were exposed to a total dose of 500 or 1000 rad 137 Cs gamma rays delivered at 0.01 rad/min. Effects were scored at 1, 5, 7, and 10 weeks after cessation of treatment. Histologically, ovaria in the 500 rad group showed a decrease up to 11% in follicle numbers as compared to controls; with the prolongation of the time after exposure, a further fall in follicle numbers is observed. In the 1000 rad group, depopulation of ovaria was complete. With the 500 rad dose, total dominant lethality was found to be increased for any of the time intervals between radiation exposure and conception; postimplantation dominant lethality was comparatively low, with similar scores between the weeks investigated. (author)

  3. Preliminary study of haemostasis in irradiated-enterectomised dog. Primary haemostasis, coagulation, plasma factors exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubos, M.; Niaussat, P.M.; Neveux, Y.; Nguyen, T.L.; Drouet, J.; Bac, P.

    Some hematological changes due to the combined effects of ionizing radiations and surgery were studied in dogs irradiated at 250, 300 and 350R. A constant hemorrhagic syndrome was observed with an impairment of the platelets functions and a depletion of several coagulation factors [fr

  4. Influence Of Quinolone Lethality on Irradiated Anaerobic Growth of Escherichia Coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, I.M.; El-Kabbany, H.M.; El-Esseily, E.SH.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities were measured with wild type cells and isomerase mutants of Escherichia coli for ciprofloxacin, formation of quinolone-gyrase-DNA complexes, observed as a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) dependent drop in cell lysate viscosity, occurred during aerobic and anaerobic growth and in the presence and in the absence of chloramphenicol. Quinolone activity against Escherichia coli was examined during aerobic growth, aerobic treatment with chloramphenicol, and anaerobic growth. Nalidixic acid, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin were lethal for cultures growing aerobically, and the bacteriostatic activity of each quinolone was unaffected by anaerobic growth. However, lethal activity was distinct for each quinolone with cells treated aerobically with chloramphenicol or grown anaerobically. Nalidixic acid failed to kill cells under both conditions, norfloxacin killed cells when they were grown anaerobically but not when they were treated with chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin killed cells under both conditions but required higher concentrations than those required with cells grown aerobically, C-methoxy fluoro quinolone was equally lethal under all conditions. However, lethal chromosome fragmentation, detected as a drop in viscosity in the absence of SDS, was occurred with nalidixic acid treatment only under aerobic conditions in the absence of chloramphenicol, thus, all quinolones tested appeared to form reversible bacteriostatic complexes containing broken DNA during aerobic growth, during anaerobic growth, and when protein synthesis is blocked. The ability to fragment chromosomes rapidly kill cells under these conditions depends on quinolone structure. The radiation of sublethal dose was 3 Gy at rate of 0.6 Gy/min was shown as non-significant result

  5. The clinic and pathologic picture in the lethal dose irradiated ewes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halagan, J.; Stanikova, A.; Maracek, I.

    2004-01-01

    The history of clinical symptoms as well as pathologic histological and morphological changes after long/lasting gamma irradiation were estimated in seven clinical healthy ewes. The animals were irradiated continually seven days with totally 6.7 Gy per ewe. Clinically recognizable symptoms of the radiation sickness were observed commencing the 4 th after last dose of irradiation. Sharp increase of the body temperature, heart and respiratory frequency rate as well as apathy, anorexia, arrhythmia, dyspnoe, diarrhea, dehydration, polyuria were prevalent in clinical founding . All of the animals were death in course of seven days after last irradiated dose. The gastrointestinal radiation syndrome was typical evidence of gastrointestinal tract and the general hemorrhagic enhancing of the gamma irradiation damage effects was confirmed. (authors)

  6. A novel challenge test incorporating irradiation (60Co) of compost sub-samples to validate thermal lethality towards pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John E; Watabe, Miyuki; Stewart, Andrew; Cherie Millar, B; Rao, Juluri R

    2009-01-01

    Maturing compost heaps normally attaining temperatures ranging from 55 to 65 degrees C is generally regarded to conform to recommended biological risks and sanitation standards for composts stipulated by either EU or US-EPA. Composted products derived from animal sources are further required by EU biohazard safety regulatory legislation that such composts either attain 70 degrees C for over 3h during maturation or via treatment at 70 degrees C for 1h before being considered for dispensation on land. The setting of the upper limit of thermal lethality at 70 degrees C/1h for achieving biosecurity of the animal waste composted products (e.g. pelleted fertilizer formulations) is not properly substantiated by specific validation tests, comprising a 'wipe-out' step (usually via autoclaving) followed by inoculation of a prescribed bacterium, exposure to 70 degrees C/1h and the lethality determined. Pelleted formulations of composts are not amenable for wet methods (autoclaving) for wipe-out sterilization step as this is detrimental to the pellet and compromises sample integrity. This study describes a laboratory method involving the employment of ((60)Co) irradiation 'wipe-out' step to: (a) compost sub-samples drawn from compost formulation heaps and (b) pelleted products derived from composted animal products while determining the thermal lethality of a given time/temperature (70 degrees C/1h) treatment process and by challenging the irradiated sample (not just with one bacterium but), out with 10 potential food-poisoning organisms from the bacterial genera (Campylobacter, Escherichia, Listeria, Salmonella, Yersinia) frequently detected in pig and poultry farm wastes. This challenge test on compost sub-samples can be a useful intervention ploy for 'inspection and validation' technique for composters during the compost maturity process, whose attainment of temperatures of 55-65 degrees C is presumed sufficient for attainment of sanitation. Stringent measures are further

  7. Some biochemical characteristics of a toxic substance isolated from organs of lethally irradiated animals in the course of the intestinal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meter, J D; Sirota, N S [Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Rentgeno-Radiologicheskij Inst., Leningrad (USSR)

    1976-05-01

    A toxic substance isolated from organs of lethally irradiated (1300 rads) animals in the period when intestinal syndrome has developed is classified according to the parameters under study (namely, the molecular weight, UV-absorption curve, extinction coefficient, specific monosaccharides, the presence and percentage of KDA, etc.) as lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli, the main inhabitant of the gastroenteric tract of mice. That endotoxins (sensitivity to which is increased in this period of radiation sickness) are detected in the blood and organs of lethally irradiated animals, might indicate their participation in the pathogenesis of the intestinal syndrome.

  8. Some biochemical characteristics of a toxic substance isolated from organs of lethally irradiated animals in the course of the intestinal syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meter, J.D.; Sirota, N.S.

    1976-01-01

    A toxic substance isolated from organs of lethally irradiated (1300 rads) animals in the period when intestinal syndrome has developed is classified according to the parameters under study (namely, the molecular weight, UV-absorption curve, extinction coefficient, specific monosaccharides, the presence and percentage of KDA, etc.) as lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli, the main inhabitant of the gastroenteric tract of mice. That endotoxins (sensitivity to which is increased in this period of radiation sickness) are detected in the blood and organs of lethally irradiated animals, might indicate their participation in the pathogenesis of the intestinal syndrome

  9. Extracorporeal irradiation of dog blood: the effects of a radiostrontium irradiator on blood stem cells (CFU-C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szemere, P.; Fliedner, T.M.; Nothdurft, W.; Breitig, D.

    1982-07-01

    The radiation sensitivity of dog blood stem cells was measured in vitro and in an extracorporeal circulation passing through a radiation field. It was established that the calculated D/sub 0/ was as low as 0.45 Gy. Investigating the cell killing rate in our equipment (Buchler type /sup 90/Sr device for extracorporeal irradiation), we found an overkill situation; the dose delivered was in excess of that which would be required for the total eradication of all stem cells in the peripheral blood passing through the radiation field. Various other types of devices used for extracorporeal irradiation of blood are also reviewed.

  10. Effect of BCNU combined with total body irradiation or cyclophosphamide on survival of dogs after autologous marrow grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, A.H.G.; English, D.

    1979-01-01

    Dogs were treated with either: (1) 750 rad total body irradiation; (2) BCNU 2 or 4 mg/kg IV 48 hours prior to 750 rad total body irradiation; or (3) BCNU 4 mg/kg IV plus cyclophosphamide 30 mg/kg IV. Results showed that of 11 dogs who received 750 rad total body irradiation and did not receive cryopreserved autologous bone marrow cells, none survived, compared to an 88% survival (31 of 35 dogs) after 750 rad total body irradiation if the dogs received stored autologous bone marrow cells. However, when the dogs were treated with BCNU 2 or 4 mg/kg prior to 750 rad total body irradiation the survival rate, despite infusion of autologous bone marrow cells, dropped to 25% (3 of 12 dogs) for BCNU 2 mg/kg, and 17% (2 of 12 dogs) for BCNU 4 mg/kg. This effect did not seem to be due to direct serum inhibition of hemopoietic cell proliferation since serum obtained at various intervals after BCNU administrations failed to inhibit CFU growth in vitro. The dogs died from hemorrhage and infection; at autopsy there was hemorrhagic pneumonitis and intestinal ulcerations with petechial hemorrhages, suggesting that the combination of BCNU and total body irradiation may have synergistic toxicity on the canine gastro-intestinal tract. When BCNU was combined with cyclophosphamide, reversal of marrow toxicity occurred in 54% (6 of 11 dogs) with stored autologous bone marrow cells compared to no survival (0 of 8 dogs) with stored autologous bone marrow cells. Thus while autologous bone marrow grafts are useful for reversal of marrow toxicity due to many therapeutic protocols, such grafts alone may not provide protection against toxicity due to the combination of high dosage BCNU and total body irradiation

  11. Skin allografts in lethally irradiated animals repopulated with syngeneic hemopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwadron, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Total body irradiation and repopulation with syngeneic hemopoietic cells can be used to induce tolerance to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched heart and kidney grafts in rats and mice. However, this protocol does not work for MHC mismatched skin grafts in rats or mice. Furthermore, LEW rats that accept WF cardiac allografts after irradiation and repopulation reject subsequent WF skin grafts. Treatment of skin allograft donors with methotrexate prior to grafting onto irradiated and reconstituted mice resulted in doubling of the mean survival time. Analysis of which antigens provoked skin graft rejection by irradiation and reconstituted animals revealed the importance of I region antigens. Cardiac allograft acceptance by irradiated and reconstituted animals is mediated by suppressor cells found in the spleen. Adoptively tolerant LEW rats accepted WF skin grafts in 50% of grafted animals. Analysis of this phenomenon revealed that the adoptive transfer procedure itself was important in achieving skin allograft acceptance by these animals. In general, it seems that the lack of ability of irradiated and reconstituted animals to accept fully MHC disparate skin grafts results from the inability of these animals to suppress lymph node effector cells against I region antigen seen on highly immunogenic allogeneic Langerhans cells in the skin

  12. Isoelectrofocusing analysis of plasma proteins in dogs irradiated with γ-rays in different doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinping; Ma Liren

    1986-01-01

    The plasma proteins in dogs irradiated with 2.65, 3.75, 5 and 10 Gy of γ-rays were analysed by isoelectrofocusing. Two groups of proteins, which the author named acute phase reactive proteins (A 1 pI = 4.3, A 2 pI = 4.8), were increased during the acute phase of disease. The levels of these proteins were found to be relative to the ultimate fate of the dogs. The causes of the changes of these proteins are discussed

  13. Successful use of camelid (alpaca) antivenom to treat a potentially lethal tiger snake (Notechis scutatus) envenomation in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Andrew M; Winkel, Kenneth D

    2016-05-01

    This report describes a confirmed clinical case of tiger snake (Notechis scutatus) envenomation in a domestic dog that was successfully treated with a novel polyvalent camelid (alpaca; Llama pacos) antivenom. Samples collected from the dog were assayed for tiger snake venom (TSV) using a highly sensitive and specific ELISA. The TSV concentration in serum and urine at initial presentation was 365 ng/mL and 11,640 ng/mL respectively. At the time of initial presentation whole blood collected from the dog did not clot and the Prothrombin Time was abnormally increased (>300 s). Serum was also visibly hemolysed. The dog was administered antihistamine, dexamethasone and 4000 Units (sufficient to neutralise 40 mg of TSV) of a novel polyvalent alpaca antivenom diluted in 0.9% NaCl. At 4 h post-antivenom treatment the dog's clinical condition had improved markedly with serum TSV concentrations below the limit of detection (<0.015 ng/mL), consistent with complete binding of venom antigens by the alpaca antivenom. Coagulation parameters had begun to improve by 4 h and had fully normalised by 16 h post-antivenom. Venom concentrations in both serum and urine remained undetectable at 16 h post-antivenom. The dog made a complete recovery, without complications, suggesting that the alpaca-based antivenom is both clinically safe and effective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lethal effect after whole-body irradiation on mouse with various photon radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohda, Shizuo

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of mortality on the quality of radiation was investigated in ICR mice after wholebody irradiation with 200 kV x-ray, 60 Co γ-ray, or 10 MV x-ray. With respect to the 30 day mortality, LD 50 values were estimated as 606 rad for 200 kV x-ray and as 713 rad both for 60 Co γ-ray and for 10 MV x-ray. Hence, the value of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to that for 200 kV x-ray was 0.850, while the value decreased with increasing the mortality rate. The value extrapolated to 100% mortality was estimated as 0.6. These results were valid for either 7 or 8 week mice, but the life span of 7 week mice after the irradiation was 3 days shorter than that of 8 week mice. These findings resulted in following conclusions: 1) There are no qualitative differences between 10 MV x-ray and 60 Co γ-ray irradiations. 2) The biological effects after 10 MV x-ray and 60 Co γ-ray irradiations are reduced with increased killing rate, compared with that after 200 kV x-ray irradiations. (Evans, J.)

  15. Strand breaks and lethal damage in plasmid DNA subjected to 60CO-γirradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimczak, U.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments with calf thymus DNA subjected to extracellular irradiation yield information on the role of direct and indirect effects in single-strand breakage, if this is evaluated with reference to the scavenger activity in respect of OH radicals. The role of the two processes in the occurrence of double-stand breaks and further damage leading to cell decay has so far remained largely obscure. It was the aim of the study described here to contribute to research in this field by performing in vitro experiments on biologically active DNA. For this purpose, DNA from pBR322 plasmids was irradiated in the presence of OH-radical scavengers. The number of single-strand and double-strand breaks was determined on the basis of the system's ability to eliminate OH radicals. In order to asses the influence of irradiation processes on the biological activity of DNA, investigations were carried out in E. coli for transformations caused by irradiated plasmid DNA. The results were interpreted in the light of theories about inhomogenous reaction kinetics put forward by Mark et al. (1989). It was finally discussed, which of the gamma-irradiation injuries occurring in DNA was to be held responsible for the inactivation of plasmid DNA and which enzymatic processes were additionally at work here. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Protection of melanized Cryptococcus neoformans from lethal dose gamma irradiation involves changes in melanin's chemical structure and paramagnetism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelahad Khajo

    Full Text Available Certain fungi thrive in highly radioactive environments including the defunct Chernobyl nuclear reactor. Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans, which uses L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA to produce melanin, was used here to investigate how gamma radiation under aqueous aerobic conditions affects the properties of melanin, with the aim of gaining insight into its radioprotective role. Exposure of melanized fungal cell in aqueous suspensions to doses of γ-radiation capable of killing 50 to 80% of the cells did not lead to a detectable loss of melanin integrity according to EPR spectra of melanin radicals. Moreover, upon UV-visible (Xe-lamp illumination of melanized cells, the increase in radical population was unchanged after γ-irradiation. Gamma-irradiation of frozen cell suspensions and storage of samples for several days at 77 K however, produced melanin modification noted by a reduced radical population and reduced photoresponse. More direct evidence for structural modification of melanin came from the detection of soluble products with absorbance maxima near 260 nm in supernatants collected after γ-irradiation of cells and cell-free melanin. These products, which include thiobarbituric acid (TBA-reactive aldehydes, were also generated by Fenton reagent treatment of cells and cell-free melanin. In an assay of melanin integrity based on the metal (Bi(+3 binding capacity of cells, no detectable loss in binding was detected after γ-irradiation. Our results show that melanin in C. neoformans cells is susceptible to some damage by hydroxyl radical formed in lethal radioactive aqueous environments and serves a protective role in melanized fungi that involves sacrificial breakdown.

  17. The two types of a loss of sight (blindness) exhibited by cats and dogs after local irradiation of heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushakov, I.B.; Razgovorov, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    After local irradiation of heads with doses of 50 to 100 Gy cats and dogs exhibited two types of a loss of sight: early blindness (during the first two hours) noted only in cats after a dose of 100 Gy, and delayed blindness in cats after a dose of 50 Gy, and in dogs after all doses under study

  18. Extracellular hydrogen peroxide produced under irradiation as the most important factor in the lethality of gamma-irradiated Paramecium tetraurelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Dupouy, D.; Planel, H.

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown that the surviving fraction of γ-irradiated paramecia is correlated with the residual H 2 O 2 concentration in the extracellular medium which is strongly dependent on the bacterial concentration, that is, on the enzyme content in the culture medium. (author)

  19. Extracellular hydrogen peroxide produced under irradiation as the most important factor in the lethality of gamma-irradiated Paramecium tetraurelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Dupouy, D.; Planel, H. (Laboratoire de Biologie Medicale, 31 - Toulouse (France))

    1982-02-01

    It has been shown that the surviving fraction of ..gamma..-irradiated paramecia is correlated with the residual H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration in the extracellular medium which is strongly dependent on the bacterial concentration, that is, on the enzyme content in the culture medium.

  20. Morphological changes connected with irradiation of large fields in dogs and with the effect of automyelotransplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klestova, O.V.; Sil'chenko, N.N.; Stanzhevskaya, T.I.; Strelin, G.S.; Vishnyakov, Yu.S.; Gubareva, A.V.; Skripkina, N.S.

    1983-01-01

    Dogs have been used to study the effect of automyelotransplantation on processes of post-radiation recovery of hemopoietic organs in large-field fractionated irradiation and morphological changes in some internal organs irradiated with different doses. Dogs of both sexes were irradiated in the gamma device twice a week alternately from the back and from the stomach with fractions of 8 Gy for the radiation field. The integral dose for all irradiated sections is 48 Gy. Automyelotransplantation of bone marrow is done after irradiation of the upper part of the body of the animal. Morphological changes in bone marrow, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, liver, heart and lungs, are found. It is shown that automyelotransplantation from non-irradiated section in the case of large-field radiation promotes the recovery of bone marrow and other homopoietic organs which is expressed in the intensification of repopulation of bone marrow of breast bone and lymphoid hemopoiesis in spleen. It is noted that such reparation of bone marrow can play a positive role in the recovery of bone marrow syndrome of radiation disease

  1. Effects of intraoperative electron irradiation in the dog on cell turnover in intact and surgically-anastomosed aorta and intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Morrow, B.M.; Travis, E.L.; Tepper, J.; Merkel, A.B.; Kranda, K.; Terrill, R.

    1983-01-01

    Adults dogs were subjected to laparotomy and intraoperative electron irradiation after division and reanastomosis of aorta or after construction of a blind loop of small intestine having a transverse suture line and an end-to-side anastomosis. Dogs received intraoperative irradiation of both intact and anastomosed aorta or intestine in doses of 0, 2000, 3000, or 4500 rad. Animals were sacrificed at seven days or three months following treatment. At 24 hours prior to sacrifice, dogs received 5 mCi tritiated thymidine intravenously. Irradiated and non-irradiated segments of aorta and small intestine, including intact and anastomotic regions, were analyzed for tritiated thymidine incorporation and were subjected to autoradiography. Incorporation studies showed diminution in tritiated thymidine uptake by irradiated portions of aorta and small intestine, in both intact and anastomotic regions. Autoradiograms revealed that irradiated areas of intact or anastomotic aorta or intestine had diminished labeling of stromal cells, suggesting a lowered cell proliferative capacity of irradiated tissue compared to non-irradiated portions. Inflammatory cells showed similar labeling indices in irradiated and non-irradiated tissues, both intact and surgically-manipulated, suggesting that irradiation does not significantly affect a subsequent local inflammatory response. Radiation-induced decreases in tritiated thymidine incoporation in irradiated aorta and small intestine were generally more marked at seven days than at three months following irradiation, suggesting that radiation-induced depression of cell turnover rates decreases with time

  2. On the development of neoplasma in dogs after chronic gamma-irradiation at a low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovleva, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    In order to estimate end effects of chronic prolonged gamma irradiation of dogs, an exposure of 80 animals to irradiation was terminated and they were followed up closely. Out of 80 animals 30 dogs (Ist series) were irradiated for 3 years and 50 dogs (2 series) for 6 years. The dogs were exposed to irradiation at doses of 21 to 190 rad per year. Out of the total number of animals 22 dogs died. Post-mortem examinations showed neoplasms in 13 animals (7 malignant and 12 benign neoplasms). The highest number of tumors developed in dogs of the 2 series (10 out of 11) one-two years after irradiation (6 malignant tumors-malignant pheochro--mocytoma of adrenals; malignant adenoma of the hypophysis: polymorphocellular sarcoma of the liver; leucomyosarcoma of the uterus; blader cancer; breast cancer; and 10 benign tumors-pancreatic adenoma; liver angioma; 2 papillary adenomas of the prostate; 3 renal adenomas; lipoma; polyps of the gall-bladder). Animals of the 1-st series displayed 3 neoplasms (1 malignant tumor-bladder tumor and 2 benign tumors-liver hepatoma and spleen angioma) 4-5 years after irradiation

  3. Molecular basis for the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Pathways of DNA repair in bacteria and mammalian cells. Progress is reported on the following studies: genetic control of incision and excision in Escherichia coli; effects of binding proteins on the repair process in vitro; location of endonuclease - uv-irradiated DNA complexes; identification of eukaryotic repair mechanisms; nuclear complementation in HeLa cells; enzyme isolation from repair syndrome skin fibroblasts; and expression of the E. coli - SV40 hybrid DNA

  4. Heritable non-lethal damage to cultured human cells irradiated with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.T.; Walker, O.A.

    2002-01-01

    During interplanetary flights the nuclei of all of a crew member's cells could be traversed by at least one high-LET (linear energy transfer) cosmic-ray particle. In mammalian cells irradiated in vitro about 1 in 10,000 of the surviving cells traversed by heavy particles is transformed to malignancy or mutated. What, if anything, happens to the remaining >99% of surviving cells? A retrospective analysis of archived data and samples from heavy-ion irradiation experiments with cultured human cells in vitro indicated that heavy ions caused a dose- and LET-dependent reduction in growth rates of progeny of irradiated cells, based on colony-size distributions. The maximum action cross section for this effect is between 100 and 300 μm 2 , at least as large as the cell nuclear area and up to 3 times the cross section for cell killing. Thus, heritable slow growth is the most prevalent effect of high-LET radiations on cultured animal cells, which may have implications for crew health during deep space travel. (author)

  5. Free radical scavenging and the expression of potentially lethal damage in X-irradiated repair-deficient Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, D.

    1987-01-01

    When cells are exposed to ionizing radiation, they suffer lethal damage (LD), potentially lethal damage (PLD), and sublethal damage (SLD). All three forms of damage may be caused by direct or indirect radiation action or by the interaction of indirect radiation products with direct DNA damage. In this report I examine the expression of LD and PLD caused by the indirect action of X rays in isogenic, repair-deficient Escherichia coli. The radiosensitivity of a recA mutant, deficient both in pre- and post replication recombination repair and SOS induction (inducible error-prone repair), was compared to that of a recB mutant which is recombination deficient but SOS proficient and to a previously studied DNA polymerase 1-deficient mutant (polA) which lacks the excision repair pathway. Indirect damage by water radicals (primarily OH radicals) was circumvented by the presence of 2 M glycerol during irradiation. Indirect X-ray damage by water radicals accounts for at least 85% of the PLD found in exposed repair-deficient cells. The DNA polymerase 1-deficient mutant is most sensitive to indirect damage with the order of sensitivity polA1 greater than recB greater than or equal to recA greater than wild type. For the direct effects of X rays the order of sensitivity is recA greater than recB greater than polA1 greater than wild type. The significance of the various repair pathways in mitigating PLD by direct and indirect damage is discussed

  6. Effects of intraoperative irradiation on gastric and urinary bladder incisions in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, J.A.; Sigler, R.; Walker, M.

    1985-01-01

    Fourteen adult dogs of mixed breeding were given intraoperative irradiation (25 Gy) after surgical incisions were made into the greater curvature of the stomach and the ventral surface of the urinary bladder. Sequential biopsy samples were obtained 10 days to 180 days after surgical operation. All irradiated stomachs developed gastritis and persistent ulceration of the irradiated field. Microscopic changes induced by irradiation of both the bladder and stomach progressed from severe submucosal edema to severe submucosal fibrosis. A parallel progression of fibrinoid degeneration of the small blood vessels was seen in both organs. Severe gastric ulceration persisted up to 180 days after irradiation, although a degree of mucous neck cell and gastric gland regeneration did occur. Pathologic changes were less severe in the bladder than in the stomach. The bladder had greater resiliency and capability for healing and, in contrast to the stomach, showed a capability to reepithelialize the radiation-induced ulcers. Conclusions of this study are as follows: (a) the canine urinary bladder tolerated intraoperative radiation therapy after tissue resection better than did the canine stomach, (b) the combination of surgical operation and irradiation resulted in a more prolonged and complicated healing pattern than did either procedure alone, and (c) the introduction of a surgical procedure upon irradiated tissue within an undetermined time span relative to irradiation resulted in a similar pattern of disturbed healing

  7. Abnormal sensitivity of diploid skin fibroblasts from a family with Gardner's syndrome to the lethal effects of X-irradiation, ultraviolet light and mitomycin-C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.B.; Nove, J.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts isolated from two members of the same family with the cancer-prone disease Gardner's Syndrome (intestinal polyposis, colon cancer, bone and soft tissue tumors) showed enhanced sensitivity to the lethal effects of X-irradiation, ultraviolet light and mitomycin-C. These cells showed no liquid-holding type recovery following UV-irradiation of confluent cultures, but were normal in their capacity for UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis. UV survival was not influenced by post-irradiation incubation with caffeine. (orig.)

  8. Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Connect With Us New & Noteworthy Dogs Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Overview Diseases ... healthy. Diseases The most common diseases associated with dogs that can cause human illness are: Campylobacteriosis ( Campylobacter ...

  9. Changes in electrographic correlates of sleep-wakefulness cycle in cats irradiated with minimal lethal doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordzadze, R.N.; Nadarishvili, K.Sh.; Tsinitia, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    The paper deals with the dynamics of changes in bioelectrical activity (BEA) of the somatosensory cortex (SC) and dorsal hippocampus (DH) in the sleep-wakefulness (SW) cycle by means of a computer and automatized frequency analysis system in the course of chronic experiences with cats before and at various stages of development of radiation sickness (RS). The dose of single whole-body irradiation equaled 8 Gr (800+-20 rad). It has been shown that changes which occur in SC substantially differ in dependence on the stages of the SW cycle. More pronounced changes after irradiation are observed in low-frequency rhythms, particularly at the stage of deep slow wave sleep (DSWS) and less pronounced - in the paradoxical sleep (PS). Rhythmics shifts taking place in DH are mainly similar during wakefulness (W), superficial slow wave sleep (SSWS) and DSWS. In PS changes in rhythmics considerably differ as compared with We SSWS and DSWS. Revealed are also other specific shifts including a reliable enhancement of absolute value (AV) and specific ponderability (SP) of thera-rhythm of hippocampus during the RS acute period in animals survived the three week observation period. All this permits to conclude that BEA quantitative studies of various brain areas in the SW permit to reveal the trends in search of diagnostic and prognostic value of such investigations in case of different extreme states and to outline on the patogenetic basis correction methods for neutral disorders in case of RS

  10. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. II. Synergistic lethality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busse, P.M.; Bose, S.K.; Jones, R.W.; Tolmach, L.J.

    1977-01-01

    Postirradiation treatment of HeLa S3 cells with 1 mM caffeine results in a marked diminution of the surviving fraction as scored by colony formation. The decrease is dose dependent; the effect of a 24-hour postirradiation treatment of a nonsynchronous population with caffeine is to change the terminal slope of the survival curve and its intercept. D 0 is reduced from 130 to 60 rad; the extrapolation number is increased about twofold. The amount of postirradiation killing is maximal if cells are exposed to caffeine at a concentration of at least 1 mM for 8 hours; less than 10% of unirradiated cells are killed under these conditions. Dose-response curves were also obtained for synchronous cells at various phases of the cell cycle. Similar results were obtained at all cell ages, but the magnitude of the effect is age dependent. This age dependence was further explored in experiments in which mitotically collected cells were exposed to 300 or 500 rad doses at 2-hour intervals throughout the cell cycle. Treatment with caffeine for 24 hours after irradiation enchances the killing of cells late in the cycle more than cells in G1. The sensitivities of two other cell lines, CHO and EMT6, also were examined; both are substantially less sensitive to caffeine. The smaller cell-cycle dependence of CHO cells is qualitatively the same as that of HeLa cells

  11. Relationship of DNA repair and chromosome aberrations to potentially lethal damage repair in X-irradiated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Nagasawa, H.; Little, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    By the alkaline elution technique, the repair of x-ray-induced DNA single strand breaks and DNA-protein cross-links was investigated in stationary phase, contact-inhibited mouse cells. During the first hour of repair, approximately 90% of x-ray induced single strand breaks were rejoined whereas most of the remaining breaks were rejoined more slowly during the next 5 h. The number of residual non-rejoined single strand breaks was approximately proportional to the x-ray dose at early repair times. DNA-protein cross-links were removed at a slower rate - T 1/2 approximately 10 to 12 h. Cells were subcultured at low density at various times after irradiation and scored for colony survival, and chromosome aberrations in the first mitosis after sub-culture. Both cell lethality and the frequency of chromosome aberrations decreased during the first several hours of repair, reaching a minimum level by 6 h; this decrease correlated temporally with the repair of the slowly rejoining DNA strand breaks. The possible relationship of DNA repair to changes in survival and chromosome aberrations is discussed

  12. Dose rate and dose fractionation studies in total body irradiation of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, H.J.; Netzel, B.; Schaffer, E.; Kolb, H.

    1979-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) with 800-900 rads and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation according to the regimen designated by the Seattle group has induced remissions in patients with otherwise refractory acute leukemias. Relapse of leukemia after bone marrow transplantation remains the major problem, when the Seattle set up of two opposing 60 Co-sources and a low dose rate is used in TBI. Studies in dogs with TBI at various dose rates confirmed observations in mice that gastrointestinal toxicity is unlike toxicity against hemopoietic stem cells and possibly also leukemic stem cells depending on the dose rate. However, following very high single doses (2400 R) and marrow infusion acute gastrointestinal toxicity was not prevented by the lowest dose rate studied (0.5 R/min). Fractionated TBI with fractions of 600 R in addition to 1200 R (1000 rads) permitted the application of total doses up to 300 R followed by marrow infusion without irreversible toxicity. 26 dogs given 2400-3000 R have been observed for presently up to 2 years with regard to delayed radiation toxicity. This toxicity was mild in dogs given single doses at a low dose rate or fractionated TBI. Fractionated TBI is presently evaluated with allogeneic transplants in the dog before being applied to leukemic patients

  13. Free and microvascular bone grafting in the irradiated dog mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altobelli, D.E.; Lorente, C.A.; Handren, J.H. Jr.; Young, J.; Donoff, R.B.; May, J.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Microvascular and free rib grafts were placed in 4.5 cm defects in an edentate mandibular body defect 18 to 28 days after completion of 50 Gy of irradiation from a 60 Co source. The animals were sacrificed from two to forty weeks postoperatively and evaluated clinically, radiographically, and histologically. There was a marked difference in the alveolar mucosal viability with the two grafts. Mucosal dehiscence was not observed over any of the microvascular grafts, but was present in seven-eighths of the free grafts. Union of the microvascular bone graft to the host bone occurred within six weeks. In contrast, after six weeks the free graft was sequestered in all the animals. An unexpected finding with both types of graft was the marked subperiosteal bone formation. This bone appeared to be derived from the host bed, stabilizing and bridging the defects bilaterally. The results suggest that radiated periosteum may play an important role in osteogenesis

  14. Inhibitory action of chlorophyllin of autosome recessive lethals induced by irradiation; Accion inhibidora de la clorofilina de letales recesivos autosonicos inducidos por irradiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salceda, V M; Pimentel, P A.E.; Cruces, M P [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The chlorolin is a sodium salt of the chlorophyll that has a strong protective action of the damage induced by different agents so much physical as chemical. In Drosophila there is reported this effect in somatic cells. In contrast, in germinal cells using tests with the sexual chromosomes has not been found such inhibitory action. For this reason, in this occasion we will refer to the effect of the lethality induced in autosome chromosomes, in particular to the chromosome II of this species. For such effect groups of males of the line Canton-S its were pre-treated for 24h with or without 69 mm of CCS and later on treaties with or without 40 Gy of gamma irradiation. The males were then subjected to the technical Cy L / Pm for the detection of recessive lethals. In the third generation the respective counts of the descendant of each one of them to determine the corresponding categories for each extracted chromosome were made. To be mendelian crosses it is expected for a normal chromosome a proportion 2:1 of individuals with genotype Cy L / +: +/+. The absence of individuals +/+ it is indicative of a lethal gene, until 10% of these individuals of each male's total descendant, it is considered that is carrying of a semi lethal gene. The sum of lethal and semi lethals constitutes the category detrimental. The obtained results indicated that the pre-treatment with CCS reduces in a significant way the frequency of induced lethals by 40 Gy of gamma rays. The fact that an effect inhibitor has not been observed in the test of recessive lethal bound to the sex obtained previously, it contrasts with the effect observed in the chromosome II, results of this study and with the one observed in the chromosome III in somatic cells. The above-mentioned shows a differential action of the CCS between sexual chromosomes and autosomal before the effect of the gamma radiation. At the moment we don't have an explanation to these evidences. To evaluate the action of the chlorophyllin on

  15. Inhibitory action of chlorophyllin of autosome recessive lethals induced by irradiation; Accion inhibidora de la clorofilina de letales recesivos autosonicos inducidos por irradiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salceda, V.M.; Pimentel, P.A.E.; Cruces, M.P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: vmss@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    The chlorolin is a sodium salt of the chlorophyll that has a strong protective action of the damage induced by different agents so much physical as chemical. In Drosophila there is reported this effect in somatic cells. In contrast, in germinal cells using tests with the sexual chromosomes has not been found such inhibitory action. For this reason, in this occasion we will refer to the effect of the lethality induced in autosome chromosomes, in particular to the chromosome II of this species. For such effect groups of males of the line Canton-S its were pre-treated for 24h with or without 69 mm of CCS and later on treaties with or without 40 Gy of gamma irradiation. The males were then subjected to the technical Cy L / Pm for the detection of recessive lethals. In the third generation the respective counts of the descendant of each one of them to determine the corresponding categories for each extracted chromosome were made. To be mendelian crosses it is expected for a normal chromosome a proportion 2:1 of individuals with genotype Cy L / +: +/+. The absence of individuals +/+ it is indicative of a lethal gene, until 10% of these individuals of each male's total descendant, it is considered that is carrying of a semi lethal gene. The sum of lethal and semi lethals constitutes the category detrimental. The obtained results indicated that the pre-treatment with CCS reduces in a significant way the frequency of induced lethals by 40 Gy of gamma rays. The fact that an effect inhibitor has not been observed in the test of recessive lethal bound to the sex obtained previously, it contrasts with the effect observed in the chromosome II, results of this study and with the one observed in the chromosome III in somatic cells. The above-mentioned shows a differential action of the CCS between sexual chromosomes and autosomal before the effect of the gamma radiation. At the moment we don't have an explanation to these evidences. To evaluate the action of the

  16. Relationship between chromosomal aberration of germ cells and dominant lethal mutation in male mice after low dosage of X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingdong, Wang; Baochen, Yang; Yuke, Jin [Bethune (N.) Medical Univ., Changchun, JL (China). Dept. of Gentics

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between chromosomal aberration adn dominant mutation in spermatocytes of late pachytene phase in male mice after a single X-irridiation was reported. It was found that the frequency of aberrant cells was correlative to the rate of fetal death, the latter was being about 2.5 times as high as the former. The frequency of dominant lethal mutation induced by X-irradiation is 2.1995x10{sup -3} gamete {center dot} 10 mGy.

  17. Proliferation and Differentiation of Autologic and Allogenic Stem Cells in Supralethally X-Irradiated Dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, I. L. [Department of Radiobiology, Central Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Moscow, USSR (Russian Federation)

    1967-07-15

    Full text: Allogenic bone marrow after transplantation into dogs irradiated with 1000 R X-rays differentiates in the normal way only for 3-4 days, afterwards transforming into lymphoid cells. This transformation is due to the antigen stimulus of the host on the grafted stem cells. The lymphoid cells, obtained from the host's blood on the 7-8th day after grafting, showed specific, immune activity under the Immune Lymphocyte Transfer test. Within a short duration of the immune response immunoblasts and immunocytes Undergo degenerative changes: destroyed mitochondria, formation of autophagic vacuoles and, finally, lysis of the cells. These changes are suggested to be the result of overloading of immune cells with antigen. Preliminary sensitization of the donor with prospective host's haemopoietic tissue does not hasten the immune transformation of haemopoiesis. Injections of bacterial pyrogen, cortisone or 6-mercaptopurine into recipients, as well as incubation of bone marrow at 37 Degree-Sign C for 2 hours, do not prevent the immune transformation. Preliminary thymectomy of the prospective recipients prevents in some of the cases immune transformation of the bone-marrow graft. The delay of allogenic bone-marrow transplantation for 5-6 days prevents in some dogs (X-irradiated with 1000 R, but not with 1200 R) the immune transformation. Transplantation of autologic bone marrow or shielding of the legs during irradiation is accompanied with good restoration of normal haemopoiesis without lymphoid transformation. (author)

  18. The production of IL-1, IL-3, CSA by bone marrow nuclears during bone marrow haemopoiesis after lethal irradiation and syngenic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dygaj, A.M.; Buznik, D.V.; Bogdashin, I.V.; Agafonov, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    The production of haemopoietic factors (IL-1, IL-3, CSA) by adherent and unadherent cells of lethally irradiate CBA mice bone marrow and after syngenic myelokaryocyte transplantation was studied. Radioresistant myelokaryocytes capable to produce haemopoetic factors IL-1, CSA as early as 24 hr after irradiation were found in adherent cell fraction. The synthesis of humoral factors (IL-3, CSA) by unadherent bone marrow elements was realised in a late of experiment (3-6 days) that was connected with forming of functionally valuable cell forms from transplanted or viable stem cells

  19. MASM, a Matrine Derivative, Offers Radioprotection by Modulating Lethal Total-Body Irradiation-Induced Multiple Signaling Pathways in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Matrine is an alkaloid extracted from Sophora flavescens Ait and has many biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antitumor, anti-fibrosis, and immunosuppressive properties. In our previous studies, the matrine derivative MASM was synthesized and exhibited potent inhibitory activity against liver fibrosis. In this study, we mainly investigated its protection against lethal total-body irradiation (TBI in rats. Administration of MASM reduced the radiation sickness characteristics and increased the 30-day survival of rats before or after lethal TBI. Ultrastructural observation illustrated that pretreatment of rats with MASM significantly attenuated the TBI-induced morphological changes in the different organs of irradiated rats. Gene expression profiles revealed that pretreatment with MASM had a dramatic effect on gene expression changes caused by TBI. Pretreatment with MASM prevented differential expression of 53% (765 genes of 1445 differentially expressed genes induced by TBI. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 21 pathways, such as metabolic pathways, pathways in cancer, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways. Our data indicated that pretreatment of rats with MASM modulated these pathways induced by TBI, suggesting that the pretreatment with MASM might provide the protective effects on lethal TBI mainly or partially through the modulation of these pathways, such as multiple MAPK pathways. Therefore, MASM has the potential to be used as an effective therapeutic or radioprotective agent to minimize irradiation damages and in combination with radiotherapy to improve the efficacy of cancer therapy.

  20. Stem and stromal cell reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice following transplantation of hematopoietic tissue from donors of various ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, C.M.; Doran, G.A.; Crouse, D.A.; Sharp, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    If the limited life span of hematopoietic tissues in vitro is due to a finite proliferative capacity of individual stem cells, one might expect tissues of young donors to possess a greater proliferative capacity and to contain a larger population of primitive stem cells than those of older donors. To test this hypothesis, we used 12- and 8-day spleen colony formation (CFU-s) to assay more and less primitive stem cell subpopulations of three murine hematopoietic tissues: fetal liver (FL) and weanling (WBM) and adult (ABM) bone marrow. Subsequently, the same assays and a stromal cell assay were performed on the bone marrow from groups of lethally irradiated mice reconstituted with these tissues. Comparison of the CFU-s content of the donor tissues revealed that FL contained a significantly greater proportion of primitive stem cells as evidenced by a (Day 12):(Day 8) CFU-s ratio of 3.0 +/- 1.0 as compared to 0.9 +/- 0.1 for WBM and ABM. In addition, at 21 weeks post-transplantation the CFU-s/femur values of the FL reconstituted group were significantly greater than those of the ABM and WBM reconstituted groups. These results suggest that fetal hematopoietic tissue contains a greater proportion of primitive stem cells and has a greater proliferative potential than hematopoietic tissue from older donors. No differences were seen in stromal cell reconstitution of the three experimental groups. In all cases, assayable fibroblast colony forming cells (CFU-f) remained at 20-40% of control values, even at 21 weeks postreconstitution

  1. Inhibition of potential lethal damage repair and related gene expression after carbon-ion beam irradiation to human lung cancer grown in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashiro, Tomoyasu; Fujisawa, Takehiko; Koyama-Saegusa, Kumiko; Imai, Takashi; Miyamoto, Tadaaki

    2007-01-01

    Using cultured and nude mouse tumor cells (IA) derived from a human lung cancer, we previously demonstrated their radiosensitivity by focusing attention on the dynamics of tumor clonogens and the early and rapid survival recovery (potential lethal damage repair: PLD repair) occurring after X-ray irradiation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating gene expression in association with PLD repair after carbon-ion beam or X-ray irradiation to cancer cells. In this study we tried to detect the mechanism of DNA damage and repair of the clonogens after X-ray or carbon-ion beam irradiation. At first, colony assay method was performed after irradiation of 12 Gy of X-ray or 5 Gy of carbon-ion beam to compare the time dependent cell survival of the IA cells after each irradiation pass. Second, to search the genes causing PLD repair after irradiation of X-ray or carbon-ion beam, we evaluated gene expressions by using semi-quantitative RT-PCR with the selected 34 genes reportedly related to DNA repair. The intervals from the irradiation were 0, 6, 12 and 24 hr for colony assay method, and 0, 3, 18 hr for RT-PCR method. From the result of survival assays, significant PLD repair was not observed in carbon-ion beam as compared to X-ray irradiation. The results of RT-PCR were as follows. The gene showing significantly higher expressions after X-ray irradiation than after carbon-ion beam irradiation was PCNA. The genes showing significantly lower expressions after X-ray irradiation rather than after carbon-ion beam irradiation were RAD50, BRCA1, MRE11A, XRCC3, CHEK1, MLH1, CCNB1, CCNB2 and LIG4. We conclude that PCNA could be a likely candidate gene for PLD repair. (author)

  2. Specific allogeneic unresponsiveness in irradiated dogs reconstituted with autologous bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapaport, F.T.; Bachvaroff, R.J.; Akiyama, N.; Sato, T.; Ferrebee, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Hemopoietic reconstitution of supralethally irradiated adult dogs of the Cooperstown colony with their own stored bone marrow can produce long-term unresponsiveness to DLA-identical kidney allografts with no need for any additional immunosuppression. Eleven of 18 kidneys transplanted 12 h after replacement of autologous marrow into irradiated recipients currently survive with normal function for as long as 1417 d; 8 of 13 organs transplanted 28 h after marrow replacement, and 8 of 13 organs transplanted 36 h after marrow injection, currently survive up to 502 d, with no further treatment. Alterations in the timing and sequence of each procedure decrease the incidence of unresponsiveness. Survival and function of the kidney allografts were not affected by the rejection of successive skin grafts from the kidney donor. Skin grafts from other DLA-identical donors and DLA-incompatible skin grafts were rejected by the same recipients in uniform fashion

  3. Role of marrow architecture and stromal cells in the recovery process of aplastic marrow of lethally irradiated rats parabiosed with healthy litter mates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.; Kagawa, K.; Awai, M.; Irino, S.

    1986-01-01

    Bone marrow aplasia was induced in rats by whole body lethal irradiation (1,000 rads by x-ray), and rats died of irradiation injury within 7 days. Correlative studies at light (LM), transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated swelling of endothelial and reticular cells and hemorrhage due to detachment of sinus endothelial cells on days 1 and 2. With time, structural recovery occurred without hemopoietic recovery. Reticular cells developed small intracytoplasmic lipid droplets on days 3 and 4. This resulted in fatty aplastic marrow within 7 days. On the other hand, in the marrow of irradiated rats parabiosed with healthy mates by aortic anastomosis, hemopoiesis was initiated by adhesion of nucleated blood cells to fine cytoplasmic pseudopods of fat-stored cells on days 1 and 2 after parabiosis. On days 3 to 5, reticular cells with large lipid droplets and fine pseudopods increased, then hemopoietic foci became clear and extensive. On day 8 after parabiosis, the aplastic bone marrow recovered completely both its structure and hemopoietic activity. Thus, hemopoietic recovery in lethally irradiated marrow begins with recovery of vascular endothelial cells, re-establishment of sinusoidal structure, and morphological and functional recoveries of reticular cells from fat-storage cells by releasing intracytoplasmic lipid droplets. Marrow stromal cells, namely reticular, fat-storage and fibroblastoid cells, share a common cellular origin, and regain their structure and function when fat-storage cells and fibroid cells are placed in contact with hemopoietic precursor cells

  4. Lethal Effect of Gamma Irradiation on the Potato Tuber Moth, Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) and its Effect on Certain Physicochemical Properties of Potato Tubers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, G.M.; Rizk, S. A.; Abdalla, R.S.; Sobeiha, A.M.K.; Dahroug, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of 4-day-old eggs of Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) to a dose level of 800 Gy of gamma radiation caused complete mortality and prevent egg hatching after 4 days from exposure to radiation. This dose level was considered as the lethal dose for the egg stage. The dose levels of 700 and 2800 Gy were considered lethal for the full grown larvae after periods of 9 and 1 days elapsed respectively from exposure to gamma radiation .The percent larval mortality increased with the increase of both the dose level applied and the time elapsed after exposure to gamma radiation. Irradiation of full grown pupae at the dose level 1900 Gy resulted in a complete reduction of adult emergence, reached 100 % . It could be concluded that gamma irradiation with a dose level 2800 Gy caused complete mortality to different stages of Phthorimaea operculella. Moreover, the physical and chemical properties of irradiated potato tubers did not significantly differ as compared to unirradiated tubers .This obtained, fatal irradiation dose did not exceed the safe limits recommended by the international organization FAO/WHO.

  5. Spontaneous cell-mediated cytolysis by peripheral blood cells obtained from whole-body chronically irradiated beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, J.A.; Shifrine, M.; Klein, A.K.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Kawakami, T.

    1986-01-01

    The level of natural killer (NK) activity of continuously gamma-irradiated (whole body) beagle dogs and their nonirradiated controls was studied. For analytical purposes, irradiated dogs were segregated into groups according to their clinical status: clinically normal, hypocellular, or with acute non-lymphocytic leukemia. Since unirradiated control animals exhibited a wide range of NK responses, the data from each irradiated animal were compared to its own age-matched or litter-matched unirradiated control. Of the eight clinically normal irradiated dogs (median = 146% activity of control) only one animal had a NK activity lower than that of its control. The hypocellular group (n = 5, median = 21.8% of control) and the leukemic group (n = 4, median = 52.5% of control) each contained one responder with higher activity than its control. The difference between the percentage of control of the clinically normal and clinically abnormal dogs was found to be significant (P less than 0.05). There is a negative correlation between the NK results obtained and the total accumulated dose of radiation at the time of sampling (correlation coefficient = -0.739, P less than 0.01), suggesting a radiation effect upon natural killer activity, which is evidence by enhancement at lower doses and depression at higher doses of irradiation

  6. Late response to whole-lung irradiation alone and with whole-body hyperthermia in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, S.M.; Gillette, E.L.; Dawson, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The late effects of whole-lung irradiation with and without whole-body hyperthermia were studied in beagle dogs. The reference doses ranged from 18 to 49.5 Gy given in 1.5-Gy fractions over 6 weeks. Whole-body hyperthermia was given in three 2-h treatments to a deep rectal temperature of 42.0 degrees C. Radiation was given simultaneously with hyperthermia on those days. Physiological and histopathological responses were evaluated. Physiological changes included decreases in cardiac output, systemic blood pressure, dynamic compliance and serotonin uptake. Early changes included an increase in extravascular water and total protein in the lavage. These changes were considered mild, were compensated for and occurred only in dogs receiving doses of 40.5 Gy or greater given in 1.5-Gy fractions over 6 weeks. Histopathological change were typical of irradiated lung and included pleural fibrosis, interstitial fibrosis, fibrotic foci, and peribronchial and perivascular fibrosis. There was no enhancement of late injury to lung by hyperthermia seen in this study. 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Changing patterns of radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitors from chronically irradiated dogs prone either to aplastic anemia or to myeloproliferative disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.; Kaspar, L.V.

    1990-01-01

    Hematopoietic patterns have been assessed in chronic 60 Co gamma irradiated dogs during preclinical phases of evolving aplastic anemia (AA) or myeloproliferative disease (MPD), principally myeloid leukemia. The results support the concept that acquired radioresistance of vital granulocyte/monocyte lineage-committed hematopoietic progenitors is temporally, perhaps causally, linked to the processes mediating hematopoietic recovery and accommodation under chronic irradiation, and in turn to preclinical events of evolving MPD. In addition, the marked differential responses of progenitors to gamma and neutron irradiation in vitro might suggest differences in the nature of cellular lesions elicited by chronic gamma irradiation, in vivo. (author)

  8. Changing patterns of radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitors from chronically irradiated dogs prone either to aplastic anemia or to myeloproliferative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.M.; Kaspar, L.V. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Hematopoietic patterns have been assessed in chronic {sup 60}Co gamma irradiated dogs during preclinical phases of evolving aplastic anemia (AA) or myeloproliferative disease (MPD), principally myeloid leukemia. The results support the concept that acquired radioresistance of vital granulocyte/monocyte lineage-committed hematopoietic progenitors is temporally, perhaps causally, linked to the processes mediating hematopoietic recovery and accommodation under chronic irradiation, and in turn to preclinical events of evolving MPD. In addition, the marked differential responses of progenitors to gamma and neutron irradiation in vitro might suggest differences in the nature of cellular lesions elicited by chronic gamma irradiation, in vivo. (author).

  9. Effects of sub-lethal dose of gamma-irradiation on levels of acid phosphatase in cerebellum of pigeons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.C.; Gadhia, P.K.

    1980-01-01

    The changes in the activities of acid phosphatase in the sham-irradiated and γ-irradiated cerebellum of pigeons have been studied both biochemically as well as histochemically after 400 rads. The specific activity of acid phosphatase decreased significantly after 48h and 72h of irradiation. The histochemical observations following total body irradiation confirmed the results obtained by quantitative biochemical studies. (author)

  10. The effect of a single lethal X-irradiation exposure on the activity of lipoprotein lipase in the tissues of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlakova, A.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M.

    1979-01-01

    Wistar male rats, both fed and fasting for 16 h prior to irradiation, were exposed to a single lethal X-ray dose of 387 mC/kg (1500R). The activity of lipoprotein lipase in white adipose (epididymal) tissue and heart muscle and the concentration of serum triglycerides were determined at 1, 6, 24, 48, and 72 h after irradiation. In the early time periods, at 1 and 6 h after exposure, the activity of lipoprotein lipase decreased in adipose tissue and increased in heart muscle of the irradiated fed rats; in fasting rats it decreased in heart muscle at 1 h after exposure. The concentration of serum triglycerides increased at 1 h and decreased at 6 h after exposure in fed rats. In these rats, alterations in serum triglycerides correlated with changes in lipoprotein lipase activity in adipose tissue. Alterations observed at the later time periods were more dependent on the time interval between irradiation and the analysis. Lipoprotein lipase activity increased with time after irradiation up to the maximal values at 72 h. Fasting prior to and after irradiation substantially modified the response of animals to radiation. (author)

  11. Clinical and symptomatological study of pigs subjected to a lethal dose of integral gamma irradiation; Etude clinique et symptomatologique chez le porc soumis a une irradiation gamma totale a dose letale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaiman, M; Guenet, J -L; Maas, J; Nizza, P

    1966-05-01

    Results are reported from a clinical and haematological study on a Corsican species of pigs wholly exposed to an approximately lethal dose of {gamma} radiation. The aim of this work was to examine the changes in the irradiation syndrome of irradiation for pigs to make it thus possible to devise further experiments, in particular in the therapeutic field. The dose received was 285 rads (measured as the absorption in the vertical antero-posterior medial plane). Data are presented on cyto-haematological changes in the blood circulating immediately after irradiation, and followed up to death, and changes in the medullary cytology after irradiation. The clinical picture of lethal radiation injury in swine is described. (authors) [French] Les auteurs rapportent les resultats d'une etude clinique et hematologique chez des porcs de race corse irradies in toto a dose sensiblement letale. Le but de cette etude etait de connaitre l'evolution du syndrome aigu d'irradiation chez le porc et de permettre ainsi le developpement d'experimentations ulterieures, en particulier dans le domaine therapeutique. La dose delivree etait de 285 rad (en dose absorbee au niveau du plan median vertical anteroposterieur. L'etude a porte essentiellement: 1. Sur les modifications cyclo-hematologiques du sang circulant immediatement apres l'irradiation, pour les differentes lignees cellulaires; l'evolution de ces modifications a ete notee jusqu'a la mort; 2. Sur les modifications de la cytologie medullaire apres irradiation (evolution du myelogramme et essai d'evaluation de la cellularite de la moelle osseuse);: 3. Sur les signes cliniques, d'ailleurs tres discrets, observes chez les porcs apres irradiation. (auteurs)

  12. Clinical and symptomatological study of pigs subjected to a lethal dose of integral gamma irradiation; Etude clinique et symptomatologique chez le porc soumis a une irradiation gamma totale a dose letale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaiman, M.; Guenet, J.-L.; Maas, J.; Nizza, P

    1966-05-01

    Results are reported from a clinical and haematological study on a Corsican species of pigs wholly exposed to an approximately lethal dose of {gamma} radiation. The aim of this work was to examine the changes in the irradiation syndrome of irradiation for pigs to make it thus possible to devise further experiments, in particular in the therapeutic field. The dose received was 285 rads (measured as the absorption in the vertical antero-posterior medial plane). Data are presented on cyto-haematological changes in the blood circulating immediately after irradiation, and followed up to death, and changes in the medullary cytology after irradiation. The clinical picture of lethal radiation injury in swine is described. (authors) [French] Les auteurs rapportent les resultats d'une etude clinique et hematologique chez des porcs de race corse irradies in toto a dose sensiblement letale. Le but de cette etude etait de connaitre l'evolution du syndrome aigu d'irradiation chez le porc et de permettre ainsi le developpement d'experimentations ulterieures, en particulier dans le domaine therapeutique. La dose delivree etait de 285 rad (en dose absorbee au niveau du plan median vertical anteroposterieur. L'etude a porte essentiellement: 1. Sur les modifications cyclo-hematologiques du sang circulant immediatement apres l'irradiation, pour les differentes lignees cellulaires; l'evolution de ces modifications a ete notee jusqu'a la mort; 2. Sur les modifications de la cytologie medullaire apres irradiation (evolution du myelogramme et essai d'evaluation de la cellularite de la moelle osseuse);: 3. Sur les signes cliniques, d'ailleurs tres discrets, observes chez les porcs apres irradiation. (auteurs)

  13. Survival patterns and hemopathological responses of dogs under continuous gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.; Fritz, T.E.; Tolle, D.V.; Poole, C.M.; Lombard, L.S.; Doyle, D.E.; Kaspar, L.V.; Cullen, S.M.; Carnes, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    Survival curves were constructed and analyzed relative to contributing hematopathological responses for groups of beagles exposed continuously for duration of life to low daily doses of whole body 60 Co gamma irradiation (27.3 rads/day to 4 rads/day). The survival curves versus time were progressively displaced toward longer survival as rates of exposure were reduced from the relatively high dose rate of 27.3 rads/day to the low dose rate of 4.0 rads/day. Average survival times increased from 57 days at 27.3 rads/day to 1830 days at 4.0 rads/day, representing fractional increased life-spans from 1.5% to 50.8%, respectively. Survival curves versus total dose were markedly displaced along the cumulative radiation dose axis at the extreme dose rates (i.e., 27.3 and 4.0 rads/day), but not at the intermediate dose rates (i.e., 13.4 and 7.9 rads/day) in which the upper linear portions of the survival curves are superimposed. From these dose-dependent survival curves, LD 50 values for whole body gamma irradiation, delivered chronically at 27.3, 13.4, 7.9, and 4.0 rads per day were estimated to be 1442, 2124, 2039, and 7161 rads, respectively. Both time- and dose-dependent survival curves for the intermediate dose rates, in contrast to the extreme dose rates, exhibited pronounced transitions in the lethality rate below the 50% survival level. These lethality rate transitions occurred at approx. 2500 rads of accumulated dose and were attributed to a shift in the spectrum of developing hematopathologies: namely, from a predominance of the acutely ablative radiation-induced lymphohematopoietic syndromes (i.e., septicemias and aplastic anemias) to a predominance of the late arising hematopoietic neoplasias (myelogenous leukemia and related myeloproliferative disorders)

  14. The lethal interaction of x ray and penicillin induced lesions following x-irradiation of Escherichia coli B/r in the presence of hypoxic cell sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, N.E.; Obioha, F.I.

    1982-01-01

    When Escherichia coli B/r were x-irradiated under anoxia in the presence of different electron-affinic sensitizers and then incubated in broth containing penicillin (at a concentration that did not kill unirradiated cells) additional killing of the bacteria occurred provided the sensitizers were of relatively high lipophilicity. The overall effect was to increase the efficiency of these sensitizers. It is concluded that sensitizer-dependent latent radiation lesions(s) are produced in membrane components of the cell envelope that interact with damage caused by penicillin in the peptidoglycan layer and this causes the additional lethality

  15. Hematologic syndrome in man modeled from mammalian lethality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.D.

    1981-01-01

    Data on acute radiation lethality due to failure of the hematologic system in rats, mice, dogs, swine, monkeys and man are analyzed. Based on the available data, the mortality incidences for 1-100% levels can be computed directly if one has only an estimate of the dose lethal to 50% of the population (LD 50 ) for the mammalian strain and radiation environment of interest. The sole restriction is that the dose profile to the marrow be moderately uniform. If an LD 50 for any exposure situation has been measured, then one can readily scale to any desired situation through implicit-biological and empirical-physical relationships. The LD 50 for man, exposed to an isotropic cloud of photons, and knowledge of the bone-marrow dose profiles readily permit evaluation of the model for other levels of human mortality from different irradiating particles, partial body irradiation and spatially dependent and/or mixed radiation environments. (author)

  16. The induction of micronuclei in X-irradiated Beagle dog lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rithidech, K.; Lozano, D.; Brooks, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    We developed a simple, sensitive, and reproducible method using the micronucleus assay in dog blood lymphocytes for detecting genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation. Micronuclei (MM) are expressed in cells that have undergone 1 cell division. Thus, it was important to determine the optimum culture condition and sampling time to obtain a maximum number of such cells. To identify cells that have divided, cytochalasin B was added to block cytokinesis. Cells were harvested at 72, 76, or 94 h after incubation with different concentrations of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) 15 or 16. After optimizing the culture time and PHA concentration, the system was calibrated by evaluating the dose response for the induction of MN by X rays. Blood samples were drawn, X-irradiated (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, or 4.0 Gy), grown in optimum culture medium, harvested at 94 h after incubation, and the frequency of MN analyzed in binucleated cells. The dose-response relationship was fit by a quadratic model; micronuclei/binucleated cell = 0.017 + 0.046D + 0.0093D 2 , where D = dose. The MN assay in dog blood lymphocytes provides a sensitive and reliable technique for measuring genotoxic damage in a large animal model. The MN assay will be very useful for evaluating genotoxic effects of hazardous agents after both chronic and acute exposures and for estimating radiation dose. (author)

  17. Dose effect comparisons between HFR and BMRR irradiated dogs with respect to healthy tissue tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huiskamp, R.; Philipp, K.H.I.; Gavin, P.R.; Wheeler, F.J.; Siefert, A.

    1993-01-01

    Epithermal neutron beams are being developed for the application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of deep seated tumors, like glioblastoma and astrocytomas, through the intact skin. Epithermal neutrons will be moderated by the tissue mass between skin and tumour to produce the thermal neutrons necessary for the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction in the target tissue. Although the neutron capture cross-sections of elements in normal tissue are several orders of magnitude lower that for boron, the high abundance of hydrogen and nitrogen will cause a significant contribution to the total absorbed radiation dose through the 1 H(n,γ) 2 H and the 14 N(n,p) 14 C reaction, respectively. Due to inevitable incomplete filtration, an epithermal beam will also contain a fast neutron component, i.e. neutrons with energies ≥ 10 keV, and a γ-photon component originating from the reactor and produced in structural and filter materials. Therefore, the resultant radiation consists of a complex of low and high LET radiation of which the constitutents vary rapidly with depth in tissue. Based on the ongoing canine healthy tissue tolerance study at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) using the epithermal beam without BSH, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the fast neutron beam component has been determined for skin reactions. In addition, a open-quotes compound factorclose quotes, i.e geometry x RBE, for the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction was derived for dogs irradiated at the BMRR with the epithermal beam and BSH (Gavin et al.). Currently, a healthy tissue tolerance study with BSH is being carried out at the HB11 epithermal beam of the High Flux Reactor at Petten. The present paper describes preliminary dose effect comparisons between High Flux Reactor (HFR) and BMRR irradiated dogs with respect to healthy tissue tolerance in order to refine the BSH compound factors and the fast neutron RBE for skin and brain

  18. Irradiation-induced erythroleukemia and myelogenous leukemia in the beagle dog: hematology and ultrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.; Tolle, D.V.; Fritz, T.E.; Devine, R.L.; Poole, C.M.; Norris, W.P.

    1977-01-01

    A high incidence of leukemia in adult beagle dogs was induced by continuous whole-body exposure to low doses of 60 Co gamma irradiation. At 5, 10, and 17 R per 22-hr exposure day, 20 animals of 53 died of either myelogenous leukemia (15 of 20) or erythroleukemia (5 of 20); the latter occurred only at 5 R/day. Consistent preclinical changes occurred in the peripheral blood, including a partial recovery from an initial severe leukopenia, a prolonged accommodation-to-irradiation phase, and marked oscillations in platelet values in the preleukemic period. In the terminal condition the dogs were severely anemic, thrombocytopenic, and commonly leukopenic. Peripheral blood buffy-coat preparations contained circulating ''blast'' cells and juvenile forms. Abnormal erythrocyte and platelet morphology was consistently present. The bone marrow was altered most severely; other organs showed variable degrees of leukemic infiltration and proliferation and loss of normal tissue architecture. The marrow was hyperplastic with little or no fat remaining. Differential marrow cell counts showed increased numbers of immature cell forms. Myeloid:erythroid (M:E) ratios ranged from 2.6:1 to 61.5:1 in the granulocytic leukemias, and 0.2:1 to 1:1 in the erythroleukemias. Juvenile leukemic cells (both circulating and tissue forms) displayed a number of distinctive cytologic features, including asynchronous patterns of nuclear-cytoplasmic maturation, increased incidence of nuclear clefts, coalescence of cytoplasmic granules, and bizarre arrangements of endoplasmic reticulum. These experimentally induced canine leukemias have many hematologic and cytologic features in common with both spontaneous and radiation-induced leukemias of man. Thus, they may provide a useful model for the study of human leukemia

  19. An interspecies comparison of responses of mice and dogs to continuous 60Co γ irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, W.P.; Tyler, S.A.; Sacher, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    Young-adult purebred beagle dogs were exposed continuously, 22h/d, to 60 Co γ rays until they died. The daily dose rates ranged from 3.5 to 210 rad. At 3.5 rad/d the mean survival time was in excess of 1860 days (the study was still in progress in Nov.1975), while at 210 rad/d mean survival time was 13 days. The data are compared with those from previously published information from similarly irradiated mice. The comparison is made in terms of radiation-specific death rate, defined as 1/MASsub(i)-1/MASsub(c), where MASsub(i) and MASsub(c) are the mean after-survival times of the irradiated and control populations, respectively. In both species, when log radiation-specific death rate is plotted against log dose rate, the response has a slope=2, i.e. the death rate increases with the square of dose rate. This occurs over the entire dose rate range where damage to haematopoietic tissues is the primary cause of death. In the mouse, at daily dose rates below 20 rad/d, haematopoietic injury is no longer a primary cause of death and the response curve shifts to slope=1 where injury is dependent only on total accumulated dose and is independent of dose rate. The data available so far suggest that a similar inflection may occur with the dog at dose rates below 3.5 rad/d. An experiment is being initiated to determine whether this will be the case. Statistical considerations, essential to the design of the study, are presented. (author)

  20. Enhancement of the far-UV lethality in yeast Candida guilliermondii by near-UV post-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraikin, G.Y.; Pospelov, M.E.; Rubin, L.B.

    1980-01-01

    In experiments with the non-photoreactivable yeast Candida guilliermondii, radiations at 313, 334 and 365 nm, having no effect on untreated cell populations, produced an 'enhancing' effect on the lethality of 254 nm-pretreated cells. Wavelengths in the visible region of the spectrum did not exhibit a similar effect. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the biofragmentable anastomotic ring following preoperative irradiation to the rectosigmoid in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.D.; Bubrick, M.P.; Mestitz, S.T.; Crouch, F.M.; Johnston, G.R.; Feeney, D.A.; Strom, R.L.; Maney, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    An animal study was done to evaluate the safety of a sutureless colorectal anastomosis in irradiated bowel. Forty mongrel dogs received preoperative radiation with 5000 rads and then underwent a low anterior resection and anastomosis using either the EEA-31TM stapling device, a two-layer handsewn technique, or the biofragmentable anastomotic ring (BAR) 31-1.5 mm and BAR 31-2.0 mm devices. The anastomoses were then evaluated for early and late anastomotic healing and leaks. The results show four radiographic (three clinical) leaks (P less than .05) in the BAR 31-1.5 mm group and one radiographic leak in the handsewn group. No leaks were detected in the EEA or BAR 31-2.0 mm groups. Results indicate that all three techniques can be done safely with this dose of radiation, and gap size (1.5 mm vs. 2.0 mm) is of critical importance when performing a BAR anastomosis in irradiated bowel.

  2. Evaluation of the biofragmentable anastomotic ring following preoperative irradiation to the rectosigmoid in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.D.; Bubrick, M.P.; Mestitz, S.T.; Crouch, F.M.; Johnston, G.R.; Feeney, D.A.; Strom, R.L.; Maney, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    An animal study was done to evaluate the safety of a sutureless colorectal anastomosis in irradiated bowel. Forty mongrel dogs received preoperative radiation with 5000 rads and then underwent a low anterior resection and anastomosis using either the EEA-31TM stapling device, a two-layer handsewn technique, or the biofragmentable anastomotic ring (BAR) 31-1.5 mm and BAR 31-2.0 mm devices. The anastomoses were then evaluated for early and late anastomotic healing and leaks. The results show four radiographic (three clinical) leaks (P less than .05) in the BAR 31-1.5 mm group and one radiographic leak in the handsewn group. No leaks were detected in the EEA or BAR 31-2.0 mm groups. Results indicate that all three techniques can be done safely with this dose of radiation, and gap size (1.5 mm vs. 2.0 mm) is of critical importance when performing a BAR anastomosis in irradiated bowel

  3. A Study on Recovery from Potentially Lethal Damage induced by γ-Irradiation in Plateau-phase Vero Cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Il Han; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il; Cha, Chang Yong

    1988-01-01

    Recovery from potentially lethal damage (PLDR) after irradiation was studied in plateau-phase culture of Vero cells in vitro. Unfed plateau-phase cells were irradiated with dose of 1 to 9 Gy using Cs-137 irradiator. Cells then were incubated again and left in situ for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 24 hours and then were trypsinized, explanted, and subcultured in fresh RPMI-1640 media containing 0.33% agar. Cell survival was measured by colony forming ability. An adequate number of heavily irradiated Vero cells were added as feeder cells to make the total cell number constant in every culture dish. As the postirradiation in situ incubation time increased, surviving fraction increased saturation level at 2 to 4 hours after in situ incubation. As the radiation dose increased, the rate of PLDR also increased. In analysis of cell survival curve fitted to the linear-quadratic model, the linear inactivation coefficient (a) decreased largely and reached nearly to zero but the quadratic inactivation coefficient (b) increased minimally by increment of postirradiation in situ incubation time. So PLDR mainly affected the damage expressed as a. In the multitarget model, significant change was not obtained in D0 but in Dq. Therefore, shoulder region in cell survival curve was mainly affected by PLDR and terminal slope was not influenced at all. And dose-modifying factor by PLDR was relatively higher in shoulder region, that is, in low dose area below 3 Gy

  4. Anti-asialo GM1 antiserum treatment of lethally irradiated recipients before bone marrow transplantation: Evidence that recipient natural killer depletion enhances survival, engraftment, and hematopoietic recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiberghien, P.; Longo, D.L.; Wine, J.W.; Alvord, W.G.; Reynolds, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are reported to have an important role in the resistance of lethally irradiated recipients to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Therefore, we investigated the effects of recipient NK depletion on survival, chimerism, and hematopoietic reconstitution after lethal irradiation and the transplantation of limiting amounts of T-cell-deficient bone marrow (BM). When administered before BMT, anti-asialo GM1 (ASGM1) antiserum treatment, effective in depleting in vivo NK activity, was associated with a marked increase in survival in 3 of 3 allogeneic combinations (BALB/c into C3H/HeN, C57B1/6, or C3B6F1). This enhanced survival was independent of the susceptibility of each recipient strain to accept BALB/c BM. Moreover, recipient anti-ASGM1 treatment was also effective in increasing survival in recipients of syngeneic BM, suggesting that NK cells can adversely affect engraftment independent of genetically controlled polymorphic cell surface determinants. Analysis of chimerism in surviving animals 2 months post-BMT showed that recipient NK depletion significantly increased the level of donor engraftment when high doses of BM were transplanted. These studies also demonstrated that anti-ASGM1 pretreatment mainly resulted in an increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis in the second and third week after irradiation. Anti-ASGM1 treatment also dramatically accelerated the rate of appearance of donor-derived cells with a higher level of donor-cell engraftment apparent at a time when the differences in survival between NK-depleted and control BMT recipients became significant. Peripheral cell counts were also affected by NK depletion, with significantly enhanced platelet and red blood cell recovery and a moderate increase in granulocyte recovery

  5. Anti-asialo GM1 antiserum treatment of lethally irradiated recipients before bone marrow transplantation: Evidence that recipient natural killer depletion enhances survival, engraftment, and hematopoietic recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiberghien, P.; Longo, D.L.; Wine, J.W.; Alvord, W.G.; Reynolds, C.W. (Program Resources, Inc., Frederick, MD (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are reported to have an important role in the resistance of lethally irradiated recipients to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Therefore, we investigated the effects of recipient NK depletion on survival, chimerism, and hematopoietic reconstitution after lethal irradiation and the transplantation of limiting amounts of T-cell-deficient bone marrow (BM). When administered before BMT, anti-asialo GM1 (ASGM1) antiserum treatment, effective in depleting in vivo NK activity, was associated with a marked increase in survival in 3 of 3 allogeneic combinations (BALB/c into C3H/HeN, C57B1/6, or C3B6F1). This enhanced survival was independent of the susceptibility of each recipient strain to accept BALB/c BM. Moreover, recipient anti-ASGM1 treatment was also effective in increasing survival in recipients of syngeneic BM, suggesting that NK cells can adversely affect engraftment independent of genetically controlled polymorphic cell surface determinants. Analysis of chimerism in surviving animals 2 months post-BMT showed that recipient NK depletion significantly increased the level of donor engraftment when high doses of BM were transplanted. These studies also demonstrated that anti-ASGM1 pretreatment mainly resulted in an increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis in the second and third week after irradiation. Anti-ASGM1 treatment also dramatically accelerated the rate of appearance of donor-derived cells with a higher level of donor-cell engraftment apparent at a time when the differences in survival between NK-depleted and control BMT recipients became significant. Peripheral cell counts were also affected by NK depletion, with significantly enhanced platelet and red blood cell recovery and a moderate increase in granulocyte recovery.

  6. Effects of high-dose and low-dose preoperative irradiation on low anterior anastomoses in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubrick, M.P.; Rolfsmeyer, E.S.; Schauer, R.M.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; Strom, R.L.; Hitchcock, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty mongrel dogs underwent preoperative irradiation to the colon and rectum, receiving 4000 rads according to the Nominal Standard Dose Equation. Each dog then underwent anterior resection of the rectosigmoid, and reconstructive technique was randomized into two groups consisting of either handsewn or EEA-stapled anastomoses. Anastomoses were examined digitally and radiographically at the time of surgery and on the seventh postoperative day. There were four radiographic leaks among the handsewn anastomoses, but only one was clinically significant and associated with peritonitis. There were no leaks among the ten EEA-stapled anastomoses. The data suggest that low anterior resection and anastomosis can be done safely after 4000 rad irradiation and that the EEA-stapled anastomosis may be preferable

  7. Effects of high-dose and low-dose preoperative irradiation on low anterior anastomoses in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bubrick, M.P.; Rolfsmeyer, E.S.; Schauer, R.M.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; Strom, R.L.; Hitchcock, C.R.

    Twenty mongrel dogs underwent preoperative irradiation to the colon and rectum, receiving 4000 rads according to the Nominal Standard Dose Equation. Each dog then underwent anterior resection of the rectosigmoid, and reconstructive technique was randomized into two groups consisting of either handsewn or EEA-stapled anastomoses. Anastomoses were examined digitally and radiographically at the time of surgery and on the seventh postoperative day. There were four radiographic leaks among the handsewn anastomoses, but only one was clinically significant and associated with peritonitis. There were no leaks among the ten EEA-stapled anastomoses. The data suggest that low anterior resection and anastomosis can be done safely after 4000 rad irradiation and that the EEA-stapled anastomosis may be preferable.

  8. Inter-species comparison of the responses of mice and dogs to continuous 60Co γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, W.P.; Tyler, S.A.; Sacher, G.A.

    1975-11-01

    Young-adult, purebred, beagle dogs were exposed continuously, 22 hours/day, to 60 Co γ-rays until they died. The daily dose rates ranged from 3.5 to 210 rad. At 3.5 rad/day the mean survival time was in excess of 1860 days (the study is still in progress), while at 210 rad/day mean survival time was 13 days. The data are compared to those from previously published information from similarly irradiated mice

  9. Protective effect of Yin Shen Yin on chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood in dogs induced by γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Bingchai; Chen Tiehe; Lu Jiaben; Wang Zongwu; Huang Yinmei

    1992-01-01

    'Yin Shen Yin' preparation used in this studies is made up of Tremella Fcuiformis, Radix Acanthopanacis Senticosi and others. The drug was taken orally to dogs before irradiation, and the same time, its anti-radiation effect was compared with those of Tremella Fuciformis and cystamine. The results showed that 'Yin Shen Yin', Tremella and cystamine all have not obvious harmful effects on chromosome, however, they have good protective effects on chromosome damage induced by γ-ray irradiation. Among them, high dose 'Yin Shen Yin' has the best radio-protective effect

  10. Blood leukocyte responses to extracorporeal circulation. 1. Short term extracorporeal circulation in dogs without and with extracorporeal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szemere, P.; Fliedner, T.M. (Ulm Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Klinische Physiologie)

    1983-01-01

    Short term (1 h) extracorporeal circulation without or with irradiation of blood was performed in two normal dogs in a series of experiments. The granulocyte count was constantly diminished, while the lymphocytes did not show any particular change in their concentration. In the majority of the experiments a decrease of the CFU-C content occurred to less than 70% of the initial level. There was no difference in the results of experiments with or without irradiation. In the 'bag to bag' procedures, no significant change in the blood leukocyte counts including CFU-C, was established.

  11. Rescue by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in dogs from bone marrow failure after total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zander, A.R.; Gray, K.N.; Hester, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine the minimum dose of buffy coat cells necessary to achieve hematopoietic rescue following supralethal irradiation, mongrel dogs under general anesthesia were subjected to leukacytapheresis using three different techniques of cell separation. The buffy coats were frozen with dimethylsulfoxide and stored at -196 degrees C until transfused. Sixteen dogs were irradiated with 800 rads and were supported with antibiotics and transfusions of irradiated homologous blood. They were transfused with the frozen and thawed buffy coat cells, and, if they survived, they were followed for 100 days, sacrificed, and their tissues studied. The mean yield of mononuclear cells during leukocytapheresis ranged from 4.1 +/- 2.0 X 10(9) (mean +/- SD) to 6.0 +/- 4.0 X 10(9) for the three leukacytapheresis methods; one technique was not as satisfactory as the other two. Six of the 16 dogs fully recovered with evidence of marrow rescue; however, only one had a dose of mononuclear cells less than 11.1 X 10(9). These data indicate that seven to 17 leukacytapheresis procedures would be required to reconstitute a 70 kilogram patient. These preliminary findings suggest that, because the yields of transplantable cells with current technology are not adequate, the transplantation potential of buffy coat cells exposed to mobilizing agents should be evaluated

  12. Contribution to the study of non-lethal whole-body gamma irradiation effects on the unitary activities of the dorsal hippocampus in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassant, M.-H.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of non-lethal whole-body gamma irradiation on the spontaneous activity of the dorsal hippocampus pyramidal cells were studied in rabbits. First of all the unitary activity of the CA 1 and CA 4 pyramidal cells was recorded extracellularly in the reference animal. The results were analyzed by a statistical method. By classifying the various cell functioning modes observed, and measuring the frequency with which they appear as a function of the state of vigilance, an attempt was made to characterize precisely the spontaneous activity of the hippocampal neurons. Recording were then made under identical experimental conditions on animals totally irradiated to mean absorbed doses of 250 and 450 rads (delivered at a constant rate of 14 rads/mn). The electroencephalographic activity of the hippocampus shows many anomalies (slow waves, wave-points, theta rythm deformation) as a function of which several pathological states were distinguished and used to classify the data, then processed by the methods already used for the reference data. The results obtained prove that the statistical characteristics of the unitary activity are changed by irradiation [fr

  13. Glucorticoids/insulin ratio in irradiated animal blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizina, T.Yu.

    1990-01-01

    Similar changes in blood levels of immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and glucocorticoids (GC) were observed in rats, mice and dogs after X-irradiation with lethal doses. The use of the blood GC/IRI ratio indices in estimating the functional status of the exposed organism is discussed

  14. Effect of Pseudomonas contamination or antibiotic decontamination of the GI tract on acute radiation lethality after neutron or gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of antibiotic decontamination of Pseudomonas contamination of the GI tract prior to whole-body neutron or gamma irradiation was studied. It was observed that for fission neutron doses greater than 5.5 Gy, cyclotron-produced neutron doses greater than 6.7 Gy, and 137Cs gamma-ray doses greater than 14.4 Gy, the median survival time of untreated rats was relatively constant at 4.2 to 4.5 days, indicating death was due to intestinal injury. Within the dose range of 3.5 to 5.5 Gy of fission neutrons, 4.9 to 6.7 Gy of cyclotron-produced neutrons, and 9.6 to 14.4 Gy of gamma rays, median survival time of these animals was inversely related to dose and varied from 12 to 4.6 days. This change in survival time with dose reflects a transition in the mechanisms of acute radiation death from pure hematopoietic, to a combination of intestinal and hematopoietic, to pure intestinal death. Decontamination of the GI tract with antibiotics prior to irradiation increased median survival time 1 to 5 days in this transitional dose range. Contamination of the intestinal flora with Pseudomonas aeruginosa prior to irradiation reduced median survival time 1 to 5 days in the same radiation dose range. Pseudomonas-contaminated animals irradiated within this transitional dose range had maximum concentrations of total bacteria and Pseudomonas in their livers at the time of death. However, liver bacteria concentration was usually higher in gamma-irradiated animals, due to a smaller contribution of hematopoietic injury in neutron-irradiated animals. The effects of both decontamination of the GI tract and Pseudomonas contamination of the GI tract were negligible in the range of doses in which median survival time was dose independent, i.e., in the pure intestinal death dose range

  15. Lethality in repair-proficient Escherichia coli after 365nm ultraviolet light irradiation is dependent on fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Reciprocity (total applied fluence produces the same response, regardless of the fluence rate) for the lethal effects caused by 365 and 254 nm ultraviolet light (UV) was studied for repair-proficient and -deficient Escherichia coli strains. In the repair-proficient strain, E. coli WP2 uvr A + recA + , reciprocity after 365 nm UV was only observed at fluence rates of about 750 Wm -2 and above. Below this rate, the cells became increasingly sensitive as the fluence rate was decreased. Similar lack of reciprocity was obtained whether the cells were exposed at 0 or 25 0 C. The double repair-defective mutant, E. coli WP100 uvr A recA, showed complete reciprocity after 365 nm UV over the same range of fluence rates measured for the repair-proficient strain. For 254 nm UV, complete reciprocity occurred in both strains over a range of fluence rates differing by an order of magnitude. (author)

  16. Induction of specific unresponsiveness to heart allografts in mongrel dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation and antithymocyte globulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strober, S.; Modry, D.L.; Hoppe, R.T.

    1984-01-01

    The survival of heterotopic heart allografts was determined in mongrel dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) alone or in combination with other immunosuppressive agents. TLI alone (total dose, 1800 rad) minimally prolonged graft survival as compared with untreated controls. However, marked synergy was observed when TLI was combined with a 10-day post-transplant course of rabbit anti-dog thymocyte globulin (ATG). Approximately 40% of recipients given TLI and ATG showed specific unresponsiveness, as judged by the lack of rejection on serial biopsies for more than 1 year and the prompt rejection of third party hearts. The addition of post-transplant azathioprine (90 to 180 days) to the TLI and ATG regimen increased the mortality of recipients and reduced the fraction of dogs showing specific unresponsiveness. Infusion of donor bone marrow cells at the time of heart transplantation failed to induced specific unresponsiveness in recipients given TLI alone or TLI in combination with post-transplant methotrexate, cyclosporine A, or ATG. The results indicate that the combination of TLI and a brief course of ATG without marrow transplantation was the most effective regimen for the induction of specific unresponsiveness in mongrel dogs

  17. Fractionated total body irradiation and autologous bone marrow transplantation in dogs: Hemopoietic recovery after various marrow cell doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenburger, U.; Kolb, H.J.; Thierfelder, S.; Netzel, B.; Schaeffer, E.; Kolb, H.

    1980-01-01

    Hemopoietic recovery was studied in dogs given 2400 R fractionated total body irradiation within one week and graded doses of cryopreserved autologous bone marrow. Complete hemopoietic recovery including histology was observed after this dose and sufficient doses of marrow cells. Doses of more than 5.5 x 10 7 mononuclear marrow cells/kg body weight were sufficient for complete recovery in all dogs, 1.5 to 5.5 x 10 7 cells/kg were effective in some of the dogs and less than 1.5 x 10 7 cells/kg were insufficient for complete recovery. Similarly, more than 30000 CFUsub(c)/kg body weight were required for hemopoietic recovery. The optimal marrow cell dose which has been defined as the minimal dose required for the earliest possible recovery of leukocyte and platelet counts was 7-8 x 10 7 mononuclear marrow cells/kg body weight. It has been concluded that fractionated total body irradiation with 2400 R dose not require greater doses of marrow cells for hemopoietic reconstitution than lower single doses and that the hemopoietic microenvironment is not persistently disturbed after this dose. (author)

  18. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. VII. Evidence that caffeine enhances expression of potentially lethal radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetham, K.L.; Tolmach, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    HeLa cells irradiated with 2 Gy of 220-kV X rays suffer a 60-70% loss of colony-forming ability which is increased to 90% by postirradiation treatment with 10 mM caffeine for 6 hr. The detailed postirradiation patterns of cell death and sister-cell fusion in such cultures and in cultures in which the colony-forming ability was brought to about the same level by treatment with a larger (4 Gy) X-ray dose alone or by longer (48 hr) treatment with 10 mM caffeine alone were recorded by time-lapse cinemicrography. Because the patterns of cell death and fusion differ radically in irradiated and in caffeine-treated cultures, the response of the additional cells killed by the combined treatment can be identified as X-ray induced rather than caffeine induced. The appearance of cultures after several days of incubation confirms the similarity of the post-treatment patterns of proliferation in cultures suffering enhanced killing to those occurring in cultures treated with larger doses of X rays alone. It is concluded that x rays do not sensitize cells to caffeine, but rather that caffeine enhanced the expression of potentially lethal radiation-induced damage

  19. Effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to lethal whole-body. gamma. irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoue, M.; Uchida, K.; Yokokura, T.; Takahashi, T.; Mutai, M.

    1981-11-01

    The effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to 2-kR whole-body ..gamma.. irradiation was studied using germfree, monoassociated, and conventionalized ICR mice. The germfree mice were monoassociated with 1 of 11 bacterial strains, which were isolated from the fresh feces of conventional mice, 2 weeks prior to irradiation. All mice died within 3 weeks after irradiation. Monoassociation with Fusobacterium sp., Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas sp. significantly reduced the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. In contrast, monoassociation with Clostridium sp., Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, or Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly prolonged the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. This suggests that the latter organisms may perform some activity to protect the mice from radiation injury. In this histopathological autopsy examination, the main lesions were hypocellularity in hematopoietic organs and hemorrhage in various organs. Neither karyorrhexis nor desquamation of intestinal mucosal cells was observed in any mice. From these observations, it is suggested that the death of these mice was related to hematopoietic damage. Bacterial invasion into various organs was observed in conventionalized and Pseudomonas-, E. coli-, or S. faecalis-monoassociated mice but not in Clostridium-, B. pseudolongum-, L. acidophilus-, or Fusobacterium-monoassociated mice.

  20. Effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to lethal whole-body γ irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoue, M.; Uchida, K.; Yokokura, T.; Takahashi, T.; Mutai, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to 2-kR whole-body γ irradiation was studied using germfree, monoassociated, and conventionalized ICR mice. The germfree mice were monoassociated with 1 of 11 bacterial strains, which were isolated from the fresh feces of conventional mice, 2 weeks prior to irradiation. All mice died within 3 weeks after irradiation. Monoassociation with Fusobacterium sp., Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas sp. significantly reduced the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. In contrast, monoassociation with Clostridium sp., Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, or Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly prolonged the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. This suggests that the latter organisms may perform some activity to protect the mice from radiation injury. In this histopathological autopsy examination, the main lesions were hypocellularity in hematopoietic organs and hemorrhage in various organs. Neither karyorrhexis nor desquamation of intestinal mucosal cells was observed in any mice. From these observations, it is suggested that the death of these mice was related to hematopoietic damage. Bacterial invasion into various organs was observed in conventionalized and Pseudomonas-, E. coli-, or S. faecalis-monoassociated mice but not in Clostridium-, B. pseudolongum-, L. acidophilus-, or Fusobacterium-monoassociated mice

  1. Mutagenesis and lethality following S phase irradiation of xeroderma pigmentosum and normal human diploid fibroblasts with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Little, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of u.v. light exposure in the DNA synthetic phase of the cell cycle were determined in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XP-A), hereditary adenomatosis of the colon and rectum (ACR), and a normal, foreskin derived cell strain (AG1522). For AG1522, an increased sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of u.v. light was observed as compared to previous findings for confluent, non-proliferating cultures. XP-A fibroblasts were markedly hypersensitive and ACR fibroblasts exhibited an intermediate response. The mutagenic response of ACR fibroblasts, however, was similar to normal fibroblasts. A threshold of 1.5-2 J/m 2 was observed for u.v. induced mutagenesis in normal and ACR fibroblasts. XP fibroblasts, on the other hand, were strikingly hypermutable and demonstrated little or no threshold. When S phase mutagenesis was considered as a function of survival level rather than u.v. light dose, XP fibroblasts remained significantly hypermutable as compared with normal fibroblasts at all survival levels. Previous mutagenesis results with confluent, non-proliferating cultures of XP and normal fibroblasts were reanalyzed as a function of cytotoxicity; XP hypermutability at all survival levels was also observed. (author)

  2. Interaction of co-insult treatments wth cadmium chloride and gamma irradiation on lethality and blood indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were (1) to gain insight into sensitivities of vital organs systems after treatments with cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 ), gamma ( 60 Co) radiation, and combined CdCl 2 -gamma radiation; (2) to determine physiological and cellular/molecular changes after these same treatments; and (3) to develop a summary of biochemical/hematological indicators for each insult individually, as well as for the co-insult treatment. Three lethality studies, Acute CdCl 2 , Chronic CdCl 2 , and Acute Radiation, wwere used to determine sublethal doses for the fourth study (Co-insult), which utilized various combinations of CdCl 2 and gamma radiation and from which the hematological and biochemical data were derived. Radiation groups exhibited statistically significant decreases in the total number of leukocytes, lymphocytes, and polyneutrophils. Significant increases were seen in serum iron, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase, and triglycerides. Cadmium groups had increased total numbers of leukocytes, polyneutrophils, and serum glutamic oxaloacetate transminase (SGOT). Decreases were seen in lymphocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, total red blood cell counts, and total protein. When co-insult treatments were used, significant decreases were seen in the total number of leukocytes, polyneutrophils, lymphocytes, hemoglobin, total red blood cells, and serum iron

  3. Fixation of potentially lethal radiation damage by post-irradiation exposure of Chinese hamster cells to 0.5 M or 1.5 M NaCl solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Dewey, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of 0.05 M and 1.5 M NaCl treatments on CHO cells during and after irradiation has been examined. Treatment with either hypotonic or hypertonic salt solutions during and after irradiation resulted in the fixation of radiation damage which would otherwise not be expressed. The half time for fixation was 4 to 5 min, and the increased expression of the potentially lethal damage by anisotonic solutions was mainly characterized by large decreases in the shoulder of the survival curve, as well as by decreases in Dsub(o). Fixation of radiation damage at 37 0 C occurred to a much greater extent for the hypertonic treatment than for the hypotonic treatment and was greater at 37 0 C than at 20 0 C. Although both the hypotonic and hypertonic treatments during and after irradiation reduced or eliminated the repair of sublethal and potentially lethal damage, treatment during irradiation only, radiosensitized the cells when the treatment was hypotonic, and radioprotected the cells when the treatment was hypertonic. These observations are discussed in relation to salt treatments and different temperatures altering competition between repair and fixation of potentially lethal lesions, the number of which depends on the particular salt treatment at the time of irradiation. (author)

  4. Lethal response of HeLa cells to x irradiation in the latter part of the generation cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, T.D.; Tolmach, L.J.

    1976-01-01

    The age-response for the killing of HeLa S3 cells by x rays during the latter part of the generation cycle has been examined in detail. As synchronous cells move from the G1/S boundary through S phase, the relatively high sensitivity of late G1 cells gradually decreases; minimum sensitivity is reached in mid-S and maintained during the remainder of that phase. The response of cells as they progress from S to the point in G2 at which they are temporarily arrested by radiation (or by inhibitors of protein synthesis) was measured in populations free of both S phase cells and late G2 cells that had passed the arrest point: cells retain their high resistance from early G2 up to the arrest point. The response of G2 cells that have passed the arrest point before being irradiated was examined by exposing randomly growing cultures to x rays and collecting cells periodically thereafter, as they entered mitosis. Survival values very close to those of sensitive mitotic cells were found in the 2 h period after irradiation during which unarrested cells continued to reach mitosis. Values typical of late S/early G2 were found only after cells that had been arrested began arriving at mitosis. Thus, HeLa S3 cells undergo an abrupt increase in sensitivity at or near the arrest point. The sensitivity to a second irradiation of cells arrested in G2 by a conditioning x-ray dose increases rapidly in the early part of the arrest period

  5. Protective properties of the plasma of burnt and irradiated rats with respect to the lethal effect of endotoxins in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, R.S.; Chureeva, L.N.

    1984-01-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of endotoxins s. typhimurium and E. coli to preliminarily irradiated rats resulted in death of 80% of animals during 24 hours. At combined injection of endoxins with heterologic plasma of intact rats death decreased to 12 and 19% respectively. Deep burn of skin, acute radiation sickness and combined radiation-thermal injury did not eliminate the given phenomenon of humoral detoxication; at different periods after thermal, radiation and combined effects plasma of test rats produced protective effect practically the same as at the control

  6. Engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow without graft-versus-host disease in mongrel dogs using total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottlieb, M.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Grumet, F.C.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1980-01-01

    We achieved long-term engraftment of unmatched bone marrow (BM) in dogs without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) using a regimen of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) which could be applied clinically. Twelve normal adult mongrel dogs were given TLI in 18 fractions of 100 rad each (total dose, 1800 rad) over 4 weeks to mantle and abdominal fields in continuity. Nine of the 12 were transfused with one or two random donor whole blood transfusions during the irradiation regimen to determine the risk of sensitization after the onset of immunosuppression. A mean (+- SD) of 0.71 +- 0.54 x 10 9 BM cells/kg of recipient body weight from unrelated sex-mismatched donors was infused within 24 h of the 18th irradiation fraction. Engraftment was assessed by demonstration of donor-type sex chromosomes in spontaneous metaphase spreads of recipient marrow aspirates, and by the appearance of donor-type red blood cells antigens (DEA) in the recipients' blood. Three untransfused and nine transfused recipients were shown to be stable mixed BM chimeras during a followup period of 2 to 11 months after transplantation. Blood transfusion during TLI did not result in graft rejection. We observed no clinical signs of acute or chronic GVHD. TLI has minimal toxicity when compared with conditioning regimens currently used in BM transplantation for aplastic anemia. Potential advantages of the TLI regimen include the opportunity to use unmatched marrow donors and protection from GVHD

  7. Human umbilical-cord-blood mononucleated cells enhance the survival of lethally irradiated mice. Dosage and the window of time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, Olga A.; Ende, Norman; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the window of time and dose of human umbilical-cord-blood (HUCB) mononucleated cells necessary for successful treatment of radiation injury in mice. Female A/J mice (27-30 weeks old) were exposed to an absorbed dose of 9-10 Gy of 137 Cs γ-rays delivered acutely to the whole body. They were treated either with 1 × 10 8 or 2 × 10 8 HUCB mononucleated cells at 24-52 h after the irradiation. The antibiotic Levaquin was applied 4 h postirradiation. The increased dose of cord-blood cells resulted in enhanced survival. The enhancement of survival in animals that received 2 × 10 8 HUCB mononucleated cells relative to irradiated but untreated animals was highly significant (P < 0.01). Compared with earlier studies, the increased dose of HUCB mononucleated cells, coupled with early use of an antibiotic, extended the window of time for effective treatment of severe radiation injury from 4 to 24-52 h after exposure. (author)

  8. Cellular proliferation and infiltration following interstitial irradiation of normal dog brain is altered by an inhibitor of polyamine synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fike, John R.; Gobbel, Glenn T.; Chou, Dean; Wijnhoven, Bas P. L.; Bellinzona, Mattia; Nakagawa, Minoru; Seilhan, Theresa M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to quantitatively define proliferative and infiltrative cell responses after focal 125 I irradiation of normal brain, and to determine the effects of an intravenous infusion of α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) on those responses. Methods and Materials: Adult beagle dogs were irradiated using high activity 125 I sources. Saline (control) or DFMO (150 mg/kg/day) was infused for 18 days starting 2 days before irradiation. At varying times up to 8 weeks after irradiation, brain tissues were collected and the cell responses in and around the focal lesion were quantified. Immunohistochemical stains were used to label astrocytes (GFAP), vascular endothelial cells (Factor VIII), polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs; MAC 387) and cells synthesizing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (BrdU). Cellular responses were quantified using a histomorphometric analysis. Results: After radiation alone, cellular events included a substantial acute inflammatory response followed by increased BrdU labeling and progressive increases in numbers of capillaries and astrocytes. α-Difluoromethylornithine treatment significantly affected the measured cell responses. As in controls, an early inflammatory response was measured, but after 2 weeks there were more PMNs/unit area than in controls. The onset of measurable BrdU labeling was delayed in DFMO-treated animals, and the magnitude of labeling was significantly reduced. Increases in astrocyte and vessel numbers/mm 2 were observed after a 2-week delay. At the site of implant, astrocytes from DFMO-treated dogs were significantly smaller than those from controls. Conclusions: There is substantial cell proliferation and infiltration in response to interstitial irradiation of normal brain, and these responses are significantly altered by DFMO treatment. Although the precise mechanisms by which DFMO exerts its effects in this model are not known, the results from this study suggest that modification of radiation

  9. Blood responses under chronic low daily dose gamma irradiation: Pt. 2; Differential preclinical responses of irradiated female dogs in progression to either aplastic anemia or myeloproliferative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.; Carnes, B.; Tolle, D.; Fritz, T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Biological and Medical Research Div.)

    1993-05-01

    Female beagle dogs were chronically exposed to low daily doses of [sup 60]Co gamma rays and responded in one of three distinct hemopathological patterns. These patterns, reflective of distinct subgroups, were characterized by (a) low radioresistance resulting in progressive hematopoietic suppression, terminal aplastic anemia (AA), and relatively short (<400 days) survival ([sup -]S-AA subgroups); (b) high radioresistance, initially coupled with strong but aberrant regenerative hematopoiesis, and later with the development of myeloproliferative disease (MPD) ([sup +]-R-MPD subgroup); and (c) high radioresistance, coupled with an early phase of strong regenerative hematopoiesis, but later with no myeloproliferative disease ([sup +]R-nonMPD subgroup). In this study, the changes in circulating blood cells levels (granulocytes, monotcytes, erythrocytes, lymphocytes and platelets) were sequentially assessed in time and fitted to a flexible, quadratic-linear-type response model previously developed. The results are consistent with our earlier observations of blood responses of chronically irradiated male dogs, in the subgroups of female dogs prone to specific radiogenic hematopathologies (i.e. AA and MPD) can be readily identified and staged in specific preclinical periods by a series of marked differential blood responses. (Author).

  10. Toxicity studies on the radioprotective agent WR-2721 in CDF1 mice and beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, T.E.; Glaza, S.M.; Dickie, B.C.; Weltman, R.H.; Greenspun, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    WR-2721, S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid, is used extensively to protect normal cells during the irradiation of neoplastic cells. Dose levels for human radiotherapy are based on results obtained from laboratory animal lethality and toxicity studies. WR-2721 was administered intravenously to CDF1 mice and beagle dogs. Single dose lethality studies in mice showed the average 1/10 of the lethal dose, the median lethal dose and 9/10 the lethal dose to be 508 (1523 mg/m2), 589 (1766 mg/m2), and 682 mg/kg (2047 mg/m2), respectively. The lethal dose for female mice was lower than that for males. The 1/10 lethal dose in mice was slightly toxic to dogs; 1/10 of that dose was nontoxic. The lethal dose for dogs (6000 mg/m2) was higher than that for mice (2000 mg/m2). Clinical signs of toxicosis in the single-dose mouse toxicity study were evident in the 1st week following treatment and declined during the recovery period; signs of toxicosis were transient in dogs. Acute drug-induced pathologic changes included elevated BUN and SGOT levels, lymphoid necrosis, and renal tubular degeneration in mice. These changes were evident in the 1st week following treatment, but had dissipated by study termination. Generalized vascular changes (congestion, hemorrhage, and edema) and renal tubular degeneration occurred in treated dogs that had died or were killed moribund 7 days postinjection. These findings indicate sex-dependent and interspecies variation in the toxicity of WR-2721 with acute, but reversible, pathologic changes

  11. Lethality and the depression on DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, K. (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation suppresses the semiconservative DNA replication in mammalian cells. The rate of DNA synthesis is initially depressed and later recovers after low doses of UV radiation in human cells. Such a response is more sensitive to UV radiation in cells derived from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) than that in normal human cells. The relative rate of DNA synthesis is not always correlated with cell survival because, unlike cell survival, the dose-response curve of the relative rate of DNA synthesis shows the biphasic nature of the sensitivity. In the experiments reported herein, the total amount (not the rate) of DNA synthesized during a long interval of incubation which covers the period of inhibition and recovery (but not longer than one generation time) after irradiation with various doses of UV radiation was examined in normal human and XP cells, and was found to be well correlated with cell survival in all the cells tested.

  12. Effects of low-dose preoperative irradiation on low anterior anastomosis in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, R.M.; Bubrick, M.P.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; Rolfsmeyer, E.S.; Strom, R.L.; Hitchcock, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty mongrel dogs underwent preoperative radiation therapy to the colon and rectum using the Nominal Standard Dose Equation to simulate treatment with 2000 rads. Each dog then underwent anterior resection of the rectosigmoid, and reconstruction was randomized into two groups consisting of either handsewn or EEA-stapled anastomoses. Anastomoses were examined digitally and radiographically on the day of surgery and on the seventh postoperative day. There were three radiographic leaks among the ten dogs having the handsewn anastomoses and one radiographic leak among the ten dogs having the EEA-stapled anastomoses. There was one clinically significant leak which occurred in a dog having an EEA-stapled anastomosis and was associated with peritonitis and death. The overall leak rate was 30 per cent among dogs having handsewn anastomoses and 20 per cent among dogs with stapled anastomoses. The data suggest that an anterior resection in low colorectal anastomosis can be done safely after low-dose radiation using either handsewn or stapling techniques

  13. Effects of low-dose preoperative irradiation on low anterior anastomosis in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, R.M.; Bubrick, M.P.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; Rolfsmeyer, E.S.; Strom, R.L.; Hitchcock, C.R.

    Twenty mongrel dogs underwent preoperative radiation therapy to the colon and rectum using the Nominal Standard Dose Equation to simulate treatment with 2000 rads. Each dog then underwent anterior resection of the rectosigmoid, and reconstruction was randomized into two groups consisting of either handsewn or EEA-stapled anastomoses. Anastomoses were examined digitally and radiographically on the day of surgery and on the seventh postoperative day. There were three radiographic leaks among the ten dogs having the handsewn anastomoses and one radiographic leak among the ten dogs having the EEA-stapled anastomoses. There was one clinically significant leak which occurred in a dog having an EEA-stapled anastomosis and was associated with peritonitis and death. The overall leak rate was 30 per cent among dogs having handsewn anastomoses and 20 per cent among dogs with stapled anastomoses. The data suggest that an anterior resection in low colorectal anastomosis can be done safely after low-dose radiation using either handsewn or stapling techniques.

  14. Effects of low-dose preoperative irradiation on low anterior anastomosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, R M; Bubrick, M P; Feeney, D A; Johnston, G R; Rolfsmeyer, E S; Strom, R L; Hitchcock, C R

    1982-01-01

    Twenty mongrel dogs underwent preoperative radiation therapy to the colon and rectum using the Nominal Standard Dose Equation to simulate treatment with 2000 rads. Each dog then underwent anterior resection of the rectosigmoid, and reconstruction was randomized into two groups consisting of either handsewn or EEA-stapled anastomoses. Anastomoses were examined digitally and radiographically on the day of surgery and on the seventh postoperative day. There were three radiographic leaks among the ten dogs having the handsewn anastomoses and one radiographic leak among the ten dogs having the EEA-stapled anastomoses. There was one clinically significant leak which occurred in a dog having an EEA-stapled anastomosis and was associated with peritonitis and death. The overall leak rate was 30 per cent among dogs having handsewn anastomoses and 20 per cent among dogs with stapled anastomoses. The data suggest that an anterior resection in low colorectal anastomosis can be done safely after low-dose radiation using either handsewn or stapling techniques.

  15. Protection of Escherichia coli cells against the lethal effects of ultraviolet and X-irradiation by prior X-irradiation. A genetic and physiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K C; Martignoni, K D [Stanford Univ., Calif. (USA). Dept. of Radiology

    1976-12-01

    When log phase cells of wild-type E.coli K-12 were maintained in growth medium after X-irradiation, they became progressively more resistant to a subsequent exposure to UV or X-radiation. The time to achieve maximum resistance was about 60 min. The uvrB, uvrD, polA and certain exrA strains (W3110 background) also demonstrated this X-ray-induced resistance to subsequent UV or X-irradiation but recA, recB, lex (AB1157 or W3110 backgrounds) and other exrA strains (AB1157 background) did not. The resistance induced in wild-type, uvrB and uvrD cells was characterized by the production or enhancement of a shoulder on the survival curves obtained for the second irradiation, while the resistance induced in the W3110 exrA strains was expressed only as a change in slope. The induction of resistance in the W3110 exrA strain was not inhibited by the presence of chloramphenical, but that in the wild-type cells appeared to be. The production or enhancement of a shoulder on the survival curves of the rec/sup +/ lex/sup +/ exr/sup +/ cells is consistent with the concept of the radiation induction of repair enzymes. Alternative explanations, however, are discussed.

  16. Blood leukocyte responses to extracorporeal circulation. 3. Long term extracorporeal circulation without and with irradiation in normal and splenectomized dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szemere, P.; Fliedner, T.M. (Ulm Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Klinische Physiologie)

    1983-01-01

    Long term (12-48 h) extracorporeal circulation without and with irradiation of the blood was performed in normal and splenectomized dogs in order to observe the effect of these procedures on blood leukocyte counts including CFU-C. A transient granulocytopenia and a decrease of lymphocyte count were observed. The blood CFU-C level diminished to a very low level and remained low for the whole time of the experiments. There was no significant difference between the results of procedures with or without irradiation. The similar effect of a shortened tubing system on the blood leukocyte count is also reported. Heparin infusion alone did not decrease the peripheral CFU-C concentration. The possible explanations for the observed phenomena are discussed.

  17. Animal experimental model of a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction after allogenic transplantation of bone marrow in lethally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenke, H.; Muench, S.; Haubold, S.; Weber, B.

    1977-01-01

    The graft-versus-host (GVH) disease represents a serious still unsolved problem in the human allogenic transplantation of bone marrow. An experimental model of GVH reaction after an allogenic transplantation of bone marrow in the adult mouse has been worked out as a prerequisite for further studies on the therapeutic influence of this syndrome. 3 groups have been formed out of 82 lethally X-irradiated C57 Bl mice. The non-transplanted control group died to a hundred per cent within 12 days. While out of the 2nd group treated with syngenic bone marrow 55 per cent survived from the 22nd day, 30 per cent of the third animal group, allogenicly transplanted with histoincompatible AKR donor marrow developed a chronic GVH syndrome. The following symptoms were observed: retardation, alterations of the skin, diarrhea, edemas of the legs, failing increase of leukocytes in blood and proliferation of lymphocytes in bone marrow of about 60 per cent (18 per cent in syngenically transplanted animals), in lacking proliferation of hematopoiesis. The increase of liver and especially spleen index is not characteristic in comparison with the syngenically transplanted group, since in the latter there is also an increase of the values on account of a strong hematopoetic proliferation. The model is suitable and sufficiently well characterized for the performance of further experimental studies. (author)

  18. Effect of a non lethal whole-body gamma irradiation on the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalographic activities of the adult rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, L.

    1969-01-01

    The whole of the experimental methods described (animal preparation, achievement of a precise physiological technique, dosimetry, biological information processing) allowed us to follow the changes for 15 days in the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalogram activities of rabbits submitted to a non-lethal 400 rads whole-body gamma-irradiation. Behavioural troubles, changes in the arousal state and the spontaneous electrical activity of the neo-cortex and hippocampus were noticed constantly together with an enhanced cortical excitability, and the appearance of elements of the paroxystic series sometimes in contrast with a general decrease in amplitude. After a visual stimulus the general morphology of evoked activities at the level of the primary visual areas and hippocampus was unchanged, but enhanced latencies and delays, less systematic modifications in amplitudes seemed to show out a direct effect of radiations on the nervous system and sensorial activities; these troubles seemed to occur independently from the basic electrical activity. As a whole, the changes observed were usually transitory and varied with each individual. Finally an assumption is made to explain the mechanism of arousal troubles and the general evolution of spontaneous electrical activity in the brain. (author) [fr

  19. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors

  20. Lethal Epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, Roger W

    2016-09-01

    Epistaxis or nosebleed refers to bleeding from the nostrils, nasal cavity, or nasopharynx. Occasional cases may present with torrential lethal hemorrhage. Three cases are reported to demonstrate particular features: Case 1: A 51-year-old woman with lethal epistaxis with no obvious bleeding source; Case 2: A 77-year-old man with treated nasopharyngeal carcinoma who died from epistaxis arising from a markedly neovascularized tumor bed; Case 3: A 2-year-old boy with hemophilia B who died from epistaxis with airway obstruction in addition to gastrointestinal bleeding. Epistaxis may be associated with trauma, tumors, vascular malformations, bleeding diatheses, infections, pregnancy, endometriosis, and a variety of different drugs. Careful dissection of the nasal cavity is required to locate the site of hemorrhage and to identify any predisposing conditions. This may be guided by postmortem computerized tomographic angiography (PCTA). Despite careful dissection, however, a source of bleeding may never be identified. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. V. Identity of the sector of cells that expresses potentially lethal damage in G1 and G2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetham, K.L.; Tolmach, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    When HeLa S3 cells are irradiated in early G 1 with 4 Gy of 220-kV x rays and are then incubated in growth medium containing up to 5 mM caffeine, survival is reduced (as reported previously), reaching a concentration-dependent plateau. Cell killing presumably occurs as a result of the fixation of a portion of the potentially lethal damage the cells contain. These cells respond to continued treatment with caffeine at concentrations greater than 2 mM during S, but less so than during G 1 . When they reach G 2 arrest, however, extensive cell killing again occurs (reported previously), presumably also the result of potentially lethal damage fixation. G 1 -irradiated cultures that are treated with caffeine either continuously at a concentration in the range 1 to 5 mM, or at 10 mM for 8 hr and subsequently with the low concentration, achieve the same survival level in G 2 , provided that the potentially lethal damage is not repaired during G 1 and S. Repair seems to be completely inhibited in the presence of 3 to 4 mM caffeine. The results indicate that fixation of potentially lethal damage occurs in the same sector of cells in G 1 and G 2 , suggesting that the same cellular lesion gives rise to cell killing in the two phases

  2. Use of the dog spleen for studying effects of irradiation and chemotherapeutic agents, with suggested uses of other organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, L.D.; De Rose, G.; Cooke, D.

    1976-01-01

    The irradiation of the exteriorized spleen of the dog, with the animal lead-shielded, produced constant changes in the white blood cells. The time of recovery from the irradiation effect was determined. The normal canine spleen could handle live pneumococci injected into the splenic artery, as proven by sterile cultures of splenic vein samples. The size of the bolus used was determined by repeated trials and proved to be one billion pneumococci per pound of body weight. The capacity of the irradiated spleen to handle this number of pneumococci was impaired. It was found that whole body irradiation, nitrogen mustard, thio-tepa, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, vinblastine, and azothioprine all impaired this capacity of the spleen. The dose of the chemotherapeutic agent was the same in milligrams per kilogram as that used in the cancer clinic. A method for determining the recovery time following the use of one or more agents was developed with the repeated use of the spleen model. By extending the methods used with the spleen it was found that similar use could be made, usually without surgery, of the liver, gut, and lungs

  3. Analysis of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations in genetically different strains of Drosophila melanogaster ms and w irradiated in the five-kilometer zone of the Chernobyl meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, M.M.; Kim, A.I.; Magomedova, M.A.; Fatkulbayanova, N.L.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of induced and spontaneous recessive sex-linked lethal mutations (RSLLM) in Drosophila melanogaster strains w and ms was estimated after their chronic irradiation in the five-kilometer zone of the Chernobyl' meltdown. The mutagenic effect of relatively low radiation doses was analyzed. In an experiment conducted in 1990, a significant increase in the RSLLM frequency was recorded, while, in 1991, no significant difference between the experiment and control was found

  4. Effect of serum from rats with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus on the formation of hemopoietic colonies in the spleen of lethally irradiated mice after bone marrow cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, N.A.; Likhovetskaya, Z.M.; Kurbanova, G.N.; Prigozhina, T.A.; L'vovich, A.I.

    1982-01-01

    Colony formation capability of serum from animals with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus was studied in lethally irradiated mice. Male-rats of Wistar line and hybrid mice (CBA x C57 BL) were used in the experiments. The serum from rats with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus was injected simultaneously with bone marrow transplantation into lethally irradiated mice. The number of macrocolonies in the spleen was counted on the 9th day. It was ascertained that the serum from rats with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus caused an increase of the number of macroscopically visible colonies in the spleen of lethally irradiated mice. The determination of hemopoetic types of colonies showed that the effect of the serum from those animals caused an increase of the number of granulocytic-type colonies. The initiation of colony stimulating and leukopoetic activity in the blood of animals after the destruction of mammillary body nuclei and posterior hypothalamic nucleus attested, according to the authors point of view, that humoral mediators (humoral mediator) could participated in the mechanism of hypothalamus effect on leulopoiesis

  5. Cytogenetic studies in dogs after total body irradiation and allogeneic transfusion with cryopreserved blood mononuclear cells: observations in long-term chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, F.; Calvo, W.; Fliedner, T.M.; Kratt, E.; Gerhartz, H.; Koerbling, M.; Nothdurft, W.; Ross, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed on two dog groups after total body irradiation and allogeneic transfusion with cryopreserved blood mononuclear cells. The first group of dogs was transfused with unseparated leukocytes and suffered from graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Cytogenetic studies demonstrated only cells of donor origin in all dogs of this group. The second group of animals was transfused with fraction 2 of a discontinuous albumin gradient. The dogs of this group did not develop GvHD, and the cytogenetic studies showed the presence of a mosaic of cells from donor and recipient origin in all of them. These results suggest that the GvHD may suppress autochthonous regeneration

  6. Maintenance of host leukocytes in peripheral immune compartments following lethal irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution: implications for graft versus host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Elizabeth M; Tanner, Scott M; Daft, Joseph G; Stanus, Andrea L; Martin, Steven M; Lorenz, Robin G

    2013-03-01

    Bone marrow reconstitution is utilized as a tool for disease treatment and as a research technique to elucidate the function of bone marrow derived cells. Clinically successful engraftment is indicated by the development of a functioning immune repertoire. In research, reconstitution is considered successful if >85% of splenic leukocytes are of donor origins. Previous work suggests that splenic reconstitution may not be indicative of reconstitution in the mucosa. We sought to evaluate mucosal reconstitution in animals following a standard bone marrow eradication and reconstitution technique. Bone marrow was harvested from adult B6.SJL donor mice (CD45.1) and injected via either the retro-orbital or intraperitoneal route into lethally irradiated B6 (CD45.2) adult or neonatal recipients respectively. The expression of CD45 by flow cytometry was used to calculate reconstitution with respect to immune compartment and cell type. In reconstituted adult animals 93.2±1.5% of splenic leukocytes expressed the donor CD45.1 antigen thus meeting the standard definition of reconstitution, however only 58.6±13.6% of intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes and 52.4±16.0% of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes were of donor origin, confirming splenic reconstitution fails to represent peripheral immune reconstitution. T-cells in the gastrointestinal tract are the most poorly reconstituted, while B-cells appear to be almost universally replaced by donor cells. The inadequate mucosal reconstitution was not corrected by evaluating later time points or by performing the bone marrow transfer during the neonatal period. This demonstration that substantial host T-cells remain in the intestinal mucosa after a "successful" bone marrow transplantation should cause a re-evaluation of data from research bone marrow chimera experiments, as well as the mechanisms for complications after clinical bone marrow transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of thermal treatment on the body temperature, respiration and pulse rate in dogs chronically irradiated with γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, N.A.; Petrovnin, M.G.

    1975-01-01

    Male dogs were chronically gamma-irradiated at different dose rates (0.06, 0.17, 0.34 rad/day) and subjected to heat treatment (raising of temperature from 22 0 C to 40 0 C) during winter and summer. Internal (rectal) temperature, respiration rate and heart rate were recorded. The respiration rate changed appreciably in all groups during all periods of temperature rise and fall in the chamber, but the variations were more pronounced in all groups during the winter experiment than during the summer experiment; no significant differences were found between the groups of animals while the respiration rate was changing, either in the winter or in the summer experiment. In both experiments, there were considerable heart rate variations only in the control group and in the group exposed to a dose rate of 0.06 rad/day. (V.A.P.)

  8. DNA polymerase I is crucial for the repair of potentially lethal damage caused by the indirect effects of X irradiation in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, D.

    1985-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in DNA polymerase I was measured in the presence of OH radical scavengers. The extreme X-ray sensitivity of the mutant could be abolished by OH radical scavengers if a sufficiently high level of radioprotector was present. There was a direct correlation between the OH radical scavenging activity of the chemicals tested (NO 2 - , n-butanol, glycerol, t-amyl alcohol, and t-butanol) and their protective ability. The author interprets the data as showing that the indirect actions of X rays (primarily OH radicals) result in major damage to the bacterial DNA which in large part consists of potentially lethal lesions. This potentially lethal damage is repaired through an enzymatic pathway requiring DNA polymerase I. I. In the mutant lacking DNA polymerase I, these potentially lethal lesions are expressed as cell lethality

  9. Morphological study of the effect of cyclophosphamide, dimethylmyleran and whole-body irradiation for the conditioning of dogs to bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, L.

    1980-01-01

    Dogs were treated with either cyclophosphamide (CY) or dimethylmyleran (DMM), both cytostatics or with total body irradiation (TBI) in order to find out which agents are most suitable for conditioning for bone marrow (BM) transplantation. The histomorphological changes in various organs (lung, bone marrow, lymphatic tissues, digestive tract, liver, kidney, bladder, heart and gonads) after treatment with different doses are described. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Repair of potentially lethal damage following irradiation with x rays or cyclotron neutrons: response of the EMT-6/UW tumor system treated under various growth conditions in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasey, J.S.; Nelson, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    Postirradiation potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair was examined in the EMT-6/UW tumor system under a variety of in vitro and in vivo growth conditions. Following x irradiation, surviving fraction increased in fed and unfed plateau cultures if subculture and plating were delayed; in exponentially growing cultures if they were covered with depleted medium for the first 6 h postirradiation; and in tumors in vivo if excision for preparation of a cell suspension was delayed. Following irradiation with 21.5 meV (d + → Be) neutrons, PLD repair was measurable only in unfed plateau cultures when subculture was delayed and in exponentially growing cells exposed to depleted culture medium immediately after irradiation. In x-irradiated EMT-6/UW cells, the greatest repair capacity and the highest surviving fraction ratios were measured in unfed plateau cultures; the least repair was observed in exponentially growing cells exposed to depleted medium. Thus post-neutron repair was not limited to situations where the amount of repair of photon PLD is large. The demonstration of PLD repair in tumors irradiated in vivo with X rays and the absence of such repair after neutrons could have important implications in radiotherapy if this is a general phenomenon

  11. Blood responses under chronic low daily dose gamma irradiation: Pt. 1; Differential preclinical responses of irradiated male dogs in progression to either aplastic anemia or myeloproliferative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.M.; Carnes, B.A.; Tolle, D.V.; Fritz, T.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Male beagles chronically exposed to low daily doses of {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays show one of three hematopoietic patterns, which reflect three different distinctly responding subgroups: (1) low radioresistance with progressing aplastic anemia and shortened survival ({sup -S}-AA subgroup); (2) high radioresistance with a complex of progressing myeloproliferative disorders ({sup +}R-MPD group); or (3) high radioresistance with other nonMPD syndromes ({sup +}R-nonMPD group). Blood cell levels (granulocytes, monocytes, erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets) were assessed and fitted to a flexible polynomial spline model. Results showed that relative to the overall magnitude of blood cell loss as well as to the maximum rate of suppression during the initial phase, the subgroups were generally ranked {sup -}S-AA >> {sup +}R-MPD > {sup +}R-nonMPD. Relative to the overall strength of the recovery response, the subgroups were generally ranked {sup +}R-MPD > {sup +}R-nonMPD >>> {sup -}S-AA. In terms of overall maintenance levels of circulating blood cells during the recovery phase, however, the {sup +}R-nonMPD subgroup consistently exhibited stronger responses than the {sup +}R-MPD subgroup. These results support our contention that selected subgroups of dogs have strong propensities to specific hematopathologies (i.e. aplastic anemia and myeloid leukemia) under chronic irradiation and that these pathology-prone animals exhibit a series of marked differential hematopoietic responses during early preclinical phases, which serve effectively to prognosticate subsequent pathological progression. (author).

  12. Blood leukocyte responses to extracorporeal circulation. 2. Medium term extracorporeal circulation without and with extracorporeal irradiation in normal and splenectomized dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szemere, P.; Fliedner, T.M. (Ulm Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Klinische Physiologie)

    1983-01-01

    Medium term (6-8 h) extracorporeal irradiation without and with irradiation of blood was performed in normal and splenectomized dogs to reveal the changes of blood leukocytes including CFU-C. A regular but transitory decrease of granulocytes and a longer lasting diminution of lymphocytes in the blood were observed. The CFU-C level became and mostly remained very low during the procedure. Splenectomy did not influence significantly the changes of peripheral leukocyte counts. No marked difference of leukocytes was seen in the blood samples taken from the arterial or venous side of the shunt or even from the cubital vein. Also, the irradiation did not produce any difference in the alterations of blood cell counts compared to those without irradiation. The possible explanations of these results are discussed.

  13. Effect of a non lethal whole-body gamma irradiation on the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalographic activities of the adult rabbit; Effets d'une irradiation gamma globale non letale sur les activites electroencephalograpiques spontanees et evoquees du lapin adulte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Court, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The whole of the experimental methods described (animal preparation, achievement of a precise physiological technique, dosimetry, biological information processing) allowed us to follow the changes for 15 days in the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalogram activities of rabbits submitted to a non-lethal 400 rads whole-body gamma-irradiation. Behavioural troubles, changes in the arousal state and the spontaneous electrical activity of the neo-cortex and hippocampus were noticed constantly together with an enhanced cortical excitability, and the appearance of elements of the paroxystic series sometimes in contrast with a general decrease in amplitude. After a visual stimulus the general morphology of evoked activities at the level of the primary visual areas and hippocampus was unchanged, but enhanced latencies and delays, less systematic modifications in amplitudes seemed to show out a direct effect of radiations on the nervous system and sensorial activities; these troubles seemed to occur independently from the basic electrical activity. As a whole, the changes observed were usually transitory and varied with each individual. Finally an assumption is made to explain the mechanism of arousal troubles and the general evolution of spontaneous electrical activity in the brain. (author) [French] 'L'ensemble des methodes experimentales decrites (preparation des animaux, mise au point d'une technique physiologique precise, dosimetrie, traitement de l'information biologique) a permis de suivre, pendant 15 jours, chez le lapin soumis a une irradiation gamma globale non letale de 400 rads, les modifications des activites electroencephaliques spontanees et evoquees. De facon constante, on note des troubles du comportement, des modifications de la vigilance et de l'activite electrique spontanee du neo-cortex et de l'hippocampe, ainsi qu'une augmentation de l'excitabilite corticale, l'apparition d'elements de la serie paroxystique contrastant parfois avec une diminution

  14. Dose planning with comparison to in vivo dosimetry for epithermal neutron irradiation of the dog brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppaelae, Tiina; Auterinen, Iiro; Aschan, Carita; Seren, Tom; Benczik, Judit; Snellman, Marjatta; Huiskamp, Rene; Ramadan, Usama Abo; Kankaanranta, Leena; Joensuu, Heikki; Savolainen, Sauli

    2002-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental type of radiotherapy, presently being used to treat glioblastoma and melanoma. To improve patient safety and to determine the radiobiological characteristics of the epithermal neutron beam of Finnish BNCT facility (FiR 1) dose-response studies were carried on the brain of dogs before starting the clinical trials. A dose planning procedure was developed and uncertainties of the epithermal neutron-induced doses were estimated. The accuracy of the method of computing physical doses was assessed by comparing with in vivo dosimetry. Individual radiation dose plans were computed using magnetic resonance images of the heads of 15 Beagle dogs and the computational model of the FiR 1 epithermal neutron beam. For in vivo dosimetry, the thermal neutron fluences were measured using Mn activation foils and the gamma-ray doses with MCP-7s type thermoluminescent detectors placed both on the skin surface of the head and in the oral cavity. The degree of uncertainty of the reference doses at the thermal neutron maximum was estimated using a dose-planning program. The estimated uncertainty (±1 standard deviation) in the total physical reference dose was ±8.9%. The calculated and the measured dose values agreed within the uncertainties at the point of beam entry. The conclusion is that the dose delivery to the tissue can be verified in a practical and reliable fashion by placing an activation dosimeter and a TL detector at the beam entry point on the skin surface with homogeneous tissues below. However, the point doses cannot be calculated correctly in the inhomogeneous area near air cavities of the head model with this type of dose-planning program. This calls for attention in dose planning in human clinical trials in the corresponding areas

  15. Both caffeine-induced lethality and the negative liquid holding effect, in UV- or γ-irradiated wild-type Schizosaccharomyces pombe, are consequences of interference with a recombinational repair process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    UV-or γ-irradiated G2 phase cells of rad + Schizosac charonmyces pombe show increased inactivation if incubated postirradiation, in liquid growth medium containing caffeine, before being plated on normal agar medium. The following however, do not show such caffeine-induced lethality: G1 phase rad + cells; ascospores of a rad + strain; either G2 or G1 phase cells of the recombination-deficient rad1 strain; unirradiated rad + cells. Of the above, only the G2 phase rad + cells possess, at the time of radiation exposure, the capability for recombination. Similarly, the negative liquid holding effect is manifested only in G2 phase rad + cells. Both the negative liquid holding effect and caffeine-induced lethality therefore are seen only in cells which fulfill all of the following conditions: (a) they must be genetically recombination-proficient; (b) they must possess at the time of irradiation the necessary two DNA copies with which to perform recombinational repair (for a haploid cell, this means they must be in G2 phase); (c) their DNA must be damaged, such as by UV or γ-ray exposure, thus requiring that recombinational repair capability be exercised in order to maintain viability; and (d) they must be incubated under conditions that fail to support the normal progress of recombinational repair. (orig./AJ) [de

  16. Chronic radiation injury with mice and dogs exposed to external whole-body irradiation at the Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahn, D.; Fritz, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    This document describes studies on chronic radiation injury in experimental animals and the extrapolation of derived injury parameters to man. Most of the large studies have used mice given single, weekly, or continuous exposure to cobalt-60 gamma rays, or, more recently, single or weekly exposure to fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor. Primary measures of injury have been life shortening and the associated major pathological changes, particularly neoplastic diseases. Recent and ongoing studies compare the effects of extremely low neutron exposures with gamma irradiations delivered as a single dose or in 60 equal weekly increments. Total neutron doses range from 1 to 40 rads; gamma-ray doses range from 22.5 to 600 rads. Selected genetic studies are performed concurrently to provide a nearly complete matrix of somatic and genetic effects of these low exposures. Studies with the beagle have complemented those with mice and have shown a strong parallelism in the responses of the two species. Present exposures are at 0.3, 0.75, and 1.88 rads per day of continuous gamma irradiation to test a model for the prediction of life shortening in man which has evolved from Argonne's long-term studies. The dog offers the opportunity for longitudinal clinical evaluations that are not possible in the mouse, to develop a broader view of the neoplastic disease spectrum, and to study the mechanisms of radiation induction of leukemia. Diverse statistical approaches have been used to measure excess risk, dose-response functions, and rates of injury and repair. Actuarial statistical methods have been favored since they permit a more direct means of extrapolation to man. 50 refs., 4 figs

  17. Evidence for successful acceptance of irradiated free gingival allografts in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubenstein, H.S.; Ruben, M.P.; Levy, C.; Peiser, S.

    1975-01-01

    Free graft samples were excised and frozen to -55 0 C. Subsequently the grafts were exposed to 2.5 x 10 6 rads of 60 Co γ-radiation. The irradiated allogeneic grafts were later reconstituted and surgically transferred to four recipient subjects. Three autogenous nonirradiated grafts were also placed as controls. The animals were killed so as to furnish healing data at 0, 3, 7, 10, and 40 days postoperatively. Fourteen allografts were evaluated. They were judged to be nonantigenic, immunologically incompetent and nonviable. However, retention of an essentially unaltered connective tissue corium may have been instrumental in supporting subsequent epithelial regeneration from adjacent host tissue, while being passively incorporated into a very dynamic receptor zone. The graft thus served as a scaffolding for connective tissue deposition and attachment. It appears that the experimental regime obviated the immunologic interference usually encountered in allografting procedures. Thus, high intensity irradiation of the graft tissue may have rendered the tissue to be immunologically tolerable. Further studies are required to ascertain the duration of the host's immunologic unresponsiveness to the alien tissue, as well as ultimate structural and biologic fate of the transplanted tissues. Experiments are now in progress which have been designed to test the extent of immunologic sensitization induced by the grafted tissue

  18. The repopulation of lymph nodes of dogs after 1200 R whole-body x-irradiation and intravenous administration of mononuclear blood leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, B; Calvo, W; Fliedner, T M; Herbst, E; Bruch, C; Schnappauf, H P; Flad, H D

    1976-08-01

    Fresh and cryopreserved autologous or allogeneic mononuclear blood cells (MBCs) intravenously injected in 1200 R total-body x-irradiated dogs repopulated lymph nodes within 10 days after tranfusion. Several parameters of the lymphopoietic regeneration were correlated with the number of cells transfused and with the number of colony-forming units contained in the cell suspension when they were cultured in agar (CFUc). Values within the normal or close to normal range were reached in the mesenteric nodes of most of the animals transfused with 10 X 10(9) MBC or more. These values were obtained when 5 X 10(5) CFUc or more were transfused. Axillary nodes showed lower values than mesenteric nodes. They were mostly under the normal range but well over those of the irradiated controls. Frozen and thawed MBCs seem to be as effective as fresh cells for lymphopoietic restoration. The mesenteric nodes of dogs transfused with allogeneic MBCs showed higher cellularity and larger cortical-paracortical areas than those of dogs tranfused with approximately the same number of autologous cells. The repopulation of lymph nodes parallels that of the marrow.

  19. Repopulation of lymph nodes of dogs after 1200 R whole-body x-irradiation and intravenous administration of mononuclear blood leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.; Calvo, W.; Fliedner, T.M.; Herbst, E.; Bruch, C.; Schnappauf, H.P.; Flad, H.D.

    1976-01-01

    Fresh and cryopreserved autologous or allogeneic mononuclear blood cells (MBCs) intravenously injected in 1200 R total-body x-irradiated dogs repopulated lymph nodes within 10 days after transfusion. Several parameters of the lymphopoietic regeneration were correlated with the number of cells transfused and with the number of colony-forming units contained in the cell suspension when they were cultured in agar (CFU/sub c/). Values within the normal or close to normal range were reached in the mesenteric nodes of most of the animals transfused with 10 x 10 9 MBC or more. These values were obtained when 5 x 10 5 CFU/sub c/ or more were transfused. Axillary nodes showed lower values than mesenteric nodes. They were mostly under the normal range but well over those of the irradiated controls. Frozen and thawed MBCs seem to be as effective as fresh cells for lymphopoietic restoration. The mesenteric nodes of dogs transfused with allogeneic MBCs showed higher cellularity and larger cortical-paracortical areas than those of dogs transfused with approximately the same number of autologous cells. The repopulation of lymph nodes parallels that of the marrow

  20. Experiences in therapy for lethal midline granuloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosaka, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Takeru

    1982-01-01

    Four cases of the lethal midline granuloma or malignant granuloma of the nose were treated by irradiation and chemotherapy, which are generally prescribed for malignant lymphomas. Clinical, histological and laboratory examination indicated that they were the lethal midline granuloma and clearly differentiated from Wegener's granulomatosis or malignant lymphoma. All of the cases exhibited primary remission. The four cases were observed up to 38, 22, 14, and 10 months since the beginning of the therapy, showing no local or general recurrence. (author)

  1. Restoring efficiency of hemopoietic cell transplantation in a mouse lethally irradiated by a total exposure to X rays; L'efficacite restauratrice de la greffe de cellules hemopoietiques chez la souris letalement irradiee par une exposition totale aux rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Gino

    1959-10-15

    This research thesis reports the study of possibility of treatments (or restoration) of a mouse which has been submitted to a lethal dose of X rays. More particularly, the author compared the restoring efficiency of bone marrow and fetal liver injected in a mouse which had been lethally irradiated by a total exposure to X rays. He also studied the functional status of the hemopoietic graft, and the emergence of the secondary disease in mice which had been as well lethally irradiated and then restored by injection of bone marrow and fetal liver. The author then addressed the influence of the induction of immune tolerance of the host with respect to the donor on the survival of a mouse lethally irradiated and restored by homologue bone marrow [French] Des resultats des recherches que nous avons conduites permettent, dans les limites de nos conditions experimentales, d'eclaircir certains aspects du probleme de la restauration des animaux irradies par la greffe de cellules hemopoietiques. On peut admettre que la moelle osseuse de 30 jours est 2 fois plus efficace que le foie foetal de 16 jours, pour ce qui concerne la survie 30 jours; ceci aussi bien en cas de restauration isologue que homologue. En outre, le foie foetal de 16 jours permet une survie d'environ 50 pc plus elevee que les foies foetaux de 13 ou 19 jours; ceci en cas de restauration isologue. On a aussi montre que les degres de capacite restauratrice des differents tissus hemopoietiques dependent du nombre de cellules souches, progenitrices des granulocytes polynucleaires. Nous avons mis en evidence, en cas de restauration par la moelle osseuse homologue, que la presence d'un greffon hemopoietique fonctionnel est necessaire et suffisante pour l'apparition de la maladie secondaire et que celle-ci est une cause suffisante et non necessaire de la mortalite tardive. La constatation experimentale que la viabilite du greffon est une cause suffisante et non necessaire de la mortalite tardive en est la preuve

  2. Severe acute radiation syndrome. Treatment of a lethally 60Co-source irradiated accident victim in China with HLA-mismatched peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Mei; Dong Zheng; Qiao Jianhui

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of a 32-year-old man exposed to a total body dose of 14.5 Gy γ-radiation in a lethal 60 Co-source irradiation accident in 2008 in China. Frequent nausea, vomiting and marked neutropenia and lymphopenia were observed from 30 min to 45 h after exposure. HLA-mismatched peripheral blood stem cell transplantation combined with infusion of mesenchymal stem cells was used at Day 7. Rapid hematopoietic recovery, stable donor engraftment and healing of radioactive skin ulceration were achieved during Days 18-36. The patient finally developed intestinal obstruction and died of multi-organ failure on Day 62, although intestinal obstruction was successfully released by emergency bowel resection. (author)

  3. The effect of postirradiation holding at 22 degrees C on the repair of sublethal, potentially lethal and potentially neoplastic transforming damage in gamma-irradiated HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redpath, J.L.; Antoniono, R.J.; Mendonca, M.S.; Sun, C.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of postirradiation holding at 22 degrees C on cell growth, progression of cells through the cell cycle, and the repair of sublethal, potentially lethal and potentially neoplastic transforming damage in γ-irradiated HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells has been examined. Cell growth and cell cycle progression were essentially stopped at this reduced temperature. Cell survival was dramatically reduced by holding confluent cultures for 6 h at 22 degrees C, as opposed to 37 degrees C, after 7.5 Gy γ radiation delivered at a rate of 2 Gy/min. Return of the cells to 37 degrees C for 6 h after holding at 22 degrees C did not result in increased survival. A similar effect was obtained when the cells were held at 22 degrees C between split-dose irradiation of log-phase cultures where no increase in survival was observed over a split-dose interval of 4 h. In this case a partial increase in survival was observed upon returning the cells to 37 degrees C for 3 h after holding at 22 degrees C for the first 3 h of the split-dose interval. Neoplastic transformation frequency was not enhanced by holding confluent cultures for 6 h at 22 degrees C after 7.5 Gy γ radiation. This is consistent with previous observations that misrepair of potentially neoplastic transforming damage already occurs at 37 degrees C. The overall results are interpreted in terms of the reduced temperature favoring misrepair, rather than inhibition of repair, of sublethal, potentially lethal and potentially transforming radiation damage. 24 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Early changes in GABA and dlutamine levels and aminotransferase activity in rat brain after total-body γ-irradiation with absolutely lethal doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanov, V.A.; Karpovich, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The contents of gaama-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (GL) as well as GABA-aspartate- and alanine aminotransferase activities were measured in rat cerebellum, cerebral cortex and truncus cerebri 1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 hr following total-body γ-irradiation ( 60 Co) with a dose of 30 Gy. All the indices under study changed in a similar way in the cortex and truncus cerebri while in the cerebellum, GABA level increased and GABA-α-ketoglutarate aminotransfearse activity decreased 60 min after irradiation. The levels of GABA and GL in the cortex and truncus cerebri decreased immediately and increased 24 hr after irradiation. Activity of aminotransferases changed in a phase manner: changes in aspartate- and alanine aminotransferase activity were more pronounced than those of GABA-α-ketoglutarate aminotransferase activity and correlated with the glutamate level changes

  5. A quick method for testing recessive lethal damage with a diploid strain of Aspergillus nidulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morpurgo, G.; Puppo, S.; Gualandi, G.; Conti, L.

    1978-01-01

    A simple method capable of detecting recessive lethal damage in a diploid strain of Aspergillus nidulans is described. The method scores the recessive lethals on the 1st, the 3rd and the 5th chromosomes, which represent about 40% of the total map of A. nidulans. Two examples of induced lethals, with ultraviolet irradiation and methyl methanesulfonate are shown. The frequency of lethals may reach 36% of the total population with UV irradiation. (Auth.)

  6. Anatomoclinical changes in a dog subjected to whole-body irradiation followed four days later by a partial ileectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neveux, Y.; Deloince, R.; Dubos, M.; Drouet, J.; Nguyen, T.L.

    Various anatomoclinical changes observed in a dog subjected to gamma radiation at three doses (250, 300, 350 R) and to an ileectomy performed four days later, were described. A comparative study with a dog subjected to gamma radiation only, proved that radiation syndrome prognosis is increased by surgery. Pathological changes were evaluated as a function of radiation doses in hematopoietic organs (bone marrow, spleen, lymph nodes) and digestive tract (stomach, duodenum, small intestine, colon, liver) [fr

  7. Protection to glycolysis by a combination of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan and 2-aminoethylisothiuronium bromide hydrobromide in lethally irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, S.K.; Srinivasan, M.N.; Chuttani, K.; George, S.

    1992-01-01

    Rate of glycolysis in vivo at different time intervals following 8 Gy[LDsub(100(30)] whole body gamma radiation (WBGR) was evaluated by estimating liver glycogen, blood sugar, serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and lactic acid concentration in adult male Sprague Dawley rats. Within 1 hr of radiation exposure, a significant fall in liver glycogen was observed in rats fed food and water ad libitum. The glycogen content increased after 24 hr and had returned to control level on 7th day after radiation exposure. Blood sugar, serum LDH and blood lactate levels increased significantly as compared to non irradiated controls. Pretreatment with 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP;100 mg/kg) + 2-aminoethylisothiuronium bromide hydrobromide (AET;20 mg/kg)ip 30 min before 8 Gy WBGR, modified these values and restored them to normal level on 7th day post-irradiation. (author). 24 refs

  8. Synergistic effects of combined immunosuppressive modulation. I. Unresponsiveness to dendritic cell-depleted renal allografts in dogs exposed to total-lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapaport, F.T.; Meek, A.; Miura, S.; Hayashi, R.; Arnold, A.N.; Strober, S.

    1988-01-01

    Attenuation of the allogeneic stimulus provided by dendritic cells (DC) was achieved by irradiation of the donors, followed by their reconstitution with bone marrow from the prospective DLA-identical recipient. Following long-term (131-187 days) recovery free of graft-versus-host (GVH) disease, the chimeric kidneys were placed into the corresponding recipients; such allografts were rejected at 55, 55, and 60 days, respectively. Four other recipients were conditioned with 1750-1790 cgy of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and were then given a similar chimeric kidney from the corresponding partner. These allografts currently survive for 296, 295, 290, and 252 days, respectively. A third group of four dogs was exposed to TLI prior to transplantation of a normal DLA-identical kidney. These grafts were rejected at 20, 42, 46, and 242 days, respectively. Thirteen DLA-identical renal allografts transplanted into normal dogs survived for 13-38 days (mean survival time = 28.6 days). Depletion of allogeneic DC alone, or TLI alone, produced relative prolongations in allograft survival in canine recipients. Combined use of these two modalities, however, resulted in long-term allogeneic unresponsiveness in the recipients

  9. Autologous stem cell transplantation following high-dose whole-body irradiation of dogs - influence of cell number and fractionation regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenberger, U.

    1981-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome after a single dose of 1600 R (approx. 12-14 Gy in body midline) and after fractionated irradiation with 2400 R (approx. 18-20 Gy) was studied with regard to fractionation time and to the number of bone marrow cells infused. The acute radiation syndrome consisted of damage to the alimentary tract and of damage to the hemopoietic system. Damage of hemopoiesis was reversible in dogs which had been given a sufficient amount of hemopoietic cells. Furthermore changes in skin and in the mucous membranes occurred. Hemopoietic recovery following infusion of various amounts of bone marrow was investigated in dogs which were irradiated with 2400 R within 7 days. Repopulation of bone marrow as well as rise of leukocyte and platelet counts in the peripheral blood was taken as evidence of complete hemopoietic reconstitution. The results indicate that the acute radiation syndrom following 2400 R TBI and autologous BMT can be controlled by fractionation of this dose within 5 or 7 days. The acute gastrointestinal syndrome is aggravated by infusion of a lesser amount of hemopoietic cells. However, TBI with 2400 R does not require greater numbers of hemopoietic cells for restoration of hemopoiesis. Thus, the hemopoiesis supporting tissue can not be damage by this radiation dose to an essential degree. Longterm observations have not revealed serious late defects which could represent a contraindication to the treatment of malignent diseases with 2400 R of TBI. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Cystic meningiomas in 2 dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, R.S.; Kornegay, J.N.; Lane, S.B.; Thrall, D.L.; Page, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Two dogs with signs of forebrain disease had hypodense lesions on computed tomography evaluation. Magnetic resonance imaging of the first dog showed a hypointense lesion on the T1-weighted scan and a hyperintense lesion on T2-weighted scanning. At surgery, both dogs had a primary cystic intracranial lesion, and the abnormal tissue adjacent to the cyst had histological features of meningioma. Each dog underwent whole brain irradiation after surgery, and 1 dog lived for 3 years after treatment. While uncommon, meningioma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs with cystic intracranial lesions

  11. Induction and repair of lethal and oncogenic lesions and their relationship to cytogenetic changes in UV-irradiated mouse 10T1/2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, G.L.; Nagasawa, H.; Little, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    While bacterial system is valuable for the pragmatic purpose of screening potential environmental carcinogens, the fundamental difference between prokaryotes and mammalian cells warrant caution against the use of bacterial mutagenic mechanisms to explain the oncogenic process in mammalian cells. The 10 T1/2 cells exposed to UV light in the plateau phase and subcultured immediately to low density to assay for clonogenic survival were extremely resistant to the cytotoxic effect of UV light. Purely physical considerations such as the increased thickness of plateau phase cells and the increased cytoplasmic shielding of UV light from the nuclei were insufficient to account for this unusual resistance. The effect of caffeine on the repair processes in UV-irradiated mammalian cells appears to be exerted during the first DNA synthetic phase after the UV exposure. The daughter DNA synthesized on a UV-irradiated template is of reduced molecular weight. 10 T1/2 cells were exposed in the log phase of growth to UV light, and then they were cultured for the next 48 hours in the complete growth medium containing the specific concentration of caffeine. Parallel experiments were performed, in which cells were exposed for 48 hours to caffeine only with no prior exposure to UV light. It was found that caffeine did not potentiate the transformation by UV light. Caffeine alone induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE), whereas the caffeine given after UV light had no effect. The class of UV-induced lesions which induce SCE also leads to malignant transformation. (Yamashita, S.)

  12. Caracterização da dose letal mínima por irradiação gama para Penicillium citrinum Characterization of minimum lethal dosis of gama irradiation to Penicillium citrinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Norberg

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available O uso das radiações ionizantes na destruição de microrganismos responsáveis pela deterioração de alimentos ou causadores de infecções ou toxinfecções alimentares, constituiu-se aplicação da energia nuclear, para fins verdadeiramente pacíficos. Penicillium citrinum é um fungo produtor de micotoxinas, responsáveis por intoxicações em humanos e animais que se utilizam de alimentos contaminados. Há escassez de informações sobre a resistência do P. citrinum à irradiação gama; assim esta pesquisa objetivou determinar a dose letal por irradiação gama para esse microrganismo. Foram irradiadas 76 suspensões, contendo aproximadamente 100.000 esporos por mililitro, com doses entre 0,2 e 2,2 KGy (KiloGray, sendo os sobreviventes re-irradiados com doses até 3,0 KGy. O fungo foi totalmente destruído com dose de 2,2 KGy. P. citrinum descendentes dos sobreviventes de 2,0 KGy, quando re-irradiados também foram totalmente destruídos com dose de 2,2 KGy. Observou-se um aumento da resistência às doses mais baixas em relação ao fungo não irradiadoThe use of nuclear power through radiation for the destruction of microrganisms which cause food decay, and toxicosis, is specifically for peaceful purposes. Penicillium citrinum is a fungus which produce mycotoxins responsible for intoxication in humans and animals as a result of eating contaminated food. There is little informations on the resistance of P. citrinum to radiation. The objective of this research is to determine the lethal dose of gama radiation for these microrganisms. Seventy six suspensions containing approximately 100,000 spores/ml received a dose of radiation between 0.2 and 2.2 KGy (KiloGray, being one sample still alive re-irradiated with doses up to 3.0 KGy. The fungus were totally destroyed with a 2.2 KGy. Seventy six suspensions containing approximately 100,000 spores/ml received a dose of radiation between 0.2 and 2.2 KGy, being one sample still alive re-irradiated

  13. Dog Bite – A Rare Cause Of Oesophageal Injury | Arif | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though rabies has been successfully controlled in some provinces, dog bite is a common problem encountered in the Accident and Emergency (A & E) departments of South Africa. In our experience, dog bites are usually from police dog units or a neighbour's dog. Oesophageal injury is very lethal if not treated early.

  14. Comparative studies on the proliferation and differentiation of granulocytic progenitor cells CFU-C from the blood and bone marrow of dogs under normal conditions and after 80 R whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faul, H.

    1984-01-01

    The study on hand was performed on dogs of both sexes and dealt with two complex issues: 1) the identity of the granulocytic progenitor cell CFU-C in the blood and bone marrow, and 2) possible verification of damage to stem cell store using the granulocytic progenitor cell CFU-C as an indicator for damage caused, in this case, by 80 rd whole body irradiation of dogs. A special culture technique was developed to study these issues, and was tested for its functionability. Examinations of the dogs with whole-body irradiation revealed the following results: a) Radiation damage to the stem cell store could be verified by the study object of CFU-C granulocytic progenitor cell of the bone marrow. A reduction of proliferative capacity linked with a change in the differentiation profiles for the different cell types in the suspension cultures was clearly verified. b) The suspension culture technique allows to verify damage by ionizing radiation both in the acute phase, i.c. two hours after irradiation, and in the late recovery phase. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Biological alterations resulting from chronic lung irradiation. II. Connective tissue alterations following inhalation of 144Ce fused clay aerosol in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickrell, J.A.; Harris, D.V.; Pfleger, R.C.; Benjamin, S.A.; Belasich, J.J.; Jones, R.K.; McClellan, R.O.

    1975-01-01

    Beagle dogs were exposed by inhalation to an aerosol of 144 Ce clay to quantitate the relationship between pulmonary radiation dose and induced fibrosis. Collagen, elastin, glucosamine, and the ratios of elastin/collagen, hydroxyproline/hydroxylysine, and hydroxyproline/proline were determined to indicate changes in connective tissue constituents. Total lung collagen was partitioned into native collagen, soluble collagen, and ultrafilterable hydroxyproline peptides. Increased total lung collagen correlated best with increasing cumulative radiation dose and increasing time after inhalation exposure. The increase in total lung collagen was not seen until more than 4 mo after exposure and a cumulative dose of about 40,000 rad. Soluble collagen and low molecular weight hydroxyproline peptide quantities both increased at 2 mo after exposure and cumulative doses of 20,000 to 27,000 rad. A variable elastin response apparently was not related to either increasing time or increasing radiation dose after exposure. These results indicate that collagen accumulation is an important factor in pulmonary fibrosis. Although collagen synthesis and breakdown were both activated at a relatively early time after inhalation, a significant increase in native collagen (scarring) occurred only when the metabolic balance was altered by protracted time or irradiation after exposure. The interrelationships observed in this study provide insight into the mechanism of fibrosis induced by chronic pulmonary injury. (U.S.)

  16. Effects of extracellular and intracellular pH on repair of potentially lethal damage, chromosome aberrations and DNA double-strand breaks in irradiated plateau-phase A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanth, V.R.; Bayne, M.T.; Varnes, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    Plateau-phage A549 cells exhibit a high capacity for repair of potentially lethal radiation damage (PLD). Previously it was found that PLD repair could be partially inhibited by increasing the extracellular pH (pH e ) of the spent medium from its normal value of 6.7-6.8 to 7.6 during postirradiation holding. This study shows that PLD repair is also inhibited by reducing the pH e of the spent medium to 6.0. The effects of altering pH e on rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) as measured by neutral filter elution and on mitotic delay and chromosome aberrations seen after releasing cells from the plateau phase were investigated. Neither increasing nor decreasing the pH e of the spent medium had an effect on radiation-induced mitotic delay. Rejoining of DSBs was significantly inhibited by holding at pH e 6.0 but not affected by holding at pH e 7.6. At 2 h after irradiation about 51% of unrejoined breaks remained at pH e 6.0, compared to about 15% at pH e 6.7 or 7.6. However, holding at pH e 7.6 appeared to cause a marginal change in the kinetics of rejoining of DSBs. Repair of lesions leading to dicentric and acentric chromosome aberrations did not occur when cells were held at pH e 6.0, since less than 10% of these aberrations disappeared from cells held for 24 h before subculture. In contrast, holding plateau-phase cells at pH e 7.6 vs 6.7 caused a small but significant reduction in the disappearance of dicentrics but had no effect on the rate or extent of the disappearance of acentrics. These data have led us to hypothesize that inhibition of PLD repair by holding at pH e 6.0 is related both to inhibition of pH-dependent DNA repair enzymes and to induction of changes in DNA which lead to misrepair when the cells are released from plateau phase. Inhibition of PLD repair by holding at pH e 7.6 is related primarily to changes in DNA structure which promote misrepair. 43 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Radiation toxicity in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, W.P.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the effects of continuous (22 hr/day), whole-body γ-irradiation in the pure-bred beagle dog. Dogs were exposed continuously until death at one of four different exposure rates ranging from 5 to 35 R/day. The study is still 2441 days (approximately 6.7 yr) of irradiation. The experiment has narrowed to the dogs receiving 5 R/day and the controls. A group of dogs receiving one of these relatively low daily exposure rates may exhibit remarkably varied responses, both in survival times in the γ field and in ultimate causes of death. The basis for these large differences in responses of individual dogs remains mostly unexplained, but is presumed to reside in their genetic composition. The composite result in the study, however, demonstrates an orderly, step-wise appearance of clinical end points resulting from radiation-induced damage to the blood-forming tissues. About one-half the dogs exposed continuously to 10 R/day develop bone marrow aplasia and die of anemia, while the other one-half develop bone marrow hyperplasias and die of malignancies, usually myelogenous leukemias. In dogs exposed at rates greater than 10 R/day, aplastic bone marrows predominate; while hyperplastic responses are the dominant cause of death at 5 R/day. Only among the most recent deaths of dogs exposed continuously to either 10 or 5 R/day, have there appeared terminal causes of death unrelated to hematopoietic injury. These causes (degenerative and/or inflammatory disease and cancers of tissue other than bone marrow) suggest that we are now beginning to define the combinations of exposure rate and time of exposure that allow expressions of damage by tissues outside the hematopoietic system. (U.S.)

  18. Histopathological effects of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The histopathological effects of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of glyphosate on African catfish Clarias gariepinus were investigated. C. gariepinus juveniles were assessed in a static renewal bioassay for 96 hours (acute toxicity) and 28 days (chronic toxicity) using varying concentrations (0.0 mg/l 20.0 mg/l, 30.0 mg/l, ...

  19. Home - DOG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsroom Services Information Why Alaska? DOG 101 Director & Deputy Bios Division Experts Applications — Give Feedback Thanks for giving feedback! The captcha entered is not valid. Send Close DOG DOA DNR

  20. Effect of a non lethal whole-body gamma irradiation on the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalographic activities of the adult rabbit; Effets d'une irradiation gamma globale non letale sur les activites electroencephalograpiques spontanees et evoquees du lapin adulte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Court, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The whole of the experimental methods described (animal preparation, achievement of a precise physiological technique, dosimetry, biological information processing) allowed us to follow the changes for 15 days in the spontaneous and evoked electroencephalogram activities of rabbits submitted to a non-lethal 400 rads whole-body gamma-irradiation. Behavioural troubles, changes in the arousal state and the spontaneous electrical activity of the neo-cortex and hippocampus were noticed constantly together with an enhanced cortical excitability, and the appearance of elements of the paroxystic series sometimes in contrast with a general decrease in amplitude. After a visual stimulus the general morphology of evoked activities at the level of the primary visual areas and hippocampus was unchanged, but enhanced latencies and delays, less systematic modifications in amplitudes seemed to show out a direct effect of radiations on the nervous system and sensorial activities; these troubles seemed to occur independently from the basic electrical activity. As a whole, the changes observed were usually transitory and varied with each individual. Finally an assumption is made to explain the mechanism of arousal troubles and the general evolution of spontaneous electrical activity in the brain. (author) [French] 'L'ensemble des methodes experimentales decrites (preparation des animaux, mise au point d'une technique physiologique precise, dosimetrie, traitement de l'information biologique) a permis de suivre, pendant 15 jours, chez le lapin soumis a une irradiation gamma globale non letale de 400 rads, les modifications des activites electroencephaliques spontanees et evoquees. De facon constante, on note des troubles du comportement, des modifications de la vigilance et de l'activite electrique spontanee du neo-cortex et de l'hippocampe, ainsi qu'une augmentation de l'excitabilite corticale, l'apparition d'elements de la serie

  1. Suicide Lethality: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBastiani, Summer; De Santis, Joseph P

    2018-02-01

    Suicide is a significant health problem internationally. Those who complete suicide may have different behaviors and risk factors than those who attempt a non-fatal suicide. The purpose of this article is to analyze the concept of suicide lethality and propose a clear definition of the concept through the identification of antecedents, attributes, and consequences. A literature search for articles published in the English language between 1970 and 2016 was conducted using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Pubmed, Psychlit, Ovid, PsycINFO, and Proquest. The bibliographies of all included studies were also reviewed to identify additional relevant citations. A concept analysis was conducted on the literature findings using six stages of Walker and Avant's method. The concept analysis differentiated between suicide, lethality, suicidal behavior, and suicide lethality. Presence of a suicide plan or a written suicide note was not found to be associated with the majority of completed suicides included in the definition of suicide lethality. There are a few scales that measure the lethality of a suicide attempt, but none that attempt to measure the concept of suicide lethality as described in this analysis. Clarifying the concept of suicide lethality encourages awareness of the possibility of different suicidal behaviors associated with different suicide outcomes and will inform the development of future nursing interventions. A clearer definition of the concept of suicide lethality will guide clinical practice, research, and policy development aimed at suicide prevention.

  2. Sterilization and lethal gamma radiation doses on adults and eggs of Sitotroga Cerealella (OLIVIER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiendl, F.M.; Bovi, O.A.; Arthur, V.

    1975-04-01

    The influence of lethal doses of radiation from a cobalt 60 gamma source on eggs, adults and fertitility of Sitotroga Cerealella (Olivier) is described. Eggs irradiated with a dose of 14 Krad still showed viability of 16.1%. On longevity doses up to 70 Krad were usually non lethal but some variation could be observed related to the larval diet. Females fertilized by males irradiated with a dose of 70 Krad produced 36% fertile eggs. When the females were irradiated with the same dose, their fertility dropped to 2.2% and when both sexes were irradiated with a 60 Krad dose, the fertility was 28.8%

  3. Frequencies of aneuploidy and dominant lethal mutations in young female mice induced by low dose γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Suyan; Zhang Chaoyang; Dai Lianlian; Gao Changwen

    1991-01-01

    Relationship between aneuploidy, dominant lethal mutations and doses in young feral mice induced by low dose γ-rays was examined. The results suggest that the frequencies of aneuploidy of embryos increased at 0.15 Gy, but increases at over 0.50 Gy after irradiation in groups. The frequencies of aneuploidy and dominant lethal mutations increased with increasing doses and fitted linear relationship. This dose-response relationship of trisomic was not significant. The frequency of dominant lethal mutations induced by 60 Co γ irradiation is 5.59%. The effect of dominant lethal mutation is higher than that of the aneuploidy

  4. Prenatal and neonatal radiation injury and lymphohematopoietic development in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nold, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Immunologic and hematopoietic responses were studied in beagle dogs following prenatal or neonatal irradiation to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing lymphohematopoietic system. In prenatally-irradiated dogs thymic medullary volumes were significantly reduced at birth, but had returned to control levels by 12 weeks of age. Irradiated dogs exhibited a significant reduction in primary humoral antibody responses and showed a concurrent decrease in T helper lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. In neonatally-irradiated dogs lymphocyte blastogenic responses were sharply decreased at 8 weeks, but returned to control levels by 12 weeks of age. Contact sensitivity to dinitrochlorobenzene was decreased, indicating reduced cell-mediated immune responses. Alterations in peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations included decreases in B cells and increases in T cells, possibly due to increased numbers of T suppressor cells. There were significant reductions in body size and body tissue weights in all irradiated dogs, although these were more severe and persistent in the prenatally-irradiated dogs. These data show that prenatally or neonatally-irradiated dogs have significantly postnatal immunologic and hematopoietic defects. The effect on bone marrow function in prenatally-irradiated dogs was more severe and persistent than in neonatally-irradiated animals; however, the neonatally-irradiated dogs exhibited more severe alterations in lymphocyte subpopulations than did the prenatally-irradiated dogs. The observation of altered lymphocyte subpopulations suggests altered immunoregulation and raises some important questions relating to radiation-induced immunodeficiency and increased susceptibility to clinical disease, including neoplasia

  5. Curative effects of Tiron on dogs with acute uranium intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yumin; Zhao Xingcheng; You Zhanyun; Wang Lihua; Yin Xieyu

    1986-01-01

    It was reported that the tiron had good therapeutic effects on small animals with acute uranium intoxication. The tiron's therapeutic effects as a first aid on large animals (38 dogs) with acute uranium poisoning are reported in this paper. Indices reflecting its effect were as follows: excretion rate of uranium from the dogs, several appropriate biochemical tests, clinical manifestations, histo-pathological changes of kidney and liver, and also the mortality of dogs. The results showed that the tiron or a combination of tiron and NaHCO 3 has a good therapeutic effect as a first aid on the dogs receiving lethal dose of uranyl nitrate

  6. Pyrimetin therapy of early symptoms of radiation sickness in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehky, F.; Dobsinska, E.

    1975-01-01

    The antiemetic effect of Pyrimetin in dogs whole-body irradiated with gamma rays at a dose of 500 R, administered per os, intramuscularly, and subcutaneously, immediately before the exposure and after it in the course of the initial symptoms of radiation sickness was studied. A decreased emesis occurred after per os administration of Pyrimetin immediately before whole-body irradiation of the dogs. After the intramuscular application before whole-body irradiation two dogs vomitted, and in the case of the intramuscular administration after whole-body irradiation one dog vomitted. The subcutaneous application of Pyrimetin to dogs before whole-body irradiation and also after it produced only a 30% therapeutic effect. (author)

  7. Effect of testicular irradiation on established BPH in the dog: evidence of a non-steroidal testicular factor for BPH maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayhack, J.T.; Lee, C.; Brand, W.

    1985-01-01

    Irradiation of the testes of four to 13-year-old male beagles with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) was undertaken to attempt to evaluate the possibility that the testes secrete a non-androgenic accessory sex gland-stimulating substance that may have a critical role in the development of BPH. Thirteen non-irradiated and shoulder irradiated control and 16 beagles subjected to 1500 to 2200 rads single dose testis irradiation had pre-irradiation, interval post-irradiation and terminal caliper measurements of prostatic length, width and depth, prostatic and testicular biopsies, and determination of serum testosterone and estradiol levels. Four beagles survived in a group observed for 109 weeks post testis irradiation, 12 in a group observed for 51 and 10 in a group observed for 59 weeks. The wet weight of the prostate was determined at sacrifice. Ratios of the final/initial length and width and final actual/initial calculated weight of the prostate were significantly decreased in testis-irradiated as compared to control beagles. Histologic evaluation also demonstrated a significant difference in degree of prostatic stimulation in control and testis-irradiated groups. The serum testosterone and estradiol levels were not significantly different in the testis-irradiated and control beagles

  8. The Gottingen minipig is a model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome: G-colony stimulating factor stimulates hematopoiesis and enhances survival from lethal total-body γ-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D; Holt, Rebecca K; Whitnall, Mark H

    2013-08-01

    We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroni, Maria, E-mail: maria.moroni@usuhs.edu [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ngudiankama, Barbara F. [Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Christensen, Christine [Division of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Olsen, Cara H. [Biostatistics Consulting Center, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Owens, Rossitsa [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Lombardini, Eric D. [Veterinary Medicine Department, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok (Thailand); Holt, Rebecca K. [Veterinary Science Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Whitnall, Mark H. [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  10. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes

  11. Potentially lethal damage and its repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    Two forms termed fast-and slow-potentially lethal lethal damage (PLD) are introduced and discussed. The effect on the survival of x-irradiated Chinese hamster cells (V79) of two different post-treatments is examined in plateau- and in log-phases of growth. The postirradiation treatments used : a) incubation in hypertonic solution, and b) incubation in conditioned medium obtained from plateau-phase. Similar reduction in survival was caused by postirradiation treatment with hypertonic phosphate buffered saline, and similar increased in survival was effected by treatment in conditioned medium in plateau- and in log-phases cells. However, repair of PLD sensitive to hypertonic treatment was faster (half time, 5-10 min)(f-PLD repair) and independent from the repair of PLD (half time, 1-2 hour)(s-PLD repair) observed in conditioned medium. The results indicate the induction of two forms of PLD by radiation. Induction of both PLD was found to decrease with increasing LET of the radiation used. Identification of the molecular processes underlying repair and fixation of PLD is a task of particular interest, since it may allow replacement of a phenomenological definition with a molecular definition. Evidence is reviewed indicating the DNA double strand breaks (directly or indirectly induced) may be the DNA lesions underlying PLD. (author)

  12. Factors controlling the engraftment of transplanted dog bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwyk, W.M.; Heidt, P.J.; Hogeweg, B.; Zurcher, C.; Bekkum, D.W. van

    1982-01-01

    The LD50 of total body irradiation (TBI) for the bone marrow (BM) syndrome and the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrme was determined in dogs as 3.7 Gy, and 8.5 Gy respectively. Five Gy TBI was adequate conditioning for BM cells of littermate donors identical for the major histocompatibility comples (MHC). The maximum tolerated TBI (about 7.5 Gy) caused more side effects than 5.0 Gy TBI and was insufficient for engraftment of realistic numbers of BM cells of MHC mismatched donors. In autologous and MHC matched transplants, the rateof hemopoietic recovery correlated with the number of BM cells given. Approximtely 2 x 10 7 autologous and 1 x 10 8 MHC identical BM cells.kg -1 were needed for radiation protection. Platelet recovery was significantly more rapid in allogeneic combinations in comparison to autologous transplants. Low numbers of autologous cryopreserved bone marrow cells were as effective as fresh bone marrow cells in rescuing animals after lethal TBI. Other factors that influence BM cell engraftment were confirmed (prior sensitization of the recipient, donor selection) or identified (purification of BM cells on density gradient and selective gastrointestinal decontamination of the recipient). Consistent engraftment of gradient separated, MHC identical, BM cells was found after conditioning with two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI, separated by 72 h. One MHC haplotype mismatched marrow did engraft after two TBI fractions of 6.0 Gy. Engraftment no longer occurred with gradient purified bone marrow cells from this type of donor. Late effects of TBI were early greying in all animals, and secondary uterine inertia in female dogs after 7.5 GY TBI. Fertility in males or females was not changed by radiation. An increase of pancreas fibrosis was noted in dogs receiving fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI. (author)

  13. Development of blood irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This project is designed to improve the techniques of blood irradiation through the development of improved and portable blood irradiators. A portable blood irradiator, consisting of a vitreous carbon body and thulium-170 radiation source, was attached to dogs via a carotid-jugular shunt, and its effects on the immune system measured. The device has demonstrated both significant suppression of circulating lymphocytes and prolonged retention of skin allografts

  14. Theories of Lethal Mutagenesis: From Error Catastrophe to Lethal Defection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero, Héctor; Montero, Francisco; Nuño, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses get extinct in a process called lethal mutagenesis when subjected to an increase in their mutation rate, for instance, by the action of mutagenic drugs. Several approaches have been proposed to understand this phenomenon. The extinction of RNA viruses by increased mutational pressure was inspired by the concept of the error threshold. The now classic quasispecies model predicts the existence of a limit to the mutation rate beyond which the genetic information of the wild type could not be efficiently transmitted to the next generation. This limit was called the error threshold, and for mutation rates larger than this threshold, the quasispecies was said to enter into error catastrophe. This transition has been assumed to foster the extinction of the whole population. Alternative explanations of lethal mutagenesis have been proposed recently. In the first place, a distinction is made between the error threshold and the extinction threshold, the mutation rate beyond which a population gets extinct. Extinction is explained from the effect the mutation rate has, throughout the mutational load, on the reproductive ability of the whole population. Secondly, lethal defection takes also into account the effect of interactions within mutant spectra, which have been shown to be determinant for the understanding the extinction of RNA virus due to an augmented mutational pressure. Nonetheless, some relevant issues concerning lethal mutagenesis are not completely understood yet, as so survival of the flattest, i.e. the development of resistance to lethal mutagenesis by evolving towards mutationally more robust regions of sequence space, or sublethal mutagenesis, i.e., the increase of the mutation rate below the extinction threshold which may boost the adaptability of RNA virus, increasing their ability to develop resistance to drugs (including mutagens). A better design of antiviral therapies will still require an improvement of our knowledge about lethal

  15. Ultraviolet-B lethal damage on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degiorgi, C.F.; Fernandez, R.O.; Pizarro, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has shown an increased sensitivity compared with that of Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae, when they were exposed to 0.4 kJ/m2 of ultraviolet-B radiation. The rapid decay in cell viability observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa after the irradiation was influenced by factors such as culture media and the presence of pyocyanine during the irradiation. The radioinduced lethal damage could be prevented by photoreactivating treatment, indicating that pyrimidine dimer formation was the mechanism causing bacterial death. The results indicate that several environmental conditions may act as protective agents against ultraviolet-B-induced damage

  16. Struvite urolithiasis in a litter of miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausner, J S; Osborne, C A; O'Leary, T P; Gebhart, R N; Griffith, D P

    1980-05-01

    Magnesium ammonium phosphate calculi developed in the urinary bladders and urethras of four of five offspring of Miniature Schnauzer parents with recurrent struvite urolithiasis. Calculi were detected by radiograhy when the dogs were 12 to 15 months old. Males and females were affected. A significant number of urease-producing staphylococci were identified in the urine of three of four dogs before urolith formation, and in one dog after urolith formation. The dogs were evaluated until they were 26 months old. Serum concentrations of calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium were inside usual limits throughout the study. Abnormalities that might predispose to urinary tract infection were not identified by radiography or necropsy studies. In one dog, bladder calculi recurred after surgical removal of multiple cystoliths. In another, urethral obstruction and acute generalized pyelonephritis induced a lethal uremic crisis. Gross and microscopic lesions, detected after necropsy of all dogs with uroliths, were typical of bacterial infection.

  17. The growth of hemopoietic precursor cells (CFU-C) of adriamycin-treated or whole-body-irradiated dogs with or without bleomycin in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkamer, A.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the cytostatic drug bleomycin (BLM) on the growth of canine hemopoietic stem-cells in vitro was tested in order to detect a stem-cell deficiency after in vivo-treatment with adriamycin (ADM) or whole-body-irradiation. Stem-cells damaged by irradiation or cytostatics are suppressed by bleomycin-induced strand-breaks in vitro. After stem-cell recovery the increased sensitivity towards bleomycin can no longer be detected. After whole-body-irradiation and cytostatical treatment the stem-cells who remained intact have to compensate the quantitative change of the stem-cells by increased proliferation. The proliferating cells show a particular bleomycin-sensitivity. Especially after irradiation a long persistence of the bleomycin-sensitivity can be reckoned on. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Non-Lethal Weapons Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets Frequently Asked Questions Non-Lethal Weapons FAQs Active Denial System FAQs Human Electro -Muscular Incapacitation FAQs Related Links Business Opportunities Contact JNLWD Congressional Engagement , Wednesday, Sept 20, 2017. The Active Denial System, blunt-impact munitions, dazzling lasers, LRAD 100X

  19. Sudden cardiac death in dogs with remodeled hearts is associated with larger beat-to-beat variability of repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Truin, Michiel; van Opstal, Jurren M

    2005-01-01

    Increased proarrhythmia in dogs with chronic AV block (AVB) has been explained by ventricular remodeling causing a decrease in repolarization reserve. Beat-to-beat variability of repolarization (BVR) has been suggested to reflect repolarization reserve, in which high variability represents...... diminished reserve and larger propensity for repolarization-dependent ventricular arrhythmia. A subset of chronic AVB dogs (10%) suffers sudden cardiac death (SCD). With the assumption that repolarization defects constitute a potentially lethal proarrhythmic substrate, we hypothesized that BVR in SCD dogs...... are larger than in matched control chronic AVB dogs. From a population of 200 chronic AVB dogs, initially two groups were chosen retrospectively: 8 dogs that died suddenly (SCD) and 8 control dogs. Control dogs had a longer lifespan after AVB (10 to 18 weeks) than SCD dogs (5 to 10 weeks). All dogs had...

  20. Allegheny County Dog Licenses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — A list of dog license dates, dog breeds, and dog name by zip code. Currently this dataset does not include City of Pittsburgh dogs.

  1. Radiation toxicity in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, W.P.

    1975-01-01

    Three related, but separate, studies are in progress. In the first, young adult beagles of both sexes are placed in the γ-ray field, to be kept there for duration of life at one of a number of daily exposure rates. In the second, young adult beagles are exposed in a similar fashion until they have accumulated predetermined amounts of total exposure ranging up to 4000 R, delivered at various daily exposure rates. They are then removed from the radiation field and kept for the rest of their lives to allow development of late effects attributable to radiation exposure. In the third study, pregnant beagles are irradiated, at one of four daily exposure rates, for all or part of their gestation periods, to produce an evaluation of the effects of continuous irradiation in the developing fetus. All of these studies are done by arranging dogs at various distances from a calibrated 60 Co γ-ray source, where they are irradiated during 22 hours of each day. The remaining 2 hours are used for animal care, maintenance, and clinical evaluation of the dogs. The combined results demonstrate that the cellular and organ systems of the dog respond predictably, and in a differential manner, depending on exposure rate. Exposure rates in excess of 17 R/day destroy the blood-cell producing elements of bone marrow and cause death, therefore, within 1 to 2 months. Minimally sublethal exposure rates to bone marrow (5-17 R/day), however, produce a very high (50-75 percent) incidence of anemia or myeloid leukemia. Furthermore, at exposure rates of 5 R/day or below, bone marrow appears to function in an essentially normal fashion, and causes of death appear, from preliminary data, to be related to degenerative disease and malignancies of other tissues

  2. Left ventricular function during lethal and sublethal endotoxemia in swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfarb, R.D.; Nightingale, L.M.; Kish, P.; Weber, P.B.; Loegering, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that after a median lethal dose (LD 50 ) of endotoxin, cardiac contractility was depressed in nonsurviving dogs. The canine cardiovascular system is unlike humans in that dogs have a hepatic vein sphincter that is susceptible to adrenergic stimulation capable of raising hepatic and splanchnic venous pressures. The authors retested the hypothesis that lethality after endotoxin administration is associated with cardiac contractile depression in pigs, because of the hepatic circulation in this species is similar to that of humans. They compared cardiac mechanical function of pigs administered a high dose (250 μg/kg) or a low dose (100 μg/kg) endotoxin by use of the slope of the end-systolic pressure-diameter relationship (ESPDR) as well as other measurements of cardiac performance. In all the pigs administered a high dose, ESPDR demonstrated a marked, time-dependent depression whereas we observed no significant ESPDR changes after low endotoxin doses. The other cardiodynamic variables were uninterpretable, due to the significant changes in heart rate, end-diastolic diameter (preload), and aortic diastolic pressure (afterload). Plasma myocardia depressant factor activity accumulated in all endotoxin-administered animals, tending to be greater in the high-dose group. In this group, both subendocardial blood flow and global function were depressed, whereas pigs administered the low dose endotoxin demonstrated slight, but nonsignificant, increases in flow and function. These observations indicate that myocardial contractile depression is associated with a lethal outcome to high doses of endotoxin. Myocardial perfusion was measured using radiolabeled microspheres infused into the left atria

  3. Contribution to the study of the radioprotective effect of serotonin on brain spontaneous and evoked electrical activities in the adult rabbit following whole-body lethal $gamma$-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatome, M; Court, L

    1973-11-01

    Thesis. Submitted to Paris Univ., (France). A 1 to 12 mg/kg serotonin- creatine-sulfate intravenous injection seems to act only slightly on the chronic implanted rabbit CNS except for an increase in latencies and delays of the fast components of evoked potentials and a generalized decrease in the total energy of the signal occurring 20 to 60 min after the injection. The CNS is given a real protection by a 10 mg/kg serotonin injec, tion 20 min before a 650 R whole-body exposure, the spontaneous or induced electrical activity being slightly disturbed. In the hours following irradiation the total energy increase is less important than in the unprotected animal, and there is no clear variation towards the low frequencies. Serotonin could act on the brain structures and the total energy of the signal through its depressing effect. Its radioprotective effect could act, at least partly, through the CNS. (auth)

  4. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs.

  5. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerens, H [Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France); Saint-Lebe, L

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment.

  6. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerens, H.; Saint-Lebe, L.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment [fr

  7. Military Dog Training Aids: Toxicity and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-10

    therapy should be considered. Sunportive therapy, including high levels of broad-spectrum vitamins and a bland diet , should be given. Patients should be...Median lethal dose 11,000 mg/min/m 3 Median incapacitating 3 dose Approx. 80 mg/min/m Rate of detox . Rapid; effects disappear in a few hours 20 3...Dog Training Aids: Toxicity and Treatment," Technical Report, Air Force Occupational and Environmental Health Laboratory (1975) 2. Sporting Arms and

  8. Modification of the repair of potentially lethal damage in plateau-phase Chinese hamster cells by 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Hiraoka, Wakako; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Matsuda, Akira; Ueda, Tohru; Sato, Fumiaki.

    1988-09-01

    The ability of 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, to inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage was demonstrated in Chinese hamster V79 cells after X irradiation in plateau-phase cultures. This ability of the drug was completely diminished when deoxycytidine was added at the same time, though this was slightly affected by the addition of adenosine, suggesting that this drug was phosphorylated by deoxycytidine kinase to serve as an inhibitor of the repair of potentially lethal damage. Compared with hydroxyurea, another ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, this drug appeared to contain its own activity which suppressed the repair of potentially lethal damage. A combined study of post-irradiation treatment with hypertonic salt solution and with this drug on the fixation of potentially lethal damage revealed that this drug inhibited the repair of hypertonic-insensitive potentially lethal damage.

  9. Modification of the repair of potentially lethal damage in plateau-phase Chinese hamster cells by 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Hiraoka, Wakako; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Matsuda, Akira; Ueda, Tohru; Sato, Fumiaki.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, to inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage was demonstrated in Chinese hamster V79 cells after X irradiation in plateau-phase cultures. This ability of the drug was completely diminished when deoxycytidine was added at the same time, though this was slightly affected by the addition of adenosine, suggesting that this drug was phosphorylated by deoxycytidine kinase to serve as an inhibitor of the repair of potentially lethal damage. Compared with hydroxyurea, another ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, this drug appeared to contain its own activity which suppressed the repair of potentially lethal damage. A combined study of post-irradiation treatment with hypertonic salt solution and with this drug on the fixation of potentially lethal damage revealed that this drug inhibited the repair of hypertonic-insensitive potentially lethal damage. (author)

  10. Lethal mechanisms in gastric volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omond, Kimberley J; Byard, Roger W

    2017-01-01

    A 55-year-old wheelchair-bound woman with severe cerebral palsy was found at autopsy to have marked distention of the stomach due to a volvulus. The stomach was viable, and filled with air and fluid and had pushed the left dome of the diaphragm upwards causing marked compression of the left lung with a mediastinal shift to the right (including the heart). There was no evidence of gastric perforation, ischaemic necrosis or peritonitis. Removal of the organ block revealed marked kyphoscoliosis. Histology confirmed the viability of the stomach and biochemistry showed no dehydration. Death in cases of acute gastric volvulus usually occurs because of compromise of the gastric blood supply resulting in ischaemic necrosis with distention from swallowed air and fluid resulting in perforation with lethal peritonitis. Hypovolaemic shock may also occur. However, the current case demonstrates an alternative lethal mechanism, that of respiratory compromise due to marked thoracic organ compression.

  11. National food irradiation programme of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimaki, M.

    1982-01-01

    The present state of studies on feasibility and wholesomeness of irradiated food is presented. Irradiation projects were realized of potatoes, onions, wheat, Vienna sausages, fish-paste products, and mandarine oranges. Mutagenecity tests with Salmonella or E. coli, chromosome aberration tests, dominant lethal tests, fibroblasts and micronucleus tests, and toxicity tests performed in amimals fed with irradiated food showed no positive results

  12. Rifaximin diminishes neutropenia following potentially lethal whole-body radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahraus, Christopher D; Schemera, Bettina; Rynders, Patricia; Ramos, Melissa; Powell, Charles; Faircloth, John; Brawner, William R

    2010-07-01

    Terrorist attacks involving radiological or nuclear weapons are a substantial geopolitical concern, given that large populations could be exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation. Because of this, evaluating potential countermeasures against radiation-induced mortality is critical. Gut microflora are the most common source of systemic infection following exposure to lethal doses of whole-body radiation, suggesting that prophylactic antibiotic therapy may reduce mortality after radiation exposure. The chemical stability, easy administration and favorable tolerability profile of the non-systemic antibiotic, rifaximin, make it an ideal potential candidate for use as a countermeasure. This study evaluated the use of rifaximin as a countermeasure against low-to-intermediate-dose whole-body radiation in rodents. Female Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were irradiated with 550 cGy to the whole body and were evaluated for 30 d. Animals received methylcellulose, neomycin (179 mg/kg/d) or variably dosed rifaximin (150-2000 mg/kg/d) one hour after irradiation and daily throughout the study period. Clinical assessments (e.g. body weight) were made daily. On postirradiation day 30, blood samples were collected and a complete blood cell count was performed. Animals receiving high doses of rifaximin (i.e. 1000 or 2000 mg/kg/d) had a greater increase in weight from the day of irradiation to postirradiation day 30 compared with animals that received placebo or neomycin. For animals with an increase in average body weight from irradiation day within 80-110% of the group average, methylcellulose rendered an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of 211, neomycin rendered an ANC of 334, rifaximin 300 mg/kg/d rendered an ANC of 582 and rifaximin 1000 mg/kg/d rendered an ANC of 854 (P = 0.05 for group comparison). Exposure to rifaximin after near-lethal whole-body radiation resulted in diminished levels of neutropenia.

  13. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isildar, M.; Bakale, G.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of ionizing radiation on histidine-deficient auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium were studied to improve the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The auxotrophs were divided into two groups - one which is sensitive to base-pair substitutions and another sensitive to frameshifts. These groups were composed of parent-daughter pairs in which the chemical mutagenicity enhancing plasmid, pKM101, is absent in the parent strain and present in the daughter. Co-60 #betta#-radiation and 250 kV x-rays were used to irradiate the bacteria. Irradiation of the frameshift - sensitive strains which carry the pKm101 plasmid doubled the absolute number of induced revertants whereas irradiation of the base-pair substitution sensitive strain which also carries the pKm101 plasmid produced nearly no change in the number of induced revertants. A nearly negligible effect on the mutation rate was observed for all parent strains

  14. Radiation toxicity in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.; Lombard, L.S.; Poole, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is measurement of the late effects of low doses of ionizing radiation in a large, relatively long-lived animal, the dog, to aid in assessing hazards and understanding mechanisms of radiaton damage in man. Young adult beagles are given whole-body exposures to protracted irradiation (22 hours/day, 7 days/week) from 60 Co gamma ray sources. They are exposed: (1) until they die; or (2) until they accumulate predetermined total doses of irradiation. The dogs are monitored regularly by clinical, hematological, and pathological examinations. End points determined are times to death (life shortening), causes of death, and characterization of all pathological processes. Monitoring of the hematopoietic system is emphasized because of the importance of myelogenous leukemia and related myeloproliferative disorders as shown by data in other experimental species and in man. Earlier exposures, given continuously until death or terminated at predetermined total ic fields associated with energy transmission. Proteins in human urine and selected tissues are examined by two-dimensional electrophoresis to detect disease and pollutant related changes. Assessment of human risk associated with nuclearing collective dose commitment will result in more attention being paid to potential releases of radionuclides at relatively short times after disposal

  15. Chemical and radiation induced late dominant lethal effects in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favor, J.; Crenshaw, J.W. Jr.; Soares, E.R.

    1978-01-01

    Although theoretically expected, experimental data to date have not shown dominant lethal expression to occur throughout the developmental period. Specifically, late post-implantation effects have not been demonstrated. The authors routinely use an experimental technique in which parental females mated to mutagenically treated males are allowed to give birth and wean their litter, and their uterine horns are then inspected for uterine scars indicative of live and dead embryos. In a number of experiments in which males were mutagenically treated with either chemicals or X-irradiation, a discrepancy was observed between the number of live embryos as determined by the scar technique and the number of live observed at birth, suggesting the possibility of embryonic losses at a late stage in development. Initial analyses showed that mutagenic treatment increased the percentage of these late losses. These differences were statistically significant in 2 of 3 analyses. Factors affecting statistical significance and an understanding of dominant lethal mutations are discussed. (Auth.)

  16. Fully portable blood irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    A fully portable blood irradiator was developed using the beta emitter thulium-170 as the radiation source and vitreous carbon as the body of the irradiator, matrix for isotope encapsulation, and blood interface material. These units were placed in exteriorized arteriovenous shunts in goats, sheep, and dogs and the effects on circulating lymphocytes and on skin allograft retention times measured. The present work extends these studies by establishing baseline data for skin graft rejection times in untreated animals

  17. Neoplasms in dogs receiving low-level gamma radiation during pre- and postnatal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, S.A.; Thomassen, R.W.; Hargis, A.M.; Angleton, G.M.; Lee, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    Mortality because of neoplasia was examined in Segment III dogs exposed to 0,20, or 100 R of 60 Co gamma radiation in prenatal and early postnatal life. During the inital 10 years of the experiment (through January 31, 1978) 20 dogs died or were killed because of neoplasia, 19 having been irradiated. Tumors in these 19 irradiated dogs included 5 malignant lymphomas, 8 carcinomas (2 of mammary origin, 2 of prostatic origin, and 1 each or oral mucosa, ovary, urinary bladder, and thyroid origin), 4 sarcomas (2 hemangiosarcomas, 1 fibrosarcoma and 1 mast cell sarcoma), 1 astrocytoma, and 1 hepatocellular adenoma. Neoplasms occurred in all irradiated groups except 8 dpc (20 and 100R) and 70 dpp (100R). Eleven neoplasms developed in dogs irradiated perinatally (55 dpc or 2 dpp) with 20 or 100R. Four of the tumors in the perinatally irradiated dogs were detected before 2 years of age. The earliest death was at 3 months, because of an astrocytoma. A single sham-irradiated dog died or a malignant tumor, a mammary carcinoma. Preliminary analyses point to three findings of particular interest: the preponderance of neoplasms causing death or euthanasia occurred in irradiated dogs, the unusual finding of four deaths because of neoplasia prior to 2 years of age in perinatally irradiated dogs, and the occurrence of five malignant lymphomas in this relatively small irradiated population

  18. Irradiation of blood by 238Pu alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Culver, G.G.; Gillis, M.F.; Ragan, H.A.

    1976-01-01

    A developmental 238 Pu blood irradiator produced no evidence of lymphopenia in a dog. Irradiation continued for a year at an estimated rate of about 100 rads/day, but this dosimetry is highly uncertain

  19. Ability of immunodiagnostic tests to differentiate between dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum and Leishmune(®)-vaccinated dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, R. A. N.; Teixeira-Neto, R. G.; Belo, V. S.; Ferreira, E. C.; Schallig, H. D. F. H.; Silva, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a serious chronic disease with a lethality rate of up to 10 % in humans. In urban areas of Brazil, dogs are the main reservoirs of the etiological agent (Leishmania infantum) of VL, and the Brazilian Ministry of Health recommends the euthanasia of animals that are

  20. Neoplasms in dogs receiving low-level gamma radiation during pre- and postnatal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, R.W.; Angleton, G.M.; Lee, A.C.; Phemister, R.D.; Benjamin, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    Beagle dogs were given whole-body exposure to 60 Co gamma radiation at one of six ages of pre- or postnatal life. Four-hundred and eighty dogs, 120 for each age at exposure, received 20 R at 8, 28 or 55 days postcoitus (dpc) or at 2 days postpartum (dpp). Similarity 480 dogs, in groups of 120, were exposed to 100 R at these same ages. Exposures of 100 R were also given to 118 dogs at 70 dpp and 231 dogs at 365 dpp. An additional 359 dogs were sham-irradiated. Mean values for each age at exposure ranged from 15.6 to 17.5 rads for 20 R exposures and from 80.8 to 88.3 rads for exposure to 100 R. Mortality due to neoplasia during the initial ten years of the experiment was examined. Twenty dogs died or were killed because of neoplasia, 19 having been irradiated. Tumours in these 19 irradiated dogs included five malignant lymphomas, eight carcinomas (two of mammary origin, two of prostatic origin, and one each of oral mucosa, ovary, urinary bladder, and thyroid origin), four sarcomas (two haemangiosarcomas, one fibrosarcoma and one mast cell sarcoma), one astrocytoma, and one hepatocellular adenoma. Neoplasms occurred in all irradiated groups except 8 dpc (20 and 100 R) and 70 dpp (100 R). Eleven neoplasms developed in dogs irradiated perinatally (55 dpc or 2 dpp) with 20 or 100 R. Four of the tumours in the perinatally irradiated dogs were detected before two years of age. The earliest death was at three months, due to an astrocytoma. Preliminary analyses point to findings of particular interest: (1) the preponderance of neoplasms causing death or euthanasia occurred in irradiated dogs; (2) the unusual finding of four deaths due to neoplasia before two years of age in perinatally irradiated dogs; and (3) the occurrence of five malignant lymphomas in this relatively small irradiated population

  1. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  2. Modification of radiation-induced sex-linked recessive lethal mutation frequency by tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, C.; Roy, R.M.; Sproule, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of supplementing culture medium with α-tocopherol acetate on the yield of sex-linked recessive lethal mutants induced by X-irradiation in mature sperm of Drosophila. Although tocopherol treatment of males had no impact on the yield of mutations, a drastic reduction in mutation frequency was observed when irradiated males were mated to females raised and subsequently maintained on tocopherol-enriched diet. (orig./MG)

  3. Marrow toxicity of fractionated vs. single dose total body irradiation is identical in a canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storb, R.; Raff, R.F.; Graham, T.; Appelbaum, F.R.; Deeg, H.J.; Schuening, F.G.; Shulman, H.; Pepe, M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors explored in dogs the marrow toxicity of single dose total body irradiation delivered from two opposing 60 Co sources at a rate of 10 cGy/min and compared results to those seen with total body irradiation administered in 100 cGy fractions with minimum interfraction intervals of 6 hr. Dogs were not given marrow transplants. They found that 200 cGy single dose total body irradiation was sublethal, with 12 of 13 dogs showing hematopoietic recovery and survival. Seven of 21 dogs given 300 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to 6 of 10 dogs given 300 cGy fractionated total body irradiation. One of 28 dogs given 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to none of six given fractionated radiation. With granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) administered from day 0-21 after 400 cGy total body irradiation, most dogs survived with hematological recovery. Because of the almost uniform success with GCSF after 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation, a study of GCSF after 400 cGy fractionated total body irradiation was deemed not to be informative and, thus, not carried out. Additional comparisons between single dose and fractionated total body irradiation were carried out with GCSF administered after 500 and 600 cGy of total body irradiation. As with lower doses of total body irradiation, no significant survival differences were seen between the two modes of total body irradiation, and only 3 of 26 dogs studied survived with complete hematological recovery. Overall, therefore, survival among dogs given single dose total body irradiation was not different from that of dogs given fractionated total body irradiation (p = .67). Similarly, the slopes of the postirradiation declines of granulocyte and platelet counts and the rates of their recovery in surviving dogs given equal total doses of single versus fractionated total body irradiation were indistinguishable. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Pedigree analyses of yeast cells recovering from DNA damage allow assignment of lethal events to individual post-treatment generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, F.; Karwan, A.; Wintersberger, U.

    1990-01-01

    Haploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were treated with different DNA damaging agents at various doses. A study of the progeny of individual such cells allowed the assignment of lethal events to distinct post treatment generations. By microscopically inspecting those cells which were not able to form visible colonies the authors could discriminate between cells dying from immediately effective lethal hits and those generating microcolonies probably as a consequence of lethal mutation(s). The experimentally obtained numbers of lethal events were mathematically transformed into mean probabilities of lethal fixations at taking place in cells of certain post treatment generations. Such analyses give detailed insight into the kinetics of lethality as a consequence of different kinds of DNA damage. For example, X-irradiated cells lost viability mainly by lethal hits, only at a higher dose also lethal mutations fixed in the cells that were in direct contact with the mutagen, but not in later generations, occurred. Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-treated cells were hit by 00-fixations in a dose dependent manner. The distribution of all sorts of lethal fixations taken together, which occurred in the EMS-damaged cell families, was not random. For comparison analyses of cells treated with methyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and nitrous acid are also reported

  5. Pulsed Irradiation Studies in Mice, Rats and Dogs; Etudes sur l'Exposition de la Souris, du Rat et du Chien a des Rayonnements Pulses; Impul'snoe obluchenie myshej, krys i sobak; Estudios sobre la Irradiacion Pulsante de Ratones, Ratas y Perros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, E. J.; Leong, G. F.; Kendall, K.; Alpen, E. L.; Albright, M. L. [US Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory. San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1964-05-15

    Radiation lethality as a function of radiation dose rate has been extensively explored over the range of less than one rad to a few hundreds of rad/min, but comparatively little is known of the biological consequences at exposure intensities of the order of 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} rad/min. In the present experiments radiations produced by a TRIGA reactor have been used to study the comparative acute-mortality responses (LD{sub 50}/{sub 30}) of mice and dogs irradiated either at moderate dose rates (40 or 100 rad/min for mice and 23 rad/min for dogs) or by a single high dose-rate radiation pulse ({approx} 10{sup 6} rad/min for mice and {approx}2.0 X 10{sup 5} rad/min for dogs). In the mouse experiments, the LD{sub 50}/{sub 30} of animals exposed at the moderate dose rates of 40 rad of n/min or 100 rad for gamma-radiation/min was not significantly different from the LD{sub 50}/{sub 30} of animals exposed to the same radiation given as a pulsed exposure. Likewise, in acute mortality studies conducted with unilaterally neutron-irradiated dogs, no significant differences in LDso/sowere found between groups irradiated at 23 rad/min or exposed to pulsed dose rates in excess of 1.5 x 10{sup 5} rad/min. Other studies have been conducted to determine if recovery from radiation injury in mice, as estimated by the split-dose irradiation technique, is influenced by the rate at which the initial sublethal injury is produced. Recovery has been compared at 5 and 14 days post-irradiation in groups of animals exposed at either 40 or 9 x 10{sup 4} rad/min and no dose-rate dependency of recovery has been detected. (author) [French] La letalite due aux rayonnements en fonction du debit de dose a fait l'objet d'etudes approfondies dans la gamme des debits comprise entre moins de un rad et plusieurs centaines de rad/min, mais l 'on sait relativement peu de choses sur les consequences biologiques des debits de dose de l 'ordre de 10{sup 5} a 10{sup 6} rad/min. Les auteurs ont utilise les

  6. Effect of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of tobacco (Nicotiana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lethal and sub-lethal bioassays on Clarias gariepinus were conducted to evaluate the toxicity of tobacco (Nicotiana tobaccum) leaf dust on weight gain and haematological indices of Clarias gariepinus (mean weight 10.5±0.70g) in glass aquaria with aeration system. The concentrations used during the lethal exposure are: ...

  7. Experimental treatment of gastrointestinal radiation syndrome in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Bingzhi; Chen Dezheng; Liu Zuobin

    1986-01-01

    Gastrointestinal radiation syndrome occurred in 27 mongrel dogs irradiated with 9-12 Gy of 60 Co γ-rays. Six of them received autologous bone marrow transplantation (auto-BMT), 10 animals were treated with symptomatic and supportive measures only, and the remaining 11 dogs served as controls without any treatment. All animals of the latter two groups died between 3 and 11 days after irradiation without any evidence of hematopoietic recovery. Recovery of gastrointestinal injury was found in 7 dogs treated with symptomatic and supportive measures only. Of 6 dogs having received auto-BMT 2 died 15 days after irradiation, 3 survived over 30 days with recovery of gastrointestinal and hematopoietic injury but died of distemper later, and the other one, still alive, has survived for more than 4 years. The results show that the effective measures for gastrointestinal radiatin syndrome are BMT and symptomatic therapy

  8. Potentiation of radiation lethality by Topotecan, a Topoisomerase I inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamond, J.P.; Kinsella, T.J.; Boothman, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Topotecan is a water soluble Topoisomerase I (Topo I) inhibitor that has demonstrated antineoplastic activity in phase I/II trials of solid tumors (such as non-small cell lung, small cell lung, ovarian, esophageal and head and neck primaries) and leukemias. We sought to determine (1) if Topotecan potentiated the lethal effects of ionizing radiation, and (2) the characteristics of the synergistic effect. Materials and Methods: Human radioresistant melanoma (U1-Mel) and glioma (D54) cells were grown in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DME) with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) until confluence-arrest. Cells were x-irradiated (0-700 cGy) and exposed to various Topotecan concentrations (2-100μM), either before (for 4 hours), during, or after (for 4 hours) irradiation. Appropriate controls were also performed. Survival was determined via colony forming assays. Survival curves were normalized to correct for drug cytotoxicities and variations in initial viable cells plated. In another set of experiments, U1-Mel cells were exposed to 10 μM Topotecan either before, during or after 400 cGy, as described above. A modification of the SDS and KCl assay was used to quantify Topo I-DNA complexes via glass fiber filter binding. All experiments were performed at least 7 times in duplicate. Results: Potentiation of radiation lethality was seen in the U1-Mel and D54 cell lines. The synergistic effects were (1) dependent on drug concentration, with lethality enhancement and minimal drug lethality alone in the 2-10 μM range (2) dependent on timing, with synergy present only when the drug was present at the time of, or shortly after irradiation, and (3) irreversible, with inhibition of potential lethal damage repair (PLDR). The dose enhancement ratios (DER) for 4 μM Topotecan in the U1-Mel cells was 1.7 - 2.4, depending on the survival endpoints that were used. The DER for 2 μM Topotecan in D54 cells was 3.0 - 4.0. The U1-Mel cells that were exposed to Topotecan

  9. Cat and Dog Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wellness Staying Healthy Pets and Animals Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites Share Print Cat and dog bites are common injuries. A family pet or ... bites. Path to safety If a cat or dog bites you, you should: Wash the wound gently ...

  10. A linear-quadratic model of cell survival considering both sublethal and potentially lethal radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutz, H.P.; Coucke, P.A.; Mirimanoff, R.O.

    1991-01-01

    The authors assessed the dose-dependence of repair of potentially lethal damage in Chinese hamster ovary cells x-irradiated in vitro. The recovery ratio (RR) by which survival (SF) of the irradiated cells was enhanced increased exponentially with a linear and a quadratic component namely ζ and ψ: RR=exp(ζD+ψD 2 ). Survival of irradiated cells can thus be expressed by a combined linear-quadratic model considering 4 variables, namely α and β for the capacity of the cells to accumulate sublethal damage, and ζ and ψ for their capacity to repair potentially lethal damage: SF=exp((ζ-α)D+ (ψ-β)D 2 ). author. 26 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  11. DogPulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Christoffer; Thomsen, Josephine Raun; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents DogPulse, an ambient awareness system to support the coordination of dog walking among family members at home. DogPulse augments a dog collar and leash set to activate an ambient shape-changing lamp and visualize the last time the dog was taken for a walk. The lamp gradually...... changes its form and pulsates its lights in order to keep the family members aware of the dog walking activity. We report the iterative prototyping of DogPulse, its implementation and its preliminary evaluation. Based on our initial findings, we present the limitations and lessons learned as well...

  12. Effects of whole-body, ionizing radiation on the semen in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Six beagle dogs were exposed to a total dose of 183 R of gamma radiation at a dose rate of 1 R/day, while three other dogs were exposed to a single dose of 100 R. Weekly semen analysis was performed on all irradiated dogs plus four nonirradiated dogs. Semen volume, sperm concentration, total sperm count, sperm motility and sperm head morphometry were examined. Dogs exposed to chronic radiation showed a severe decline in sperm numbers, detected after seven weeks of exposure. Sperm concentration and total sperm count were the first parameters affected and were the only parameters consistently affected. The dogs exposed to 100 R as a single dose, did not show a significant decline in sperm numbers. During a 36 week recovery period, the chronically irradiated dogs did show a slight increase in sperm numbers, but they never approached pre-exposure levels

  13. Dogs catch human yawns

    OpenAIRE

    Joly-Mascheroni, Ramiro M; Senju, Atsushi; Shepherd, Alex J

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first to demonstrate that human yawns are possibly contagious to domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). Twenty-nine dogs observed a human yawning or making control mouth movements. Twenty-one dogs yawned when they observed a human yawning, but control mouth movements did not elicit yawning from any of them. The presence of contagious yawning in dogs suggests that this phenomenon is not specific to primate species and may indicate that dogs possess the capacity for a rudimentary f...

  14. Experimental studies on the influence of irradiation (60Co) on wound healing of colonic suture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Munehiro

    1980-01-01

    Effects of preoperative 60 Co irradiation on wound healing of colonic suture in adult dogs of mixed breed were discussed. Wound healing 7 days after colonic suture was compared among dogs which received colonic suture immediately, or 3 days, or 7 days after the 60 Co irradiation. As a result, there was not a big difference in their wound healing among these dogs, and disorders of wound healing were not found. Bursting pressure at sutured sites was always lower in irradiated dogs than controls. Recovery of the bursting pressure was 2 days slower in irradiated dogs than non-irradiated dogs for 7 days after the suture. Bursting pressure was the lowest on the 3rd day after the suture in both groups. As to fine changes in irradiated dogs, appearance of recommunicating phenomena in blood vessels, delay of a decrease in avascular regions, delay of granulation, and hypertrophy of vascular walls seemed to be influenced by 60 Co irradiation, but there was not a big difference in these results between irradiated and non-irradiated dogs. An increase in postoperative concentration of hydroproline tended to be little lower in irradiated dogs than controls, which seemed to be influenced by the 60 Co irradiation. This result was also suggested from delay of granulation and remaining inflammations. Effects of 60 Co irradiation on wound healing of colonic suture seemed to be slight generally, because ruptured suture scarecely occurred in the irradiated dogs. When doses used in this experiment were calculated roughly by Ellis's method, irradiation of 60 Co seemed not to influence seriously wound healing if the total of 2,000 to 2,500 rad was irradiated in 8 to 10 doses to human colon. (Tsunoda, M.)

  15. Factors influencing circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, R C; Bozigian, H P; Davies, M H; Merrick, B A; Park, K S; McMillan, D A

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of changes in lighting schedules and food consumption on circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels in male mice. Under a normal lighting schedule (light: 06.00-18.00 h), male mice exhibited a circadian rhythm in acetaminophen lethality (peak: 18.00 h; nadir: 06.00, 10.00 h) and an inverse rhythm in hepatic glutathione concentrations (peak: 06.00, 10.00 h; nadir: 18.00 h). Under a reversed lighting schedule (light: 18.00-06.00 h) the glutathione rhythm was reversed and the rhythm in acetaminophen lethality was altered showing greater sensitivity to the drug. Under continuous light, there was a shift in the acetaminophen lethality and the hepatic glutathione rhythms. Under continuous dark, both rhythms were abolished. Under a normal lighting regimen, hepatic glutathione levels were closely correlated with food consumption; i.e., both were increased during the dark phase and decreased during the light phase. Fasting the mice for 12 h abolished the rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels; moreover, the lethality was increased and the hepatic glutathione levels were decreased. These experiments show that both lighting schedules and feeding can alter the circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels in male mice.

  16. Transporting Patients with Lethal Contagious Infections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swartz, Colleen

    2002-01-01

    .... The AIT is a unique military medical team capable of worldwide air evacuation and management of a limited number of patients who are potentially exposed to known and unknown lethal communicable...

  17. Hygiene assessment of irradiated potato mutagenic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uralova, M.; Grunt, J.; Patzeltova, N.

    1977-01-01

    Albino rat males were fed on gamma-irradiated potatoes for one month and mated with two intact female rats each. The dominant lethal mutation method was then used for the study of possible mutagenic activity of the irradiated potatoes. No statistically significant differences were observed and no mutagenic activity was found. Thus, the test showed that potatoes irradiated with a dose of 10 krad of gamma radiation does not present genetic hazards for albino rats. (L.O.)

  18. Qualitative dose response of the normal canine head to epithermal neutron irradiation with and without boron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHaan, C.E.; Gavin, P.R.; Kraft, S.L.; Wheeler, F.J.; Atkinson, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is being re-evaluated for the treatment of intracranial tumors. Prior to human clinical trials, determination of normal tissue tolerance is critical. Dogs were chosen as a large animal model for the following reasons. Dogs can be evaluated with advanced imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Dogs are amenable to detailed neurologic examination and subtle behavioral changes are easily detected. Specifically, Labrador retrievers were chosen for their large body and head size. The dogs received varying doses of epithermal neutron irradiation and boron neutron capture irradiation using an epithermal neutron source. The dogs were closely monitored for up to one year post irradiation

  19. Be your dog

    OpenAIRE

    Bartram, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Be Your Dog is about establishing relationships beyond the hierarchies of pet and owner. This saw participants and their dogs attend workshops over two consecutive weekends to learn how to establish empathy, equality and connection. This included learning strategies for dog and human to ‘be’ equals with each other. A concluding public event was staged at KARST (Plymouth) following the workshops on 6 November 2016 where all participants, human and dog, performed as collaborators. This proj...

  20. Thyroid neoplasia in beagles receiving whole-body irradiation during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, L.C.; Norrdin, R.W.; Hargis, A.M.; Benjamin, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty malignant and 17 benign thyroid neoplasms have been diagnosed in 37 Segment III beagles. Nine males and 8 females had follicular adenomas, and 7 males and 13 females had thyroid carcinomas. The dogs ranged in age from 5.16 to 10.66 years. Twenty-nine of the 37 dogs (78.4 percent) were hypothyroid. Twenty-six (70.3 percent) dogs were irradiated. Of the 26 irradiated dogs 15 had malignant tumors. Fourteen (37.8 percent) of the 37 dogs had the same sire

  1. Lethality Index 2008-2014: Less shootings, same lethality, more opacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Silva Forné

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the use of lethal force by Mexican federal security forces during shootings with presumed members of organized crime from 2008-2014. The authors use official data and press reports on deaths and wounded in shootings to construct indicators such as the number of dead civilians over the number of dead officials from the federal security forces and the number of dead civilians over the number of wounded civilians. In a context where certain factors that contribute to an excessive use of force become more common, the results of the study show a growing use of lethal force. This raises questions over the possible excessive use of lethal force as a normal or systematic practice. The study also shows a growing context of opacity in the information available to evaluate the use of lethal force and the general lack of a legal framework to regulate the use of lethal force in Mexico.

  2. The effects of radiation dose-rate and quality on the induction of dominant lethals in mouse spermatids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, A.G.; Beechey, G.V.

    1981-01-01

    Hybrid male mice were given 3 Gy (300 rad) doses of X- or γ-irradiation at dose-rates of either 0.6 or 0.002 Gy/min for each radiation. Germ-cells treated as spermatids were tested for dominant lethality. Effects on spermatogonia were evaluated by studying testis-weight, sperm-count and sperm abnormalities. The rate of induction of dominant lethal mutations was 2.1 times as high after acute X-irradiation as after protracted γ-irradiation. Most of this difference resulted from the change in radiation quality, since the relative effectiveness of X- versus γ-irradiation was 1.9 at low and 1.6 at high dose rates. For each radiation, however, fewer dominant lethals were induced at low dose-rates than at high (low/high ratios of 0.8 and 0.9 respectively) although differences did not reach a significant level. There were no statistically significant effects of dose rate on testis-weight of sperm-count in the X-ray series, but there were significantly less severe effects on both with protraction of the γ-irradiation. Evidence for effects of radiation quality on these characters was conflicting. Frequencies of abnormal spermatozoa were markedly increased 7 weeks after irradiation but there were no consistent effects of radiation intensity or quality. (orig.)

  3. Spatially-explicit modelling model for assessing wild dog control strategies in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large predators can significantly impact livestock industries. In Australia, wild dogs (Canis lupus familiaris, Canis lupus dingo, and hybrids) cause economic losses of more than AUD $40M annually. Landscape-scale exclusion fencing coupled with lethal techniques is a widely pract...

  4. Genetic evidence of subaortic stenosis in the Newfoundland dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reist-Marti, S B; Dolf, G; Leeb, T; Kottmann, S; Kietzmann, S; Butenhoff, K; Rieder, S

    2012-06-09

    Subaortic stenosis (SAS) is a cardiac disorder with a narrowing of the descending aorta below the left ventricular outflow tract of the heart. It occurs in several species and breeds. The Newfoundland is one of the dog breeds where it is more common and usually leads to death at early adulthood. It is still discussed to which extent SAS has a genetic background and what its mode of inheritance could be. Extensive pedigree data comprising more than 230,000 Newfoundland dogs from the European and North American population reaching back to the 19th century including 6023 dogs with a SAS diagnosis were analysed for genetic factors influencing SAS affection. The incidence and prevalence of SAS in the analysed Newfoundland population sample were much higher than those reported in previous studies on smaller population samples. Assuming that some SAS-affected dogs remained undiscovered or were not reported, these figures may even be underestimated. SAS-affected Newfoundland dogs were more often inbred and closer related to each other than unaffected dogs, which is an indicator for a genetic background of SAS. The sex had no significant impact on SAS affectedness, pointing at an autosomal inheritance. The only simple mode of inheritance that fitted the data well was autosomal codominant with lethal homozygosity and a penetrance of 1/3 in the heterozygotes.

  5. Dietary hyperthyroidism in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, B; Stengel, C; Neiger, R

    2012-03-01

    Evaluation of dogs with elevated plasma thyroxine concentration fed raw food before and after changing the diet. Between 2006 and 2011 all dogs presented with an elevated plasma thyroxine concentration and a dietary history of feeding raw food were included. Thyroxine (reference interval: 19·3 to 51·5 nmol/L) and in many cases also thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations (reference interval: weight loss, aggressiveness, tachycardia, panting and restlessness while six dogs had no clinical signs. After changing the diet eight dogs were examined: thyroxine concentration normalised in all dogs and clinical signs resolved. Dietary hyperthyroidism can be seen in dogs on a raw meat diet or fed fresh or dried gullets. Increased plasma thyroxine concentration in a dog, either with or without signs of hyperthyroidism, should prompt the veterinarian to obtain a thorough dietary history. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  6. Mutagenic effects of irradiated glucose in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, M.B.; Rao, K.P.; Nandan, S.D.; Rao, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    The mutagenic effects of irradiated glucose were studied using the sex-linked recessive lethal test in Drosophila melanogaster. Oregon K males of D. melanogaster reared on a medium containing 20 or 40% glucose irradiated with a dose of 0.02, 0.10, 0.20, 2 or 5 Mrad #betta#-rays were scored for the induction of sex-linked recessive lethals. The results showed no significant increase in the frequency of X-lethals in Drosophila at any of the dose levels. (author)

  7. The effect of 60Co γ-rays irradiation on seeds and branches of Euonymus fortunei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao Yan; Inner Mongolia Agriculture Univ., Huhhot; Zhang Guosheng; Lu Renqiang; Pan Qinghua

    2006-01-01

    Seeds and plant branches of Euonymus fortunei were irradiated with 60 Co γ-ray. The results showed that after irradiation, seed germination rate, emergence rate and surviving rate were restrained, and it was negatively correlated with irradiation dose increasing significantly. The first euphylis period was delayed compared with control. Seedling height decreased with the increase of irradiation dose. Semi-lethal dose of Euonymus fortunei seeds was 128.56 Gy. Branch irradiation could cause significantly number and length reduced, and it is correlated with irradiation dose increasing. The semi-lethal dose for Euonymus fortunei branches was 95.54 Gy. (authors)

  8. Dogs recognize dog and human emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Natalia; Guo, Kun; Wilkinson, Anna; Savalli, Carine; Otta, Emma; Mills, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The perception of emotional expressions allows animals to evaluate the social intentions and motivations of each other. This usually takes place within species; however, in the case of domestic dogs, it might be advantageous to recognize the emotions of humans as well as other dogs. In this sense, the combination of visual and auditory cues to categorize others' emotions facilitates the information processing and indicates high-level cognitive representations. Using a cross-modal preferential looking paradigm, we presented dogs with either human or dog faces with different emotional valences (happy/playful versus angry/aggressive) paired with a single vocalization from the same individual with either a positive or negative valence or Brownian noise. Dogs looked significantly longer at the face whose expression was congruent to the valence of vocalization, for both conspecifics and heterospecifics, an ability previously known only in humans. These results demonstrate that dogs can extract and integrate bimodal sensory emotional information, and discriminate between positive and negative emotions from both humans and dogs. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Survival of allografts from bone marrow donors in temporary dog radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.

    Complete radiation chimeras accept indefinitely a skin or a kidney graft from the bone marrow (BM) donor. The advantages of this method of inducing graft acceptance are that it does not require the use of toxic post-operative immunosuppressive agents and that the immune reactivity against antigens other than the ones carried by the BM donor remains intact. The disadvantages of this approach are that supralethal total body irradiation (TBI) causes toxicity and that allogeneic BM cells can cause lethal Graft versus Host reactions. Attempts were made to diminish the significance of these disadvantages by using lower dose TBI and giving fewer BM cells. It is shown that, in dogs, 7.5 Gy TBI followed by 4 X 10 8 BM cells.kg -1 body weight of a DLA identical sibling leads to the development of complete radiation chimeras. The exclusive presence of donor type haemopoiesis can be demonstrated by determinations of 'informative' genetic markers, i.e., markers that show different genotypes in donor and recipient. (Auth.)

  10. Inhaled /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ and/or total-body gamma radiation: Early mortality and morbidity in rats and dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipy, R.E.; Decker, J.R.; Lai, Y.L.; Lauhala, K.E.; Buschbom, R.L.; Hiastala, M.P.; McGee, D.R.; Park, J.F.; Kuffel, E.G.; Ragan, H.A.; Cannon, W.C.; Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1988-08-01

    Rats and beagle dogs were given doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation and/or body burdens of /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ within lethal ranges in an experiment to determine and compare morbidity and mortality responses of both species within 1 year after exposure. Radiation-induced morbidity was assessed by measuring changes in body weights, hematologic parameters, and pulmonary-function parameters. Gamma radiation caused transient morbidity, reflected by immediately depressed blood cell concentrations and by long-term loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function in animals of both species that survived the acute gamma radiation syndrome. Inhaled plutonium caused a loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function in both species, but its only effect on blood cell concentrations was lymphocytopenia in dogs. Combined gamma irradiation and plutonium lung burdens were synergistic, in that animals receiving both radiation insults had higher morbidity and mortality rates than would be predicted based on the effect of either kind of radiation alone. Plutonium lung burdens enhanced the effect of gamma radiation in rats within the first 30 days of exposure, and gamma radiation enhanced the long-term effect of plutonium lung burdens in both species. Rats were less sensitive to both kinds of radiation, whether administered alone or in combination. 71 refs., 105 figs., 48 tabs.

  11. Inhaled 239PuO2 and/or total-body gamma radiation: Early mortality and morbidity in rats and dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipy, R.E.; Decker, J.R.; Lai, Y.L.

    1988-08-01

    Rats and beagle dogs were given doses of 60 Co gamma radiation and/or body burdens of 239 PuO 2 within lethal ranges in an experiment to determine and compare morbidity and mortality responses of both species within 1 year after exposure. Radiation-induced morbidity was assessed by measuring changes in body weights, hematologic parameters, and pulmonary-function parameters. Gamma radiation caused transient morbidity, reflected by immediately depressed blood cell concentrations and by long-term loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function in animals of both species that survived the acute gamma radiation syndrome. Inhaled plutonium caused a loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function in both species, but its only effect on blood cell concentrations was lymphocytopenia in dogs. Combined gamma irradiation and plutonium lung burdens were synergistic, in that animals receiving both radiation insults had higher morbidity and mortality rates than would be predicted based on the effect of either kind of radiation alone. Plutonium lung burdens enhanced the effect of gamma radiation in rats within the first 30 days of exposure, and gamma radiation enhanced the long-term effect of plutonium lung burdens in both species. Rats were less sensitive to both kinds of radiation, whether administered alone or in combination. 71 refs., 105 figs., 48 tabs

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Amish lethal microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 in 500 newborns in the Old Order Amish population of Pennsylvania. It has not been found outside this population. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic ... gene cause Amish lethal microcephaly . The SLC25A19 gene provides instructions for ...

  13. The evolution of lethal intergroup violence

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Raymond C.

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings and analyses in evolutionary biology, archaeology, and ethnology provide a favorable conjuncture for examining the evolution of lethal intergroup violence among hominids during the 2.9-million-year Paleolithic time span. Here, I seek to identify and investigate the main turning points in this evolutionary trajectory and to delineate the periodization that follows from this inquiry.

  14. The evolution of lethal intergroup violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Raymond C

    2005-10-25

    Recent findings and analyses in evolutionary biology, archaeology, and ethnology provide a favorable conjuncture for examining the evolution of lethal intergroup violence among hominids during the 2.9-million-year Paleolithic time span. Here, I seek to identify and investigate the main turning points in this evolutionary trajectory and to delineate the periodization that follows from this inquiry.

  15. A new lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingston, H.M.; Freeman, J.S.; Hall, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    A neonate is described with a lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia associated with prenatal fractures and craniofacial abnormalities including microcephaly, exophthalmos, hypoplastic nose and mid-face, small jaw and nodular hyperplasia of the gums. Parental consanguinity suggests that an autosomal recessive mutation is the likely aetiology. (orig.)

  16. Caffeine and D sub 2 O medium interact in affecting the expression of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, H. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Radiation Biology Center); Elkind, M.M. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Radiological Health Sciences)

    1991-10-01

    Earlier work has been extended to compare the killing of long-phase V79 Chinese hamster cells by ionizing radiation when they are treated immediately after irradiation with medium containing either caffeine or 90% D{sub 2}O. The object was to determine if the enhanced killing due to post-treatment with caffeine, or D{sub 2}O, resulted from action on the same sector of potentially lethal damage as appeared to be the case for hypertonic shock and D{sub 2}O medium. The treatments by themselves were not toxic to unirradiated cells. We found that the enhanced expression of potentially lethal damage by post-treatment with caffeine or D{sub 2}O medium is similar. For example, the kinetic of the repair of the potentially lethal damage expressible by either post-treatment was similar, and an additive enhancement of potentially lethal damage occurred when the two treatments were administered sequentially. These findings suggest that caffeine and D{sub 2}O medium affect the same sector of potentially lethal damage. When the two treatments were combined, however, they competed with each other. Thus, although caffeine and D{sub 2}O medium act on the same sector of potentially lethal damage they do so differently, suggesting that more than one pathway of the expression of radiation damage can result in the same phenotypic effect. (author).

  17. Caffeine and D2O medium interact in affecting the expression of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1991-01-01

    Earlier work has been extended to compare the killing of long-phase V79 Chinese hamster cells by ionizing radiation when they are treated immediately after irradiation with medium containing either caffeine or 90% D 2 O. The object was to determine if the enhanced killing due to post-treatment with caffeine, or D 2 O, resulted from action on the same sector of potentially lethal damage as appeared to be the case for hypertonic shock and D 2 O medium. The treatments by themselves were not toxic to unirradiated cells. We found that the enhanced expression of potentially lethal damage by post-treatment with caffeine or D 2 O medium is similar. For example, the kinetic of the repair of the potentially lethal damage expressible by either post-treatment was similar, and an additive enhancement of potentially lethal damage occurred when the two treatments were administered sequentially. These findings suggest that caffeine and D 2 O medium affect the same sector of potentially lethal damage. When the two treatments were combined, however, they competed with each other. Thus, although caffeine and D 2 O medium act on the same sector of potentially lethal damage they do so differently, suggesting that more than one pathway of the expression of radiation damage can result in the same phenotypic effect. (author)

  18. Reproductive ability of female dogs (beagles) surviving a single, midlethal, whole-body x-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, A.C.; Rosenblatt, L.S.

    1976-01-01

    The ability of 82 irradiated and sham-treated female beagles to whelp and wean pups was tested over a major portion of their reproductive life span. The dogs were exposed to 290 or 300 R of x rays (250 kVp) either as young pups, prior to puberty, or at puberty. Although all of the irradiated dogs were fertile and produced approximately the same number of litters as controls, litters of the pup irradiated and prepubertal irradiated dams surviving throughout the study were smaller than those of controls by 17 and 9 percent, respectively. Pup survival was also reduced relative to controls; the number of pups weaned was 38 percent lower in the pup irradiated group and 18 percent lower in the prepubertal irradiated group, as compared with controls. The overall reproductive ability of dogs irradiated at puberty was similar to that of sham-treated controls

  19. The role of cell progression in potentiation of radiation lethality by hyperthermia and by chemical means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djordjevic, B.; Lange, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    Aerobic stationary dense cultures of HeLa cells show very little potentiation of radiation lethality when irradiated cells are incubated with procaine HCl for two hours at 37 0 C, but if cells are diluted in fresh medium after irradiation and incubated for two hours with procaine, a high degree of radiopotentiation is obtained. This effect is not cell density dependent, since the addition of heavily irradiated cells to achieve comparable densities did not diminish lethality in the diluted culture. Procaine radiopotentiation at 37 0 C could be prevented by simultaneous administration with procaine of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Since cycloheximide inhibits cell cycle progression (with block points in G1 and G2) progression is strongly implicated in the phenomenon of radiopotentiation. Cell progression may be also involved in hyperthermic radiopotentiation: adding cycloheximide during heating of irradiated cells at 41 0 C for two hours increased survival. This effect of cycloheximide is even more pronounced in cells also treated with procaine during heating, thus diminishing the interaction of heat and procaine in radiopotentiation. Data pertaining to cell progression in synchronous cultures of HeLa cells under various treatment conditions are presented and discussed

  20. Repair in schizosaccharomyces pombe as measured by recovery from caffeine enhancement of radiation-induced lethality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Werner, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    Inhibition of DNA repair by caffeine is manifested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe wild-type cells as an enhancement of UV- or γ-irradiation-induced lethality. The progress of DNA repair processes involving one or more caffeine-sensitive steps may be conveniently followed by measuring the concomitant decrease of this lethal enhancement effect. By measuring, during post-irradiation incubation, the ability of cells to overcome susceptibility to repair inhibition by caffeine, we have determined the time course and requirements for repair in S. pombe. Recovery began immediately and took 150-200 min after γ-irradiation and more than 500 min after UV-irradiation, for exposures which gave about 10% survival in the absence of caffeine. An incubation medium capable of supporting growth was required for caffeine-sensitive repair; no recovery occurred under liquid holding conditions. Survival curves after various recovery times indicated that a logarithmic phase cell population was homogeneous with respect to caffeine-sensitive repair of both UV- and γ-ray-induced damage. Recovery from caffeine inhibition was compared for cells of different physiological states (logarithmic and stationary phase); although the importance of the physiological state was not the same for the two types of radiation, recovery was found to occur more rapidly in the more radiation-resistant state, in each case. (orig.) [de

  1. Total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    An outline review notes recent work on total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) as a means of preparing patients for grafts and particularly for bone-marrow transplantation. T.L.I. has proved immunosuppressive in rats, mice, dogs, monkeys and baboons; when given before bone-marrow transplantation, engraftment took place without, or with delayed rejection or graft-versus-host disease. Work with mice has indicated that the thymus needs to be included within the irradiation field, since screening of the thymus reduced skin-graft survival from 50 to 18 days, though irradiation of the thymus alone has proved ineffective. A more lasting tolerance has been observed when T.L.I. is followed by an injection of donor bone marrow. 50% of mice treated in this way accepted allogenic skin grafts for more than 100 days, the animals proving to be stable chimeras with 50% of their peripheral blood lymphocytes being of donor origin. Experiments of a similar nature with dogs and baboons were not so successful. (U.K.)

  2. Quantitative aspects of repair of potentially lethal damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, G.; Pohlit, W.

    1979-01-01

    Stationary cultures of Ehrlich ascites tumour cells were irradiated with X-rays and then immediately or after a time interval tsub(rep) plated to measure the survival. The increase in survival observed after delayed plating was interpreted as repair of potentially lethal damage. A cybernetic model was used to analyse these data. Three states of damage were assumed for the cells. In state A the cells could grow to macrocolonies, in state B the cells suffered potentially lethal damage and could grow to macrocolonies only if they were allowed to repair the damage and in state C the cells were lethally damaged. A method of deriving the values of the parameters of the model from the experimental data was given. The dependence of the reaction rate constant of the repair potentially lethal damage on the dose D was used to derive a possible mechanism for the production of the shoulder in the dose effect curve. Finally this model was compared with other models of radiation action in living cells. (author)

  3. Interaction of radiation, Dihydroxyanthraquinone, and Adriamycin on the induction of acute lethality in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimler, B.F.; Cox, G.G.; Reddy, E.K.

    1984-01-01

    The acute lethality induced by combinations of radiation, Dihydroxyanthraquinone (DHAQ), and Adriamycin (ADR) was investigated in mice. Whole-body irradiation produced acute lethality, with an LD-50/30 of approximately 6.5 Gy. ADR and DHAQ produced LD-50/30's of 14 and 4 mg/kg, respectively. When 10 mg/kg doses were fractionated into 5 x 2 mg/kg daily doses, both drugs were equally or more efficient at producing mortality, 90% by day 30. When 4 Gy radiation was combined with 5 mg/kg ADR or 5 mg/kg DHAQ, a response no greater than that produced by drug alone was obtained. However, when 5 mg/kg ADR was administered concomitantly with 5 mg/kg DHAQ, there was a less-than-additive induction of lethality, resulting in only 21% mortality by day 20. ADR and DHAQ (at doses of 5 mg/kg) were combined but with a 1 day interval between drugs, the protective effect was lost and animals died earlier than after either agent alone. At present, no definite explanation is available for this unusual protective effect of ADR against acute lethality induced by DHAQ

  4. Comparative study of different sexis mutability: recessive sex-linked and dominant lethals in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatti, K.V.; Dzhaparidze, L.A.; Mamon, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    The frequency of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations (RSLLM) and those realizing in embryogenesis of dominant lethals, which form in oo- and spermatogenesis of Drosophila and fly productivity under the effect of X-rays and N-nitroso-N methylourea (NMU), is studied. In the case of effect of both mutagens RSLLM form in spermatocytes with higher frequency as compared with oocytes. Dominant lethal mutations (DLM) during irradiation are also often registered in spermatocytes. NMU induces DLM in mitotic male cells with a very high frequency but is not effective during the effect on oocytes. When both mutagens affect males and X-rays affect females, the decrease of productivity is mainly conditioned by DLM. As NMU does not induce DLM in females realizing in embryogenesis but reduces productivity, a later lethal realization connected with their different nature is supposed. Differences in mole and female mutability found in the course of X-ray and NMU effect are discussed in connection with peculiarities of their mitotic cells and the nature of effect of mutagens applied [ru

  5. Lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Yim, Chung Ik; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1986-01-01

    We have detailed our experiences on 6 cases of neonatal lethal short-limbed dwarfism and reviewed the articles. They include, achondrogenesis, thanatophoric dysplasia, asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfect a congenita, and hypophosphatasia lethals. Five babies were born alive but died soon after birth and one was a stillbirth. The main cause of failure to thrive was respiratory insufficiency. Each case was having quite characteristic radiologic findings, even if the general appearances were similar to the achondroplasts clinically. Precise diagnosis is very important for genetic counselling of the parents and alarm to them the possibility of bone dysplasias to the next offsprings. For this purpose, the radiologists play major role for the correct diagnosis. We stress that when the baby is born with short-limbed dwarfism, whole body radiogram should be taken including lateral view and postmortem radiogram is also very precious.

  6. Lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Yim, Chung Ik; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    We have detailed our experiences on 6 cases of neonatal lethal short-limbed dwarfism and reviewed the articles. They include, achondrogenesis, thanatophoric dysplasia, asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfect a congenita, and hypophosphatasia lethals. Five babies were born alive but died soon after birth and one was a stillbirth. The main cause of failure to thrive was respiratory insufficiency. Each case was having quite characteristic radiologic findings, even if the general appearances were similar to the achondroplasts clinically. Precise diagnosis is very important for genetic counselling of the parents and alarm to them the possibility of bone dysplasias to the next offsprings. For this purpose, the radiologists play major role for the correct diagnosis. We stress that when the baby is born with short-limbed dwarfism, whole body radiogram should be taken including lateral view and postmortem radiogram is also very precious.

  7. Mining of lethal recessive genetic variation in Danish cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    in fertility. The primary objective of this PhD projekt was to identify recessive lethal gentic variants in the main Danish dairy cattle breed. Holstein-Friesian utilzing next generation sequencing (NGS) data. This study shows a potential for the use of the NGS-based reverse genetic approach in identifying...... lethal or semi-lethal recessive gentic variation...

  8. Lethal midline granuloma syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle; Oliveira, Ana Luiza Vianna Sobral de Magalhaes; Marchon Junior, Joao Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The rare lethal midline granuloma syndrome is difficult to diagnose because of the wide array of related diseases and lack of knowledge by the majority of physicians. In the present report, the authors describe the case of a patient with this disease, caused by squamous cell carcinoma, drawing attention to differential diagnoses and to clinical and radiological findings that may be useful to define the diagnosis. (author)

  9. Lethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocene

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-P?rez, Ana; Pablos, Adri?n; Mart?nez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M.; G?mez-Olivencia, Asier; Berm?dez de Castro, Jos? Mar?a; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force ...

  10. Lethal midline granuloma syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle [Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (HUCFF-UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Ana Luiza Vianna Sobral de Magalhaes [Resident of Medical Practice, Hospital Federal da Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marchon Junior, Joao Luiz [Unit of Computed Tomography, Hospital Federal da Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    The rare lethal midline granuloma syndrome is difficult to diagnose because of the wide array of related diseases and lack of knowledge by the majority of physicians. In the present report, the authors describe the case of a patient with this disease, caused by squamous cell carcinoma, drawing attention to differential diagnoses and to clinical and radiological findings that may be useful to define the diagnosis. (author)

  11. Splenitis in 33 Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, F; Zini, E; Auriemma, E; Castagnaro, M; Coppola, L M; Peano, A; Martella, V; Decaro, N; Kuhnert, P; Ferro, S

    2017-01-01

    Splenitis is uncommonly reported in dogs. Herein, the authors describe its prevalence, clinical findings and outcomes, histologic patterns, and causes. Splenic samples of dogs diagnosed with splenitis between 2005 and 2013 were collected and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Gram, green-Gram, Giemsa, periodic acid-Schiff, and Ziehl-Neelsen. Samples were processed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect bacteria, fungi, and protozoa ( Leishmania infantum, Hepatozoon canis). Thirty-three of 660 splenic samples (5%) had splenitis. Clinical findings and outcomes were available in 19 dogs (58%); 49% had weakness, 33% had fever, and 84% survived. The most frequent inflammatory patterns included purulent splenitis (27%), pyogranulomatous splenitis (24%), and neutrophilic perisplenitis (15%). One dog had a putative diagnosis of primary splenitis; in 8 dogs, microorganisms were identified histologically or by PCR in the spleen without obvious comorbidities. Twenty-four dogs (73%) had concurrent diseases; a permissive role in the development of splenitis was suspected in 21 of these cases. Histologic examination identified the cause of splenitis in 10 dogs. Bacteria were identified by PCR in 23 cases, but the bacteria were confirmed histologically in only 6 of these. Leishmania was detected with PCR in 6 dogs. Leishmania was identified in 1 dog and H. canis in another histologically, but both were PCR negative. Fungi were identified in 8 spleens by PCR and in 1 by histology. This study suggests that splenitis is uncommon in dogs and is frequently associated with systemic diseases. Prognosis is favorable in most cases. Identification of bacteria, fungi, and protozoa in the spleens of affected dogs with PCR should be interpreted cautiously, because the findings are not confirmed histologically in many cases.

  12. Derangement of cellular plasma membranes due to non-lethal radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.; Kubasova, T.; Somosy, Z.; Horvath, L.

    1983-01-01

    Earlier observations in the laboratory on fibroblasts and various blood cells of animal and human origins pointed to alteration of concanavalin A binding sites of plasma membranes as well as to concomitant morphological changes and scanning electron microscopic appearance of cell surfaces following sub-lethal doses of X-, fission neutron and beta irradiations. The effects appeared early and existed temporarily; their intensities and the restitution of membrane function depended on radiation doses, types and conditions of cells. In the present paper further aspects of structural and functional derangements of plasma membranes are introduced which were provoked by X- and tritium beta irradiation in the dose range up to 2.5 Gy and in the concentration range from 3.7 kBq/mL, respectively. The state of membrane structure was followed by bindings of various ligands of different receptor requirements, concanavalin A, cationized ferritin and polio virus. In the case of X-irradiation the binding conditions suggest the shift of overall negative surface charges to less negative ones. It was also found that radiation-induced phenomena appear on the cell surface unevenly. Long- and short-term treatments of cells with 3 H-thymidine and 3 H-water also perturb the plasma membrane; beta irradiation affects it directly. Membrane structure and function are suggested to offer good biological models to study correlation of energy deposition and biological effects, both restricted to domains of nanometre range. The data give evidence for radiation-induced membrane alterations in the sub-lethal or non-lethal ranges which might have consequences in the development of stochastic and non-stochastic effects. (author)

  13. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohemi Sala

    Full Text Available Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  14. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  15. Feeding Studies of Irradiated Foods with Insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaharanu, Srisan

    1978-06-15

    Insects are of value to man in many scientific studies. Microsomal detoxication systems exist in both insects and mammals. In the preliminary investigations it was found that irradiated cocoa beans and white and red kidney beans (Phaseolus spp.) did not significantly change the percentage of egg-hatch in the insects tested. In more detailed investigations food samples that are susceptible to insect spoilage and are representatives of widely consumed human foods were fed to various insect species. The development, sex distortion and reproductivity of the insects were investigated. Cytogenetic aberrations as related to dominant lethality were studied in insects with reasonably clear chromosomal patterns. The meiosis stage was examined, using the squash technique and Aceto-orcein staining. Black beans, Phaseolus spp., irradiated with up to 200 krad of gamma rays did not apparently change the percentage of survival and the sex ratio of the bean weevil, Zabrotes subfasciatus. Dominant lethality in the German cockroach, Blatella germanica, fed on irradiated black beans did not apparently occur when considering the results of cytological investigation and the number of offspring obtained. Dried sardine samples irradiated with up to 400 krad of gamma rays neither apparently affected the survival nor caused sex distortion in the cheese skipper, Piophila casei. This irradiated product apparently did not induce dominant lethality in the German cockroach as tested. Coffee processed from coffee beans that had been irradiated with up to 100 krad of gamma rays did not apparently cause adverse effects on the experimental insects. (author)

  16. Feeding studies of irradiated foods with insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaharanu, S.

    1978-01-01

    Insects are of value to man in many scientific studies. Microsomal detoxication systems exist in both insects and mammals. In the preliminary investigations it was found that irradiated cocoa beans and white and red kidney beans (Phaseolus spp.) did not significantly change the percentage of egg-hatch in the insects tested. In more detailed investigations food samples that are susceptible to insect spoilage and are representatives of widely consumed human foods were fed to various insect species. The development, sex distortion and reproductivity of the insects were investigated. Cytogenetic aberrations as related to dominant lethality were studied in insects with reasonably clear chromosomal patterns. The meiosis stage was examined, using the squash technique and Aceto-orcein staining. Black beans, Phaseolus spp., irradiated with up to 200 krad of gamma rays did not apparently change the percentage of survival and the sex ratio of the bean weevil, Zabrotes subfasciatus. Dominant lethality in the German cockroach, Blatella germanica, fed on irradiated black beans did not apparently occur when considering the results of cytological investigation and the number of offspring obtained. Dried sardine samples irradiated with up to 400 krad of gamma rays neither apparently affected the survival nor caused sex distortion in the cheese skipper, Piophila casei. This irradiated product apparently did not induce dominant lethality in the German cockroach as tested. Coffee processed from coffee beans that had been irradiated with up to 100 krad of gamma rays did not apparently cause adverse effects on the experimental insects. (author)

  17. High detection rate of dog circovirus in diarrheal dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Han-Siang; Lin, Ting-Han; Wu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Lee-Shuan; Chung, Cheng-Shu; Chiou, Ming-Tang; Lin, Chao-Nan

    2016-06-17

    Diarrhea is one of the most common clinical symptoms reported in companion animal clinics. Dog circovirus (DogCV) is a new mammalian circovirus that is considered to be a cause of alimentary syndromes such as diarrhea, vomiting and hemorrhagic enteritis. DogCV has previously only been identified in the United States, Italy, Germany (GeneBank accession number: KF887949) and China (GeneBank accession number: KT946839). Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of DogCV in Taiwan and to explore the correlation between diarrhea and DogCV infection. Clinical specimens were collected between 2012 and 2014 from 207 dogs suffering from diarrhea and 160 healthy dogs. In this study, we developed a sensitive and specific SYBR Green-based real-time PCR assays to detected DogCV in naturally infected animals. Of the analyzed fecal samples from diarrheal dogs and health dogs, 58 (28.0 %) and 19 (11.9 %), respectively, were DogCV positive. The difference in DogCV prevalence was highly significant (P = 0.0002755) in diarrheal dogs. This is the first study to reveal that DogCV is currently circulating in domestic dogs in Taiwan and to demonstrate its high detection rate in dogs with diarrhea.

  18. Dominance in domestic dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, Van Der J.A.M.; Schilder, M.B.H.; Vinke, C.M.; Vries, De Han; Petit, Odile

    2015-01-01

    A dominance hierarchy is an important feature of the social organisation of group living animals. Although formal and/or agonistic dominance has been found in captive wolves and free-ranging dogs, applicability of the dominance concept in domestic dogs is highly debated, and quantitative data are

  19. Estimation of the contribution of ionization and excitation to the lethal effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petin, V.G.; Komarov, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A simple theoretical model is proposed for estimating the differential contribution of ionization and excitation to the lethal effect of ionizing radiation. Numerical results were obtained on the basis of published experimental data on the ability of bacterial cells Escherichia coli to undergo photoreactivation of radiation-induced damage. It was shown that inactivation by excitation may be highly significant for UV-hypersensitive cells capable of photoreactivation; inactivation by excitation increased with the energy of ionizing radiation and the volume of irradiated suspensions. The data are in qualitative agreement with the assumption of a possible contribution of the UV-component of Cerenkov radiation to the formation of excitations responsible for the lethal effect and the phenomenon of photoreactivation after ionizing radiation. Some predictions from the model are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Scopolamine methylbromide mitigates radiation induced damage and lethality in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Nitisha; Joshi, Jayadev; Ghosh, Subhajit; Dimri, Manali; Prem Kumar, Indracanti; Sehgal, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    In view of the strategic importance radiation countermeasures hold, the present study was undertaken to screen a collection of small molecule clinical compounds for possible radioprotective action using zebrafish as a model system. Preliminary screening in developing zebrafish embryos (24 hour post fertilization, (hpf)) using damage manifestations and survival as end point identified scopolamine methylbromide (SMB), a muscarinic receptor antagonist, as a potential radiomitigator. It was found to be optimal (60% survival advantage after 6 th post irradiation day) at a dose of 80 μM when added 3 h post 20 Gy exposure. Mechanistic studies suggested that SMB though exhibited no significant antioxidant potential, but was found to limit radiation induced apoptosis (pre G1 population) quantified through flow cytometry (6 and 5% reduction after 8 or 24 h after treatments) and annexin V staining (8% reduction). Further, quantitative analysis, using caspase 3 assay, revealed a 2.46 fold increase in apoptosis in irradiated group and treatment of irradiated zebrafish embryos with SMB led to a significant reduction in global apoptosis (1.7 fold; p<0.05) when compared to irradiated group. In silico studies based on structural and functional similarity with known radioprotectors suggested similarities with atropine, a known anti-inflammatory agent with muscarinic antagonism and radioprotective potential. In view of this SMB was tested, in silico, for possible anti-inflammatory action. Molecular docking studies revealed that SMB interacts (B.E-8.0 Kcal/mole) with cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2). In lieu of this, anti-inflammation activity was assessed through ChIN (chemically induced inflammation) method in 3 dpf (days post fertilization) embryos and SMB was found to significantly inhibit inflammation at all doses studied from 20-200 μM at 3 and 6 hpi (hours post inflammation). Overall the result suggests that scopolamine methylbromide mitigates radiation induced injury and lethality in

  1. Dominant lethal effect of gamma radiation of 60Co in Biomphalaria glabrata (SAY, 1818)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallarico, Lenita de Freitas

    2003-01-01

    Germ cell mutations are used in ecotoxicological studies as biomarkers of population effects and indicators of ecological changes. Biomphalaria glabrata, a freshwater mollusk, is a good experimental model for biomonitoring studies due to its biological characteristics and the ecological importance of this invertebrate group. The dominant lethal test was established in B. glabrata for the detection of germ cell mutations. Results with chemical mutagens showed that this system is efficient, specific and sensitive in the evaluation of germ cell mutations induced by reference mutagens. In this work, the dominant lethal effects of gamma radiation of 60 Co were studied. A preliminary experiment was done to establish the dose range and to estimate the chronology of spermatogenesis in B. glabrata. This estimate is possible because of the uniformity in response to ionizing radiation between germ cells at homologous stages of spermatogenesis in widely different species. In general, pre-meiotic germ cells are less sensitive to the induction of lethal dominant mutations than post-meiotic cells. This effect can be attributed to: young gametogenic cells - mitotically active - have greater repair ability from sub-lethal DNA damage and there is a selective elimination of the damaged cells. In our system: induction of lethal dominant mutations causes an increase in the frequency of malformations and, cytotoxic effect is displayed as a reduction in the crossing rates. Total duration of spermatogenesis was estimated in approximately 36 days, with the following distribution of stages: 1 to 13 days - spermatogonia, 14 to 20 days - spermatocytes, 21 to 36 days - spermatids and spermatozoa. Based on this chronology, irradiated wild-type snails with 2,5; 10 and 20Gy and crossed with non-irradiated albino snails after 7, 17, 23, 30 and 36 days. The frequencies of malformations in the heterozygous wild-type offspring of the nonirradiated albino snails were used as indicator of germ cell

  2. Seed irradiation with continuously increasing doses of thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlik, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Pittermann, P.

    1977-01-01

    In the 'Raman' pea cv. the biological activity of thermal neutrons was investigated after irradiation of a 780 mm column of seeds for 3000 and 4167 seconds with a flux of 5.607 x 10 9 n.cm -2 per second. For different fractions of the seed column the average density of the neutron flux was calculated. It was proved that for the described method of seed irradiation it was sufficient to determine only the dose approaching the lethal dose. If a sufficiently high column of seeds is used part of the column of seeds will be irradiated with the optimum range of doses. The advantages of the suggested method of irradiation are not only smaller time and technological requirements resulting from the need for the determination of only the critical lethal dose of radiation by means of inhibition tests performed with seedlings, but also a simpler irradiation procedure. The suggested method of irradiation is at least nine times cheaper. (author)

  3. Evaluation of lethal effect of microwave exposure on protoscolices of hydatid cyst in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Eslamirad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the lethal effect of microwave radiation on protoscolices of hydatid cyst. Methods: The protoscolices were divided in two separate groups. The first group received continuous irradiation while the second group received repetitive irradiation. According to the exposure time, the first and the second groups were divided into 8 subgroups. Non-treated protoscolices were considered as the control in each experiment. The protoscolex mortality rate was calculated, and changes in temperature difference in protoscolex suspension before and after the irradiation and the mortality rate with the increase of exposure time were recorded. Results: The results showed that microwave was able to increase the mortality rate of protoscolices in hydatid cyst. The mortality rate from 20% in 20 s of continuous exposure was increased to 100% in 50 s. Also, the differences between the mortality rates in subgroups of the first and the second groups and the control were significant (P < 0.001. Although the effect of temperature change in repetitive irradiation was not significant, non-thermal repetitive irradiation effects were obviously stronger than the thermal continuous irradiation effects. Conclusions: It seems that, microwaves especially in the repetitive mode, may be used as a supplementary measure for both treatment and prevention of hydatidosis.

  4. Effects of 0.5 - 2 Gy gamma-rays on physical activities and intellectual behavior in dogs and influence of physical exertion on clinical manifestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingxi; Li Chunhai; Jin Cuizhen

    1988-01-01

    A comparison of 88 pre-radiation and 433 post-radiation determinations demonstrated that 0.5∼2.0 Gy gamma irradiated police dogs could keep a good condition in physical performances such as 100-metre dash with or without load and 1.5∼5 km long-distance running with a load of 1/5 body weight. No detectable change could be found in intellectual behavior including performances in response to vocal or gestural command, discrimination of metronomic frequencies, differentiation between handkerchiefs from different persons, trailing, guarding and memory in any one of these dogs. As compared with 6 police dogs and 3 mongrel dogs kept at rest after irradiation, 7 police dogs and 3 mongrel dogs and 3 mongrel dogs undergoing above mentioned physical exertion showed fewer and milder symptoms and higher white

  5. Oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity of Escherichia coli and mitigation in lethality by superoxide dismutase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Taeko; Yamaguchi, Hikoyuki; Yano, Keiji

    1978-01-01

    Oxygen-dependent radiosensitivity of Escherichia coli W3623 his - was confirmed. Regarding cellular superoxide dismutase (SOD), cells grown oxically gained higher activity than those anoxically, however, the reinforced enzyme level could not compensate the oxygen effect, i.e., the enhanced lethal effect of oxic γ-irradiation. Rather, the enhancement of oxygen effect was found in cells grown oxically compared with those anoxically. Oxygen enhanced lethality was mitigated to the extent by the amount of added SOD into the cell suspension to be irradiated. The results supported a proposal that superoxide anion, O 2 - , is involved in the oxygen effect, with the most likely site of the damage in the outer structure of cell but not in the cell matrix. Reverse oxygen effect could be found with lambda phage DNA in transfecting ability. Added SOD protected phage DNA somewhat in oxic irradiation. While considerable protections were found in anoxic one with the added SOD even autoclaved but their function was still unknown. (auth.)

  6. Wholesomeness study of irradiated salted and dried mackerel in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anukarahanonta, T.; Temcharoen, P.; Nagara, B.N.; Chudhabuddhi, C.; Bhamarapravati, N.

    1981-01-01

    A long-term multigeneration study was performed of the wholesomeness of irradiated salted and dried mackerel fed to the rats of Wistar strain and revealed no significant evidence that would impose a hazard attributable to irradiation with respect to the longevity, carcinogenecity, teratogenicity, dominant lethal, reproductive function and biophysiological function. Some abnormalities that were noted could be explained on the basis of differences in food quality due to the addition of fish protein and minerals rather than the irradiation effect

  7. Irradiation effects on the variability of yield characteristics of soybeans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasztor, K.; Egri, K.; Toeroek, Z.; Bornemiszane, P.P.

    1983-01-01

    The seeds of soybean varieties 'Merit' and 'S-1346' were irradiated by fast neutrons with doses between 4 and 174 Gy. The doses in the range of 57-174 Gy proved to be lethal. After low dose irradiation, shorter breeding time and the stimulation of plant growth could be observed. The effects of irradiation on the oil and protein contents of soybeans were contradictory. (V.N.)

  8. Immune reactivity after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassmann, W.; Wottge, H.U.; von Kolzynski, M.; Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.

    1986-01-01

    Immune reactivity after total-body irradiation was investigated in rats using skin graft rejection as the indicator system. After sublethal irradiation with 10.5 Gy (approximately 50% lethality/6 weeks) the rejection of major histocompatibility complex allogeneic skin grafts was delayed significantly compared with nonirradiated control animals (28 versus 6.5 days). In contrast, skin grafts were rejected after 7.5 days in sublethally irradiated animals and 7 days in lethally irradiated animals if additional skin donor type alloantigens--namely, irradiated bone marrow cells--were given i.v. either simultaneously or with a delay of not more than 24 hr after the above conditioning regimen. These reactions were alloantigen-specific. They were observed in six different strain combinations with varying donors and recipients. Starting on day 2 after irradiation, i.v. injection of bone marrow gradually lost its effectivity and skin grafts were no longer rejected with uniform rapidity; skin donor marrow given on days 4 or 8 did not accelerate skin graft rejection at all. These data show that for approximately 1-2 days after high-dose total-body irradiation rats are still capable of starting a vigorous immune reaction against i.v.-injected alloantigens. The phenomenon of impaired rejection of skin grafted immediately after high-dose irradiation appears to result from the poor accessibility of skin graft alloantigens during the early postirradiation phase when vascularization of the grafted skin is insufficient

  9. Prolongation of experimental islet transplant survival by fractionated splenic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, E.; Casanova, M.; Largiader, F.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments designed to delay the rejection of intrasplenic pancreatic fragment allotransplants in dogs showed increased transplant survival times from 3.1 days (controls) to 5.5 days with fractionated splenic irradiation and to 7.5 days with combined local irradiation and immunosuppressive chemotherapy. Drug treatment alone had no beneficial effect

  10. Functional and morphologic damage in the neonatally irradiated canine kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peneyra, R.S.; Jaenke, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    Perinatal irradiation of the developing kidney results in progressive glomerulosclerosis (PGS) and renal failure. This syndrome may result from direct radiation damage to mature deep cortical nephrons and/or nephron functional adaptations resulting from outer cortical nephron ablation. Beagle dogs received single, whole-body exposures (330 R) to 60 Co gamma radiation at 4 days of age (IR4) to study the combined effects of direct radiation damage and nephron loss, or at 30 days of age (IR30) to study the effects of renal irradiation alone. To study the effects of nephron loss alone, dogs underwent unilateral nephrectomy (UN4) or superficial hyperthermic renal ablation (HY4) at 4 days of age. Nephron loss due to irradiation (IR4) and partial renal ablation (UN4 and HY4) was associated with compensatory nephron hypertrophy and increased single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR), while irradiation at 30 days resulted in transitory decreased SNGFR. Similar degrees of PGS occurred in IR4 dogs which experienced both irradiation and loss of nephrons and UN4 and HY4 dogs which experienced only loss of nephrons. PGS of lesser severity also occurred in IR30 dogs. These findings indicate that PGS associated with perinatal renal irradiation results from direct radiation damage to deep cortical nephrons and compensatory functional changes occurring in response to loss of renal mass

  11. Hyperthermic radiosensitization of synchronous Chinese hamster cells: relationship between lethality and chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, W.C.; Sapareto, S.A.; Betten, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    Synchronous Chinese hamster cells in vitro were obtained by mitotic selection. The cells were heated at 45.5 0 C for 4 min in mitosis, 11 min in G 1 , or 7 min in S sphase and then x-irradiated immediately thereafter. Colony survival from heat alone was 0.30 to 0.45, and the frequency of chromosomal aberrations induced by heat was 0.00, 0.14, or 0.97 for heat treatments during M, G 1 , or S, respectively. As shown previously, lethality from hyperthermia alone is due to chromosomal aberrations only when the cells are heated during S phase. The log survival (D 0 /sup approximately/ = 80 rad) and aberration frequency curves for cells irradiated during mitosis were linear, and the only effect of hyperthermia was to shift the curves in accord with the effect from heat alone. Thus, hyperthermia did not radiosensitize the mitotic cells. The cells irradiated in G 1 were more resistant (D 0 /sup approximately/ = 100 rad) than those irradiated in mitosis, and the survival and aberration frequency curves both had shoulders. The primary effect of hyperthermia was to greatly reduce the shoulders of the curves and to increase the slopes by about 23%. The cells irradiated in S were the most resistant (D 0 /sup approximately/ = 140 rad), and the survival and aberration frequency curves both had large shoulders. For both end points of lethality and chromosomal aberrations, heat selectively radiosensitized S-phase cells relative to G 1 cells by removing most of the shoulder and increasing the slope by about 45%. For cells treated in G 1 or S, the increase in radiosensitization following hyperthermia can be accounted for by an increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations

  12. Lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) and other lethal arthrogryposes in Finland--an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkasjärvi, Niklas; Ritvanen, Annukka; Herva, Riitta; Peltonen, Leena; Kestilä, Marjo; Ignatius, Jaakko

    2006-09-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by multiple contractures with an estimated frequency of 1 in 3,000 births. With improving diagnostic methods, increasing numbers of fetuses with arthrogryposis are found. The pathogenetic mechanisms are relatively well known but the epidemiology and genetics of the prenatally lethal forms of arthrogryposis are less well known. In this study we collected all cases of a multiple contractures diagnosed in Finland during 1987-2002 including live born infants, stillbirths, and terminated pregnancies. Ninety-two cases of 214 suffered intrauterine demise (68 selective pregnancy terminations and 24 stillbirths) and 58 died in infancy. In 141 out of these cases the diagnosis could be included within lethal arthrogryposes, with a prevalence of 1 in 6,985 (1.43/10,000) births. Of these, 59 had spinal cord pathology at autopsy and thus were of neurogenic origin. Thirty-nine cases had lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) clinically characterized by total immobility of the fetus at all ultrasound examinations (12 weeks or later), multiple joint contractures in both upper and lower limbs, hydrops, and fetal death before the 32nd week of pregnancy. LCCS is noted as a unique Finnish disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 25,250 (0.40/10,000) births and is a major cause of lethal arthrogryposis in Finland.

  13. Suicide Intent and Accurate Expectations of Lethality: Predictors of Medical Lethality of Suicide Attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory K.; Henriques, Gregg R.; Sosdjan, Daniella; Beck, Aaron T.

    2004-01-01

    The degree of intent to commit suicide and the severity of self-injury were examined in individuals (N = 180) who had recently attempted suicide. Although a minimal association was found between the degree of suicide intent and the degree of lethality of the attempt, the accuracy of expectations about the likelihood of dying was found to moderate…

  14. Enhanced sensitivity to the lethal and mutagenic effects of photosensitizing action of chlorpromazine in ethylenediaminetetraacetate-treated Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, S.; Todo, T.

    1982-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) treatment of Escherichia coli H/r30 (Arg - ) enhanced cell sensitivity to the lethal and mutagenic effects of the photosensitizing action of chlorpromazine (CPZ). The most obvious effect of EDTA on the fluence-survival curve was an elimination of the shoulder. In the absence of EDTA, CPZ plus near-UV radiation did not induce the reversion from arginine-auxotroph to autotroph of E. coli H/r30. However, when EDTA (5 mM)-treated cells were subjected to CPZ plus near-UV radiation, the induced reversion frequency increased with time of irradiation. It is concluded that the enhanced penetration of CPZ into E. coli cells by EDTA facilitates the drug binding to DNA within the cells upon near-UV irradiation and that this is the cause for the enhanced photosensitized lethal and mutagenic effects of CPZ. (author)

  15. Lethal doses of ionizing radiation versus endogenous level of superoxide dismutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipecka, K; Domanski, T; Dniaszewska, K; Grabowska, B; Pietrowicz, D; Lindner, P; Cisowska, B; Gorski, H [Military Medical Academy, Lodz (Poland). Inst. of Occupational Medicine

    1982-06-22

    The stability of superoxide dismutase (SOD) as well as its activity distribution in a human population were investigated. The SOD activity level of the erythrocytes proved to be an index for the endogenous SOD activity in the whole body. In a rat population, having similar SOD frequency distribution as a human population, the mortality due to acute irradiation depended on the SOD level; after a single acute dose approximating the lethal dose (LD/sub 50/30/) the survival depended distinctly on the endogenous SOD activity level.

  16. New Therapeutic Possibilities of the Post-Irradiation Haemorrhagic Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisil, J.; Dienstbier, Z. [Institute of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of General Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czechoslovak Socialist Republic (Czech Republic); Skala, E. [Central Military Hospital, Prague-Stresovice, Czechoslovak Socialist Republic (Czech Republic)

    1969-10-15

    Haemorrhagic diathesis is one of the dominant symptoms of acute post-irradiation lesion. Haemorrhagic syndrome is caused by the disturbance of haemocoagulation during simultaneous lesion of the vascular system. In our study we have tried to affect the post-irradiation haemocoagulation disturbance. Epsilon- amino-caproic acid (EACA) administered between the 8{sup th} and the 18{sup th} day (0.4 g/kg per day) to whole- body irradiated dogs (600 R) partially regulated the post-irradiation disturbance of haemocoagulation. The favourable effect of EACA was verified by in vitro experiments in which the blood of irradiated dogs was used. A repeated administration of EACA in the dose of 0.4 g/kg per day to whole-body irradiated rats (600 R) did not substantially affect the post-irradiation changes in the number of white blood elements; however, its administration to healthy animals caused lymphocytosis. In whole-body irradiated dogs (600 R) we have found lower levels of EACA in the blood up to the 8 day following irradiation as compared with healthy dogs after oral application of EACA. The whole-body irradiation of mice did not increase the acute toxicity of EACA. The daily administration of 0.4 g EACA/kg to whole-body irradiated mice (600 and 700 R) did not change the mortality induced by irradiation. The authors consider EACA to be a suitable compound for a complex therapy of radiation sickness. The administration of para-amino-methyl-benzoic acid (PAMBA), in spite of a certain improvement of postirradiation haemocoagulation disturbance, is less efficient. Our recent experiments with ellagic acid which significantly affects the post-traumatic haemorrhage in whole-body irradiated rats seem to be very promising. (author)

  17. Lethal domestic violence in eastern North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, M G; Spence, P R; Spence, R L

    2000-01-01

    Strategies for preventing domestic violence can be tailored to a particular geographic or socioeconomic area if the patterns of domestic violence in the area are known. National statistics, although widely available, may not be applicable to a specific region. We reviewed homicide deaths in Eastern North Carolina between 1978 and 1999 to identify patterns in this rural area. Approximately 20% of the homicide deaths in eastern North Carolina are caused by intimate partners. Women accounted for 53% of the victims in 1976, similar to national figures but not rising to 72% as seen nationally in 1998. Latinos are an increasing presence in the area, but had only one recorded episode of lethal violence against an intimate partner. Gunshots accounted for most of the deaths (59% in men, 72% in women). Knowledge of such patterns can assist in selecting prevention strategies for this particular area. Over the last 25 years increasing attention has been devoted to domestic violence (DV), initially defined as abuse committed against a spouse, former spouse, fiancée, boy- or girlfriend, or cohabitant. As time has passed, the definition has been broadened to include other family members--elders, children, and siblings. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now uses the term "intimate partner violence" for intentional emotional or physical abuse inflicted by a spouse, ex-spouse, a present or former boy- or girlfriend, or date. For the purposes of this paper, we consider DV interchangeable with intimate partner violence. There has been a national concern that abusive events are under-reported. The National Crime Victimization Survey, an anonymous household survey, indicated nearly 1 million incidents of non-lethal intimate partner violence per year between 1992 and 1996. The number decreased from 1.1 million in 1993 to 840,000 in 1996. Attempts to validate such data for a given geographic area often require subjects to violate anonymity--this may account for lower

  18. Genetic effects of feeding irradiated wheat to mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayalaxmi

    1976-01-01

    The effects of feeding irradiated wheat in mice on bone marrow and testis chromosomes, germ cell numbers and dominant lethal mutations were investigated. Feeding of freshly irradiated wheat resulted in significantly increased incidence of polyploid cells in bone marrow, aneuploid cells in testis, reduction in number of spermatogonia of types A, B and resting primary spermatocytes as well as a higher mutagenic index. Such a response was not observed when mice were fed stored irradiated wheat. Also there was no difference between the mice fed un-irradiated wheat and stored irradiated wheat. (author)

  19. Dog and owner demographic characteristics and dog personality trait associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubinyi, Eniko; Turcsán, Borbála; Miklósi, Adám

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships between four personality traits (calmness, trainability, dog sociability and boldness) of dogs (Canis familiaris) and dog and owner demographics on a large sample size with 14,004 individuals. German speaking dog owners could characterize their dog by filling out a form on the Internet. There were five demographic variables for dogs and nine for owners. Two statistical methods were used for investigating the associations between personality and demographic traits: the more traditional general linear methods and regression trees that are ideal for analyzing non-linear relationships in the structure of the data. The results showed that calmness is influenced primarily by the dog's age, the neutered status, the number of different types of professional training courses (e.g. obedience, agility) the dog had experienced and the age of acquisition. The least calm dogs were less than 2.5 years old, neutered and acquired after the first 12 weeks of age, while the calmest dogs were older than 6.9 years. Trainability was affected primarily by the training experiences, the dog's age, and the purpose of keeping the dog. The least trainable dogs had not received professional training at all and were older than 3 years. The most trainable dogs were those who participated in three or more types of professional training. Sociability toward conspecifics was mainly determined by the age, sex, training experience and time spent together. The least sociable dogs were older than 4.8 years and the owners spent less than 3h with the dog daily. The most sociable dogs were less than 1.5 years old. Males were less sociable toward their conspecifics than females. Boldness was affected by the sex and age of the dog and the age of acquisition. The least bold were females acquired after the age of 1 year or bred by the owner. The boldest dogs were males, acquired before the age of 12 weeks, and were younger than 2 years old. Other variables

  20. Biochemical aspects of the immunomodular action in irradiated survival mice with 60C gama irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Agudo, N.L. del M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The radioprotective action of Calmetti-Guerin bacillus (BCG), Corynebacterium parvum, Escherichia coli Lipopolysccharides (LPS) and peptone proteose was evaluated. A single injection of the macrophage activiting agents prior to 60 Co whole-body irradiation increased the survival rate of mice in the lethal dose range. (L.M.J.) [pt

  1. Jealousy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christine R; Prouvost, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that jealousy is unique to humans, partially because of the complex cognitions often involved in this emotion. However, from a functional perspective, one might expect that an emotion that evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers might exist in other social species, particularly one as cognitively sophisticated as the dog. The current experiment adapted a paradigm from human infant studies to examine jealousy in domestic dogs. We found that dogs exhibited significantly more jealous behaviors (e.g., snapping, getting between the owner and object, pushing/touching the object/owner) when their owners displayed affectionate behaviors towards what appeared to be another dog as compared to nonsocial objects. These results lend support to the hypothesis that jealousy has some "primordial" form that exists in human infants and in at least one other social species besides humans.

  2. Platelet function in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line A.; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Pedersen, Henrik D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Clinical studies investigating platelet function in dogs have had conflicting results that may be caused by normal physiologic variation in platelet response to agonists. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate platelet function in clinically healthy dogs of 4...... different breeds by whole-blood aggregometry and with a point-of-care platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), and to evaluate the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administration on the results from both methods. Methods: Forty-five clinically healthy dogs (12 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels [CKCS], 12...... applied. However, the importance of these breed differences remains to be investigated. The PFA-100 method with Col + Epi as agonists, and ADP-induced platelet aggregation appear to be sensitive to ASA in dogs....

  3. Sniffer dogs unleashed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-07

    A 10-year conservation project to restore the native bird populations of South Georgia has involved eradicating invasive rodent species. As Daniel Gillett explains, specially trained sniffer dogs are an important part of 'team rat'. British Veterinary Association.

  4. How dogs drink water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gart, Sean; Socha, Jake; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2014-11-01

    Animals with incomplete cheeks (i.e. dogs and cats) need to move fluid against gravity into the body by means other than suction. They do this by lapping fluid with their tongue. When a dog drinks, it curls its tongue posteriorly while plunging it into the fluid and then quickly withdraws its tongue back into the mouth. During this fast retraction fluid sticks to the ventral part of the curled tongue and is drawn into the mouth due to inertia. We show several variations of this drinking behavior among many dog breeds, specifically, the relationship between tongue dynamics and geometry, lapping frequency, and dog weight. We also compare the results with the physical experiment of a rounded rod impact onto a fluid surface. Supported by NSF PoLS #1205642.

  5. Efficacy of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing Leishmania Antigen against Leishmania Challenge in Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuichi Miura

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV vaccination confers long-term protection against CDV reinfection. To investigate the utility of CDV as a polyvalent vaccine vector for Leishmania, we generated recombinant CDVs, based on an avirulent Yanaka strain, that expressed Leishmania antigens: LACK, TSA, or LmSTI1 (rCDV-LACK, rCDV-TSA, and rCDV-LmSTI1, respectively. Dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK were protected against challenge with lethal doses of virulent CDV, in the same way as the parental Yanaka strain. To evaluate the protective effects of the recombinant CDVs against cutaneous leishmaniasis in dogs, dogs were immunized with one recombinant CDV or a cocktail of three recombinant CDVs, before intradermal challenge (in the ears with infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major. Unvaccinated dogs showed increased nodules with ulcer formation after 3 weeks, whereas dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK showed markedly smaller nodules without ulceration. Although the rCDV-TSA- and rCDV-LmSTI1-immunized dogs showed little protection against L. major, the cocktail of three recombinant CDVs more effectively suppressed the progression of nodule formation than immunization with rCDV-LACK alone. These results indicate that recombinant CDV is suitable for use as a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine for protection against both CDV and L. major infections in dogs.

  6. Efficacy of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing Leishmania Antigen against Leishmania Challenge in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ryuichi; Kooriyama, Takanori; Yoneda, Misako; Takenaka, Akiko; Doki, Miho; Goto, Yasuyuki; Sanjoba, Chizu; Endo, Yasuyuki; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Sugai, Akihiro; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccination confers long-term protection against CDV reinfection. To investigate the utility of CDV as a polyvalent vaccine vector for Leishmania, we generated recombinant CDVs, based on an avirulent Yanaka strain, that expressed Leishmania antigens: LACK, TSA, or LmSTI1 (rCDV-LACK, rCDV-TSA, and rCDV-LmSTI1, respectively). Dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK were protected against challenge with lethal doses of virulent CDV, in the same way as the parental Yanaka strain. To evaluate the protective effects of the recombinant CDVs against cutaneous leishmaniasis in dogs, dogs were immunized with one recombinant CDV or a cocktail of three recombinant CDVs, before intradermal challenge (in the ears) with infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major. Unvaccinated dogs showed increased nodules with ulcer formation after 3 weeks, whereas dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK showed markedly smaller nodules without ulceration. Although the rCDV-TSA- and rCDV-LmSTI1-immunized dogs showed little protection against L. major, the cocktail of three recombinant CDVs more effectively suppressed the progression of nodule formation than immunization with rCDV-LACK alone. These results indicate that recombinant CDV is suitable for use as a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine for protection against both CDV and L. major infections in dogs.

  7. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soothill, R.

    1987-01-01

    The issue of food irradiation has become important in Australia and overseas. This article discusses the results of the Australian Consumers' Association's (ACA) Inquiry into food irradiation, commissioned by the Federal Government. Issues discussed include: what is food irradiation; why irradiate food; how much food is consumer rights; and national regulations

  8. Effects of chronic radiation exposure on the reproduction of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shifrine, M.; Kawakami, T.G.; Rasmussen, C.

    1984-01-01

    During studies on radiation leukemogenesis 7 dogs were exposed to 4.4 R/day starting at 150 days of age. Three of these dogs were females. To determine whether the exposure to chronic irradiation affected their reproductive capacity the three bitches were bred. Two of the bitches did not conceive, and one of these died shortly thereafter from myeloproliferative disease (MPD) which could have been a factor. The third bitch whelped 7 pups, one of which died shortly after birth, and the other 6 are healthy 2 months after birth. 1 table

  9. Changes in some blood lipid fractions in whole-body irradiated rats as influenced by some radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousri, R.M.; Roushdy, H.; Gawish, M.A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of sublethal and lethal total body gamma irradiation on some serum lipid fractions in male rats was investigated. The protective efficacy of estradiol and/or α-tocopherol was also studied. The results of this study demonstrate that the lethally irradiated rats showed significant alteration in serum triglycerides, cholesterol, total lipids and phospholipids level. Estradiol exerted a benefical effect on lipid fractions after one and two days post lethal α-irradiation (8 Gy). No consistent radioprotective effect of tocopherol could be detected on the levels of serum lipid fractions. This finding was also observed when both radioprotectors were used. (orig.) [de

  10. Tolerance of bile duct to intraoperative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Tepper, J.; Travis, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    In order to determine the effects of intraoperative radiation therapy of the bile duct and surrounding tissues, seven adult dogs were subjected to laparotomy and intraoperative irradiation with 11 MeV electrons. Two animals were treated at each dose level of 2000, 3000, and 4500 rads. A single dog which received a laparotomy and sham irradiation served as a control. The irradiation field consisted of a 5 cm diameter circle encompassing the extrahepatic bile duct, portal vein, hepatic artery, and lateral duodenal wall. The animals were followed clinically for mor than 18 months after treatment, and autopsies were performed on dogs that died to assess radiation-induced complications or tissue damage. All dogs developed fibrosis and mural thickening of the common duct, which appeared by 6 weeks following irradiation and which was dose-related, being mild at low doses and more severe at high doses. Hepatic changes were seen as early as 6 weeks after irradiation, consisting of periportal inflammation and fibrosis. The hepatic changes appeared earliest at the highest doses. Frank biliary cirrhosis eventually developed at all dose levels. Duodenal fibrosis appeared in the irradiation portal, being most severe at the highest doses and in some animals resulting in duodenal obstruction. No changes were observed in irradiated portions of portal vein and hepatic artery at any dose level. It was concluded that intraoperative radiation therapy delivered to the region of the common duct leads to ductal fibrosis, partial biliary obstruction with secondary hepatic changes, and duodenal fibrosis if bowel wall is included in the field. Clinical use of intraoperative radiation therapy to the bile duct in humans may require routine use of biliary and duodenal bypass to prevent obstructive complications

  11. Enhanced lethal effect of combined ACNU with x-ray on cultured HeLaS3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Haruyuki; Miyamoto, Tadaaki

    1983-01-01

    The combined effects of ACNU and X-irradiation on cultured HeLaS 3 cells were investigated. Pretreatment with either ACNU or X-ray induced a substantial reduction in shoulder width the D 0 value of the dose-response curve for the other agent, given later was unchanged. ACNU did not inhibit the recovery of sublethal damage (SLD) induced by X-ray when this treatment preceded the spilit-dose experiment. Our results indicate that some cell damage induced by each agent is transmissible to the progeny of the surviving cells and that the interaction of ACNU and X-irradiation was lethal to the cells. (author)

  12. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review of food irradiation and lists plants for food irradiation in the world. Possible applications for irradiation are discussed, and changes induced in food from radiation, nutritional as well as organoleptic, are reviewed. Possible toxicological risks with irradiated food and risks from alternative methods for treatment are also brought up. Ways to analyze weather food has been irradiated or not are presented. 8 refs

  13. Estimation of mutation rates induced by large doses of gamma, proton and neutron irradiation of the X-chromosome of the nematode Panagrellus redivivus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denich, K.T.R.; Samoiloff, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation-resistant free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus was used to study mutation rates in oocytes, following gamma, proton and neutron irradiation in the dose range 45-225 grays. γ-Radiation produced approximately 0.001 lethal X-chromosomes per gray over the range tested. Proton or neutron irradiation produced approximately 0.003 lethal X-chromosomes per gray at lower doses, with the mutation rate dropping to 0.001 lethal X-chromosome per gray at the higher doses. These results suggest a dose-dependent mutation-repair system. Cell lethality was also examined. γ-Radiation produced the greatest amount of cell lethality at all doses, while neutron irradiation had no cell lethal effect at any of the doses examined. (orig.)

  14. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T. (ROB, DCT, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (US))

    1991-05-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the {alpha} and {beta} terms reflect lethal damage created {ital during} the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD.

  15. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T.

    1991-01-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the α and β terms reflect lethal damage created during the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with ''unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD

  16. Influence of thorax irradiation on lactic dehydrogenase isoenzyme activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle, C.; Munnich, A.; Pasquier, C.

    The right hemi-thorax of rats was irradiated with 1200 and 3000 rads ( 60 Co) and blood samples were taken sequentially. The five lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes which have proved to be useful as biochemical indicators of acute pulmonary injury in other experimental animals (dogs), were assayed, after irradiation, as a function of time and as a functon of dose. There was no significant change in LDH isoenzyme activities after lung irradiation in rats [fr

  17. Computed tomography of lethal medline granuloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Suk; Kim, Tae Ho; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duk Sik

    1991-01-01

    In order to clarify the CT findings of lethal midline granuloma (LMG) diagnosed clinically or histopathologically, the authors retrospectively analyzed 12 patients who were seen at Kyungpook National University Hospital from February 1985 to August 1989. CT showed nasal mucosal thickening and / or soft tissue mass (9 case), spreading of the lesions along the facial subcutaneous fat plane (8 cases), invasion into the paranasal sinuses (5 cases), bone destruction (5 cases), nasopharyngeal mass lesion (2 cases), and extension of the lesion into the infratemporal fossa (1 case). In spite of the fact that CT does not make definitive diagnosis of LMG, it permits evaluation of the extent of the lesion, detection of the combined lesion, differential diagnosis, and close monitoring of its evolution under treatment

  18. Ants defend aphids against lethal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Charlotte; Agrawal, Anurag A.; Hajek, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    Social insects defend their own colonies and some species also protect their mutualist partners. In mutualisms with aphids, ants typically feed on honeydew produced by aphids and, in turn guard and shelter aphid colonies from insect natural enemies. Here we report that Formica podzolica ants tending milkweed aphids, Aphis asclepiadis, protect aphid colonies from lethal fungal infections caused by an obligate aphid pathogen, Pandora neoaphidis. In field experiments, bodies of fungal-killed aphids were quickly removed from ant-tended aphid colonies. Ant workers were also able to detect infective conidia on the cuticle of living aphids and responded by either removing or grooming these aphids. Our results extend the long-standing view of ants as mutualists and protectors of aphids by demonstrating focused sanitizing and quarantining behaviour that may lead to reduced disease transmission in aphid colonies. PMID:19923138

  19. Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael

    1997-12-01

    Antibacterial agents are increasingly being used for the prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases. As these agents can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Light-activated antimicrobial agents release singlet oxygen and free radicals which can kill adjacent bacteria and a wide range of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria has been shown to be susceptible to such agents. In the oral cavity these organisms are present as biofilms (dental plaques) which are less susceptible to traditional antimicrobial agents than bacterial suspensions. The results of these studies have shown that biofilm-grown oral bacteria are also susceptible to lethal photosensitization although the light energy doses required are grater than those needed to kill the organisms when they are grown as aqueous suspensions.

  20. Tityus serrulatus venom--A lethal cocktail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Cordeiro, Francielle Almeida; Longhim, Heloisa Tavoni; Cremonez, Caroline Marroni; Oliveira, Guilherme Honda; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2015-12-15

    Tityus serrulatus (Ts) is the main scorpion species of medical importance in Brazil. Ts venom is composed of several compounds such as mucus, inorganic salts, lipids, amines, nucleotides, enzymes, kallikrein inhibitor, natriuretic peptide, proteins with high molecular mass, peptides, free amino acids and neurotoxins. Neurotoxins are considered the most responsible for the envenoming syndrome due to their pharmacological action on ion channels such as voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and potassium (Kv) channels. The major goal of this review is to present important advances in Ts envenoming research, correlating both the crude Ts venom and isolated toxins with alterations observed in all human systems. The most remarkable event lies in the Ts induced massive releasing of neurotransmitters influencing, directly or indirectly, the entire body. Ts venom proved to extremely affect nervous and muscular systems, to modulate the immune system, to induce cardiac disorders, to cause pulmonary edema, to decrease urinary flow and to alter endocrine, exocrine, reproductive, integumentary, skeletal and digestive functions. Therefore, Ts venom possesses toxins affecting all anatomic systems, making it a lethal cocktail. However, its low lethality may be due to the low venom mass injected, to the different venom compositions, the body characteristics and health conditions of the victim and the local of Ts sting. Furthermore, we also described the different treatments employed during envenoming cases. In particular, throughout the review, an effort will be made to provide information from an extensive documented studies concerning Ts venom in vitro, in animals and in humans (a total of 151 references). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inactivated recombinant plant virus protects dogs from a lethal challenge with canine parvovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langeveld, J.P.M.; Brennan, F.R.; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    A vaccine based upon a recombinant plant virus (CPMV-PARVO1), displaying a peptide derived from the VP2 capsid protein of canine parvovirus (CPV), has previously been described. To date, studies with the vaccine have utilized viable plant chimaeric particles (CVPs). In this study, CPMV-PARVO1...

  2. Chloroquine Improves Survival and Hematopoietic Recovery After Lethal Low-Dose-Rate Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim Yiting; Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M.; Kastan, Michael B.; Matsui, William; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 μg per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection

  3. Dog Ownership, Dog Walking, and Children's and Parents' Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Jo; Timperio, Anna; Chu, Binh; Veitch, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine cross-sectional associations of dog ownership, dog walking, and physical activity (PA) among children and their parents. Objective measures of PA were obtained for children ages 5-6 and 10-12 years from 19 primary schools across Melbourne, Australia. Parents self-reported their PA, dog ownership, and frequency of dog…

  4. Improving guide dog team play with accessible dog toys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauser, S.; Wakkary, R.L.; Neustaedter, C.

    2014-01-01

    People with vision impairment have been a longstanding well-recognized user group addressed in HCI. Despite the recent interest in studying sighted dog owners and their pets in HCI, there is a noticeable gap in the field with regards to research on visually impaired owners and their dogs (guide dog

  5. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenewald, T

    1985-01-01

    Food irradiation has become a matter of topical interest also in the Federal Republic of Germany following applications for exemptions concerning irradiation tests of spices. After risks to human health by irradiation doses up to a level sufficient for product pasteurization were excluded, irradiation now offers a method suitable primarily for the disinfestation of fruit and decontamination of frozen and dried food. Codex Alimentarius standards which refer also to supervision and dosimetry have been established; they should be adopted as national law. However, in the majority of cases where individual countries including EC member-countries so far permitted food irradiation, these standards were not yet used. Approved irradiation technique for industrial use is available. Several industrial food irradiation plants, partly working also on a contractual basis, are already in operation in various countries. Consumer response still is largely unknown; since irradiated food is labelled, consumption of irradiated food will be decided upon by consumers.

  6. Treating Cushing's Disease in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Treating Cushing's Disease in Dogs Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... FDA Consumer Health Information Your 9-year old dog has been drinking a lot more lately and ...

  7. Augmented collar for assistance dog

    OpenAIRE

    Lemasson , Germain; Lucidarme , Philippe; Pesty , Sylvie; Duhaut , Dominique

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present briefly our reflexion on how to communicate with a dog using embedded devices. We also present the prototype collar we made in order to improve the communication between an assistance dog and his disabled master.

  8. Upper Airway Injury in Dogs Secondary to Trauma: 10 Dogs (2000-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basdani, Eleni; Papazoglou, Lysimachos G; Patsikas, Michail N; Kazakos, Georgios M; Adamama-Moraitou, Katerina K; Tsokataridis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Ten dogs that presented with trauma-induced upper airway rupture or stenosis were reviewed. Tracheal rupture was seen in seven dogs, tracheal stenosis in one dog, and laryngeal rupture in two dogs. Clinical abnormalities included respiratory distress in five dogs, subcutaneous emphysema in eight, air leakage through the cervical wound in seven, stridor in three dogs, pneumomediastinum in four and pneumothorax in one dog. Reconstruction with simple interrupted sutures was performed in four dogs, tracheal resection and end-to-end anastomosis in five dogs, and one dog was euthanized intraoperatively. Complications were seen in three dogs including aspiration pneumonia in one and vocalization alterations in two dogs.

  9. Differential effect of procaine on irradiated mammalian cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djordjevic, B.

    1979-01-01

    HeLa and V-79 Chinese hamster cells temporarily stored in ampoules were treated with the local anesthetic procaine. Postirradiation treatment increased lethality in HeLa cells depending on drug concentration, duration of treatment, and cell density, as measured by colony-forming ability upon plating. If present during irradiation only, procaine protected from irradiation. In V-79 cells, procaine potentiated radiation lethality only in freshly trypsinized cells. Procaine effect was thus cell type specific and most likely involved the cell membrane

  10. Hemostimulating efficiency of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs under modified irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhvoronkov, L.P.; Sklobovskaya, I.Eh.

    1988-01-01

    Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) were found to have hemostimulating effect in mice after irradiation. This effect was rather definite under irradiation conditions modified by dose fractioning or radioprotective chemicals. NSAID application during fractionated irradiation with midlethal integral dose leads to almost complete recovery of bone marrow hemopoiesis by the 9th day of radiation illness. NSAID usage combined with chemical radioprotectors provides effective hemopoiesis stimulation leading to survival increase in animals, irradiated with absolutely lethal doses. (author)

  11. Chronic exposure of corals to fine sediments: lethal and sub-lethal impacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florita Flores

    Full Text Available Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora. The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l(-1 TSS (25 mg cm(-2 day(-1 for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l(-1 TSS (83 mg cm(-2 day(-1 for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue.

  12. Chronic Exposure of Corals to Fine Sediments: Lethal and Sub-Lethal Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Smith, Luke D.; Cooper, Timothy F.; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l−1 TSS (25 mg cm−2 day−1) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l−1 TSS (83 mg cm−2 day−1) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue. PMID:22662225

  13. The influence of continuous γ-irradiation at decreasing dose-rate on the survival rote and induction of gene mutations in cultured Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feoktistova, T.P.; Elisova, E.V.; Stavrakova, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    Continuous γ-irradiation at decreasing dose-rate was shown to be less effective than acute exposure with regard to the lethal effect and frequency of mutations of resistance to 6-thioguanine in cultured Chinese hamster cells. The cell population subjected to continuons irradiation was d more radioresistant than the intact one. Lethal and genetic effects of continuous irradiation at decreasing dose-rate were mainly determined by the contribution of the radiation dose received during the first 24 h of exposure

  14. Preoperative irradiation of hypernephroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbar, D.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1969, preoperative irradiation of hypernephiroid carcinoma has been a routine measure at the Steglitz medical clinic: It consists in the application of a focal dose of 30 Gy, fractionated into doses of 2.5 Gy, as Betatron pendulum irradiation (42 MeV photons) covering the para-aortic lymph nodes. After a treatment-free interval of 3 weeks, radical nephrectomy is carried through. Of 178 patients, 47 were in tumor stage I, 15 in stage II, 83 in stage III and 33 in stage IV. In 99 patients the treatment dated back longer than 5 years; the survival rate was 52%. 67% of the patients had survived longer than 3 years. Operation lethality was 3%. The preoperative irradiation pursues the following aims: 1. Devitalization of potentially proliferating cells in the tumor periphery, and thus prevention of displaced tumor cells growing on and postoperative local recidivations; 2. Shrinking of the tumor, facilitating the surgical intervention. In a third of the cases a measurable alteration of the tumor was confirmed by X-ray. The low operation lethality of 3% is attributed to this. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Radiation-induced erythroleukemia in the beagle dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolle, D.V.; Fritz, T.E.; Norris, W.P.

    1977-01-01

    Eleven cases of myeloproliferative disease occurred in a group of 24 beagle dogs placed in a 60 Co γ-ray field at about 13 months of age and irradiated at an exposure rate of 5 R/22-hour day for duration of life. Of these 11 dogs, 5 were diagnosed as having erythroleukemia. The bone marrow showed marked erythroblastic hyperplasia, with maturation arrest of the erythroid elements, and increased numbers of myeloblasts and promyelocytes. The terminal peripheral blood was characterized by marked anemia and thrombocytopenia, with circulating erythrocytic precursors and abnormal erythrocyte morphology. Splenomegaly and hepatomegaly occurred in 4 of the 5 animals. In the spleens and livers of all 5, there was extensive leukemic infiltration and proliferation. The extent of leukemic involvement in other tissues and organs varied in individual dogs

  16. Effects of β-arabinofuranosyladenine on the growth and repair of potentially lethal damage in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, G.

    1980-01-01

    β-D-Arabinofuranosyladenine (β-araA) inhibit the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells by selective inhibition of DNA polymerases. RNA and protein synthesis are not significantly affected. Addition of β-araA to the cells after irradiation resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in survival, presumably due to the inhibition of the repair of potentially lethal damage. Since β-araA selectively inhibits DNA polymerases it is suggested that repair of potentially lethal damage involves steps at the DNA level which require some polymerization. These repair steps take place in the DNA with a velocity comparable to that of the repair of potentially lethal damage. The inhibition of the repair of potentially lethal damage by β-araA was modified by the addition of deoxyadenosine; this supports the finding that β-araA acts competitively against dATP at the molecular level. The inhibition of the repair of potentially lethal damage by β-araA, which is partly reversible, resulted in a concentration-dependent modification of the survival curve. At low concentrations of β-araA a dose-modifying decrease in survival was observed. At higher concentrations (more than 12 μM) the decrease in survival resulted in a decrease of the shoulder width of the survival curve. Eventually an exponential curve was obtained. We suggest therefore that the shoulder of the survival curve results from some repair or potentially lethal damage. Preliminary information has been obtained on the time course of this repair

  17. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Piotti

    Full Text Available Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs' abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human's goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs' behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs' behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs' neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor. The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human's vocal communication and the

  18. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs' abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human's goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs' behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs' behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs' neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human's vocal communication and the presence of the

  19. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomotaro; Aoki, Shohei

    1976-01-01

    Definition and significance of food irradiation were described. The details of its development and present state were also described. The effect of the irradiation on Irish potatoes, onions, wiener sausages, kamaboko (boiled fish-paste), and mandarin oranges was evaluated; and healthiness of food irradiation was discussed. Studies of the irradiation equipment for Irish potatoes in a large-sized container, and the silo-typed irradiation equipment for rice and wheat were mentioned. Shihoro RI center in Hokkaido which was put to practical use for the irradiation of Irish potatoes was introduced. The state of permission of food irradiation in foreign countries in 1975 was introduced. As a view of the food irradiation in the future, its utilization for the prevention of epidemics due to imported foods was mentioned. (Serizawa, K.)

  20. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of five pesticides used in rice farming on the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, Andreu; Sabater, Consuelo; Castillo, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of five pesticides typically used in rice farming (trichlorfon, dimethoate, carbendazim, tebuconazole and prochloraz) was evaluated on different lethal and sub-lethal endpoints of the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The evaluated endpoints included: avoidance behaviour after an exposure

  1. Dog and owner characteristics affecting the dog-owner relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Iben Helene Coakley; Forkman, Björn

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between companion dogs and their owners has important impact on the effect of life for both dog and owner. Identifying factors that affect the dogeowner relationship will assist the understanding of how the successful relationship is achieved and how the less...... successful relationship is mended, with potential benefits for the welfare of both species. In the present study, we investigated the effect of several dog and owner characteristics, including the personality of the dog, on the dogeowner relationship as measured by the Monash Dog Owner Relationship Scale...... (MDORS). Data were collected by inviting owners of dogs that had been tested on the Danish Dog Mentality Assessment (DMA) to answer an online questionnaire. We were able to match 421 owner answers with their dogs’ DMA test results. The questionnaire consisted of the 28 items of the MDORS, as well...

  2. Influence of γ-radiation on the enzymic activity of dog liquor lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushakov, I.B.; Gajdamakin, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    Cytochemical activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDG), L-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (L-GPDG), lactate dehydrogenase (LDG), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDG) in increased immediately after total-body irradiation with a dose of 129 mC/kg. After 2 h, LDG activity only returned to the control level. Irradiation of the head with the same dose caused less pronounced changes. Changes caused by lethal irradiation (1290 mC/kg) were different: there was an increase after exposure of the abdomen and a decrease in the activity of SDG and L-GPDG after irradiation of the head

  3. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  4. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The article explains what radiation does to food to preserve it. Food irradiation is of economic importance to Canada because Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is the leading world supplier of industrial irradiators. Progress is being made towards changing regulations which have restricted the irradiation of food in the United States and Canada. Examples are given of applications in other countries. Opposition to food irradiation by antinuclear groups is addressed

  5. Directionality of dog vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommolt, Karl-Heinz; Gebler, Alban

    2004-07-01

    The directionality patterns of sound emission in domestic dogs were measured in an anechoic environment using a microphone array. Mainly long-distance signals from four dogs were investigated. The radiation pattern of the signals differed clearly from an omnidirectional one with average differences in sound-pressure level between the frontal and rear position of 3-7 dB depending from the individual. Frequency dependence of directionality was shown for the range from 250 to 3200 Hz. The results indicate that when studying acoustic communication in mammals, more attention should be paid to the directionality pattern of sound emission.

  6. Lead poisoning in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M R; Lewis, G

    1963-08-03

    Within a short period, 14 cases of lead poisoning in the dogs have been encountered. A detailed record appears justified as no published reference can be found to this condition occurring in Britain and because reports from other countries stress the similarity of the clinical manifestations of lead poisoning to those of the common infections of the dog. Five of the 14 clinical cases of lead poisoning are described. The available literature is reviewed and the diagnosis and significance of the condition discussed. 19 references, 2 tables.

  7. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of food irradiation are outlined. The interaction of irradiation with matter is then discussed with special reference to the major constituents of foods. The application of chemical analysis in the evaluation of the wholesomeness of irradiated foods is summarized [af

  8. Lethal endomyocarditis caused by chronic "Krokodil" intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Antonella; Trotta, Silvia; Colucci, Anna Pia; Aventaggiato, Lucia; Marzullo, Andrea; Solarino, Biagio

    2018-03-19

    "Krokodil" is a home-made opioid drug obtained by synthesizing desomorphine from codeine and combining it with other low-cost additives. Initially introduced in the former Soviet countries, it was then imported to Western Europe as a heroin substitute. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an Italian case of lethal krokodil abuse, that occurred in a 39-year-old man, who died suddenly after transportation to the Emergency Department (ED) for hyperthermia associated with sweating, dyspnoea and tachycardia. Post-mortem examination revealed extensive necrotic ulcerative lesions on the forearms, and autopsy showed a hypertrophic heart with ample endocardial vegetation on the aortic valve and patency of the foramen ovale. Histopathological examination of the heart showed ulcero-vegetative lesions of the aortic valve with an abscess on the annulus and extension to the periaortic adipose tissue, as well as diffuse myocardial interstitial inflammatory neutrophilic infiltrates. Toxicological analysis demonstrated a desomorphine metabolite in urine. On the basis of all these findings the cause of death was ruled to be congestive heart failure caused by endocarditis and myocarditis, correlated with chronic abuse of krokodil.

  9. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Human cooperation by lethal group competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egas, Martijn; Kats, Ralph; van der Sar, Xander; Reuben, Ernesto; Sabelis, Maurice W

    2013-01-01

    Why humans are prone to cooperate puzzles biologists, psychologists and economists alike. Between-group conflict has been hypothesized to drive within-group cooperation. However, such conflicts did not have lasting effects in laboratory experiments, because they were about luxury goods, not needed for survival ("looting"). Here, we find within-group cooperation to last when between-group conflict is implemented as "all-out war" (eliminating the weakest groups). Human subjects invested in helping group members to avoid having the lowest collective pay-off, whereas they failed to cooperate in control treatments with random group elimination or with no subdivision in groups. When the game was repeated, experience was found to promote helping. Thus, not within-group interactions alone, not random group elimination, but pay-off-dependent group elimination was found to drive within-group cooperation in our experiment. We suggest that some forms of human cooperation are maintained by multi-level selection: reciprocity within groups and lethal competition among groups acting together.

  11. Low anterior anastomotic dehiscence following preoperative irradiation with 6000 rads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, D.P.; Bubrick, M.P.; Kochsiek, G.G.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; Strom, R.L.; Hitchcock, C.R.

    1984-03-01

    Twenty mongrel dogs received 6000 rads of irradiation to the rectum and colon using the Nominal Standard Dosage Equation. Three weeks after irradiation each dog underwent anterior resection of the rectosigmoid with reconstruction randomized to either an EEA stapled or a two layer handsewn anastomosis. Each dog was studied digitally and by barium enema at the time of surgery, on the seventh postoperative day, and at autopsy. Five clinically significant leaks and three radiographic leaks occurred in the EEA stapled anastomoses. The handsewn anastomoses had five clinically significant leaks and two radiographic leaks. The data indicate that low anterior resection with either an EEA stapled or handsewn anastomosis cannot be done safely after 6000 rad preoperative irradiation.

  12. Low anterior anastomotic dehiscence following preoperative irradiation with 6000 rads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, D.P.; Bubrick, M.P.; Kochsiek, G.G.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; Strom, R.L.; Hitchcock, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty mongrel dogs received 6000 rads of irradiation to the rectum and colon using the Nominal Standard Dosage Equation. Three weeks after irradiation each dog underwent anterior resection of the rectosigmoid with reconstruction randomized to either an EEA stapled or a two layer handsewn anastomosis. Each dog was studied digitally and by barium enema at the time of surgery, on the seventh postoperative day, and at autopsy. Five clinically significant leaks and three radiographic leaks occurred in the EEA stapled anastomoses. The handsewn anastomoses had five clinically significant leaks and two radiographic leaks. The data indicate that low anterior resection with either an EEA stapled or handsewn anastomosis cannot be done safely after 6000 rad preoperative irradiation

  13. Inhibition of radioemesis by disruption of catecholamines in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthra, Y.K.; Mattsson, J.L.; Yochmowitz, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    Dogs were treated 30 min to 1 h before x irradiation with α-methyl-p-tyrosine or 6-hydroxydopamine. A third group of dogs was given a known antiradioemetic drug, haloperidol to verify the sensitivity of the procedure. Irradiated but untreated controls were also used. Light methoxyflurane anesthesia was used for restraint during the exposure. Exposure dose was 800 rad kerma delivered at 50 rad/min to a 10 x 10-cm area covering the abdominal area from xiphoid to pubis. Haloperidol and 6-hydroxydopamine significantly reduced the number of emetic episodes and delayed the onset time to the first episode, α-Methyl-p-tyrosine caused no significant changes. The effectiveness of 6-hydroxydopamine indicates that catecholaminergic neurons are involved in radioemesis, whereas haloperidol and phenothiazine-derivative tranquilizers inhibit radiomesis by blocking catecholamine receptor neurons

  14. Hyperthermia radiosensitization in human glioma cells comparison of recovery of polymerase activity, survival, and potentially lethal damage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Feeley, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    DNA polymerase inactivation is compared to thermal radiosensitization and inhibition of damage recovery in human glioma cells. Two human glioma cell lines (U87MG and U373MG) were exposed to hyperthermia and irradiation. Hyperthermia was given at 43 degrees C and 45 degrees C and DNA polymerase α + δ + ε and β activities were measured. Hyperthermia was given at various times before irradiation and the degree of radiosensitization and polymerase activity was assessed at various times after heating. In addition the ability of cells to undergo repair of potentially lethal radiation damage was assessed for cells irradiated at various times after heating. Polymerase α + δ + ε and polymerase β both recovered after heating but polymerase β was faster and was complete in U373MG but not in the U87MG cell lines after 48 h incubation after heating (45 degrees C, 60 min). Incubation, between hyperthermia and irradiation resulted in a loss of radiosensitization and a loss of inhibition of repair of potentially lethal damage. These changes correlated well with recovery of polymerase β but not with polymerase α + δ + ε. The correlation of polymerase β activity and thermoradiosensitization and its recovery indicate that polymerase β may be one of the mechanisms involved in thermoradiosensitization. 35 refs., 7 figs

  15. Colon mucosal cells after high-dose fractional irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorc-Pleskovic, R.; Vraspir-Porenta, O.; Petrovic, D.; Zorc, M.; Pleskovic, L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histological and stereological changes in cryptal enterocytes, mucosal lymphocytes and mast cells 10 days after irradiation. For experimental model, 24 Beagle dogs 1-2 years old were used. Twelve dogs were irradiated 20 days with 32 Gy over the whole pelvis and tail. Another 12 dogs represented a control group. For the detection of apoptosis, the TUNEL technique was used. Histological and stereological analyses were performed using a Wild sampling microscope M 1000. In the irradiated group, volume density (P < 0.01), numerical density (P < 0.05) and average volume of lymphocytes (P < 0.001) were significantly lower than in the nonirradiated group. Numerical areal density of mast cells in the irradiated group was also significantly lower (P < 0.05). Volume density (P < 0.001) and average volume of mast cells (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the irradiated group. The results of our experiments show that irradiation causes injury and loss of lymphocytes and mast cells in the colon mucosa. Apoptosis was detected in enterocytes and lymphocytes in the irradiated group and in nonirradiated group in equal numbers (2.5 ± 0.3 vs. 2.3 ± 0.3; ns.), suggesting that 10 days after high-dose irradiation, the cell loss is not due to apoptosis. (author)

  16. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklin, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Queensland Government has given its support the establishment of a food irradiation plant in Queensland. The decision to press ahead with a food irradiation plant is astonishing given that there are two independent inquiries being carried out into food irradiation - a Parliamentary Committee inquiry and an inquiry by the Australian Consumers Association, both of which have still to table their Reports. It is fair to assume from the Queensland Government's response to date, therefore, that the Government will proceed with its food irradiation proposals regardless of the outcomes of the various federal inquiries. The reasons for the Australian Democrats' opposition to food irradiation which are also those of concerned citizens are outlined

  18. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1989-01-01

    The ranges of doses used for food irradiation and their effect on the processed foods are outlined. The wholesomeness of irradiated foods is discussed. The present food irradiation technology development in the world is described. A review of the irradiated foods permitted for public consumption, the purposes of food irradiaton, the doses used and a review of the commercial-scale food irradiators are tabulated. The history and the present state of food processing in Czechoslovakia are described. (author). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  19. Irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrington, Hugh

    1988-06-01

    This special edition of 'Food Manufacture' presents papers on the following aspects of the use of irradiation in the food industry:- 1) an outline view of current technology and its potential. 2) Safety and wholesomeness of irradiated and non-irradiated foods. 3) A review of the known effects of irradiation on packaging. 4) The problems of regulating the use of irradiation and consumer protection against abuse. 5) The detection problem - current procedures. 6) Description of the Gammaster BV plant in Holland. 7) World outline review. 8) Current and future commercial activities in Europe. (U.K.)

  20. Is your dog empathic? Developing a Dog Emotional Reactivity Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szánthó, Flóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' seemingly empathic behaviour attracts general and scientific attention alike. Behaviour tests are usually not sufficiently realistic to evoke empathic-like behaviour; therefore we decided to ask owners about their experiences with their dogs in emotionally loaded situations. Owners from Hungary (N = 591) and from Germany (N = 2283) were asked to rate their level of agreement on a 1-5 Likert scale with statements about the reactivity of their dogs to their emotions and to other dogs' behaviour. We created two scales with satisfactory internal reliability: reactivity to the owner's emotion and reactivity to other dogs' behaviour. Based on an owner-dog personality matching theory, we hypothesised that the owner's empathy, as measured by the subscale on the cooperativeness character factor of the human personality, will correlate with their dog's emotional reactivity in emotionally loaded situations. In addition we also examined how anthropomorphism, contagious yawning, attitude toward the dog are related to emotional reactivity in dogs as perceived by the owner. In addition we examined how owners rate dog pictures. We found that the scale scores were largely independent from demographic and environmental variables like breed, sex, age, age at acquiring, keeping practices, training experiences and owner's age. However, anthropomorphic and emotional attitude of the owners probably biased the responses. In the German sample more empathic owners reported to have more emotionally reactive dog, as expected by the personality matching theory. More empathic owners reported to have fewer problems with their dogs and they rated a puppy picture as more cute in both countries. 62% of owners from Hungary and 36% of owner from Germany agreed with the statement "My dog is more important for me than any human being". In Germany, more empathic owners agreed less with this statement and indicated that their dogs have a tendency for contagious yawning. Owners whose attitudes

  1. Investigation into knowledge about dogs, dog ownership and the behavior of dog owners living in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Brengelmann, Nathaly

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to find out the level of knowledge of dog owners living in Germany; covering various aspects of dog handling, which personal and social circumstances have influence on this, and in which areas and which groups of people possible knowledge gaps exist. For this purpose, a multiple choice test was developed. This contained eight subject areas: “man-dog-relationship”, “puppy purchase and raising”, “learning behavior and training”, “dog behavior”, “keeping”, “dog and th...

  2. Neosporosis in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite of animals. Until 1988, it was misdiagnosed as Toxoplasma gondii. Since its first recognition in 1984 and the description of a new genus and species Neospora caninum in 1988, neosporosis has emerged as a serious disease of dogs and cattle worldwide. Additiona...

  3. X-ray lethality in diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cember, H.; Thorson, T.M. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Rats were made diabetic with streptozotocin and were irradiated with X-rays at various exposure levels in order to determine the LD-50/30 day dose. Non-diabetic control rats were exposed in a similar manner. The LD-50 exposures for the diabetic rats and the control rats were 436 R, and 617 R respectively. In view of the high prevalence of diabetes among the adult population, this finding may have important implications for diabetic workers who may be exposed accidentally to high levels of ionizing radiation

  4. Occurrence and distribution of bone tumors in beagle dogs exposed to 90Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, A.; Book, S.A.; California Univ., Davis

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced bone tumors in beagle dogs exposed to 90 Sr have been evaluated in terms of their incidence, time of appearance, occurrence as multiple tumors, anatomic distribution, and the influence of sex on their development. Among dogs fed 90 Sr during skeletal development, the incidence of bone tumors was dose independent. Tumors thus appeared in 10 of 19 dogs receiving average skeletal doses of 130 Gy, 15 of 60 receiving 97 Gy, 5 of 61 receiving 61 Gy, 2 of 65 receiving 26 Gy, and 1 of 40 receiving 1.3 Gy. No tumors appeared among 66 dogs who received 8 Gy, 78 who received 0.3 Gy, and 80 non-irradiated controls, all of which have been observed for life. Among dogs given a single inravenous injection of 90 Sr in early adulthood, tumor production was somewhat higher than among 90 Sr-fed dogs at the same radiation dose: bone tumors were present in 6 of 25 dogs who received 62 Gy and 1 of 20 dogs who received 7.5 Gy. Bone tumors appeared sooner and were more often multiple in animals receiving the higher doses. Long bones were the sites of most of the tumors appearing after the highest dose level. Bones of the head, particularly the mandible, were the predominant site of tumors in the next highest dose level group. (orig.)

  5. Action of sulfured radioprotectors on spontaneous cerebral electric activity of implanted chronic non irradiated adult rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatome, M.

    In a previous study, the radioprotective action of serotonin on central nervous system of lethal dose irradiated rabbit had been determined. In the present study, the possibilities of sulfured radioprotectors were considered in order to see if these products have by themselves an action on central nervous system of non irradiated animals [fr

  6. Repair of potentially lethal radiation damage: comparison of neutron and x-ray RBE and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Kraljevic, U.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments with Chinese hamster cells have shown that neutron irradiation does not result in repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD), i.e., that which can be influenced by changes in environmental conditions following irradiation. Since PLD is presumed to be repaired in tumors but not in normal tissues, this absence of differential sparing of tumor cells relative to normal tissues--a feature characteristic of irradiation with x rays--represents an advantage of neutrons in addition to their reduced oxygen effect. At a given dose, the difference in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) between tumors and normal tissues corresponds to a 5 percent increase in tumor dose with no concomitant increase in dose to normal tissues, which could be significant in cancer therapy

  7. Protective effect of Asparagus racemosus root extract against lethal total - body electron beam radiation induced damage in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharmila, K.P.; Bhandary, B. Satheesh Kumar; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Bhat, Vadish S.; Shetty, Jayaram; Peter, Alex John; Jose, Jerish M.; Fernandes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the protective effect of Asparagus Racemosus Root ethanolic extract (ARE) in Swiss albino mice against acute lethal total - body Electron beam irradiation. Swiss Albino mice were used for the assessment of radiation induced sickness and 30 day survival analysis. Survival studies were determined using the Kaplan-Meier survival curves. The maximum survival was observed in the experimental mice pretreated with 200 mg/kg.b.wt. of ARE which also reduced the radiation sickness characteristics. This dose was considered as an optimal dose for radioprotection. Treatment of mice with ARE before irradiation delayed the onset of mortality as compared with the untreated irradiated controls. Present findings demonstrate the potential of ARE in mitigating radiation-induced mortality, which may be attributed to its free radical scavenging and increased antioxidant potential

  8. Lethal and mutagenic effects of radiation and chemicals on cultured fish cells derived the erythrophoroma of goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitani, H. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Zoology)

    1983-01-01

    GEM 199 cells derived from an eryhtrophoroma of goldfish (Carassius auratus), which had a high plating efficiency, were used to investigate the lethal and mutational effects of radiations (UV and ..gamma..-rays) and chemicals (4NQO and MNNG). The cells were more resistant to rays than mammalian cells and CAF-MM1 cells derived from the normal fin tissue of goldfish. They were also more resistant to UV-irradiation than CAF-MM1 cells. Photoreactivation after UV-irradiation was present in GEM 199 cells for both survival and mutation. The initial shoulder of the survival curve of UV-irradiated cells was reduced greatly by caffeine, suggesting a high activity of the post-replication repair. The spontaneous mutation frequency to ouabain resistance was 1-5x10/sup -6/ clones per viable cell. MNNG was effective in inducing ouabain-resistant mutation, while 4NQO and ..gamma..-rays did not induce mutation.

  9. Influences of irradiation on the anastomotic sites of artificial graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Junichi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Koide, Shirosaku; Kawada, Shimei; Shotsu, Akira

    1989-01-01

    To examine the acute influences of irradiation on the anastomotic sites of EPTFE vascular grafts, experimental study was performed using canine dogs. After replacement of superior vena cava and bilateral femoral arteries with EPTFE grafts, a total of 20 to 100 Gy doses were given at the anastomotic sites of superior vena cava and right femoral artery. There were no degradation of grafts themselves or rupture in the anastomoses at cumulative anastomotic sites of superior vena cava, stenoses and/or overgrowth of granulation tissues were observed, although at those of right femoral artery, no remarkable differences were observed between dogs which received irradiation and those which did not receive. (author)

  10. Life-span radiation effects studies in prenatally and postnatally exposed beagle dogs at Colorado State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, S.A.; Lee, A.C.; Angleton, G.M.; Jaenke, R.S.; Saunders, W.J.; Miller, G.K.; Brewster, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The lifetime hazards associated with exposure to ionizing radiation during development are studied in 1680 beagle dogs given whole-body exposures to 60 Co gamma radiation. Eight groups of 120 dogs each received 20-R or 100-R exposures at 8, 28, or 55 days postcoitus (dpc) or at 2 days postpartum (dpp). In addition, exposures of 100 R were given to 120 dogs at 70 dpp and to 240 dogs at 365 dpp. An additional 360 dogs were sham exposed. Smaller groups of dogs were used to identify organs and tissues of particular sensitivity to radiation injury during development and to evaluate mechanisms of radiation injury. The research is concerned primarily with evaluating the role of age at exposure as a factor influencing response to radiation injury. As of December 31, 1982, of the 1680 dogs, 1058 were dead. Survivors ranged from 9.9 to 15 years of age. Through 10 years of age, no differences in survival were evident in any exposure groups. A variety of clinical, pathophysiologic, and pathologic responses have been studied. Irradiation during development has been found to be associated with abnormalities of skeletal, dental, and central nervous system development. Irradiation during ocular development has induced dysplastic and atrophic retinal lesions. Perinatal irradiation of the kidney has resulted in dysplasia, and, in animals receiving higher doses, significant chronic renal disease. The thymus gland, particularly thymic epithelium, has been found to be highly radiosensitive during fetal development

  11. Effects of neutron irradiation on red blood cell labeling with technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, R.R.; Conklin, J.J.; Grissom, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of in vivo and in vitro neutron irradiation on red blood cell radiolabeling with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) were studied. Blood from three dogs was irradiated with neutrons (725 rads, free in air dose) followed by radiolabeling with Tc-99m. The three dogs were subsequently whole body, neutron irradiated (250 rads, midline dose); and blood samples were drawn for radiolabeling at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours post-irradiation. Blood from three control dogs was also drawn and radiolabeled on each day for comparison. The results show that there were no significant differences between the radiolabeling capacities of in vivo or in vitro neutron irradiated and control RBCs

  12. Mitral stenosis in 15 dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmkuhl, L.B.; Ware, W.A.; Bonagura, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Mitral stenosis was diagnosed in 15 young to middle-aged dogs. There were 5 Newfoundlands and 4 bull terriers affected, suggesting a breed predisposition for this disorder. Clinical signs included cough, dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and syncope. Soft left apical diastolic murmurs were heard only in 4 dogs, whereas 8 dogs had systolic murmurs characteristic of mitral regurgitation. Left atrial enlargement was the most prominent radiographic feature. Left-sided congestive heart failure was detected by radiographs in 11 dogs within 1 year of diagnosis. Electrocardiographic abnormalities varied among dogs and included atrial and ventricular enlargement, as well as atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Abnormalities on M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiograms included abnormal diastolic motion of the mitral valve characterized by decreased leaflet separation, valve doming, concordant motion of the parietal mitral valve leaflet, and a decreased E-to-F slope. Increased mitral valve inflow velocities and prolonged pressure half-times were detected by Doppler echocardiography. Cardiac catheterization, performed in 8 dogs, documented a diastolic pressure gradient between the left atrial, pulmonary capillary wedge, or pulmonary artery diastolic pressures and the left ventricular diastolic pressure. Necropsy showed mitral stenosis caused by thickened, fused mitral valve leaflets in 5 dogs and a supramitral ring in another dog. The outcome in affected dogs was poor; 9 of 15 dogs were euthanatized or died by 2 1/2 years of age

  13. Preliminary report on the sensitivity of tea plant to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Lijuan

    1985-01-01

    The seeds of different varieties of tea have been irradiated. In most cases the rate of emergence of seedings was delayed and the rate of emergence of seedlings was decreased with increasing the radiation doses. The more suitable doses for tea seeds were 5 Krads, and the lethal dose is over 7 Krads. Except for the variety Fudingdabai, the survival rate of cuttings was decreased and its growth rate was reduced with increasing the radiation doses. The applicable dose and the lethal dose for cuttings were 0.5-1 Krads and 2 Krads respectively. Irradiation with low dose (below 4 Krads) give a good effect in the germination of pollen. The semilethal dose for pollen is 12 Krads, and the lethal dose is more than 20 Krads

  14. Genotoxicity test of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Noriho

    2004-01-01

    Safety tests of radiation irradiated foods started as early as from 1967 in Japan and genotoxicity tests in the Hatano Res. Inst., from 1977. The latter is unique in the world and is reviewed in this paper. Tests included those for the initial injury of DNA, mutagenicity, chromosomal aberration and transformation with use of bacteria, cultured mammalian cells and animals (for chromosomal aberration, micronucleus formation and dominant lethality). Foods tested hitherto were onion, rice, wheat and flour, Vienna sausage, fish sausage (kamaboko), mandarian orange, potato, black pepper and red capsicum, of which extract or powder was subjected to the test. Irradiation doses and its purposes were 0.15-6 kGy γ-ray ( 60 Co) or electron beam by the accelerator (only for the orange), and suppression of germination, pesticide action or sterilization, respectively. Genotoxicity of all foods under tested conditions is shown negative. (N.I.)

  15. A new type of lethal short-limbed dwarfism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nairn, E.R.; Chapman, S.

    1989-01-01

    Details are presented of a most unusual osteo-chondrodysplasia which presents with lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism, defective ossification and nodular calcification with cartilage. The features resemble one case previously described in the literature. (orig.)

  16. Back to the future: revisiting HIV-1 lethal mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapp, Michael J.; Patterson, Steven E.; Mansky, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of eliminating HIV-1 infectivity by elevating the viral mutation rate was first proposed over a decade ago, even though the general concept had been conceived earlier for RNA viruses. Lethal mutagenesis was originally viewed as a novel chemotherapeutic approach for treating HIV-1 infection in which use of a viral mutagen would over multiple rounds of replication lead to the lethal accumulation of mutations, rendering the virus population non infectious – known as the slow mutation accumulation model. There have been limitations in obtaining good efficacy data with drug leads, leaving some doubt into clinical translation. More recent studies of the APOBEC3 proteins as well as new progress in the use of nucleoside analogs for inducing lethal mutagenesis have helped to refocus attention on rapid induction of HIV-1 lethal mutagenesis in a single or limited number of replication cycles leading to a rapid mutation accumulation model. PMID:23195922

  17. New type of lethal short-limbed dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nairn, E.R.; Chapman, S.

    1989-05-01

    Details are presented of a most unusual osteo-chondrodysplasia which presents with lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism, defective ossification and nodular calcification with cartilage. The features resemble one case previously described in the literature.

  18. Homologous tracheal transplantation with grafts previously exposed to high doses of gamma radiation in dogs without immunosuppressive agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Inui, Kenji; Kure, Toshio; Wada, Hiromi; Itomi, Shigeki

    1993-01-01

    The study was designed to determine whether previous high doses irradiation of gamma radiation would contribute to tracheal transplantation with no use of immunosuppressive agents. Twenty mongrel dogs were used as experimental animals. Five rings of thoracic tracheas, which were extracted from recipients, were exposed to 20000, 50000, or 100000 cGy in each 5 dogs. Five other non-irradiated dogs served as controls. Irradiated tracheal grafts were transplanted and covered with pedicled omentum. After transplantation, no immunosuppressive agents were given to dogs. All dogs in the control group died of tracheal stenosis due to graft-host rejection within one month. All but one long-term survivor died of tracheal stenosis, as well, in both the 20000 cGy and 50000 cGy groups. In the 100000 cGy group, grafts became viable in 4 dogs, and three of these survived one year or more. In conclusion, previous irradiation with high doses of 100000 cGy allowed homologous tracheal transplantation even when no immunosuppressive agents are given. (N.K.)

  19. Quantitative determination of the contribution of indirect and direct radiation action to the production of lethal lesions in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlit, W.; Drenkard, S.

    1985-01-01

    For quantitative models of radiation action in living cells it is necessary to know what fraction of the absorbed dose affects the target molecule by direct radiation action and what fraction by indirect radiation action. Mammalian cells were irradiated in suspension, saturated with N 2 O or CO 2 . With these gases the production of OH-radicals is changed by a factor of two in aqueous solutions and a corresponding change in cell survival would be expected, if only indirect radiation action is involved in the production of lethal lesions in the living cell. No difference could be detected, however, and it is concluded that indirect radiation action does not contribute to radiation lethality in mammalian cells. (author)

  20. Radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs versus other dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jihye; Keh, Seoyeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Junyoung; Yoon, Junghee

    2013-01-01

    Differential diagnoses for canine liver disease are commonly based on radiographic estimates of liver size, however little has been published on breed variations. Aims of this study were to describe normal radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs and to compare normal measurements for this breed with other dog breeds and Pekingese dogs with liver disease. Liver measurements were compared for clinically normal Pekingese (n = 61), normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic (n = 45), normal nonbrachycephalic (n = 71), and Pekingese breed dogs with liver disease (n = 22). For each dog, body weight, liver length, T11 vertebral length, thoracic depth, and thoracic width were measured on right lateral and ventrodorsal abdominal radiographs. Liver volume was calculated using a formula and ratios of liver length/T11 vertebral length and liver volume/body weight ratio were determined. Normal Pekingese dogs had a significantly smaller liver volume/body weight ratio (16.73 ± 5.67, P dogs (19.54 ± 5.03) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (18.72 ± 6.52). The liver length/T11 vertebral length ratio in normal Pekingese (4.64 ± 0.65) was significantly smaller than normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic breed dogs (5.16 ± 0.74) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (5.40 ± 0.74). Ratios of liver volume/body weight and liver length/T11 vertebral length in normal Pekingese were significantly different from Pekingese with liver diseases (P dogs have a smaller normal radiographic liver size than other breeds. We recommend using 4.64× the length of the T11 vertebra as a radiographic criterion for normal liver length in Pekingese dogs. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  1. Effects of x-irradiation of young female beagles on life span and tumor incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, L.S.; Book, S.A.; Goldman, M.

    1986-01-01

    Causes of death and the occurrence of neoplasia in female beagle dogs were evaluated retrospectively for 57 unexposed and 296 exposed dogs given single or fractionated whole-body x-irradiation exposures of 100 or 300 R. Some dogs subsequently were bred, and all were observed for the duration of their lives. The pathology for these dogs was derived from clinical records, gross-necropsy reports, tissue slides, and Formalin-fixed tissues. The results of this study indicated dose-related shortening of life span was clearly evident; causes of death due to either neoplasia (50%) or nonneoplastic disease (50%), with few exceptions, were similar in control and irradiated dogs; the incidences of neoplasms were not significantly greater for irradiated dogs than for controls, but the latency period decreased as dose increased; protraction increased survival in dogs given 300 R but not 100 R, which is attributable solely to amelioration of incidence rates of nonmammary neoplasia; and the cumulative rates of death due to mammary tumors were the same in dogs exposed to 100 R and 300 R. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Pathologic changes in the hearts of beagles irradiated with fractionated fast neutrons or photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zook, B.C.; Bradley, E.W.; Casarett, G.W.; Rogers, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-nine adult male purebred beagles received either fast-neutron or photon irradiation to the right thorax to determine the effects on pulmonary tissue. The right atrium, a small portion of the right ventricle, and the right anterior abdomen were included in the field. Twenty-four dogs (six/group) received fast neutrons with a mean energy of 15 MeV to doses of 1000, 1500, 2250, or 3375 rad in four fractions per week for 6 weeks. Fifteen dogs received 3000, 4500, or 6750 rad of photons (five/group) in an identical fractionation pattern. Fourteen dogs died or were euthanatized in extremis between 47 and 708 days after radiation because of radiation damage to digestive organs. Six other dogs died of anesthetic accidents between 196 and 1144 days after radiation; these deaths were probably related to hepatic dysfunction. Two neutron-irradiated dogs developed cardiac neoplasms after 396 and 1624 days. One dog died of a myocardial infarct and one died of an unrelated infection. The major atrial lesions were hemorrhage and necrosis of myocardial cells in dogs that died 47-109 days postirradiation. Myocardial and endocardial fibrosis were most extensive in dogs that died 84 or more days following irradiation. All beagles had degenerative and occlusive vascular changes associated with atrial lesions. The relative biological effectiveness of fast neutrons for pathologic injury of the heart was estimated to be between 4 and 5

  3. Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease presenting as hydrops fetalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenHamida, Emira; Ayadi, Imene; Ouertani, Ines; Chammem, Maroua; Bezzine, Ahlem; BenTmime, Riadh; Attia, Leila; Mrad, Ridha; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease is very rare and is considered a variant of type 2 Gaucher disease that occurs in the neonatal period. The most distinct features of perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease are non-immune hydrops fetalis. Less common signs of the disease are hepatosplenomegaly, ichthyosis and arthrogryposis. We report a case of Gaucher's disease (type 2) diagnosed in a newborn who presented with Hydrops Fetalis.

  4. Conflict Without Casualties: Non-Lethal Weapons in Irregular Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    the body,” and the Geneva Protocol of 1925, bans the use of chemical and biological weapons .11 On 8 April 1975, President Ford issued Executive...E Funding – PE 63851M) (accessed 15 December 2006). The American Journal of Bioethics . “Medical Ethics and Non-Lethal Weapons .” Bioethics.net...CASUALTIES: NON-LETHAL WEAPONS IN IRREGULAR WARFARE by Richard L. Scott September 2007 Thesis Advisor: Robert McNab Second Reader

  5. Non-Lethal Weapons: Opportunities for R&D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    during the Vietnam War. US; emulsifying agents are used in food processing, drilling fluids, cosmetics , pharmaceuticals, heavy- duty cleaners, textile...conducted in a professional manner, with no threat to public safety or the environment. 11 References [1] Fenton , G., (2001). NLW Technology Taxonomy...W.A., Mason, R.L., Collins, K.R., (2000). Non-Lethal Applicants of Slippery Substances. NDIA Non-Lethal Defense IV. [24] Fenton , G., (2000). Overview

  6. Lethal synergy involving bicyclomycin: an approach for reviving old antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Muhammad; Li, Liping; Zhao, Xilin; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Drlica, Karl

    2014-12-01

    One way to address the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance is to revive old compounds that may have intrinsic lethal activity that is obscured by protective factors. Bicyclomycin is an old inhibitor of the Rho transcription terminator that by itself shows little rapid lethal activity. However, bicyclomycin participates in bacteriostatic synergy, which raises the possibility that conditions for lethal synergy may exist, perhaps through a suppression of protective factors. Bicyclomycin was combined with bacteriostatic inhibitors of gene expression, and bactericidal activity was measured with several cultured Gram-negative pathogens. When used alone, bicyclomycin failed to rapidly kill growing cultures of Escherichia coli; however, the additional presence of bacteriostatic concentrations of tetracycline, chloramphenicol or rifampicin led to rapid killing. Four other pathogen species, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and Shigella dysenteriae, also exhibited enhanced killing when bicyclomycin was combined with tetracycline or rifampicin. This lethal synergy was achieved at low concentrations (slightly above the MIC) for all agents tested in combinations. Follow-up work with E. coli indicated that lethal synergy arose from a blockage of transcription elongation. Moreover, lethal synergy was reduced when bicyclomycin was added 60 min before tetracycline, suggesting that bicyclomycin induces a protective factor. The action of bicyclomycin illustrates the potential present in a largely abandoned antibacterial agent; it exhibits lethal synergy when coadministered with known, bacteriostatic inhibitors of gene expression. The identification of protective factors, which are currently uncharacterized, may reveal new ways to promote the lethal action of some old antibiotics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved

  7. Sonographic features of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome at 14 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Chan, Gavin Shueng Wai; Lee, Chin Peng; Tang, Mary Hoi Yin

    2005-06-01

    Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome is a rare inherited disorder. Previous reports suggest that the diagnosis may be based on prenatal sonographic demonstration of severe limb flexion, absence of fetal motion, and a large cystic hygroma in the second and third trimesters. We present the sonographic features and postmortem features of a fetus with lethal multiple pterygium syndrome at 13 weeks of gestation, which shows that the condition can possibly be diagnosed in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  8. Physiological alterations in UV-irradiated cells: liquid holding recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragao, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    The biochemical and physiological alterations that occur in ultraviolet irradiated cells, during liquid holding have been studied. Incubation in buffer acts not to interfer directly with the mechanic repairs but by promoting metabolic alterations that would block some irreversible and lethal physiological responses. (L.M.J.) [pt

  9. Foodstuff irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Report written on behalf of the Danish Food Institute summarizes national and international rules and developments within food irradiation technology, chemical changes in irradiated foodstuffs, microbiological and health-related aspects of irradiation and finally technological prospects of this conservation form. Food irradiatin has not been hitherto applied in Denmark. Radiation sources and secondary radiation doses in processed food are characterized. Chemical changes due to irradiation are compared to those due to p.ex. food heating. Toxicological and microbiological tests and their results give no unequivocal answer to the problem whether a foodstuff has been irradiated. The most likely application fields in Denmark are for low radiation dosis inhibition of germination, riping delay and insecticide. Medium dosis (1-10 kGy) can reduce bacteria number while high dosis (10-50 kGy) will enable total elimination of microorganisms and viruses. Food irradiation can be acceptable as technological possibility with reservation, that further studies follow. (EG)

  10. Xylitol and Your Dog: Danger, Paws Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Xylitol and Your Dog: Danger, Paws Off Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... vitamins mouthwash toothpaste Why is Xylitol Dangerous to Dogs, but Not People? In both people and dogs, ...

  11. Effect of preoperative irradiation on healing of low colorectal anastomoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, L.; Sanders, G.; Wahlstrom, E.; Yadegar, J.; Amodeo, P.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of preoperative irradiation on the healing of low colorectal anastomoses was studied experimentally. In 12 dogs in whom preoperative irradiation of 4,000 rads was given before low colorectal stapled anastomosis was performed, anastomotic leakage occurred in 66 percent. More than half of the anastomotic leaks were associated with either severe sepsis or death. In a matched group of control animals that underwent stapled anastomoses without irradiation, no anastomotic complications occurred. The clinical implications of this study are that stapled anastomoses in irradiated colon are at serious risk of anastomotic dehiscence and, therefore, should be protected with a proximal colostomy

  12. Looking after chronically ill dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Stine B.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Sandøe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    thus face similar challenges when caring for their animals. This qualitative study uncovers impacts on an owner's life, when attending to the care of an aged or chronically ill dog and reflects on the differing roles of caregivers with animal and human patients. Twelve dog owners were selected for in......-depth interviews based on the dogs' diagnoses, and the choice of treatments and care expected to affect the owner's life. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed qualitatively. The dog owners reported several changes in their lives due to their dog's condition: practicalities like extra care, changes...... in use of the home, and restrictions relating to work, social life, and finances. These were time-consuming, tough, and annoying, but could often be dealt with through planning and prioritizing. Changes in the human–dog relationship and activities caused sadness and frustration, which in turn led...

  13. Hemibody irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schen, B.C.; Mella, O.; Dahl, O.

    1992-01-01

    In a large number of cancer patients, extensive skeletal metastases or myelomatosis induce vast suffering, such as intolerable pain and local complications of neoplastic bone destruction. Analgetic drugs frequently do not yield sufficient palliation. Irradiation of local fields often has to be repeated, because of tumour growth outside previously irradiated volumes. Wide field irradiation of the lower or upper half of the body causes significant relief of pain in most patients. Adequate pretreatment handling of patients, method of irradiation, and follow-up are of importance to reduce side effects, and are described as they are carried out at the Department of Oncology, Haukeland Hospital, Norway. 16 refs., 2 figs

  14. Health care of hunting dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Spasojević-Kosić, Ljubica; Savić, Sara

    2013-01-01

    There are two basic aspects of hunting dog’s health care: infectious diseases of hunting dogs and dog’s hunting performance. Concerning infectious diseases of hunting dogs, special attention is paid to public health, preventing possible dangers that could possibly arise. On the other hand, hunting performance of dogs depends on their nutrition. A complete analysis of hunting dogs’ health care in our country requires an assessment of awareness level in hunte...

  15. Paraquat poisoning in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    Recovery from paraquat poisoning in the dog is rare. This is a report of a case of recovery from confirmed paraquat poisoning in a clinical setting. The dog exhibited the usual signs of paraquat poisoning. The diagnosis was confirmed on toxicological analysis of urine using an ion exchange technique. The dog was treated with frusemide, nicotinamide, corticosteroids, α-tocopherol, vitamin A, etamiphylline camsylate and ampicillin. He recovered after seven weeks of intensive therapy. Alternative treatments are discussed

  16. Miastenia gravis diagnostic in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Patricia Suraniti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Miastenia Gravis is a neuromuscular disease caused by auto antibodies. Early Clinical and biochemical diagnosis and treatment is demanded in the assurementof quality and time of life in all dogs. In this study we describe the conventional diagnosis methods and therapy in 32 dogs with suspected myasthenia gravis and propose the administration of bromide of piridostigmin as another use full diagnosis method in dogs.

  17. Feed the dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gry Høngsmark; Bajde, Domen

    2016-01-01

    MedieKultur | Journal of media and communication research | ISSN 1901-9726Article – Open sectionPublished by SMID | Society of Media researchers In Denmark | www.smid.dkTh e online version of this text can be found open access at www.mediekultur.dk196Feed the dogsA case of humanitarian communicat......MedieKultur | Journal of media and communication research | ISSN 1901-9726Article – Open sectionPublished by SMID | Society of Media researchers In Denmark | www.smid.dkTh e online version of this text can be found open access at www.mediekultur.dk196Feed the dogsA case of humanitarian...

  18. "... Formanden dog det dobbelte"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Artiklen analyserer, hvorvidt den traditionsbestemte honorargrundsætning i aktieselskaber ”... formanden dog det dobbelte” gennemsyrer både ret- og pligtsiden for formanden, således at forstå, at ikke blot rettighedssiden med retten til honorar og andre goder forøges for en formand, men også...... næppe er urimeligt at genbruge talemåden ”... formanden dog det dobbelte”, her forstået som: en generelt øget ansvarsrisiko, uanset om dette udspringer af ansvarsstandarden, af den bevismæssige nærhed ved beslutningerne eller en kombination af begge disse faktorer. Artiklen foretager en gennemgang af de...

  19. CARDIAC LYMPHOMA IN DOG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Cruz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoma is a lymphoid tumor that originates in hematopoietic organs such as lymph node, spleen or liver. In dogs, the overall prevalence of cardiac tumors was estimated to be only 0.19% based on the results of the survey of a large database, and lymphomas accounts for approximately 2% of all cardiac tumors. In general, the involvement of the myocardium is rarely described in canine lymphoma. Currently, there is no evidence of a viral association with primary cardiac lymphoma in dogs, but other types of immunosuppression may contribute to abnormal events, such as involvement primary cardiac. The aim of this study was to analyze a case of sudden death of a bitch, SRD, aged 10, who had the final diagnosis of cardiac lymphoma.

  20. Pretreatment with ascorbic acid prevents lethal gastrointestinal syndrome in mice receiving a massive amount of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kinoshita, Manabu; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Hiroi, Sadayuki; Sugasawa, Hidekazu; Majima, Takashi; Seki, Shuhji; Matsushita, Yoshitaro; Saitoh, Daizoh

    2010-01-01

    While bone marrow or stem cell transplantation can rescue bone marrow aplasia in patients accidentally exposed to a lethal radiation dose, radiation-induced irreversible gastrointestinal damage (GI syndrome) is fatal. We investigated the effects of ascorbic acid on radiation-induced GI syndrome in mice. Ascorbic acid (150 mg/kg/day) was orally administered to mice for 3 days, and then the mice underwent whole body irradiation (WBI). Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) 24 h after irradiation rescued mice receiving a WBI dose of less than 12 Gy. No mice receiving 14 Gy-WBI survived, because of radiation-induced GI syndrome, even if they received BMT. However, pretreatment with ascorbic acid significantly suppressed radiation-induced DNA damage in the crypt cells and prevented denudation of intestinal mucosa; therefore, ascorbic acid in combination with BMT rescued mice after 14 Gy-WBI. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that irradiation up-regulated expressions of apoptosis-related genes in the small intestine, including those related to the caspase-9-mediated intrinsic pathway as well as the caspase-8-mediated extrinsic pathway, and down-regulated expressions of these genes in ascorbic acid-pretreated mice. Thus, pretreatment with ascorbic acid may effectively prevent radiation-induced GI syndrome. (author)

  1. Evidence for a decreased susceptibility to acute radiation lethality in young lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, P B [Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lower Hutt (New Zealand). Inst. of Nuclear Sciences; Pfeffer, A T [Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Upper Hutt (New Zealand). Wallaceville Animal Research Centre

    1980-08-01

    The survival of 2- to 4-day old Romney-lambs was studied following bilateral /sup 60/Co irradiation at about 3.5 R/min (the exposure rate in air at the mid-line of the animal). Probit analysis of the data yielded an LDsub(50/60) of 900 R with 95% confidence limits of 700-1150 R. Mature sheep irradiated under similar conditions are known to have an LDsub(50/60) in the region of 250-350 R. These data indicate that very young lambs were less susceptible to radiation-induced hemopoietic failure than adults. Dorset Horn lambs and Romneys born by caesarian section also exhibited low susceptibility when irradiated at 2-4 days of age. There are few data available on LD/sub 50/ values for very young, large mammals (as opposed to rodents). Consideration must be given to the possibility that large mammals may be less sensitive to radiation-induced lethality shortly after birth than they are at maturity. Further work on the radiation response as a function of age after birth seems warranted and suggestions for some of the parameters which require investigation are made.

  2. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs’ abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human’s goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs’ behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs’ behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs’ neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human’s vocal communication and the presence

  3. Psychosocial and Environmental Factors Associated with Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Elizabeth; McDonough, Megan H; Edwards, Nancy E; Lyle, RM; Troped, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Dog walking is associated with higher levels of physical activity (PA). However, not all dog owners walk their dog(s) at a level sufficient for health benefits. Therefore, identifying correlates of dog walking may help to inform the design of more effective interventions to promote this specific form of PA. The purpose of this study was to examine psychosocial and environmental correlates of dog walking and relationships of dog walking with overall PA. In 2010, 391 dog owners (Mage= 43.6±12.3...

  4. Noise Phobia in Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangle

    Full Text Available Fear of thunderstorms and other forms of noise phobia are common problems in dogs. Administering medications along with changing the pet’s environment, and using behavior modification techniques can help ease the fear. Above all, do not give your pet any attention or reward when he is showing signs of fear; this will only reinforce the fearful behavior. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(11.000: 351-352

  5. Blue light induced reactive oxygen species from flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide on lethality of HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Yeh; Chang, Chih-Jui; Chen, Liang-Yü

    2017-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a safe and non-invasive treatment for cancers and microbial infections. Various photosensitizers and light sources have been developed for clinical cancer therapies. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are the cofactor of enzymes and are used as photosensitizers in this study. Targeting hypoxia and light-triggering reactive oxygen species (ROS) are experimental strategies for poisoning tumor cells in vitro. HeLa cells are committed to apoptosis when treated with FMN or FAD and exposed to visible blue light (the maximum emitted wavelength of blue light is 462nm). Under blue light irradiation at 3.744J/cm 2 (=0.52mW/cm 2 irradiated for 2h), the minimal lethal dose is 3.125μM and the median lethal doses (LD 50 ) for FMN and FAD are 6.5μM and 7.2μM, respectively. Individual exposure to visible blue light irradiation or riboflavin photosensitizers does not produce cytotoxicity and no side effects are observed in this study. The western blotting results also show that an intrinsic apoptosis pathway is activated by the ROS during photolysis of riboflavin analogues. Blue light triggers the cytotoxicity of riboflavins on HeLa cells in vitro. Based on these results, this is a feasible and efficient of PDT with an intrinsic photosensitizer for cancer research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Lead poisoning in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zook, B.C.; Carpenter, J.L.; Leeds, E.B.

    1969-01-01

    Lead poisoning was diagnosed and studied in 60 dogs. It was found that lead poisoning is a common disease of young dogs, especially in the summer and fall, and is related to their chewing and eating habits resulting in the ingestion of paint, linoleum, or other lead-containing materials. The signs were characterized by gastrointestinal dysfunction (colic, vomiting, and diarrhea) and nervous disorders (convulsions, hysteria, nervousness, behavioral changes). The blood findings, which the authors consider nearly pathognomonic, consisted of numerous stippled and immature (especially nucleated) erythrocytes in the absence of severe anemia. Protein and casts were frequently found in the urine. Radiography sometimes revealed lead-containing particles in the gastro-intestinal tract, and lead lines were occasionally detected in the metaphysis of long bones in immature dogs. Treatment with calcium ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid resulted in rapid and often dramatic recoveries in nearly all instances. Removal of lead from the gastrointestinal tract and treatment to relieve pronounced central nervous disorders was sometimes necessary. 40 references, 6 figures, 7 tables

  7. Lethal effects of solar radiation in proficient and deficient bacteria in repair systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa Neto, A. de.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the lethal action of solar radiation on strains of E.coli K12, proficient or deficient in repair systems, as well as the wild type strain gene products are involved in repair of damage induced by solar radiation. The inactivation of the various bacterial strains (normalized to a dose equivalent to radiation at a wavelength 254 nm) suggests that the more energetic wavelengths of the solar spectrum (290-320 nm) could be responsible for the primary damage that occurs in the DNA. The reduction in the shoulder of the survival curve in wild type strains in indicative of induction of sub-lethal damage in this region of the curve. Analysing solar inactivation curves of the bacterial strains (normalised by spore dosimetry) together with those of the same strains irradiated with UV at 254 nm, it was evident that 254 nm is not the ideal wavelength for comparison. This analysis also indicated that in addition to damage to DNA, other factors are involved in the solar radiation inactivation of wild type strains. (author)

  8. Effect of sulfhydryls on potentiation of radiation-induced cell lethality by substituted anthraquinones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimler, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of various substituted anthraquinones (SAQ's) and Adriamycin (ADR) were investigated in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells. These drugs cause a potentiation of radiation-induced cell lethality, albeit by different mechanisms. One possibility is that these components operate through the production of free radicals which then produce DNA strand breaks and crosslinks. If so, then one should be able to change the degree of cell kill by modifying sulfhydryl (SH) levels such that free radical processes are altered. Diamide, buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine, and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) were used to reduce intracellular SH levels. Cysteamine and dithiotheitol were used to increase SH levels. In general, altered SH levels did not affect SAQ-induced cytotoxicity at low drug concentrations. When drug-tested cells were also irradiated, survival levels were generally those predicted from assuming purely additive interactions. On the other hand, survival after treatment with high concentrations of ADR and one other SAQ were decreased by concomitant treatment with NEM. Since altered SH levels do not produce changes in the potentiation of radiation-induced cell lethality by SAQs, it is concluded that free radicals are not involved in this potentiation. A free radical-mediated process may be involved in the cytotoxicity induced by ADR and other SAQs; however, it is not a simple process

  9. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercader, J.P.; Emily Leong

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  10. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Akira

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews researches, commentaries, and conference and public records of food irradiation, published mainly during the period 1987-1989, focusing on the current conditions of food irradiation that may pose not only scientific or technologic problems but also political issues or consumerism. Approximately 50 kinds of food, although not enough to fill economic benefit, are now permitted for food irradiation in the world. Consumerism is pointed out as the major factor that precludes the feasibility of food irradiation in the world. In the United States, irradiation is feasible only for spices. Food irradiation has already been feasible in France, Hollands, Belgium, and the Soviet Union; has under consideration in the Great Britain, and has been rejected in the West Germany. Although the feasibility of food irradiation is projected to increase gradually in the future, commercial success or failure depends on the final selection of consumers. In this respect, the role of education and public information are stressed. Meat radicidation and recent progress in the method for detecting irradiated food are referred to. (N.K.) 128 refs

  11. Irradiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Akira

    1977-01-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures. (Kanao, N.)

  12. Irradiation proctitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, A [Osaka Kita Tsishin Hospital (Japan)

    1977-06-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures.

  13. Treatment of dogs with oral melanoma by hypofractionated radiation therapy and platinum-based chemotherapy (1987-1997).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Kim P; Hahn, Kevin A; Harris, F Dee; King, Glen K

    2003-01-01

    This retrospective study in 39 dogs with incompletely resected oral melanoma examined the efficacy of hypofractionated radiation therapy and platinum-containing chemotherapy. All dogs were completely staged, with the majority of dogs classified as stage 1. Dogs received 6 weekly fractions of 6-gray (Gy) megavoltage irradiation with a cobalt-60 unit or a 4-MeV (megaelectron volts) linear accelerator. Dogs received cisplatin (10-30 mg/m2 IV) or carboplatin (90 mg/m2 IV) chemotherapy 60 minutes before radiation delivery. Durations of local control, metastasis-free survival time, and overall survival time were recorded. By the Kaplan-Meier method, 15% of the dogs had local recurrence within a median time of 139 days. Fifty-one percent of the dogs developed metastatic disease within a median time of 311 days (range, 24-2, 163 days). Median survival time for all 39 dogs was 363 days. The combined use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy in this protocol provided local control consistent with previous studies. Low-dose chemotherapy was used with the intent of enhancing radiation therapy for the local control of an incompletely excised tumor. Survival times were longer than previously reported for dogs with oral malignant melanoma. Additional studies are required to determine whether these results were due to the effects of chemotherapy on microscopic disease or the enhanced local control provided by chemoradiation therapy.

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kikuchi, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Food irradiation can have a number of beneficial effects, including prevention of sprouting; control of insects, parasites, pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, moulds and yeasts; and sterilization, which enables commodities to be stored for long periods. It is most unlikely that all these potential applications will prove commercially acceptable; the extend to which such acceptance is eventually achieved will be determined by practical and economic considerations. A review of the available scientific literature indicates that food irradiation is a thoroughly tested food technology. Safety studies have so far shown no deleterious effects. Irradiation will help to ensure a safer and more plentiful food supply by extending shelf-life and by inactivating pests and pathogens. As long as requirement for good manufacturing practice are implemented, food irradiation is safe and effective. Possible risks of food irradiation are not basically different from those resulting from misuse of other processing methods, such as canning, freezing and pasteurization. (author)

  15. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  16. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  17. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  18. Tear ferning in normal dogs and dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates tear ferning as an ancillary technique for the evaluation of the canine tear film in normal eyes and eyes affected by keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Thirty dogs with KCS and 50 control dogs with normal tear film were evaluated with a full ophthalmoscopic examination and a Schirmer tear test type 1 ...

  19. Development of a portable blood irradiator for potential clinical uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungate, F.P.

    1988-12-01

    This document provides an account of the development of a fully portable blood irradiator and the evaluation of its safety and efficacy when implanted in goats, sheep, a baboon and dogs. The program was initiated because the control of lymphocyte populations by irradiation is a potential method for improving success in organ or tissue transplantation and for treating a variety of blood diseases. 15 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Comparison of the Concentrations of Lidocaine in Different Body Fluids/Tissues after Subarachnoid Space and Intravenous Administration of a Lethal Dose of Lidocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the concentration of lidocaine in different body fluids/tissues after subarachnoid space and intravenous administrations of a lethal dose of lidocaine. Totally 18 dogs were used in the experiment. Six dogs were given subarachnoid anesthesia, another were given an intravenous injection of a dose of 75 mg/kg weight of lidocaine hydrochloride in 5 min and the last 6 dogs were used as the blank control dogs and given a subarachnoid space injection or a femoral artery injection of the same volume of sodium chloride. As soon as its vital signs disappeared, each dog was dissected and the specimen, such as brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in lateral ventricle, CSF in subarachnoid space, spinal cord (cervical spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, lumbar spinal cord, and waist spinal cord, heart, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, bile, urine, heart blood, peripheral blood, muscle in injection location, and muscle in no injection location, were collected for analysis of lidocaine immediately. Analysis was performed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. From the maximum to the minimum, the order of lidocaine concentration detected in the subarachnoid space-administered dogs was as follows: CSF in subarachnoid space, waist spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, CSF in lateral ventricle, lumbar spinal cord, cervical spinal cord, lung, kidney, muscle in injection location, heart, brain, spleen, heart blood, liver, peripheral blood, bile, muscle in no injection location, and urine. The order of lidocaine concentration detected in the intravenously administered dogs was as followed: Kidney, heart, lung, spleen, brain, liver, peripheral blood, bile, heart blood, cervical spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, muscle in injection location, lumbar spinal cord, muscle in no injection location, CSF in subarachnoid space, urine, and CSF in lateral ventricle. The maximum concentration of lidocaine was detected in the subarachnoid